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Sample records for perineural catheter placement

  1. Radiologic placement of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, L.J.; Mauro, M.A.; Jaques, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Hickman catheter inserter has previously been predominantly accomplished surgically by means of venous cutdown or percutaneous placement in the operating room. The authors describe their method and results for 55 consecutive percutaneous placements of Hickman catheters in the interventional radiology suite. Complication rates were comparable to those for surgical techniques. Radiologic placement resulted in increased convenience, decreased time and cost of insertion, and super fluoroscopic control of catheter placement and any special manipulations. Modern angiographic materials provide safer access to the subclavian vein than traditional methods. The authors conclude that radiologic placement of Hickman catheters offers significant advantages over traditional surgical placement

  2. Technique of Peritoneal Catheter Placement under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, A.K.; Gaddikeri, S.; Saddekni, S.

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal catheters are mainly used for peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Other uses of this catheter include intraperitoneal chemotherapy and gene therapy for ovarian cancer and draining of uncontrolled refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Traditionally, surgeons place most of these peritoneal catheters either by laparoscopy or open laparotomy. We detail our percutaneous approach to placing peritoneal catheters using fluoroscopic guidance. We emphasize the use of additional ultrasound guidance, including gray scale and color Doppler ultrasound, to determine the safest puncture site and to guide the initial needle puncture in order to avoid bowel perforation and injury to epigastric artery. We present our experience in placing peritoneal catheters using this technique in 95 patients with various indications. Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous placement of peritoneal catheters is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective alternative to open surgical or laparoscopic placement.

  3. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate

  4. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  5. Percutaneous placement of peritoneal port-catheter in oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Franco; Vigna, Paolo Della; Bonomo, Guido; Penco, Silvia; Lovati, Elena; Bellomi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the technique of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided placement of a peritoneal port-catheter in an interventional radiological setting. Nineteen patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis were selected for intraperitoneal port-catheter placement in order to perform intracavitary receptor-immuno- or radio-immunotherapy with Ytrium-90. All the procedures were performed percutaneously under US and fluoro guidance; the insertion site for catheters was chosen according to abdominal conditions and US findings: all devices were implanted at the lower abdominal quadrants. All patients were followed up with CT and US according to the therapy protocol. The procedure was successfully completed in 15/19 patients, in 4 being contraindicated by peritoneal adhesions. No procedure-related complications and device occlusions during therapy were observed; one catheter displaced 7 months later the placement. In our experience, this procedure was feasible, reliable and easy to perform, allowing the correct administration of the planned intracavitary therapy. Peritoneal adhesions are the main limitation of peritoneal port placement. (orig.)

  6. Preventing Inadvertent Placement of Foley Catheter into Prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Percutaneous suprapubic trocar cystostomy (SPC) is often needed to drain the bladder when urethral catheterization either fails or is not advisable.[1] It is ... vertical or slightly tilting its tip toward umbilicus during foley placement, prevents the inadvertent migration of catheter into prostatic urethra and further complications.

  7. Evaluation of the safety of latrogenic lntestinal perforation during placement of percutaneous drainage catheter in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyung; Park, Ga Young; Shin, Hong Sub; Kim, In Sub; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of transgression of the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement in an animal model. Eight 8-F straight catheters were percutaneously inserted into the small and large bowel of eight rabbits. In four animals, the catheters were left in place until autopsy, whereas in the remaining four, the catheters were withdrawn five days after insertion. Autopsy was performed in all animals ten days after catheter placement, and gross and microscopic examination was carried out. Transgressing the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement did not contribute to any clinically significant complications. At autopsy, there was no bowel leakage, peritonitis, or abscess, although peritoneal adhesions were found around the catheter tract. Although further study is warranted, our study with an animal model indicated that transgression of the intestine during percutaneous placement of an intraabdominal catheter did not produce significant complications

  8. Evaluation of the safety of latrogenic lntestinal perforation during placement of percutaneous drainage catheter in rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyung; Park, Ga Young; Shin, Hong Sub; Kim, In Sub; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the safety of transgression of the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement in an animal model. Eight 8-F straight catheters were percutaneously inserted into the small and large bowel of eight rabbits. In four animals, the catheters were left in place until autopsy, whereas in the remaining four, the catheters were withdrawn five days after insertion. Autopsy was performed in all animals ten days after catheter placement, and gross and microscopic examination was carried out. Transgressing the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement did not contribute to any clinically significant complications. At autopsy, there was no bowel leakage, peritonitis, or abscess, although peritoneal adhesions were found around the catheter tract. Although further study is warranted, our study with an animal model indicated that transgression of the intestine during percutaneous placement of an intraabdominal catheter did not produce significant complications.

  9. Ultrasound-guided Placement of a Foley Catheter Using a Hydrophilic Guide Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Huber

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute urinary retention is a common problem in the emergency department. Patients can present in significant distress, necessitating the placement of a urinary catheter. Foley catheter placement can be difficult to accomplish depending on the etiology of the retention and the degree of the obstruction. In the case presented here, we used ultrasound guidance, a guidewire, and a Foley catheter to successfully relieve a patient’s urinary retention after multiple failed attempts.

  10. Interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters : results and complications in 557 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Do, Young Soo; Paik, Chul H. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate prospectively the results of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters, and subsequent complications. Between April 1997 and April 1998, a total of 557 tunneled central venous catheters were percutaneously placed in 517 consecutive patients in an interventional radiology suite. The indications were chemotherapy in 533 cases, total parenteral nutrition in 23 and transfusion in one. Complications were evaluated prospectively by means of a chart review, chest radiography, central vein angiography and blood/catheter culture. The technical success rate for tunneled central venous catheter placement was 100% (557/557 cases). The duration of catheter placement ranged from 4 to 356 (mean, 112{+-}4.6) days; Hickman catheters were removed in 252 cases during follow-up. Early complications included 3 cases of pneumothorax(0.5%), 4 cases of local bleeding/hematoma(0.7%), 2 cases of primary malposition(0.4%), and 1 case of catheter leakage(0.2%). Late complications included 42 cases of catheter-related infection(7.5%), 40 cases of venous thrombosis (7.2%), 18 cases of migration (3.2%), 5 cases of catheter / pericatheter of occlusion(0.8%), and 1 case of pseudoaneurysm(0.2%). The infection rate and thrombosis rate per 1000 days were 1.57 and 1.50, respectively. The technical success rate of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters was high. In comparison to conventional surgical placement, it is a more reliable method and leads to fewer complications.

  11. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  12. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications.

  13. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Philip J.; Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71–3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  14. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  15. A comparative analysis of radiological and surgical placement of central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, Kieran D.; Fisher, Ross; Warnock, Neil; Winfield, David A.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Gaines, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the differences in practice and outcome of all radiologically and surgically placed central venous catheters retrospectively over a 2-year period simultaneously, at a single institution. Methods.A total of 253 Hickman catheters were inserted in 209 patients; 120 were placed radiologically in 102 patients and 133 were placed surgically in 107 patients. The indication was chemotherapy in 76% of radiological and in 47% of surgical cases; the remainder were for total parenteral nutrition and venous access. Results. There were 6 (4.5%) primary surgical failures and a further 17 (13%) surgical cases requiring multiple placement attempts. Pneumothorax occurred once (0.8%) surgically and four times (3.3%) radiologically. There were no radiological primary misplacements but there were five (3.7%) surgical ones. Catheter or central vein thrombosis occurred in four (3.3%) radiological and five (3.7%) surgical cases. The rate of infection per 1000 catheter-days was 1.9 in radiologically placed catheters and 4.0 in surgically placed ones (p<0.001). Average catheter life-span was similar for the two placement methods (100±23 days). Conclusion. Radiological placement is consistently more reliable than surgical placement. There are fewer placement complications and fewer catheter infections overall

  16. Simplified Surgical Placement of Tenckhoff Catheter under Local Anesthesia: The Dammam Central Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youmbissi T

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many methods are used for the placement of Tenckhoff catheters. Eighteen consecutive Tenckhoff catheters were placed under local anesthesia through a mini laparotomy with a reduced operating team. There were only three total catheter failures. Complications were infrequent and operating time was less than one hour on average. This simple procedure should be a part of the training program of all junior surgeons and nephrologists.

  17. Catheter placement via the occipital artery to achieve superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Toshinori; Mitsudo, Kenji; Fukui, Takafumi

    2008-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via the superficial temporal artery (STA) has become useful for oral cancer. However, this method can not be performed if catheter placement via the STA is impossible. Therefore, we report a surgical method for catheter placement via the occipital artery (OA) to achieve retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Preoperatively, three-dimensional computed tomography angiography was performed to identify the course of the external carotid artery and the relationship between OA and the target artery. Ten patients with oral cancer underwent catheter placement via the OA with Doppler ultrasound and Harmonic Scalpel under local anesthesia. Catheter placement via the OA was superselectively successful in all the patients. The mean exposure time of OA and mean operating time were 17.5 min and 70.5 min, respectively. Catheter placement via the OA is useful when catheter placement via the STA is impossible. Three-dimensional vascular mapping and the use of Doppler ultrasound and Harmonic Scalpel can shorten the surgical time. (author)

  18. Low-angled peripheral intravenous catheter tip placement decreases phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hidenori; Murayama, Ryoko; Yabunaka, Koichi; Oe, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Komiyama, Chieko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-11-02

    Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are frequently removed due to phlebitis. We hypothesized that catheters made of polyurethane, which is more flexible than Teflon, would decrease phlebitis, and that flexibility could be estimated by measuring the catheter-tip angle. Ultrasonography in two groups of patients with different catheter types was then used to compare catheter-tip angles and phlebitis. Observational studies were carried out at a medical ward in a university hospital. Infusion therapy was administered to one group of patients in 2014 using Teflon catheters (control group, n = 200), and to another group of patients in 2015 using polyurethane catheters (investigational group, n = 207). The symptoms were assessed according to a scale developed by the Infusion Nurses Society. Long-axis ultrasonography images taken immediately before catheter removal were used to measure the angle between the central line of the catheter within 2 mm from the distal point and a tangent to the vessel wall. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to sex, age, and medical diagnosis. In the control and investigational groups, the rates of phlebitis were 37% (73/200) and 17% (36/207), respectively (pPhlebitis occurred more frequently when the catheter-tip was placed at angle >5.8°. The frequency of phlebitis was lower in the polyurethane, in which the catheter was placed at lower angle, almost parallel to the vessel. Our results will aid in developing new catheters and in improving PIVC-securement techniques.

  19. Evaluation of percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: technical aspects, results, and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yub; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun Gyoo

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of the percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters. Between December 1999 and April 2001, 26 peritoneal dialysis catheters were placed percutaneously in 26 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The patient group consisted of 16 men and ten women with a mean age of 55 (range, 30-77) years. The results and complications arising were reviewed, and the expected patency of the catheters was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The technical success rate for catheter placement was 100% (26/26 patients). Severe local bleeding occurred in one patient due to by inferior epigastric artery puncture, and was treated by compression and electronic cautery. The duration of catheter implantation ranged from 1 to 510 days and the patency rate was 416±45 days. Catheter malfunction occurred in four patients. In two, this was restored by manipulation in the intervention room, and in one, through the use of urokinase. In three patients, peritonitis occurred. Catheters were removed from four patients due to malfunction (n=2), peritonitis (n=1), and death (n=1). Percutaneous radiologic placement of a peritoneal dialysis catheter is a relatively simple procedure that reduces the complication rate and improves catheter patency

  20. Evaluation of percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: technical aspects, results, and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yub; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun Gyoo [Kyunghee University Hospital, seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of the percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters. Between December 1999 and April 2001, 26 peritoneal dialysis catheters were placed percutaneously in 26 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The patient group consisted of 16 men and ten women with a mean age of 55 (range, 30-77) years. The results and complications arising were reviewed, and the expected patency of the catheters was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The technical success rate for catheter placement was 100% (26/26 patients). Severe local bleeding occurred in one patient due to by inferior epigastric artery puncture, and was treated by compression and electronic cautery. The duration of catheter implantation ranged from 1 to 510 days and the patency rate was 416{+-}45 days. Catheter malfunction occurred in four patients. In two, this was restored by manipulation in the intervention room, and in one, through the use of urokinase. In three patients, peritonitis occurred. Catheters were removed from four patients due to malfunction (n=2), peritonitis (n=1), and death (n=1). Percutaneous radiologic placement of a peritoneal dialysis catheter is a relatively simple procedure that reduces the complication rate and improves catheter patency.

  1. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K.; Møller, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures......) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse......, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients...

  2. [Delayed (tension) pneumothorax after placement of a central venous catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, E C; van der Vliet, J A

    1999-09-11

    Laborious attempts at introducing a central venous catheter for parenteral nutrition in two women, aged 36 and 62 years, were followed by shortness of breath after 32 and 10 hours, respectively. This symptom was due to a (tension) pneumothorax not visible on earlier roentgenograms. Thoracic drainage led to recovery. In all patients with a central venous catheter an undetected delayed pneumothorax can be present. Urgent chest X-ray examination should be performed in all patients with acute respiratory symptoms. Patients undergoing elective intubation with positive pressure breathing should be examined carefully, since they are at risk of developing a late (tension) pneumothorax.

  3. Comparison of complications between pediatric peripherally inserted central catheter placement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Lungren, Matthew P.; Patel, Manish N.; Racadio, John M.; Johnson, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is among the most common procedures performed in children in the hospital setting. PICC insertion can be simplified with the use of a sheathed needle as an alternative to the modified Seldinger technique. To retrospectively evaluate PICC placement for the technique used and the incidence of complications at a large pediatric tertiary care center. We retrospectively reviewed all PICC placements at a single institution over a 4-year period. We reviewed patient records for demographic data, PICC placement technique, catheter size and number of lumens, and the incidence of complications (i.e. multiple attempted puncture sites, phlebitis and vessel thrombosis). We analyzed complication rates between two placement techniques using a chi-square test. We identified 8,816 successful PICC placements, 4,749 (53.9%) in males and 4,067 (46.1%) in females. The average age of the patients for which a line was placed was 5.6 years (range 1 day to 45 years). A direct sheathed needle puncture technique was used in 8,362 (94.9%) placements and a modified Seldinger technique was used in 454 (5.1%). Complications occurred in 312 (3.7%) of direct sheathed needle puncture placements versus 17 (3.7%) of modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.99). Multiple puncture sites were required in 175 (2.1%) attempted direct sheathed needle puncture placements compared with 8 (1.7%) attempted modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.63). Phlebitis occurred in 94 (1.1%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 5 (1.1%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.96). Vessel thrombosis occurred in 43 (0.5%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 4 (0.9%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.30). The direct peel-away sheathed needle vessel puncture technique and the modified Seldinger technique used to place PICC lines in children have similar complication rates. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of complications between pediatric peripherally inserted central catheter placement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Lungren, Matthew P. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital Stanford, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Patel, Manish N.; Racadio, John M.; Johnson, Neil D. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is among the most common procedures performed in children in the hospital setting. PICC insertion can be simplified with the use of a sheathed needle as an alternative to the modified Seldinger technique. To retrospectively evaluate PICC placement for the technique used and the incidence of complications at a large pediatric tertiary care center. We retrospectively reviewed all PICC placements at a single institution over a 4-year period. We reviewed patient records for demographic data, PICC placement technique, catheter size and number of lumens, and the incidence of complications (i.e. multiple attempted puncture sites, phlebitis and vessel thrombosis). We analyzed complication rates between two placement techniques using a chi-square test. We identified 8,816 successful PICC placements, 4,749 (53.9%) in males and 4,067 (46.1%) in females. The average age of the patients for which a line was placed was 5.6 years (range 1 day to 45 years). A direct sheathed needle puncture technique was used in 8,362 (94.9%) placements and a modified Seldinger technique was used in 454 (5.1%). Complications occurred in 312 (3.7%) of direct sheathed needle puncture placements versus 17 (3.7%) of modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.99). Multiple puncture sites were required in 175 (2.1%) attempted direct sheathed needle puncture placements compared with 8 (1.7%) attempted modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.63). Phlebitis occurred in 94 (1.1%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 5 (1.1%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.96). Vessel thrombosis occurred in 43 (0.5%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 4 (0.9%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.30). The direct peel-away sheathed needle vessel puncture technique and the modified Seldinger technique used to place PICC lines in children have similar complication rates. (orig.)

  5. Laparoscopic Placement of Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters in CAPD Patients: Complications and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Roueentan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopic techniques for the placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters are becoming increasingly popular. Recently, with the improvements in laparoscopic surgery, various methods for the insertion of peritoneal dialysis catheters have been reported, indicating that the laparoscopic insertion is preferred over the open and percutaneous techniques. The aim of this study was to introduce and assess a simplified laparoscopic method for the insertion of peritoneal dialysis catheters in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD patients.Methods: We enrolled 79 consecutive end-stage renal patients (46 men and 33 women with a mean age of 50 years (range: 19-83 years in this study. During the surgery, a 5-mm trocar was placed in the left upper quadrant for the optics and another 5-mm trocar was placed to the left of the umbilicus. Using the second trocar, a tunnel was formed 2 cm left of the umbilical plane for the insertion of a Tenckhoff catheter. Under direct vision, the catheter was advanced into the abdomen. The catheter was tested for patency. Catheters of all subjects were capped for two weeks before dialysis initiation.Results: The mean duration of the operation was 15 minutes. Ten patients died during the follow-up period, all due to other medical problems, and six patients underwent renal transplantation; however, no deaths or complications were observed during surgery. Early onset complications were seen in 12 patients (15.1%. The most frequent late-onset medical and mechanical complications were peritonitis (6.3% and hernia (3.7%. During a follow-up period of four years, removal of the catheter was required in two patients as a result of peritonitis.Conclusion: We obtained a low complication rate and a high catheter survival rate with this laparoscopic insertion of the Tenckhoff catheter. We believe future experience will encourage the use of this safe, simple and quick procedure.

  6. Resection of deep-seated gliomas using neuroimaging for stereotactic placement of guidance catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Kengo; Higashi, Hisato; Tomita, Susumu; Furuta, Tomohisa; Ohmoto, Takashi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    A simple computed tomography- (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided stereotactic method for guided microsurgical resection of either deep-seated gliomas or tumors adjacent to an eloquent area is described. The technique employs the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic system and twist drills, 2.7 mm in diameter, for the stereotactic placement of 2.4 mm diameter scaled guidance catheters through the calvaria. In a patient with a deep-seated small glioma, less than 2 cm diameter, one catheter was implanted into the center of the enhanced mass through the cerebral cortex. In the other 14 patients, three to six catheters were used which made the tumor border clearer. After implantation of the guidance catheters, the stereotactic frame was removed and a standard open craniotomy performed. Target localization is not affected by brain movement, which is inevitable during open surgery. The tumor involved the frontal lobe in eight patients, the parietal lobe in two, and the thalamus in five. In all cases the lesion was quickly localized and radical removal was acheived. Neurological complications occurred in only one patient who suffered transient hemiparesis after the resection of a lesion in the pyramidal tract. The results demonstrate that microsurgery combined with CT- or MR imaging-guided stereotactic placement of guidance catheters is a new option for surgery of deep-seated gliomas or tumors adjacent to an eloquent area. (author).

  7. A system for visualization and automatic placement of the endoclamp balloon catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Hugo; Stüdeli, Thomas; Sette, Mauro; Samset, Eigil; Gersak, Borut

    2010-02-01

    The European research network "Augmented Reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports minimally invasive cardiac surgery based on augmented reality (AR) technology. The system supports the surgical team during aortic endoclamping where a balloon catheter has to be positioned and kept in place within the aorta. The presented system addresses the two biggest difficulties of the task: lack of visualization and difficulty in maneuvering the catheter. The system was developed using a user centered design methodology with medical doctors, engineers and human factor specialists equally involved in all the development steps. The system was implemented using the AR framework "Studierstube" developed at TU Graz and can be used to visualize in real-time the position of the balloon catheter inside the aorta. The spatial position of the catheter is measured by a magnetic tracking system and superimposed on a 3D model of the patient's thorax. The alignment is made with a rigid registration algorithm. Together with a user defined target, the spatial position data drives an actuator which adjusts the position of the catheter in the initial placement and corrects migrations during the surgery. Two user studies with a silicon phantom show promising results regarding usefulness of the system: the users perform the placement tasks faster and more accurately than with the current restricted visual support. Animal studies also provided a first indication that the system brings additional value in the real clinical setting. This work represents a major step towards safer and simpler minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

  8. Intraventricular catheter placement by electromagnetic navigation safely applied in a paediatric major head injury patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenblatten, Christoph Alexander; Altermatt, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    In the management of severe head injuries, the use of intraventricular catheters for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and the option of cerebrospinal fluid drainage is gold standard. In children and adolescents, the insertion of a cannula in a compressed ventricle in case of elevated intracranial pressure is difficult; therefore, a pressure sensor is placed more often intraparenchymal as an alternative option. In cases of persistent elevated ICP despite maximal brain pressure management, the use of an intraventricular monitoring device with the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid drainage is favourable. We present the method of intracranial catheter placement by means of an electromagnetic navigation technique.

  9. Postprocedural Aspiration Test to Predict Adequacy of Dialysis Following Tunneled Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jason C.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; Michael, Beckie

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if a timed aspiration technique with a 20-ml syringe can be used to predict adequacy of blood flow in tunneled dialysis catheters. Sixteen patients referred for de novo placement or manipulation of failing tunneled hemodialysis catheters had the time it takes to fill a 20-ml syringe with the plunger fully withdrawn measured to the nearest tenth of a second. These measurements were correlated with flow rates recorded in dialysis just prior to (if failed catheter) and in the following dialysis session with adequacy determined as at least 300 ml/min. Syringe-filling time (22 catheters in 16 patients) was plotted against adequacy of dialysis. The mean time to fill a 20-ml syringe was 2.2 sec, with a range of 1.0-4.7 sec. The mean time to fill syringes for catheters with adequate dialysis was 1.7 ± 0.5 sec, and for inadequate catheters, it was 2.8 ± 0.8 sec. These differences are statistically significant (p < 0.001). Using a filling time of greater than or equal to 2 sec as a threshold gives the highest sensitivity (100%) for predicting inadequate dialysis while maintaining high specificity (75%). To achieve a specificity of 100%, a 3-sec cutoff would be necessary, but would lead to a sensitivity of only 20%. A simple and objective aspiration technique can be performed at the time of tunneled dialysis catheter placement/manipulation to reasonably predict adequacy of subsequent dialysis

  10. Radiologic placement of tunneled central catheters: rates of success and of immediate complications in a large series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, B L; Sadler, D J; Gray, R R; Saliken, J C; So, C B

    1999-08-01

    The objective was to examine the success and immediate complication rates in a large series of radiologically placed tunneled central venous catheters. We prospectively recorded the success and immediate complication rates in 880 consecutive radiologically placed tunneled central venous catheters. We also recorded the indication for placement, the success of placement, the number of passes required, and whether a double- or single-wall puncture occurred. Hemodialysis was the most common indication for long-term venous access. Venous access was successful in all patients, and catheter placement was successful in 99.4% of patients, with only five failed placements. All patients in whom placement was initially unsuccessful underwent successful placement the same day. All catheters were placed using real-time sonographic guidance. Most were placed in an internal jugular vein, with 87.4% requiring only a single needle pass. The immediate complication rate was only 4.0%, and no major complications occurred. To our knowledge, this series is the largest for which the immediate complication and success rates for radiologically placed central venous catheters have been reported. Our results suggest that radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters is a safe and effective alternative to surgery.

  11. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B. [Foothills Hospital, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  12. Verification of intravenous catheter placement by auscultation--a simple, noninvasive technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehavi, Amit; Rudich, Utay; Schechtman, Moshe; Katz, Yeshayahu Shai

    2014-01-01

    Verification of proper placement of an intravenous catheter may not always be simple. We evaluated the auscultation technique for this purpose. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomized for 18G catheter inserted intravenously either in the right (12) or left arm (8), and subcutaneously in the opposite arm. A standard stethoscope was placed over an area approximately 3 cm proximal to the tip of the catheter in the presumed direction of the vein to grade on a 0-6 scale the murmur heard by rapidly injecting 2 mL of NaCl 0.9% solution. The auscultation was evaluated by a blinded staff anesthesiologist. All 20 intravenous injection were evaluated as flow murmurs, and were graded an average 5.65 (±0.98), whereas all 20 subcutaneous injections were evaluated as either crackles or no sound, and were graded an average 2.00 (±1.38), without negative results. Sensitivity was calculated as 95%. Specificity and Kappa could not be calculated due to an empty false-positive group. Being simple, handy and noninvasive, we recommend to use the auscultation technique for verification of the proper placement of an intravenous catheter when uncertain of its position. Data obtained in our limited sample of healthy subjects need to be confirmed in the clinical setting.

  13. Central venous catheter placement by an interventional radiology unit: an australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. K. S.; Mossop, P. J.; Vrazas, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) placement carried out by an interventional radiology unit. A review of our hospital records identified 331 consecutive patients who underwent insertion of a tunnelled or non-tunnelled CVC between January 2000 and December 2004. Key outcome measures included the technical success rate of CVC insertion and the percentage of immediate ( 30 days) complications. A total of 462 CVCs were placed under radiological guidance, with an overall success rate of 98.9%. Immediate complications included one pneumothorax, which was diagnosed 7 days after subclavian CVC insertion, and eight episodes of significant haematoma or bleeding within 24 h of CVC insertion. No cases were complicated by arterial puncture or air embolus. Catheter-related sepsis occurred in 2% of non-tunnelled CVC and 8.9% of tunnelled CVC. The overall incidence of catheter-related sepsis was 0.17 per 100 catheter days. As the demand for chemotherapy and haemodialysis grows with our ageing population, interventional radiology suites are well placed to provide a safe and reliable service for the placement of central venous access devices

  14. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PERCUTANEOUS AND OPEN SURGICAL TECHNIQUESFOR PERITONEAL CATHETER PLACEMENT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Medani, Samar

    2012-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the preferred available option of renal replacement therapy for a significant number of end-stage kidney disease patients. A major limiting factor to the successful continuation of PD is the long-term viability of the PD catheter (PDC). Bedside percutaneous placement of the PDC is not commonly practiced despite published data encouraging use of this technique. Its advantages include faster recovery and avoidance of general anesthesia.♢ METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 313 PDC insertions at our center, comparing all percutaneous PDC insertions between July 1998 and April 2010 (group P, n = 151) with all surgical PDC insertions between January 2003 and April 2010 (group S, n = 162).♢ RESULTS: Compared with group P patients, significantly more group S patients had undergone previous abdominal surgery or PDC insertion (41.8% vs 9.3% and 33.3% vs 3.3% respectively, p = 0.00). More exit-site leaks occurred in group P than in group S (20.5% vs 6.8%, p = 0.002). The overall incidence of peritonitis was higher in group S than in group P (1 episode in 19 catheter-months vs 1 episode in 26 catheter-months, p = 0.017), but the groups showed no significant difference in the peritonitis rate within 1 month of catheter insertion (5% in group P vs 7.4% in group S, p =0.4) or in poor initial drainage or secondary drainage failure (9.9% vs 11.7%, p = 0.1, and 7.9% vs 12.3%, p = 0.38, for groups P and S respectively). Technical survival at 3 months was significantly better for group P than for group S (86.6% vs 77%, p = 0.037); at 12 months, it was 77.7% and 68.7% respectively (p = 0.126). No life-threatening complications attributable to the insertion of the PDC occurred in either group.♢ CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis demonstrates further encouraging outcomes of percutaneous PDC placement compared with open surgical placement. However, the members of the percutaneous insertion group were primarily a

  15. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Iain, E-mail: iain.franklin@health.qld.gov.au; Gilmore, Christopher [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  16. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a previous history of catheter placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Yildirim, Sedat; Torun, Dilek

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dialysis history, imaging findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in six patients with central venous stenosis without a history of previous catheter placement. Material and methods: Between April 2000 and June 2004, six (10%) of 57 haemodialysis patients had stenosis of a central vein without a previous central catheter placement. Venography findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in these six patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were three women (50%) and three men aged 32-60 years (mean age: 45 years) and all had massive arm swelling as the main complaint. The vascular accesses were located at the elbow in five patients and at the wrist in one patient. Results: Three patients had stenosis of the left subclavian vein and three patients had stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein. The mean duration of the vascular accesses from the time of creation was 25.1 months. Flow volumes of the vascular access were very high in four patients who had flow volume measurement. The mean flow volume was 2347 ml/min. One of three patients with brachiocephalic vein stenosis had compression of the vein by the brachiocephalic artery. All the lesions were first treated with balloon angioplasty and two patients required stent placement on long term. Number of interventions ranged from 1 to 4 (mean: 2.1). Symptoms resolved in five patients and improved in one patient who had a stent placed in the left BCV. Conclusion: Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a history of central venous catheterization tends to occur or be manifested in patients with a proximal permanent vascular access with high flow rates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement offers good secondary patency rates in mid-term

  17. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a previous history of catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Yildirim, Sedat; Torun, Dilek

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate dialysis history, imaging findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in six patients with central venous stenosis without a history of previous catheter placement. Between April 2000 and June 2004, six (10%) of 57 haemodialysis patients had stenosis of a central vein without a previous central catheter placement. Venography findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in these six patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were three women (50%) and three men aged 32-60 years (mean age: 45 years) and all had massive arm swelling as the main complaint. The vascular accesses were located at the elbow in five patients and at the wrist in one patient. Three patients had stenosis of the left subclavian vein and three patients had stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein. The mean duration of the vascular accesses from the time of creation was 25.1 months. Flow volumes of the vascular access were very high in four patients who had flow volume measurement. The mean flow volume was 2347 ml/min. One of three patients with brachiocephalic vein stenosis had compression of the vein by the brachiocephalic artery. All the lesions were first treated with balloon angioplasty and two patients required stent placement on long term. Number of interventions ranged from 1 to 4 (mean: 2.1). Symptoms resolved in five patients and improved in one patient who had a stent placed in the left BCV. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a history of central venous catheterization tends to occur or be manifested in patients with a proximal permanent vascular access with high flow rates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement offers good secondary patency rates in mid-term.

  18. Serious Gaming to Improve the Safety of Central Venous Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Katz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 5 million central venous catheters (CVCs are placed by physicians annually in the United States, with a complication rate of 15%.1 Guidelines and recommendations are continually being established and updated regarding CVC placement.2 While much has been done regarding training the technical skills of CVC placement using part-task trainers (i.e., mannequins, successfully finding and cannulating a central vein is but one part of the process. In fact, many steps designed to prevent untoward complications involve non-technical skills which are perhaps more important in training practitioners to safely place CVCs. First in aviation and now in healthcare, practitioners are being trained in realistic and highly interactive simulated environments so they can learn not just technical skills , but the key management and non-technical steps which make their task safer.3 One modality being used to improve performance is video gaming simulation, or "serious gaming." Gaming as a learning tool is being increasingly utilized in health care fields and can lead to better skill-based outcomes.4 As such, we have developed a game based around the placement of CVCs that will be used as a new teaching modality in a pilot program for instructing residents in safe CVC placement.

  19. Lumbar epidural catheter placement in the presence of low back tattoos: a review of the safety concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welliver, Dawn; Welliver, Mark; Carroll, Tammy; James, Peggy

    2010-06-01

    Current fashion in body art includes low back tattoos of varying designs and colors, a trend that presents unique concerns for anesthesia providers. Does the placement of epidural catheters risk the introduction of tattoo pigment dyes into the epidural space through the process of coring? Are there specific risks associated with tattoo dyes and epidural needle placement? We performed a comprehensive review of the literature using multiple search databases with the intent to form guidelines for practice using a level of evidence taxonomy. The available evidence does not identify any specific risks associated with epidural catheter placement through low back tattoos, although tissue coring with tissue transport to deeper sites has been confirmed. Continued investigation is necessary before comprehensive practice guidelines regarding the practice of placing epidural needles and catheters through lumbar tattoos can be developed. We suggest avoidance of piercing tattoos when performing epidural punctures until there is sound evidence of short-term and long-term safety.

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Music Use During Epidural Catheter Placement on Laboring Parturient Anxiety, Pain, and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzymalski, Dan M; Tsen, Lawrence C; Palanisamy, Arvind; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Kodali, Bhavani S

    2017-02-01

    Although music is frequently used to promote a relaxing environment during labor and delivery, the effect of its use during the placement of neuraxial techniques is unknown. Our study sought to determine the effects of music use on laboring parturients during epidural catheter placement, with the hypothesis that music use would result in lower anxiety, lower pain, and greater patient satisfaction. We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of laboring parturients undergoing epidural catheter placement with or without music. The music group listened to the patient's preferred music on a Pandora® station broadcast through an external amplified speaker; the control group listened to no music. All women received a standardized epidural technique and local anesthetic dose. The primary outcomes were 3 measures of anxiety. Secondary outcomes included pain, patient satisfaction, hemodynamic parameters, obstetric parameters, neonatal outcomes, and anesthesia provider anxiety. Intention-to-treat analysis with Bonferroni correction was used for the primary outcomes. For secondary outcomes, a P value of music group, the duration of music use was 31.1 ± 7.7 minutes (mean ± SD). The music group experienced higher anxiety as measured by Numeric Rating Scale scores immediately after epidural catheter placement (2.9 ± 3.3 vs 1.4 ± 1.7, mean difference 1.5 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.2-2.7], P = .02), and as measured by fewer parturients being "very much relaxed" 1 hour after epidural catheter placement (51% vs 78%, odds ratio {OR} 0.3 [95% CI 0.1-0.9], P = .02). No differences in mean pain scores immediately after placement or patient satisfaction with the overall epidural placement experience were observed; however, the desire for music use with future epidural catheter placements was higher in the music group (84% vs 45%, OR 6.4 [95% CI 2.5-16.5], P Music use during epidural catheter placement in laboring parturients is associated with higher postprocedure

  1. Repeated peritoneal catheter blockage caused by neurocysticercosis following ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Hua Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cysticercosis is common, but the possibility for repeated occurrence of peritoneal catheter blockage caused by neurocysticercosis (NCC after two revisions following ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for hydrocephalus is unusual. Herein, we describe one rare case in which peritoneal catheter revision was performed two times unsuccessfully. Endoscopic cysternostomy rather than peritoneal catheter adjustment was performed successfully, and histopathological examination of excised cystic samples confirmed NCC in our hospital. The present case highlights the need for awareness of NCC as a possible etiology of hydrocephalus, especially in developing countries. Uncommon findings in both lateral ventricles following low-field magnetic resonance imaging scans as well as the rarity of this infection involved in unusual location play important roles in misdiagnosis and incorrect treatment for hydrocephalus; thus, endoscopic cysternostomy, rather than multiple shunt adjustment of the peritoneal end, is recommended in the selected patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of hydrocephalus caused by cerebral cysticercosis in China.

  2. The blind pushing technique for peripherally inserted central catheter placement through brachial vein puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Myeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Kim, Han Myun; Song, Myung Gyu; Song, Soon-Young; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective clinical trial evaluating the technical feasibility and short-term clinical outcome of the blind pushing technique for placement of pretrimmed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) through brachial vein access. Patients requiring PICC placement at any of the three participating institutions were prospectively enrolled between January and December 2016. The review boards of all participating institutions approved this study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. PICC placement was performed using the blind pushing technique and primary brachial vein access. The following data were collected from unified case report forms: access vein, obstacles during PICC advancement, procedure time, and postprocedural complications. During the 12-month study period, 1380 PICCs were placed in 1043 patients. Of these, 1092 PICCs placed in 837 patients were enrolled, with 834 PICCs (76%) and 258 PICCs (34%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. In both arms, obstacles were most commonly noted in the subclavian veins (n = 220) and axillary veins (n = 94). Successful puncture of the access vein was achieved at first try in 1028 PICCs (94%). The technical success rate was 99%, with 1055 PICCs (97%) placed within 120 seconds of procedure time and 1088 PICCs (99%) having the tip located at the ideal position. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound detected catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) for 18 PICCs in 16 patients and late symptomatic UEDVT for 16 PICCs in 16 patients (3.1%). Catheter-associated UEDVT was noted for 28 PICCs (82%) and 6 PICCs (18%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. The incidence of obstacles and the procedure time (pushing technique and primary brachial vein access is technically feasible and may represent an alternative to the conventional PICC placement technique, having low incidences of

  3. Effect of Isometric Hand Grip Exercises on Blood Flow and Placement of IV Catheters for Administration of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaraman, Ayse; Yesilbalkan, Öznur Usta

    2016-04-01

    Complications may occur in the subcutaneous or subdermal tissues during IV administration of chemotherapy related to blood flow and catheter placement. Daily isometric hand grip exercises were evaluated for their effect on blood flow in the vessels of the nondominant arm before placement of IV catheters and the success rate of IV catheter placement on the first attempt. The study focused on patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma receiving the first and second cycles of chemotherapy. The intervention group performed daily isometric hand grip exercises before chemotherapy with peripheral catheter insertion. The control group performed routine activities only. Blood flow was measured by ultrasound in the brachial artery (BA) and brachial vein (BV) of the nondominant arm before the first (T1) and second (T2) cycles of chemotherapy. Blood flow slightly increased in the intervention group at T2 compared to T1. In the control group, blood flow decreased in the BA and did not change in the BV at T2 compared to T1. The success rate for first-attempt placement of a peripheral IV catheter was the same for the intervention and control groups.

  4. Initial placement and secondary displacement of a new suture-method catheter for sciatic nerve block in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, T S; Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C

    2017-01-01

    electromyography and cold sensation. After return of motor and sensory function, volunteers performed standardised physical exercises; injection of the same study medication was repeated in the same leg and followed by motor and sensory assessments. Fifteen of 16 (94%; 95%CI 72-99%) initial catheter placements...... displacement was 5 mm. Catheters with secondary block failure were displaced between 6 and 10 mm. One catheter was displaced 1.8 mm that resulted in a decrease in maximum voluntary isometric contraction of less than 20%. After repeat test injection, 14 of the 16 volunteers had loss of cold sensation. Neither...

  5. Measurements of Epidural Space Depth Using Preexisting CT Scans Correlate with Loss of Resistance Depth during Thoracic Epidural Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel H. Greene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thoracic epidural catheters provide the best quality postoperative pain relief for major abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures, but placement is one of the most challenging procedures in the repertoire of an anesthesiologist. Most patients presenting for a procedure that would benefit from a thoracic epidural catheter have already had high resolution imaging that may be useful to assist placement of a catheter. Methods. This retrospective study used data from 168 patients to examine the association and predictive power of epidural-skin distance (ESD on computed tomography (CT to determine loss of resistance depth acquired during epidural placement. Additionally, the ability of anesthesiologists to measure this distance was compared to a radiologist, who specializes in spine imaging. Results. There was a strong association between CT measurement and loss of resistance depth (P35 changed this relationship (P=0.007. The ability of anesthesiologists to make CT measurements was similar to a gold standard radiologist (all individual ICCs>0.9. Conclusions. Overall, this study supports the examination of a recent CT scan to aid in the placement of a thoracic epidural catheter. Making use of these scans may lead to faster epidural placements, fewer accidental dural punctures, and better epidural blockade.

  6. Percutaneous catheter drainage of thoracic fluid: the usefulness and safety of bedside trocar placement under ultrasound guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The author wanted to evaluate the usefulness and safety of the trocar technique for US-guided bedside catheter placement into thoracic fluid collections, and this technique has generally been reserved for the larger or superficial fluid collections. 42 drainage procedures were performed in 38 patients at the bedside. The patients were positioned supine or semi-upright. A drainage catheter system with a stylet and cannula assembly was used and all of the catheters were inserted using the trocar technique. The procedures consisted of drainage of empyema (n=14), malignant effusion (n=13), lung abscess (n=3), massive transudate (n=8), hemothorax (n=2) and chest wall hematoma (n=2). The clinical results were classified as successful (complete and partially successful), failure or undetermined. The medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the success rate, the complications and the procedure time. Technical success was achieved in all of the 42 procedures. With using the trocar technique, all the catheters were placed into even the small collections without significant complications. Drainage was successful in 36 (85.7%) of the 42 procedures. The average volume of thoracic fluid that was aspirated manually at the time of catheter placement was 420 mL (range: 35 to 1470 mL). The procedure time was less than 10 minutes from US-localization to complete catheter placement in all of the procedures. The trocar technique under US guidance can be an efficient and safe alternative to the Seldinger or guide-wire exchange technique for bedside catheter placement in the critically ill or hemodynamically unstable patients.

  7. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  8. A Case of Unrecognized Intrathoracic Placement of a Subclavian Central Venous Catheter in a Patient with Large Traumatic Hemothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Wallin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional recommendations suggest placement of a subclavian central venous catheter (CVC ipsilateral to a known pneumothorax to minimize risk of bilateral pneumothorax. We present the case of a 65-year-old male with a right hemopneumothorax who was found to have intrathoracic placement of his right subclavian CVC at thoracotomy despite successful aspiration of blood and transduction of central venous pressure (CVP. We thus recommend extreme caution with the interpretation of CVC placement by blood aspiration and CVP measurement alone in patients with large volume ipsilateral hemothorax.

  9. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Miyuki; Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 ± 0/2.9 ± 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 ± 0/2.9 ± 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 ± 0.2/2.9 ± 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 ± 0.3/2.9 ± 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 ± 0.4/2.9 ± 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 ± 0.2/2.9 ± 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 ± 0.8/2.2 ± 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 ± 0.8/2.6 ± 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC

  10. Novel needle guide reduces time to perform ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter placement: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Alparslan; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Maheshwari, Kamal; Farag, Ehab; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Soliman, Loran Mounir; Sessler, Daniel I

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks have become the standard when performing regional nerve blocks in anaesthesia. Infiniti Plus (CIVCO Medical Solutions, Kalona, Iowa, USA) is a needle guide that has been recently developed to help clinicians in performing ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. We tested the hypothesis that femoral nerve catheter placement carried out with the Infiniti Plus needle guide will be quicker to perform than without the Infiniti Plus. Secondary aims were to assess whether the Infiniti Plus needle guide decreased the number of block attempts and also whether it improved needle visibility. A randomised, controlled trial. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. We enrolled adult patients having elective total knee arthroplasty with a femoral nerve block and femoral nerve catheter. Patients, who were pregnant or those who had preexisting neuropathy involving the surgical limb, coagulopathy, infection at the block site or allergy to local anaesthetics were excluded. Patients were randomised into two groups to receive the ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter placement with or without the Infiniti Plus needle guide. The time taken to place the femoral nerve catheter, the number of attempts, the success rate and needle visibility were recorded. We used an overall α of 0.05 for both the primary and secondary analyses; the secondary analyses were Bonferroni corrected to control for multiple comparisons. The median (interquartile range Q1 to Q3) time to perform the femoral nerve catheter placement was 118 (100 to 150) s with Infiniti Plus and 177 (130 to 236) s without Infiniti Plus. Infiniti Plus significantly reduced the time spent performing femoral nerve catheterisation, with estimated ratio of means [(95% confidence interval), P value] of 0.67 [(0.60 to 0.75), P Infiniti Plus compared with no Infiniti Plus. However, Infiniti Plus had no effect on the odds of a successful femoral nerve catheter placement, number of attempts or percentage of perfect

  11. Epidemiology of peritonitis following maintenance peritoneal dialysis catheter placement during infancy: a report of the SCOPE collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Joshua Jacob; Hanevold, Coral; Quigley, Raymond; Richardson, Troy; Wong, Cynthia; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Lawlor, John; Rodean, Jonathan; Neu, Alicia; Warady, Bradley A

    2018-04-01

    Maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the dialysis modality of choice for infants and young children. However, there are limited outcome data for those who undergo PD catheter insertion and initiate maintenance PD within the first year of life. Using data from the Children's Hospital Association's Standardizing Care to Improve Outcomes in Pediatric End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Collaborative (SCOPE), we examined peritonitis rates and patient survival in 156 infants from 29 North American pediatric dialysis centers who had a chronic PD catheter placed prior to their first birthday. In-hospital and overall annualized rates of peritonitis were 1.73 and 0.76 episodes per patient-year, respectively. Polycystic kidney disease was the most frequent renal diagnosis and pulmonary hypoplasia the most common co-morbidity in infants with peritonitis. Multivariable regression models demonstrated that nephrectomy at or prior to PD catheter placement and G-tube insertion after catheter placement were associated with a nearly sixfold and nearly threefold increased risk of peritonitis, respectively. Infants with peritonitis had longer initial hospital stays and lower overall survival (86.3 vs. 95.6%, respectively; P high and several risk factors associated with the development of peritonitis were identified. Given that peritonitis was associated with a longer duration of initial hospitalization and increased mortality, increased attention to the potentially modifiable risk factors for infection is needed.

  12. US-guided placement of temporary internal jugular vein catheters: immediate technical success and complications in normal and high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Kara, Gulcan; Torun, Dilek; Kizilkilic, Osman; Yildirim, Tulin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: : To evaluate the technical success and immediate complication rates of temporary internal jugular vein (IJV) haemodialysis catheter placement in normal and high-risk patients. Methods and materials: Two-hundred and twenty temporary internal jugular vein catheters inserted under ultrasound guidance in 172 patients were prospectively analyzed. Of 172 patients, 93 (54%) were males and 79 (46%) were females (age range, 18-83; mean, 56.0 years). Of 220 catheters, 171 (78%) were placed in patients who had a risk factor for catheter placement like patients with disorder of haemostasis, poor compliance, and previous multiple catheter insertion in the same IJV. Forty-seven (21.3%) procedures were performed on bed-side. A catheter was inserted in the right IJV in 178 procedures (80.9%) and left IJV in 42 procedures. Of 172 patients, 112 (65%) had only one catheter placement and the rest had had more than one catheter placement (range, 1-5). Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients (100%). Average number of puncture was 1.24 (range, 1-3). One hundred and eighty-three insertions (83.1%) were single-wall punctures, whereas 37 punctures were double wall punctures. Nine (4%) minor complications were encountered. Inadvertent carotid artery puncture without a sequel in four procedures (1.8%), oozing of blood around the catheter in three procedures (1.4%), a small hematoma in one procedure (0.4%), and puncture through the pleura in one procedure (0.4%) without development of pneumothorax. Oozing of blood was seen only in patients with disorder of haemostasis. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided placement of internal jugular vein catheters is very safe with very high success rate and few complications. It can safely be performed in high-risk patients, like patients with disorders of haemostasis and patients with previous multiple catheter insertion in the same vein

  13. Real-Time 3-Dimensional Ultrasound-Assisted Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Catheter Placement: Implications of a New Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Clendenen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are a variety of techniques for targeting placement of an infraclavicular blockade; these include eliciting paresthesias, nerve stimulation, and 2-dimensional (2D ultrasound (US guidance. Current 2D US allows direct visualization of a “flat” image of the advancing needle and neurovascular structures but without the ability to extensively analyze multidimensional data and allow for real-time manipulation. Three-dimensional (3D ultrasonography has gained popularity and usefulness in many clinical specialties such as obstetrics and cardiology. We describe some of the potential clinical applications of 3D US in regional anesthesia. Methods. This case represents an infraclavicular catheter placement facilitated by 3D US, which demonstrates 360-degree spatial relationships of the entire anatomic region. Results. The block needle, peripheral nerve catheter, and local anesthetic diffusion were observed in multiple planes of view without manipulation of the US probe. Conclusion. Advantages of 3D US may include the ability to confirm correct needle and catheter placement prior to the injection of local anesthetic. The spread of local anesthetic along the length of the nerve can be easily observed while manipulating the 3D images in real-time by simply rotating the trackball on the US machine to provide additional information that cannot be identified with 2D US alone.

  14. The Nelaton Catheter Guard for Safe and Effective Placement of Subdural Drain for Two-Burr-Hole Trephination in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Jens; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, A; Stieglitz, Lennart Henning

    2015-09-01

    For chronic subdural hematoma, placement of a Blake drain with a two-burr-hole craniotomy is often preferred. However, the placement of such drains carries the risk of penetrating the brain surface or damaging superficial venous structures. To describe the use of a Nelaton catheter for the placement of a subdural drain in two-burr-hole trephination for chronic subdural hematoma. A Nelaton catheter was used to guide placement of a Blake drain into the subdural hematoma cavity and provide irrigation of the hematoma cavity. With the two-burr-hole method, the Nelaton catheter could be removed easily via the frontal burr hole after the Blake drain was in place. We used the Nelaton catheters in many surgical procedures and found it a safe and easy technique. This method allows the surgeon to safely direct the catheter into the correct position in the subdural space. This tool has two advantages. First, the use of a small and flexible Nelaton catheter is a safe method for irrigation of a chronic subdural hematoma cavity. Second, in comparison with insertion of subdural drainage alone through a burr hole, the placement of the Nelaton catheter in subdural space is easier and the risk of damaging relevant structures such as cortical tissue or bridging veins is lower. Thus this technique may help to avoid complications when placing a subdural drain. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Missed signs of autonomic dysreflexia in a tetraplegic patient after incorrect placement of urethral Foley catheter: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Oo, Tun; Hughes, Peter L; Singh, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is poorly recognised outside of spinal cord injury centres, and may result in adverse outcomes including mortality from delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present a spinal cord injury patient, who developed autonomic dysreflexia following incorrect placement of urethral Foley catheter. Health professionals failed to recognise signs and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia as well as its significance in this tetraplegic patient. A tetraplegic patient started sweating profusely following insertion of a Foley catheter per urethra. The catheter was draining urine; there was no bypassing, no bleeding per urethra, and no haematuria. Patient's wife, who had been looking after her tetraplegic husband for more than forty years, told the health professionals that the catheter might have been placed incorrectly but her concerns were ignored. Ultrasound scan of urinary tract revealed no urinary calculi, no hydronephrosis. The balloon of Foley catheter was not seen in urinary bladder but this finding was not recognised by radiologist and spinal cord physician. Patient continued to sweat profusely; therefore, CT of pelvis was performed, but there was a delay of ten days. CT revealed the balloon of Foley catheter in the over-stretched prostate-membranous urethra; the tip of catheter was not located within the urinary bladder but was lying distal to bladder neck. Flexible cystoscopy was performed and Foley catheter was inserted into the bladder over a guide wire. The intensity of sweating decreased; noxious stimuli arising from traumatised urethra might take a long while to settle. Inserting a catheter in a tetraplegic patient should be carried out by a senior health professional, who is familiar with spasm of bladder neck which occurs frequently in tetraplegic patients. Facilities for urgent CT scan should be available to check the position of Foley catheter in spinal cord injury patients when a patient manifests signs and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia

  16. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Open Versus Laparoscopic Placement of a Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter and Outcomes: The CAPD I Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laanen, Jorinde H H; Cornelis, Tom; Mees, Barend M; Litjens, Elisabeth J; van Loon, Magda M; Tordoir, Jan H M; Peppelenbosch, Arnoud G

    2018-01-01

    To determine the best operation technique, open versus laparoscopic, for insertion of a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter with regard to clinical success. Clinical success was defined as an adequate function of the catheter 2 - 4 weeks after insertion. All patients with end-stage renal disease who were suitable for PD and gave informed consent were randomized for either open surgery or laparoscopic surgery. A previous laparotomy was not considered an exclusion criterion. Laparoscopic placement had the advantage of pre-peritoneal tunneling, the possibility for adhesiolysis, and placement of the catheter under direct vision. Catheter fixation techniques, omentopexy, or other adjunct procedures were not performed. Other measured parameters were in-hospital morbidity and mortality and post-operative infections. Between 2010 and 2016, 95 patients were randomized to this study protocol. After exclusion of 5 patients for various reasons, 44 patients received an open procedure and 46 patients a laparoscopic procedure. Gender, age, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, current hemodialysis, severe heart failure, and previous an abdominal operation were not significantly different between the groups. However, in the open surgery group, fewer patients had a previous median laparotomy compared with the laparoscopic group (6 vs 16 patients; p = 0.027). There was no statistically significant difference in mean operation time (36 ± 24 vs 38 ± 15 minutes) and hospital stay (2.1 ± 2.7 vs 3.1 ± 7.3 days) between the groups. In the open surgery group 77% of the patients had an adequate functioning catheter 2 - 4 weeks after insertion compared with 70% of patients in the laparoscopic group ( p = not significant [NS]). In the open surgery group there was 1 post-operative death (2%) compared with none in the laparoscopic group ( p = NS). The morbidity in both groups was low and not significantly different. In the open surgery group, 2 patients had an exit-site infection and 1 patient

  17. Ablation of lumbar sympathetic ganglia by absolute ethanol injection and paravertebral catheter placement under CT guidance: evaluation of the efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hua; Xiong Yuanchang; Shao Chengwei; Zuo Changjing; Sheng Jing; Tian Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ablation of lumbar sympathetic ganglia by using single injection of absolute ethanol and retaining a paravertebral catheter under CT guidance for the treatment of lower extremity ischemia. Methods: Single absolute ethanol injection of L2 sympathetic ganglia was done in 25 cases (group B), single absolute ethanol injection of L2 sympathetic ganglia together with placement of a paravertebral catheter at L3 was carried out in 23 cases (group BT). All the procedures were performed under CT guidance. Three days after the procedure, the pain severity of the lower limbs was evaluated based on VAS method. If the patient in group BT still had a VAS score ≥4 on the third day, 3 ml of 1% lidocaine was infected via the retained catheter in the prone position. If VAS score became ≤3 at 5 min after the injection, additional 5 ml of ethanol was given through the catheter. The pain severity was evaluated again one week later. VAS score, analgesic dose and temperature of lower limbs were recorded. Results: One week after the procedure the excellent rate and effective rate for group B were 32% and 80% respectively, while for group BT were 60.9% and 95.7% respectively, with a significant difference between two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: For the ablation of lumbar sympathetic ganglia the combination of single absolute ethanol injection with paravertebral catheter placement under CT guidance is superior to the single absolute ethanol injection. This technique is more individual with better results and is more likely to be accepted by the patients. (authors)

  18. Impact of Lesion Placement on Efficacy and Safety of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Felix; Tunev, Stefan; Ewen, Sebastian; Cremers, Bodo; Ruwart, Jennifer; Schulz-Jander, Daniel; Linz, Dominik; Davies, Justin; Kandzari, David E; Whitbourn, Robert; Böhm, Michael; Melder, Robert J

    2015-10-20

    Insufficient procedural efficacy has been proposed to explain nonresponse to renal denervation (RDN). The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different patterns of lesion placements on the efficacy and consistency of catheter-based radiofrequency RDN in pigs. The impact of increasing number of lesions versus location of RDN was investigated in a porcine model (Group 1; n = 51). The effect of treating the main artery, the branches, and the 2 combined was compared in Group 2 (n = 48). The durability of response and safety of combined treatment of the main artery plus branches was examined in Group 3 (n = 16). Renal norepinephrine (NE) tissue content and renal cortical axon density were assessed. Increasing the number of RF lesions (4, 8, and 12) in the main renal artery was not sufficient to yield a clear dose-response relationship on NE content and axon density. In contrast, targeted treatment of the renal artery branches or distal segment of the main renal artery resulted in markedly less variability of response and significantly greater reduction of both NE and axon density than conventional treatment of only the main renal artery. Combination treatment (main artery plus branches) produced the greatest change in renal NE and axon density with the least heterogeneity. The changes were durable through 28 days post-treatment. These data provide the rationale for investigation of an optimized approach for RDN in future clinical studies. This may have profound implications for the clinical application of RDN, as this approach may not only achieve greater reductions in sympathetic activity but also reduce treatment effect variability. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Placement of central venous port catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters in the routine clinical setting of a radiology department: analysis of costs and intervention duration learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, Roman; Gebauer, Bernhard; Schnapauff, Dirk; Streitparth, Florian; Wieners, Gero; Grieser, Christian; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-12-01

    Background Placement of central venous port catheters (CVPS) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is an integral component of state-of-the-art patient care. In the era of increasing cost awareness, it is desirable to have more information to comprehensively assess both procedures. Purpose To perform a retrospective analysis of interventional radiologic implantation of CVPS and PICC lines in a large patient population including a cost analysis of both methods as well as an investigation the learning curve in terms of the interventions' durations. Material and Methods All CVPS and PICC line related interventions performed in an interventional radiology department during a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were examined. Documented patient data included sex, venous access site, and indication for CVPS or PICC placement. A cost analysis including intervention times was performed based on the prorated costs of equipment use, staff costs, and expenditures for disposables. The decrease in intervention duration in the course of time conformed to the learning curve. Results In total, 2987 interventions were performed by 16 radiologists: 1777 CVPS and 791 PICC lines. An average implantation took 22.5 ± 0.6 min (CVPS) and 10.1 ± 0.9 min (PICC lines). For CVPS, this average time was achieved by seven radiologists newly learning the procedures after performing 20 CVPS implantations. Total costs per implantation were €242 (CVPS) and €201 (PICC lines). Conclusion Interventional radiologic implantations of CVPS and PICC lines are well-established procedures, easy to learn by residents, and can be implanted at low costs.

  20. Umbilical venous catheters placement evaluation on frontal radiogram: application of a simplified flow-chart for radiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Sergio; Tudisca, Chiara; Murmura, Elena; Matranga, Domenica; La Tona, Giuseppe; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Lo Casto, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Umbilical Venous Catheter (UVC) are commonly used in neonatal period; they can be not correctly positioned and could be associated with complications. The purpose of this article is to suggest a flow-chart to evaluate the placement of UVC, testing it in young radiologists-in-training. We developed a simple flow-chart to asses, steps by step, UVC placement considering its course and tip location (ideally placed in the atriocaval junction). We tested the flow-chart impact asking to 20 residents to evaluate the placement of 10 UVC before and after they familiarized with the flow-chart and the anatomical findings of a newborn. The agreement among the 20 students was evaluated too. The number of correct characterizations was different due to the administration of the flow-chart. One hundred and six correct UVC assessments at the beginning switched to 196 after the administration of the flow-chart (p = 0.0001). The observed agreement among the twenty radiology residents was statistically significant, both before (kappa = 0.41, p < 0.001) and after (kappa = 0.37, p < 0.001) the flow-chart administration. The developed flow-chart demonstrated to be useful in increasing residents performance in UVC placement assessment.

  1. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-01-01

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  2. A clever technique for placement of a urinary catheter over a wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E Abbott

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Placing urinary catheters over a wire is standard practice for urologists, however, use of this technique gives the freedom of performing wire-guided catheterization in more situations than a council-tip allows. This technique facilitates successful transurethral catheterization over wire in the setting of DUC for all catheter types and styles aiding in urologic management of patients at a cost benefit to the health care system.

  3. Intra-operative placement of catheters for interstitial microwave-induced hyperthermia and iridium brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, C.T.; Wong, T.Z.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Colacchio, T.A.; Belch, R.Z.; Sutton, J.E. Jr.; Douple, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have previously described a system for delivery of microwave-induced hyperthermia utilizing flexible coaxial cables that are modified to serve as microwave antennas. These small (--1.6mm o.d.) antennas ae introduced into 2mm o.d. nylon catheters implanted in the tumor. This system has been further modified for use in the treatment of surgically unresectible abdominal, pelvic, and head and neck tumors. The modifications are described that were used to treat two pelvic, one upper abdominal, and one base of tongue tumor. The nylon catheters are implanted during surgery. After a short recovery period, the microwave antennas are inserted and the tumor region is heated for --1hr. The antennas are removed, iridium-192 seeds are placed in the catheters, 2800 - 5000 rad (CGy) doses are delivered, followed by a 1hr hyperthermia treatment. The temperature distributions and future applications are discussed

  4. Placement of empty catheters for an HDR-emulating LDR prostate brachytherapy technique: comparison to standard intraoperative planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermayr, Thomas R; Nguyen, Paul L; Murciano-Goroff, Yonina R; Kovtun, Konstantin A; Neubauer Sugar, Emily; Cail, Daniel W; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Cormack, Robert A; Buzurovic, Ivan; Wolfsberger, Luciant T; O'Leary, Michael P; Steele, Graeme S; Devlin, Philip M; Orio, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether placing empty catheters within the prostate and then inverse planning iodine-125 seed locations within those catheters (High Dose Rate-Emulating Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy [HELP] technique) would improve concordance between planned and achieved dosimetry compared with a standard intraoperative technique. We examined 30 consecutive low dose rate prostate cases performed by standard intraoperative technique of planning followed by needle placement/seed deposition and compared them to 30 consecutive low dose rate prostate cases performed by the HELP technique. The primary endpoint was concordance between planned percentage of the clinical target volume that receives at least 100% of the prescribed dose/dose that covers 90% of the volume of the clinical target volume (V100/D90) and the actual V100/D90 achieved at Postoperative Day 1. The HELP technique had superior concordance between the planned target dosimetry and what was actually achieved at Day 1 and Day 30. Specifically, target D90 at Day 1 was on average 33.7 Gy less than planned for the standard intraoperative technique but was only 10.5 Gy less than planned for the HELP technique (p 0.05). Placing empty needles first and optimizing the plan to the known positions of the needles resulted in improved concordance between the planned and the achieved dosimetry to the target, possibly because of elimination of errors in needle placement. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Innovative Approaches to Neuraxial Blockade in Children: The Introduction of Epidural Nerve Root Stimulation and Ultrasound Guidance for Epidural Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ban CH Tsui

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous epidural blockade remains the cornerstone of pediatric regional anesthesia. However, the risk of catastrophic trauma to the spinal cord when inserting direct thoracic and high lumbar epidural needles in anesthetized or heavily sedated pediatric patients is a concern. To reduce this risk, research has focused on low lumbar or caudal blocks (ie, avoiding the spinal cord and threading catheters from distal puncture sites in a cephalad direction. However, with conventional epidural techniques, including loss-of-resistance for localization of the needle, optimal catheter tip placement is difficult to assess because considerable distances are required during threading. Novel approaches include electrical epidural stimulation for physiological confirmation and segmental localization of epidural catheters, and ultrasound guidance for assessing related neuroanatomy and real-time observation of the needle puncture and, potentially, catheter advancement. The present article provides a brief and focused review of these two advances, and outlines recent clinical experiences relevant to pediatric epidural anesthesia.

  6. Simulation training for pediatric residents on central venous catheter placement: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott M; Burch, Wesley; Kuehnle, Sarah E; Flood, Robert G; Scalzo, Anthony J; Gerard, James M

    2013-11-01

    To assess the effect of simulation training on pediatric residents' acquisition and retention of central venous catheter insertion skills. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of simulation training on self-confidence to perform the procedure. Prospective observational pilot study. Single university clinical simulation center. Pediatric residents, postgraduate years 1-3. Residents participated in a 60- to 90-minute ultrasound-guided central venous catheter simulation training session. Video recordings of residents performing simulated femoral central venous catheter insertions were made before (baseline), after, and at 3-month following training. Three blinded expert raters independently scored the performances using a 24-item checklist and 100-mm global rating scale. At each time point, residents rated their confidence to perform the procedure on a 100-mm scale. Twenty-six residents completed the study. Compared with baseline, immediately following training, median checklist score (54.2% [interquartile range, 40.8-68.8%] vs 83.3% [interquartile range, 70.0-91.7%]), global rating score (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 0.0-64.3 mm] vs 79.5 mm [interquartile range, 16.3-91.7 mm]), success rate (38.5% vs 80.8%), and self-confidence (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 3.8-19.0 mm] vs 52.0 mm [interquartile range, 43.5-66.5 mm]) all improved (p interquartile range, 40.8-68.8%] vs 54.2% [interquartile range, 45.8-80.4%], p = 0.47), global rating score (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 0.0-64.3 mm] vs 35.5 mm [interquartile range, 5.3-77.0], p = 0.62), and success rate (38.5% vs 65.4%, p = 0.35) were similar at 3-month follow-up. Self-confidence, however, remained above baseline at 3-month follow-up (8.0 mm [interquartile range, 3.8-19.0 mm] vs 61.0 mm [interquartile range, 31.5-71.8 mm], p < 0.01). Simulation training improved pediatric residents' central venous catheter insertion procedural skills. Decay in skills was found at 3-month follow-up. This suggests that

  7. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57–93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 ± 13 (SD) min (range 24–78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7–812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  8. Catheter placement for lysis of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas: does a catheter position in the core of the hematoma allow more effective and faster hematoma lysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Vesna; Schlegel, Anna; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2017-07-01

    For the fibrinolytic therapy of intracerebral hematomas (ICH) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), a catheter position in the core of the hematoma along the largest clot diameter was assumed to be optimal for an effective clot lysis. However, it never had been proven that core position indeed enhances clot lysis if compared with less optimal catheter positions. In this study, the impact of the catheter position on the effectiveness and on the time course of clot lysis was evaluated. We analyzed the catheter position using a relative error calculating the distance perpendicular to the catheter's center in relation to hematoma's diameter and evaluated the relative hematoma volume reduction (RVR). The correlation of the RVR with the catheter position was evaluated. Additionally, we tried to identify patterns of clot lysis with different catheter positions. The patient's outcome at discharge was evaluated using the Glasgow outcome score. A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The mean hematoma volume was 56 ml. The overall RVR was 62.7 %. In 69 patients, a catheter position in the core of the clot was achieved. We found no significant correlation between catheter position and hematoma RVR (linear regression, p = 0.14). Core catheter position leads to more symmetrical hematoma RVR. Faster clot lysis happens in the vicinity of the catheter openings. We found no significant difference in the patient's outcome dependent on the catheter position (linear regression, p = 0.90). The catheter position in the core of the hematoma along its largest diameter does not significantly influence the effectiveness of clot lysis after rtPA application.

  9. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin; Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  10. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroglu, M.; Demir, M.; Koroglu, B.K.; Sezer, M.T.; Akhan, O.; Yildiz, H.; Yavuz, L.; Baykal, B.; Oyar, O. [Suleyman Demirel Univ., Isparta (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Internal Medicine and Anesthesiology

    2006-02-15

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

  11. Evaluation of the fetal dose during prophylactic placement of internal iliac artery balloon occlusion catheters in placenta accreta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Placenta accrete patients whose mother mortality rates are rather high due to massive bleeding during childbirth need to have Prophylactic placement of Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion Catheters procedure to reduce amount of blood loss and inoperative transfusion. Nevertheless, studies for mothers inevitably exposed to dose during PIIABOCs procedure have not been published many yet. Therefore, this study is to investigate exact information on radiation dose exposed to fetus during PIIABOCs procedure. Average effective dose of fetus per organ is 2.38∼8.83 mGy, measured highest at beam center and followed by eyeball, stomach and bladder. The result showed that the longer fluoroscopy time is used, the closer beam center is and the thicker abdominal thickness is, the more effective dose on fetus is increasing. When using the collimator and protection shown to decrease the effective dose and when using higher the patient table shown to decrease the effective dose. It has been reported that the threshold of deterministic effect is about 100mGy. Deterministic effect was regarded as a factor that would influence on fetus exposed by medical radiation than stochastic effect. Consequently, it concluded that dose exposed on fetus in PIIABOCs procedure was approximately 10% of threshold of deterministic effect with effective dose of 0.49∼18.27 mGy.

  12. Superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery and occipital artery for gingival carcinoma of the mandible. Simultaneous catheter placement to the maxillary artery and facial artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Toshinori; Mitsudo, Kenji; Fukui, Takafumi

    2009-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery (STA) has become useful for oral cancer. Approaching via the occipital artery (OA) enables superselective intra-arterial infusion when catheter placement via the STA is impossible. Therefore, simultaneous catheter placement via the STA and OA is possible. We report a surgical method of simultaneous catheter placement via the STA and OA to achieve retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion for gingival carcinoma of the mandible. Preoperatively, three-dimensional computed tomography angiography was performed to identify the route of the external carotid artery and branches such as the STA, OA, maxillary artery, and facial artery (FA). Thirteen patients with mandibular gingival cancer underwent catheter placement via the STA and OA under local anesthesia. Catheter placement via the STA and OA was superselectively successful in all the patients. The mean operating time was 150.8 min. Catheter placed to the FA via the OA was dislocated during the treatment in one patient, and so the catheter was replaced. This method is useful to enable superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy to the whole gingival carcinoma of the mandible from the start of treatment compared with approaching via the STA. (author)

  13. Perineural extension of facial melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Bevilacqua, Paula

    2005-05-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a pigmented cutaneous lesion on the right side of his face along with right facial numbness. Histological examination revealed malignant melanoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed perineural extension along the entire course of the maxillary division of the right trigeminal nerve. This is a rare but important manifestation of the spread of head and neck malignancy. (orig.)

  14. Perineural spread in head and neck tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M

    2014-01-01

    Perineural spread is the dissemination of some types of head and neck tumors along nervous structures. Perineural spread has negative repercussions on treatment because it requires more extensive resection and larger fields of irradiation. Moreover, perineural spread is associated with increased local recurrence, and it is considered an independent indicator of poor prognosis in the TNM classification for tumor staging. However, perineural spread often goes undetected on imaging studies. In this update, we review the concept of perineural spread, its pathogenesis, and the main pathways and connections among the facial nerves, which are essential to understand this process. Furthermore, we discuss the appropriate techniques for imaging studies, and we describe and illustrate the typical imaging signs that help identify perineural spread on CT and MRI. Finally, we discuss the differential diagnosis with other entities. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Does interscalene catheter placement with stimulating catheters improve postoperative pain or functional outcome after shoulder surgery? A prospective, randomized and double-blinded trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Markus F.; Werdehausen, Robert; Golla, Elisabeth; Braun, Sebastian; Hermanns, Henning; Ilg, Ansgar; Willers, Reinhardt; Lipfert, Peter

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind trial we investigated the use of stimulating catheters in patients during and after shoulder surgery; functional improvement being the primary outcome measurement. METHODS: After eliciting an adequate muscular twitch at

  16. J-tipped guidewire as a target for puncture of the subclavian artery in the placement of a reservoir port and catheter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Yukihiro; Kusano, Shoichi; Makita, Kohzoh

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the feasibility of using a J-tipped guidewire as a target for puncture of the subclavian artery in the placement of a reservoir port and catheter system (RPCS). Twenty-five patients with various hepatic malignancies underwent percutaneous implantation of an RPCS through the left subclavian artery for regional chemotherapy. To successfully puncture the left subclavian artery, a J-tipped guidewire was used as a target with fluoroscopic guidance. Technical success and complication rates, and numbers of puncture failures, were retrospectively analyzed. Implantation of the RPCS was successful in all patients. Eight (32%) patients had minor complications and no patient had major complications. The number of puncture failures per patient was 0 to 1 (mean=0.32). The J-tipped guidewire is a safe and appropriate target for puncture of the subclavian artery in the placement of an RPCS. (orig.)

  17. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction after living donor liver transplantation managed with ectopic placement of a foley catheter: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel Wahab

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We report the use of foley catheter to temporary fix the graft and correct the HVOO. It is a simple and safe way, and could be easily monitored and removed under Doppler US without any complications.

  18. Bilhemia: a fatal complication following percutaneous placement of a transhepatic inferior vena cava catheter in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierre, Sergio; Lipsich, Jose; Questa, Horacio

    2007-01-01

    A transhepatic central venous catheter was implanted in a 2-year-old child with a history of multiple venous access procedures and superior and inferior vena cava thrombosis. After 2 weeks, inadvertent dislodgement of the catheter was complicated by a biloma. The biloma was percutaneously drained, but a biliary-venous fistula led to a rapidly progressive and fatal bilhemia. We report this case as an infrequent complication of transhepatic catheterization. (orig.)

  19. Role of regional anesthesia for placement of peritoneal dialysis catheter under ultrasound guidance: Our experience with 52 end-stage renal disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranjit Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The number of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD has shown a consistent rise in India in recent years. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD remains one of the safe and effective forms of treatment. In this study, we have tried to assess the effectiveness of field block technique for analgesia during catheter placement surgery until 24 h postoperatively, also, if it can obviate the need for general anesthesia in these high-risk patients. Materials and Methods: We studied 52 ESRD patients from 2010 to 2012 who were posted for CAPD catheterization in the Department of Urology, Care Hospital, Hyderabad, India. Under ultrasound guidance, "unilateral posterior" and "unilateral subcostal" transversus abdominis plane block anesthesia were given for the placement of CAPD catheter. Patient′s intra-operative pain and post-operative pain were recorded with visual analog scores (VAS and analyzed. Results: All patients in our study belonged to American Society of Anesthesiologists category 2 or 3 with multiple co-morbidities. 41 out of 52 patients required no supplemental analgesia during the procedure; 8 patients needed additional infiltration of local anesthetic during skin incisions. Three patients required supplemental analgesia and were considered as failure. A VAS of two was noted in 30 patients and 1 in 19 Patients. No Patient had significant pain 24 h post operatively. No local complication was noted in any patient. Conclusion: CAPD Catheterization under regional field block remains safe and effective options for ESRD patients.

  20. Spinal canal extension of hyperalimentation catheter without neurologic sequela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasier, M.; Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock; Hassell, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt at placement of a left femoral vein hyperalimentation catheter resulted in entrance of the catheter into the spinal canal. Catheter location was documented by injections of nonionic contrast material into the catheter without neurologic sequellae. (orig.)

  1. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark. After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001. Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056. Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group.

  2. Delayed vocal fold paralysis after continuous interscalene level brachial plexus block with catheter placement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollapalli, Lakshman; McKelvey, George; Wang, Hong

    2014-08-01

    We report an incident of delayed onset of true vocal fold paralysis with continuous interscalene brachial plexus block. A 51 year old woman underwent left shoulder manipulation and lysis of adhesions with fluoroscopy and general anesthesia. An interscalene brachial plexus block was performed and a catheter with a continuous infusion pump was placed for postoperative pain control. Following hospital discharge, approximately 8 hours after the initial catheter bolus the patient developed hoarseness, dysphagia, and dyspnea, secondary to left vocal fold palsy. The patient was admitted for observation and the catheter was discontinued with no intubation required. By the next morning, the patient's dysphagia and dyspnea had resolved and her hoarseness improved. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Postoperative Chylothorax of Unclear Etiology in a Patient with Right-sided Subclavian Central Venous Catheter Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Samie; Shamim, Faisal

    2017-01-01

    A young male underwent decompressive craniotomy for an intracerebral bleed. A right-sided subclavian central venous catheter was placed in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. Postoperatively, he was shifted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation due to low Glasgow coma scale. He had an episode of severe agitation and straining on the tracheal tube in the evening same day. On the 2 nd postoperative day in ICU, his airway pressures were high, and chest X-ray revealed massive pleural effusion on right side. Under ultrasound guidance, 1400 milky white fluid was aspirated. It was sent for analysis (triglycerides) that confirmed chyle and hence, chylothorax was made as diagnosis. A duplex scan was done which ruled out thrombosis in subclavian vein. The catheter had normal pressure tracing with free aspiration of blood from all ports. Enteral feeding was continued as it is a controversial matter in the literature and he was monitored clinically and radiologically.

  4. Transurethral Bougie-guided Placement of Suprapubic Catheter Over Guide Wire Monorail in Females: A Novel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalela, Divakar; Gupta, Piyush; Dalela, Disha; Srinivas, A K; Bhaskar, Ved; Govil, Tuhina; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan

    2016-08-01

    To assess the safety and effectiveness of a novel transurethral bougie-guided monorail technique for suprapubic catheterization in females with vesicovaginal fistula. Patients undergoing transvaginal vesicovaginal fistula repair from February 2013 to December 2013 were selected. Suprapubic catheter was placed using this technique and assessment was done in terms of time taken, intraprocedural dislodgement or entanglement of catheter during the procedure, bleeding from the anterior abdominal wall or urethra, or any other intraoperative difficulty. All patients were catheterized smoothly without any intraoperative difficulty, with a mean time of 6 minutes. We describe a new technique of performing suprapubic cystostomy in patients, especially where the bladder cannot be distended. It is safe and easy to perform. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Retrospective Study Evaluating the Effect of Low Doses of Perineural Dexamethasone on Ropivacaine Brachial Plexus Peripheral Nerve Block Analgesic Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepper, Gregory D; Kightlinger, Benjamin I; Jiang, Yunyun; Wolf, Bethany J; Bolin, Eric D; Wilson, Sylvia H

    2017-09-23

    Examination of the effectiveness of perineural dexamethasone administered in very low and low doses on ropivacaine brachial plexus block duration. Retrospective evaluation of brachial plexus block duration in a large cohort of patients receiving peripheral nerve blocks with and without perineural dexamethasone in a prospectively collected quality assurance database. A single academic medical center. A total of 1,942 brachial plexus blocks placed over a 16-month period were reviewed. Demographics, nerve block location, and perineural dexamethasone utilization and dose were examined in relation to block duration. Perineural dexamethasone was examined as none (0 mg), very low dose (2 mg or less), and low dose (greater than 2 mg to 4 mg). Continuous catheter techniques, local anesthetics other than ropivacaine, and block locations with fewer than 15 subjects were excluded. Associations between block duration and predictors of interest were examined using multivariable regression models. A subgroup analysis of the impact of receiving dexamethasone on block duration within each block type was also conducted using a univariate linear regression approach. A total of 1,027 subjects were evaluated. More than 90% of brachial plexus blocks contained perineural dexamethasone (≤4 mg), with a median dose of 2 mg. Increased block duration was associated with receiving any dose of perineural dexamethasone (P block duration did not differ with very low- or low-dose perineural dexamethasone after controlling for other factors (P = 0.420). Perineural dexamethasone prolonged block duration compared with ropivacaine alone; however, duration was not greater with low-dose compared with very low-dose perineural dexamethasone. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Perineural tumor extension through the foramen ovale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, F.J.; Braun, I.F.; Jensen, M.E.; Nadel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The third division of the trigeminal nerve exists through the foramen ovale and supplies extensive superficial and deep facial structures. As such, it is a common route of perineural spread of head and neck tumors. Perineural tumor extension through basal foramina is well documented pathologically and has been described with multiple radiologic modalities. The authors present seven patients with transforaminal lesions evaluated with MR imaging. Clinical findings referable to the two dimensions of V 3 are correlated with the images. This paper focuses on the normal anatomy and pathologic findings in and around the foramen ovale

  7. Urinary catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheter - urine; Foley catheter; Indwelling catheter; Suprapubic catheters ... stones Blood infections ( septicemia ) Blood in the urine (hematuria) Kidney damage (usually only with long-term, indwelling ...

  8. Extra Luminal Entrapment of Guide Wire; A Rare Complication of Central Venous Catheter Placement in Right Internal Jugular Vein

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Md Abu Masud; Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Shailesh; Kumari, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Central venous Catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed procedure for venous access. It is associated with several complications. We report a rare case of extra luminal entrapment of guide wire during CVC placement in right jugular vein. We report a case of 28 years old female patient presented in our emergency with history of entrapped guide wire in right side of neck during CVC. X-ray showed coiling of guide wire in neck. CT Angiography showed guide wire coursing in between common caro...

  9. Image-guided placement of port catheters: is there an increased risk of infection if the port is immediately accessed and used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Gloria; Yeddula, Kalpana; Wicky, Stephan; Oklu, Ramhi; Ganguli, Suvranu; Waltman, Arthur C; Walker, Thomas G; Kalva, Sanjeeva P

    2013-01-01

    To compare complication rates in patients who have port-a-catheters inserted and left accessed for immediate use and those who have ports inserted but not accessed. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, medical records of patients who received a port catheter between 9/2009 and 2/2010 were reviewed. The data collected included patient demographics, diagnosis, procedure and complications. The patients were categorized into two groups: accessed (patients in whom the port was accessed with a Huber needle for immediate intravenous use and the patient left the procedure area with needle indwelling) and control (patients in whom the ports were not accessed). Complications were classified according to Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Results are given as mean ±SD. Statistical analysis was performed with student t test and statistical significance was considered at Pports were placed in 465 patients (Men: 206); 10.7% in the accessed group (n=50, age: 60±13.9) and 89.3% in the control group (n=417, age: 59±13.5). There were no statistically significant differences in patient demographics between the groups. The overall complication rate was 0.6% (n=3). Two complications (hematoma causing skin necrosis and thrombosis of the port) occurred in the control group and one (infection) in the accessed group. Infection rates after procedures were 2% (1/50) in the accessed group and 0% (0/417) in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in overall complication (P=.1) and infection (P=.1) rates among the groups. Leaving the port accessed immediately after placement does not increase the risk of infection or other complications.

  10. Extra Luminal Entrapment of Guide Wire; A Rare Complication of Central Venous Catheter Placement in Right Internal Jugular Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Md Abu Masud; Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Shailesh; Kumari, Sarita

    2016-10-01

    Central venous Catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed procedure for venous access. It is associated with several complications. We report a rare case of extra luminal entrapment of guide wire during CVC placement in right jugular vein. We report a case of 28 years old female patient presented in our emergency with history of entrapped guide wire in right side of neck during CVC. X-ray showed coiling of guide wire in neck. CT Angiography showed guide wire coursing in between common carotid artery and internal jugular vein (IJV), closely abutting the wall of both vessels. The guide wire was coiled with end coursing behind the esophageal wall. Guide wire was removed under fluoroscopic guide manipulation under local anesthesia. We want to emphasize that even though CVC placement is common and simple procedure, serious complication can occur in hands of untrained operator. The procedure should be performed under supervision, if done by trainee. Force should never be applied to advance the guide wire if resistance is encountered.

  11. Perineural spread of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Radiological and CT demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandolfo, I.; Gaeta, M.; Longo, M.; Faranda, C.; Blandino, A.

    1988-01-01

    Perineural spread is well known to be the most insidious form of tumour spread of a number of head and neck malignancies. However, perineural extension of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NC) is a poorly recognized event. Four cases of perineural metastases from NC have been detected with pluridirectional tomography and CT. In 3 cases involvement of the Vidian nerve (nervus canalis pterygoidei) and pterygoid canal was observed. In a fourth patient, invasion of one pterygopalatine fossa and perineural spread along ipsilateral maxillary nerve with enlargement and erosion of the foramen rotundum was demonstrated. Radiological diagnosis of clinically unsuspected perineural tumour spread is important because it markedly influences treatment planning and prognosis of NC. (orig.)

  12. Perineural spread of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Radiological and CT demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandolfo, I.; Gaeta, M.; Longo, M.; Faranda, C.; Blandino, A.

    1988-11-01

    Perineural spread is well known to be the most insidious form of tumour spread of a number of head and neck malignancies. However, perineural extension of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NC) is a poorly recognized event. Four cases of perineural metastases from NC have been detected with pluridirectional tomography and CT. In 3 cases involvement of the Vidian nerve (nervus canalis pterygoidei) and pterygoid canal was observed. In a fourth patient, invasion of one pterygopalatine fossa and perineural spread along ipsilateral maxillary nerve with enlargement and erosion of the foramen rotundum was demonstrated. Radiological diagnosis of clinically unsuspected perineural tumour spread is important because it markedly influences treatment planning and prognosis of NC.

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray ... are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test ...

  14. MRI of perineural extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, A. [Rehabilitation Medicine, Hunters Moor Neurological Rehabilitation Centre, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Hodgson, T. [Neuroradiology Dept., Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Jacubowski, J. [Neurosurgical Dept., Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Norfolk, D. [Haematology Department, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Smith, C. [Pathology Dept., Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2001-06-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary solid tumour consisting of myelogenous leukaemic blast cells, usually seen in acute myeloid leukaemia and less commonly in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia or myeloproliferative disorders. Blast cells have a predilection for periosteal and perineural regions and rarely precede evidence of systemic disease. We present two patients, aleukaemic on peripheral blood counts, both at presentation and during subsequent treatment. We present the MRI features of this rare but important condition. (orig.)

  15. IgG4-Related Perineural Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Inoue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To elucidate characteristics of IgG4-related disease involving the peripheral nervous system. Methods. Retrospective review of 106 patients with IgG4-related disease identified 21 peripheral nerve lesions in 7 patients. Clinicopathological and radiological features were examined. Results. Peripheral nerve lesions were commonly identified in orbital or paravertebral area, involving orbital (=9, optic (=4, spinal (=7, and great auricular nerves (=1. The predominant radiological feature was a distinct perineural soft tissue mass, ranging 8 to 30 mm in diameter. Histologically, the epineurium was preferentially involved by massive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4+ plasma cells. All lesions were neurologically asymptomatic and steroid-responsive at the first presentation, but one recurrent lesion around the optic nerve caused failing vision. Conclusion. IgG4-related disease of the peripheral nervous system is characterized by orbital or paravertebral localization, perineural mass formation, and rare neurologic symptoms. The term “IgG4-related perineural disease” seems appropriate to describe this entity.

  16. Neurosyphilis Presenting as Asymptomatic Optic Perineuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Parker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease that is known as “the great imitator” due to its wide variety of clinical presentations, including ocular disorders. There has been an increase in the rate of syphilis in the United States, especially in persons with HIV. We report a case of optic perineuritis in an asymptomatic male secondary to central nervous system (CNS syphilis. Case Report. A 41-year-old man was found to have bilateral disc edema on a routine exam. Brain MRI was unremarkable, and lumbar puncture revealed a normal opening pressure, with an elevated cerebrospinal fluid white cell count. Orbit MRI showed optic nerve sheath expansion and enhancement, consistent with optic perineuritis. He tested positive for syphilis based on serum RPR and FTA-ABS. Conclusion. Ophthalmologic findings, including disc edema, may be the presenting features of CNS syphilis. Even in asymptomatic persons, perineuritis should be considered early, as diagnosis and treatment are imperative given the progressive nature of the disease.

  17. Life-threatening urethral hemorrhage after placement of a Foley catheter in a patient with uroseptic disseminated intravascular coagulation due to chronic urinary retention induced by untreated benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Keisuke; Imaizumi, Tsuyoshi; Isosu, Tsuyoshi; Kurosawa, Shin; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    A 77-year-old man with severe septic disseminated intravascular coagulation following urinary infection was transported to our hospital. He had developed urinary retention induced by untreated prostatic hyperplasia. Immediate drainage with a Foley catheter was successfully carried out, but the hematuria progressed to life-threatening hemorrhage. Complete hemostasis was impossible by surgical treatment because the tissue around the prostatic urethra was very fragile and hemorrhagic. Organized treatments (continuous hemodiafiltration combined with polymyxin-B immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion and systemic treatment with antibiotics and coagulation factors) were commenced soon after the operation. The patient eventually recovered from the septic disseminated intravascular coagulation. This case report illustrates the risk of placement of Foley catheters in patients with severe septic disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  18. Trigeminal perineural spread of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornik, Alejandro; Rosenblum, Jordan; Biller, Jose

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old man had a five-day history of “pins and needles” sensation on the left chin. Examination showed decreased pinprick sensation on the territory of the left mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium showed enhancement involving the left mandibular branch. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a left kidney mass diagnosed as renal carcinoma following nephrectomy. The “numb-chin” syndrome heralds or accompanies systemic malignancies. Trigeminal perineural spread has been well-documented in head and neck neoplasms, however, to our knowledge, it has not been reported in renal neoplasms. (author)

  19. Current research in perineural invasion of cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Xi-Yun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perineural invasion is a common path for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA metastasis, and it is highly correlated with postoperative recurrence and poor prognosis. It is often an early event in a disease that is commonly diagnosed in advanced stages, and thus it could offer a timely therapeutic and diagnostic target if better understood. This article systematically reviews the progress of CCA neural invasion-related molecules. Methods Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed databases for articles from January 1990 to December 2009, using the keywords "cholangiocarcinoma," "perineural invasion," "nerve growth factor"(NGF, "neural cell adhesion molecule" (NCAM, "matrix metalloproteinase"(MMP, "neurotransmitter," "acetylcholine" (Ach, and "transforming growth factor" (TGF." Additional papers and book chapters were identified by a manual search of references from the key articles. Results From above we found that the molecules NGF, NCAM, MMP, Ach and TGF may have prognostic significance in, and offer clues to the mechanism of CCA neural invasion. Conclusions Cholangiocarcinoma's increasing worldwide incidence is especially poignant in view of both the lacking effective therapies, and the fact that it is commonly diagnosed in advanced stages. As CCA neural invasion often appears early, more complete characterization of its molecular pathology could lead to the identification of targets for the diagnosis and therapy of this devastating malignancy.

  20. Infraclavicular versus axillary nerve catheters: A retrospective comparison of early catheter failure rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Michaela B; Sviggum, Hans P; Hanson, Andrew C; Stoike, David E; Martin, David P; Niesen, Adam D

    2018-05-01

    Continuous brachial plexus catheters are often used to decrease pain following elbow surgery. This investigation aimed to assess the rate of early failure of infraclavicular (IC) and axillary (AX) nerve catheters following elbow surgery. Retrospective study. Postoperative recovery unit and inpatient hospital floor. 328 patients who received IC or AX nerve catheters and underwent elbow surgery were identified by retrospective query of our institution's database. Data collected included unplanned catheter dislodgement, catheter replacement rate, postoperative pain scores, and opioid administration on postoperative day 1. Catheter failure was defined as unplanned dislodging within 24 h of placement or requirement for catheter replacement and evaluated using a covariate adjusted model. 119 IC catheters and 209 AX catheters were evaluated. There were 8 (6.7%) failed IC catheters versus 13 (6.2%) failed AX catheters. After adjusting for age, BMI, and gender there was no difference in catheter failure rate between IC and AX nerve catheters (p = 0.449). These results suggest that IC and AX nerve catheters do not differ in the rate of early catheter failure, despite differences in anatomic location and catheter placement techniques. Both techniques provided effective postoperative analgesia with median pain scores < 3/10 for patients following elbow surgery. Reasons other than rate of early catheter failure should dictate which approach is performed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an artery. The catheter is ... need for surgery. If surgery remains necessary, it can be performed more accurately. Catheter angiography presents a ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  5. Ultrasound-guided approach to the paravertebral space for catheter insertion in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Karen; Visoiu, Mihaela; Bigeleisen, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Paravertebral perineural blocks are used to prevent pain in the thoracoabdominal dermatomes. Traditionally, a landmark-based technique is used in children, while ultrasound-guided (UG) techniques are being employed in adult patients. To describe an UG technique for placement of thoracic paravertebral nerve block (TPVNB) catheters in pediatric patients. Retrospective chart review of a series of 22 pediatric patients' ages 6 months to 17 years with weights from 6.25 kg to 135 kg using a transverse in-plane technique. Catheters were placed both bilateral and unilateral for a variety of thoracic and abdominal procedures. A linear ultrasound transducer was used in all cases with frequency of oscillation and transducer length chosen based on individual patient characteristics of age, weight, and BMI. The median pain scores at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h were 1.2 (interquartile range, 4.5), 0.84 (interquartile range 3.0), 1.6 (interquartile range 2.9), and 0.83 (interquartile range 1.74), respectively. The median dose of opioid expressed as morphine equivalents consumed during the first 24 h after surgery was 0.14 mg·kg(-1) (interquartile range, 0.78 mg·kg(-1) ) and from 24 to 48 h the median dose was 0.11 mg·kg(-1) (interquartile range 0.44 mg·kg(-1) ). No complications were noted, and catheters were left an average of 3 days with a range of 1-5 days with good pain relief. This technical description demonstrates the feasibility of placing PVNB catheters using a transverse in-line ultrasound-guided technique in a wide range of pediatric patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A unilateral optic perineuritis in a teenager - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameilia, Ahmad; Shatriah, Ismail; Wan-Hitam, Wan Hazabbah; Yunus, Rohaizan

    2015-06-01

    Optic perineuritis is an uncommon inflammatory disorder that involves optic nerve sheath. Numerous case reports have been published on optic perineuritis in adults, the majority of whom had bilateral presentation. There are limited data on optic perineuritis occurring in pediatric patients. We report a teenager who presented with a unilateral sign that mimicked the presentation of optic neuritis. The orbit and brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed features of unilateral optic perineuritis. She was treated with a high dose of corticosteroids for 2weeks, and her final visual outcome was satisfactory. No signs of relapse were noted during follow-up visits. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Overview of Head and Neck Malignancy with Perineural Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of perineural spread of head and neck malignancy. It defines the problem and explores some of the unique features, which occur with this pathology. The expectation is for a better understanding of this extraordinary disease, hopefully leading to earlier diagnosis and for a more consistent reporting of results. It summarizes the topics to be covered in this special edition, which should leave the reader with a fairly complete understanding of the contemporary issues of perineural spread.

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  9. Comparison between radiation exposure levels using an image intensifier and a flat-panel detector-based system in image-guided central venous catheter placement in children weighing less than 10 kg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Cortis, Kelvin; Gerasia, Roberta; Maggio, Simona; Luca, Angelo [Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Piazza, Marcello [Department of Anesthesia, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Tuzzolino, Fabio [Department of Information Technology, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy)

    2014-09-10

    Ultrasound-guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance during central venous catheter (CVC) positioning optimizes technical success and lowers the complication rates in children, and is therefore considered standard practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation exposure levels recorded during CVC placement in children weighing less than 10 kg in procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) to those performed in a flat-panel detector-based interventional suite (FPDS). A retrospective review of 96 image-guided CVC placements, between January 2008 and October 2013, in 49 children weighing less than 10 kg was performed. Mean age was 8.2 ± 4.4 months (range: 1-22 months). Mean weight was 7.1 ± 2.7 kg (range: 2.5-9.8 kg). The procedures were classified into two categories: non-tunneled and tunneled CVC placement. Thirty-five procedures were performed with the IIDS (21 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC); 61 procedures were performed with the FPDS (47 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC). For non-tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 113.5 ± 126.7 cGy cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 15.9 ± 44.6 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P < 0.001). For tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 84.6 ± 81.2 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 37.1 ± 33.5 cGy cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P = 0.02). The use of flat-panel angiographic equipment reduces radiation exposure in small children undergoing image-guided CVC placement. (orig.)

  10. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material ... inserted into an artery. The catheter is then guided through the arteries to the area to be ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ... nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the catheter entered the ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area ... small incision (usually a few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... should inform the nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the ... Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter tip ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... catheter , is inserted into an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once the catheter is ... the tube and images are captured using a small dose of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an artery ... examined, a contrast material is injected through the tube and images are captured using a small dose ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the ... days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a ... tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material to examine ... removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x- ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... most cases, the kidneys will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter ... limitations of Catheter Angiography? Patients with impaired kidney function, especially those who also have diabetes, are not ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... lies. The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lessen your anxiety during the procedure. The area of the groin or arm where the catheter will be inserted is shaved, ... contrast material is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is ...

  4. MR-guided perineural injection of the ganglion impar: technical considerations and feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, David R.; Carrino, John A.; Fritz, Jan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); U-Thainual, Paweena [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor [Queen' s University, School of Computing, Kingston, ON (Canada); Flammang, Aaron J. [Siemens Corporate Research, Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, Iulian I. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Perineural ganglion impar injections are used in the management of pelvic pain syndromes; however, there is no consensus regarding the optimal image guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high soft tissue contrast and the potential to directly visualize and target the ganglion. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of MR-guided percutaneous perineural ganglion impar injections. Six MR-guided ganglion impar injections were performed in six human cadavers. Procedures were performed with a clinical 1.5-Tesla MRI system through a far lateral transgluteus approach. Ganglion impar visibility, distance from the sacrococcygeal joint, number of intermittent MRI control steps required to place the needle, target error between the intended and final needle tip location, inadvertent punctures of non-targeted vulnerable structures, injectant distribution, and procedure time were determined. The ganglion impar was seen on MRI in 4/6 (66 %) of cases and located 0.8 mm cephalad to 16.3 mm caudad (average 1.2 mm caudad) to the midpoint of the sacrococcygeal joint. Needle placement required an average of three MRI control steps (range, 2-6). The average target error was 2.2 ± 2.1 mm. In 6/6 cases (100 %), there was appropriate periganglionic distribution and filling of the presacrococcygeal space. No punctures of non-targeted structures occurred. The median procedure time was 20 min (range, 12-29 min). Interventional MRI can visualize and directly target the ganglion impar for accurate needle placement and successful periganglionic injection with the additional benefit of no ionizing radiation exposure to patient and staff. Our results support clinical evaluation. (orig.)

  5. The clinical application of head-ring type posture pad used for prone position in performing the placement of central venous catheter in patients with tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Meiqian; Wang Chunmei; Chen Feiyin; Zhang Lubing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to observe the effectiveness of head-ring type posture pad used for prone position in performing the procedure of peripheral insertion of central catheter (PICC) via the dorsal forearm vein in patients with neoplasm. Methods: A total of 80 consecutive tumor patients were randomly divided into two groups. PICC was carried out in all patients in prone position. In control group (n=38) PICC was performed with patient's head inclining to one side, while in study group (n=42) PICC was performed with the help of head-ring type pad to keep the patient in comfortable posture. The comfortableness, breathing rhythm, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and the change of heart rate during the procedure were observed. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: The results is study group were much better than those in control group. Statistically significant difference in the comfortableness, breathing rhythm, transcutaneous oxygen saturation and heart rate existed between the two groups. Conclusion: The head-ring type posture pad used for prone position can make the patients more comfortable in performing peripheral insertion of central venous catheter via the dorsal forearm vein. (authors)

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  8. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  9. Intravascular (catheter) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Hurst, G.C.; Katz, D.E.; Dverk, J.L.; Wiesen, E.J.; Czerski, L.W.; Malaya, R.; Bellon, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Intravascular MR probes allow excellent spatial resolution and have the potential to detect arterial wall microstructure. Ultrasonic intravascular probes suggest that detailed morphologic information can assist clinical decision making. Catheter MR probes of 2--7 mm outside diameter (OD) were built of copper wire, Teflon, and parts from standard commercial catheters. The probes were connected to the surface coil receiver input of our Picker VISTA 2055HP 1.5-T imaging system. The extant (linear) body coil was used for transmit. Phantoms were constructed of coaxial glass MR tubes, filled with doped water. Watanabe rabbit aorta and human autopsy iliac artery specimens were examined within 4 hours of excision or stored by freezing. In vivo iliac arteries in dogs under general anesthesia were imaged, with percutaneous placement of the probe. Results are presented

  10. Malfunctioning and infected tunneled infusion catheters: over-the-wire catheter exchange versus catheter removal and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, David M; Trerotola, Scott O; Clark, Timothy W; Dagli, Mandeep; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Itkin, Maxim; Soulen, Michael C; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Stavropoulos, S William

    2011-05-01

    To compare the safety and effectiveness of over-the-wire catheter exchange (catheter-exchange) with catheter removal and replacement (removal-replacement) at a new site for infected or malfunctioning tunneled infusion catheters. Using a quality assurance database, 61 patients with tunneled infusion catheters placed during the period July 2001 to June 2009 were included in this study. Patients receiving hemodialysis catheters were excluded. Catheter-exchange was performed in 25 patients, and same-day removal-replacement was performed in 36 patients. Data collected included demographic information, indication for initial catheter placement and replacement, dwell time for the new catheter, and ultimate fate of the new device. Statistical comparisons between the two cohorts were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and Fisher exact test. Catheters exchanged over the wire remained functional without infection for a median of 102 days (range, 2-570 days), whereas catheters removed and replaced were functional for a median 238 days (range, 1-292 days, P = .12). After catheter replacement, there were 11 instances of subsequent infection in the catheter-exchange group and 7 instances in the removal-replacement cohort, accounting for infection rates of 4.4 and 2.3 per 1,000 catheter days (P = .049). Patients in the catheter-exchange group had 3.2 greater odds of infection compared with patients in the removal-replacement group. Five malfunction events occurred in each group, accounting for 2.0 and 1.7 malfunctions per 1,000 catheter days in the catheter-exchange and removal-replacement groups (P = .73). Catheter-exchange of tunneled infusion catheters results in a higher infection rate compared with removal-replacement at a new site. The rate of catheter malfunction is not significantly different between the two groups. Catheter-exchange is an alternative for patients with tunneled infusion catheters who have limited venous access, but this technique should not be

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available ... will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of severe arterial narrowing, ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography produces very detailed, clear and ... possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking and allergies, especially ... is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... angiogram may be performed in less than an hour; however, it may last several hours. top of ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material to examine blood vessels in ... technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... far outweighs the risk. If you have a history of allergy to x-ray contrast material, your ... Angiography (CTA) X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... and x-rays. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a ... the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches. show the extent and severity of ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Interventional radiologist performing an angiography exam View ... ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored by Please note ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such ... to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... 20 minutes (or by using a special closure device). When the examination is complete, you may be ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material is injected through the ... You should inform your physician of any medications being taken and if there are any allergies, especially ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography ...

  7. Does dexamethasone have a perineural mechanism of action?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, P; Grevstad, Jens Ulrik; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone prolongs block duration. Whether this is achieved via a peripheral or a central mechanism of action is unknown. We hypothesized that perineural dexamethasone added as an adjuvant to ropivacaine prolongs block duration compared with ropivacaine alone, by a locally mediated...... effect when controlled for a systemic action. METHODS: We performed a paired, blinded, randomized trial, including healthy men. All subjects received bilateral blocks of the saphenous nerve with ropivacaine 0.5%, 20 ml mixed with dexamethasone 2 mg in one leg and saline in the other, according...

  8. Surgical Management of Perineural Spread of Head and Neck Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, C Arturo; Mason, Eric; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    The surgical management of perineural spread of head and neck cancers has become an integral part in the contemporary treatment of this pathology. We now understand that tumour spreads within the epineurium and in a continuous fashion. We also can rely on the accuracy of magnetic resonance neurography in detecting and defining the extent of disease. With modern skull base techniques and a greater understanding of the anatomy in this region, specific operations can be designed to help eradicate disease. We review the current approaches and techniques used that enable us to better obtain tumour free margins and hence improve survival.

  9. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... stent placement. guide interventional radiologists and surgeons making repairs to diseased blood vessels, such as implanting stents ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... to help prepare for a kidney transplant or stent placement. guide interventional radiologists and surgeons making repairs to diseased blood vessels, such as implanting stents or evaluating a stent after implantation. detect injury ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow to help prepare for a kidney transplant or stent placement. guide interventional radiologists and surgeons ... absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... rare, and radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. There is a small risk that ... standard x-ray contrast. Catheter angiography should be done very cautiously—if at all—in patients who ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes ... including the: brain neck heart chest abdomen (such as the kidneys and liver) pelvis legs and feet ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  15. Knee strength retention and analgesia with continuous perineural fentanyl infusion after total knee replacement: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangar, Devanand; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Sprenker, Collin J; Downes, Katheryne L; Taffe, Narrene; Wainwright, Robert; Gustke, Kenneth; Bernasek, Thomas L; Camporesi, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Despite providing adequate pain relief, a femoral nerve block can induce postoperative muscle weakness after total knee arthoplasty (TKA). Fentanyl has been shown to have peripheral effects but has not been used as a perineural infusate alone after TKA. Sixty patients scheduled for TKA were randomized to one of three blinded groups: a continuous 24 h infusion of either fentanyl 3 μg/ml, ropivacaine 0.1%, or 0.9% normal saline through a femoral nerve sheath catheter at 10 ml/h. The main outcome was maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) in the quadriceps femoris (knee extension), measured by a handheld dynamometer (Nm/kg). Other variables assessed were preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores, hamstrings MVIC (knee flexion), active range of motion of the operative knee, distance ambulated, incidence of knee buckling, supplemental morphine usage, postoperative side effects, and serum fentanyl levels. Quadriceps MVIC values were significantly greater in the fentanyl group compared to the group that received ropivacaine (median values, 0.08 vs. 0.03 Nm/kg; p = 0.028). The incidence of postoperative knee buckling upon ambulation was higher in the ropivacaine group compared to the fentanyl group, although not statistically significant (40% vs. 15 %, respectively; p = 0.077). VAS scores while ambulating were not significantly different between the fentanyl group and the ropivacaine group (p = 0.270). Postoperative morphine consumption, nausea and vomiting, and resting VAS scores were similar among the three groups. A continuous perineural infusion of fentanyl produced greater strength retention than ropivacaine post-TKA.

  16. Risk factors for peritoneal dialysis catheter failure in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC) failure still remains a common clinical problem in pediatric patients despite advancements in catheter placement and dialysis techniques. Our aim was to determine the risk factors that may lead to PDC failure, especially those factors that could be potentially modified to ...

  17. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jung Suk; Lee, Hae Giu; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6–20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6–38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5–14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10–58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites

  18. Placing of tunneled central venous catheters prior to induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Frydenberg, Morten

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) are inevitable in children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CVC-related complications in children with ALL in relation to timing of catheter placement and type of catheter. PROCEDURE: All...

  19. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napalkov, Pavel; Felici, Diana M; Chu, Laura K; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M

    2013-10-16

    Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association's Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter-related complications (MCRCs). Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter-related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters. Data provided in this study can be applied

  20. Intracranial Management of Perineural Spread in the Trigeminal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Michael J; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Since the mid-1960s surgeons have attempted to cure intracranial perineural spread (PNS) of cutaneous malignancies. Untreated patients with trigeminal PNS die from brainstem invasion and leptomeningeal disease. It was understood that resection with clear margins was potentially curative, but early surgical attempts were unsuccessful. The prevailing wisdom considered that this surgery failed to improve the results achieved with radiation therapy alone and was associated with high morbidity. However, with improved imaging, surgical equipment, and better understanding of cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy and access, contemporary surgeons can improve outcomes for this disease. The aim of this paper is to describe a technique to access the interdural compartment of the CS and treat PNS of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in the intracranial trigeminal nerve and ganglion. It is based on the experience of the Queensland Skull Base Unit, Australia in managing PNS of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (cSCCHN).

  1. Defining incidental perineural invasion: the need for a national registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Lauren; De'Ambrosis, Brian; DeAmbrosis, Kathryn; Warren, Timothy; Huilgol, Shyamala; Soyer, H Peter; Panizza, Benedict

    2014-05-01

    This article by the Perineural Invasion (PNI) Registry Group aims to clarify clinical and histopathological ambiguities surrounding PNI in non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). PNI is reportedly present in approximately 2-6% of cases of NMSC and is associated with greater rates of morbidity and mortality. The distinction between clinical PNI and incidental PNI is somewhat unclear, especially in regard to management and prognosis. One important objective of the PNI Registry is to develop a standardised method of classifying perineural invasion. Hence, in this article we propose a definition for PNI and for its sub-classification. This article also provides a critical analysis of the current literature on the treatment of incidental PNI by evaluating the key cohort studies that have investigated the use of surgery or radiotherapy in the management of incidental PNI. At present, there are no universal clinical guidelines that specify the acceptable treatment of NMSC exhibiting incidental PNI. Consequently, patients often receive surgery with varying wider margins, or radiotherapy despite the limited evidence substantiating such management options. It is evident from the existing literature that current opinion is divided over the benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy. Certain prognostic factors have been proposed, such as the size and depth of tumour invasion, nerve diameter, the presence of multifocal PNI and the type of tumour. The PNI Registry is a web-based registry that has been developed to assist in attaining further data pertaining to incidental PNI in NMSC. It is envisaged that this information will provide the foundation for identifying and defining best practice in managing incidental PNI. © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  2. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T.; Akhan, Okan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  3. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T. [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  4. Outcome of tunneled infusion catheters inserted via the right internal jugular vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sung Wook; Do, Young Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Yoo, Wi Kang; Choo, In Wook; Kim, Jae Hyung

    2003-01-01

    To assess the outcome of tunneled central venous catheter placement via the right internal jugular vein. Between June 2001 and May 2002, 670 consecutive Hickman catheters were placed in 654 patients via the right internal jugular vein. The procedural complications arising and follow-up data obtained from May to July 2002 were evaluated. The technical success rate for catheter placement was 99.9% (669/670). Procedural complications were limited to eight cases (1.2%), including three pneumothoraces, one early migration of the catheter, one clinically unimportant air embolism, one catheter injury, one catheter kinking and one primary malpositioning in the azygos vein. Catheter dwelling time ranged from 1 to 407 (mean 107.1) days. During the follow-up period, 416 catheter were removed for various reasons: treatment had ended (n=334), patients declined treatment or their drug regimen was changed (n=16), late complications arose (n=53), or other circumstances intervened (n=13). Late complications included 44 cases of catheter-related infection (6.6%), five of catheter migration (0.7%), two of catheter occlusion (0.3%), one of thrombophlebitis (0.15%), and one of catheter-related right atrial thrombosis (0.15%). Only one instance of symptomatic venous thrombosis or stenosis was noted, namely the one case of thrombophlebitis. Because the incidence of subsequent symptomatic venous thrombosis or stenosis is lower, the preferred route for tunneled central venous catheter placement is the right internal jugular vein

  5. Indwelling catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley catheter ... You will need to make sure your indwelling catheter is working properly. You will also need to ... not get an infection or skin irritation. Make catheter and skin care part of your daily routine. ...

  6. Bilateral idiopathic optic perineuritis with severe vision loss: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee-Min Teh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Optic perineuritis is an orbital inflammatory disorder that is either idiopathic or secondary to other conditions such as infection or systemic inflammatory disorders. This condition is very similar to demyelinating optic neuritis, but certain features of the history and magnetic resonance imaging findings are characteristic for and aid in the diagnosis of optic perineuritis. Vision loss varies greatly, from minimal clouding of vision up to only light perception. We report a case of a 44-year-old female with idiopathic bilateral optic perineuritis with vision loss of up to no light perception in both eyes. Radio imaging studies were typical of optic perineuritis and she was started on systemic corticosteroids. She responded very well to steroid therapy and achieved nearly complete visual recovery. There had been no relapse despite cessation of therapy.

  7. Paravertebral block catheter breakage by electrocautery during thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Noboru; Sugimoto, Yuki; Mori, Yoko; Kato, Takahiro; Miyoshi, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Ryuji; Koga, Tomomichi

    2017-06-01

    Advantages of thoracic paravertebral analgesia (TPA) include placement of the catheter closer to the surgical field; however, the catheter can become damaged during the operation. We experienced a case of intraoperative TPA catheter breakage that prompted us to perform an experiment to investigate possible causes. A 50-year-old male underwent a thoracoscopic lower lobectomy under general anesthesia with TPA via an intercostal approach. Following surgery, it was discovered that the catheter had become occluded, as well as cut and fused, so we reopened the incision and removed the residual catheter. From that experience, we performed an experiment to examine electrocautery-induced damage in normal (Portex™, Smith's Medical), radiopaque (Perifix SoftTip™, BBraun), and reinforced (Perifix FX™, BBraun) epidural catheters (n = 8 each). Chicken meat was penetrated by each catheter and then cut by electrocautery. In the normal group, breakage occurred in 8 and occlusion in 6 of the catheters, and in the radiopaque group breakage occurred in 8 and occlusion in 7. In contrast, breakage occurred in only 3 and occlusion in none in the reinforced group, with the 5 without breakage remaining connected only by the spring coil. Furthermore, in 7 of the reinforced catheters, electric arc-induced thermal damage was observed at the tip of the catheter. A TPA catheter for thoracic surgery should be inserted via the median approach, or it should be inserted after surgery to avoid catheter damage during surgery.

  8. Keyword: Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The practical goal of graduate education is placement of graduates. But what does "placement" mean? Academics use the word without thinking much about it. "Placement" is a great keyword for the graduate-school enterprise. For one thing, its meaning certainly gives a purpose to graduate education. Furthermore, the word is a portal into the way of…

  9. [Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation (malignant perineurinoma) of the cervix uteri].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzhikov, A A; Mukhina, T S

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a case of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation and at the rare site of the cervix uteri in a 57-year-old patient. The diagnosis was established on the basis of extensive immunohistochemical examination, by excluding the similar neoplasms and detecting an immunophenotype characteristic of perineural differentiation. There are data available in the literature on the morphological and immunophenotypical characteristics of this tumor.

  10. Which features of advanced head and neck basal cell carcinoma are associated with perineural invasion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Bandiera de Oliveira Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Perineural invasion is a unique route for tumor dissemination. In basal cell carcinomas, the incidence is low, but increases in advanced cases. Its importance is recognized but not fully understood. Objective To compare head and neck basal cell carcinomas with and without perineural invasion. Methods A retrospective medical chart review of multidisciplinary surgeries for basal cell carcinomas that required a head and neck surgery specialist in a tertiary referral center was performed. Clinical-demographics and histopathological features were analyzed. Results Of 354 cases, perineural invasion was present in 23.1%. Larger tumors and morpheaform subtype were statistically related to perineural invasion. Nodular and superficial subtypes were less frequent in positive cases. No significant difference was found in gender, age, ulceration, location, and mixed histology. Conclusion In this series of selected patients with basal cell carcinomas submitted to major resections, perineural invasion was clearly related to morpheaform subtype and to larger tumors. Other classically associated features, such as location in high-risk mask zone of the face, male gender and mixed histology, were not so strongly linked to perineural invasion.

  11. [Peripheral intravenous catheter-related phlebitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sar-van der Brugge, Simone; Posthuma, E F M Ward

    2011-01-01

    Phlebitis is a very common complication of the use of intravenous catheters. Two patients with an i.v. catheter complicated by thrombophlebitis are described. Patient A was immunocompromised due to chronic lymphatic leukaemia and developed septic thrombophlebitis with positive blood cultures for S. Aureus. Patient B was being treated with flucloxacillin because of an S. Aureus infection and developed chemical phlebitis. Septic phlebitis is rare, but potentially serious. Chemical or mechanical types of thrombophlebitis are usually less severe, but happen very frequently. Risk factors include: female sex, previous episode of phlebitis, insertion at (ventral) forearm, emergency placement and administration of antibiotics. Until recently, routine replacement of peripheral intravenous catheters after 72-96 h was recommended, but randomised controlled trials have not shown any benefit of this routine. A recent Cochrane Review recommends replacement of peripheral intravenous catheters when clinically indicated only.

  12. Hollow mandrin facilitates external ventricular drainage placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, O; Regelsberger, J; Kehler, U; Westphal, M

    2005-07-01

    Placement of ventricular catheters is a routine procedure in neurosurgery. Ventricle puncture is done using a flexible ventricular catheter stabilised by a solid steel mandrin in order to improve stability during brain penetration. A correct catheter placement is confirmed after removing the solid steel mandrin by observation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow out of the flexible catheter. Incorrect placement makes further punctures necessary. The newly developed device allows CSF flow observation during the puncture procedure and in addition precise intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. The developed mandrin is hollow with a blunt tip. On one side 4-5 small holes with a diameter of 0.8 mm are drilled corresponding exactly with the holes in the ventricular catheter, allowing CSF to pass into the hollow mandrin as soon as the ventricle is reached. By connecting a small translucent tube at the distal portion of the hollow mandrin ICP can be measured without loss of CSF. The system has been used in 15 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) or intraventricular haemeorrhage (IVH) and subsequent hydrocephalus. The new system improved the external ventricular drainage implantation procedure. In all 15 patients catheter placement was correct. ICP measurement was easy to perform immediately at ventricle puncture. In 4 patients at puncture no spontaneous CSF flow was observed, therefore by connecting a syringe and gentle aspiration of CSF correct placement was confirmed in this unexpected low pressure hydrocephalus. Otherwise by using the conventional technique further punctures would have been necessary. Advantages of the new technique are less puncture procedures with a lower risk of damage to neural structures and reduced risk of intracranial haemorrhages. Implantation of the ventricular catheter to far into the brain can be monitored and this complication can be overcome. Using the connected pressure monitoring tube an exact measurement of the opening

  13. Principles of subcutaneous port placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Shaun J; Li, Ruizong

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of totally implantable subcutaneous devices in the early 1980s provided patients with secure, reliable venous access and also gave them the ability to move more freely and have a more normal lifestyle with these devices in place. The most common totally implantable device used today is the subcutaneous port. These ports consist of an injection port connected to a catheter. Ports provide a number of advantages compared with other venous catheters; the most important is the reduced risk of infection. These devices have significantly lower rates of infection than nontunneled and tunneled catheters. Additional advantages include less frequent irrigation and minimal home care, and they are less prone to environmental or cutaneous contamination when not being accessed. This article will focus on the placement of these ports. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Peritoneal catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position to prevent catheter malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyan; Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Xia, Yangyang; Tang, Tianfeng; Wan, Cheng; Shao, Qiuyuan; Liu, Jing; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    Catheter malfunction is the main reason for early peritoneal dialysis (PD) technique failure. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a new surgery technique with catheter fixation to the lower abdominal wall combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position in reducing catheter malfunction. Patients with end stage renal disease who received PD in our centre from January 2013 to December 2015 were involved in this study. They were randomly divided into three groups according to surgical technique: traditional open surgery group, modified open surgery group and modified open surgery with catheter fixation group. All patients were followed up for six months after surgery. Catheter- related complications were analyzed. A total of 152 patients were involved. Among them, 49 received traditional open surgery (TOS group), 49 received modified open surgery (MOS group), and 54 received modified open surgery with catheter fixation (MOS-F group). During follow-up, no patients (0%) in MOS-F group developed catheter malfunction which was significantly lower than that of the TOS group (0 vs 16.33%, P = 0.002). Although not statistically significant, the incidence of catheter malfunction was lower in MOS-F group than that in MOS group (0 vs 4.08%, P = 0.134). No significant difference was observed in the episodes of infection, bleeding, leakage, inflow or outflow pain, hernia and delayed wound healing among the three groups (all P > 0.05). Catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position can effectively prevent catheter malfunction in PD catheter placement. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. High-dose steroid therapy for idiopathic optic perineuritis: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimura Tatsuya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction It has been reported that the prognosis of optic perineuritis may be poor when initiation of treatment is delayed. Here we report the successful treatment of three patients with idiopathic optic perineuritis, including two in whom initiation of therapy was delayed. Case presentation Three Japanese patients (two women aged 73 and 66 years, and one man aged 27 years presented with loss of vision (for five months, several months, and two months respectively and pain on eye movement in the third case only, and were diagnosed as having idiopathic optic perineuritis. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted magnetic resonance images showed high signal intensity areas around the affected optic nerves, suggesting the presence of optic perineuritis. Two patients received steroid pulse therapy and the third was given high-dose steroid therapy. The visual acuity improved in all three cases. Conclusion High-dose steroid therapy may be effective for idiopathic perineuritis in patients without optic nerve atrophy, even if initial treatment (including moderate-dose steroids has failed.

  16. Radiation impairs perineural invasion by modulating the nerve microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Bakst

    Full Text Available Perineural invasion (PNI by cancer cells is an ominous clinical event that is associated with increased local recurrence and poor prognosis. Although radiation therapy (RT may be delivered along the course of an invaded nerve, the mechanisms through which radiation may potentially control PNI remain undefined.An in vitro co-culture system of dorsal root ganglia (DRG and pancreatic cancer cells was used as a model of PNI. An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how RT to nerve or cancer affects nerve invasion by cancer.Cancer cell invasion of the DRG was partially dependent on DRG secretion of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. A single 4 Gy dose of radiation to the DRG alone, cultured with non-radiated cancer cells, significantly inhibited PNI and was associated with decreased GDNF secretion but intact DRG viability. Radiation of cancer cells alone, co-cultured with non-radiated nerves, inhibited PNI through predominantly compromised cancer cell viability. In a murine model of PNI, a single 8 Gy dose of radiation to the sciatic nerve prior to implantation of non-radiated cancer cells resulted in decreased GDNF expression, decreased PNI by imaging and histology, and preservation of sciatic nerve motor function.Radiation may impair PNI through not only direct effects on cancer cell viability, but also an independent interruption of paracrine mechanisms underlying PNI. RT modulation of the nerve microenvironment may decrease PNI, and hold significant therapeutic implications for RT dosing and field design for patients with cancers exhibiting PNI.

  17. Redefining Perineural Invasion: Integration of Biology With Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitd, Ligia B; Beesley, Lauren J; Russo, Nickole; Bellile, Emily L; Inglehart, Ronald C; Liu, Min; Romanowicz, Genevieve; Wolf, Gregory T; Taylor, Jeremy M G; D'Silva, Nisha J

    2018-05-22

    A diagnosis of perineural invasion (PNI), defined as cancer within or surrounding at least 33% of the nerve, leads to selection of aggressive treatment in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recent mechanistic studies show that cancer and nerves interact prior to physical contact. The purpose of this study was to explore cancer-nerve interactions relative to clinical outcome. Biopsy specimens from 71 patients with oral cavity SCC were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical (IHC; cytokeratin, S100, GAP43, Tuj1) stains. Using current criteria, PNI detection was increased with IHC. Overall survival (OS) tended to be poor for patients with PNI (P = .098). OS was significantly lower for patients with minimum tumor-nerve distance smaller than 5 μm (P = .011). The estimated relative death rate decreased as the nerve-tumor distance increased; there was a gradual drop off in death rate from distance equal to zero that stabilized around 500 μm. In PNI-negative patients, nerve diameter was significantly related to OS (HR 2.88, 95%CI[1.11,7.49]). Among PNI-negative nerves, larger nerve-tumor distance and smaller nerve diameter were significantly related to better OS, even when adjusting for T-stage and age (HR 0.82, 95% CI[0.72,0.92]; HR 1.27, 95% CI[1.00,1.62], respectively). GAP43, a marker for neuronal outgrowth, stained less than Tuj1 in nerves at greater distances from tumor (OR 0.76, 95% CI[0.73,0.79]); more GAP43 staining was associated with PNI. Findings from a small group of patients suggest that nerve parameters other than presence of PNI can influence outcome and that current criteria of PNI need to be re-evaluated to integrate recent biological discoveries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Percutaneous transfemoral repositioning of malpositioned central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, G G; Roizental, M

    1995-04-01

    Central venous catheters inserted by blind surgical placement may not advance into a satisfactory position and may require repositioning. Malpositioning via surgical insertion is common in patients in whom central venous catheters have previously been placed, as these patients are more likely to have central venous thrombosis and distortion of central venous anatomy. This is less of a problem when catheter placement is guided by imaging; however, even when insertion is satisfactory, central venous catheters may become displaced spontaneously after insertion (Fig. 1). Repositioning can be effected by direct manipulation using guidewires or tip-deflecting wires [1, 2], by manipulation via a transfemoral venous approach [3-5], and by injection of contrast material or saline [6]. Limitations of the direct approach include (1) the number and type of maneuvers that can be performed to effect repositioning when anatomy is distorted, (2) difficulty in accessing the catheter, and (3) the risk of introducing infection. Moreover, these patients are often immunosuppressed, and there is a risk of introducing infection by exposing and directly manipulating the venous catheter. Vigorous injection of contrast material or saline may be unsuccessful for the same reasons: It seldom exerts sufficient force to reposition large-caliber central venous catheters and may cause vessel damage or rupture if injection is made into a small or thrombosed vessel. We illustrate several alternative methods for catheter repositioning via a transfemoral venous approach.

  19. A pilot study to assess adductor canal catheter tip migration in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jody C; Harrison, T Kyle; Miller, Brett; Howard, Steven K; Conroy, Myles; Udani, Ankeet; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-04-01

    An adductor canal catheter may facilitate early ambulation after total knee arthroplasty, but there is concern over preoperative placement since intraoperative migration of catheters may occur from surgical manipulation and result in ineffective analgesia. We hypothesized that catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may influence tip migration for preoperatively inserted adductor canal catheters. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 20 catheter insertion trials were divided randomly into one of four groups: flexible epidural catheter either tunneled or not tunneled; or rigid stimulating catheter either tunneled or not tunneled. Intraoperative patient manipulation was simulated by five range-of-motion exercises of the knee. Distance and length measurements were performed by a blinded regional anesthesiologist. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.225) and length of catheter within the adductor canal (p = 0.467) were not different between the four groups. Two of five non-tunneled stimulating catheters (40 %) were dislodged compared to 0/5 in all other groups (p = 0.187). A cadaver model may be useful for assessing migration of regional anesthesia catheters; catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may not affect migration of adductor canal catheters based on this preliminary study. However, future studies involving a larger sample size, actual patients, and other catheter types are warranted.

  20. Positioning of nasobiliary tube using magnet-loaded catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Seitaro; Sato, Takamitsu; Kato, Shingo; Hosono, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kubota, Kensuke

    2013-10-01

    In endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD), repositioning the catheter from the mouth to the nose is complicated. We devised a method using catheters with magnets and verified its utility and safety. We prospectively enrolled 20 patients undergoing ENBD at Yokohama City University Hospital. The procedures were successful in all 20 cases and no case required a change of operators to a senior doctor. The mean time for the procedure was 36.6 seconds. The emetic reflex was induced 0.5 times on average using the magnet method. The mean X-ray exposure time was 29.6 seconds. No complications occurred. The magnet-loaded catheter method for positioning the ENBD catheter before finally leading it through the nose took little time and was performed successfully and safely. Therefore, the magnet method could become the first choice among techniques for ENBD catheter placement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Skin cancer of the head and neck with incidental microscopic perineural invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, Mark W.; Mendenhall, William M.; Parsons, James T.; Flowers, Franklin P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To address outcomes in clinically asymptomatic patients in whom the unexpected finding of microscopic perineural invasion is noted at the time of surgery. Methods and Materials: The 35 patients included in this study had skin cancers of the head and neck treated with curative intent between January 1965 and April 1995 at the University of Florida. All patients were without clinical or radiographic evidence of perineural invasion but, at the time of biopsy or surgical excision, had the incidental finding of microscopic perineural invasion. Definitive therapy consisted of radiotherapy alone after lesion biopsy (3 patients) or surgical excision preceded (2 patients) or followed (30 patients) by radiotherapy. All patients had follow-up for at least 1 year, 13 patients (37%) had follow-up for at least 5 years. Results: The 5-year local control rate was 78%. The 5-year local control rate for the few patients treated with radiotherapy alone was statistically similar to that for patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (100% vs. 77%, p = 0.4). Multivariate analysis for factors affecting local control included sex, histology, age, treatment group, clinical T stage, initial histologic differentiation, and previously untreated vs. recurrent tumors, none of which was found to be significant. Conclusions: Both surgery plus radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone provide a relatively high rate of local control for patients with incidentally discovered perineural invasion secondary to skin cancer

  2. Perineural inflammation in morphea (localized scleroderma): systematic characterization of a poorly recognized but potentially useful histopathological feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Catharine A; MacKenzie, Andrew I; Biswas, Asok

    2014-01-01

    The association between morphea and perineural inflammation has been reported sporadically but never studied systematically. To assess the prevalence and nature of perineural inflammation in various clinicopathologic stages of morphea and a cohort of other inflammatory dermatoses, 80 morphea and 36 control skin biopsies were studied using hematoxylin/eosin and S100 stains. Perineural inflammation was semiquantitatively analyzed (scored), which along with the pattern (concentric vs. marginal) and cellular composition was compared in the two groups. Perineural inflammation was identified in 84% and 61% of morphea and control cases, respectively. Examination of only routinely stained sections could still detect this feature in 58% of morphea and 33% of control biopsies. Mean perineural inflammation score in morphea (0.65) was significantly higher than in the control group (0.23) (p morphea cases. Although perineural inflammation is common in morphea, it is not unusual to find this feature in other inflammatory conditions. Nevertheless, perineural inflammation can serve as an important diagnostic adjunct in difficult cases of morphea if one considers its greater intensity, predominantly concentric pattern and the tendency to show plasma cell neurotropism. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparative study of peripherally inserted central venous catheter and traditional central catheter assisted with X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianchun; Wang Xiurong; Jiang Zhuming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, complications, mid- and long-term advantages of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) compared with central venous access assisted with X-ray. Methods: From Jan 1997 to Dec 1998, the authors conducted a study in 60 patients with placed PICC lines and 60 patients with central lines. Study variables included tip placement and complication rates. Results: Tere were on significant differences between PICC and CVC in the successful placement 95.0% and 88.3%, t = 1.745, P 0.19; the mean duration 13(6-98) days and 14 (7-104) days, F = 0.049, P = 0.83; the total occlusion rate 6.7% (4/60) and 5.0%(3/60), t = 0.152, P = 0.70. In PICC patients, the occlusion rate was slightly higher in 3 Fr (20-gauge) catheter (3/20, 15.0%) than in 4 Fr(18-gauge) catheters (1/20, 5.0%), t = 1.111, P=0.29. Phlebitis occurred in 5.0% of patients (3/60) and one catheter fracture was happened on the catheter hub junction (1.7%). In 3 catheter tips dislocation cases, the catheter tips were moved to the optional position assisted with X-ray image. In CVC group, pneumothorax happened in 1 case (1.7%). In 4 catheter dislocation cases, the catheters were with drawn. No catheter-related sepsis and hemo-pneumothorax happened in both group patients. Conclusions: Both PICC and CVC can be acceptable in clinical use. PICC assisted with X-ray possesses the advantages of less trauma, accurate localization preventing some possible severe complications of central venous access such as pneumothorax. The new method provides a reliable, effective venous access for mid-and long-term usage in patients receiving a variety of solutions, primarily parenteral alimentation, chemotherapy or antibiotic infusion

  4. STUDENT PLACEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    students express lack of interest in the field they are placed, it ... be highly motivated to learn than students placed in a department ... the following research questions. Research Questions. •. Did the criteria used by Mekelle. University for placement of students into different departments affect the academic performance of ...

  5. Ultrasound Pulsed-Wave Doppler Detects an Intrathecal Location of an Epidural Catheter Tip: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Saasouh, Wael; Patel, Bimal; Babazade, Rovnat

    2018-04-01

    Currently, no gold standard method exists for localization of an epidural catheter after placement. The technique described in this report uses pulsed-wave Doppler (PWD) ultrasound to identify intrathecal location of an epidural catheter. A thoracic epidural catheter was inserted after multiple trials with inconclusive aspiration and test dose. Ultrasound PWD confirmed no flow in the epidural space and positive flow in the intrathecal space. A fluid aspirate was positive for glucose, reconfirming intrathecal placement. PWD is a potential tool that can be used to locate the tip of an epidural catheter.

  6. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  7. Reducing catheter-related thrombosis using a risk reduction tool centered on catheter to vessel ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Timothy R; Mahoney, Keegan J

    2017-11-01

    In vascular access practices, the internal vessel size is considered important, and a catheter to vessel ratio (CVR) is recommended to assist clinicians in selecting the most appropriate-sized device for the vessel. In 2016, new practice recommendations stated that the CVR can increase from 33 to 45% of the vessels diameter. There has been evidence on larger diameter catheters and increased thrombosis risk in recent literature, while insufficient information established on what relationship to vessel size is appropriate for any intra-vascular device. Earlier references to clinical standards and guidelines did not clearly address vessel size in relation to the area consumed or external catheter diameter. The aim of this manuscript is to present catheter-related thrombosis evidence and develop a standardized process of ultrasound-guided vessel assessment, integrating CVR, Virchow's triad phenomenon and vessel health and preservation strategies, empowering an evidence-based approach to device placement. Through review, calculation and assessment on the areas of the 33 and 45% rule, a preliminary clinical tool was developed to assist clinicians make cognizant decisions when placing intravascular devices relating to target vessel size, focusing on potential reduction in catheter-related thrombosis. Increasing the understanding and utilization of CVRs will lead to a safer, more consistent approach to device placement, with potential thrombosis reduction strategies. The future of evidence-based data relies on the clinician to capture accurate vessel measurements and device-related outcomes. This will lead to a more dependable data pool, driving the relationship of catheter-related thrombosis and vascular assessment.

  8. Value of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation for continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with fixed catheter tip method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; White, Robert I.

    2008-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the use of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation with the fixed catheter tip method in comparison with other previously used coils. The cohort of this study was 143 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer for whom a port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted. In the most recent 32 patients, Micronester coils were used for catheter tip fixation. Details of embolic agents for fixation, persistent blood flow beyond the distal end of the indwelling catheter, and complications were compared between cases without and with Micronester coils. In all, percutaneous port-catheter placement was successful. Mean number of coils used for fixation was 4.2 without Micronester coils vs. 2.5 with Micronester coils. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol was additionally used for catheter tip fixation in 85.6% of 111 procedures without Micronester coils and in 50% of 32 using Micronester coils. The gastroduodenal artery beyond the distal end was not detected at the final examination after any procedure. Catheter dislocation occurred in five and hepatic arterial obstruction or severe stenosis in eight. The number of coils used and necessity of NBCA-Lipiodol could be decreased with usage of Micronester coils without decreasing fixation ability compared to other coils. (orig.)

  9. Central venous catheters: detection of catheter complications and therapeutical options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, B.; Beck, A.; Wagner, H.J.; Vivantes-Kliniken, Hellersdorf und Prenzlauer Berg

    2008-01-01

    For modern medicine central venous catheters play an important role for diagnostic and therapeutic options. Catheter implantation, complication detection and therapy of catheter complications are an increasing demand for the radiologist. The review article provides an overview of different catheter types, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Catheter malpositions are usually detectable in conventional X-ray. Most malpositions are correctable using interventional-radiological techniques. In addition therapeutical options for thrombotic complications (venous thrombosis, catheter occlusion, fibrin sheath) are discussed. In case of an infectious catheter complication, usually a catheter extraction and re-implantation is necessary

  10. High dose urokinase for restoration of patency of occluded permanent central venous catheters in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, L; Lifschitz, M; Plaksin, J; Grenader, T; Slotki, I

    2010-10-01

    Catheter thrombosis is common and results in inadequate dialysis treatment and, frequently, in catheter loss. Since dialysis treatment runs on a strict schedule, occluded catheters need to be restored in a timely and cost effective manner. We present a new shortened protocol of urokinase infusion that allows hemodialysis to be performed within 90 minutes. To chronic hemodialysis patients, who developed complete catheter occlusion, urokinase was infused simultaneously through both lumens of the catheter (125,000 units to each lumen) over 90 minutes. Technical success was defined as restoring blood pump speed to at least 250 ml/min. We determined the average time from catheter placement to first clot event (primary patency PP), recurrent clot event after urokinase treatment (secondary patency SP), catheter salvage rate and cause for removal. 37 catheters developed total thrombosis and urokinase was used to restore patency one or more times (total 47 treatments). Catheter salvage rate was 97 %. The average time of PP was 152 ± 56 days (7 - 784 days). Nine patients (30%) developed recurrent occlusion and the average time of SP was 64 ± 34 days (2 - 364 days). One catheter was removed because of dysfunction due to thrombosis. Other catheters were removed due to infection, fistula maturation or fell out spontaneously. Hemodialysis was performed immediately after treatment with blood speed of 250 ml/min in all patients. Our protocol is highly effective, short, and allows to restore patency of totally occluded central venous catheters with minimal disruption of the dialysis session.

  11. The Natural History and Treatment Outcomes of Perineural Spread of Malignancy within the Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Timothy A; Nagle, Christina M; Bowman, James; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural history of diseases enables the clinician to better diagnose and treat their patients. Perineural spread of head and neck cancers are poorly understood and often diagnosis is delayed resulting in poorer outcomes and more debilitating treatments. This article reviews a large personal series of head and neck malignancy presenting with perineural spread along almost exclusively the trigeminal and/or facial nerves. A detailed analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of cutaneous origin is presented including an analysis of likely primaries, which most often have occurred months to years prior. The importance of early detection is reinforced by the highly significant (p < 0.0001) differences in disease specific survival, which occur, depending on how far along a cranial nerve the disease has been allowed to spread.

  12. Definitive Radiotherapy for Skin and Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma with Perineural Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Mendenhall, William M.; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) and, to a lesser extent, cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas may exhibit perineural invasion (PNI). A subset of patients have tumors with extensive PNI tracking to the skull base that are incompletely resectable and are treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). RT may be administered with intensity-modulated RT or proton RT. Patients with ACC may also be considered for neutron RT, although the number of available neutron facilities is ...

  13. Skin cancer of the head and neck with clinical perineural invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, Mark W.; Mendenhall, William M.; Parsons, James T.; Amdur, Robert J.; Stringer, Scott P.; Cassisi, Nicholas J.; Million, Rodney R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To review treatment and outcomes in 62 patients with clinical and/or gross evidence of perineural invasion from skin cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients received radiotherapy at the University of Florida as part or all of their treatment between January 1965 and April 1995. All patients had clinical signs and symptoms of perineural involvement and/or documentation of tumor extending to grossly involve nerve(s). Twenty-one patients underwent therapy for previously untreated lesions, including 12 who received radiotherapy alone and nine who had surgery with postoperative radiotherapy. Forty-one patients underwent therapy for recurrent lesions, including 18 treated with radiotherapy alone and 23 who received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Results: Factors on multivariate analysis that predicted local control included patient age, previously untreated vs. recurrent lesions, presence of clinical symptoms, and extent of radiotherapy fields. Recurrence patterns were predominantly local; 26 of 31 patients (84%) who developed local recurrence after treatment had recurrent cancer limited to the primary site. Conclusions: Many patients with skin cancer and symptomatic perineural invasion have disease that is incompletely resectable. Approximately half these patients will be cured with aggressive irradiation alone or combined with surgery. Age, prior treatment, and clinical symptoms influence the likelihood of cure

  14. Perineural invasion on prostate needle biopsy does not predict biochemical failure following brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weight, Christopher J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhou Ming; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if the presence of perineural invasion (PNI) predicts biochemical recurrence in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case control matching study was performed. The records of 651 patients treated with brachytherapy between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Sixty-three of these patients developed biochemical failure. These sixty-three patients were then matched in a one-to-one ratio to patients without biochemical failure, controlling for biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, age, and the use of androgen deprivation. The pathology of the entire cohort was then reviewed for evidence of perineural invasion on initial prostate biopsy specimens. The biochemical relapse free survival rates for these two groups were compared. Results: Cases and controls were well matched, and there were no significant differences between the two groups in age, Gleason grade, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, and the use of androgen deprivation. PNI was found in 19 (17%) patients. There was no significant difference in the rates of PNI between cases and controls, 19.6% and 14.3% respectively (p 0.45). PNI did not correlate with biochemical relapse free survival (p 0.40). Conclusion: Perineural invasion is not a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing brachytherapy for prostate cancer

  15. CATHETER DURATION AND THE RISK OF SEPSIS IN PREMATURE BABIES WITH UMBILICAL VEIN CATHETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartojo Hartojo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical catheters are frequently required in the management of severely ill premature babies. The risk of complications may increase with duration of UVC use. Objective: To determine whether the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs and sepsis remained constant over the duration of umbilical vein catheters (UVCs in high-risk premature neonates. Methods:retrospective analysis. The data were collected from the medical record of high risk premature neonates who had a UVC placed in neonatal care unit of Husada Utama Hospital between April 1st 2008 to April 30th 2011 with purposive sampling. Catheter duration was observed before and after 14 days on placement. Blood and UVC culture was performed to establish the risk of CLA-BSIs and sepsis. Chi-square and logistic regression analysis were performed in the laboratorium data. Result: A total 44 high risk premature babies with UVCs were enrolled (sepsis group: n = 23 and non sepsis group: n = 21. Baseline demographics were similar between the groups. 15 babies in sepsis group have UVCs duration > 14 days, and 8 babies have UVCs 14 days show blood culture performance in 11 babies with positive evidence, UVCs culture performance is negative in 18 babies (p = 0.456. Burkholderia cepacia and Klebsiella pneumonia mostly appeared in blood culture performance. 25% of UVC culture performance shows Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Conclusions: The catheter duration have no significant difference in risk of sepsis in premature babies with Umbilical Vein Catheters.

  16. A Brief Recap of Tips and Surgical Manoeuvres to Enhance Optimal Outcome of Surgically Placed Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie H. Frost

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Peritoneal dialysis (PD is an effective option of renal replacement therapy for ESRF, offering advantages over haemodialysis. Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC placement is thought to be the key to successful PD and the economic advantages are lost if a patient switches to HD in the 1st year. This paper is a brief document elaborating a recap of published literature, looking at various surgical tips and manoeuvres to enhance optimal outcome of PDC placement. Methods. A search strategy assessing for access team, preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, type of catheter, catheter exit site, intraoperative catheter trial, optimal time to commence PD, hernia repairs, number of cuffs, catheter-embedding procedures, rectus sheath tunnelling, laparoscopic fixing, omentopexy, omentectomy, the “Y”-Tec system, resection of epiploic appendages, adhesiolysis, a trained surgeon, and perioperative catheter care protocol was used looking at various databases. Findings. The complications of catheterrelated dysfunction can be reduced with advanced planning of access placement, immaculate surgery, and attention to catheter insertion techniques. Conclusion. The success of a peritoneal dialysis programme depends upon functional and durable long term access to the peritoneal cavity; this depends on placement techniques and competent surgeons and psychosocial support to the patient. The various technical tips and manoeuvres elaborated here should be considered options carried out to improve outcome and reduce catheter dysfunction.

  17. Private placements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugeaud, G. J. R.

    1998-01-01

    The principles underlying private placements in Alberta, and the nature of the processes employed by the Alberta Securities Commission in handling such transactions were discussed. The Alberta Securities Commission's mode of operation was demonstrated by the inclusion of various documents issued by the Commission concerning (1) special warrant transactions prior to listing, (2) a decision by the Executive Director refusing to issue a receipt for the final prospectus for a distribution of securities of a company and the reasons for the refusal, (3) the Commission's decision to interfere with the Executive Director's decision not to issue a receipt for the final prospectus, with full citation of the Commission's reasons for its decision, (4) and a series of proposed rules and companion policy statements regarding trades and distributions outside and in Alberta. Text of a sample 'short form prospectus' was also included

  18. Suprapubic catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... going back into your bladder. Try not to disconnect the catheter more than you need to. Keeping ... Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of ...

  19. Total parenteral alimentation via indwelling umbilical catheters in the newborn period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R T; Rhodes, P G

    1976-01-01

    Total parenteral alimentation (TPA) was delivered to 80 infants via indwelling umbilical artery and to 9 via indwelling umbilical venous catheters. The primary indication for catheter placement and maintenance was monitoring of arterial blood gases (umbilical venous catheter tip in left atrium) in a group of sick neonates requiring increased inspired oxygen or assisted ventilation. Results were compared with those from 23 infants who had tunnelled jugular catheters for a variety of chronic medical and surgical problems preventing gastric or intestinal feeding. A mean weight gain was achieved in both groups. Mortality and morbidity rates were similar in both groups. The most common complications were infection and thrombotic phenomena. Metabolic complications were few. It is concluded that infusing TPA solutions via indwelling umbilical catheters presents no greater risk than infusion via tunnelled jugular catheters, and provides a method for supplying adequate caloric intake for growth during the acute stage of illness. PMID:827978

  20. Radiographic assessment of venous catheter position in children: Value of the lateral view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Brasch, R.C.; Gooding, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Frontal chest radiographs can be misleading in the evaluation of central venous catheter placement. Lateral chest radiographs were obtained, in addition to the standard frontal radiographs, in 25 young children. In five (20%) of the children, the catheters were found to be malpositioned, and the frontal radiograph showed evidence of the abnormality in all five. The lateral radiographs also showed evidence of the abnormality in all five children; however, in three of the five, the lateral radiographs provided additional, more specific, diagnostic information. The lateral chest radiographs also demonstrated satisfactory catheter positioning in three other children in whom the frontal radiographs suggested abnormal positioning. Accurate assessment of catheter position was possible in all patients using both frontal and lateral chest radiographs. Injection of contrast material was not necessary to locate malpositioned catheters. Lateral radiographs are recommended whenever an abnormal catheter position is suspected clinically or from findings on the routine frontal radiograph. (orig.)

  1. Sediment Placement Areas 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Dredge material placement sites (DMPS), including active, inactive, proposed and historical placement sites. Dataset covers US Army Corps of Engineers San Francisco...

  2. Sediment Placement Areas 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Dredge material placement sites (DMPS), including active, inactive, proposed and historical placement sites. Dataset covers US Army Corps of Engineers San Francisco...

  3. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  4. Emergency Department Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention: Multisite Qualitative Study of Perceived Risks and Implemented Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eileen J; Pallin, Daniel J; Mandel, Leslie; Sinnette, Corine; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-02-01

    Existing knowledge of emergency department (ED) catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention is limited. We aimed to describe the motivations, perceived risks for CAUTI acquisition, and strategies used to address CAUTI risk among EDs that had existing CAUTI prevention programs. In this qualitative comparative case study, we enrolled early-adopting EDs, that is, those using criteria for urinary catheter placement and tracking the frequency of catheters placed in the ED. At 6 diverse facilities, we conducted 52 semistructured interviews and 9 focus groups with hospital and ED participants. All ED CAUTI programs originated from a hospitalwide focus on CAUTI prevention. Staff were motivated to address CAUTI because they believed program compliance improved patient care. ED CAUTI prevention was perceived to differ from CAUTI prevention in the inpatient setting. To identify areas of ED CAUTI prevention focus, programs examined ED workflow and identified 4 CAUTI risks: (1) inappropriate reasons for urinary catheter placement; (2) physicians' limited involvement in placement decisions; (3) patterns of urinary catheter overuse; and (4) poor insertion technique. Programs redesigned workflow to address risks by (1) requiring staff to specify the medical reason for catheter at the point of order entry and placement; (2) making physicians responsible for determining catheter use; (3) using catheter alternatives to address patterns of overuse; and (4) modifying urinary catheter insertion practices to ensure proper placement. Early-adopting EDs redesigned workflow to minimize catheter use and ensure proper insertion technique. Assessment of ED workflow is necessary to identify and modify local practices that may increase CAUTI risk.

  5. Targeted Ultrasound-Guided Perineural Hydrodissection of the Sciatic Nerve for the Treatment of Piriformis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S

    2018-05-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a common cause of lumbar, gluteal, and thigh pain, frequently associated with sciatic nerve symptoms. Potential etiologies include muscle injury or chronic muscle stretching associated with gait disturbances. There is a common pathological end pathway involving hypertrophy, spasm, contracture, inflammation, and scarring of the piriformis muscle, leading to impingement of the sciatic nerve. Ultrasound-guided piriformis injections are frequently used in the treatment of these pain syndromes, with most of the published literature describing injection of the muscle. We describe a safe, effective ultrasound-guided injection technique for the treatment of piriformis syndrome using targeted sciatic perineural hydrodissection followed by therapeutic corticosteroid injection.

  6. An epidural catheter removal after recent percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery stenting: Epidural catheter and antiaggregation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksić Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in the presence of the epidural catheter is still controversial. It is well known that dual antiplatelet therapy is indicated for 12 months after the placement of drug-eluting stents (DES. Removal of an epidural catheter during that period is related to an increased risk of stent occlusion in case of discontinuation of platelet function inhibitors or, on the other hand, increased risk of epidural hematoma associated with neurological deficit if suppressed platelet function is still present. Case Report: Here we present a case of a 63-year-old man who was admitted to Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases Dedinje for elective aortic surgery. Before the induction, an epidural catheter was inserted at the Th10-Th11 epidural space. Uneventful surgery was performed under the combined epidural and general anesthesia. On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient sustained a ST depression myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention with DES placement, while epidural catheter was still in place. Dual antiplatelet therapy with 600mg of clopidogrel, 100 mg of acetilsalicylic acid (ASA and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH were started during the procedure. The next day, clopidogrel (75 mg and ASA (100 mg were continued as well as LMWH. The decision to remove the epidural catheter was made on the 9th postoperative day, after platelet aggregation assays were performed. Six hours after catheter removal the patient again received clopidogrel, ASA and LMWH. There were no signs of epidural hematoma. Conclusion: This case shows that point-of-care testing with platelet aggregation assays may be useful in increasing the margin of safety for epidural catheter removal during dual antiplatelet therapy.

  7. SU-F-T-20: Novel Catheter Lumen Recognition Algorithm for Rapid Digitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dise, J; McDonald, D; Ashenafi, M; Peng, J; Mart, C; Koch, N; Vanek, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Manual catheter recognition remains a time-consuming aspect of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning. In this work, a novel catheter lumen recognition algorithm was created for accurate and rapid digitization. Methods: MatLab v8.5 was used to create the catheter recognition algorithm. Initially, the algorithm searches the patient CT dataset using an intensity based k-means filter designed to locate catheters. Once the catheters have been located, seed points are manually selected to initialize digitization of each catheter. From each seed point, the algorithm searches locally in order to automatically digitize the remaining catheter. This digitization is accomplished by finding pixels with similar image curvature and divergence parameters compared to the seed pixel. Newly digitized pixels are treated as new seed positions, and hessian image analysis is used to direct the algorithm toward neighboring catheter pixels, and to make the algorithm insensitive to adjacent catheters that are unresolvable on CT, air pockets, and high Z artifacts. The algorithm was tested using 11 HDR treatment plans, including the Syed template, tandem and ovoid applicator, and multi-catheter lung brachytherapy. Digitization error was calculated by comparing manually determined catheter positions to those determined by the algorithm. Results: he digitization error was 0.23 mm ± 0.14 mm axially and 0.62 mm ± 0.13 mm longitudinally at the tip. The time of digitization, following initial seed placement was less than 1 second per catheter. The maximum total time required to digitize all tested applicators was 4 minutes (Syed template with 15 needles). Conclusion: This algorithm successfully digitizes HDR catheters for a variety of applicators with or without CT markers. The minimal axial error demonstrates the accuracy of the algorithm, and its insensitivity to image artifacts and challenging catheter positioning. Future work to automatically place initial seed

  8. SU-F-T-20: Novel Catheter Lumen Recognition Algorithm for Rapid Digitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dise, J; McDonald, D; Ashenafi, M; Peng, J; Mart, C; Koch, N; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Manual catheter recognition remains a time-consuming aspect of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning. In this work, a novel catheter lumen recognition algorithm was created for accurate and rapid digitization. Methods: MatLab v8.5 was used to create the catheter recognition algorithm. Initially, the algorithm searches the patient CT dataset using an intensity based k-means filter designed to locate catheters. Once the catheters have been located, seed points are manually selected to initialize digitization of each catheter. From each seed point, the algorithm searches locally in order to automatically digitize the remaining catheter. This digitization is accomplished by finding pixels with similar image curvature and divergence parameters compared to the seed pixel. Newly digitized pixels are treated as new seed positions, and hessian image analysis is used to direct the algorithm toward neighboring catheter pixels, and to make the algorithm insensitive to adjacent catheters that are unresolvable on CT, air pockets, and high Z artifacts. The algorithm was tested using 11 HDR treatment plans, including the Syed template, tandem and ovoid applicator, and multi-catheter lung brachytherapy. Digitization error was calculated by comparing manually determined catheter positions to those determined by the algorithm. Results: he digitization error was 0.23 mm ± 0.14 mm axially and 0.62 mm ± 0.13 mm longitudinally at the tip. The time of digitization, following initial seed placement was less than 1 second per catheter. The maximum total time required to digitize all tested applicators was 4 minutes (Syed template with 15 needles). Conclusion: This algorithm successfully digitizes HDR catheters for a variety of applicators with or without CT markers. The minimal axial error demonstrates the accuracy of the algorithm, and its insensitivity to image artifacts and challenging catheter positioning. Future work to automatically place initial seed

  9. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion, the LOCI-trial: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Sander M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peritoneal dialysis (PD is an effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. It allows patients more freedom to perform daily activities compared to haemodialysis. Key to successful PD is the presence of a well-functioning dialysis catheter. Several complications, such as in- and outflow obstruction, peritonitis, exit-site infections, leakage and migration, can lead to catheter removal and loss of peritoneal access. Currently, different surgical techniques are in practice for PD-catheter placement. The type of insertion technique used may greatly influence the occurrence of complications. In the literature, up to 35% catheter failure has been described when using the open technique and only 13% for the laparoscopic technique. However, a well-designed randomized controlled trial is lacking. Methods/Design The LOCI-trial is a multi-center randomized controlled, single-blind trial (pilot. The study compares the laparoscopic with the open technique for PD catheter insertion. The primary objective is to determine the optimum placement technique in order to minimize the incidence of catheter malfunction at 6 weeks postoperatively. Secondary objectives are to determine the best approach to optimize catheter function and to study the quality of life at 6 months postoperatively comparing the two operative techniques. Discussion This study will generate evidence on any benefits of laparoscopic versus open PD catheter insertion. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2878

  10. Combined central retinal artery and vein occlusion with optic perineuritis following herpes zoster dermatitis in an immunocompetent child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Singh, Ramandeep; Takkar, Aastha; Lal, Vivek

    2017-11-01

    A 15-year-old healthy boy developed acute, rapidly progressing visual loss in left eye following herpes zoster dermatitis, with a combined central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), along with optic perineuritis. Laboratory tests were negative. Despite an empirical, intensive antiviral treatment with systemic corticosteroids, and vision could not be restored in the affected eye. Herpes zoster dermatitis, in an immunocompetent individual, may be associated with a combined CRAO and CRVO along with optic perineuritis, leading to profound visual loss.

  11. UK Renal Registry 15th annual report: Chapter 8 UK multisite peritoneal dialysis access catheter audit for first PD catheters 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Victoria; Pitcher, David; Braddon, Fiona; Fogarty, Damian; Wilkie, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central paradigm of effective peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an appropriate standard of PD catheter function. The aim of the project was to develop an effective national PD access audit which would identify an 'appropriate standard' of PD catheter function. The UK Renal Registry collected centre specific information on various PD access outcome measures including catheter functionality and post-insertion complications. The first PD access audit covering England, Northern Ireland and Wales was conducted during April to June 2012 looking at incident dialysis patients in 2011. Forty three data collection spreadsheets were returned from a total of 65 centres describing 917 PD catheter placements. The median age of PD patients was 61 years and 61.5% were male. The proportion of patients initiated on PD in comparison to HD was lower in socially deprived areas. There was a relationship between the timing of nephrology referral and the likelihood of surgical assessment regarding PD catheter placement. Patients with diabetes did not have higher rates of PD catheter failure or of early peritonitis. A comparative PD catheter audit has the potential to provide valuable information on an important patient related outcome measure and lead to an improvement in patient experience. There was wide variation between centres of PD catheter use for late presenting patients. Overall patients were more likely to get a PD catheter if they had been known to the service for more than 1 year. The percutaneous insertion technique was associated with a higher early (less than 2 week) peritonitis rate and more catheter flow problems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from perineural invasion of a lip squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, L.M.; Smee, R.

    2006-01-01

    Perineural invasion resulting in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is a rare, but well-recognized phenomenon in head and neck carcinomas. We report the rare case of a patient with a squamous cell carcinoma of the lip resulting in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis and review the relevant published work. A 51-year-old man presented with progressive facial paraesthesia after treatment for a recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip. Cavernous sinus involvement was confirmed on MRI and he received stereotactic radiotherapy. He subsequently developed progressive lower limb neurological signs. An MRI showed multiple enhancing leptomeningeal nodules in the cervical and lumbar spine consistent with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Whole spine radiotherapy and dexametha-sone resulted in short-term stabilization of symptoms only and he rapidly succumbed to progressive neurological disease. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of a squamous cell carcinoma of the lip resulting in leptomeningeal disease of the cauda equina. It illustrates the potential aggressive natural history of squamous cell carcinomas with perineural invasion Copyright (2006) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  13. Insight into the epidemiology of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with perineural spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Timothy A; Whiteman, David C; Porceddu, Sandro V; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-09-01

    Perineural spread (PNS) of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) can be associated with poor outcomes. Disease understanding and awareness is limited leading to delayed diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study was to identify epidemiological features of patients with PNS of cutaneous SCCHN. Tumor characteristics and demographics of patients with PNS of cutaneous SCCHN managed through a single institution were collected between 1998 and 2013. One hundred twenty patients were included in this study. The majority had a history of skin cancer (85.8%). The median time from primary tumor treatment to PNS symptom onset was 16 months (range, 1-86 months). A total of 34.2% had no perineural invasion (PNI) detected in the primary, and 22.5% had no known primary tumor. Only 5.8% of the patients had nodal involvement at presentation. Patients can present with PNS from cutaneous SCCHN with no known primary tumor or with primary tumors without PNI. The majority of patients presented without regional nodal involvement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1416-1420, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cardiac pacemaker dysfunction in children after thoracic drainage catheter manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobdell, K W; Walters, H L; Hudson, C; Hakimi, M

    1997-05-01

    Two children underwent placement of permanent, epicardial-lead, dual-chamber, unipolar pacemaker systems for complete heart block. Postoperatively, both patients demonstrated subcutaneous emphysema-in the area of their pulse generators-temporally related to thoracic catheter manipulation. Acutely, each situation was managed with manual compression of the pulse generator, ascertaining appropriate pacemaker sensing and pacing. Maintenance of compression with pressure dressings, vigilant observation/monitoring, and education of the care givers resulted in satisfactory pacemaker function without invasive intervention.

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Perirectal Abscess Drainage without Drainage Catheter: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kwang Choi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A perirectal abscess is a relatively common disease entity that occurs as a postsurgical complication or as a result of various medical conditions. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS-guided drainage was recently described as a promising alternative treatment. Previous reports have recommended placement of a drainage catheter through the anus for irrigation, which is inconvenient to the patient and carries a risk of accidental dislodgement. We report four cases of perirectal abscess that were successfully treated with only one or two 7 F double pigtail plastic stent placements and without a drainage catheter for irrigation.

  16. Catheter-associated UTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  17. Frequency of puncture holes in peritoneal dialysis catheters related to the beta cap adapter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yasushi; Kansal, Sheru; Schreiber, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Between November 2009 and September 2011, 12 patients (6 women, 6 men) undergoing continuous peritoneal dialysis (PD) or automated PD developed puncture-like holes in the PD catheter near the interface of the adapter with the superior aspect of the Silastic PD catheter The adapter is used to connect the PD catheter to the PD transfer set. Over the course of 23 months, the 12 patients presented to the PD unit with 19 separate instances of catheter holes, for an event rate of 0.23 holes per patient-year Data including socio-demographic information, PD modality, need for antibiotic treatment, event recurrence, infectious complications, and time from catheter placement were collected from patients whose catheters did and did not develop holes. We observed no differences between patients whose catheters developed holes and those whose catheters did not. The location of the individual holes suggested a relationship between the adapter and the catheter holes. The holes, which led to increased patient morbidity and costs, may be related to structural changes made in 2006 to the adapter.

  18. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcsar, Zsolt; Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Thoracic Nerve Root Entrapment by Intrathecal Catheter Coiling: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing L; Loriaux, Daniel B; Tybout, Caroline; Kinon, Merritt D; Rahimpour, Shervin; Runyon, Scott L; Hopkins, Thomas J; Boortz-Marx, Richard L; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-03-01

    Intrathecal catheter placement has long-term therapeutic benefits in the management of chronic, intractable pain. Despite the diverse clinical applicability and rising prevalence of implantable drug delivery systems in pain medicine, the spectrum of complications associated with intrathecal catheterization remains largely understudied and underreported in the literature. To report a case of thoracic nerve root entrapment resulting from intrathecal catheter migration. Case report. Inpatient hospital service. A 60-year-old man status post implanted intrathecal (IT) catheter for intractable low back pain secondary to failed back surgery syndrome returned to the operating room for removal of IT pump trial catheter after experiencing relapse of preoperative pain and pump occlusion. Initial attempt at ambulatory removal of the catheter was aborted after the patient reported acute onset of lower extremity radiculopathic pain during the extraction. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) subsequently revealed that the catheter had ascended and coiled around the T10 nerve root. The patient was taken back to the operating room for removal of the catheter under fluoroscopic guidance, with possible laminectomy for direct visualization. Removal was ultimately achieved with slow continuous tension, with complete resolution of the patient's new radicular symptoms. This report describes a single case report. This case demonstrates that any existing loops in the intrathecal catheter during initial implantation should be immediately re-addressed, as they can precipitate nerve root entrapment and irritation. Reduction of the loop or extrication of the catheter should be attempted under continuous fluoroscopic guidance to prevent further neurosurgical morbidity.

  20. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed.

  1. A survey of the use of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats: 267 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Cynthia M; Hofmeister, Erik H; Quandt, Jane E; Shepard, Molly K

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical practice of insertion of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats, to document complications of arterial catheterization, and to determine risk factors associated with the complications. Prospective clinical study and retrospective evaluation of medical records. University teaching hospital. Dogs (n = 251) and 13 cats anesthetized for clinical procedures with arterial catheters inserted for blood pressure monitoring. None. Details of the animal and catheter were collected at the time of anesthesia. On the following day, the catheter site was palpated and observed for abnormalities and the medical records of all animals were reviewed retrospectively for complications. Details of catheter placement were available for 216 catheters: 158 catheters in a dorsal pedal artery, 50 catheters in the median caudal (coccygeal) artery, 6 in the median artery, and 1 each in a cranial tibial and lingual artery. Blood pressure was obtained from 200 catheters, and 12 catheters failed before the end of anesthesia. Postoperative observational data obtained from 112 catheters described a palpable arterial pulse at 73 sites and no pulse at 21 sites. No risk factor for arterial occlusion was identified. No complications resulting from arterial catheterization were noted in the medical records. Arterial catheterization resulted in loss of a peripheral pulse postoperatively in 21/94 (22.3%) of animals examined, although no evidence of tissue ischemia was noted in the medical records of any of the patients in this study. These results suggest that insertion of a catheter in the dorsal pedal or coccygeal arteries was not associated with a high risk for complications. However, the course of arterial occlusion postoperatively warrants further investigation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  2. Boat boarding ladder placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Presented in three volumes; 'Boat Boarding Ladder Placement,' which explores safety considerations including potential for human contact with a rotating propeller; 'Boat Handhold Placement,' which explores essential principles and methods of fall con...

  3. Slug silencing inhibited perineural invasion through regulation of EMMPRIN expression in human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baolei; Wei, Jianhua; Hu, Zhiqiang; Shan, Chun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Chenping; Yang, Xi; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin

    2016-02-01

    Salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is the most frequent salivary gland malignancy with a unique characteristic that has been named perineural invasion (PNI). EMMPRIN is a transmembrane glycoprotein that has been demonstrated to promote PNI in SACC. Slug, one of the most effective promoters of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), has been found to be associated with PNI in SACC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles and relationships of Slug, EMMPRIN, and E-cadherin in the PNI process of SACC. The expression levels of Slug, EMMPRIN, and E-cadherin in 115 primary SACC cases were statistically analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Simultaneously, the SACC cell line SACC-83 was transfected with recombinant plasmids of silencing Slug (si-Slug) and/or silencing EMMPRIN (si-EMMPRIN). The functions of Slug and EMMPRIN in the EMT and PNI process were assessed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), western blotting, morphological observation, scratch test, migration assay, and in vitro perineural invasion assay. The immunohistochemical statistics revealed that the high expression of Slug and EMMPRIN and the low expression of E-cadherin were significantly associated with the PNI of SACC (P EMMPRIN expression (P EMMPRIN expression were both significantly negatively associated with E-cadherin expression (P EMMPRIN silencing both significantly inhibited EMMPRIN expression but promoted E-cadherin expression in SACC-83 cells (P EMMPRIN, or both induced cell morphology changes and inhibited tumor cell motility and PNI ability in SACC-83 cells (P EMMPRIN and then upregulating E-cadherin in the PNI process of SACC. The present study indicated that Slug and EMMPRIN are potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the diagnosis and treatment of PNI in human SACC.

  4. Perineural Invasion is a Marker for Pathologically Advanced Disease in Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Irwin H.; Roberts, Rebecca; Shah, Rajal B.; Wojno, Kirk J.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if perineural invasion (PNI) should be included in addition to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage for risk-stratification of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed prostatectomy findings for 1550 patients, from a prospectively collected institutional database, to determine whether PNI was a significant predictor for upgrading of Gleason score or pathologic T3 disease after patients were stratified into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups (on the basis of PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage). Results: For the overall population, PNI was associated with a significantly increased frequency of upgrading and of pathologic T3 disease. After stratification, PNI was still associated with significantly increased odds of pathologic T3 disease within each risk group. In particular, for low-risk patients, there was a markedly increased risk of extraprostatic extension (23% vs. 7%), comparable to that of intermediate-risk patients. Among high-risk patients, PNI was associated with an increased risk of seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node involvement. Furthermore, over 80% of high-risk patients with PNI were noted to have an indication for postoperative radiation. Conclusions: Perineural invasion may be useful for risk-stratification of prostate cancer. Our data suggest that low-risk patients with PNI on biopsy may benefit from treatment typically reserved for those with intermediate-risk disease. In addition, men with high-risk disease and PNI, who are contemplating surgery, should be informed of the high likelihood of having an indication for postoperative radiation therapy

  5. Cerebral microdialysis methodology--evaluation of 20 kDa and 100 kDa catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, P J; O'Connell, M T; Nortje, J; Smith, P; Al-Rawi, P G; Gupta, A K; Menon, D K; Pickard, J D

    2005-08-01

    Microdialysis monitoring of cerebral metabolism is now performed in several neuro-intensive care units. Conventional microdialysis utilizes CMA70 catheters with 20 kDa molecular weight cut-off membranes enabling the measurement of small molecules such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate. The CMA71 100 kDa molecular weight cut-off microdialysis catheter has recently been introduced to allow detection of larger molecules such as cytokines. The objective of this study was to perform in vitro and in vivo testing of the CMA71 microdialysis catheter, comparing its performance with the CMA70. In vitro comparison studies of three of each catheter using reference analyte solutions, demonstrated equivalent recovery for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate (range 94-97% for CMA70 and 88-103% for CMA71). In vivo comparison involved intracranial placement of paired CMA70 and CMA71 catheters (through the same cranial access device) in six patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Both catheters were perfused with CNS Perfusion Fluid without dextran at 0.3 microl min-1 with hourly sampling and bedside analysis on a CMA600 microdialysis analyser. The two catheters yielded equivalent results for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio. CMA71 microdialysis catheters can, therefore, be used for routine clinical monitoring of extracellular substances, as well as for their intended research role of larger molecular weight protein sampling.

  6. The Impact of Tunneled Catheters for Ascites and Peritoneal Carcinomatosis on Patient Rehospitalizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Chuanxing; Xing, Minzhi; Ghodadra, Anish; McCluskey, Kevin M.; Santos, Ernesto; Kim, Hyun S.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of the study is to assess patient outcomes, complications, impact on rehospitalizations, and healthcare costs in patients with malignant ascites treated with tunneled catheters.Materials and MethodsA total of 84 patients with malignant ascites (mean age, 60 years) were treated with tunneled catheters. Patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis and malignant ascites treated with tunneled drain catheter placement over a 3-year period were studied. Overall survival from the time of ascites and catheter placement were stratified by primary cancer and analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Complications were graded by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE). The differences between pre- and post-catheter admissions, hospitalizations, and Emergency Department (ED) visits, as well as related inpatient expenses were compared using paired t tests.ResultsThere were no significant differences in gender, age, or race between different primary cancer subgroups. One patient (1 %) developed bleeding (CTCAE-2). Four patients (5 %) developed local cellulitis (CTCAE-2). Three patients (4 %) had prolonged hospital stay (between 7 and 10 days) to manage ascites-related complications such as abdominal distention, discomfort, or pain. Comparison between pre- and post-catheter hospitalizations showed significantly lower admissions (−1.4/month, p < 0.001), hospital stays (−4.2/month, p = 0.003), and ED visits (−0.9/month, p = 0.002). The pre- and post-catheter treatment health care cost was estimated using MS-DRG IPPS payment system and it demonstrated significant cost savings from decreased inpatient admissions in post-treatment period (−$9535/month, p < 0.001).ConclusionsTunneled catheter treatment of malignant ascites is safe, feasible, well tolerated, and cost effective. Tunneled catheter treatment may play an important role in improving patients’ quality of life and outcomes while controlling health care expenditures.

  7. The Impact of Tunneled Catheters for Ascites and Peritoneal Carcinomatosis on Patient Rehospitalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Chuanxing [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Xing, Minzhi [Yale University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale Cancer Center (United States); Ghodadra, Anish; McCluskey, Kevin M.; Santos, Ernesto; Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study is to assess patient outcomes, complications, impact on rehospitalizations, and healthcare costs in patients with malignant ascites treated with tunneled catheters.Materials and MethodsA total of 84 patients with malignant ascites (mean age, 60 years) were treated with tunneled catheters. Patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis and malignant ascites treated with tunneled drain catheter placement over a 3-year period were studied. Overall survival from the time of ascites and catheter placement were stratified by primary cancer and analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Complications were graded by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE). The differences between pre- and post-catheter admissions, hospitalizations, and Emergency Department (ED) visits, as well as related inpatient expenses were compared using paired t tests.ResultsThere were no significant differences in gender, age, or race between different primary cancer subgroups. One patient (1 %) developed bleeding (CTCAE-2). Four patients (5 %) developed local cellulitis (CTCAE-2). Three patients (4 %) had prolonged hospital stay (between 7 and 10 days) to manage ascites-related complications such as abdominal distention, discomfort, or pain. Comparison between pre- and post-catheter hospitalizations showed significantly lower admissions (−1.4/month, p < 0.001), hospital stays (−4.2/month, p = 0.003), and ED visits (−0.9/month, p = 0.002). The pre- and post-catheter treatment health care cost was estimated using MS-DRG IPPS payment system and it demonstrated significant cost savings from decreased inpatient admissions in post-treatment period (−$9535/month, p < 0.001).ConclusionsTunneled catheter treatment of malignant ascites is safe, feasible, well tolerated, and cost effective. Tunneled catheter treatment may play an important role in improving patients’ quality of life and outcomes while controlling health care expenditures.

  8. Successful catheter directed thrombolysis of IVC and renal vein occlusive thrombus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, E

    2011-11-01

    Thrombus formation is a recognised complication of IVC filter placement, however IVC and bilateral renal vein occlusion secondary to thrombus is much less common. We present a case of infrahepatic caval and bilateral renal vein occlusion secondary to thrombosis of a suprarenal IVC filter. With progressive clinical deterioration and failure of conservative medical management the patient underwent successful mechanical disruption and catheter directed thrombolysis.

  9. Managing malignant pleural effusion with an indwelling pleural catheter: factors associated with spontaneous pleurodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W M; Tam, T Cc; Wong, M Ky; Lui, M Ms; Ip, M Sm; Lam, D Cl

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural effusion can be recurrent despite active anti-cancer treatment. Significant malignant pleural effusion leads to debilitating dyspnoea and worsening quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. An indwelling pleural catheter offers a novel means to manage recurrent malignant pleural effusion and may remove the need for repeated thoracocentesis. Spontaneous pleurodesis is another unique advantage of indwelling pleural catheter placement but the factors associated with its occurrence are not clearly established. The aims of this study were to explore the safety of an indwelling pleural catheter in the management of symptomatic recurrent malignant pleural effusion, and to identify the factors associated with spontaneous pleurodesis. This case series with internal comparisons was conducted in the Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong. All patients who underwent insertion of an indwelling pleural catheter from the initiation of such service from January 2010 to December 2014 were included for data analysis. Patients were monitored until December 2014, with the last catheter inserted in July 2014. Between 2010 and 2014, a total of 23 indwelling pleural catheters were inserted in 22 consecutive patients with malignant pleural effusion, including 15 (65.2%) cases with malignant pleural effusion as a result of metastatic lung cancer. Ten (43.5%) cases achieved minimal output according to defined criteria, in five of whom the pleural catheter was removed without subsequent re-accumulation of effusion (ie spontaneous pleurodesis). Factors associated with minimal output were the absence of trapped lung (P=0.036), shorter time from first appearance of malignant pleural effusion to catheter insertion (P=0.017), and longer time from catheter insertion till patient's death or end of study (P=0.007). An indwelling pleural catheter provides a safe means to manage symptomatic malignant pleural effusion

  10. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  11. Intravenous catheter training system: computer-based education versus traditional learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engum, Scott A; Jeffries, Pamela; Fisher, Lisa

    2003-07-01

    Virtual reality simulators allow trainees to practice techniques without consequences, reduce potential risk associated with training, minimize animal use, and help to develop standards and optimize procedures. Current intravenous (IV) catheter placement training methods utilize plastic arms, however, the lack of variability can diminish the educational stimulus for the student. This study compares the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia, virtual reality computer IV catheter simulator with a traditional laboratory experience of teaching IV venipuncture skills to both nursing and medical students. A randomized, pretest-posttest experimental design was employed. A total of 163 participants, 70 baccalaureate nursing students and 93 third-year medical students beginning their fundamental skills training were recruited. The students ranged in age from 20 to 55 years (mean 25). Fifty-eight percent were female and 68% percent perceived themselves as having average computer skills (25% declaring excellence). The methods of IV catheter education compared included a traditional method of instruction involving a scripted self-study module which involved a 10-minute videotape, instructor demonstration, and hands-on-experience using plastic mannequin arms. The second method involved an interactive multimedia, commercially made computer catheter simulator program utilizing virtual reality (CathSim). The pretest scores were similar between the computer and the traditional laboratory group. There was a significant improvement in cognitive gains, student satisfaction, and documentation of the procedure with the traditional laboratory group compared with the computer catheter simulator group. Both groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly. CONCLUSIONS; This evaluation and assessment was an initial effort to assess new teaching methodologies related to intravenous catheter placement and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors

  12. Development and Implementation of an Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Program for Emergency Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Courtney; Jones, Jodi

    2018-01-01

    Emergency medical care often necessitates placement of peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters. When traditional methods for obtaining PIV access are not successful, ultrasound guidance is a rescue technique for peripheral vascular placement that improves the quality of patient care. The aim of this training program was to develop a process where emergency nurses would be competent to perform ultrasound guided PIV to improve the quality of patient care delivered while reducing throughput time. Administrative program development required creating a nursing practice statement, procedure guideline, operational plan, and competency validation. A training program comprising both didactic and hands-on training was developed and provided by emergency medicine physicians with formal ultrasound fellowship training. In determining whether the training program was adequate in preparing the student to place an ultrasound-guided PIV, 92.9% of students "agreed" or "strongly agreed." In having confidence in their ability to obtain an ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 35.7% of respondents "agreed" and 64.3% "strongly agreed." In finding it difficult to be successful in achieving ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 71.4% of students "strongly disagreed" and 14.3% "disagreed." All students (100%) felt it was a feasible task to train nurses to successfully place ultrasound-guided PIV catheters and 71.4% of students strongly support continuing to provide this training program and competency validation. Establishment of an effective didactic and hands-on training program resulted in emergency department nurses becoming competent in placement of ultrasound guided PIV catheters to provide optimal patient care. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  14. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  15. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  16. 3T MRI evaluation of large nerve perineural spread of head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulch, Justin; Gandhi, Mitesh; Sommerville, Jennifer; Panizza, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Accurate definition of the presence and extent of large nerve perineural spread (PNS) is a vital component in planning appropriate surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Our research aimed to define the sensitivity and specificity of 3T MRI in detecting the presence and extent of large nerve PNS, compared with histologic evaluation. Retrospective review of surgically proven cases of large nerve PNS in patients with preoperative 3T MRI performed as high resolution neurogram. 3T MRI had a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 84%, detecting PNS in 36 of 38 nerves and correctly identifying uninvolved nerves in 16 of 19 cases. It correctly identified the zonal extent of spread in 32 of 36 cases (89%), underestimating the extent in three cases and overestimating the extent in one case. Targeted 3T MRI is highly accurate in defining the presence and extent of large nerve PNS in head and neck cancers. However, there is still a tendency to undercall the zonal extent due to microscopic, radiologically occult involvement. Superficial large nerve involvement also remains a difficult area of detection for radiologists and should be included as a 'check area' for review. Further research is required to define the role radiation-induced neuritis plays in the presence of false-positive PNS on MRI. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  17. 3T MRI evaluation of large nerve perineural spread of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Justin; Gandhi, Mitesh; Sommerville, Jennifer; Panizza, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Accurate definition of the presence and extent of large nerve perineural spread (PNS) is a vital component in planning appropriate surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Our research aimed to define the sensitivity and specificity of 3T MRI in detecting the presence and extent of large nerve PNS, compared with histologic evaluation. Retrospective review of surgically proven cases of large nerve PNS in patients with preoperative 3T MRI performed as high resolution neurogram. 3T MRI had a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 84%, detecting PNS in 36 of 38 nerves and correctly identifying uninvolved nerves in 16 of 19 cases. It correctly identified the zonal extent of spread in 32 of 36 cases (89%), underestimating the extent in three cases and overestimating the extent in one case. Targeted 3T MRI is highly accurate in defining the presence and extent of large nerve PNS in head and neck cancers. However, there is still a tendency to undercall the zonal extent due to microscopic, radiologically occult involvement. Superficial large nerve involvement also remains a difficult area of detection for radiologists and should be included as a ‘check area’ for review. Further research is required to define the role radiation-induced neuritis plays in the presence of false-positive PNS on MRI.

  18. Individualized prediction of perineural invasion in colorectal cancer: development and validation of a radiomics prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Dong, Di; Yang, Caiyun; Liang, Cuishan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Zelan; Huang, Xiaomei; Yao, Su; Liang, Changhong; Tian, Jie; Liu, Zaiyi

    2018-02-01

    To develop and validate a radiomics prediction model for individualized prediction of perineural invasion (PNI) in colorectal cancer (CRC). After computed tomography (CT) radiomics features extraction, a radiomics signature was constructed in derivation cohort (346 CRC patients). A prediction model was developed to integrate the radiomics signature and clinical candidate predictors [age, sex, tumor location, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level]. Apparent prediction performance was assessed. After internal validation, independent temporal validation (separate from the cohort used to build the model) was then conducted in 217 CRC patients. The final model was converted to an easy-to-use nomogram. The developed radiomics nomogram that integrated the radiomics signature and CEA level showed good calibration and discrimination performance [Harrell's concordance index (c-index): 0.817; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.811-0.823]. Application of the nomogram in validation cohort gave a comparable calibration and discrimination (c-index: 0.803; 95% CI: 0.794-0.812). Integrating the radiomics signature and CEA level into a radiomics prediction model enables easy and effective risk assessment of PNI in CRC. This stratification of patients according to their PNI status may provide a basis for individualized auxiliary treatment.

  19. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  20. Ultrasound as a Screening Tool for Central Venous Catheter Positioning and Exclusion of Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Rabia; Knio, Ziyad O; Mahmood, Feroze; Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Leibowitz, Akiva; Bose, Ruma; Shaefi, Shahzad; Mitchell, John D; Ahmed, Muneeb; Bardia, Amit; Talmor, Daniel; Matyal, Robina

    2017-07-01

    Although real-time ultrasound guidance during central venous catheter insertion has become a standard of care, postinsertion chest radiograph remains the gold standard to confirm central venous catheter tip position and rule out associated lung complications like pneumothorax. We hypothesize that a combination of transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound is noninferior to chest radiograph when used to accurately assess central venous catheter positioning and screen for pneumothorax. All operating rooms and surgical and trauma ICUs at the institution. Single-center, prospective noninferiority study. Patients receiving ultrasound-guided subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheters. During ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement, correct positioning of central venous catheter was accomplished by real-time visualization of the guide wire and positive right atrial swirl sign using the subcostal four-chamber view. After insertion, pneumothorax was ruled out by the presence of lung sliding and seashore sign on M-mode. Data analysis was done for 137 patients. Chest radiograph ruled out pneumothorax in 137 of 137 patients (100%). Lung ultrasound was performed in 123 of 137 patients and successfully screened for pneumothorax in 123 of 123 (100%). Chest radiograph approximated accurate catheter tip position in 136 of 137 patients (99.3%). Adequate subcostal four-chamber views could not be obtained in 13 patients. Accurate positioning of central venous catheter with ultrasound was then confirmed in 121 of 124 patients (97.6%) as described previously. Transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound are noninferior to chest x-ray for screening of pneumothorax and accurate central venous catheter positioning. Thus, the point of care use of ultrasound can reduce central venous catheter insertion to use time, exposure to radiation, and improve patient safety.

  1. CT guided transthoracic catheter drainage of intrapulmonary abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Mahira

    2009-10-01

    To determine the efficacy of CT- guided transthoracic catheter drainage of intrapulmonary abscess considering success rate versus complications. This prospective study was carried out at radiology department of Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia, from 1.1.2003 to 31.12.2005. Nineteen patients were selected for CT guided percutaneous drainage. Under CT guidance catheter placement was carried out using Seldinger technique. Nineteen patients with lung abscess were selected for the percutaneous CT guided drainage. Eight (42.105%) patients encountered no complications and lung abscess completely resolved with no residual cavity. Five (26.31%) patients developed pneumothorax, which was the most common complication of this study. These patients were kept under observation and followed-up by chest X-rays. Three (15.78%) had mild pneumothorax, which resolved and needed no further management, while two (10.52%) patients developed moderate pneumothorax and chest tube was inserted. Two (10.52%) patients developed mild haemoptysis which resolved within two hours, hence, no further management was required. Two (10.52%) patients had residual cavity and surgery was performed. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) was found in both cases. Two patients out of nineteen patients (10.52%) developed bronchopleural fistula and were operated. No mortality occurred during or after the procedure. CT allows optimal placement of catheter and hence enables safe and effective percutaneous evacuation of lung abscess. The morbidity and mortality of patients with percutaneous catheter drainage is lower than with surgical resection. Hence, CT guided drainage should be considered the first therapeutic choice in most patients of lung abscess who do not respond to medical therapy.

  2. Urethral catheterization facilitates preradiation fiducial marker placement in postprostatectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher; Costa, Joseph; Mandia, Stephen; Henderson, Randal; Marino, Robert; Mendenhall, Nancy

    2012-05-01

    Surgical absence of the prostate can make placement of fiducial markers difficult, because anatomic landmarks are distorted and there is a paucity of substantial tissue to hold fast the markers. We describe a method for improving the accuracy of fiducial marker placement for the purpose of salvage or adjuvant external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer in patients who have undergone radical prostatectomy. To assist with identification of the urethrovesical junction and to facilitate placement of the markers, a Foley catheter was placed and the balloon was inflated. Gentle traction on the catheter seated the balloon at the bladder neck to echographically define the anatomy of the urethrovesical junction. Next, a rectal ultrasound probe was inserted into the rectum, allowing visualization of the region of the urethrovesical junction. Fiducial markers were then placed bilaterally in the detrusor muscle at the bladder neck or in the periurethral tissue using the applicator needle. The treating radiation oncologist verified that marker placement was suitable for assisting with radiation therapy in all cases. Preradiation pelvic imaging verified that markers were not in the bladder or urethral lumen, and there were no patient complaints of voiding out the markers with urination.

  3. The prognostic effect of perineural invasion in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jie-Wei; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xie, Jing-Dun; Ling, Yi-Hong; Li, Peng; Yan, Shu-Mei; Xi, Shao-Yan; Luo, Rong-Zhen; Yun, Jing-Ping; Xie, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is correlated with adverse survival in several malignancies, but its significance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains to be clearly defined. The objective of this study was to determine the association between PNI status and clinical outcomes. We retrospectively evaluated the PNI of 433 patients with ESCC treated with surgery between 2000 and 2007 at a single academic center. The resulting data were analyzed using Spearman’s rank correlation, the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards regression modeling and Harrell’s concordance index (C-index). PNI was identified in 209 of the 433 (47.7%) cases of ESCC. The correlation analysis demonstrated that PNI in ESCC was significantly correlated with tumor differentiation, infiltration depth, pN classification and stage (P < 0.05). The five-year overall survival rate was 0.570 for PNI-negative tumors versus 0.326 for PNI-positive tumors. Patients with PNI-negative tumors exhibited a 1.7-fold increase in five-year recurrence-free survival compared with patients with PNI-positive tumors (0.531 v 0.305, respectively; P < 0.0001). In the subset of patients with node-negative disease, PNI was evaluated as a prognostic predictor as well (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, PNI was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.027). The C-index estimate for the combined model (PNI, gender and pN status) was a significant improvement on the C-index estimate of the clinicopathologic model alone (0.739 v 0.706, respectively). PNI can function as an independent prognostic factor of outcomes in ESCC patients, and the PNI status in primary ESCC specimens should be considered for therapy stratification

  4. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

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    Ingrid R. Cordeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1 regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues.

  5. Prognostic Value of Perineural Invasion in Esophageal and Esophagogastric Junction Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiqin Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Here we aimed to clarify the prognostic significance of perineural invasion (PNI in esophageal and esophagogastric junction (EGJ carcinoma. Methods. A comprehensive literature search for relevant reports published up to July 2015 was performed using Pubmed and Embase databases. The pooled HR and 95% CI for overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS were used to assess the prognostic value. The association of PNI with pathological characteristics was evaluated by OR and 95% CI. Results. A total of 13 cohorts were retrieved, covering 2770 patients treated by surgery. The cumulative analysis revealed a statistical correlation between PNI and poor OS (HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.54–2.20, and P<0.00001, as well as poor DFS (HR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.42–2.71, and P<0.001. Moreover, analysis of 1475 patients showed improved PNI in T3 + T4 (OR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.21–0.70, and P=0.002, N+ (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.40–0.69, and P<0.00001, and G3 + G4 (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.48–0.90, and P=0.008 patients compared with T1 + T2, N−, and G1 + G2 ones, respectively. No significant heterogeneity was found between the studies. Conclusions. PNI is an adverse prognostic biomarker in esophageal and EGJ carcinoma. Moreover, PNI implies advanced T, N stage and poor cell differentiation.

  6. Impact of quality management monitoring and intervention on central venous catheter dysfunction in the outpatient chemotherapy infusion setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Anu; Binkert, Christoph A; Robinson, Malcolm K; Shulman, Lawrence N; Pellerin, Linda; Davison, Brian

    2008-08-01

    To assess the utility of maintaining and analyzing a quality-management database while investigating a subjectively perceived increase in the incidence of tunneled catheter and port dysfunction in a cohort of oncology outpatients. All 152 patients undergoing lytic therapy (2-4 mg alteplase) of a malfunctioning indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) from January through June 2004 at a single cancer center in the United States were included in a quality-management database. Patients were categorized by time to device failure and the initial method of catheter placement (surgery vs interventional radiology). Data were analyzed after 3 months, and areas of possible improvement were identified and acted upon. Three months of follow-up data were then collected and similarly analyzed. In a 6-month period, 152 patients treated for catheter malfunction received a total of 276 doses of lytic therapy. A 3-month interim analysis revealed a disproportionately high rate (34%) of early catheter malfunction (ECM; <30 days from placement). Postplacement radiographs demonstrated suboptimal catheter positioning in 67% of these patients, all of whom had surgical catheter placement. There was a 50% absolute decrease in the number of patients presenting with catheter malfunction in the period from April through June (P < .001). Evaluation of postplacement radiographs in these patients demonstrated a 50% decrease in the incidence of suboptimal positioning (P < .05). Suboptimal positioning was likely responsible for some, but not all, cases of ECM. Maintenance of a quality-management database is a relatively simple intervention that can have a clear and important impact on the quality and cost of patient care.

  7. Incidence of Central Vein Stenosis and Occlusion Following Upper Extremity PICC and Port Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, Carin F.; Eschelman, David J.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; DuBois, Nancy; Bonn, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of central vein stenosis and occlusion following upper extremity placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheters(PICCs) and venous ports. One hundred fifty-four patients who underwent venography of the ipsilateral central veins prior to initial and subsequent venous access device insertion were retrospectively identified. All follow-up venograms were interpreted at the time of catheter placement by one interventional radiologist over a 5-year period and compared to the findings on initial venography. For patients with central vein abnormalities, hospital and home infusion service records and radiology reports were reviewed to determine catheter dwelltime and potential alternative etiologies of central vein stenosis or occlusion. The effect of catheter caliber and dwell time on development of central vein abnormalities was evaluated. Venography performed prior to initial catheter placement showed that 150 patients had normal central veins. Three patients had central vein stenosis, and one had central vein occlusion. Subsequent venograms (n = 154)at the time of additional venous access device placement demonstrated 8 patients with occlusions and 10 with stenoses. Three of the 18 patients with abnormal follow-up venograms were found to have potential alternative causes of central vein abnormalities. Excluding these 3 patients and the 4 patients with abnormal initial venograms, a 7% incidence of central vein stenosis or occlusion was found in patients with prior indwelling catheters and normal initial venograms. Catheter caliber showed no effect on the subsequent development of central vein abnormalities. Patients who developed new or worsened central vein stenosis or occlusion had significantly (p =0.03) longer catheter dwell times than patients without central vein abnormalities. New central vein stenosis or occlusion occurred in 7% of patients following upper arm placement of venous access devices

  8. Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation-High success and low complication rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; El-Sheik, Michael; Vogt, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate peri-procedural, early and late complications as well as patients' acceptance of combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided radiological port catheter implantation. Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, all consecutive radiological port catheter implantations (n = 299) between August 2002 and December 2004 were analyzed. All implantations were performed in an angio suite under analgosedation and antibiotic prophylaxis. Port insertion was guided by ultrasonographic puncture of the jugular (n = 298) or subclavian (n = 1) vein and fluoroscopic guidance of catheter placement. All data of the port implantation had been prospectively entered into a database for interventional radiological procedures. To assess long-term results, patients, relatives or primary physicians were interviewed by telephone; additional data were generated from the hospital information system. Patients and/or the relatives were asked about their satisfaction with the port implantion procedure and long-term results. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (298/299). There were no major complications according to the grading system of SIR. A total of 23 (0.33 per 1000 catheter days) complications (early (n = 4), late (n = 19)) were recorded in the follow-period of a total of 72,727 indwelling catheter days. Infectious complications accounted for 0.15, thrombotic for 0.07 and migration for 0.04 complications per 1000 catheter days. Most complications were successfully treated by interventional measures. Twelve port catheters had to be explanted due to complications, mainly because of infection (n = 9). Patients' and relatives' satisfaction with the port catheter system was very high, even if complications occurred. Conclusion: Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation is a very safe and reliable procedure with low peri-procedural, early and late complication rate. The intervention achieves very high acceptance by the patients and

  9. Histopathological features of clinical perineural invasion of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and the potential implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Benedict; Warren, Timothy A; Solares, C Arturo; Boyle, Glen M; Lambie, Duncan; Brown, Ian

    2014-11-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) with perineural invasion (PNI) is most commonly seen in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The cranial nerves are a conduit for skin cancer to reach the brainstem. The histopathological features of 51 tissue specimens from 49 patients with cutaneous SCCHN and clinical PNI were assessed with consecutive transverse and longitudinal sections. No skip lesions were identified. Tumor spread was contiguous in all specimens. No tumor spread into the perineural space from surrounding or adjacent tumor was seen. Proximal large cranial nerves showed epineural involvement in 3.9% in areas with large tumor bulk, extensive PNI, and intraneural invasion. Perineural tumor spread in cutaneous SCCHN was contiguous and no skip lesions were evident in nerve specimens assessed in this series. Spread beyond cranial nerve perineurium was uncommon, reflecting its multilayer barrier function at this level. These findings may have treatment implications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in intensive care unit patients: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Conceição Merces

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Nursing has an important role in urinary tract infection prevention and control. Urinary catheters insertion represents the local topography with the highest rate of hospital infection. Foley catheter placement is performed solely by the nurse and requires aseptic techniques during its performance, thus preventing risks to the patients. The study aimed to evaluate the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion and point out limits and possibilities of this practice in patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of Hospital Geral do Interior da Bahia (HGIB. Methods: This was a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews. After data analysis, two categories were evaluated, namely: the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients and the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses in ICU patients. Bardin analysis was used for data analysis. Results: The study shows that the nurse’s practice on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients is based on the use of aseptic techniques for urinary tract infection prevention, theoretical and practical knowledge on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients, knowledge on urinary tract infections and associations with catheter insertion, whereas the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses are understood through measures to minimize the risk of hospital infection caused by long-term catheter use in the ICU. Nurses point out that the risks of hospital infection are inherent to long-term catheter use. This is an important fact, as the knowledge or its absence may constitute a limit or possibility for Foley catheter insertion practice by the nurse in ICU patients. Conclusion: Nurses must seek the systematization of knowledge, which warrants support for the team, as well as information, safety and prompt care, allowing the reduction of urinary

  11. ESL Placement and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Rebecca; Wilkinson, Lindsey; Muller, Chandra; Frisco, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors explore English as a Second Language (ESL) placement as a measure of how schools label and process immigrant students. Using propensity score matching and data from the Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement Study and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors estimate the effect of ESL placement on immigrant achievement. In schools with more immigrant students, the authors find that ESL placement results in higher levels of academic performance; in schools with few immigrant students, the effect reverses. This is not to suggest a one-size-fits-all policy; many immigrant students, regardless of school composition, generational status, or ESL placement, struggle to achieve at levels sufficient for acceptance to a 4-year university. This study offers several factors to be taken into consideration as schools develop policies and practices to provide immigrant students opportunities to learn. PMID:20617111

  12. Does Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improve Outcomes In pT1-3N0 Oral Cavity Cancer With Tumor-Free Margins and Perineural Invasion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The criteria for administration of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain controversial, and it is unclear whether patients with pT1-3N0 disease benefit from adjuvant radiation in the presence of free margins and perineural invasion. The goal of this report was to determine whether this group would benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy in terms of 5-year local control rate and overall survival rate. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed our case records from January 1996 to May 2005. In all, 460 pT1-3N0 OSCC patients had tumor-free margins, of whom 68 had perineural invasion. Postoperative adjuvant RT was performed in patients with pT4 tumors, positive lymph nodes, or close margins (≤4 mm). In addition, selected OSCC patients with large pT3 tumors or perineural invasion received postoperative adjuvant RT. Local control and overall survival rates were plotted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in 5-year local control (p 0.1936) and overall survival (p = 0.5580) rates between patients with perineural invasion compared with those without. Among patients with perineural invasion, the addition of adjuvant radiotherapy did not significantly alter the 5-year local control rate (p = 0.3170) or the overall survival rate (p = 0.0935). Conclusion: Altogether, these data seem to indicate that radical surgical resection alone should be considered a sufficient treatment for OSCC patients with pT1-3N0 disease, even in the presence of perineural invasion

  13. Elevated frequencies of CD8 T cells expressing PD-1, CTLA-4 and Tim-3 within tumour from perineural squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linedale, Richard; Schmidt, Campbell; King, Brigid T; Ganko, Annabelle G; Simpson, Fiona; Panizza, Benedict J; Leggatt, Graham R

    2017-01-01

    Perineural spread of tumour cells along cranial nerves is a severe complication of primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. While surgical excision of the tumour is the treatment of choice, removal of all the tumour is often complicated by the neural location and recurrence is frequent. Non-invasive immune treatments such as checkpoint inhibitor blockade may be useful in this set of tumours although little is understood about the immune response to perineural spread of squamous cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry studies suggest that perineural tumour contains a lymphocyte infiltrate but it is difficult to quantitate the different proportions of immune cell subsets and expression of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1, Tim-3 and CTLA-4. Using flow cytometry of excised perineural tumour tissue, we show that a T cell infiltrate is prominent in addition to less frequent B cell, NK cell and NKT cell infiltrates. CD8 T cells are more frequent than other T cells in the tumour tissue. Amongst CD8 T cells, the frequency of Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 expressing cells was significantly greater in the tumour relative to the blood, a pattern that was repeated for Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 amongst non-CD8 T cells. Using immunohistochemistry, PD-1 and PD-L1-expression could be detected in close proximity amongst perineural tumour tissue. The data suggest that perineural SCC contains a mixture of immune cells with a predominant T cell infiltrate containing CD8 T cells. Elevated frequencies of tumour-associated Tim-3+, CTLA-4+ and PD-1+ CD8 T cells suggests that a subset of patients may benefit from local antibody blockade of these checkpoint inhibitors.

  14. Elevated frequencies of CD8 T cells expressing PD-1, CTLA-4 and Tim-3 within tumour from perineural squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Linedale

    Full Text Available Perineural spread of tumour cells along cranial nerves is a severe complication of primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. While surgical excision of the tumour is the treatment of choice, removal of all the tumour is often complicated by the neural location and recurrence is frequent. Non-invasive immune treatments such as checkpoint inhibitor blockade may be useful in this set of tumours although little is understood about the immune response to perineural spread of squamous cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry studies suggest that perineural tumour contains a lymphocyte infiltrate but it is difficult to quantitate the different proportions of immune cell subsets and expression of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1, Tim-3 and CTLA-4. Using flow cytometry of excised perineural tumour tissue, we show that a T cell infiltrate is prominent in addition to less frequent B cell, NK cell and NKT cell infiltrates. CD8 T cells are more frequent than other T cells in the tumour tissue. Amongst CD8 T cells, the frequency of Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 expressing cells was significantly greater in the tumour relative to the blood, a pattern that was repeated for Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 amongst non-CD8 T cells. Using immunohistochemistry, PD-1 and PD-L1-expression could be detected in close proximity amongst perineural tumour tissue. The data suggest that perineural SCC contains a mixture of immune cells with a predominant T cell infiltrate containing CD8 T cells. Elevated frequencies of tumour-associated Tim-3+, CTLA-4+ and PD-1+ CD8 T cells suggests that a subset of patients may benefit from local antibody blockade of these checkpoint inhibitors.

  15. Radiologic placement of implantable chest ports in pediatric patients under sedation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Tae Beom

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the radiologic placement of implantable chest ports under intravenous sedation in pediatric patients with malignancy. Between October 2001 and June 2002, 20 chest ports were placed in 19 pediatric patients [13 boys and six girls aged 1-11 (mean, 4.7) years] for the purpose of long-term chemotherapy. In three patients, tunneled central venous catheters had been removed because of catheter extration, infection, and tearing. Under intravenous sedation, the right internal jugular vein was used for access in 19 cases, and the left internal jugular vein in one. Venipucture was performed using a micropuncture needle with real-time ultrasound guidance. A port chamber was created at the infraclavicular fossa, and to prevent catheter kinking, a smooth-angled tunnel was created between the venipuncture site and the subcutaneous pocket. The catheter tip was positioned under fluoroscopy at the junction of the superior vena cava and right atrium. We observed technical success, complications arouse during and after the procedure, and duration of catheter use. Implantation of the port system was successful in all cases, though slight hematoma, treated with manual compression, occurred at a chamber pocket in one case. In addition, the port system was removed from one patient because of wound infection leading to dehiscence and catheter malpositiong. A new port system was implanted through the left internal jugular vein. The median period during which catheter use was followed up was 118 (range, 18-274) days. For long-term chemotherapy in pediatric patients with malignancy, radiologic placement of an implantable chest port under intravenous sedation shows a high technical success rate, with few complications. This method may thus be used instead of surgical port placement

  16. Risk Factors Related to Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Nonselective Removal in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohe Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with nonselective removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC in neonates. In this prospective cohort study, neonates who underwent PICC placement at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in China from October 2012 to November 2015 were included. The patient demographics, catheter characteristics, catheter duration, PICC insertion site, indication for PICC insertion, infuscate composition, PICC tip location, and catheter complications were recorded in a computerized database. Risk factors for nonselective removal were analyzed. A total of 497 PICCs were placed in 496 neonates. Nonselective removal occurred in 9.3% of PICCs during 10,540 catheter-days (4.6 nonselective removals per 1,000 catheter-days. These included occlusion (3%, infection (1.4%, leakage (2.0%, phlebitis (0.6%, displacement (1%, pleural effusion(0.6%, and breaks (0.6%. Noncentral tip position was independently associated with an increased risk of nonselective removal (odds ratio 2.621; 95% confidence interval, 1.258-5.461 after adjusting for gestational age, sex, birth weight, and PICC dwell time. No significant differences in the rate of complications occurred between silastic and polyurethane PICC or different insertion sites. Noncentral PICC tip position was the only independent risk factor for nonselective removal of PICC.

  17. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Guidewire versus nonguidewire use: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, S C; Edwards, S; McClure, S

    1992-01-01

    To date, no research articles have been published that explore the practice of using guidewires for placement of peripherally inserted central catheters. The literature contains speculations regarding the pros and cons of guidewire use. However, no studies to date have compared patient outcomes when peripherally inserted central catheter lines are inserted with and without guidewires. To examine the use of guidewires for peripherally inserted central lines, a comparative study was conducted at two acute care facilities, one using guidewires for insertion and one inserting peripherally inserted central catheter lines without guidewires. 109 catheters were studied between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 1991. The primary focus of this study was to examine whether guidewire use places patients at higher risk for catheter-related complications, particularly phlebitis. No significant differences in phlebitis rates between the two study sites were found. Other catheter-related and noncatheter-related complications were similar between the two facilities. The results of this study do not support the belief that guidewire use increases complication rates.

  18. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Too, Chow Wei; Sayani, Raza; Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva; Teo, Terence K.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture.ResultsMean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32–503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported.ConclusionThe REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  19. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Too, Chow Wei, E-mail: toochowwei@gmail.com [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Sayani, Raza [Aga Khan University Hospital (Pakistan); Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Teo, Terence K. [Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital (Singapore)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeTo describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture.ResultsMean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32–503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported.ConclusionThe REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  20. Use of wound soaker catheters for the administration of local anesthetic for post-operative analgesia: 56 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Amanda L; McCobb, Emily C; Shaw, Scott; Armitage-Chan, Elizabeth; Wetmore, Lois A; Karas, Alicia Z; Blaze, Cheryl

    2009-11-01

    To describe the administration of local anesthetic through wound soaker catheters for post-operative veterinary patients and to characterize complications. Retrospective study of hospital records. Records of patients in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively between November 1, 2004 and July 1, 2006 at a veterinary teaching hospital. Records in which a limb amputation was performed between January 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 and in which a wound soaker catheter was not placed were reviewed for historic control. A total of 56 cases were identified in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively including 52 dogs, 2 cats, and 2 goats. Twenty canine cases were identified in which limb amputation was performed and no wound soaker catheter was placed. The majority of surgical procedures for which a wound soaker catheter was placed included thoracic limb amputation (46.4%) and pelvic limb amputation (35.7%). Wound soaker catheters remained in place for an average of 1.6 +/- 0.5 days. Feline and caprine patients received intermittent bupivacaine boluses every 6 hours. Canine patients received continuous lidocaine infusions. Complications included disconnection of the catheter from the infusion (7.7%), one seroma, and one suspected lidocaine neurotoxicity. Incisional infections were noted in 3/56 (5.3%) limb amputations with wound soaker catheters placed which was not higher than the incisional infection rate found in the historic control cases 3/20 (15%). Use of the wound soaker catheter was a viable means of providing local analgesia in post-operative veterinary patients. Studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of pain management, and to further investigate techniques for catheter placement and maintenance which may help to optimize the analgesia achieved using this technique.

  1. Effect of electromagnetic navigated ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement on failure rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Nayoung; Kim, Dongwon

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of electromagnetic (EM) navigation system on ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt failure rate through comparing the result of standard shunt placement. All patients undergoing VP shunt from October 2007 to September 2010 were included in this retrospective study. The first group received shunt surgery using EM navigation. The second group had catheters inserted using manual method with anatomical landmark. The relationship between proximal catheter position and shunt revision rate was evaluated using postoperative computed tomography by a 3-point scale. 1) Grade I; optimal position free-floating in cerebrospinal fluid, 2) Grade II; touching choroid or ventricular wall, 3) Grade III; tip within parenchyma. A total of 72 patients were participated, 27 with EM navigated shunts and 45 with standard shunts. Grade I was found in 25 patients from group 1 and 32 patients from group 2. Only 2 patients without use of navigation belonged to grade III. Proximal obstruction took place 7% in grade I, 15% in grade II and 100% in grade III. Shunt revision occurred in 11% of group 1 and 31% of group 2. Compared in terms of proximal catheter position, there was growing trend of revision rate according to increase of grade on each group. Although infection rate was similar between both groups, the result had no statistical meaning (p=0.905, chi-square test). The use of EM navigation in routine shunt surgery can eliminate poor shunt placement resulting in a dramatic reduction in failure rates.

  2. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype

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    De Oliveira Tiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Methods Syndecan-2 (SDC-2 expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. Results SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and - further downstream - phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. Conclusion SDC-2 is a novel (perineural invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  3. Evaluation of electrical nerve stimulation for epidural catheter positioning in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L; Sanders, Robert; Shih, Andre C; Sonea, Ioana M; Hauptman, Joseph G

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of epidural catheter placement at different levels of the spinal cord guided solely by electrical nerve stimulation and resultant segmental muscle contraction. Prospective, experiment. Six male and two female Beagles, age (1 ± 0.17 years) and weight (12.9 ± 1.1 kg). Animals were anesthetized with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. An insulated epidural needle was used to reach the lumbosacral epidural space. A Tsui epidural catheter was inserted and connected to a nerve stimulator (1.0 mA, 0.1 ms, 2 Hz) to assess positioning of the tip at specific spinal cord segments. The catheter was advanced to three different levels of the spinal cord: lumbar (L2-L5), thoracic (T5-T10) and cervical (C4-C6). Subcutaneous needles were previously placed at these spinal levels and the catheter was advanced to match the needle location, guided only by corresponding muscle contractions. Catheter position was verified by fluoroscopy. If catheter tip and needle were at the same vertebral body a score of zero was assigned. When catheter tip was cranial or caudal to the needle, positive or negative numbers, respectively, corresponding to the number of vertebrae between them, were assigned. The mean and standard deviation of the number of vertebrae between catheter tip and needle were calculated to assess accuracy. Results are given as mean ± SD. The catheter position in relation to the needle was within 0.3 ± 2.0 vertebral bodies. Positive predictive values (PPV) were 57%, 83% and 71% for lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions respectively. Overall PPV was 70%. No significant difference in PPV among regions was found. Placement of an epidural catheter at specific spinal levels using electrical nerve stimulation was feasible without radiographic assistance in dogs. Two vertebral bodies difference from the target site may be clinically acceptable when performing segmental epidural regional anesthesia. © 2013 Association of Veterinary

  4. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institute / Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pan, L; Gilson, W [Siemens Corporation, Corporate Technology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Seethamraju, R [Siemens Healthcare, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  5. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E; Pan, L; Gilson, W; Seethamraju, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  6. Translumbar aortography by catheter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, B.; Honemeyer, U.; Meier-Duis, H.

    1982-01-01

    400 examinations performed during the last three years by TLA (only catheter technique) were subjected to critical analysis and studied particularly in respect to the rate of complications. We observed 13 complications (3.25%) of moderate severity, including 3 large hematomas (documented by CT), 3 paravasations and 7 dissections, but no fatal complication. Two (0.5%) of these complications had clinical evidence. The advantages of the catheter technique of TLA are described. Injections through rigid metal cannula should be avoided because of the high incidence of complications (mainly the increased risk of dissection). Downstream injection resulted in excellent visualization of peripheral occluding vascular disease. Upstream injection should be preferred to demonstrate the major abdominal arteries as well as supraceliac collateral circulation in the case of high Leriche syndrome. The low or intermediate puncture of the aorta is preferable to facilitate caudad direction of the catheter and to diminish the risk of damaging other vessels or puncturing an organ. (orig.) [de

  7. Product Placement in Cartoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Oroz Štancl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Product placement is a marketing approach for integrating products or services into selected media content. Studies have shown that the impact of advertising on children and youth are large, and that it can affect their preferences and attitudes. The aim of this article is to determine the existing level of product placement in cartoons that are broadcast on Croatian television stations. Content analysis of cartoons in a period of one month gave the following results: in 30% of cartoons product placement was found; most product placement were visual ads, in 89%, however, auditory product placement and plot connection was also found. Most ads were related to toys and it is significant that even 65% of cartoons are accompanied by a large amount of products available on the Croatian market. This is the result of two sales strategies: brand licensing (selling popular cartoon characters to toys, food or clothing companies and cartoon production based on existing line of toys with the sole aim of making their sales more effective.

  8. A new Subcutaneously Anchored Device for Securing External Cerebrospinal Fluid Catheters: our Preliminary Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, Paolo; Massimi, Luca; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Pittiruti, Mauro; Doglietto, Francesco; Nucci, Carlotta Ginevra; Caldarelli, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    Accidental dislocation or removal is a well-known complication of external cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in daily clinical practice. At present, no data about the incidence of such complications are available in the scientific literature. SecurAcath (Interrad Medical, Plymouth, Minnesota, USA) is a subcutaneously anchored device recently adopted for securement of central venous catheters, known to be highly effective (and cost-effective) in reducing the risk of catheter dislodgement and/or accidental removal. We report our preliminary experience with the use of SecurAcath to secure CSF drainage, either ventricular or spinal, to the skin. SecurAcath was used in 29 consecutive patients (age range: 3 weeks-16 years, median age 6.3 years). In particular, the device was used for 25 ventricular catheters (a patient received 2 catheters in the same procedure for bilateral brain abscess) and 5 spinal drainages. Period in place ranged from 1-4 weeks (median 22 days). No complication related to the use of the device was observed, in particular there was no case of dislocation or accidental removal of the catheter. The removal procedure was extremely easy. The device has proven its utility also in 3 cases requiring an adjustment of the length of the catheter. In our experience, SecurAcath is a safe and effective device to secure CSF external catheters to the skin, with several relevant advantages: its placement and maintenance are easy; it may stay in place for the entire duration of the catheter; it allows a more complete antisepsis of the exit site, thus reducing local skin complications; it eliminates the risk of suture-related needlestick injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS AFFECTING CATHETER AND TECHNIQUE SURVIVAL WITH PERMANENT SINGLE-LUMEN DIALYSIS CATHETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEESTER, J; VANHOLDER, R; DEROOSE, J; RINGOIR, S

    1994-01-01

    This long-term study on the outcome of permanent silicone single-lumen dialysis catheters consisted of 43 surgically inserted catheters in 33 patients. All catheters were attached to a pressure-pressure single-cannula dialysis system. Technique and catheter survival were 80 and 59% at 1 year, and 63

  10. Epidural Catheter Breakage In-Situ

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    Geetanjali S Verma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 45yr old woman diagnosed with dysfunctional uterine bleeding and incisional hernia was planned for total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and mesh repair under combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia. Using VYGON® epidural catheter with its recommended introducer, the catheter was inserted but it snapped off at 11cm mark while positioning the catheter. After radiological confirmation, the neurosurgeon removed the catheter under general anaesthesia, which was followed by the scheduled surgery.

  11. Large-volume paracentesis with indwelling peritoneal catheter and albumin infusion: a community hospital study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Martin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of ascites can be problematic. This is especially true in patients with diuretic refractory ascites who develop a tense abdomen. This often results in hypotension and decreased venous return with resulting renal failure. In this paper, we further examine the risks and benefits of utilizing an indwelling peritoneal catheter to remove large-volume ascites over a 72-h period while maintaining intravascular volume and preventing renal failure. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts and identified 36 consecutive patients undergoing continuous large-volume paracentesis with an indwelling peritoneal catheter. At the time of drain placement, no patients had signs or laboratory parameters suggestive of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The patients underwent ascitic fluid removal through an indwelling peritoneal catheter and were supported with scheduled albumin throughout the duration. The catheter was used to remove up to 3 L every 8 h for a maximum of 72 h. Regular laboratory and ascitic fluid testing was performed. All patients had a clinical follow-up within 3 months after the drain placement. Results: An average of 16.5 L was removed over the 72-h time frame of indwelling peritoneal catheter maintenance. The albumin infusion utilized correlated to 12 mg/L removed. The average creatinine trend improved in a statistically significant manner from 1.37 on the day of admission to 1.21 on the day of drain removal. No patients developed renal failure during the hospital course. There were no documented episodes of neutrocytic ascites or bacterial peritonitis throughout the study review. Conclusion: Large-volume peritoneal drainage with an indwelling peritoneal catheter is safe and effective for patients with tense ascites. Concomitant albumin infusion allows for maintenance of renal function, and no increase in infectious complications was noted.

  12. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

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    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  13. A new device for the prevention of pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients: Results of the European Angel Catheter Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, Fabio S; Bunker, Nicholas; Waldmann, Carl; De Backer, Daniel; Brohi, Karim; Jones, Robert G; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life-threatening complication of critical illness. In trauma and neurosurgical patients with contraindications to anticoagulation, inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have been used to prevent PE, but their associated long-term complication rates and difficulties associated with filter removal have limited their use. The Angel catheter is a temporary device, which combined an IVC filter with a triple-lumen central venous catheter (IVC filter-catheter) and is intended for bedside placement and removal when no longer indicated. This study presents data from a European Registry of 60 critically ill patients in whom the IVC filter-catheter was used to prevent PE. The patients were all at high risk of PE development or recurrence and had contraindications to anticoagulation. The primary end points of this study were to evaluate the safety (in particular, the presence of infectious or thrombotic events) and effectiveness (the numbers of PEs and averted PEs) of the IVC filter-catheter. The main diagnosis before catheter insertion was major trauma in 33 patients (55%), intracerebral hemorrhage or stroke in 9 (15%), a venous thromboembolic event in 9 (15%), and active bleeding in 6 (10%). The IVC filter-catheter was placed as prophylaxis in 51 patients (85%) and as treatment in the 9 patients (15%) with venous thromboembolic event. The devices were inserted at the bedside without fluoroscopic guidance in 54 patients (90%) and within a median of 4 days after hospital admission. They were left in place for a mean of 6 days (4-8 days). One patient developed a PE, without hemodynamic compromise; two PEs were averted. No serious adverse events were reported. Early bedside placement of an IVC filter-catheter is possible, and our results suggest that this is a safe, effective alternative to short-term PE prophylaxis for high-risk patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. Therapeutic study, level V.

  14. Migration of a Central Venous Catheter in a Hemodialysis Patient Resulted in Left Atrial Perforation and Thrombus Formation Requiring Open Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin; Marks, Barry A; Qureshi, Anwer; Stemm, Joseph J

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheterization is widely used in patients on hemodialysis. A rare complication associated with the clinical use of central venous catheters is perforation of the heart or major vessels. We report a case of inadvertent perforation of the left atrium and thrombosis after the placement of a hemodialysis catheter in the right internal jugular vein. In such cases, surgical removal of the central venous catheter from perforation sites in the heart and vessel walls poses anesthetic challenges because of the high risk of pneumothorax, hemorrhage, arrhythmias, thrombosis, and death.

  15. Preliminary Results of Emergency Computed Tomography-Guided Ventricular Drain Placement-Precision for the Most Difficult Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andreas; Wagner, Franca; Söll, Nicole; Hakim, Arsany; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, Andreas; Z'Graggen, Werner J

    2018-04-05

    External ventricular drainage (EVD) catheter placement is one of the most commonly performed neurosurgical procedures. The study's objective was to compare a computed tomography (CT) bolt scan-guided approach for the placement of EVDs with conventional landmark-based insertion. In this retrospective case-control study, we analyzed patients undergoing bolt-kit EVD catheter placement, either CT-guided or landmark-based, between 2013 and 2016. The CT bolt scan-guided approach was based on a dose-reduced CT scan after bolt fixation with immediate image reconstruction along the axis of the bolt to evaluate the putative insertion axis. If needed, angulation of the bolt was corrected and the procedure repeated before the catheter was inserted. Primary endpoint was the accuracy of insertion. Secondary endpoints were the overall number of attempts, duration of intervention, complication rates, and cumulative radiation dose. In total, 34 patients were included in the final analysis. In the group undergoing CT-guided placement, the average ventricle width was significantly smaller (P = 0.04) and average midline shift significantly more pronounced (P = 0.01). CT-guided placement resulted in correct positioning of the catheter in the ipsilateral frontal horn in all 100% of the cases compared with landmark-guided insertion (63%; P = 0.01). Application of the CT-guided approach increased the number of total CT scans (3.6 ± 1.9) and the overall radiation dose (3.34 ± 1.61 mSv) compared with the freehand insertion group (1.84 ± 2.0 mSv and 1.55 ± 1.66 mSv). No differences were found for the other secondary outcome parameters. CT-guided bolt-kit EVD catheter placement is feasible and accurate in the most difficult cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bronchial lumen is the safer route for an airway exchange catheter in double-lumen tube replacement: preventable complication in airway management for thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiang-Ling; Tai, Ying-Hsuan; Wei, Ling-Fang; Cheng, Hung-Wei; Ho, Chiu-Ming

    2017-10-01

    There is no current consensus on which lumen an airway exchange catheter (AEC) should be passed through in double-lumen endotracheal tube (DLT) to exchange for a single-lumen endotracheal tube (SLT) after thoracic surgery. We report an unusual case to provide possible solution on this issue. A 71-year-old man with lung adenocarcinoma had an event of a broken exchange catheter used during a DLT replacement with a SLT, after a video-assisted thoracic surgery. The exchange catheter was impinged at the distal tracheal lumen and snapped during manipulation. All three segments of the catheter were retrieved without further airway compromises. Placement of airway tube exchanger into the tracheal lumen of double-lumen tube is a potential contributing factor of the unusual complication. We suggest an exchange catheter be inserted into the bronchial lumen in optimal depth with the adjunct of video laryngoscope, as the safe method for double-lumen tube exchange.

  17. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO recommendations “Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt’s hospitals in autumn, 2015.Material and methods: In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt’s , inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model.Results: Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%. In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change.Conclusion: Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two

  18. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) recommendations "Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections" in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Grünewald, Miriam; Otto, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt's hospitals in autumn, 2015. In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt's 17 hospitals, inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of 5 wards were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters) and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model. Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%). In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change. Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two nurses. Against this background, a sufficient

  19. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caridi, James G.; Hawkins, Irvin F.; Akins, E. William; Young, Ronald S.

    1997-01-01

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  20. The Efficacy of the Coaxial Technique Using a 6-Fr Introducer Sheath in Stent Placement for Treating the Obstructions Proximal to the Descending Colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Il Soo; Park, Sang Woo; Hwang, Dae Yong; Seong, Moo Kyung; Joh, Hee Kyung; Yoon, So Young; Cho, Yo Han; Choe, Won Hyeok [Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the efficacy of stent placement using the coaxial technique with a stiff, long introducer sheath in patients with technical failure using an angiographic catheter for the obstructions proximal to the descending colon. Self-expandable metallic stent placement was attempted under fluoroscopy-guidance in 77 consecutive patients who had malignant colorectal obstruction. Stent placement was performed using an angiographic catheter and a guide wire. If the angiographic catheter could not be advanced over the guide wire into the obstructive lesions proximal to the descending colon, then a 6-Fr introducer sheath was used. The technical success rate, the clinical success rate and the complications were analyzed. Successful stent placement was achieved in 75 of 77 patients (97%). The angiographic catheter failed to advance into the obstructive lesions of 11 patients (M:F = 7:4: mean age, 65.5 years) whose lesions were at the level of the splenic flexure or transverse colon. Therefore, the coaxial technique was implemented in all these 11 patients using a 6-Fr stiff introducer sheath and then the stent placement was successful. There were no complications related to the use of a stiff introducer sheath. Clinical success, which was defined as relief of clinical obstructive bowel symptoms, was obtained within 24 hours in all of patients. The coaxial technique using a stiff introducer sheath can increase the technical success of fluoroscopy-guided, self-expandable metallic stent placement in patients with colonic obstruction proximal to the descending colon

  1. The Efficacy of the Coaxial Technique Using a 6-Fr Introducer Sheath in Stent Placement for Treating the Obstructions Proximal to the Descending Colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Il Soo; Park, Sang Woo; Hwang, Dae Yong; Seong, Moo Kyung; Joh, Hee Kyung; Yoon, So Young; Cho, Yo Han; Choe, Won Hyeok

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the efficacy of stent placement using the coaxial technique with a stiff, long introducer sheath in patients with technical failure using an angiographic catheter for the obstructions proximal to the descending colon. Self-expandable metallic stent placement was attempted under fluoroscopy-guidance in 77 consecutive patients who had malignant colorectal obstruction. Stent placement was performed using an angiographic catheter and a guide wire. If the angiographic catheter could not be advanced over the guide wire into the obstructive lesions proximal to the descending colon, then a 6-Fr introducer sheath was used. The technical success rate, the clinical success rate and the complications were analyzed. Successful stent placement was achieved in 75 of 77 patients (97%). The angiographic catheter failed to advance into the obstructive lesions of 11 patients (M:F = 7:4: mean age, 65.5 years) whose lesions were at the level of the splenic flexure or transverse colon. Therefore, the coaxial technique was implemented in all these 11 patients using a 6-Fr stiff introducer sheath and then the stent placement was successful. There were no complications related to the use of a stiff introducer sheath. Clinical success, which was defined as relief of clinical obstructive bowel symptoms, was obtained within 24 hours in all of patients. The coaxial technique using a stiff introducer sheath can increase the technical success of fluoroscopy-guided, self-expandable metallic stent placement in patients with colonic obstruction proximal to the descending colon

  2. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unsatisfactory hepatic perfusion after placement of the infusaid pump: Angiographic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, J.C.; Williams, D.M.; Cho, K.J.; Knol, J.A.; Wahl, R.L.; Ensminger, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Complete perfusion limited to the liver is essential to the success of regional chemotherapy for hepatic malignancy. Thirty-three patients with unsatisfactory hepatic artery perfusion scintigrams after surgical placement of a pump and catheter system were evaluated with selective angiography (31 cases) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) via the pump side port (six cases). The cause of the perfusion defect was hepatic artery thrombosis (14 cases), extrahepatic flow through collaterals (13 cases), misplaced catheter (three cases), short proper hepatic artery without adequate length for mixing (two cases), and undefined (one case). DSA findings were diagnostic in only two cases. Angiographic findings directed attempted correction in 22 of 33 cases

  4. Effects of intraneural and perineural injection and concentration of Ropivacaine on nerve injury during peripheral nerve block in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilvana Hasanbegovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Injury during peripheral nerve blocks is relatively uncommon, but potentially devastating complication. Recent studies emphasized that location of needle insertion in relationship to the fascicles may be the predominant factor that determines the risk for neurologic complications. However, it is wellestablished that concentration of local anesthetic is also associated with the risk for injury. In this study, we examined the effect of location of injection and concentration of Ropivacaine on risk for neurologic complications. Our hypothesis is that location of the injection is more prognostic for occurrence of nerve injury than the concentration of Ropivacaine.Methods: In experimental design of the study fi fty Wistar rats were used and sciatic nerves were randomized to receive: Ropivacaine or 0.9% NaCl, either intraneurally or perineurally. Pressure data during application was acquired by using a manometer and was analyzed using software package BioBench. Neurologic examination was performed thought the following seven days, there after the rats were sacrificed while sciatic nerves were extracted for histological examination.Results: Independently of tested solution intraneural injections in most of cases resulted with high injection pressure, followed by obvious neurologic defi cit and microscopic destruction of peripheral nerves. Also, low injection pressure, applied either in perineural or intraneural extrafascicular area, resulted with transitory neurologic defi cit and without destruction of the nerve normal histological structure.Conclusions: The main mechanism which leads to neurologic injury combined with peripheral nerve blockade is intrafascicular injection. Higher concentrations of Ropivacaine during intrafascicular applications magnify nerve injury.

  5. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis; Zygomalas, Apollon; Papas, Theofanis; Maras, Dimitris; Pavlidis, Polyvios; Andrikopoulou, Maria; Tsanis, Antonis; Alivizatos, Vasileios; Bessias, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates

  6. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis, E-mail: gkotsikoris@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Zygomalas, Apollon, E-mail: azygomalas@upatras.gr [Department of General Surgery, University Hospital of Patras (Greece); Papas, Theofanis, E-mail: pfanis@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Maras, Dimitris, E-mail: dimmaras@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Pavlidis, Polyvios, E-mail: polpavlidis@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Andrikopoulou, Maria, E-mail: madric@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Tsanis, Antonis, E-mail: atsanis@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Alivizatos, Vasileios, E-mail: valiviz@hol.gr [Department of General Surgery and Artificial Nutrition Unit, “Agios Andreas” General Hospital of Patras (Greece); Bessias, Nikolaos, E-mail: bessias@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates.

  7. Randomized clinical trial of pigtail catheter versus chest tube in injured patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvatunyou, N; Erickson, L; Vijayasekaran, A; Gries, L; Joseph, B; Friese, R F; O'Keeffe, T; Tang, A L; Wynne, J L; Rhee, P

    2014-01-01

    Small pigtail catheters appear to work as well as the traditional large-bore chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax, but it is not known whether the smaller pigtail catheters are associated with less tube-site pain. This study was conducted to compare tube-site pain following pigtail catheter or chest tube insertion in patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax. This prospective randomized trial compared 14-Fr pigtail catheters and 28-Fr chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax presenting to a level I trauma centre from July 2010 to February 2012. Patients who required emergency tube placement, those who refused and those who could not respond to pain assessment were excluded. Primary outcomes were tube-site pain, as assessed by a numerical rating scale, and total pain medication use. Secondary outcomes included the success rate of pneumothorax resolution and insertion-related complications. Forty patients were enrolled. Baseline characteristics of 20 patients in the pigtail catheter group were similar to those of 20 patients in the chest tube group. No patient had a flail chest or haemothorax. Pain scores related to chest wall trauma were similar in the two groups. Patients with a pigtail catheter had significantly lower mean(s.d.) tube-site pain scores than those with a chest tube, at baseline after tube insertion (3.2(0.6) versus 7.7(0.6); P pneumothorax, use of a 14-Fr pigtail catheter is associated with reduced pain at the site of insertion, with no other clinically important differences noted compared with chest tubes. NCT01537289 (http://clinicaltrials.gov). © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. PEG Tube Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptarshi Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall.

  9. It all unraveled from there: case report of a central venous catheter guidewire unraveling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, Samuel; Emdadi, Vanessa; Mancinelli, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters can present challenges to emergency physicians in the process of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 68-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with severe shortness of breath and was intubated. A central line was placed after the intubation to facilitate peripheral access. A CVC guidewire unraveled during placement after getting caught on an IVC filter. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians should be aware of the complications that IVC filters can cause in the placement of CVCs. Imaging and identification of IVC filters beforehand will allow for proper planning of how to manage the case in which a filter catches on the guidewire. Simple anecdotal techniques, such as advancing the guidewire and spinning the guidewire between the fingers, can facilitate the removal of the guide wire from the IVC filter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Geometric leaf placement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, J D; Temple, S W P; Clements, R W; Lawrence, G P; Mayles, H M O; Mayles, W P M

    2004-01-01

    Geometric leaf placement strategies for multileaf collimators (MLCs) typically involve the expansion of the beam's-eye-view contour of a target by a uniform MLC margin, followed by movement of the leaves until some point on each leaf end touches the expanded contour. Film-based dose-distribution measurements have been made to determine appropriate MLC margins-characterized through an index d 90 -for multileaves set using one particular strategy to straight lines lying at various angles to the direction of leaf travel. Simple trigonometric relationships exist between different geometric leaf placement strategies and are used to generalize the results of the film work into d 90 values for several different strategies. Measured d 90 values vary both with angle and leaf placement strategy. A model has been derived that explains and describes quite well the observed variations of d 90 with angle. The d 90 angular variations of the strategies studied differ substantially, and geometric and dosimetric reasoning suggests that the best strategy is the one with the least angular variation. Using this criterion, the best straightforwardly implementable strategy studied is a 'touch circle' approach for which semicircles are imagined to be inscribed within leaf ends, the leaves being moved until the semicircles just touch the expanded target outline

  11. Impacted material placement plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility

  12. Umbilical venous catheter malposition and errors in interpretation in newborns with Bochdalek hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Patricia T.; Taylor, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often require placement of lines and tubes for supportive therapy. The resulting altered anatomy can result in diagnostic errors when interpreting the location of support lines and tubes such as UVCs (umbilical venous catheters). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CDH on UVC position and to evaluate the accuracy at which radiologists describe the position on chest radiographs. During a 5-year period, 406 chest radiographs performed within 7 days of birth in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified and reviewed for the following data: presence of UVC, location of catheter tip (cavoatrial junction, intracardiac, intrahepatic or umbilical vein), and location of CDH (right or left). The radiologic report of the UVC tip location for each case was then reviewed individually to determine the adequacy of interpretation. Inadequate reports were classified as incorrect (the wrong location of the catheter tip was reported), no mention (the location of the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location but not mentioned), and not specified (the precise location of the catheter tip was not clearly stated in the report when the tip was in a suboptimal location). A total of 60 infants were identified as having CDH (56 on the left, 4 on the right). The most common location for an incorrectly placed UVC was the contralateral chest, accounting for 26.7% (16/60) of the infants, followed by an abdominal intrahepatic location (16.7%) and the umbilical vein (8.3%). Thirty percent (120/406) of the chest radiograph reports were found to be inadequate regarding the interpretation of the location of the catheter tip. The majority of the inadequate reports (48/406, 11.8%) did not specify when the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location. In 37 reports (9.1%), the location of the catheter tip was reported incorrectly, and no mention of the catheter location was made in 35 reports (8.6%). The location of

  13. Umbilical venous catheter malposition and errors in interpretation in newborns with Bochdalek hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Patricia T.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often require placement of lines and tubes for supportive therapy. The resulting altered anatomy can result in diagnostic errors when interpreting the location of support lines and tubes such as UVCs (umbilical venous catheters). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CDH on UVC position and to evaluate the accuracy at which radiologists describe the position on chest radiographs. During a 5-year period, 406 chest radiographs performed within 7 days of birth in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified and reviewed for the following data: presence of UVC, location of catheter tip (cavoatrial junction, intracardiac, intrahepatic or umbilical vein), and location of CDH (right or left). The radiologic report of the UVC tip location for each case was then reviewed individually to determine the adequacy of interpretation. Inadequate reports were classified as incorrect (the wrong location of the catheter tip was reported), no mention (the location of the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location but not mentioned), and not specified (the precise location of the catheter tip was not clearly stated in the report when the tip was in a suboptimal location). A total of 60 infants were identified as having CDH (56 on the left, 4 on the right). The most common location for an incorrectly placed UVC was the contralateral chest, accounting for 26.7% (16/60) of the infants, followed by an abdominal intrahepatic location (16.7%) and the umbilical vein (8.3%). Thirty percent (120/406) of the chest radiograph reports were found to be inadequate regarding the interpretation of the location of the catheter tip. The majority of the inadequate reports (48/406, 11.8%) did not specify when the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location. In 37 reports (9.1%), the location of the catheter tip was reported incorrectly, and no mention of the catheter location was made in 35 reports (8.6%). The location of

  14. Is the Routine Check Nephrostogram Following Percutaneous Antegrade Ureteric Stent Placement Necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, Keng Chuan; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo; MM Htoo, Austin; HG Lo, Richard; Lin, Shueh En

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technical success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients

  15. Use of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae-Ik; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Yoon, Chang Jin; Nam, Deok Ho; Choi, Won-Chan; Lim, Jin-Oh

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the safety and usefulness of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. Two types of guiding sheath were made from straight polytetrafluoroethylene tubes. Type A was 80 cm in length, 4 mm in outer diameter and 3 mm in inner diameter. Type B was 70 cm in length, 6 mm in outer diameter and 5 mm in inner diameter. The type A sheath was used in 18 patients in whom a catheter-guide wire combination failed to pass through a stricture. The type B sheath was used in 22 patients in whom a stent delivery system failed to pass through the stricture due to loop formation within the gastric lumen. The overall success rate for guiding a catheter-guide wire through a stricture after using the type A sheath was 89%. The overall success rate for passing a stent delivery system through a stricture after using the type B sheath was 100%. All procedures were tolerated by the patients without any significant complications. The guiding sheaths were safe and useful in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. (orig.)

  16. Real-Time Ultrasound-Guided Catheter Navigation for Approaching Deep-Seated Brain Lesions: Role of Intraoperative Neurosonography with and without Fusion with Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Karhade, Aditya; Phi, Ji Hoon; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2017-01-01

    Brain shift during the exposure of cranial lesions may reduce the accuracy of frameless stereotaxy. We describe a rapid, safe, and effective method to approach deep-seated brain lesions using real-time intraoperative ultrasound placement of a catheter to mark the dissection trajectory to the lesion. With Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the radiographic, pathologic, and intraoperative data of 11 pediatric patients who underwent excision of 12 lesions by means of this technique. Full data sets were available for 12 lesions in 11 patients. Ten lesions were tumors and 2 were cavernous malformations. Lesion locations included the thalamus (n = 4), trigone (n = 3), mesial temporal lobe (n = 3), and deep white matter (n = 2). Catheter placement was successful in all patients, and the median time required for the procedure was 3 min (range 2-5 min). There were no complications related to catheter placement. The median diameter of surgical corridors on postresection magnetic resonance imaging was 6.6 mm (range 3.0-12.1 mm). Use of real-time ultrasound guidance to place a catheter to aid in the dissection to reach a deep-seated brain lesion provides advantages complementary to existing techniques, such as frameless stereotaxy. The catheter insertion technique described here provides a quick, accurate, and safe method for reaching deep-seated lesions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Efficacy of Prophylactic Antibiotics at Peritoneal Catheter Insertion on Early Peritonitis: Data from the Catheter Section of the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanot, Antoine; Lobbedez, Thierry; Bechade, Clémence; Verger, Christian; Fabre, Emmanuel; Dratwa, Max; Vernier, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    International guidelines recommend the use of a prophylactic antibiotic before the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter can be inserted. The main objective of this study was to assess whether this practice is associated with a lower risk of early peritonitis and to estimate the magnitude of the centre effect. A retrospective, multi-centric study was conducted, in which data from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry was analysed. Patients were separated into 2 groups based on whether or not prophylactic antibiotics were used prior to catheter placement. Out of the 2,014 patients who had a PD catheter placed between February 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014, 1,105 were given a prophylactic antibiotic. In a classical logit model, the use of prophylactic antibiotics was found to protect the individual against the risk of early peritonitis (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.92). However, this association lost significance in a mixed logistic regression model with centre as a random effect: OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.48-1.09). Covariates associated with the risk of developing early peritonitis were age over 65: OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.39-0.85), body mass index over 35 kg/m2: OR 1.99 (95% CI 1.13-3.47), transfer to PD due to graft failure: OR 2.24 (95% CI 1.22-4.11), assisted PD: OR 1.96 (95% CI 1.31-2.93), and the use of the Moncrief technique: OR 3.07 (95% CI 1.85-5.11). There is a beneficial effect of prophylactic antibiotic used prior to peritoneal catheter placement, on the occurence of early peritonitis. However, the beneficial effect could be masked by a centre effect. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-07-01

    Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance.

  19. Perineural pretreatment of bee venom attenuated the development of allodynia in the spinal nerve ligation injured neuropathic pain model; an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Won Uk; Choi, Seong Soo; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Lee, So Hee; Lee, Sun Kyung; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Leem, Jeong Gil; Song, Jun Gol; Shin, Jin Woo

    2014-11-04

    Diluted bee venom (BV) is known to have anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore assessed whether perineural bee venom pretreatment could attenuate the development of neuropathic pain in the spinal nerve ligation injured animal model. Neuropathic pain was surgically induced in 30 male Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves, with 10 rats each treated with saline and 0.05 and 0.1 mg BV. Behavioral testing for mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia was conducted on postoperative days 3 to 29. Three rats in each group and 9 sham operated rats were sacrificed on day 9, and the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), and melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) receptors in the ipsilateral L5 dorsal root ganglion was analyzed. The perineural administration of BV to the spinal nerves attenuated the development of mechanical, thermal, and cold allodynia, and the BV pretreatment reduced the expression of TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPM8 and c - Fos in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion. The current study demonstrates that the perineural pretreatment with diluted bee venom before the induction of spinal nerve ligation significantly suppresses the development of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, this bee venom induced suppression was strongly related with the involvement of transient receptor potential family members.

  20. Randomised Controlled Trial to determine the appropriate time to initiate peritoneal dialysis after insertion of catheter to minimise complications (Timely PD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fassett Robert G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most appropriate time to initiate dialysis after surgical insertion of Tenckhoff catheters is not clear in the literature. There is the possibility of peritoneal dialysis (PD complications such as leakage and infection if dialysis is started too soon after insertion. However, much morbidity and expense could be saved by reducing dependency on haemodialysis (HD by earlier initiation of PD post catheter insertion. Previous studies are observational and mostly compare immediate with delayed use. The primary objective is to determine the safest and shortest time interval between surgical placement of a Tenckhoff catheter and starting PD. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial of patients who will start PD after insertion of Tenckhoff catheter at Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH or Rockhampton Base Hospital (RBH who meet the inclusion criteria. Patients will be stratified by site and diabetic status. The patients will be randomised to one of three treatment groups. Group 1 will start PD one week after Tenckhoff catheter insertion, group 2 at two weeks and group 3 at four weeks. Nurses and physicians will be blinded to the randomised allocation. The primary end point is the complication rate (leaks and infection after initiation of PD. Discussion The study will determine the most appropriate time to initiate PD after placement of a Tenckhoff catheter. Trial Registration ACTRN12610000076077

  1. Deep venous thrombosis in the lower extremity: catheter-directed thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, En A; Park, Ki Han; Yoon, Kwon Ha; So, Byung Jun; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Won, Jin Jong [School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis in treating symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in lower limbs. Twenty-six consecutive patients (16 male and 10 female; mean age, 55 years) with lower extremity DVT underwent thrombolytic therapy. The duration of symptoms was 1-90 (mean, 17) days: 20 days or less in 16 cases (acute DVT) and less than 20 days in ten (chronic DVT). Catheter-directed infusions of urokinase were administered via ipsilateral popliteal veins, and angioplasty or stent placement was performed after the thrombolytic procedure. Oral medication of warfarin continued for six months, and for the evaluation of venous patency, follow-up ultrasonography was performed. The total dose of infused urokinase was 1,750,000-10,000,000 (mean 4,84,000) IU, and the total procedural time was 25-115 (mean, 64) hours. Lysis was complete in 16 cases (62%, all acute DVT), partial in five (19%, chronic DVT), and failed in five (19%, chronic DVT). Eight patients with venous stenosis and two with occlusion were treated by means of angioplasty (n=3D4) or Wallstent placement (n=3D6). Minor bleeding occurred in six cases and major complications in two (one of pulmonary embolism, and one of multiorgan failure). Catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase is effective for the treatment of DVT in lower limbs. (author)

  2. Deep venous thrombosis in the lower extremity: catheter-directed thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, En A; Park, Ki Han; Yoon, Kwon Ha; So, Byung Jun; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Won, Jin Jong

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis in treating symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in lower limbs. Twenty-six consecutive patients (16 male and 10 female; mean age, 55 years) with lower extremity DVT underwent thrombolytic therapy. The duration of symptoms was 1-90 (mean, 17) days: 20 days or less in 16 cases (acute DVT) and less than 20 days in ten (chronic DVT). Catheter-directed infusions of urokinase were administered via ipsilateral popliteal veins, and angioplasty or stent placement was performed after the thrombolytic procedure. Oral medication of warfarin continued for six months, and for the evaluation of venous patency, follow-up ultrasonography was performed. The total dose of infused urokinase was 1,750,000-10,000,000 (mean 4,84,000) IU, and the total procedural time was 25-115 (mean, 64) hours. Lysis was complete in 16 cases (62%, all acute DVT), partial in five (19%, chronic DVT), and failed in five (19%, chronic DVT). Eight patients with venous stenosis and two with occlusion were treated by means of angioplasty (n=3D4) or Wallstent placement (n=3D6). Minor bleeding occurred in six cases and major complications in two (one of pulmonary embolism, and one of multiorgan failure). Catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase is effective for the treatment of DVT in lower limbs. (author)

  3. Lung abscess; Percutaneous catheter therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, H.K. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Kang, M.W. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, J.M. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Yang, W.J. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Shinn, K.S. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Bahk, Y.W. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    1993-07-01

    Lung abscess was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage in 5 of 6 patients. Complete abscess resolution occurred in 4 patients, partial resolution in one, and no response in one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days (mean 15.5 days) in successful cases. The failure of drainage in one neurologicall impaired patient was attributed to persistent aspiration. In 2 patients, concurrent pleural empyema was also cured. CT provided the anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is a safe and effective method for treating lung abscess. (orig.).

  4. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Shamit S., E-mail: shamit.desai@northwestern.edu [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Konanur, Meghana [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States); Foltz, Gretchen [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University, Interventional Radiology (United States); Malaisrie, S. Chris [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (United States); Resnick, Scott, E-mail: sresnick@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  5. Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections: a quality-improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Katherine Finn; Colebaugh, Ann M; Eithun, Benjamin L; Klieger, Sarah B; Meredith, Dennis J; Plachter, Natalie; Sammons, Julia Shaklee; Thompson, Allison; Coffin, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common health care-associated infections in the United States, yet little is known about the prevention and epidemiology of pediatric CAUTIs. An observational study was conducted to assess the impact of a CAUTI quality improvement prevention bundle that included institution-wide standardization of and training on urinary catheter insertion and maintenance practices, daily review of catheter necessity, and rapid review of all CAUTIs. Poisson regression was used to determine the impact of the bundle on CAUTI rates. A retrospective cohort study was performed to describe the epidemiology of incident pediatric CAUTIs at a tertiary care children's hospital over a 3-year period (June 2009 to June 2012). Implementation of the CAUTI prevention bundle was associated with a 50% reduction in the mean monthly CAUTI rate (95% confidence interval: -1.28 to -0.12; P = .02) from 5.41 to 2.49 per 1000 catheter-days. The median monthly catheter utilization ratio remained unchanged; ∼90% of patients had an indication for urinary catheterization. Forty-four patients experienced 57 CAUTIs over the study period. Most patients with CAUTIs were female (75%), received care in the pediatric or cardiac ICUs (70%), and had at least 1 complex chronic condition (98%). Nearly 90% of patients who developed a CAUTI had a recognized indication for initial catheter placement. CAUTI is a common pediatric health care-associated infection. Implementation of a prevention bundle can significantly reduce CAUTI rates in children. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Shamit S.; Konanur, Meghana; Foltz, Gretchen; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period

  7. TrapEase inferior vena cava filter placement: use of the subclavian vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patrick A; Aburahma, Ali F; Hass, Stephen M; Hofeldt, Matthew J; Zimmerman, William B; Deel, John T; Deluca, John A

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the safety and technical success of TrapEase inferior vena cava filter placement via the subclavian vein. As of yet, no reports in the literature have specifically investigated the use of the subclavian vein as a route for deploying TrapEase vena cava filters. Retrospective chart review was conducted of 135 patients with attempted TrapEase inferior vena cava filter placement over a 2-year period. In a majority of cases, the choice of subclavian vein approach was based primarily on surgeon preference. Other circumstances for subclavian vein deployment included cervical immobilization secondary to trauma, desire for concomitant placement of a subclavian long-term central venous access catheter, and patient body habitus limiting exposure to the internal jugular vein. One hundred and thirty-five filters were placed over this 2-year period. The internal jugular vein approach was used in 56 patients, the femoral vein approach in 39 patients, and the subclavian vein approach in 40 patients. Thirty-nine of the 40 TrapEase filter placements using the subclavian vein were successful. Twenty-six were deployed through the right subclavian vein and 14 through the left subclavian vein. The single failed subclavian deployment was due to the inability to pass the guidewire adequately into the inferior vena cava after successful cannulation of the right subclavian vein. The average deployment time for subclavian vein placement was 26 minutes when TrapEase filter placement was the only procedure performed. No insertional complications were encountered, specifically no pneumothoraces confirmed by chest radiography or fluoroscopy. The subclavian vein provides an alternative site of access for the TrapEase inferior vena cava filter. This route is comparable to other alternative methods evaluated both in average deployment time and complication occurrence. Furthermore, the subclavian vein route is valuable in patients with limited central access

  8. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  9. 21 CFR 880.5200 - Intravascular catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Devices § 880.5200 Intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. An intravascular catheter is a device that consists of a slender tube and any necessary connecting fittings and that is inserted into the patient's vascular system for short term use (less than 30 days) to sample blood, monitor blood pressure, or...

  10. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.J. van den; Wille, J.C.; Benthem, B.H.B. van; Perenboom, R.J.M.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Nielen, A.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to

  11. Adjuvant Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy After Resection for Pancreatic Cancer Using Coaxial Catheter-Port System Compared with Conventional System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Sho, Masayuki; Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Masada, Tetsuya; Sato, Takeshi; Marugami, Nagaaki; Anai, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Kanno, Masatoshi; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2016-01-01

    PurposePrevious reports have shown the effectiveness of adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) in pancreatic cancer. However, percutaneous catheter placement is technically difficult after pancreatic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of HAIC using a coaxial technique compared with conventional technique for postoperative pancreatic cancer.Materials and Methods93 consecutive patients who received percutaneous catheter-port system placement after pancreatectomy were enrolled. In 58 patients from March 2006 to August 2010 (Group A), a conventional technique with a 5-Fr indwelling catheter was used and in 35 patients from September 2010 to September 2012 (Group B), a coaxial technique with a 2.7-Fr coaxial catheter was used.ResultsThe overall technical success rates were 97.1 % in Group B and 86.2 % in Group A. In cases with arterial tortuousness and stenosis, the success rate was significantly higher in Group B (91.7 vs. 53.8 %; P = 0.046). Fluoroscopic and total procedure times were significantly shorter in Group B: 14.7 versus 26.7 min (P = 0.001) and 64.8 versus 80.7 min (P = 0.0051), respectively. No differences were seen in the complication rate. The 1 year liver metastasis rates were 9.9 % using the conventional system and 9.1 % using the coaxial system (P = 0.678). The overall median survival time was 44 months. There was no difference in the survival period between two systems (P = 0.312).ConclusionsThe coaxial technique is useful for catheter placement after pancreatectomy, achieving a high success rate and reducing fluoroscopic and procedure times, while maintaining the safety and efficacy for adjuvant HAIC in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Adjuvant Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy After Resection for Pancreatic Cancer Using Coaxial Catheter-Port System Compared with Conventional System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sho, Masayuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Surgery (Japan); Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Masada, Tetsuya; Sato, Takeshi; Marugami, Nagaaki [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Anai, Hiroshi [Nara City Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sakaguchi, Hiroshi [Nara Prefectural Western Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kanno, Masatoshi [Nara Medical University, Oncology Center (Japan); Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology (Japan); Nakajima, Yoshiyuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Surgery (Japan); Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    PurposePrevious reports have shown the effectiveness of adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) in pancreatic cancer. However, percutaneous catheter placement is technically difficult after pancreatic surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of HAIC using a coaxial technique compared with conventional technique for postoperative pancreatic cancer.Materials and Methods93 consecutive patients who received percutaneous catheter-port system placement after pancreatectomy were enrolled. In 58 patients from March 2006 to August 2010 (Group A), a conventional technique with a 5-Fr indwelling catheter was used and in 35 patients from September 2010 to September 2012 (Group B), a coaxial technique with a 2.7-Fr coaxial catheter was used.ResultsThe overall technical success rates were 97.1 % in Group B and 86.2 % in Group A. In cases with arterial tortuousness and stenosis, the success rate was significantly higher in Group B (91.7 vs. 53.8 %; P = 0.046). Fluoroscopic and total procedure times were significantly shorter in Group B: 14.7 versus 26.7 min (P = 0.001) and 64.8 versus 80.7 min (P = 0.0051), respectively. No differences were seen in the complication rate. The 1 year liver metastasis rates were 9.9 % using the conventional system and 9.1 % using the coaxial system (P = 0.678). The overall median survival time was 44 months. There was no difference in the survival period between two systems (P = 0.312).ConclusionsThe coaxial technique is useful for catheter placement after pancreatectomy, achieving a high success rate and reducing fluoroscopic and procedure times, while maintaining the safety and efficacy for adjuvant HAIC in pancreatic cancer.

  13. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  14. Perineural Spread of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Illustration with a Proposed Anatomic Mechanism and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Krauss, William E; Amrami, Kimberly K; Parisi, Joseph E; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Perineural spread (PNS) is an unusual mechanism of tumor extension and has been typically reported in squamous cell carcinoma, adenocystic carcinoma, and desmoplastic melanoma. Our group has previously demonstrated PNS in rectal, prostate, bladder, and cervical cancer from the primary site along the autonomic nerves to the major somatic nerves and even intradurally. We believe similar principles apply to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well, despite the different anatomy. We performed a retrospective search to identify cases of intradural-extramedullary metastases of RCC caused by PNS. Strict anatomic and imaging inclusion criteria were defined: only lesions located between T6 and L3 were included, and PNS as a potential cause had to be supported by imaging evidence. Although 3 cases of spinal intradural metastases were identified, only one met our strict inclusion criteria. A 61-year-old woman developed a late intradural-extramedullary metastasis of RCC 16 years after the original diagnosis that we believe represents an example of visceral organ PNS. RCC can propagate via PNS from the primary tumor along the autonomic nerves to the aorticorenal, celiac, and mesenteric ganglia and then along the thoracic and lumbar splanchnic nerves to the corresponding spinal nerves and intradurally. We present radiologic evidence together with the review of the literature to support the premise that PNS of RCC not only occurs but goes unrecognized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for perineural spread of head and neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Timothy A; Panizza, Benedict; Porceddu, Sandro V; Gandhi, Mitesh; Patel, Parag; Wood, Martin; Nagle, Christina M; Redmond, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Queensland, Australia, has the highest rates of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Perineural invasion (PNI) is associated with reduced local control and survival. A retrospective review of a prospective database of patients with clinical PNI from cutaneous SCC of the head and neck (SCCHN) treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) between 2000 and 2011 and a minimum of 24 months follow-up. Patients were excluded if immunosuppressed, had non-SCC histology, or were treated palliatively. Fifty patients (mean age, 60 years) with median follow-up of 50 months were included in this study. A total of 54.8% of known primary tumors had incidental PNI. Ten percent had nodal disease at presentation. MRI neurogram was positive in 95.8%. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) at 5-years was 62%. Five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were 75% and 64%, respectively. There were no perioperative deaths. This report demonstrates that long-term survival is achievable in patients with clinical PNI from cutaneous SCCHN after surgery and PORT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 824-831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...... cardiologists towards catheter ablation for AF, using a nationwide survey. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed a purpose-designed questionnaire to evaluate attitudes towards catheter ablation for AF that was sent to all Danish cardiologists (n = 401; response n = 272 (67.8%)). There was no association between...... attitudes towards ablation and the experience or age of the cardiologist with respect to patients with recurrent AF episodes with a duration of 7 days and/or need for cardioversion. The majority (69%) expected a recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in more than 30% of the cases...

  17. Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zarkotou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI are among the most common healthcare-associated infections, and potentially lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Multifaceted infection control strategies implemented as bundles can prevent nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices such as CAUTIs. The components of the CAUTI bundle proposed herein, include appropriate indications for catheterization and recommendations for the procedures of catheter insertion and catheter maintenance and care. Avoiding unnecessary urinary catheter use is the most effective measure for their prevention. To minimize the risk of CAUTI, urinary catheters should be placed only when a clinical valid indication is documented and they should be removed as soon as possible; alternatives to catheterization should also be considered. Aseptic insertion technique, maintenance of closed drainage system and strict adherence to hand hygiene are essential for preventing CAUTI. The successful implementation of the bundle requires education and training for all healthcare professionals and evaluation of surveillance data.

  18. Optimal placement of capacito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gnanasekaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimal size and location of shunt capacitors in the distribution system plays a significant role in minimizing the energy loss and the cost of reactive power compensation. This paper presents a new efficient technique to find optimal size and location of shunt capacitors with the objective of minimizing cost due to energy loss and reactive power compensation of distribution system. A new Shark Smell Optimization (SSO algorithm is proposed to solve the optimal capacitor placement problem satisfying the operating constraints. The SSO algorithm is a recently developed metaheuristic optimization algorithm conceptualized using the shark’s hunting ability. It uses a momentum incorporated gradient search and a rotational movement based local search for optimization. To demonstrate the applicability of proposed method, it is tested on IEEE 34-bus and 118-bus radial distribution systems. The simulation results obtained are compared with previous methods reported in the literature and found to be encouraging.

  19. Product Placement and Brand Equity

    OpenAIRE

    Corniani, Margherita

    2003-01-01

    Product placement is the planned insertion of a brand within a movie, a fiction, etc. It can be used with other communication tools (i.e. advertising, sales promotions, etc.) in order to disseminate brand awareness and characterize brand image, developing brand equity. In global markets, product placement is particularly useful for improving brand equity of brands with a well established brand awareness.

  20. Placement of acid spoil materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pionke, H B; Rogowski, A S

    1982-06-01

    Potentially there are several chemical and hydrologic problems associated with placement of acid spoil materials. The rationale for a deep placement well below the soil surface, and preferably below a water table, is to prevent or minimize oxidation of pyrite to sulfuric acid and associated salts by reducing the supply of oxygen. If, however, substantial sulfuric acid or associated salts are already contained within the spoil because of present or previous mining, handling and reclamation operations (or if large supplies of indigenous salts exist, placement below a water table) may actually increase the rate of acid and salt leaching. Specific placement of acid- and salt-containing spoil should be aimed at preventing contact with percolating water or rising water tables. We recommend placement based on chemical and physical spoil properties that may affect water percolation O/sub 2/ diffusion rates in the profile. Both the deeper placement of acid spoil and coarser particle size can substantially reduce the amount of acid drainage. Placement above the water table with emphasis on percolate control may be better for high sulfate spoils, while placement below the non-fluctuating water table may be better for pyritic spoils.

  1. A format for phylogenetic placements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A Matsen

    Full Text Available We have developed a unified format for phylogenetic placements, that is, mappings of environmental sequence data (e.g., short reads into a phylogenetic tree. We are motivated to do so by the growing number of tools for computing and post-processing phylogenetic placements, and the lack of an established standard for storing them. The format is lightweight, versatile, extensible, and is based on the JSON format, which can be parsed by most modern programming languages. Our format is already implemented in several tools for computing and post-processing parsimony- and likelihood-based phylogenetic placements and has worked well in practice. We believe that establishing a standard format for analyzing read placements at this early stage will lead to a more efficient development of powerful and portable post-analysis tools for the growing applications of phylogenetic placement.

  2. Catheters, wires, tubes and drains on postoperative radiographs of pediatric cardiac patients: the whys and wherefores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teele, Sarah A.; Thiagarajan, Ravi R. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Emani, Sitaram M. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Teele, Rita L. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Starship Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Grafton (New Zealand)

    2008-10-15

    Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease has advanced dramatically since the first intracardiac repairs in the mid-20th century. Previously inoperable lesions have become the focus of routine surgery and patients are managed successfully in intensive care units around the world. As a result, increasing numbers of postoperative images are processed by departments of radiology in children's hospitals. It is important that the radiologist accurately documents and describes the catheters, wires, tubes and drains that are present on the chest radiograph. This article reviews the reasons for the placement and positioning of perioperative equipment in children who have surgical repair of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect or transposition of the great arteries. Also included are a brief synopsis of each cardiac anomaly, the surgical procedure for its correction, and an in-depth discussion of the postoperative chest radiograph including illustrations of catheters, wires, tubes and drains. (orig.)

  3. Catheters, wires, tubes and drains on postoperative radiographs of pediatric cardiac patients: the whys and wherefores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teele, Sarah A.; Thiagarajan, Ravi R.; Emani, Sitaram M.; Teele, Rita L.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease has advanced dramatically since the first intracardiac repairs in the mid-20th century. Previously inoperable lesions have become the focus of routine surgery and patients are managed successfully in intensive care units around the world. As a result, increasing numbers of postoperative images are processed by departments of radiology in children's hospitals. It is important that the radiologist accurately documents and describes the catheters, wires, tubes and drains that are present on the chest radiograph. This article reviews the reasons for the placement and positioning of perioperative equipment in children who have surgical repair of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect or transposition of the great arteries. Also included are a brief synopsis of each cardiac anomaly, the surgical procedure for its correction, and an in-depth discussion of the postoperative chest radiograph including illustrations of catheters, wires, tubes and drains. (orig.)

  4. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate.

  5. A Study of Use of “PORT” Catheter in Patients with Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irappa Madabhavi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective and reliable venous access is one of the cornerstones of modern medical therapy in oncology. Materials and methods: This is a prospective observational study, which collected data of patients who require “PORT” catheter insertion for any cancer, at a tertiary care oncology hospital in Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India, during a 2-year period. Aims and objectives: The main objective of this study was to study the various complications and outcomes related to “PORT” catheters. Results: “PORT” catheter was inserted in 100 patients and was most commonly used in solid malignancies (n = 86, 86%, followed by hematologic malignancies (n = 14, 14%. Among the solid malignancies, breast cancer (38, 38% was the most common underlying disease, whereas among the hematologic malignancies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (6, 6% was the most common underlying disease for “PORT” catheter insertion. Chemotherapy was started on the first day of “PORT” catheter in 74% of patients in the “PORT” study group. The various complications developed in the “PORT” study group in the descending order are as follows: 4 patients (4% developed early infection (⩽30 days after “PORT” placement, 4 (4% late infection (⩾30 days after “PORT” placement, 4 (4% bloodstream infection, 2 (2% local skin infection at the “PORT” insertion site, 2 (2% dislodgment of the “PORT” catheter, 2 (2% fracture of the “PORT” catheter, and 1 recurrent pleural effusion. One patient (1% developed thrombosis as the complication of “PORT” catheter insertion. Conclusions: The most disturbing aspect of treatment for a patient with cancer is multiple painful venipunctures made for administration of cytotoxic agents, antibiotics, blood products, and nutritional supplements. The focus of this prospective observational research is to study the various underlying diseases for which “PORT” catheter is needed in different solid and hematologic

  6. [Venous catheter-related infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Carmen; Almirante, Benito

    2014-02-01

    Venous catheter-related infections are a problem of particular importance, due to their frequency, morbidity and mortality, and because they are potentially preventable clinical processes. At present, the majority of hospitalized patients and a considerable number of outpatients are carriers of these devices. There has been a remarkable growth of knowledge of the epidemiology of these infections, the most appropriate methodology for diagnosis, the therapeutic and, in particular, the preventive strategies. Multimodal strategies, including educational programs directed at staff and a bundle of simple measures for implementation, applied to high-risk patients have demonstrated great effectiveness for their prevention. In this review the epidemiology, the diagnosis, and the therapeutic and preventive aspects of these infections are updated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiofrequency catheter oblation in atrial flutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Ji; Wang Heping; Xu Jian; Liu Fuyuan; Fan Xizhen; An Chunsheng; Han Xiaoping; Ding Xiaomei; Wang Jiasheng; Gu Tongyuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiofrequency catheter ablation for type I atrial flutter through application of Holo catheter labelling with anatomic imaging localization to ablate the isthmus of IVCTA during complete double-way block. Methods: Eleven cases with type I atrial flutter undergone Holo catheter labelling technique and consecution with conduction time change of coronary venous sinus orifice with-right atrial lower lateral wall pace excitation, were performed with radiofrequency catheter ablation for the isthmus outcoming with complete double-way conduction block. Results: All together 11 cases with 4 of atrial flutter and 7 of sinus rhythm were undergone radiofrequency catheter ablation resulting with double-way conduction block of the isthmus accompanied by prolongation of right atrial conduction time 56.0 ± 2.3 ms and 53.0 ± 4.6 ms respectively. The right atrial excitation appeared to be in clockwise and counter-clockwise of single direction. No recurrence occurred during 3-34 months follow up with only one showing atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: The application of Holo catheter labelling technique with anatomic imaging localization to achieve the double-way conduction block by radiofrequency catheter ablation of TVC-TA isthmus, is a reliable method for treating atrial flutter

  8. [Catheter-associated bloodstream infections: implementation of a new consensus protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea Ayala, M; Rozas Quesada, L

    2009-07-01

    Catheter-associated bloodstream infection is highly prevalent and often associated with fatal complications. Some studies have shown that applying preventive interventions could help to reduce and control this type of infection. To determine whether a new consensus protocol for the manipulation and maintenance of central venous catheters would decrease catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSIs) in paediatric patients. To evaluate its compliance in intensive care units. Prospective study in the paediatric (PICU) and neonatal (NICU) intensive cares units, haematology, oncology and hospital wards in a Maternal and Paediatric reference Hospital in Barcelona. The study period is divided into two periods: before (first semester) and after the start of the new protocol (second semester) in 2007. The most important changes have been the insertion of the hermetic connection in the proximal and distal site (between the line and the syringe) of the central venous catheter (CVC), the labelling of the medication line and the CVC with the date of placement. A check-list to evaluate compliance was introduced in both intensive care units (paediatrics and neonatal) during the second study period. The rates of bloodstream infection per 1000 catheter-days were assessed. The rate of bloodstream infections per 1000 catheter-days before and after the start of the new protocol was 5.7 and 4.9 in PICU; 24.6 and 18.0 in NICU; 7.6 and 4.6 in haematology-oncology, and 11.9 and 10.3 in hospital wards. As regards compliance to the protocol, we found that proximal sealed connectors were used in more than 95% of the cases and up to 85% of the central venous catheter were labelled with the insertion date in both intensive care units. A consensus protocol for the use and maintenance of central venous catheters and healthcare worker training helped to control the rate of CA-BSIs. We reaffirm the importance of epidemiological surveillance as a measure for controlling nosocomial infections.

  9. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  10. Miniaturization of catheter systems for angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.F. Jr.; Akins, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the use of small catheters and needles in angiography and interventional procedures to improve the quality of the procedures and increase the success rate and safety. This philosophy was initially poorly received, both by operators and by industry; however, more recently microtechniques have become more acceptable primarily because of the changing economic climate requiring procedures with shorter or no hospitalization time. Since 1970, the authors have performed well over 10,000 angiographic procedures using 5 French catheters, or smaller. During the last 12 years, they have used almost exclusively 4 French catheters, primarily with standard filming techniques which have resulted in no thrombosed arteries, or significant hematoma formation

  11. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  12. Iatrogenic Bowel Injury at Exchange of Supra-Pubic Catheter

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foran, AT

    2018-04-01

    Suprapubic catheter insertion and exchange is a common urological procedure, but it is not without risks and complications. While bowel perforation is a recognised complication at suprapubic catheter insertion, it is not commonly reported at suprapubic catheter exchange. We report our experience of recognition, diagnosis and subsequent successful management of the most important complication related to suprapubic catheters.

  13. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ann Arbor Veteran Affairs Medical System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars Sinai Medical System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  14. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose ≥75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8–10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8–10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  15. Clinical nursing of pelvic neoplasm treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical nursing care for patients with pelvic neoplasm who were treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system. Methods: After the implantation of an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system was successfully completed, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy was carried out in 17 patients with pelvic neoplasm and the infusion chemotherapy was repeated for several times. The pre-procedural clinical nursing care was well done and the technique of proper placement was well grasped. The side effects of chemotherapy drugs and complications were dealt with in time. Medical orientation at discharge time included the protection methods for port-catheter system. Results: Seventeen patients received infusion chemotherapy successfully several times (ranged from 3 to 8 times) with a scheduled regular interval time. No severe complications occurred. No catheter leakage nor obvious irritation and compression symptoms of local skin developed during infusion period. Of the 17 patients, 6 had a complete response, 9 achieved a partial response, while the remaining 2 failed to respond. Conclusion: In accordance with characteristics of infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system, the reasonable and effective nursing care is important to guarantee the achievement of a successful performance and a satisfactory therapeutic result. (authors)

  16. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  17. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Glowinski, A.; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212[). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF[). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [de

  18. Community Resources and Job Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jim

    1977-01-01

    In cooperation with the chamber of commerce, various businesses, associations, and other community agencies, the Sarasota schools (Florida) supplement their own job placement and follow-up efforts with community job development strategies for placing high school graduates. (JT)

  19. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duodenoscope Sampling Method Interim Duodenoscope Culture Method Multiplex Real-Time PCR Detection of KPC & NDM-1 genes Quinolones ... The most commonly used external catheter is a soft flexible sheath that fits over the penis (“condom” ...

  20. Epicardial phrenic nerve displacement during catheter ablation of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias: procedural experience and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Barbhaiya, Chirag R; Baldinger, Samuel H; Koplan, Bruce A; Maytin, Melanie; Epstein, Laurence M; John, Roy M; Michaud, Gregory F; Tedrow, Usha B; Stevenson, William G

    2015-08-01

    Arrhythmia origin in close proximity to the phrenic nerve (PN) can hinder successful catheter ablation. We describe our approach with epicardial PN displacement in such instances. PN displacement via percutaneous pericardial access was attempted in 13 patients (age 49±16 years, 9 females) with either atrial tachycardia (6 patients) or atrial fibrillation triggered from a superior vena cava focus (1 patient) adjacent to the right PN or epicardial ventricular tachycardia origin adjacent to the left PN (6 patients). An epicardially placed steerable sheath/4 mm-catheter combination (5 patients) or a vascular or an esophageal balloon (8 patients) was ultimately successful. Balloon placement was often difficult requiring manipulation via a steerable sheath. In 2 ventricular tachycardia cases, absence of PN capture was achieved only once the balloon was directly over the ablation catheter. In 3 atrial tachycardia patients, PN displacement was not possible with a balloon; however, a steerable sheath/catheter combination was ultimately successful. PN displacement allowed acute abolishment of all targeted arrhythmias. No PN injury occurred acutely or in follow up. Two patients developed acute complications (pleuro-pericardial fistula 1 and pericardial bleeding 1). Survival free of target arrhythmia was achieved in all atrial tachycardia patients; however, a nontargeted ventricular tachycardia recurred in 1 patient at a median of 13 months' follow up. Arrhythmias originating in close proximity to the PN can be targeted successfully with PN displacement with an epicardially placed steerable sheath/catheter combination, or balloon, but this strategy can be difficult to implement. Better tools for phrenic nerve protection are desirable. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Paravertebral Analgesic Pump Catheter with the Epidural Catheter in Elderly Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Brian S; Wasfie, Tarik; Chadwick, Mathew; Barber, Kimberly R; Yapchai, Raquel

    2017-04-01

    Presently, trauma guidelines recommend epidural analgesia as the optimal modality of pain relief from rib fractures. They are not ideally suited for elderly trauma patients and have disadvantages including bleeding risk. The paravertebral analgesic pump (PVP) eliminates such disadvantages and includes ease of placement in the trauma setting. This study compares pain control in patients treated by EPI versus PVP. This is a retrospective, historical cohort study comparing two methods of pain management in the trauma setting. Before 2010, patients who had epidural catheters (EPI) placed for pain control were compared with patients after 2010 in which the PVP was used. All patients had multiple rib fractures as diagnosed by CT scan. Analysis was adjusted for age, number of fractures, and comorbid conditions. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to compare average reported pain. A total of 110 patients, 31 PVP and 79 epidural catheters, were included in the study. Overall mean age was 65 years. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 (EPI) and 11.1 (PVP). Mean number rib fractures was 4.29 (EPI) and 4.71 (PVP). PVP was associated with a 30 per cent greater decrease in pain than that seen with EPI (6.0-1.9 vs 6.4-3.4). After controlling for age, Injury Severity Score, and number of rib fractures, there were no differences in intensive care unit or total length of stay (P = 0.35) or in pain score (3.76 vs 3.56, P = 0.64). In conclusion, the PVP compares well with epidural analgesia in older trauma patients yet is safe, well tolerated, and easily inserted.

  3. Conversion from temporary to tunneled catheters by nephrologists: report of a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva BC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bruno C Silva, Camila E Rodrigues, Regina CRM Abdulkader, Rosilene M Elias Nephrology Division, Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Nephrologists have increasingly participated in the conversion from temporary catheters (TC to tunneled-cuffed catheters (TCCs for hemodialysis. Objective: To prospectively analyze the outcomes associated with TCC placement by nephrologists with expertise in such procedure, in different time periods at the same center. The impact of vancomycin or cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on the infection outcomes was also tested. Patients and methods: Hemodialysis patients who presented to such procedure were divided into two cohorts: A (from 2004 to 2008 and B (from 2013 to 2015. Time from TC to TCC conversion, prophylactic antibiotics, and reasons for TCC removal were evaluated. Results: One hundred and thirty patients were included in cohort A and 228 in cohort B. Sex, age, and follow-up time were similar between cohorts. Median time from TC to TCC conversion was longer in cohort A than in cohort B (14 [3; 30] vs 4 [1; 8] days, respectively; P<0.0001. Infection leading to catheter removal occurred in 26.4% vs 18.9% of procedures in cohorts A and B, respectively, and infection rate was 0.93 vs 0.73 infections per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively (P=0.092. Infection within 30 days from the procedure occurred in 1.4% of overall cohort. No differences were observed when comparing vancomycin and cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on 90-day infection-free TCC survival in a Kaplan–Meier model (log-rank = 0.188. TCC removal for low blood flow occurred in 8.9% of procedures. Conclusion: Conversion of TC to TCC by nephrologists had overall infection, catheter patency, and complications similar to data reported in the literature. Vancomycin was not superior to cefazolin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Keywords: renal dialysis, tunneled catheters, interventional nephrology

  4. Clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Janita; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most frequent health care-associated infection in neonatal units. This study aimed to analyze articles on the clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in neonates. A systematic search was performed for studies published from 1987-2017, without language restriction. Observational studies carried out in neonates with CRBSI diagnosed using catheter-drawn blood samples or catheter tip cultures were included. A total of 412 articles were identified in the databases and 10 articles were included. The 7 studies that evaluated central venous catheter tip cultures and cultures of catheter fragments presented sensitivities ranging from 58.5%-100% and specificities ranging from 60%-95.7%. Three studies that evaluated catheter-drawn blood cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, reported sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 71% when evaluated for the differential time to positivity. When quantitative evaluation was performed, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 99.4%. Most of the studies analyzed cultures from the central venous catheter tip and catheter fragments for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonatal populations. The results of this review suggest that the analysis of the catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, are efficient methods for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonates. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Catheter ablation of epicardial ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Yamada, MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachycardias (VTs can usually be treated by endocardial catheter ablation. However, some VTs can arise from the epicardial surface, and their substrate can be altered only by epicardial catheter ablation. There are two approaches to epicardial catheter ablation: transvenous and transthoracic. The transvenous approach through the coronary venous system (CVS has been commonly used because it is easily accessible. However, this approach may be limited by the distribution of the CVS and insufficient radiofrequency energy delivery. Transthoracic epicardial catheter ablation has been developed to overcome these limitations of the transvenous approach. It is a useful supplemental or even preferred strategy to eliminate epicardial VTs in the electrophysiology laboratory. This technique has been applied for scar-related VTs secondary to often non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and sometimes ischemic cardiomyopathy, and idiopathic VTs as the epicardial substrates of these VTs have become increasingly recognized. When endocardial ablation and epicardial ablation through the CVS are unsuccessful, transthoracic epicardial ablation should be the next option. Intrapericardial access is usually obtained through a subxiphoidal pericardial puncture. This approach might not be possible in patients with pericardial adhesions caused by prior cardiac surgery or pericarditis. In such cases, a hybrid procedure involving surgical access with a subxiphoid pericardial window and a limited anterior or lateral thoracotomy might be a feasible and safe method of performing an epicardial catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory. Potential complications associated with this technique include bleeding and collateral damage to the coronary arteries and phrenic nerve. Although the risk of these complications is low, electrophysiologists who attempt epicardial catheter ablation should know the complications associated with this technique, how to minimize their

  6. A Standardized Method for 4D Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Nerve Blockade and Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Clendenen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a standardized method for using four-dimensional ultrasound (4D US guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. 4D US allows for needle tracking in multiple planes simultaneously and accurate measurement of the local anesthetic volume surrounding the nerve following injection. Additionally, the morphology and proximity of local anesthetic spread around the target nerve is clearly seen with the described technique. This method provides additional spatial information in real time compared to standard two-dimensional ultrasound.

  7. A nurse led peripherally inserted central catheter line insertion service is effective with radiological support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Jonathan M.; Booth, Doris M.; King, Julia A.; Chakraverty, Sam

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are increasingly used as a route of chemotherapy administration. Our aims were to assess a collaborative approach to PICC placement, with radiological support for a nurse led line insertion service in a minority of cases, and to determine whether PICC provided a safe and reliable method of chemotherapy administration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data on 100 consecutive patients undergoing PICC placement for chemotherapy were collected. Lines were inserted by ward based nurses or under ultrasound guidance by radiologists. End points were successful completion of treatment or patient death. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-four lines were placed for 118 courses of chemotherapy. 107 (74%) were placed by nurses and 37 (26%) by radiologists. Ninety-five percent of patients completed therapy with either one or two lines. Seventy percent of lines were removed on achieving the primary end points. In two additional patients PICC could not be placed radiologically. Twelve patients were unable to complete treatment with PICC alone, nine of these required an alternative administration route. The catheter related sepsis rate was 4.9%. CONCLUSION: The majority of PICC can be successfully placed by trained nurses, reserving image guidance only for more difficult cases. PICC have an acceptable complication profile, and decrease the need for tunnelled central lines. Barber, J.M. et al. (2002)

  8. Validity of administrative database code algorithms to identify vascular access placement, surgical revisions, and secondary patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaishi, Ahmed A; Moist, Louise M; Oliver, Matthew J; Nash, Danielle M; Fleet, Jamie L; Garg, Amit X; Lok, Charmaine E

    2018-03-01

    We assessed the validity of physician billing codes and hospital admission using International Classification of Diseases 10th revision codes to identify vascular access placement, secondary patency, and surgical revisions in administrative data. We included adults (≥18 years) with a vascular access placed between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2013 at the University Health Network, Toronto. Our reference standard was a prospective vascular access database (VASPRO) that contains information on vascular access type and dates of placement, dates for failure, and any revisions. We used VASPRO to assess the validity of different administrative coding algorithms by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of vascular access events. The sensitivity (95% confidence interval) of the best performing algorithm to identify arteriovenous access placement was 86% (83%, 89%) and specificity was 92% (89%, 93%). The corresponding numbers to identify catheter insertion were 84% (82%, 86%) and 84% (80%, 87%), respectively. The sensitivity of the best performing coding algorithm to identify arteriovenous access surgical revisions was 81% (67%, 90%) and specificity was 89% (87%, 90%). The algorithm capturing arteriovenous access placement and catheter insertion had a positive predictive value greater than 90% and arteriovenous access surgical revisions had a positive predictive value of 20%. The duration of arteriovenous access secondary patency was on average 578 (553, 603) days in VASPRO and 555 (530, 580) days in administrative databases. Administrative data algorithms have fair to good operating characteristics to identify vascular access placement and arteriovenous access secondary patency. Low positive predictive values for surgical revisions algorithm suggest that administrative data should only be used to rule out the occurrence of an event.

  9. [A clinical observation of percutaneous balloon dilation and maintenance percutaneous transhepatic cholangial catheter drainage for treatment of 21 patients with benign biliary strictures and difficult endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Shi, Hai-feng; Li, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Xiao-bo; Liu, Wei; Jin, Zheng-yu; Hong, Tao; Yang, Ai-ming; Yang, Ning

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the value of percutaneous balloon dilation and percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage (PTCD) catheter maintenance in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. The clinical data of 21 patients with benign biliary strictures at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from June 2005 to June 2011 were retrospectively studied, in which 12 patients in severe stricture (stenosis > 70%) were treated with percutaneous balloon dilation and PTCD catheter placed across the stricture, while another 9 patients in median stricture (stenosis stenosis was seen in 2 patients. A severe complication with biliary artery branch rupture and massive hemobilia was seen in 1 patient during balloon dilation. Of the 9 patients only treated with 1 - 12 months (median: 6 months) of PTCD catheter placement, 7 patients had the catheter successfully removed. In the follow-up of 5 - 18 months (median: 8 months), patency of bile duct was preserved in 5 of 7 patients, and recurrent stenosis was seen in 2 patients. No severe complication occurred. When endoscopy therapy is failed or the patient can't undergo endoscopy therapy, the percutaneous balloon dilation and PTCD catheter maintenance method is an effective alternative therapeutic approach in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. The moderate benign biliary stricture may be effectively treated only by the PTCD catheter maintenance method.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Catheter Complicated by Persistent Phrenic Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Koogler

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old male presented for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA in the beach chair position. A preoperative interscalene nerve catheter was placed under direct ultrasound-guidance utilizing a posterior in-plane approach. On POD 2, the catheter was removed. Three weeks postoperatively, the patient reported worsening dyspnea with a subsequent chest X-ray demonstrating an elevated right hemidiaphragm. Pulmonary function testing revealed worsening deficit from presurgical values consistent with phrenic nerve palsy. The patient decided to continue conservative management and declined further invasive testing or treatment. He was followed for one year postoperatively with moderate improvement of his exertional dyspnea over that period of time. The close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the brachial plexus in combination with its frequent anatomical variation can lead to unintentional mechanical trauma, intraneural injection, or chemical injury during performance of ISB. The only previously identified risk factor for PPNP is cervical degenerative disc disease. Although PPNP has been reported following TSA in the beach chair position without the presence of a nerve block, it is typically presumed as a complication of the interscalene block. Previously published case reports and case series of PPNP complicating ISBs all describe nerve blocks performed with either paresthesia technique or localization with nerve stimulation. We report a case of a patient experiencing PPNP following an ultrasound-guided placement of an interscalene nerve catheter.

  11. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intrapulmonary fluid collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, E. D.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, P. Y.; Jung, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    With the success of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, attention is now being focused on the use of similar techniques in the thorax. We studied to evaluate the effect of percutaneous drainage in parenchymal fluid collections in the lungs. We performed percutaneous drainage of abscesses and other parenchymal fluid collections of the lungs in 15 patients. All of the procedures were performed under the fluoroscopic guidance with an 18-gauge Seldinger needle and coaxial technique with a 8-10F drainage catheter. Among 10 patients with lung abscess, 8 patients improved by percutaneous catheter drainage. In one patient, drainage was failed by the accidental withdrawal of the catheter before complete drainage. One patient died of sepsis 5 hours after the procedure. Among three patients with complicated bulla, successful drainage was done in two patients, but in the remaining patient, the procedure was failed. In one patient with intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst, the drainage was not successful due to the thick internal contents. In one patient with traumatic hematoma, after the drainage of old blood clots, the signs of infection disappeared. Overally, of 14 patients excluding one who died, 11 patients improved with percutaneous catheter drainage and three patients did not. There were no major complications during and after the procedure. We conclude that percutaneous catheter drainage is effective and safe procedure for the treatment of parenchymal fluid collections of the lung in patients unresponsive to the medical treatment

  12. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intrapulmonary fluid collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, E. D.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, P. Y.; Jung, S. H. [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    With the success of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, attention is now being focused on the use of similar techniques in the thorax. We studied to evaluate the effect of percutaneous drainage in parenchymal fluid collections in the lungs. We performed percutaneous drainage of abscesses and other parenchymal fluid collections of the lungs in 15 patients. All of the procedures were performed under the fluoroscopic guidance with an 18-gauge Seldinger needle and coaxial technique with a 8-10F drainage catheter. Among 10 patients with lung abscess, 8 patients improved by percutaneous catheter drainage. In one patient, drainage was failed by the accidental withdrawal of the catheter before complete drainage. One patient died of sepsis 5 hours after the procedure. Among three patients with complicated bulla, successful drainage was done in two patients, but in the remaining patient, the procedure was failed. In one patient with intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst, the drainage was not successful due to the thick internal contents. In one patient with traumatic hematoma, after the drainage of old blood clots, the signs of infection disappeared. Overally, of 14 patients excluding one who died, 11 patients improved with percutaneous catheter drainage and three patients did not. There were no major complications during and after the procedure. We conclude that percutaneous catheter drainage is effective and safe procedure for the treatment of parenchymal fluid collections of the lung in patients unresponsive to the medical treatment.

  13. Electrophysiology Catheter-Facilitated coronary sinus cannulation and implantation of cardiac resynchronization therapy systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis S. Manolis, MD, FESC, FACC, FHRS

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT device implantation is hampered by difficult placement of the left ventricular (LV lead. We have routinely used a steerable electrophysiology catheter to guide coronary sinus (CS cannulation and facilitate LV lead positioning. The aim of this prospective study is to present our results with this approach in 138 consecutive patients receiving a CRT device over 10 years. Methods: The study included 120 men and 18 women, aged 64.8±11.4 years, with coronary disease (n=63, cardiomyopathy (n=72, or other disease (n=3, and mean ejection fraction of 24.5±4.5%. Devices were implanted for refractory heart failure and dyssynchrony, all but 2 in the presence of left bundle branch block. Implanted devices included biventricular pacemakers (CRT-P (n=33 and cardioverter defibrillators (CRT-D (n=105. Results: Using the electrophysiology catheter, the CS could be engaged in 134 (97.1% patients. In 4 patients failing CS cannulation, a dual-chamber device was implanted in 2, and bifocal right ventricular pacing was effected in 2. Bifocal (n=2 or conventional (n=1 systems were implanted in another 3 patients, in whom the LV lead got dislodged (n=2 or removed because of local dissection (n=1. Thus, finally, a CRT system was successfully established in 131 (94.9% patients. There were 3 patients with CS dissection, of whom 1 was complicated by cardiac tamponade managed with pericardiocentesis. There were no perioperative deaths. During follow-up (31.0±21.2 months, clinical improvement was reported by 108 (82.4% patients. Conclusion: Routine use of an electrophysiology catheter greatly facilitated CS cannulation and successful LV lead placement in ∼95% of patients undergoing CRT system implantation. Keywords: heart failure, cardiac resynchronization therapy, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, coronary sinus, left ventricular lead

  14. Ureteral catheters for colorectal surgery: Influence on operative times and complication outcomes: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio T. Chong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Placement of pre-operative ureteral catheters for colorectal surgery can aid in the identification of ureteral injuries. This study investigates whether simultaneous ureteral catheterization with surgery skin preparation can minimize operating room times without increasing post-operative complications. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing simultaneous colorectal surgery skin preparation and placement of pre-operative ureteral catheters (n=21 were compared to those who underwent these events sequentially (n=28. Operative time-points of anesthesia ready (AR, surgery procedure start (PS, dorsal lithotomy and catheter insertion (CI times were compared to assess for differences between groups. Complications were compared between groups. Results: There were no differences in age, gender, body mass index (BMI, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA, comorbidities, current procedure terminology (CPT or International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9 codes between groups. Simultaneous catheterization saved 11.82 minutes of operative time between CI to PS (p=0.005, t-test. There was a significant difference in mean time between CI to PS (11.82 minutes, p=0.008 between simultaneous and sequential ureteral catheterization groups in a linear regression multivariate analysis controlling for age, BMI, CPT and ICD-9 codes. There were 4 complications in the simultaneous (19% and 3 in the sequential group (11% (p=0.68. Conclusions: Ureteral catheterization and colorectal surgery skin preparation in a simultaneous fashion decreases the time between CI and PS without significant increase in complications. Mean time saved with simultaneous ureteral catheterization was 11.82 minutes per case. Simultaneous ureteral catheterization may be an option in colorectal surgery and may result in cost savings without additional complications.

  15. Impact of short-term hemodialysis catheters on the central veins: a catheter venographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguzkurt, Levent E-mail: loguzkurt@yahoo.com; Tercan, Fahri; Torun, Dilek; Yildirim, Tuelin; Zuemruetdal, Ayseguel; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2004-12-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the central veins in hemodialysis patients with temporary catheters. Methods and material: In this prospective study, 57 patients (40 males, 17 females) with temporary dialysis catheters had catheter venography by pulling back the catheter just before removal. Patient's age range was 25-87 years (mean age, 51 years). The venographic studies were evaluated for pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) and the superior vena cava (SVC). The IJV could only be evaluated if there was adequate filling during contrast administration. In a subgroup of patients who had had only right IJV or only right SCV catheters, impact of these catheters on the central veins was compared. Results: The catheter location was right internal jugular vein (IJV) in 26 cases, right subclavian vein (SCV) in 27 cases, left IJV in 1 case, and left SCV in 3 cases. Thirty-two patients (56%) had had only one temporary catheter and the rest had had more than one inserted. The mean dwell time for the catheters was 21 days (range 7-59 days). A pericatheter sleeve was detected on venography in 32 (56%) patients and thrombus formation was noted in 16 patients (28%). A total of 41 patients (72%) exhibited pericatheter sleeve and/or thrombus formation. While 19 of the 32 patients (59%) without previous catheterization had a sleeve around the catheter, only 13 (52%) of 25 patients who had had multiple catheters inserted had a sleeve (P>0.05). Of the eight patients (14%) with BCV stenosis, two had >50% stenosis. Only one patient (2%) had mild stenosis of the SVC. Three patients out of 15 (20%) who had diagnostic venography for the IJV had severe stenosis of the vein. Pericatheter sleeve formation was more frequent in women (P<0.05). However, there were no statistical differences with respect to pericatheter sleeve formation, luminal filling

  16. Balloon-tipped flow-directed catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganz, P.; Swan, H.J.C.; Ganz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic catheterization of the right side of the heart with semirigid cardiac catheters requires fluoroscopic guidance and substantial skill. Abnormal positions of the heart chambers and of the great vessels associated with cardiac dilatation or with congenital malformation present difficulties even to experienced laboratory cardiologists. These problems have been largely overcome by the introduction of balloon tipped flow directed catheters, which allow for rapid and relatively safe catheterization of the pulmonary artery without fluoroscopy. It was through the application of these catheters in the intensive care unit that the many pitfalls in the clinical assessment of hemodynamic disturbances became apparent. Although S3 gallop sounds may be useful in the clinical recognition of chronic ventricular failure, their presence or absence has limited predictive value in estimating left ventricular filling pressure in myocardial infarction. Information derived from right heart catheterization is often pivotal in the evaluation of hemodynamic disorders, in directing treatment, and in monitoring the results of therapy in critically ill patients

  17. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use.

  18. When one port does not return blood: two case reports of rare causes for misplaced central venous catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of misplaced central venous catheters having in common the absence of free blood return from one lumen immediately after placement. The former is a case of right hydrothorax associated with central venous catheterization with the catheter tip in intra-pleural location. In this case the distal port was never patent. In the latter case there was an increased aspiration pressure through the middle port due to a catheter looping.The absence of free flow on aspiration from one lumen of a central catheter should not be undervalued. In these circumstances the catheter should not be used and needs to be removed. Resumo: Apresentamos dois casos de mau posicionamento de cateter venoso central. Têm em comum a ausência do retorno sanguíneo livre em um dos lúmens imediatamente após a colocação. O primeiro é um caso de hidrotórax direito associado ao cateterismo venoso central, com a ponta do cateter em localização intrapleural. Nesse caso, a porta distal nunca esteve patente. No segundo caso houve um aumento da pressão de aspiração através da porta medial por causa da formação de alça no cateter.A ausência de fluxo livre na aspiração de um lúmen do cateter central não deve ser subestimada. Nessas circunstâncias, o cateter não deve ser usado e deve ser removido. Keywords: Central venous catheter, Hydrothorax, Looping, Malposition, Palavras-chave: Cateter venoso central, Hidrotórax, Alça, Mau posicionamento

  19. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  20. Retrograde or antegrade double-pigtail stent placement for malignant ureteric obstruction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uthappa, M.C.; Cowan, N.C.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimum approach for double-pigtail stent placement in malignant ureteric obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrograde stent placement was attempted in a consecutive series of patients presenting with malignant ureteric obstruction. If retrograde stent placement was unsuccessful, percutaneous nephrostomy was performed immediately followed by elective antegrade stent placement. Identical digital C-arm fluoroscopy for image-guidance and conditions for anaesthesia and analgesia were employed for both retrograde and antegrade procedures. Identical 8 Fr (20-26 cm) double-pigtail hydrophilic coated stents were used for each approach. RESULTS: Retrograde placement was attempted in 50 ureters in 30 patients {19 male, 11 female, average age 61.4 yr (range 29-90 yr)} over a 24-month period. The success rate for retrograde ureteric stent placement was 50% (n=25/50). Technical failures were due to failure to identify the ureteric orifice (n=22), failure to cross the stricture (n=1), failure to pass the stent (n=1) and failure to pass a 4 Fr catheter (n=1). Antegrade placement was attempted in 25 ureters with a success rate of 96% (n=24/25). Failure in the one case was due to inability to cross an upper third stricture secondary to pyeloureteritis cystica. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that retrograde route should be the initial approach if imaging shows no involvement of ureteric orifice (UO), when nephrostomy is technically very difficult or in cases of solitary kidney. The antegrade route is preferred if imaging shows tumour occlusion of the UO or if there is a tight stricture very close to the uretero-vesical junction (UVJ) making purchase within the ureter difficult for crossing the stricture

  1. Percutaneous transcholecystic approach for an experiment of biliary stent placement: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Tae Seok [Medical School of Gachon, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young; Lim, Jin Oh; Ko, Gi Young; Sung, Kyu Bo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Ho Jung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    To determine, in an experimental study of biliary stent placement, the usefulness and safety of the percutaneous transcholecystic approach and the patency of a newly designed biliary stent. A stent made of 0.15-mm-thick nitinol wire, and 10 mm in diameter and 2 cm in length, was loaded in an introducer with an 8-F outer diameter. The gallbladders of seven mongrel dogs were punctured with a 16-G angiocath needle under sonographic guidance, and cholangiography was performed. After anchoring the anterior wall of the gallbladder to the abdominal wall using a T-fastener, the gallbladder body was punctured again under fluoroscopic guidance. The cystic and common bile ducts were selected using a 0.035-inch guide wire and a cobra catheter, and the stent was placed in the common bile duct. Post-stenting cholangiography was undertaken, and an 8.5-F drainage tube was inserted in the gallbladder. Two dogs were followed-up and sacrificed at 2,4 and 8 weeks after stent placement, respectively, and the other expired 2 days after stent placement. Follow-up cholangiograms were obtained before aninmal was sacrified, and a pathologic examination was performed. Stent placement was technically successful in all cases. One dog expired 2 days after placement because of bile peritonitis due to migration of the drainage tube into the peritoneal cavity, but the other six remained healthy during the follow-up period. Cholangiography performed before the sacrifice of each dog showed that the stents were patent. Pathologic examination revealed the proliferation of granulation tissue at 2 weeks, and complete endothelialization over the stents by granulation tissue at 8 weeks. Percutaneous transcholecystic biliary stent placement appears to be safe, easy and useful. After placement, the stent was patent during the follow-period.

  2. Microbiocidal effects of various taurolidine containing catheter lock solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Nijland, R van; Gulich, A.F.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We have recently shown that a catheter lock solution containing taurolidine dramatically decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) when compared to heparin. Since several taurolidine formulations are commercially

  3. A central venous catheter coated with benzalkonium chloride for the prevention of catheter-related microbial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, H A; Tebbs, S E; Faroqui, M H; Herbst, T; Isaac, J L; Brown, J; Elliott, T S

    2000-11-01

    In an attempt to overcome infections associated with central venous catheters, a new antiseptic central venous catheter coated with benzalkonium chloride on the internal and external surfaces has been developed and evaluated in a clinical trial. Patients (235) randomly received either a triple-lumen central venous catheter coated with benzalkonium chloride (117) or a polyurethane non-antiseptic catheter (118). The incidence of microbial colonization of both catheters and retained antiseptic activity of the benzalkonium chloride device following removal were determined. The benzalkonium chloride resulted in a significant reduction of the incidence of microbial colonization on both the internal and external catheter surfaces. The reduction in colonization was detected at both the intradermal (21 benzalkonium chloride catheters vs. 38 controls, P = 0.0016) and distal segments of the antiseptic-coated catheters. Following catheter removal retained activity was demonstrated in benzalkonium chloride catheters which had been in place for up to 12 days. No patients developed adverse reactions to the benzalkonium chloride catheters. The findings demonstrate that the benzalkonium chloride catheter significantly reduced the incidence of catheter-associated colonization.

  4. Word catheter and marsupialisation in women with a cyst or abscess of the Bartholin gland (WoMan-trial): a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroese, J A; van der Velde, M; Morssink, L P; Zafarmand, M H; Geomini, P; van Kesteren, Pjm; Radder, C M; van der Voet, L F; Roovers, Jpwr; Graziosi, Gcm; van Baal, W M; van Bavel, J; Catshoek, R; Klinkert, E R; Huirne, Jaf; Clark, T J; Mol, Bwj; Reesink-Peters, N

    2017-01-01

    To compare recurrence of a cyst or abscess of the Bartholin gland after surgical treatment using a Word catheter or marsupialisation. Multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Eighteen hospitals in the Netherlands and one hospital in England. Women with a symptomatic cyst or abscess of the Bartholin gland. Women were randomised to treatment with Word catheter or marsupialisation. The primary outcome was recurrence of the cyst or abscess within 1 year of treatment. The secondary outcomes included pain during and after treatment (measured on a 10-point scale), use of analgesics, and time from diagnosis to treatment. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. To assess whether marsupialisation would reduce the recurrence rate by 5% (from 20 to 15%) we needed to include 160 women (alpha error 0.05, beta error 0.2). One hundred and sixty-one women were randomly allocated to treatment by Word catheter (n = 82) or marsupialisation (n = 79) between August 2010 and May 2014. Baseline characteristics were comparable. Recurrence occurred in 10 women (12%) allocated to Word catheter versus eight women (10%) allocated to marsupialisation: relative risk (RR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-1.91; P = 0.70. Pain scores after treatment were also comparable. In the first 24 hours after treatment, 33% used analgesics in the Word catheter group versus 74% in the marsupialisation group (P < 0.001). Time from diagnosis to treatment was 1 hour for placement of Word catheter versus 4 hours for marsupialisation (P = 0.001). In women with an abscess or cyst of the Bartholin gland, treatment with Word catheter and marsupialisation results in comparable recurrence rates. Comparable recurrence rates for treatment of Bartholinic abscess/cyst with Word catheter and marsupialisation. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  6. Catheter Occlusion in Home Infusion: The Influence of Needleless Connector Design on Central Catheter Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann

    Thrombotic catheter occlusion is a common complication associated with central venous catheters (CVCs). A wide variety of needleless connectors that differ greatly in design and function are available for use with CVCs; however, there are a limited number of studies comparing the catheter occlusion rate associated with differently designed needleless connectors. This retrospective observational study compared occlusion rates associated with a split-septum neutral-displacement needleless connector versus those of a solid-surface neutral-reflux needleless connector in patients undergoing home infusion therapy. The neutral-reflux needleless connector was associated with a significant reduction in occlusion rate and thrombolytic use versus the neutral-displacement needleless connector.

  7. [The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoli, Alessandro; Cappuccio, Serena; Marche, Bruno; Musarò, Andrea; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC). The insertion of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is not without risks. The Italian Group for the Study of Long-Term Central Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has developed a protocol (SIP: Safe Implantation of PICCs) with the aim of minimizing the risks which may be associated with the placement of PICCs. The protocol is based on recommendations available in the literature and on the main clinical practice guidelines. The SIP protocol, a bundle of evidence-based recommendations, it is is easy to use, inexpensive, and cost-effective. If routinely used and carefully inplemented, it greatly reduces complications such as failure of venipuncture, accidental arterial puncture, damage of median nerve, infection and catheter related venous thrombosis.

  8. PRODUCT PLACEMENT IN BRAND PROMOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Mikołajczyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Product placement can have a significant impact on brand awareness and customer purchasing decisions. The article discusses techniques applied in the mass media against the EU legal background and the opportunities it offers in reaching the target audience.

  9. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non-deflating Foley catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Okorie

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Most urinary catheters marketed in developing countries are unidentifiable after unpacking. A catheterization diary is a useful tool for solving catheter-related problems, and its application in health-care facilities should be encouraged. Companies marketing Foley catheters should print the catheter name on both the catheter packaging and on the catheter itself.

  10. Evidence for increased failure in patients with perineural invasion treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, S.R.; Hanlon, A.L.; Lee, W.R.; Movsas, B.; Al-Saleem, T.I.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The detection of perineural invasion (PNI) on diagnostic transrectal biopsy of the prostate is associated with a 93% frequency of extracapsular disease extension in patients treated by prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. This finding is associated with a worse outcome compared with those who have organ confined disease. This study examines the association of PNI and treatment failure in a consecutive series of patients treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) alone. Materials and Methods: We report actuarial biochemical NED (bNED) survival rates for 484 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer diagnosed by transrectal needle biopsy who have completed 3DCRT alone between May 1989 and December 1994. The median follow-up time is 28 months (range 2-75 months), and median dose to the center of the prostate was 7368 cGy (range 6316-8074 cGy). Patients were subdivided into two groups according to pretreatment PSA levels (<20 ngm/ml vs ≥20 ngm/ml). Pathology records were reviewed for the presence or absence of PNI. bNED failure is defined as PSA ≥ 1.5 ngm/ml and rising on two consecutive values. bNED survival rates were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methodology and comparisons of survival curves were accomplished using the log-rank test. Results: There was no difference in the bNED survival rates for all patients, or for the subgroup of patients with pretreatment PSA values ≥20. However, figure 1 shows the bNED survival rates for patients with pretreatment PSA below 20 ngm/ml based on PNI. This subgroup demonstrates a highly significant decrease in bNED survival (65% vs 88% at 3 yrs, 39% vs 65% at 5 yrs; p=.0009 for overall curve comparison) if PNI is present. For patients with pretreatment PSA below 20 ngm/ml, multivariate analysis of prognostic variables demonstrated a significant association between bNED survival and PNI (p=.04), Gleason score (p=.02) and pretreatment PSA (p=.003

  11. The role of MR angiography before transjugular placement of a portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.F.; Siewert, B.; Kim, D.; Edelman, R.R.; Stokes, K.R.; Finn, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The authors employed magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to guide catheter placement for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) procedures in 14 of 24 patients, and compared the results to the 10 patients who did not have prior panning based on MRA. Two-dimensional time-of-flight venography was performed during breath holding, and projection venograms were formatted in sagittal, coronal and axial planes. MRA defined venous anatomy sufficiently well to shorten the procedure and helped to minimize invasiveness. With MRA guidance, intrahepatic needle punctures were significantly fewer (without MRA guidance: mean 12.1; with MRA guidance: mean 3.5, p [de

  12. Automated Fiber Placement of Advanced Materials (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benson, Vernon M; Arnold, Jonahira

    2006-01-01

    .... ATK has been working with the Air Force Research Laboratory to foster improvements in the BMI materials and in the fiber placement processing techniques to achieve rates comparable to Epoxy placement rates...

  13. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002953.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery To use the sharing features ... to remove plaque buildup ( endarterectomy ) Carotid angioplasty with stent placement Description Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is ...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent ileostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a form...

  16. Management of Non- Deflating Foley Suprapubic Catheters - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The procedure described uses a 10 ml syringe and needle passed through the lumen of the catheter to puncture the inner surface of the catheter balloon and thus deflate it. Because the catheter balloon does not burst in this procedure there is no risk of balloon fragmentation or subsequent stone formation. The technique is ...

  17. Intravascular catheter related infections in children admitted on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peripheral venous intravascular catheters uncoated with no antibiotic or antiseptic, was done. Social demographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical examination including the catheter site were determined at enrollment. The children had their blood, catheter tip and hub samples taken off for culture and sensitivity as ...

  18. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do so. o Avoid disconnecting the catheter and drain tube. This helps to pre - vent germs from getting into the catheter tube. o The catheter is secured to the leg to prevent pulling on the ... regularly. The drainage spout should not touch any - thing while emptying ...

  19. Emergency coronary angioplasty with stenting using Cordis® diagnostic coronary catheters when there is difficulty in engaging guide catheters and bench evaluation of diagnostic and guide catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiaraj, Mark Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Difficulty in engaging with guide catheters is not uncommon in acute emergencies. We aimed to evaluate the use of Cordis ® INFINITI diagnostic catheters to perform angioplasty in patients in whom the coronaries cannot be engaged using standard guide catheters. In 34 cases of acute coronary syndrome, when difficulty in engagement with two standard guide catheters was encountered with reasonable manipulations, angioplasty was performed using diagnostic catheters. In total, 40 stents were placed by this technique. Pushability and trackability, distal tip flexion and three-point bending tests were performed to evaluate the performance of the guide and diagnostic catheters. Angioplasty was performed easily in a setting where it would have been very difficult to perform. Coronary dissection occurred in one patient, treated by a stent. The stent and dilatation balloons were easily passed through the diagnostic catheters. Pressure tracings were clearly preserved with certain stent delivery systems, and at angioplasty, although there was slightly reduced opacification of the respective artery, the coronary anatomy was sufficiently visualized to perform angioplasty. No periprocedural target lesion complications were seen in any cases. Pushability and trackability tests showed good force transmission along a tortuous path with diagnostic catheters, and balanced force-displacement curves from three-point bending tests and distal tip softness tests. Angioplasty with stenting can be performed safely through 6F Cordis ® infiniti diagnostic catheters when difficulty in engaging guide catheters is encountered. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Percutaneous pigtail catheter in the treatment of pneumothorax in major burns: the best alternative? Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Raul; Ghanem, Omar; Diroma, Frank; Milner, Stephen M; Gerold, Kevin B; Price, Leigh A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple factors place burn patients at a high risk of pneumothorax development. Currently, no specific recommendations for the management of pneumothorax in large total body surface area (TBSA) burn patients exist. We present a case of a major burn patient who developed pneumothorax after central line insertion. After the traditional large bore (24 Fr) chest tube failed to resolve the pneumothorax, the pneumothorax was ultimately managed by a percutaneous placed pigtail catheter thoracostomy placement and resulted in its complete resolution. We will review the current recommendations of pneumothorax treatment and will highlight on the use of pigtail catheters in pneumothorax management in burn patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  2. OCCASIONAL REVIEW 'Map and zap' - electrode catheter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where does this leave surgical treatment of WPW syndrome? Despite the high success rates reported, ·it is acknowledged that not all patients can be successfully treated by catheter ablation. The treatment of those with multiple accessory pathways and associated defects such as Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve is ...

  3. Thoracoscopic retrieval of a fractured thoracentesis catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W

    1994-08-01

    With the resurgence of laparoscopic surgical procedures, thorascopic procedures have followed close behind. Many procedures which in the past have required formal thoracotomy may now be performed via less invasive methods. Presented herein is a report and description of thoracoscopic retrieval of a fractured thoracentesis catheter.

  4. Mathematics Placement at the University of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren Reddy, Alison; Harper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Data from the ALEKS-based placement program at the University of Illinois is presented visually in several ways. The placement exam (an ALEKS assessment) contains precise item-specific information and the data show many interesting properties of the student populations of the placement courses, which include Precalculus, Calculus, and Business…

  5. A Cognitive Model of College Mathematics Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    study focused on the precalculus -- calculus placement decision. The Cognitive model uses novel, or analysis level, placement test items in an attempt to...relative to the requirements of a precalculus course. Placement test scores may be partitioned to give analysis and non-analysis subtest scores which can...67 5.1.1 1989 Intercorrelations ....................................................................... 67 5.1.2 1989 Precalculus -Calculus

  6. Effect of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated central venous catheters in an intensive care unit with a low blood stream infection rate after implementation of an educational program: a before-after trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Zack, Jeanne E; Thomas, James; Borecki, Ingrid B; Sona, Carrie S; Schallom, Marilyn E; Venker, Melissa; Nemeth, Jennifer L; Ward, Myrna R; Verjan, Linda; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Mazuski, John E; Boyle, Walter A; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend using antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) if, following a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI), infection rates remain above institutional goals based on benchmark values. The purpose of this study was to determine if chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated CVCs could decrease the CR-BSI rate in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a low baseline infection rate. Pre-intervention and post-intervention observational study in a 24-bed surgical/trauma/burn ICU from October, 2002 to August, 2005. All patients requiring CVC placement after March, 2004 had a chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheter inserted (post-intervention period). Twenty-three CR-BSIs occurred in 6,960 catheter days (3.3 per 1,000 catheter days)during the 17-month control period. After introduction of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters, 16 CR-BSIs occurred in 7,732 catheter days (2.1 per 1,000 catheter days; p = 0.16). The average length of time required for an infection to become established after catheterization was similar in the two groups (8.4 vs. 8.6 days; p = 0.85). Chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters did not result in a statistically significant change in the microbiological profile of CR-BSIs, nor did they increase the incidence of resistant organisms. Although chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters are useful in specific patient populations, they did not result in a statistically significant decrease in the CR-BSI rate in this study, beyond what was achieved with education alone.

  7. Anesthetic and Airways Management of a Dog with Severe Tracheal Collapse during Intraluminal Stent Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Argano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the anesthetic and airways management of a dog affected by 4th degree tracheal collapse and undergoing endoscope-guided intraluminal stent placement. After premedication with acepromazine and butorphanol, general anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with intravenous propofol and butorphanol in constant rate infusion. During intraluminal stent placement, oxygen was supplemented by means of a simple and inexpensive handmade device, namely, a ureteral catheter inserted into the trachea and connected to an oxygen source, which allowed for the maintenance of airways’ patency and adequate patient’s oxygenation, without decreasing visibility in the surgical field or interfering with the procedure. The use of the technique described in the present paper was the main determinant of the successful anesthetic management and may be proposed for similar critical cases in which surgical manipulation of the tracheal lumen, which may potentially result in hypoxia by compromising airways patency, is required.

  8. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-van Marle M Elske

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13 and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13, decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96, but increased significantly in intensive care (IC and coronary care (CC units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17. The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16 and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18 and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96 and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90. The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an existing guideline can lead to better adherence and cost savings. Especially, hospitals which use a lot of urethral catheters or

  9. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  10. [Incidence of phlebitis due to peripherally inserted venous catheters: impact of a catheter management protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrete-Morales, C; Vázquez-Pérez, M A; Sánchez-Berna, M; Gilabert-Cerro, I; Corzo-Delgado, J E; Pineda-Vergara, J A; Vergara-López, S; Gómez-Mateos, J

    2010-01-01

    To assess the impact on the incidence of PPIVC by implementing a catheter management protocol and to determine risk factors for PPIVC development in hospitalized patients. A total of 3978 episodes of venous catheterization were prospectively included from September 2002 to December 2007. A catheter management protocol was implemented during this period of time. The incidence and variables associated to the occurrence of PPIVC were determined. The incidence of PPIVC from 2002 to 2007 was 4.8%, 4.3%, 3.6%, 2.5%, 1.3% and 1.8% (phistory of phlebitis was the only factor independently associated to phlebitis due to peripherally inserted central venous catheters (AOR 3.24; CI at 95% CI= 1.05-9.98, p=0.04). A catheter management protocol decreases the incidence of PPIVC in hospitalized patients. The risk of PPIVC increases for peripherally inserted central venous catheters when the patients have a history of phlebitis and for peripheral venous catheters when amiodarone or cefotaxime are infused. Catheterization of peripheral veins performed during morning shifts is associated with a lower incidence of PPIVC when compared with night shift catheterizations.

  11. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Bilim Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)); Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A. (Dept. of Radiology of Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Ozturk, E. (Dept. of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Karatoprak, O. (Dept. of Orthopeadic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey))

    2009-02-15

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  12. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C.; Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A.; Ozturk, E.; Karatoprak, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  13. Safety of peritoneal and pleural drain placement in pediatric stem cell transplant recipients with severe veno-occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenci, Arin L; Stetson, Alyssa; Weldon, Christopher B; Lehmann, Leslie E

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic VOD (veno-occlusive disease) is a serious complication of HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) and has historically been associated with high mortality. This obstruction to hepatic flow often results in fluid collections in the peritoneal and pleural cavities. Catheter placement to drain ascites or pleural fluid may reduce intra-abdominal hypertension and/or improve respiratory parameters. The safety of these interventions among critically ill, immunocompromised children is unknown. Among 32 HSCT recipients (2000-2012) with severe VOD, we assessed the primary outcome of procedural complication from peritoneal drain placement. Twenty-four (75%) patients underwent peritoneal drain placement. No patient sustained visceral perforation or hemorrhage with drain placement. Overall mortality was 47% (n = 15). The procedure was not associated with increased overall mortality (p > 0.99). Eight (25%) peritoneal drains required replacement for malfunction. Of 24 patients with peritoneal drains, one (4%) patient had a positive culture from ascitic fluid. Eight (25%) patients underwent pleural drain placement. No pleural drain-related procedural complication or infection occurred. Four (50%) of the eight patients with pleural drains had de-escalation in oxygen requirement at drain removal, compared to time of placement. In this study, peritoneal and pleural drains were safe interventions for children with severe VOD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Repositioning of malpositioned or flipped central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Vogl, T.J. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Central Radiology Clinic, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Primary misplaced or secondary flipped implanted catheters are located mostly in the right jugular vein. We demonstrate an effective method to replace fix implanted catheters such as Ports, Grochomg or Hickman catheters. Using a femoral venous approach, replacement into the superior vena cava can easily be done with a Sidewinder 1 catheter which is hooked over the misplaced central venous approach. In all our patients the method was successful. The repositioning technique described is simple, fast and has low costs. We can keep sterile conditions and do not need to solve the catheters' fixation. (orig.)

  15. Detection of electrophysiology catheters in noisy fluoroscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Erik; Rongen, Peter; van Almsick, Markus; ter Haar Romeny, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac catheter ablation is a minimally invasive medical procedure to treat patients with heart rhythm disorders. It is useful to know the positions of the catheters and electrodes during the intervention, e.g. for the automatization of cardiac mapping. Our goal is therefore to develop a robust image analysis method that can detect the catheters in X-ray fluoroscopy images. Our method uses steerable tensor voting in combination with a catheter-specific multi-step extraction algorithm. The evaluation on clinical fluoroscopy images shows that especially the extraction of the catheter tip is successful and that the use of tensor voting accounts for a large increase in performance.

  16. Use of monorail PTCA balloon catheter for local drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Vijay; Nair, Girish M; Gupta, Mohit D

    2007-01-01

    We report the use of monorail coronary balloon as an infusion catheter to give bailout abciximab selectively into the site of stent thrombosis as an adjunct to plain old balloon angioplasty (POBA) in a patient of subacute stent thrombosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The balloon component (polyamide material) of the monorail balloon catheter was shaved off the catheter so that abciximab injected through the balloon port of the catheter exited out the shaft of the balloon catheter at the site from where the balloon material was shaved off. We believe that selective infusion with abciximab along with POBA established antegrade flow and relieved the patient's ischemia. In the absence of essential hardware to give intracoronary drugs in an emergency situation, one may employ our technique of infusion through a monorail balloon catheter after shaving the balloon component from the catheter.

  17. The bowed catheter sign: a risk for pericardial tamponade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towbin, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The use of a central venous catheter (CVC) has become commonplace in the care of children with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. Complications resulting from the insertion of these catheters are well recognized and can be life-threatening. When a temporary CVC or other catheter is inserted into the central venous system it is secured to the skin with a combination of sutures and sterile dressing. This fixes the catheter in place and does not allow it to retract, thereby putting pressure on the right atrial wall via the catheter tip if it is too long. The probability of wall penetration is increased if a catheter or device is tapered at the point of contact. The purpose of this case report is to present the bowed catheter sign and to review the anatomy of the cavotricuspid isthmus, a possible predisposing factor to cardiac perforation and tamponade. (orig.)

  18. The bowed catheter sign: a risk for pericardial tamponade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Richard [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The use of a central venous catheter (CVC) has become commonplace in the care of children with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. Complications resulting from the insertion of these catheters are well recognized and can be life-threatening. When a temporary CVC or other catheter is inserted into the central venous system it is secured to the skin with a combination of sutures and sterile dressing. This fixes the catheter in place and does not allow it to retract, thereby putting pressure on the right atrial wall via the catheter tip if it is too long. The probability of wall penetration is increased if a catheter or device is tapered at the point of contact. The purpose of this case report is to present the bowed catheter sign and to review the anatomy of the cavotricuspid isthmus, a possible predisposing factor to cardiac perforation and tamponade. (orig.)

  19. Catheter versus non-catheter angiography in isolated third nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    To discuss the controversies surrounding the indications for catheter angiography versus non-catheter and less invasive angiography techniques (e.g. magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computerized tomography angiography (CTA)) in the evaluation of patients with a third nerve palsy. Clinical opinion-perspective and literature review. The patient with an isolated third nerve palsy might have a vasculopathic (and typically benign, self limited course) etiology or a life threatening intracranial posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although it is clear that non-isolated third nerve palsies require imaging directed at the topographical localization of the clinical findings, the evaluation of the neurologically isolated third nerve palsy remains controversial. The completeness of the external (i.e. somatic) motor dysfunction and the presence or absence of internal (i.e. pupillary) dysfunction are generally used to guide the choice of initial neuroimaging. Advances in MRA and CTA technology have reduced but not eliminated our dependence upon catheter angiography in this setting. A properly performed and interpreted MRA or CTA probably will be able to detect greater than 95 % of aneurysms producing a third nerve palsy. The issues surrounding the use of catheter angiography in third nerve palsy are reviewed. If the clinician is highly confident in the capability, availability, and reliability of the neuroradiologist and of their institutional experience and quality of less invasive non-catheter MRA and CTA and if the risk of aneurysm is low or if the risk of angiography is high (e.g. elderly, renal failure, iodinated contrast allergy, risk of stroke) then MRI and MRA (or CTA) may be a reasonable alternative to catheter angiography. Patients with a moderate or uncertain risk of aneurysm and a lower risk for catheter angiography or if there is a low confidence in the quality or the interpretation of the institutional MRA (or CTA) may still require catheter

  20. Product placement and its aplication in foreign film

    OpenAIRE

    Vaněk, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Marketing and commertial communication and position of product placement within it, legislature governing product placement and its aplication, history of product placement, forms of product placement, use of product placement within marketing campaign, aplication of product placement in movie Casino Royale.

  1. Humanitarian engineering placements in our own communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderSteen, J. D. J.; Hall, K. R.; Baillie, C. A.

    2010-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in the humanitarian engineering curriculum, and a service-learning placement could be an important component of such a curriculum. International placements offer some important pedagogical advantages, but also have some practical and ethical limitations. Local community-based placements have the potential to be transformative for both the student and the community, although this potential is not always seen. In order to investigate the role of local placements, qualitative research interviews were conducted. Thirty-two semi-structured research interviews were conducted and analysed, resulting in a distinct outcome space. It is concluded that local humanitarian engineering placements greatly complement international placements and are strongly recommended if international placements are conducted. More importantly it is seen that we are better suited to address the marginalised in our own community, although it is often easier to see the needs of an outside populace.

  2. Usefulness of gram staining of blood collected from total parenteral nutrition catheter for rapid diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonens, F; el Alami, S; Van Gossum, A; Struelens, M J; Serruys, E

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of Gram staining of blood drawn from catheters used to administer total parenteral nutrition was compared with paired quantitative blood cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis. Gram staining was positive in 11 of 18 episodes of catheter-related sepsis documented by quantitative culture (sensitivity, 61%) but in none of the 5 episodes of fever unrelated to catheter infection. Thus, this procedure enabled the rapid presumptive diagnosis and guidance of antimicrobial therapy for total parenteral nutrition catheter sepsis, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 42%. PMID:7521359

  3. In vitro analysis of balloon cuffing phenomenon: inherent biophysical properties of catheter material or mechanics of catheter balloon deflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; So, Karina

    2012-06-01

    To investigates the different methods of balloon deflation, types of urinary catheters and exposure to urine media in catheter balloon cuffing. Bardex®, Bard-Lubri-Sil®, Argyle®, Releen® and Biocath® were tested in sterile and E.Coli inoculated urine at 0, 14 and 28 days. Catheter deflation was performed with active deflation; passive deflation; passive auto-deflation; and excision of the balloon inflow channel. Balloon cuffing was assessed objectively by running the deflated balloon over a plate of agar and subjectively by 3 independent observers. Bardex®, Argyle® and Biocath® showed greater degree of catheter balloon cuffing (p deflation was the worst method (p 0.05). Linear regression model analysis confirmed time as the most significant factor. The duration of catheters exposure, different deflation methods and types of catheters tested contributed significantly to catheter balloon cuffing (p < 0.01).

  4. Pelvic drainage during removal of dialysis catheter decreases the risk of subsequent intra-abdominal complications in refractory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Yang; Huang, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Kai; Huang, Chien-Wei; Chou, Nan-Hua; Lee, Po-Tsang; Fang, Hua-Chang; Chou, Kang-Ju; Chen, Chien-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Some patients with refractory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis continue to develop intra-abdominal complications despite removal of the peritoneal catheter. Repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy is often required, and mortality is not uncommon. The benefits of pelvic drainage placement during catheter removal in decreasing these complications and interventions remain unproven. Forty-six patients with refractory peritonitis who underwent removal of a Tenckhoff catheter between 1991 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Twelve patients had pelvic drainage using closed active suction devices during catheter removal (drainage group). The remaining 34 patients underwent catheter removal without drainage (non-drainage group). The outcomes measured were the development of intra-abdominal complications and the requirement for repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy within 90 days after the catheter removal. Baseline characteristics were similar with the exception of a higher median number of previous peritonitis episodes in the drainage group compared with the non-drainage group (2 vs 0, P = 0.02). During the follow-up period, intra-abdominal complications occurred in 15 (44%) of 34 patients in the non-drainage group, compared with one (8%) of 12 patients in the drainage group (P = 0.03). Twelve (35%) patients in the non-drainage group required repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy for management, compared with zero (0%) patients in the drainage group (P = 0.02). Drain tubes were removed at a median of 6 days (inter-quartile range: 5-10) without complications. In the management of refractory peritonitis, pelvic drainage during removal of dialysis catheter decreases the risk of subsequent intra-abdominal complications and invasive interventions. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Exploring relationships of catheter-associated urinary tract infection and blockage in people with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; McMahon, James M; Crean, Hugh F; Brasch, Judith

    2017-09-01

    To describe and explore relationships among catheter problems in long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, including excess healthcare use for treating catheter problems. Long-term urinary catheter users experience repeated problems with catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage of the device, yet little has been reported of the patterns and relationships among relevant catheter variables. Secondary data analysis was conducted from a sample in a randomised clinical trial, using data from the entire sample of 202 persons over 12 months' participation. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the sample over time. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were employed for logistic regressions to evaluate predictor variables of the presence/absence and frequencies of catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage. Catheter-related urinary tract infection was marginally associated with catheter blockage. Problems reported at least once per person in the 12 months were as follows: catheter-related urinary tract infection 57%, blockage 34%, accidental dislodgment 28%, sediment 87%, leakage (bypassing) 67%, bladder spasms 59%, kinks/twists 42% and catheter pain 49%. Regression analysis demonstrated that bladder spasms were significantly related to catheter-related urinary tract infection and sediment amount, and catheter leakages were marginally significantly and positively related to catheter-related urinary tract infection. Frequencies of higher levels of sediment and catheter leakage were significantly associated with higher levels of blockage, and being female was associated with fewer blockages. Persons who need help with eating (more disabled) were also more likely to have blockages. Catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage appear to be related and both are associated with additional healthcare expenditures. More research is needed to better understand how to prevent adverse catheter outcomes and patterns of problems in

  6. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-01-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi.

  7. Percutaneous catheter drainage of tuberculous psoas abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombo, F.; Martin-Egana, R.; Cela, A.; Diaz, J.L.; Linares-Mondejar, P.; Freire, M.

    1993-01-01

    Six patients with 7 tuberculous psoas or ilio-psoas abscesses were treated by CT-guided catheter drainage and chemotherapy. The abscesses (5 unilateral and 1 bilateral) were completely drained using a posterior or lateral approach. The abscess volume was 70 to 700 ml (mean 300 ml) and the duration of drainage 5 to 11 days (mean 7 days). Immediate local symptomatic improvement was achieved in all patients, and there were no procedural complications. CT follow-up at 3 to 9 months showed normalization in 5 patients, 2 of whom are still in medical therapy. One patient, who did not take the medication regularly, had a recurrent abscess requiring new catheter drainage after which the fluid collection disappeared. Percutaneous drainage represents an efficient and attractive alternative to surgical drainage as a supplement to medical therapy in the management of patients with large tuberculous psoas abscesses. (orig.)

  8. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  9. Incidence of phlebitis associated with the use of peripheral IV catheter and following catheter removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete de Souza Urbanetto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and its association with risk factors when using peripheral IV catheters (PIC and following their removal - (post-infusion phlebitis in hospitalized adults. Method: a cohort study of 171 patients using PIC, totaling 361 punctures. Sociodemographic variables and variables associated with the catheter were collected. Descriptive and analytical statistical analyses were performed. Results: average patient age was 56.96 and 51.5% of the sample population was male. The incidence of phlebitis was 1.25% while using PIC, and 1.38% post-infusion. The incidence of phlebitis while using PIC was associated with the length of time the catheter remained in place, whereas post-infusion phlebitis was associated with puncture in the forearm. Ceftriaxone, Clarithromycin and Oxacillin are associated with post-infusion phlebitis. Conclusions: this study made it possible to investigate the association between risk factors and phlebitis during catheter use and following its removal. The frequency of post-infusion phlebitis was larger than the incidence of phlebitis with the catheter in place, with Phlebitis Grade III and II being the most frequently found in each of these situations, respectively. Aspects related to post-infusion phlebitis can be explained, given the limited number of studies addressing this theme from this perspective.

  10. Retrograde prostatic urethroplasty with balloon catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, F.; Reddy, P.; Hulbert, J.; Letourneau, J.G.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplatz, K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors performed retrograde prostatic urethroplasty in 18 patients using a 25-mm urethroplasty balloon catheter. The procedure was performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia. Voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, rectal US, and MRE imaging were performed before and immediately after the procedure and at 2 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Long-term results at 18 months and possible clinical implications are discussed

  11. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death.

  12. Current status of endovascular catheter robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Alan B; Bismuth, Jean

    2018-06-01

    In this review, we will detail the evolution of endovascular therapy as the basis for the development of catheter-based robotics. In parallel, we will outline the evolution of robotics in the surgical space and how the convergence of technology and the entrepreneurs who push this evolution have led to the development of endovascular robots. The current state-of-the-art and future directions and potential are summarized for the reader. Information in this review has been drawn primarily from our personal clinical and preclinical experience in use of catheter robotics, coupled with some ground-breaking work reported from a few other major centers who have embraced the technology's capabilities and opportunities. Several case studies demonstrating the unique capabilities of a precisely controlled catheter are presented. Most of the preclinical work was performed in the advanced imaging and navigation laboratory. In this unique facility, the interface of advanced imaging techniques and robotic guidance is being explored. Although this procedure employs a very high-tech approach to navigation inside the endovascular space, we have conveyed the kind of opportunities that this technology affords to integrate 3D imaging and 3D control. Further, we present the opportunity of semi-autonomous motion of these devices to a target. For the interventionist, enhanced precision can be achieved in a nearly radiation-free environment.

  13. Proposed mechanism of action for twin mix anaesthesia when used as intra-space pterygomandibular injection for inferior alveolar nerve block with emphasis on effects of perineural injection of dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darpan Bhargava

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been recent research on the use of dexamethasone as an adjunct to local anaesthetics to enhance the block characteristics and improve post-operative pain outcomes. Numerous studies have shown that perineural dexamethasone improves post-operative analgesia, along with other clinical benefits. Intra-space pterygomandibular twin mix anaesthesia is a novel technique for inferior alveolar nerve block used for mandibular anaesthesia. Twin mix anaesthesia has its advantages in shortening the latency and prolonging the duration of the soft tissue anaesthesia, along with improving the quality of life in the post-operative period after mandibular oral surgical procedures. The concern regarding the use of perineural dexamethasone has been discussed.

  14. Placement by thermodynamic simulated annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Juan de; Lanchares, Juan; Hermida, Roman

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial optimization problems arise in different fields of science and engineering. There exist some general techniques coping with these problems such as simulated annealing (SA). In spite of SA success, it usually requires costly experimental studies in fine tuning the most suitable annealing schedule. In this Letter, the classical integrated circuit placement problem is faced by Thermodynamic Simulated Annealing (TSA). TSA provides a new annealing schedule derived from thermodynamic laws. Unlike SA, temperature in TSA is free to evolve and its value is continuously updated from the variation of state functions as the internal energy and entropy. Thereby, TSA achieves the high quality results of SA while providing interesting adaptive features

  15. Percutaneous placement of ureteral stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Antegrade placement of ureteral stents has successfully achieved in 41 of 46 ureters. When it was difficult to advance ureteral stents through the lesion, it was facilitated by retrograde guide-wire snare technique through urethra. Complications associated with the procedure were non-function of ureteral stent by occlusion, upward migration,and spontaneous fracture of ureteral stent. These complications were managed by percutaneous nephrostomy and removal of ureteral stents by guide-wire snare technique and insertion of a new ureteral stent. While blood cell in urine was markedly increased in about 50% of patients following the procedure.

  16. Intraperitoneally placed Foley catheter via verumontanum initially presenting as a bladder rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheem, Omer A; Jeong, Young Beom

    2011-09-01

    Since urethral Foley catheterization is usually easy and safe, serious complications related to this procedure have been rarely reported. Herein, we describe a case of intraperitoneally placed urethral catheter via verumontanum presenting as intraperitoneal bladder perforation in a chronically debilitated elderly patient. A 82-yr-old male patient was admitted with symptoms of hematuria, lower abdominal pain after traumatic Foley catheterization. The retrograde cystography showed findings of intraperitoneal bladder perforation, but emergency laparotomy with intraoperative urethrocystoscopy revealed a tunnel-like false passage extending from the verumontanum into the rectovesical pouch between the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum with no bladder injury. The patient was treated with simple closure of the perforated rectovesical pouch and a placement of suprapubic cystostomy tube.

  17. Peculiarities of product placement in Lithuanian movies

    OpenAIRE

    Pilelienė, Lina; Jurgilaitė, Sigita

    2013-01-01

    The scientific problem analysed in the article is formulates as follows: how product placement is used in Lithuanian movies. The object of the article is product placement in Lithuanian movies, and the aim is to analyse the peculiarities of product placement in Lithuanian movies. Following methods were used to reveal the problem and reach the aim. Theoretical analysis of scientific literature was provided to construct the framework for the research. The analysis of current usage of product pl...

  18. Do pulmonary artery catheters cause or increase tricuspid or pulmonic valvular regurgitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, S V; Wall, M H; Kennedy, D J; Brooker, R F; Butterworth, J

    2001-05-01

    There are few quantitative data on the extent or mechanism of pulmonary artery catheter (PAC)-induced valvular dysfunction. We hypothesized that PACs cause or worsen tricuspid and pulmonic valvular regurgitation, and tested this hypothesis by using transesophageal echocardiography. In 54 anesthetized adult patients, we measured color Doppler jet areas of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in two planes (midesophageal [ME] 4-chamber and right ventricular inflow-outflow views) and pulmonic insufficiency (PI) in one plane (ME aortic valve long-axis view), both before and after we advanced a PAC into the pulmonary artery. Regurgitant jet areas and hemodynamic measurements were compared by using paired t-test. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate after passage of the PAC. After PAC placement, the mean PI jet area was not significantly increased. The mean TR jet area increased significantly in the right ventricular inflow-outflow view (+0.37 +/- 0.11 cm(2)) (P = 0.0014), but did not increase at the ME 4-chamber view. Seventeen percent of patients had an increase in TR jet area > or =1 cm(2); 8% of patients had an increase in PI jet area >/=1 cm(2). In patients without pulmonic or tricuspid valvular pathology, placement of a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) worsened tricuspid regurgitation, which is consistently visualized in the right ventricular inflow-outflow view, and often not seen in the midesophageal 4-chamber view. This is consistent with malcoaptation of the anterior and posterior leaflets. PAC-induced pulmonic insufficiency was rarely detected in the midesophageal aortic valve long-axis view. We conclude that a PAC is very unlikely to be the sole cause of severe tricuspid regurgitation or pulmonic insufficiency.

  19. Perfusion index and plethysmographic variability index in patients with interscalene nerve catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Anne; Philippi, Larissa; Boehme, Stefan; Closhen, Dorothea; Schmidtmann, Irene; Scherhag, Anton; Markstaller, Klaus; Engelhard, Kristin; Pestel, Gunther

    2012-12-01

    Interscalene nerve blocks provide adequate analgesia, but there are no objective criteria for early assessment of correct catheter placement. In the present study, pulse oximetry technology was used to evaluate changes in the perfusion index (PI) in both blocked and unblocked arms, and changes in the plethysmographic variability index (PVI) were evaluated once mechanical ventilation was instituted. The PI and PVI values were assessed using a Radical-7™ finger pulse oximetry device (Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA, USA) in both arms of 30 orthopedic patients who received an interscalene catheter at least 25 min before induction of general anesthesia. Data were evaluated at baseline, on application of local anesthetics; five, ten, and 15 min after onset of interscalene nerve blocks; after induction of general anesthesia; before and after a 500 mL colloid fluid challenge; and five minutes thereafter. In the 25 patients with successful blocks, the difference between the PI values in the blocked arm and the PI values in the contralateral arm increased within five minutes of the application of the local anesthetics (P < 0.05) and increased progressively until 15 min. After induction of general anesthesia, the PI increased in the unblocked arm while it remained relatively constant in the blocked arm, thus reducing the difference in the PI. A fluid challenge resulted in a decrease in PVI values in both arms. The perfusion index increases after successful interscalene nerve blockade and may be used as an indicator for successful block placement in awake patients. The PVI values before and after a fluid challenge can be useful to detect changes in preload, and this can be performed in both blocked and unblocked arms.

  20. Product placement of computer games in cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heng-Li; Wang, Cheng-Shu

    2008-08-01

    Computer games are considered an emerging media and are even regarded as an advertising channel. By a three-phase experiment, this study investigated the advertising effectiveness of computer games for different product placement forms, product types, and their combinations. As the statistical results revealed, computer games are appropriate for placement advertising. Additionally, different product types and placement forms produced different advertising effectiveness. Optimum combinations of product types and placement forms existed. An advertisement design model is proposed for use in game design environments. Some suggestions are given for advertisers and game companies respectively.

  1. Embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations using tracker catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Yong; Son, Mi Young; Jang, Jae Chun; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    With the recent advance in micro catheters, steerable guide wires, balloons, embolic materials and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), as well as technical refinements in endovascular surgery, there has been a revolution in therapeutic strategies for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have performed super selective angiography and embolization with Tracker micro catheter about 12 cases of brain AVMs for therapeutic and preoperative aims. This micro catheter and guide wire provided high selectivity of feeding artery, greater maneuverability and useful for deliver various embolus materials

  2. Successful Use of Modified Suprapubic Catheter to Rescue Prostatorectal Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Chiu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostatorectal fistula is a complication following radiotherapy. It remains a clinical challenge to treat because most patients experience a poor quality of life. This case report discusses a modified suprapubic catheter for use in a patient with a prostatorectal fistula that developed after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. It is an inexpensive, easily available, and more patient-tolerable catheter that improves quality of life. Herein, we describe the development of this catheter.

  3. Changing Behavior among Nurses to Track Indwelling Urinary Catheters in Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bona Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs are preventable complications of hospitalization. An interdisciplinary team developed a curriculum to increase awareness of the presence of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs in hospitalized patients, addressed practical, primarily nurse-controlled inpatient risk-reduction interventions, and promoted the use of the IUC labels (“tags”. Five thirty-minute educational sessions were cycled over three daily nursing shifts on two inpatient medical floors over a 1-year period; participants were surveyed (n=152 to elicit feedback and provide real-time insight on the learning objectives. Nurse self-reported IUC tagging was early and sustained; after the IUC tag was introduced, there was a significant increase in tagging reported by the end of the block of educational sessions (from 46.2% to 84.6%, P=0.001. Early engagement combined with a targeted educational initiative led to increased knowledge, changes in behavior, and renewed CAUTI awareness in hospitalized patients with IUCs. The processes employed in this small-scale project can be applied to broader, hospitalwide initiatives and to large-scale initiatives for healthcare interventions. As first-line providers with responsibility for the placement and daily maintenance of IUCs, nurses are ideally positioned to implement efforts addressing CAUTIs in the hospital setting.

  4. Counterbalancing clinical supervision and independent practice: case studies in learning thoracic epidural catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T

    2010-12-01

    Thoracic epidural catheter placement is an example of a demanding and high-risk clinical skill that junior anaesthetists need to learn by experience and under the supervision of consultants. This learning is known to present challenges that require further study. Ten consultant and 10 trainee anaesthetists in a teaching hospital were interviewed about teaching and learning this skill in the operating theatre, and a phenomenological analysis of their experience was performed. Trainee participation was limited by time pressure, lack of familiarity with consultants, and consultants' own need for clinical experience. There was a particular tension between safe and effective consultant practice and permitting trainees' independence. Three distinct stages of participation and assistance were identified from reports of ideal practice: early (part-task or basic procedure, consultant always present giving instruction and feedback), middle (independent practice with straightforward cases without further instruction), and late (skill extension and transfer). Learning assistance provided by consultants varied, but it was often not matched to the trainees' stages of learning. Negotiation of participation and assistance was recognized as being useful, but it did not happen routinely. There are many obstacles to trainees' participation in thoracic epidural catheter insertion, and learning assistance is not matched to need. A more explicit understanding of stages of learning is required to benefit the learning of this and other advanced clinical skills.

  5. Optimal dose of perineural dexmedetomidine for interscalene brachial plexus block to control postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery: A prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hong Soo; Seo, Kwon Hui; Kang, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Jin-Young; Kim, Yong-Shin; Han, Na-Re

    2018-04-01

    Adjuvant perineural dexmedetomidine can be used to prolong the analgesic effect of interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB). We investigated the optimal dose of dexmedetomidine in ISB for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. One hundred patients scheduled for elective shoulder arthroscopic surgery were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind study. Ultrasound-guided ISB was performed before general anesthesia using 22 mL of ropivacaine 0.5% combined with 1, 1.5, or 2 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine (group D1, D2, and D3, respectively) or with normal saline as a control (group R, n = 25 per group). The primary outcome was the duration of analgesia (DOA), numeric pain rating scale (NRS), and consumption of additional analgesics during 36 h after ISB. Secondary outcome included durations of motor and sensory block (DOM and DOS), hemodynamic variables and sedation and dyspnea scores. Ninety-seven patients completed the study. The DOS, DOM, and DOA were significantly longer in the dexmedetomidine groups than in group R. The DOA was significantly longer in group D3 than in groups D1 (P = .026) and D2 (P = .039). The DOA was 808.13 ± 179.97, 1032.60 ± 288.14, 1042.04 ± 188.13, and 1223.96 ± 238.06 min in groups R, D1, D2, and D3, respectively. The NRS score was significantly higher in group R than in the dexmedetomidine groups 12 h after ISB (P surgery (P = .008 and P = .011, respectively). There were no significant differences in consumption of rescue analgesics, sedation, and dyspnea scores between the study groups. Perineural dexmedetomidine 2 μg/kg could be the optimal dose in ISB for arthroscopic shoulder surgery in that it provides an adequate DOA. However, this dose was associated with increased risk of hypotension.

  6. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shufeng Li Zheng; Gu Weizhong; Ru Fuming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  7. RJMCMC based Text Placement to Optimize Label Placement and Quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touya, Guillaume; Chassin, Thibaud

    2018-05-01

    Label placement is a tedious task in map design, and its automation has long been a goal for researchers in cartography, but also in computational geometry. Methods that search for an optimal or nearly optimal solution that satisfies a set of constraints, such as label overlapping, have been proposed in the literature. Most of these methods mainly focus on finding the optimal position for a given set of labels, but rarely allow the removal of labels as part of the optimization. This paper proposes to apply an optimization technique called Reversible-Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo that enables to easily model the removal or addition during the optimization iterations. The method, quite preliminary for now, is tested on a real dataset, and the first results are encouraging.

  8. Radiation dose associated with CT-guided drain placement for pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Cody J.; Isaacson, Ari J.; Fordham, Lynn Ansley; Ivanovic, Marija; Dixon, Robert G.; Taylor, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    To date, there are limited radiation dose data on CT-guided procedures in pediatric patients. Our goal was to quantify the radiation dose associated with pediatric CT-guided drain placement and follow-up drain evaluations in order to estimate effective dose. We searched the electronic medical record and picture archiving and communication system (PACS) to identify all pediatric (<18 years old) CT-guided drain placements performed between January 2008 and December 2013 at our institution. We compiled patient data and radiation dose information from CT-guided drain placements as well as pre-procedural diagnostic CTs and post-procedural follow-up fluoroscopic abscess catheter injections (sinograms). Then we converted dose-length product, fluoroscopy time and number of acquisitions to effective doses using Monte Carlo simulations and age-appropriate conversion factors based on annual quality-control testing. Fifty-two drainages were identified with mean patient age of 11.0 years (5 weeks to 17 years). Most children had diagnoses of appendicitis (n=23) or inflammatory bowel disease (n=11). Forty-seven patients had diagnostic CTs, with a mean effective dose of 7.3 mSv (range 1.1-25.5 mSv). Drains remained in place for an average of 16.9 days (range 0-75 days), with an average of 0.9 (0-5) sinograms per patient in follow-up. The mean effective dose for all drainages and follow-up exams was 5.3 mSv (0.7-17.1) and 62% (32/52) of the children had effective doses less than 5 mSv. The majority of pediatric patients who have undergone CT-guided drain placements at our institution have received total radiation doses on par with diagnostic ranges. This information could be useful when describing the dose of radiation to parents and providers when CT-guided drain placement is necessary. (orig.)

  9. Radiation dose associated with CT-guided drain placement for pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Cody J.; Isaacson, Ari J.; Fordham, Lynn Ansley; Ivanovic, Marija; Dixon, Robert G. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, UNC Health Care, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Taylor, J.B. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Environment, Health and Safety, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To date, there are limited radiation dose data on CT-guided procedures in pediatric patients. Our goal was to quantify the radiation dose associated with pediatric CT-guided drain placement and follow-up drain evaluations in order to estimate effective dose. We searched the electronic medical record and picture archiving and communication system (PACS) to identify all pediatric (<18 years old) CT-guided drain placements performed between January 2008 and December 2013 at our institution. We compiled patient data and radiation dose information from CT-guided drain placements as well as pre-procedural diagnostic CTs and post-procedural follow-up fluoroscopic abscess catheter injections (sinograms). Then we converted dose-length product, fluoroscopy time and number of acquisitions to effective doses using Monte Carlo simulations and age-appropriate conversion factors based on annual quality-control testing. Fifty-two drainages were identified with mean patient age of 11.0 years (5 weeks to 17 years). Most children had diagnoses of appendicitis (n=23) or inflammatory bowel disease (n=11). Forty-seven patients had diagnostic CTs, with a mean effective dose of 7.3 mSv (range 1.1-25.5 mSv). Drains remained in place for an average of 16.9 days (range 0-75 days), with an average of 0.9 (0-5) sinograms per patient in follow-up. The mean effective dose for all drainages and follow-up exams was 5.3 mSv (0.7-17.1) and 62% (32/52) of the children had effective doses less than 5 mSv. The majority of pediatric patients who have undergone CT-guided drain placements at our institution have received total radiation doses on par with diagnostic ranges. This information could be useful when describing the dose of radiation to parents and providers when CT-guided drain placement is necessary. (orig.)

  10. Pleurodesis Using Mistletoe Extract Delivered via a Spray Catheter during Semirigid Pleuroscopy for Managing Symptomatic Malignant Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Ahn, Hyo Yeong; Mok, Jeong Ha; Lee, Geewon; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Kwangha; Kim, Ki Uk; Park, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Min Ki

    Talc poudrage during thoracoscopy is considered the standard procedure for patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Until now, no alternative technique other than talc poudrage for pleurodesis during medical thoracoscopy has been proposed. Liquid sclerosants, such as mistletoe extract, have been sprayed evenly into the pleural cavity during semirigid pleuroscopy for chemical pleurodesis. We conducted a retrospective study using the database of semirigid pleuroscopy to identify the usefulness of pleurodesis using a mistletoe extract delivered via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy for symptomatic MPE. All consecutive patients with symptomatic MPE who underwent semirigid pleuroscopy from October 2015 to September 2016 were registered. The responses were evaluated using chest X- ray or computed tomography 4 weeks after pleurodesis. The study included 43 patients who underwent pleurodesis with mistletoe extract via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy. Complete and partial responses were seen in 21 (49%) and 19 (44%) patients, respectively. The median duration of chest tube placement after pleurod-esis was 7 days (range 6-8 days) in the 40 patients with complete or partial responses. No cases of severe hemorrhage, empyema formation, respiratory failure, or procedure-related mortality were observed in the subjects at 4 weeks after semirigid pleuroscopy. Pleurodesis with mistletoe extract delivered via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy is a safe and effective procedure for managing symptomatic MPE. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from indwelling Foley catheters following tube cystostomy in goats with obstructive urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Mavangira, Vengai; Byrne, Barbara A; Angelos, John A

    2017-05-01

    Tube cystostomy is a surgical method used for managing obstructive urolithiasis and involves placement of a Foley catheter into the urinary bladder. We identified and evaluated the antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria isolated from indwelling Foley catheters following tube cystostomy in goats with obstructive urolithiasis. Urine samples collected over a 10-y period from catheter tips at the time of removal were submitted for bacteriologic culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Resistance patterns to antibiotics, trends in the resistance patterns over the study period, and the probability of a bacterial isolate being resistant as a function of the identity of the isolate and antibiotic tested were determined. A total of 103 urine samples from 103 male goats with obstructive urolithiasis managed surgically with tube cystostomy were included in the study. Aerococcus (36.9%) and Enterococcus (30.1%) were isolated most frequently. The susceptibility patterns of all bacteria isolated did not change over the study period ( p > 0.05). Proportions of isolates resistant to 1, 2, and ≥3 antibiotics were 36.9%, 18.5%, and 23.3%, respectively. Thus, 41.8% of bacterial isolates were resistant to 2 or more antibiotics tested. The probability of Aerococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to be resistant to ampicillin, ceftiofur, erythromycin, penicillin, or tetracycline ranged from 0.59 to 0.76.

  12. Coronary angioplasty with second generation Monorail catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, A K; Meier, B; Urban, P; Villavicencio, R; de la Serna, F; Moles, V

    1991-07-01

    The Monorail system (Schneider) consists of a balloon catheter in which the guidewire passes through the balloon itself, exits the catheter proximal to the balloon, and runs alongside its small shaft (3 French) through the length of the guiding catheter. It offers distinct advantages over conventional systems of coronary angioplasty. It facilitates contrast injections and permits rapid balloon exchanges. This system was used for coronary angioplasty in 273 unselected consecutive patients (age 59 +/- 10, mean 35 to 73 years). There were 216 patients (84%) undergoing single-vessel and 57 patients (16%) with multi-vessel coronary angioplasty. A total of 335 coronary stenoses were dilated, which included 35 total occlusions. The size of balloon used ranged from 2.0 to 4.25 mm (3.0 +/- 0.5 mm) and the severity of stenosis was 85 +/- 11%. Technical success was defined as a residual stenosis of less than 50% as determined angiographically. Clinical success was defined as technical success, and absence of a major inhospital complication defined as absence of myocardial infarction, lack of need for coronary arterial bypass surgery, and survival. The Monorail system was technically successful in 294/300 stenotic lesions (98%). It was clinically successful for 281 lesions (94%). Of the 35 total occlusions, technical success was obtained in 25 (71%). The residual stenosis of successful cases was 26 +/- 21%. The Monorail system was also successful in 5 patients with stenosis of more than 90% in whom conventional systems failed. The complications included acute occlusion causing acute myocardial infarction in 13 cases (5%), emergency coronary arterial bypass surgery in 1 patient (0.4%), and death in 4 patients (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections – implementation of the recommendations of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO in nursing homes for the elderly in Frankfurt am Main, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary tract infections range among the most frequent infections not only in hospital patients but also in residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly. Urinary catheters are the greatest risk factor for urinary tract infections. In the guidance paper on the “prevention of infections in nursing homes” (2005 as well as in the updated recommendations for the “prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” (2015, the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO has recommended adequate preventive measures. In 2015, the implementation of these KRINKO recommendations was investigated.Method: All of Frankfurt’s 40 nursing homes were evaluated using a checklist based on the KRINKO recommendations. The evaluation included assessing the availability of operating instructions, appropriate indications for the placement of catheters etc. Age, sex and duration of catheterization, as well as current and previous infections within the past 6 months were documented for every resident with a catheter.Results: In 35 (87.5% of the nursing homes, operating instructions for the handling of urinary tract catheters were available. The decision as to whether a catheter is indicated is made by physicians, while its placement is often delegated to the nursing service. Typically, silicon catheters are used. In three-quarters of the nursing homes, regular intervals of 4–6 weeks for changing catheters were reported. On the respective survey day, 7.3% of the residents were catheterized. On the survey day, 3.6% (4.2% and in the previous 6 months a total of 28% (28.9% of the residents had a urinary tract infection (prevalence of antibiotic therapy in parentheses. Ciprofloxacin was used most often followed by cefuroxime and cotrimoxazole.Discussion: In the current evaluation, fewer nursing home residents were catheterized than in previous years and the rate of urinary tract infections was low

  14. Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections - implementation of the recommendations of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) in nursing homes for the elderly in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Gasteyer, Stefanie; Müller, Maria; Samoiski, Yvonne; Serra, Nicole; Westphal, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections range among the most frequent infections not only in hospital patients but also in residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly. Urinary catheters are the greatest risk factor for urinary tract infections. In the guidance paper on the "prevention of infections in nursing homes" (2005) as well as in the updated recommendations for the "prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections" (2015), the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) has recommended adequate preventive measures. In 2015, the implementation of these KRINKO recommendations was investigated. All of Frankfurt's 40 nursing homes were evaluated using a checklist based on the KRINKO recommendations. The evaluation included assessing the availability of operating instructions, appropriate indications for the placement of catheters etc. Age, sex and duration of catheterization, as well as current and previous infections within the past 6 months were documented for every resident with a catheter. In 35 (87.5%) of the nursing homes, operating instructions for the handling of urinary tract catheters were available. The decision as to whether a catheter is indicated is made by physicians, while its placement is often delegated to the nursing service. Typically, silicon catheters are used. In three-quarters of the nursing homes, regular intervals of 4-6 weeks for changing catheters were reported. On the respective survey day, 7.3% of the residents were catheterized. On the survey day, 3.6% (4.2%) and in the previous 6 months a total of 28% (28.9%) of the residents had a urinary tract infection (prevalence of antibiotic therapy in parentheses). Ciprofloxacin was used most often followed by cefuroxime and cotrimoxazole. In the current evaluation, fewer nursing home residents were catheterized than in previous years and the rate of urinary tract infections was low. This indicates an increasingly cautious and apparently appropriate

  15. Familial placement of Wightia (Lamiales)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qing-Mei; Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Liu, Guo-Li

    2014-01-01

    The familial placement of Wightia has long been a problem. Here, we present a comprehensive phylogenetic inspection of Wightia based on noncoding chloroplast loci (the rps16 intron and the trnL–F region) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer, and on chemical analysis. A total of 70...... samples (including 51 genera from 13 families of Lamiales) were employed in a molecular study. Phylograms suggest that Wightia is sister to Paulownia or Phrymaceae; species tree shows Wightia and Paulownia are sister groups which clustered with Phrymaceae in an unresolved clade. Chemical evidence shows...... affinity of Wightia to Paulowniaceae. With the addition of morphological, palynological and ecological characters, we suppose a familial position of Wightia belonging to or close to Paulowniaceae. Brandisia (a member of Orobanchaceae) does not have a close relationship with Wightia....

  16. Where does the pulmonary artery catheter float: Transesophageal echocardiography evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Tempe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary artery (PA catheter provides a variety of cardiac and hemodynamic parameters. In majority of the patients, the catheter tends to float in the right pulmonary artery (RPA than the left pulmonary artery (LPA. We evaluated the location of PA catheter with the help of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE to know the incidence of its localization. Three views were utilized for this purpose; midesophageal ascending aorta (AA short-axis view, modified mid esophageal aortic valve long-axis view, and modified bicaval view. Methods: We enrolled 135 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery where both the PA catheter and TEE were to be used; for this prospective observational study. PA catheter was visualized by TEE in the above mentioned views and the degree of clarity of visualization by three views was also noted. Position of the PA catheter was further confirmed by a postoperative chest radiograph. Results: One patient was excluded from the data analysis. PA catheter was visualized in RPA in 129 patients (96% and in LPA in 4 patients (3%. In 1 patient, the catheter was visualized in main PA in the chest radiograph. The midesophageal AA short-axis, modified aortic valve long-axis, and modified bicaval view provided good visualization in 51.45%, 57.4%, and 62.3% patients respectively. Taken together, PA catheter visualization was good in 128 (95.5% patients. Conclusion: We conclude that the PA catheter has a high probability of entering the RPA as compared to LPA (96% vs. 3% and TEE provides good visualization of the catheter in RPA.

  17. Totally implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: experience in 500 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Wolosker

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Totally implantable devices are increasingly being utilized for chemotherapy treatment of oncological patients, although few studies have been done in our environment to analyze the results obtained from the implantation and utilization of such catheters. OBJECTIVE: To study the results obtained from the implantation of totally implantable catheters in patients submitted to chemotherapy. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective. SETTING: Hospital do Câncer A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: 519 totally implantable catheters were placed in 500 patients submitted to chemotherapy, with preference for the use of the right external jugular vein. Evaluations were made of the early and late-stage complications and patient evolution until removal of the device, death or the end of the treatment. RESULTS: The prospective analysis showed an average duration of 353 days for the catheters. There were 427 (82.2% catheters with no complications. Among the early complications observed, there were 15 pathway hematomas, 8 cases of thrombophlebitis of the distal stump of the external jugular vein and one case of pocket infection. Among the late-stage complications observed, there were 43 infectious complications (0.23/1000 days of catheter use, 11 obstructions (0.06/1000 days of catheter use and 14 cases of deep vein thrombosis (0.07/1000 days of catheter use. Removal of 101 catheters was performed: 35 due to complications and 66 upon terminating the treatment. A total of 240 patients died while the catheter was functioning and 178 patients are still making use of the catheter. CONCLUSION: The low rate of complications obtained in this study confirms the safety and convenience of the use of totally implantable accesses in patients undergoing prolonged chemotherapy regimes.

  18. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V 100 Prostate >90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V 75 Bladder 75 Rectum 125 Urethra <<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter

  19. Effect of perineural dexmedetomidine on the quality of supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine and its interaction with general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurajala, Indira; Thipparampall, Anil Kumar; Durga, Padmaja; Gopinath, R

    2015-02-01

    The effect of perineural dexmedetomidine on the time to onset, quality and duration of motor block with ropivacaine has been equivocal and its interaction with general anaesthesia (GA) has not been reported. We assessed the influence of dexmedetomidine added to 0.5% ropivacaine on the characteristics of supraclavicular brachial plexus block and its interaction with GA. In a randomised, double blind study, 36 patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery on the upper limb under supraclavicular block and GA were divided into either R group (35 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 0.5 ml of normal saline [n - 18]) or RD group (35 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 50 μg dexmedetomidine [n - 18]). The onset time and duration of motor and sensory blockade were noted. The requirement of general anaesthetics was recorded. Both the groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. The time of onset of sensory block was not significantly different. The proportion of patients who achieved complete motor blockade was more in the RD group. The onset of motor block was earlier in group RD than group R (P quality and duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus block but did not decrease the requirement of anaesthetic agents during GA.

  20. Skin Cancer of the Head and Neck With Perineural Invasion: Defining the Clinical Target Volumes Based on the Pattern of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluck, Iris; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Popovtzer, Aron; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Bradford, Carol R.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of failure in patients with head-and-neck cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (HNCSCC) and clinical/radiologic evidence of perineural invasion (CPNI), in order to define neural clinical target volume (CTV) for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for HNCSCC with CPNI were included in the study. A retrospective review of the clinical charts, radiotherapy (RT) plans and radiologic studies has been conducted. Results: Eleven consecutive patients with HNCSCCs with CPNI were treated from 2000 through 2007. Most patients underwent multiple surgical procedures and RT courses. The most prevalent failure pattern was along cranial nerves (CNs), and multiple CNs were ultimately involved in the majority of cases. In all cases the involved CNs at recurrence were the main nerves innervating the primary tumor sites, as well as their major communicating nerves. We have found several distinct patterns of disease spread along specific CNs depending on the skin regions harboring the primary tumors, including multiple branches of CN V and VII. These patterns and the pertinent anatomy are detailed in the this article. Conclusions: Predictable disease spread patterns along cranial nerves supplying the primary tumor sites were found in this study. Awareness of these patterns, as well as knowledge of the relevant cranial nerve anatomy, should be the basis for CTV definition and delineation for RT treatment planning.

  1. Intravenous but not perineural clonidine prolongs postoperative analgesia after psoas compartment block with 0.5% levobupivacaine for hip fracture surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mannion, Stephen

    2012-02-03

    We evaluated the systemic and local effects of clonidine as an analgesic adjunct to psoas compartment block (PCB) with levobupivacaine. In a randomized, prospective, double-blind trial, 36 patients requiring hip fracture surgery received PCB and general anesthesia. Patients were randomized into three groups. Each patient received PCB with 0.4 mL\\/kg of levobupivacaine 0.5%. The control group (group L) received IV saline, the systemic clonidine group (group IC) received IV clonidine 1 mug\\/kg, and the peripheral clonidine group (group C) received IV saline and PCB with clonidine 1 microg\\/kg. The interval from time of completion of block injection to first supplementary analgesic administration was longer in group IC compared with group L (mean +\\/- sd, 13.4 +\\/- 6.1 versus 7.3 +\\/- 3.6 h; P = 0.03). There was no difference between group C and group L (10.3 +\\/- 5.9 versus 7.3 +\\/- 3.6 h; P > 0.05). The groups were similar in terms of 24 h cumulative morphine and acetaminophen consumption. There were no significant differences among groups regarding postoperative adverse effects (bradycardia, hypotension, sedation, and nausea). We conclude that IV but not perineural clonidine (1 microg\\/kg) prolongs analgesia after PCB without increasing the incidence of adverse effects.

  2. Clitoral Pain Following Retropubic Midurethral Sling Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Christofferson, DO

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Clitoral pain symptoms following placement of a retropubic midurethral sling should be evaluated and promptly addressed, given the potential negative impact on the patient's sexual function. Christofferson M, Barnard J, and Montoya TI. Clitoral pain following retropubic midurethral sling placement. Sex Med 2015;3:346–348.

  3. Internship guide : Work placements step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Internship Guide: Work Placements Step by Step has been written from the practical perspective of a placement coordinator. This book addresses the following questions : what problems do students encounter when they start thinking about the jobs their degree programme prepares them for? How do you

  4. Private Placement Debt Financing for Public Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Lance S.

    2010-01-01

    Private placement financing is a debt or capital lease obligation arranged between a municipality or a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit organization and a single sophisticated institutional investor. The investor can be a bank, insurance company, finance company, hedge fund, or high-net worth individual. Private placement financing is similar to…

  5. A physical theory on placement of fertilizers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de C.T.

    1953-01-01

    A theory was developed enabling calculation of the effect of any placement method of fertilizer on yield if the effect of one method is known.

    This theory was based on the following established facts. The reactions between soil and fertilizer rate are the same for broadcasting and placement

  6. Use of asymmetric bidirectional catheters with different curvature radius for catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantziari, Lilian; Suman-Horduna, Irina; Gujic, Marko; Jones, David G; Wong, Tom; Markides, Vias; Foran, John P; Ernst, Sabine

    2013-06-01

    The impact of recently introduced asymmetric bidirectional ablation catheters on procedural parameters and acute success rates of ablation procedures is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed data regarding ablations using a novel bidirectional catheter in a tertiary cardiac center and compared these in 1:5 ratio with a control group of procedures matched for age, gender, operator, and ablation type. A total of 50 cases and 250 controls of median age 60 (50-68) years were studied. Structural heart disease was equally prevalent in both groups (39%) while history of previous ablations was more common in the study arm (54% vs 30%, P = 0.001). Most of the ablation cases were for atrial fibrillation (46%), followed by atrial tachycardia (28%), supraventricular tachycardia (12%), and ventricular tachycardia (14%). Median procedure duration was 128 (52-147) minutes with the bidirectional, versus 143 (105-200) minutes with the conventional catheter (P = 0.232), and median fluoroscopy time was 17 (10-34) minutes versus 23 (12-39) minutes, respectively (P = 0.988). There was a trend toward a lower procedure duration for the atrial tachycardia ablations, 89 (52-147) minutes versus 130 (100-210) minutes, P = 0.064. The procedure was successfully completed in 96% of the bidirectional versus 84% of the control cases (P = 0.151). A negative correlation was observed between the relative fluoroscopy duration and the case number (r = -0.312, P = 0.028), reflecting the learning curve for the bidirectional catheter. The introduction of the bidirectional catheter resulted in no prolongation of procedure parameters and similar success rates, while there was a trend toward a lower procedure duration for atrial tachycardia ablations. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Artificial Intelligence based technique for BTS placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenoghena, C. O.; Emagbetere, J. O.; Aibinu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The increase of the base transceiver station (BTS) in most urban areas can be traced to the drive by network providers to meet demand for coverage and capacity. In traditional network planning, the final decision of BTS placement is taken by a team of radio planners, this decision is not fool proof against regulatory requirements. In this paper, an intelligent based algorithm for optimal BTS site placement has been proposed. The proposed technique takes into consideration neighbour and regulation considerations objectively while determining cell site. The application will lead to a quantitatively unbiased evaluated decision making process in BTS placement. An experimental data of a 2km by 3km territory was simulated for testing the new algorithm, results obtained show a 100% performance of the neighbour constrained algorithm in BTS placement optimization. Results on the application of GA with neighbourhood constraint indicate that the choices of location can be unbiased and optimization of facility placement for network design can be carried out.

  8. Artificial Intelligence based technique for BTS placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenoghena, C O; Emagbetere, J O; 1 Minna (Nigeria))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Telecommunications Engineering, Federal University of Techn.1 Minna (Nigeria))" >Aibinu, A M

    2013-01-01

    The increase of the base transceiver station (BTS) in most urban areas can be traced to the drive by network providers to meet demand for coverage and capacity. In traditional network planning, the final decision of BTS placement is taken by a team of radio planners, this decision is not fool proof against regulatory requirements. In this paper, an intelligent based algorithm for optimal BTS site placement has been proposed. The proposed technique takes into consideration neighbour and regulation considerations objectively while determining cell site. The application will lead to a quantitatively unbiased evaluated decision making process in BTS placement. An experimental data of a 2km by 3km territory was simulated for testing the new algorithm, results obtained show a 100% performance of the neighbour constrained algorithm in BTS placement optimization. Results on the application of GA with neighbourhood constraint indicate that the choices of location can be unbiased and optimization of facility placement for network design can be carried out

  9. Obstruction of peritoneal dialysis catheter is associated with catheter type and independent of omentectomy: A comparative data analysis from a transplant surgical and a pediatric surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Josephine; Schild, Raphael; Reismann, Marc; Ridwelski, Robert-Richard; Kempf, Caroline; Nashan, Bjoern; Rothe, Karin; Koch, Martina

    2018-04-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter occlusion is a common complication with up to 36% of catheter obstructions described in the literature. We present a comparison of complications and outcome after implantation of PD catheters in a transplant surgical and a pediatric surgical department. We retrospectively analyzed 154 PD catheters, which were implanted during 2009-2015 by transplant surgeons (TS, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, n=85 catheters) and pediatric surgeons (PS, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, n=69 catheters) in 122 children (median (range) age 3.0 (0.01-17.1) years) for acute (n=65) or chronic (n=89) renal failure. All catheters were one-cuffed or double-cuffed curled catheters, except that straight catheters were implanted into smaller children (n=19) by TS in Hamburg. Patient characteristics and operation technique did not differ between the departments. Peritonitis was the most common complication (33 catheters, 21.4%). Leakage (n=18 catheters, 11.7%) occurred more often in children weighing <10kg (p<0.001). The incidence of obstruction and dysfunction was significantly higher in catheters used in PS than catheters used in TS (30.4% vs. 11.8%, p=0.004). Omentectomy did not reduce the incidence of catheter obstruction (p=1.0). Perforation at the catheter tips was larger and appeared to be rougher in catheters used in PS than the catheters in TS. The type of catheter and presumably the type of perforation at the catheter tip may influence the incidence of peritoneal dialysis catheter obstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistent seroma after intraoperative placement of MammoSite for accelerated partial breast irradiation: Incidence, pathologic anatomy, and contributing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Kaufman, Seth A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Cardarelli, Gene; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Wazer, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of, and possible factors associated with, seroma formation after intraoperative placement of the MammoSite catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: This study evaluated 38 patients who had undergone intraoperative MammoSite catheter placement at lumpectomy or reexcision followed by accelerated partial breast irradiation with 34 Gy in 10 fractions. Data were collected regarding dosimetric parameters, including the volume of tissue enclosed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose shells, dose homogeneity index, and maximal dose at the surface of the applicator. Clinical and treatment-related factors were analyzed, including patient age, patient weight, history of diabetes and smoking, use of reexcision, interval between surgery and radiotherapy, total duration of catheter placement, total excised specimen volume, and presence or absence of postprocedural infection. Seroma was verified by clinical examination, mammography, and/or ultrasonography. Persistent seroma was defined as seroma that was clinically detectable >6 months after radiotherapy completion. Results: After a median follow-up of 17 months, the overall rate of any detectable seroma was 76.3%. Persistent seroma (>6 months) occurred in 26 (68.4%) of 38 patients, of whom 46% experienced at least modest discomfort at some point during follow-up. Of these symptomatic patients, 3 required biopsy or complete cavity excision, revealing squamous metaplasia, foreign body giant cell reaction, fibroblasts, and active collagen deposition. Of the analyzed dosimetric, clinical, and treatment-related variables, only body weight correlated positively with the risk of seroma formation (p = 0.04). Postprocedural infection correlated significantly (p = 0.05) with a reduced risk of seroma formation. Seroma was associated with a suboptimal cosmetic outcome, because excellent scores were achieved in 61.5% of women with seroma compared with 83% without seroma

  11. Percutaneous catheter drainage of lung abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Shin; Chun, Kyung Ah; Choi, Hyo Sun; Ha, Hyun Kown; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Catholic University Medical college, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    From March 1987 to July 1989, six patients (five adults and one child) with lung abscess (size, 5-13 cm in diameter) were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. In each case, the puncture was made where the wall of the abscess was in contact with the pleural surface. An 8 to 10 Fr cartheter was inserted for drainage. Five of 6 had a dynamatic clinical response within 24 hours of the drainage. Percutaneous drainage was successful with complete abscess resolution in four and partial resolution in one patient. No response was seen in the rest one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days(average, 15.5 days) in successful cases. One case of the failure in drainage was due tio persistent aspiration of the neurologically impaired patient. In one patient, the abscess resolved after drainage but recurred after inadvertent removal of the catheter 7 days after insertion. In two patients, concurrent pleural empyema was resolved completely by the drainage. Computed tomography provide anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding a puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective method for treating patient with lung abscess.

  12. Percutaneous catheter drainage of lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Shin; Chun, Kyung Ah; Choi, Hyo Sun; Ha, Hyun Kown; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    From March 1987 to July 1989, six patients (five adults and one child) with lung abscess (size, 5-13 cm in diameter) were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. In each case, the puncture was made where the wall of the abscess was in contact with the pleural surface. An 8 to 10 Fr cartheter was inserted for drainage. Five of 6 had a dynamatic clinical response within 24 hours of the drainage. Percutaneous drainage was successful with complete abscess resolution in four and partial resolution in one patient. No response was seen in the rest one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days(average, 15.5 days) in successful cases. One case of the failure in drainage was due tio persistent aspiration of the neurologically impaired patient. In one patient, the abscess resolved after drainage but recurred after inadvertent removal of the catheter 7 days after insertion. In two patients, concurrent pleural empyema was resolved completely by the drainage. Computed tomography provide anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding a puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective method for treating patient with lung abscess

  13. Prolonged use of indwelling urinary catheter following acute urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.O. Bello

    prolonged use of urinary catheters following acute urinary retention secondary to benign prostate enlarge- ment (BPE) and urethral ... indwelling urinary catheter for >3 months following acute urinary retention due to BPE or USD. The study .... the major health-care financing strategy in Nigeria and accounts for more than ...

  14. Management of retained encrusted urethral catheter with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Anwar Kunzman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of non-deflating heavily encrusted Foley catheter successfully removed by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL. To our knowledge this is the first case of using ESWL to remove encrusted foley catheter retained in the bladder.

  15. The left atrial catheter: its uses and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitman, B S; Naidich, D P; McGuinness, G; McCauley, D I

    1992-11-01

    The authors describe the radiographic appearance of the left atrial catheter, a widely used postsurgical intracardiac device. Recognition of the characteristic appearance of this catheter should be of value in detection of potential complications, including line fracture with resultant retention and/or embolization, infection, prosthetic valve dysfunction, and even cardiac tamponade.

  16. Prevention of catheter-related blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections are a morbid complication of central venous catheters. This review will highlight a comprehensive approach demonstrated to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. Elements of prevention important to inserting a central venous catheter include proper hand hygiene, use of full barrier precautions, appropriate skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine, and using the subclavian vein as the preferred anatomic site. Rigorous attention needs to be given to dressing care, and there should be daily assessment of the need for central venous catheters, with prompt removal as soon as is practicable. Healthcare workers should be educated routinely on methods to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. If rates remain higher than benchmark levels despite proper bedside practice, antiseptic or antibiotic-impregnated catheters can also prevent infections effectively. A recent program utilizing these practices in 103 ICUs in Michigan resulted in a 66% decrease in infection rates. There is increasing recognition that a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections can prevent most infections, if not all. This suggests that thousands of infections can potentially be averted if the simple practices outlined herein are followed.

  17. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated ...

  18. Detection of electrophysiology catheters in noisy fluoroscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, E.M.; Rongen, P.M.J.; Almsick, van M.A.; Haar Romenij, ter B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac catheter ablation is a minimally invasive medical procedure to treat patients with heart rhythm disorders. It is useful to know the positions of the catheters and electrodes during the intervention, e.g. for the automatization of cardiac mapping. Our goal is therefore to develop a robust

  19. Unusual migration of ventriculo peritoneal distal catheter into vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sghavamedin Tavallaee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available VP shunt is one of the most popular methods for ICP reduction and treatment of hydrocephalus. Various complications of this method are not uncommon such as shunt malfunction, infection and unusual migration of distal catheter. I present a case of migration of the peritoneal catheter out of the vagina.

  20. A prototype catheter designed for ultraviolet C disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Begovic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    UVC light exposure, sampling and plate counting. Findings Two minutes of UVC exposure was sufficient to obtain 4 log10 disinfection for the full-length prototype catheter. This exposure corresponds to ∼40 mJ/cm2 at the catheter tip and indicates that even shorter exposure times can be achieved...

  1. Intravascular catheter-related infection – current concepts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-28

    Aug 28, 2006 ... prevented. ... blood from both the catheter and a peripheral site, may ... Given the important role of cutaneous microflora in the ... valvular heart disease (especially prosthetic valves) and ... be explained by high arterial flow around the catheter, ... vena cava or right atrium via the cephalic and basilar veins of ...

  2. Predicting success of catheter drainage in infected necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollemans, Robbert A.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Besselink, Marc G.; Van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: At least 30% of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis are successfully treated with catheter drainage alone. It is currently not possible to predict which patients also need necrosectomy. We evaluated predictive factors for successful catheter drainage. Methods: This was a

  3. Predicting Success of Catheter Drainage in Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollemans, Robbert A.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ahmed Ali, Usama; van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.

    2016-01-01

    At least 30% of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis are successfully treated with catheter drainage alone. It is currently not possible to predict which patients also need necrosectomy. We evaluated predictive factors for successful catheter drainage. This was a post hoc analysis of 130

  4. Predicting Success of Catheter Drainage in Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollemans, R.A.; Bollen, T.L.; Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Ali, U. Ahmed; Goor, H. van; Boermeester, M.A.; Gooszen, H.G.; Besselink, M.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: At least 30% of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis are successfully treated with catheter drainage alone. It is currently not possible to predict which patients also need necrosectomy. We evaluated predictive factors for successful catheter drainage. METHODS: This was a

  5. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-25

    Nov 25, 2010 ... cases of extraluminal encrusted urethral catheters. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been utilised in the treatment of the bladder stones. Borrowing this principle, Kunzman et al. (12) has even used ESWL to fragment the stone-like encrustation over the retained Foley catheter balloon.

  6. Preprocedural ultrasound examination versus manual palpation for thoracic epidural catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Hasanin

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Preprocedural ultrasound imaging increased the incidence of first pass success in thoracic epidural catheter insertion and reduced the catheter insertion time compared to manual palpation method.

  7. Innovating urinary catheter design: An introduction to the engineering challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cathy

    2018-05-01

    Every day, people around the world rely on intermittent and indwelling urinary catheters to manage bladder dysfunction, but the potential or actual harm caused by these devices is well-recognised. Current catheter designs can cause urinary tract infection and septicaemia, bladder and urethral trauma and indwelling devices frequently become blocked. Furthermore, the devices can severely disrupt users' lives, limiting their daily activities and can be costly to manage for healthcare providers. Despite this, little significant design innovation has taken place in the last 80 years. In this article current catheter designs and their limitations are reviewed, common catheter-associated problems are outlined and areas of design ripe for improvement proposed. The potential to relieve the individual and economic burden of catheter use is high.

  8. An experimental study about efficacy of the drain catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Bum Gyu; Nho, Joon Young; Woo, Hyo Cheol; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Park, Choong Ki; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    Although percutaneous abscess drainage has become and accepted alternative from of therapy for selected patients with abscess, it is well known that there are several factors in the failure of adequate drainage such as pre- and post-procedural management, technique itself, various features of abscess, and selection and application of catheters. Among these factors, we made an experiment about drainage efficacy of commonly used various catheters with different viscosities of water-glycerin solution under the two different pressure gradients. The experimental values of flow rate were very lower than the calculated values. An efficacy of experimental value was 4-14%. Because the inner diameter of fittings and stopcocks was usually smaller than the inner diameter of catheters, these factors also affected the drain efficacy. Finally, we thought that it will be very helpful to the treatment of patient as well as to study about the catheter drainage, if the drain efficacy of individual catheters has been notified.

  9. Dose requirements for UVC disinfection of catheter biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D.; Tvede, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms on permanent catheters are the major sources of infection. Exposure to ultraviolet-C (UVC) light has been proposed as a method for disinfecting the inner surface of catheters. Specification of a UVC-based device for in vivo disinfection is based on the knowledge of the required...... doses to kill catheter biofilm. Given these doses and the power of available UVC light sources, calculation of the necessary treatment times is then possible. To determine the required doses, contaminated urinary catheters were used as test samples and UVC treated in vitro. Patient catheters (n = 67......) were collected and cut into segments of equal size and treated with various UVC doses. After treatment, the biofilm was removed by scraping and quantified by counting colony forming units. Percentage killing rates were determined by calculating ratios between UVC-treated samples and controls (no UVC...

  10. The dialysis catheter and infectious peritonitis in intermittent peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Hemmeløff Andersen, Karl Erik; Hansen, Lise

    1984-01-01

    118 episodes of infectious peritonitis registered among 156 patients treated with intermittent peritoneal dialysis over a 5-yr period were analysed with special reference to potential routes of infection associated with the dialysis catheter. Peritonitis was randomly distributed among the patients......, and the change of keeping free of peritonitis declined exponentially with time. The main factor determining the individual number of episodes was the total space of time, in which a patient had been wearing a dialysis catheter, whereas the number of catheter disconnections played no significant role. A relative...... preponderance of cases due to Enterobacteriaceae was noted within the first week after catheter implantation. In contrast with this, peritonitis with skin microorganisms was not associated with the implantation of catheters....

  11. Risk of extravasation after power injection of contrast media via the proximal port of multilumen central venous catheters. Case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schummer, C.; Sakr, Y.; Reinhart, K. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Anaestesiologie und Intensivtherapie; Steenbeck, J. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Gugel, M. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany). Klinik fuer Anaesthesiologie und Intensivtherapie; Schummer, W. [SRH Zentralklinikum Suhl (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

    2010-01-15

    Multilumen central venous catheters (CVCs) are not commonly used for power injection. However, in critically ill patients, CVCs - most of which do not have FDA approval for power injection - may be the only available venous access. The pitfalls of multilumen CVCs are illustrated by a case report of a patient in whom extravasation of intravenously administered contrast medium occurred after power injection in a triple-lumen CVC using the lumen with the port furthest from the catheter tip. The underlying mechanisms for the displacement of the initially correctly placed right subclavian CVC could include elevation of both arms of the obese patient or the power injection itself. The distances between port openings and catheter tips of various commercially available multilumen CVCs are assessed. We examine the possible caveats of ECG-guided CVC placement for optimal tip position, discuss technical difficulties related to power injection via CVCs, and review commonly used drugs that may cause extravasation injury. Knowledge of the distances between CVC port openings and the catheter tip are essential for safe intravasal administration of fluids. (orig.)

  12. Risk of extravasation after power injection of contrast media via the proximal port of multilumen central venous catheters. Case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schummer, C.; Sakr, Y.; Reinhart, K.; Steenbeck, J.; Gugel, M.; Schummer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Multilumen central venous catheters (CVCs) are not commonly used for power injection. However, in critically ill patients, CVCs - most of which do not have FDA approval for power injection - may be the only available venous access. The pitfalls of multilumen CVCs are illustrated by a case report of a patient in whom extravasation of intravenously administered contrast medium occurred after power injection in a triple-lumen CVC using the lumen with the port furthest from the catheter tip. The underlying mechanisms for the displacement of the initially correctly placed right subclavian CVC could include elevation of both arms of the obese patient or the power injection itself. The distances between port openings and catheter tips of various commercially available multilumen CVCs are assessed. We examine the possible caveats of ECG-guided CVC placement for optimal tip position, discuss technical difficulties related to power injection via CVCs, and review commonly used drugs that may cause extravasation injury. Knowledge of the distances between CVC port openings and the catheter tip are essential for safe intravasal administration of fluids. (orig.)

  13. A Simplified Technique of Percutaneous Hepatic Artery Port-Catheter Insertion for the Treatment of Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Hyun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Won, Jong Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Ah [Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We assessed the outcomes of a simplified technique for the percutaneous placement of a hepatic artery port-catheter system for chemotherapy infusion in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein invasion. From February 2003 to February 2008, percutaneous hepatic artery port-catheter insertion was performed in 122 patients who had hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein invasion. The arterial access route was the common femoral artery. The tip of the catheter was wedged into the right gastroepiploic artery without an additional fixation device. A side hole was positioned at the distal common hepatic artery to allow the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into the hepatic arteries. Coil embolization was performed only to redistribute to the hepatic arteries or to prevent the inadvertent delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into extrahepatic arteries. The port chamber was created at either the supra-inguinal or infra-inguinal region. Technical success was achieved in all patients. Proper positioning of the side hole was checked before each scheduled chemotherapy session by port angiography. Catheter-related complications occurred in 19 patients (16%). Revision was achieved in 15 of 18 patients (83%). This simplified method demonstrates excellent technical feasibility, an acceptable range of complications, and is hence recommended for the management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein thrombosis

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak at Percutaneous Exit of Ventricular Catheter as a Crucial Risk Factor for External Ventricular Drainage-Related Infection in Adult Neurosurgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Choi, Yeon-Ju; Ohk, Boram; Chang, Hyun-Ha

    2018-01-01

    The placement of a ventricular catheter for temporary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion is associated with a considerable risk of CSF infection. The authors investigated the effect of a CSF leak on CSF-related infection and the predisposing factors for a CSF leak. Fifty-two patients who underwent external ventricular drainage (EVD) for acute hydrocephalus associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage or intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) were enrolled in this prospective study. A CSF leak-detection paper (small sterilized filter paper) was applied at the percutaneous catheter exit site to check for any bloody CSF leak. In addition, radiologic and clinical data were collected. Four of the 52 patients (7.7%) developed an EVD-related CSF infection from organisms including Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 3) and Staphylococcus hominis (n = 1). A prolonged CSF leak >1 day was detected in 9 patients (17.3%) and revealed as a significant risk factor for CSF infection with a 44.4% positive predictive value. Moreover, an IVH >10 mL was found in 11 patients (21.2%) and revealed as a significant predisposing factor for a CSF leak at the percutaneous catheter exit. A prolonged CSF leak for >1 day at the percutaneous catheter exit site is a crucial risk factor for EVD-related CSF infection and an IVH >10 mL is a predisposing factor for a CSF leak. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Embracing Errors in Simulation-Based Training: The Effect of Error Training on Retention and Transfer of Central Venous Catheter Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Abdelfattah, Kareem; Wiersch, John; Ahmed, Rami A; Willis, Ross E

    2015-01-01

    Error management training is an approach that encourages exposure to errors during initial skill acquisition so that learners can be equipped with important error identification, management, and metacognitive skills. The purpose of this study was to determine how an error-focused training program affected performance, retention, and transfer of central venous catheter (CVC) placement skills when compared with traditional training methodologies. Surgical interns (N = 30) participated in a 1-hour session featuring an instructional video and practice performing internal jugular (IJ) and subclavian (SC) CVC placement with guided instruction. All interns underwent baseline knowledge and skill assessment for IJ and SC (pretest) CVC placement; watched a "correct-only" (CO) or "correct + error" (CE) instructional video; practiced for 30 minutes; and were posttested on knowledge and IJ and SC CVC placement. Skill retention and transfer (femoral CVC placement) were assessed 30 days later. All skills tests (pretest, posttest, and transfer) were videorecorded and deidentified for evaluation by a single blinded instructor using a validated 17-item checklist. Both the groups exhibited significant improvements (p error-based activities and discussions into training programs can be beneficial for skill retention and transfer. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Removal of non-deflatable retained foley catheter in the bladder by percutaneous puncture of catheter balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Duk; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyun; Chung, Hyon De

    1988-01-01

    Nondeflatable Foley catheter in the bladder is an uncommon event. We recently experienced a patient in whom the urologist were unable to remove a Foley catheter with cystoscope due to public bone fractures. The procedure, which was successfully carried out, consists of puncturing the ballon under fluoroscope.

  17. Sensor Placement Optimization using Chama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klise, Katherine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geotechnology and Engineering Dept.; Nicholson, Bethany L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Discrete Math and Optimization Dept.; Laird, Carl Damon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Discrete Math and Optimization Dept.

    2017-10-01

    Continuous or regularly scheduled monitoring has the potential to quickly identify changes in the environment. However, even with low - cost sensors, only a limited number of sensors can be deployed. The physical placement of these sensors, along with the sensor technology and operating conditions, can have a large impact on the performance of a monitoring strategy. Chama is an open source Python package which includes mixed - integer, stochastic programming formulations to determine sensor locations and technology that maximize monitoring effectiveness. The methods in Chama are general and can be applied to a wide range of applications. Chama is currently being used to design sensor networks to monitor airborne pollutants and to monitor water quality in water distribution systems. The following documentation includes installation instructions and examples, description of software features, and software license. The software is intended to be used by regulatory agencies, industry, and the research community. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the Python Programming Language. References are included for addit ional background on software components. Online documentation, hosted at http://chama.readthedocs.io/, will be updated as new features are added. The online version includes API documentation .

  18. Inpatient Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications: Should Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Lines Be Placed in the Intensive Care Unit Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyak, Michael; Kabir, Ishraq; Britt, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are now commonly used for central access in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting; however, there is a paucity of data evaluating the complication rates associated with these lines. We performed a retrospective review of all PICCs placed in the inpatient setting at our institution during a 1-year period from January 2013 to December 2013. These were divided into two groups: those placed at the bedside in the ICU and those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. Data regarding infectious and thrombotic complications were collected and evaluated. During the study period, 1209 PICC line placements met inclusion criteria and were evaluated; 1038 were placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients, and 171 were placed at the bedside in ICU patients. The combined thrombotic and central line associated blood stream infection rate was 6.17 per cent in the non-ICU group and 10.53 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.035). The thrombotic complication rate was 5.88 per cent in the non-ICU group and 7.60 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.38), whereas the central line associated blood stream infection rate was 0.29 per cent in the non-ICU group and 2.92 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.002). This study seems to suggest that PICC lines placed at the bedside in the ICU setting are associated with higher complication rates, in particular infectious complications, than those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. The routine placement of PICC lines in the ICU settings needs to be reevaluated given these findings.

  19. Innovations in Balloon Catheter Technology in Rhinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anza, Brian; Sindwani, Raj; Woodard, Troy D

    2017-06-01

    Since being introduced more than 10 years ago, balloon catheter technology (BCT) has undergone several generations of innovations. From construction to utilization, there has been a myriad of advancements in balloon technology. The ergonomics of the balloon dilation systems have improved with a focus on limiting the extra assembly. "Hybrid" BCT procedures have shown promise in mucosal preservation, including treating isolated complex frontal disease. Multiple randomized clinical trials report improved long-term outcomes in stand-alone BCT, including in-office use. The ever-expanding technological innovations ensure BCT will be a key component in the armamentarium of the modern sinus surgeon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  1. Diagnostic and prognostic value of 18F-FDG PET, CT, and MRI in perineural spread of head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercle, Laurent; Hartl, Dana; Rozenblum-Beddok, Laura; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Seban, Romain-David; Yeh, Randy; Bidault, François; Ammari, Samy

    2018-04-01

    We assessed whether quantitative imaging biomarkers derived from fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) could be extracted from perineural spread (PNS) in head and neck malignancies (HNM) to improve patient risk stratification. A case-control exploratory study (1:2 ratio) enrolled 81 patients with FDG-avid HNM. The case-group comprised 28 patients with documented PNS (reference: expert consensus), including 14 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Imaging biomarkers were extracted from the PNS on 18F-FDG PET, CT-scan, and MRI. The control-group enrolled 53 SCCs. The Cox proportional-hazards regression model explored the association with overall survival by univariate and multivariate analyses. The rate of PNS detection by 18F-FDG PET was 100% in the case-group. Quantitative imaging biomarkers were not associated with the presence of sensory (p>0.20) or motor (p>0.10) symptoms. In SCC patients (case: 14; control: 53), PNS was associated with a hazard ratio of death of 5.5 (95%CI: 1.4:20.9) by multivariate analysis. Increased cranial nerve SUV max was significantly associated with poorer overall survival by univariate analysis (p=0.001). Our pilot study showed the feasibility of extracting 18F-FDG PET biomarkers from PNS in FDG-avid HNM. Our results encourage the development of new PET/CT- or PET/MRI-guided management strategies in further prospective studies. • 18F-FDG PET/CT detects PNS in FDG-avid HNM. • PNS metabolism is more heterogeneous than healthy tissue. • PNS diagnosis is crucial: most patients were asymptomatic, N0 and M0. • PNS diagnosis is associated with poorer overall survival in SCC. • PET/CT- or PET/MRI-guided management strategies should be evaluated.

  2. Prostate HDR brachytherapy catheter displacement between planning and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, May; Hruby, George; Lovett, Aimee; Patanjali, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: HDR brachytherapy is used as a conformal boost for treating prostate cancer. Given the large doses delivered, it is critical that the volume treated matches that planned. Our outpatient protocol comprises two 9 Gy fractions, two weeks apart. We prospectively assessed catheter displacement between CT planning and treatment delivery. Materials and methods: Three fiducial markers and the catheters were implanted under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Metal marker wires were inserted into 4 reference catheters before CT; marker positions relative to each other and to the marker wires were measured from the CT scout. Measurements were repeated immediately prior to treatment delivery using pelvic X-ray with marker wires in the same reference catheters. Measurements from CT scout and film were compared. For displacements of 5 mm or more, indexer positions were adjusted prior to treatment delivery. Results: Results are based on 48 implants, in 25 patients. Median time from planning CT to treatment delivery was 254 min (range 81–367 min). Median catheter displacement was 7.5 mm (range −2.9–23.9 mm), 67% of implants had displacement of 5 mm or greater. Displacements were predominantly caudal. Conclusions: Catheter displacement can occur in the 1–3 h between the planning CT scan and treatment. It is recommended that departments performing HDR prostate brachytherapy verify catheter positions immediately prior to treatment delivery.

  3. Selective Placement Program Coordinator (SPPC) Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — List of the Selective Placement Program Coordinators (SPPC) in Federal agencies, updated as needed. Users can filter the list by choosing a state and/or agency name.

  4. Strengthening rural health placements for medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strengthening rural health placements for medical students: Lessons for South Africa ... rural health, primary healthcare and National Health Insurance strategies. ... preferential selection of students with a rural background, positioning rural ...

  5. Confirmation of Essure placement using transvaginal ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veersema, Sebastiaan; Vleugels, Michel; Koks, Caroline; Thurkow, Andreas; van der Vaart, Huub; Brölmann, Hans

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the protocol for confirmation of satisfactory Essure placement using transvaginal ultrasound. Prospective multicenter cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Outpatient departments of 4 teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Eleven hundred forty-five women who underwent

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000235.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge To use the sharing ... the hospital. You may have also had a stent (a tiny wire mesh tube) placed in the ...

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000234.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge To use the sharing ... peripheral artery). You may have also had a stent placed. To perform the procedure: Your doctor inserted ...

  8. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007393.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries To use the sharing features ... inside the arteries and block blood flow. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that keeps ...

  9. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jon J; Linte, Cristian A; Rettmann, Maryam E; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L; Robb, Richard A; Holmes, David R

    2015-02-21

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrode-tissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel [1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  10. Feedforward Coordinate Control of a Robotic Cell Injection Catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weyland; Law, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Remote and robotically actuated catheters are the stepping-stones toward autonomous catheters, where complex intravascular procedures may be performed with minimal intervention from a physician. This article proposes a concept for the positional, feedforward control of a robotically actuated cell injection catheter used for the injection of myogenic or undifferentiated stem cells into the myocardial infarct boundary zones of the left ventricle. The prototype for the catheter system was built upon a needle-based catheter with a single degree of deflection, a 3-D printed handle combined with actuators, and the Arduino microcontroller platform. A bench setup was used to mimic a left ventricle catheter procedure starting from the femoral artery. Using Matlab and the open-source video modeling tool Tracker, the planar coordinates ( y, z) of the catheter position were analyzed, and a feedforward control system was developed based on empirical models. Using the Student's t test with a sample size of 26, it was determined that for both the y- and z-axes, the mean discrepancy between the calibrated and theoretical coordinate values had no significant difference compared to the hypothetical value of µ = 0. The root mean square error of the calibrated coordinates also showed an 88% improvement in the z-axis and 31% improvement in the y-axis compared to the unmodified trial run. This proof of concept investigation leads to the possibility of further developing a feedfoward control system in vivo using catheters with omnidirectional deflection. Feedforward positional control allows for more flexibility in the design of an automated catheter system where problems such as systemic time delay may be a hindrance in instances requiring an immediate reaction.

  11. Magnetic catheter manipulation in the interventional MR imaging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W; Martin, Alastair B; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron D; Yee, Erin J; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vincent; Evans, Lee; Sincic, Ryan; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L; Hetts, Steven W

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate deflection capability of a prototype endovascular catheter, which is remotely magnetically steerable, for use in the interventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment. Copper coils were mounted on the tips of commercially available 2.3-3.0-F microcatheters. The coils were fabricated in a novel manner by plasma vapor deposition of a copper layer followed by laser lithography of the layer into coils. Orthogonal helical (ie, solenoid) and saddle-shaped (ie, Helmholtz) coils were mounted on a single catheter tip. Microcatheters were tested in water bath phantoms in a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner, with variable simultaneous currents applied to the coils. Catheter tip deflection was imaged in the axial plane by using a "real-time" steady-state free precession MR imaging sequence. Degree of deflection and catheter tip orientation were measured for each current application. The catheter tip was clearly visible in the longitudinal and axial planes. Magnetic field artifacts were visible when the orthogonal coils at the catheter tip were energized. Variable amounts of current applied to a single coil demonstrated consistent catheter deflection in all water bath experiments. Changing current polarity reversed the observed direction of deflection, whereas current applied to two different coils resulted in deflection represented by the composite vector of individual coil activations. Microcatheter navigation through the vascular phantom was successful through control of applied current to one or more coils. Controlled catheter deflection is possible with laser lithographed multiaxis coil-tipped catheters in the MR imaging environment. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CATTLE FEEDER BEHAVIOR AND FEEDER CATTLE PLACEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Kastens, Terry L.; Schroeder, Ted C.

    1994-01-01

    Cattle feeders appear irrational when they place cattle on feed when projected profit is negative. Long futures positions appear to offer superior returns to cattle feeding investment. Cattle feeder behavior suggests that they believe a downward bias in live cattle futures persists and that cattle feeders use different expectations than the live cattle futures market price when making placement decisions. This study examines feeder cattle placement determinants, comparing performance of expec...

  13. Disclosing brand placement to young children

    OpenAIRE

    De Pauw, Pieter; Hudders, Liselot; Cauberghe, Veroline; De Kuysscher, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This article examines whether a television brand placement warning cue can alter young children’s susceptibility for advertising effects (i.e., brand attitude) through activating their advertising literacy. The proposed model also puts forward an important moderating role for children’s skeptical attitude toward the brand placement format. Design/methodology/approach – The data were collected among 63 children between 7 and 9 years old (Mage = 8.49; 51% girls) through a single...

  14. Pregnancy Outcomes After Myomectomy With Polytetrafluoroethylene Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Jennifer L.; Milad, Magdy P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of this study was to report preliminary data on pregnancy outcomes after myomectomy with placement of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene adhesion barrier membrane. Methods: In this retrospective case series, 68 women who underwent myomectomy with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membrane placement between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2009, were identified. Of these women, 15 subsequently had documented pregnancies and were included in the final dataset...

  15. [Prevention of catheter-related infection: usefulness and cost-effectiveness of antiseptic catheters in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Ana M; Vassallo, Juan C; Moreno, Guillermo E; Althabe, María; Gómez, Silvia; Magliola, Ricardo; Casimir, Lidia; Bologna, Rosa; Barretta, Jorge; Ruffa, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the antiseptic-impregnated catheter compared with conventional catheters in preventing catheter- related blood stream infections (CR-BSI). Cost-effectiveness analysis; clinical trial, experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, open label. Patients and methods. A 172 patient cohort, under 1-year-old or less than 10 kg, postoperative cardiovascular children with central venous catheters (CVC) admitted to Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (UCI 35) at Hospital Nacional de Pediatría "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan", since September 2005 to December 2007. Demographic and CVC data were retrieved to compare: age, gender, weight, diagnosis, surgery, CVC days, costs and complications. Intervention. CVC Arrow, double-lumen, > 48 h of duration; intervention group: antiseptic-impregnated CVC vs. control group: CVC without antiseptics (conventional). The incidence of CR-IE (CR-Infected Events: colonization, local infection and/or CRBSI; combined end point) was 27% for antiseptic- impregnated CVC vs. 31% for conventional catheters (p= 0.6) with similar accumulated incidence of CR- BSI: 2.8 vs. 3.3 per 1000 dayscatheter. We found no differences between groups, except in weight: median 4.0 kg (r 2-17) vs. 4.7 kg (r 2-9) p= 0.0002 and age, median 2 months (r 1- 48) vs. 5 months (r 1- 24) p= 0.0019 in antiseptic-impregnated CVC group. These differences, though statistically significant were clinically non relevant. Median cost per patient during intensive care stay in the conventional CVC group was $3.417 (359-9.453) and in the antiseptic-impregnated-CVC group was $4.962 (239-24.532), p= 0.10. The use of antiseptic-impregnated CVC compared with conventional CVC did not decrease CR-BSI in this population. The cost per patients was higher in the antiseptic impregnated CVC group. These results do not support the routine use of this type of CVC in our population.

  16. Hickman catheter embolism in a child during stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, P.; Khan, B.; Ullah, K.; Ahmed, W.; Hussain, I.; Khan, A.A.; Anwar, M.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of stem cell recipients rely on indwelling central venous catheters situated in superior vena cava or right atrium. Semi-permanent tunneled silicone rubber Hickman catheters are widely used to provide durable central venous access for patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. A case of 5 years old child with diagnosis of severe aplastic anemia is reported. The patient received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and had successful engraftment with complete hematological recovery. He had Hickman catheter embolism in the pulmonary circulation following unsuccessful attempt to remove the line. The catherter was successfully removed by midsternostomy operation. The child is normal with sustained remission on day +218 post stem cell transplant. (author)

  17. Endovascular Treatment of an Iatrogenic Right Internal Jugular Vein- Right Subclavian Artery Fistula and Pseudoaneurysm During the Attempt of a Hemodialysis Catheter Insertion: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eui Min; Kim, Hyun Lee; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Complications during the placement of a central venous catheter, via the right internal jugular vein puncture include local hematoma, hemothorax, pneumothorax, central vein thrombosis, and hemopericardium. Iatrogenic right internal jugular vein-right subclavian artery fistula with the formation of right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysms is an extremely rare complication in patients undergoing a central vein puncture. We report the case of a patient who developed a local hematoma at the vein puncture site and dyspnea due to a right internal jugular vein-subclavian artery fistula and a right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm at the mediastinum after puncture of right internal jugular vein. The patient was successfully treated by embolization using microcoils

  18. Optimal DG placement in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, Durga; Mithulananthan, Nadarajah

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents two new methodologies for optimal placement of distributed generation (DG) in an optimal power flow (OPF) based wholesale electricity market. DG is assumed to participate in real time wholesale electricity market. The problem of optimal placement, including size, is formulated for two different objectives, namely, social welfare maximization and profit maximization. The candidate locations for DG placement are identified on the basis of locational marginal price (LMP). Obtained as lagrangian multiplier associated with active power flow equation for each node, LMP gives the short run marginal cost (SRMC) of electricity. Consumer payment, evaluated as a product of LMP and load at each load bus, is proposed as another ranking to identify candidate nodes for DG placement. The proposed rankings bridges engineering aspects of system operation and economic aspects of market operation and act as good indicators for the placement of DG, especially in a market environment. In order to provide a scenario of variety of DGs available in the market, several cost characteristics are assumed. For each DG cost characteristic, an optimal placement and size is identified for each of the objectives. The proposed methodology is tested in a modified IEEE 14 bus test system. (author)

  19. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  20. Percutaneous untying of a knot in a retained Swan-Ganz catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, Waqar A.; Sinha, Sankar; Rowlands, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A patient was referred to us with a tightly knotted Swan-Ganz catheter. The catheter could not be removed by conventional simple methods. We describe a minimally invasive means of removal of the catheter using an Amplatz gooseneck snare and an angioplasty balloon. This allowed the Catheter to be removed without trauma.