WorldWideScience

Sample records for performance computing center

  1. AHPCRC - Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    computing. Of particular interest is the ability of a distrib- uted jamming network (DJN) to jam signals in all or part of a sensor or communications net...and reasoning, assistive technologies. FRIEDRICH (FRITZ) PRINZ Finmeccanica Professor of Engineering, Robert Bosch Chair, Department of Engineering...High Performance Computing Research Center www.ahpcrc.org BARBARA BRYAN AHPCRC Research and Outreach Manager, HPTi (650) 604-3732 bbryan@hpti.com Ms

  2. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '15 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) in 2015. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance. The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.

  3. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '17 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael; HLRS 2017

    2018-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) in 2017. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance.The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.

  4. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '99 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, Willi

    2000-01-01

    The book contains reports about the most significant projects from science and engineering of the Federal High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). They were carefully selected in a peer-review process and are showcases of an innovative combination of state-of-the-art modeling, novel algorithms and the use of leading-edge parallel computer technology. The projects of HLRS are using supercomputer systems operated jointly by university and industry and therefore a special emphasis has been put on the industrial relevance of results and methods.

  5. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '98 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, Willi

    1999-01-01

    The book contains reports about the most significant projects from science and industry that are using the supercomputers of the Federal High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). These projects are from different scientific disciplines, with a focus on engineering, physics and chemistry. They were carefully selected in a peer-review process and are showcases for an innovative combination of state-of-the-art physical modeling, novel algorithms and the use of leading-edge parallel computer technology. As HLRS is in close cooperation with industrial companies, special emphasis has been put on the industrial relevance of results and methods.

  6. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '02 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, Willi

    2003-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in modeling and simulation on supercomputers. Leading German research groups present their results achieved on high-end systems of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) for the year 2002. Reports cover all fields of supercomputing simulation ranging from computational fluid dynamics to computer science. Special emphasis is given to industrially relevant applications. Moreover, by presenting results for both vector sytems and micro-processor based systems the book allows to compare performance levels and usability of a variety of supercomputer architectures. It therefore becomes an indispensable guidebook to assess the impact of the Japanese Earth Simulator project on supercomputing in the years to come.

  7. Building a High Performance Computing Infrastructure for Novosibirsk Scientific Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adakin, A; Chubarov, D; Nikultsev, V; Belov, S; Kaplin, V; Sukharev, A; Zaytsev, A; Kalyuzhny, V; Kuchin, N; Lomakin, S

    2011-01-01

    Novosibirsk Scientific Center (NSC), also known worldwide as Akademgorodok, is one of the largest Russian scientific centers hosting Novosibirsk State University (NSU) and more than 35 research organizations of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences including Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Institute of Computational Technologies (ICT), and Institute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics (ICM and MG). Since each institute has specific requirements on the architecture of the computing farms involved in its research field, currently we've got several computing facilities hosted by NSC institutes, each optimized for the particular set of tasks, of which the largest are the NSU Supercomputer Center, Siberian Supercomputer Center (ICM and MG), and a Grid Computing Facility of BINP. Recently a dedicated optical network with the initial bandwidth of 10 Gbps connecting these three facilities was built in order to make it possible to share the computing resources among the research communities of participating institutes, thus providing a common platform for building the computing infrastructure for various scientific projects. Unification of the computing infrastructure is achieved by extensive use of virtualization technologies based on XEN and KVM platforms. The solution implemented was tested thoroughly within the computing environment of KEDR detector experiment which is being carried out at BINP, and foreseen to be applied to the use cases of other HEP experiments in the upcoming future.

  8. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '16 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) in 2016. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance. The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.

  9. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '08 : Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The discussions and plans on all scienti?c, advisory, and political levels to realize an even larger “European Supercomputer” in Germany, where the hardware costs alone will be hundreds of millions Euro – much more than in the past – are getting closer to realization. As part of the strategy, the three national supercomputing centres HLRS (Stuttgart), NIC/JSC (Julic ¨ h) and LRZ (Munich) have formed the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS) as a new virtual organization enabled by an agreement between the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the state ministries for research of Baden-Wurttem ¨ berg, Bayern, and Nordrhein-Westfalen. Already today, the GCS provides the most powerful high-performance computing - frastructure in Europe. Through GCS, HLRS participates in the European project PRACE (Partnership for Advances Computing in Europe) and - tends its reach to all European member countries. These activities aligns well with the activities of HLRS in the European HPC infrastructur...

  10. Performance of Cloud Computing Centers with Multiple Priority Classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Zivkovic, Miroslav; Akkerboom, J.; Litjens, R.; van den Berg, Hans Leo

    In this paper we consider the general problem of resource provisioning within cloud computing. We analyze the problem of how to allocate resources to different clients such that the service level agreements (SLAs) for all of these clients are met. A model with multiple service request classes

  11. High performance computing in science and engineering '09: transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2009

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagel, Wolfgang E; Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    ...), NIC/JSC (J¨ u lich), and LRZ (Munich). As part of that strategic initiative, in May 2009 already NIC/JSC has installed the first phase of the GCS HPC Tier-0 resources, an IBM Blue Gene/P with roughly 300.000 Cores, this time in J¨ u lich, With that, the GCS provides the most powerful high-performance computing infrastructure in Europe alread...

  12. Polymer waveguides for electro-optical integration in data centers and high-performance computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangel, Roger; Hofrichter, Jens; Horst, Folkert; Jubin, Daniel; La Porta, Antonio; Meier, Norbert; Soganci, Ibrahim Murat; Weiss, Jonas; Offrein, Bert Jan

    2015-02-23

    To satisfy the intra- and inter-system bandwidth requirements of future data centers and high-performance computers, low-cost low-power high-throughput optical interconnects will become a key enabling technology. To tightly integrate optics with the computing hardware, particularly in the context of CMOS-compatible silicon photonics, optical printed circuit boards using polymer waveguides are considered as a formidable platform. IBM Research has already demonstrated the essential silicon photonics and interconnection building blocks. A remaining challenge is electro-optical packaging, i.e., the connection of the silicon photonics chips with the system. In this paper, we present a new single-mode polymer waveguide technology and a scalable method for building the optical interface between silicon photonics chips and single-mode polymer waveguides.

  13. AHPCRC (Army High Performance Computing Research Center) Bulletin. Volume 1, Issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    area and the researchers working on these projects. Also inside: news from the AHPCRC consortium partners at Morgan State University and the NASA ...Computing Research Center is provided by the supercomputing and research facilities at Stanford University and at the NASA Ames Research Center at...atomic and molecular level, he said. He noted that “every general would like to have” a Star Trek -like holodeck, where holographic avatars could

  14. Transportation Research & Analysis Computing Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The technical objectives of the TRACC project included the establishment of a high performance computing center for use by USDOT research teams, including those from...

  15. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  16. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  17. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  18. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  19. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  20. PRODEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP : HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING WITH QCDOC AND BLUEGENE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRIST,N.; DAVENPORT,J.; DENG,Y.; GARA,A.; GLIMM,J.; MAWHINNEY,R.; MCFADDEN,E.; PESKIN,A.; PULLEYBLANK,W.

    2003-03-11

    Staff of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Columbia University, IBM and the RIKEN BNL Research Center organized a one-day workshop held on February 28, 2003 at Brookhaven to promote the following goals: (1) To explore areas other than QCD applications where the QCDOC and BlueGene/L machines can be applied to good advantage, (2) To identify areas where collaboration among the sponsoring institutions can be fruitful, and (3) To expose scientists to the emerging software architecture. This workshop grew out of an informal visit last fall by BNL staff to the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center that resulted in a continuing dialog among participants on issues common to these two related supercomputers. The workshop was divided into three sessions, addressing the hardware and software status of each system, prospective applications, and future directions.

  1. Computer Center: Software Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhrkopf, Richard, Ed.; Belshe, John F., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a software package, "Mitosis-Meiosis," available for Apple II or IBM computers with colorgraphics capabilities. Describes the documentation, presentation and flexibility of the program. Rates the program based on graphics and usability in a biology classroom. (CW)

  2. Human Computer Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2012-01-01

    Human Computer Music Performance (HCMP) is the study of music performance by live human performers and real-time computer-based performers. One goal of HCMP is to create a highly autonomous artificial performer that can fill the role of a human, especially in a popular music setting. This will require advances in automated music listening and understanding, new representations for music, techniques for music synchronization, real-time human-computer communication, music generation, sound synt...

  3. Investigating Impact Metrics for Performance for the US EPA National Center for Computational Toxicology (ACS Fall meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data drive...

  4. Evaluate Data Center Network Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilimon, Artur

    through a data center network, which is usually built with layer 2 switches and layer 3 routers. The topology of the data center network is crucial for latency in the data communication to and from the data center and between servers in the data center. Tests can be conducted to measure latency and other...... Engineering, scientists evaluate data center network topologies with an SDN-based (Software-Defined Networking) control framework measuring network performance – primarily latency. This can be used to plan data center scaling by testing how a new topology will function before changes are made. Data center...... performance parameters for different data center network topologies. It is however important that tests can be repeated and reproduced to have comparable information from the tests. There are, of course, many topologies that can be used for data center networks. At DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics...

  5. Building the Teraflops/Petabytes Production Computing Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, William T.C.; Lucas, Don; Simon, Horst D.

    1999-01-01

    In just one decade, the 1990s, supercomputer centers have undergone two fundamental transitions which require rethinking their operation and their role in high performance computing. The first transition in the early to mid-1990s resulted from a technology change in high performance computing architecture. Highly parallel distributed memory machines built from commodity parts increased the operational complexity of the supercomputer center, and required the introduction of intellectual services as equally important components of the center. The second transition is happening in the late 1990s as centers are introducing loosely coupled clusters of SMPs as their premier high performance computing platforms, while dealing with an ever-increasing volume of data. In addition, increasing network bandwidth enables new modes of use of a supercomputer center, in particular, computational grid applications. In this paper we describe what steps NERSC is taking to address these issues and stay at the leading edge of supercomputing centers.; N

  6. Center for computer security: Computer Security Group conference. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-06-01

    Topics covered include: computer security management; detection and prevention of computer misuse; certification and accreditation; protection of computer security, perspective from a program office; risk analysis; secure accreditation systems; data base security; implementing R and D; key notarization system; DOD computer security center; the Sandia experience; inspector general's report; and backup and contingency planning. (GHT)

  7. High Performance Computing Multicast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    A History of the Virtual Synchrony Replication Model,” in Replication: Theory and Practice, Charron-Bost, B., Pedone, F., and Schiper, A. (Eds...Performance Computing IP / IPv4 Internet Protocol (version 4.0) IPMC Internet Protocol MultiCast LAN Local Area Network MCMD Dr. Multicast MPI

  8. Performing stencil computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donofrio, David

    2018-01-16

    A method and apparatus for performing stencil computations efficiently are disclosed. In one embodiment, a processor receives an offset, and in response, retrieves a value from a memory via a single instruction, where the retrieving comprises: identifying, based on the offset, one of a plurality of registers of the processor; loading an address stored in the identified register; and retrieving from the memory the value at the address.

  9. Engineering computations at the national magnetic fusion energy computer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, S.

    1983-01-01

    The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE). The NMFECC headquarters is located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its purpose is to apply large-scale computational technology and computing techniques to the problems of controlled thermonuclear research. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC also maintains a large collection of computer codes in mathematics, physics, and engineering that is shared by the entire MFE research community. This review provides a broad perspective of the NMFECC, and a list of available codes at the NMFECC for engineering computations is given

  10. Activity report of Computing Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-07-01

    On April 1997, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo (INS), and Meson Science Laboratory, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo began to work newly as High Energy Accelerator Research Organization after reconstructing and converting their systems, under aiming at further development of a wide field of accelerator science using a high energy accelerator. In this Research Organization, Applied Research Laboratory is composed of four Centers to execute assistance of research actions common to one of the Research Organization and their relating research and development (R and D) by integrating the present four centers and their relating sections in Tanashi. What is expected for the assistance of research actions is not only its general assistance but also its preparation and R and D of a system required for promotion and future plan of the research. Computer technology is essential to development of the research and can communize for various researches in the Research Organization. On response to such expectation, new Computing Research Center is required for promoting its duty by coworking and cooperating with every researchers at a range from R and D on data analysis of various experiments to computation physics acting under driving powerful computer capacity such as supercomputer and so forth. Here were described on report of works and present state of Data Processing Center of KEK at the first chapter and of the computer room of INS at the second chapter and on future problems for the Computing Research Center. (G.K.)

  11. Energy Performance Testing of Asetek's RackCDU System at NREL's High Performance Computing Data Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickinger, D.; Van Geet, O.; Ravenscroft, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we report on the first tests of Asetek's RackCDU direct-to-chip liquid cooling system for servers at NREL's ESIF data center. The system was simple to install on the existing servers and integrated directly into the data center's existing hydronics system. The focus of this study was to explore the total cooling energy savings and potential for waste-heat recovery of this warm-water liquid cooling system. RackCDU captured up to 64% of server heat into the liquid stream at an outlet temperature of 89 degrees F, and 48% at outlet temperatures approaching 100 degrees F. This system was designed to capture heat from the CPUs only, indicating a potential for increased heat capture if memory cooling was included. Reduced temperatures inside the servers caused all fans to reduce power to the lowest possible BIOS setting, indicating further energy savings potential if additional fan control is included. Preliminary studies manually reducing fan speed (and even removing fans) validated this potential savings but could not be optimized for these working servers. The Asetek direct-to-chip liquid cooling system has been in operation with users for 16 months with no necessary maintenance and no leaks.

  12. Digital optical computers at the optoelectronic computing systems center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The Digital Optical Computing Program within the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Opto-electronic Computing Systems has as its specific goal research on optical computing architectures suitable for use at the highest possible speeds. The program can be targeted toward exploiting the time domain because other programs in the Center are pursuing research on parallel optical systems, exploiting optical interconnection and optical devices and materials. Using a general purpose computing architecture as the focus, we are developing design techniques, tools and architecture for operation at the speed of light limit. Experimental work is being done with the somewhat low speed components currently available but with architectures which will scale up in speed as faster devices are developed. The design algorithms and tools developed for a general purpose, stored program computer are being applied to other systems such as optimally controlled optical communication networks.

  13. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  14. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  15. Cloud Computing in Science and Engineering and the “SciShop.ru” Computer Simulation Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Vorozhtsov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects of cloud computing applications for scientific research, applied design, and remote education are described in this paper. An analysis of the different aspects is performed based on the experience from the “SciShop.ru” Computer Simulation Center. This analysis shows that cloud computing technology has wide prospects in scientific research applications, applied developments and also remote education of specialists, postgraduates, and students.

  16. A Computer Learning Center for Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1998, MacMillan Hall opened at Brown University to students. In MacMillan Hall was the new Computer Learning Center, since named the EarthLab which was outfitted with high-end workstations and peripherals primarily focused on the use of remotely sensed and other spatial data in the environmental sciences. The NASA grant we received as part of the "Centers of Excellence in Applications of Remote Sensing to Regional and Global Integrated Environmental Assessments" was the primary source of funds to outfit this learning and research center. Since opening, we have expanded the range of learning and research opportunities and integrated a cross-campus network of disciplines who have come together to learn and use spatial data of all kinds. The EarthLab also forms a core of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research on environmental problems that draw upon the unique perspective of remotely sensed data. Over the last two years, the Earthlab has been a center for research on the environmental impact of water resource use in and regions, impact of the green revolution on forest cover in India, the design of forest preserves in Vietnam, and detailed assessments of the utility of thermal and hyperspectral data for water quality analysis. It has also been used extensively for local environmental activities, in particular studies on the impact of lead on the health of urban children in Rhode Island. Finally, the EarthLab has also served as a key educational and analysis center for activities related to the Brown University Affiliated Research Center that is devoted to transferring university research to the private sector.

  17. The Computational Physics Program of the national MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Since June 1974, the MFE Computer Center has been engaged in a significant computational physics effort. The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generations of supercomputers. The Computational Physics Group has been involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to tokamaks and compact toroids. A third area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code; this work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence have been under examination, with the hope of being able to explain anomalous transport. Also, we are collaborating in an international effort to evaluate fully three-dimensional linear stability of toroidal devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers. A summary of these programs are included in this paper. 6 tabs

  18. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  19. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLIMM,J.

    2002-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  20. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLIMM, J.

    2001-01-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook

  1. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLIMM,J.

    2001-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  2. THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLIMM,J.

    2003-11-01

    CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

  3. Performance indicators for call centers with impatience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouini, O.; Koole, G.M.; Roubos, A.

    2013-01-01

    An important feature of call center modeling is the presence of impatient customers. This article considers single-skill call centers including customer abandonments. A number of different service-level definitions are structured, including all those used in practice, and the explicit computation of

  4. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific

  5. Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for many applications in fluid mechanics research and aerospace vehicle design. A few applications being explored at NASA Ames Research Center will be presented and discussed. The examples presented will range in speed from hypersonic to low speed incompressible flow applications. Most of the results will be from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations in three space dimensions for general geometry applications. Computational results will be used to highlight the presentation as appropriate. Advances in computational facilities including those associated with NASA's CAS (Computational Aerosciences) Project of the Federal HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Program will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for future research will be presented and discussed. All material will be taken from non-sensitive, previously-published and widely-disseminated work.

  6. Human Performance Resource Center (HPRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — HPRC is aligned under Force Health Protection and Readiness and is the educational arm of the Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP) at the Uniformed...

  7. Computer-Related Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longstreet, Phil; Xiao, Xiao; Sarker, Saonee

    2016-01-01

    The existing information system (IS) literature has acknowledged computer self-efficacy (CSE) as an important factor contributing to enhancements in computer-related task performance. However, the empirical results of CSE on performance have not always been consistent, and increasing an individual......'s CSE is often a cumbersome process. Thus, we introduce the theoretical concept of self-prophecy (SP) and examine how this social influence strategy can be used to improve computer-related task performance. Two experiments are conducted to examine the influence of SP on task performance. Results show...... that SP and CSE interact to influence performance. Implications are then discussed in terms of organizations’ ability to increase performance....

  8. A multipurpose computing center with distributed resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudoba, J.; Adam, M.; Adamová, D.; Kouba, T.; Mikula, A.; Říkal, V.; Švec, J.; Uhlířová, J.; Vokáč, P.; Svatoš, M.

    2017-10-01

    The Computing Center of the Institute of Physics (CC IoP) of the Czech Academy of Sciences serves a broad spectrum of users with various computing needs. It runs WLCG Tier-2 center for the ALICE and the ATLAS experiments; the same group of services is used by astroparticle physics projects the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). OSG stack is installed for the NOvA experiment. Other groups of users use directly local batch system. Storage capacity is distributed to several locations. DPM servers used by the ATLAS and the PAO are all in the same server room, but several xrootd servers for the ALICE experiment are operated in the Nuclear Physics Institute in Řež, about 10 km away. The storage capacity for the ATLAS and the PAO is extended by resources of the CESNET - the Czech National Grid Initiative representative. Those resources are in Plzen and Jihlava, more than 100 km away from the CC IoP. Both distant sites use a hierarchical storage solution based on disks and tapes. They installed one common dCache instance, which is published in the CC IoP BDII. ATLAS users can use these resources using the standard ATLAS tools in the same way as the local storage without noticing this geographical distribution. Computing clusters LUNA and EXMAG dedicated to users mostly from the Solid State Physics departments offer resources for parallel computing. They are part of the Czech NGI infrastructure MetaCentrum with distributed batch system based on torque with a custom scheduler. Clusters are installed remotely by the MetaCentrum team and a local contact helps only when needed. Users from IoP have exclusive access only to a part of these two clusters and take advantage of higher priorities on the rest (1500 cores in total), which can also be used by any user of the MetaCentrum. IoP researchers can also use distant resources located in several towns of the Czech Republic with a capacity of more than 12000 cores in total.

  9. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffery R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the purpose, potential members and participants of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC). Included in the overview is a brief description of the administration and current activities of the NHHPC.

  10. JFK Center for the Performing Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number DC0000248, the JFK Center for the Performing Arts, in authorized to discharge from a facility in Washington, DC to the receiving waters named Potomac River.

  11. The role of dedicated data computing centers in the age of cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramarcu, Costin; Hollowell, Christopher; Strecker-Kellogg, William; Wong, Antonio; Zaytsev, Alexandr

    2017-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) anticipates significant growth in scientific programs with large computing and data storage needs in the near future and has recently reorganized support for scientific computing to meet these needs. A key component is the enhanced role of the RHIC-ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) in support of high-throughput and high-performance computing (HTC and HPC) at BNL. This presentation discusses the evolving role of the RACF at BNL, in light of its growing portfolio of responsibilities and its increasing integration with cloud (academic and for-profit) computing activities. We also discuss BNL’s plan to build a new computing center to support the new responsibilities of the RACF and present a summary of the cost benefit analysis done, including the types of computing activities that benefit most from a local data center vs. cloud computing. This analysis is partly based on an updated cost comparison of Amazon EC2 computing services and the RACF, which was originally conducted in 2012.

  12. NASA Center for Computational Sciences: History and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Nasa Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) has been a leading capacity computing facility, providing a production environment and support resources to address the challenges facing the Earth and space sciences research community.

  13. Center for Computing Research Summer Research Proceedings 2015.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Andrew Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parks, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-18

    The Center for Computing Research (CCR) at Sandia National Laboratories organizes a summer student program each summer, in coordination with the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) and Cyber Engineering Research Institute (CERI).

  14. Bioinformatics and Computational Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE COMPUTER CORE FACILITYEvaluation, purchase, set up, and maintenance of the computer hardware and network for the 170 users in the research...

  15. HPCToolkit: performance tools for scientific computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallent, N; Mellor-Crummey, J; Adhianto, L; Fagan, M; Krentel, M [Department of Computer Science, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, science teams are tackling problems that require simulation and modeling on petascale computers. As part of activities associated with the SciDAC Center for Scalable Application Development Software (CScADS) and the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI), Rice University is building software tools for performance analysis of scientific applications on the leadership-class platforms. In this poster abstract, we briefly describe the HPCToolkit performance tools and how they can be used to pinpoint bottlenecks in SPMD and multi-threaded parallel codes. We demonstrate HPCToolkit's utility by applying it to two SciDAC applications: the S3D code for simulation of turbulent combustion and the MFDn code for ab initio calculations of microscopic structure of nuclei.

  16. HPCToolkit: performance tools for scientific computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, N; Mellor-Crummey, J; Adhianto, L; Fagan, M; Krentel, M

    2008-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, science teams are tackling problems that require simulation and modeling on petascale computers. As part of activities associated with the SciDAC Center for Scalable Application Development Software (CScADS) and the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI), Rice University is building software tools for performance analysis of scientific applications on the leadership-class platforms. In this poster abstract, we briefly describe the HPCToolkit performance tools and how they can be used to pinpoint bottlenecks in SPMD and multi-threaded parallel codes. We demonstrate HPCToolkit's utility by applying it to two SciDAC applications: the S3D code for simulation of turbulent combustion and the MFDn code for ab initio calculations of microscopic structure of nuclei

  17. Improving engineers' performance with computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, E.E. III

    1984-01-01

    The problem addressed is how to improve the performance of engineers in the design, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The application of computer science to this problem offers a challenge in maximizing the use of developments outside the nuclear industry and setting priorities to address the most fruitful areas first. Areas of potential benefits include data base management through design, analysis, procurement, construction, operation maintenance, cost, schedule and interface control and planning, and quality engineering on specifications, inspection, and training

  18. Call center performance with direct response advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kiygi Calli (Meltem); M. Weverbergh (Marcel); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigates the manpower planning and the performance of a national call center dealing with car repairs and on the road interventions. We model the impact of advertising on the capacity required. The starting point is a forecasting model for the incoming calls, where we take

  19. Top scientific research center deploys Zambeel Aztera (TM) network storage system in high performance environment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    " The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has implemented a Zambeel Aztera storage system and software to accelerate the productivity of scientists running high performance scientific simulations and computations" (1 page).

  20. Human-centered Computing: Toward a Human Revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jaimes, Alejandro; Gatica-Perez, Daniel; Sebe, Nicu; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-01-01

    Human-centered computing studies the design, development, and deployment of mixed-initiative human-computer systems. HCC is emerging from the convergence of multiple disciplines that are concerned both with understanding human beings and with the design of computational artifacts.

  1. Contemporary high performance computing from petascale toward exascale

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary High Performance Computing: From Petascale toward Exascale focuses on the ecosystems surrounding the world's leading centers for high performance computing (HPC). It covers many of the important factors involved in each ecosystem: computer architectures, software, applications, facilities, and sponsors. The first part of the book examines significant trends in HPC systems, including computer architectures, applications, performance, and software. It discusses the growth from terascale to petascale computing and the influence of the TOP500 and Green500 lists. The second part of the

  2. Senior Computational Scientist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Basic Science Program (BSP) pursues independent, multidisciplinary research in basic and applied molecular biology, immunology, retrovirology, cancer biology, and human genetics. Research efforts and support are an integral part of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The Cancer & Inflammation Program (CIP),

  3. Computational Physics Program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    The principal objective of the computational physics group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. A summary of the groups activities is presented, including computational studies in MHD equilibria and stability, plasma transport, Fokker-Planck, and efficient numerical and programming algorithms. References are included

  4. Computed radiography systems performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, Clarice C.; Nersissian, Denise Y.; Furquim, Tania A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a computed radiography system was evaluated, according to the AAPM Report No. 93. Evaluation tests proposed by the publication were performed, and the following nonconformities were found: imaging p/ate (lP) dark noise, which compromises the clinical image acquired using the IP; exposure indicator uncalibrated, which can cause underexposure to the IP; nonlinearity of the system response, which causes overexposure; resolution limit under the declared by the manufacturer and erasure thoroughness uncalibrated, impairing structures visualization; Moire pattern visualized at the grid response, and IP Throughput over the specified by the manufacturer. These non-conformities indicate that digital imaging systems' lack of calibration can cause an increase in dose in order that image prob/ems can be so/ved. (author)

  5. Strategic performance evaluation in cancer centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rigoberto I; Langabeer, James R

    2009-01-01

    Most research in healthcare strategy has focused on formulating or implementing organizational plans and strategies, and little attention has been dedicated to the post-implementation control and evaluation of strategy, which we contend is the most critical aspect of achieving organizational goals. The objective of this study was to identify strategic control approaches used by major cancer centers in the country and to relate these practices to financial performance. Our intent was to expand the theory and practice of healthcare strategy to focused services, such as oncology. We designed a 17-question survey to capture elements of strategy and performance from our study sample, which comprised major cancer hospitals in the United States and shared similar mandates and resource constraints. The results suggest that high-performing cancer centers use more sophisticated analytical approaches, invest greater financial resources in performance analysis, and conduct more frequent performance reviews than do low-performing organizations. Our conclusions point to the need for a more robust approach to strategic assessment. In this article, we offer a number of recommendations for management to achieve strategic plans and goals on the basis of our research. To our knowledge, this study is one of the first to concentrate on the area of strategic control.

  6. Computational-physics program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1982-02-01

    The computational physics group is ivolved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of multidimensional Fokker-Planck, transport and combined Fokker-Planck/transport codes to both toroidal and mirror devices. Another major area is the investigation of linear and nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamics in two and three dimensions, with applications to all types of fusion devices. The MHD work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, investigations of more efficient numerical algorithms are being carried out

  7. Lecture 4: Cloud Computing in Large Computer Centers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This lecture will introduce Cloud Computing concepts identifying and analyzing its characteristics, models, and applications. Also, you will learn how CERN built its Cloud infrastructure and which tools are been used to deploy and manage it. About the speaker: Belmiro Moreira is an enthusiastic software engineer passionate about the challenges and complexities of architecting and deploying Cloud Infrastructures in ve...

  8. The computational physics program of the National MFE Computer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generation of supercomputers. The computational physics group is involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to compact toroids. Another major area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code. This work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence are being examined. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers

  9. High Performance Spaceflight Computing (HPSC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space-based computing has not kept up with the needs of current and future NASA missions. We are developing a next-generation flight computing system that addresses...

  10. High performance computing in Windows Azure cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Ambruš, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    High performance, security, availability, scalability, flexibility and lower costs of maintenance have essentially contributed to the growing popularity of cloud computing in all spheres of life, especially in business. In fact cloud computing offers even more than this. With usage of virtual computing clusters a runtime environment for high performance computing can be efficiently implemented also in a cloud. There are many advantages but also some disadvantages of cloud computing, some ...

  11. DOE Centers of Excellence Performance Portability Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Performance portability is a phrase often used, but not well understood. The DOE is deploying systems at all of the major facilities across ASCR and ASC that are forcing application developers to confront head-on the challenges of running applications across these diverse systems. With GPU-based systems at the OLCF and LLNL, and Phi-based systems landing at NERSC, ACES (LANL/SNL), and the ALCF – the issue of performance portability is confronting the DOE mission like never before. A new best practice in the DOE is to include “Centers of Excellence” with each major procurement, with a goal of focusing efforts on preparing key applications to be ready for the systems coming to each site, and engaging the vendors directly in a “shared fate” approach to ensuring success. While each COE is necessarily focused on a particular deployment, applications almost invariably must be able to run effectively across the entire DOE HPC ecosystem. This tension between optimizing performance for a particular platform, while still being able to run with acceptable performance wherever the resources are available, is the crux of the challenge we call “performance portability”. This meeting was an opportunity to bring application developers, software providers, and vendors together to discuss this challenge and begin to chart a path forward.

  12. High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '14

    CERN Document Server

    Kröner, Dietmar; Resch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in supercomputer simulation. It includes the latest findings from leading researchers using systems from the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS). The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering ranging from CFD to computational physics and from chemistry to computer science with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting findings of one of Europe’s leading systems, this volume covers a wide variety of applications that deliver a high level of sustained performance. The book covers the main methods in high-performance computing. Its outstanding results in achieving the best performance for production codes are of particular interest for both scientists and   engineers. The book comes with a wealth of color illustrations and tables of results.  

  13. High-performance computing using FPGAs

    CERN Document Server

    Benkrid, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This book is concerned with the emerging field of High Performance Reconfigurable Computing (HPRC), which aims to harness the high performance and relative low power of reconfigurable hardware–in the form Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs)–in High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. It presents the latest developments in this field from applications, architecture, and tools and methodologies points of view. We hope that this work will form a reference for existing researchers in the field, and entice new researchers and developers to join the HPRC community.  The book includes:  Thirteen application chapters which present the most important application areas tackled by high performance reconfigurable computers, namely: financial computing, bioinformatics and computational biology, data search and processing, stencil computation e.g. computational fluid dynamics and seismic modeling, cryptanalysis, astronomical N-body simulation, and circuit simulation.     Seven architecture chapters which...

  14. Supporting Human Activities - Exploring Activity-Centered Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bardram, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore an activity-centered computing paradigm that is aimed at supporting work processes that are radically different from the ones known from office work. Our main inspiration is healthcare work that is characterized by an extreme degree of mobility, many interruptions, ad-hoc...

  15. Network survivability performance (computer diskette)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    File characteristics: Data file; 1 file. Physical description: 1 computer diskette; 3 1/2 in.; high density; 2.0MB. System requirements: Mac; Word. This technical report has been developed to address the survivability of telecommunications networks including services. It responds to the need for a common understanding of, and assessment techniques for network survivability, availability, integrity, and reliability. It provides a basis for designing and operating telecommunication networks to user expectations for network survivability.

  16. Computational geometry lectures at the morningside center of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ren-Hong

    2003-01-01

    Computational geometry is a borderline subject related to pure and applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering. The book contains articles on various topics in computational geometry, which are based on invited lectures and some contributed papers presented by researchers working during the program on Computational Geometry at the Morningside Center of Mathematics of the Chinese Academy of Science. The opening article by R.-H. Wang gives a nice survey of various aspects of computational geometry, many of which are discussed in more detail in other papers in the volume. The topics include problems of optimal triangulation, splines, data interpolation, problems of curve and surface design, problems of shape control, quantum teleportation, and others.

  17. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and operate a wind farm optimally it is necessary to know in detail how the wind behaves and interacts with the turbines in a farm. This not only requires knowledge about meteorology, turbulence and aerodynamics, but it also requires access to powerful computers and efficient s...... software. Center for Computational Wind Turbine Aerodynamics and Atmospheric Turbulence was established in 2010 in order to create a world-leading cross-disciplinary flow center that covers all relevant disciplines within wind farm meteorology and aerodynamics.......In order to design and operate a wind farm optimally it is necessary to know in detail how the wind behaves and interacts with the turbines in a farm. This not only requires knowledge about meteorology, turbulence and aerodynamics, but it also requires access to powerful computers and efficient...

  18. High-performance computing — an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marksteiner, Peter

    1996-08-01

    An overview of high-performance computing (HPC) is given. Different types of computer architectures used in HPC are discussed: vector supercomputers, high-performance RISC processors, various parallel computers like symmetric multiprocessors, workstation clusters, massively parallel processors. Software tools and programming techniques used in HPC are reviewed: vectorizing compilers, optimization and vector tuning, optimization for RISC processors; parallel programming techniques like shared-memory parallelism, message passing and data parallelism; and numerical libraries.

  19. UC Merced Center for Computational Biology Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Michael; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2010-11-30

    Final report for the UC Merced Center for Computational Biology. The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) was established to support multidisciplinary scientific research and academic programs in computational biology at the new University of California campus in Merced. In 2003, the growing gap between biology research and education was documented in a report from the National Academy of Sciences, Bio2010 Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. We believed that a new type of biological sciences undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasized biological concepts and considered biology as an information science would have a dramatic impact in enabling the transformation of biology. UC Merced as newest UC campus and the first new U.S. research university of the 21st century was ideally suited to adopt an alternate strategy - to create a new Biological Sciences majors and graduate group that incorporated the strong computational and mathematical vision articulated in the Bio2010 report. CCB aimed to leverage this strong commitment at UC Merced to develop a new educational program based on the principle of biology as a quantitative, model-driven science. Also we expected that the center would be enable the dissemination of computational biology course materials to other university and feeder institutions, and foster research projects that exemplify a mathematical and computations-based approach to the life sciences. As this report describes, the CCB has been successful in achieving these goals, and multidisciplinary computational biology is now an integral part of UC Merced undergraduate, graduate and research programs in the life sciences. The CCB began in fall 2004 with the aid of an award from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under its Genomes to Life program of support for the development of research and educational infrastructure in the modern biological sciences. This report to DOE describes the research and academic programs

  20. Electoronic Performance Monitoring in Call Centers: An Ethical Decision Model

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, David

    2013-01-01

    Ever since it emerged on a widespread basis in the 1990s, electronic performance monitoring of employees has received significant scrutiny in the literature. Call centers have been the focus of many of these studies. This particular study addresses the issue of electronic performance monitoring in call centers from an ethical perspective. The following ethical dilemma is offered: "Is it ethical for a call center manager to evaluate the performance of a call center employee using electronic pe...

  1. US QCD computational performance studies with PERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Fowler, R; Huck, K; Malony, A; Porterfield, A; Reed, D; Shende, S; Taylor, V; Wu, X

    2007-01-01

    We report on some of the interactions between two SciDAC projects: The National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory (USQCD), and the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). Many modern scientific programs consistently report the need for faster computational resources to maintain global competitiveness. However, as the size and complexity of emerging high end computing (HEC) systems continue to rise, achieving good performance on such systems is becoming ever more challenging. In order to take full advantage of the resources, it is crucial to understand the characteristics of relevant scientific applications and the systems these applications are running on. Using tools developed under PERI and by other performance measurement researchers, we studied the performance of two applications, MILC and Chroma, on several high performance computing systems at DOE laboratories. In the case of Chroma, we discuss how the use of C++ and modern software engineering and programming methods are driving the evolution of performance tools

  2. Optical interconnection networks for high-performance computing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Bergman, Keren

    2012-01-01

    Enabled by silicon photonic technology, optical interconnection networks have the potential to be a key disruptive technology in computing and communication industries. The enduring pursuit of performance gains in computing, combined with stringent power constraints, has fostered the ever-growing computational parallelism associated with chip multiprocessors, memory systems, high-performance computing systems and data centers. Sustaining these parallelism growths introduces unique challenges for on- and off-chip communications, shifting the focus toward novel and fundamentally different communication approaches. Chip-scale photonic interconnection networks, enabled by high-performance silicon photonic devices, offer unprecedented bandwidth scalability with reduced power consumption. We demonstrate that the silicon photonic platforms have already produced all the high-performance photonic devices required to realize these types of networks. Through extensive empirical characterization in much of our work, we demonstrate such feasibility of waveguides, modulators, switches and photodetectors. We also demonstrate systems that simultaneously combine many functionalities to achieve more complex building blocks. We propose novel silicon photonic devices, subsystems, network topologies and architectures to enable unprecedented performance of these photonic interconnection networks. Furthermore, the advantages of photonic interconnection networks extend far beyond the chip, offering advanced communication environments for memory systems, high-performance computing systems, and data centers. (review article)

  3. The NIRA computer program package (photonuclear data center). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vander Molen, H.J.; Gerstenberg, H.M.

    1976-02-01

    The Photonuclear Data Center's NIRA library of programs, executable from mass storage on the National Bureau of Standard's central computer facility, is described. Detailed instructions are given (with examples) for the use of the library to analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and produce for publication camera-ready tabular and graphical presentations of digital photonuclear reaction cross-section data. NIRA is the acronym for Nuclear Information Research Associate

  4. Debugging a high performance computing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  5. Embedded High Performance Scalable Computing Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ngo, David

    2003-01-01

    The Embedded High Performance Scalable Computing Systems (EHPSCS) program is a cooperative agreement between Sanders, A Lockheed Martin Company and DARPA that ran for three years, from Apr 1995 - Apr 1998...

  6. Cloud Computing for Complex Performance Codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klein, Brandon Thorin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miner, John Gifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report describes the use of cloud computing services for running complex public domain performance assessment problems. The work consisted of two phases: Phase 1 was to demonstrate complex codes, on several differently configured servers, could run and compute trivial small scale problems in a commercial cloud infrastructure. Phase 2 focused on proving non-trivial large scale problems could be computed in the commercial cloud environment. The cloud computing effort was successfully applied using codes of interest to the geohydrology and nuclear waste disposal modeling community.

  7. ATLAS Tier-2 at the Compute Resource Center GoeGrid in Göttingen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Quadt, Arnulf; Weber, Pavel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    GoeGrid is a grid resource center located in Göttingen, Germany. The resources are commonly used, funded, and maintained by communities doing research in the fields of grid development, computer science, biomedicine, high energy physics, theoretical physics, astrophysics, and the humanities. For the high energy physics community, GoeGrid serves as a Tier-2 center for the ATLAS experiment as part of the world-wide LHC computing grid (WLCG). The status and performance of the Tier-2 center is presented with a focus on the interdisciplinary setup and administration of the cluster. Given the various requirements of the different communities on the hardware and software setup the challenge of the common operation of the cluster is detailed. The benefits are an efficient use of computer and personpower resources.

  8. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  9. An Adaptive Middleware for Improved Computational Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lars Frydendal

    , we are improving computational performance by exploiting modern hardware features, such as dynamic voltage-frequency scaling and transactional memory. Adapting software is an iterative process, requiring that we continually revisit it to meet new requirements or realities; a time consuming process......The performance improvements in computer systems over the past 60 years have been fueled by an exponential increase in energy efficiency. In recent years, the phenomenon known as the end of Dennard’s scaling has slowed energy efficiency improvements — but improving computer energy efficiency...... is more important now than ever. Traditionally, most improvements in computer energy efficiency have come from improvements in lithography — the ability to produce smaller transistors — and computer architecture - the ability to apply those transistors efficiently. Since the end of scaling, we have seen...

  10. Secure data exchange between intelligent devices and computing centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed; Riguidel, Michel

    2005-03-01

    The advent of reliable spontaneous networking technologies (commonly known as wireless ad-hoc networks) has ostensibly raised stakes for the conception of computing intensive environments using intelligent devices as their interface with the external world. These smart devices are used as data gateways for the computing units. These devices are employed in highly volatile environments where the secure exchange of data between these devices and their computing centers is of paramount importance. Moreover, their mission critical applications require dependable measures against the attacks like denial of service (DoS), eavesdropping, masquerading, etc. In this paper, we propose a mechanism to assure reliable data exchange between an intelligent environment composed of smart devices and distributed computing units collectively called 'computational grid'. The notion of infosphere is used to define a digital space made up of a persistent and a volatile asset in an often indefinite geographical space. We study different infospheres and present general evolutions and issues in the security of such technology-rich and intelligent environments. It is beyond any doubt that these environments will likely face a proliferation of users, applications, networked devices, and their interactions on a scale never experienced before. It would be better to build in the ability to uniformly deal with these systems. As a solution, we propose a concept of virtualization of security services. We try to solve the difficult problems of implementation and maintenance of trust on the one hand, and those of security management in heterogeneous infrastructure on the other hand.

  11. New computer system for the Japan Tier-2 center

    CERN Multimedia

    Hiroyuki Matsunaga

    2007-01-01

    The ICEPP (International Center for Elementary Particle Physics) of the University of Tokyo has been operating an LCG Tier-2 center dedicated to the ATLAS experiment, and is going to switch over to the new production system which has been recently installed. The system will be of great help to the exciting physics analyses for coming years. The new computer system includes brand-new blade servers, RAID disks, a tape library system and Ethernet switches. The blade server is DELL PowerEdge 1955 which contains two Intel dual-core Xeon (WoodCrest) CPUs running at 3GHz, and a total of 650 servers will be used as compute nodes. Each of the RAID disks is configured to be RAID-6 with 16 Serial ATA HDDs. The equipment as well as the cooling system is placed in a new large computer room, and both are hooked up to UPS (uninterruptible power supply) units for stable operation. As a whole, the system has been built with redundant configuration in a cost-effective way. The next major upgrade will take place in thre...

  12. 3rd International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kostina, Ekaterina; Phu, Hoang; Rannacher, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains a selection of papers presented at the Third International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing held at the Hanoi Institute of Mathematics, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), March 6-10, 2006. The conference has been organized by the Hanoi Institute of Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg, and its International PhD Program ``Complex Processes: Modeling, Simulation and Optimization'', and Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology. The contributions cover the broad interdisciplinary spectrum of scientific computing and present recent advances in theory, development of methods, and applications in practice. Subjects covered are mathematical modelling, numerical simulation, methods for optimization and control, parallel computing, software development, applications of scientific computing in physics, chemistry, biology and mechanics, environmental and hydrology problems, transport, logistics and site loca...

  13. 5th International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Xuan; Rannacher, Rolf; Schlöder, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This proceedings volume gathers a selection of papers presented at the Fifth International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing, which took place in Hanoi on March 5-9, 2012. The conference was organized by the Institute of Mathematics of the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), the Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR) of Heidelberg University, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, and the Vietnam Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics. The contributions cover the broad interdisciplinary spectrum of scientific computing and present recent advances in theory, development of methods, and practical applications. Subjects covered include mathematical modeling; numerical simulation; methods for optimization and control; parallel computing; software development; and applications of scientific computing in physics, mechanics and biomechanics, material science, hydrology, chemistry, biology, biotechnology, medicine, sports, psychology, transport, logistics, com...

  14. 6th International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Phu, Hoang; Rannacher, Rolf; Schlöder, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    This proceedings volume highlights a selection of papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on High Performance Scientific Computing, which took place in Hanoi, Vietnam on March 16-20, 2015. The conference was jointly organized by the Heidelberg Institute of Theoretical Studies (HITS), the Institute of Mathematics of the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), the Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR) at Heidelberg University, and the Vietnam Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics, Ministry of Education The contributions cover a broad, interdisciplinary spectrum of scientific computing and showcase recent advances in theory, methods, and practical applications. Subjects covered numerical simulation, methods for optimization and control, parallel computing, and software development, as well as the applications of scientific computing in physics, mechanics, biomechanics and robotics, material science, hydrology, biotechnology, medicine, transport, scheduling, and in...

  15. Function Follows Performance in Evolutionary Computational Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasold, Anke; Foged, Isak Worre

    2011-01-01

    As the title ‘Function Follows Performance in Evolutionary Computational Processing’ suggests, this paper explores the potentials of employing multiple design and evaluation criteria within one processing model in order to account for a number of performative parameters desired within varied...

  16. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  17. High Performance Computing Software Applications for Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, C.; Schumacher, P.; Matson, C.; Chun, F.; Duncan, B.; Borelli, K.; Desonia, R.; Gusciora, G.; Roe, K.

    The High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute for Space Situational Awareness (HSAI-SSA) has completed its first full year of applications development. The emphasis of our work in this first year was in improving space surveillance sensor models and image enhancement software. These applications are the Space Surveillance Network Analysis Model (SSNAM), the Air Force Space Fence simulation (SimFence), and physically constrained iterative de-convolution (PCID) image enhancement software tool. Specifically, we have demonstrated order of magnitude speed-up in those codes running on the latest Cray XD-1 Linux supercomputer (Hoku) at the Maui High Performance Computing Center. The software applications improvements that HSAI-SSA has made, has had significant impact to the warfighter and has fundamentally changed the role of high performance computing in SSA.

  18. Current state and future direction of computer systems at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James L. (Editor); Tucker, Jerry H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Computer systems have advanced at a rate unmatched by any other area of technology. As performance has dramatically increased there has been an equally dramatic reduction in cost. This constant cost performance improvement has precipitated the pervasiveness of computer systems into virtually all areas of technology. This improvement is due primarily to advances in microelectronics. Most people are now convinced that the new generation of supercomputers will be built using a large number (possibly thousands) of high performance microprocessors. Although the spectacular improvements in computer systems have come about because of these hardware advances, there has also been a steady improvement in software techniques. In an effort to understand how these hardware and software advances will effect research at NASA LaRC, the Computer Systems Technical Committee drafted this white paper to examine the current state and possible future directions of computer systems at the Center. This paper discusses selected important areas of computer systems including real-time systems, embedded systems, high performance computing, distributed computing networks, data acquisition systems, artificial intelligence, and visualization.

  19. DURIP: High Performance Computing in Biomathematics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Mathematics and Statistics (AMS) at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) to conduct research and research-related education in areas of...Computing in Biomathematics Applications Report Title The goal of this award was to enhance the capabilities of the Department of Applied Mathematics and...DURIP: High Performance Computing in Biomathematics Applications The goal of this award was to enhance the capabilities of the Department of Applied

  20. Clinical quality performance in U.S. health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leiyu; Lebrun, Lydie A; Zhu, Jinsheng; Hayashi, Arthur S; Sharma, Ravi; Daly, Charles A; Sripipatana, Alek; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2012-12-01

    To describe current clinical quality among the nation's community health centers and to examine health center characteristics associated with performance excellence. National data from the 2009 Uniform Data System. Health centers reviewed patient records and reported aggregate data to the Uniform Data System. Six measures were examined: first-trimester prenatal care, childhood immunization completion, Pap tests, low birth weight, controlled hypertension, and controlled diabetes. The top 25 percent performing centers were compared with lower performing (bottom 75 percent) centers on these measures. Logistic regressions were utilized to assess the impact of patient, provider, and institutional characteristics on health center performance. Clinical care and outcomes among health centers were generally comparable to national averages. For instance, 67 percent of pregnant patients received timely prenatal care (national = 68 percent), 69 percent of children achieved immunization completion (national = 67 percent), and 63 percent of hypertensive patients had blood pressure under control (national = 48 percent). Depending on the measure, centers with more uninsured patients were less likely to do well, while centers with more physicians and enabling service providers were more likely to do well. Health centers provide quality care at rates comparable to national averages. Performance may be improved by increasing insurance coverage among patients and increasing the ratios of physicians and enabling service providers to patients. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. Computer technique for evaluating collimator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to theoretically evaluate the overall performance of collimators used with radioisotope scanners and γ cameras. The first step of the program involves the determination of the line spread function (LSF) and geometrical efficiency from the fundamental parameters of the collimator being evaluated. The working equations can be applied to any plane of interest. The resulting LSF is applied to subroutine computer programs which compute corresponding modulation transfer function and contrast efficiency functions. The latter function is then combined with appropriate geometrical efficiency data to determine the performance index function. The overall computer program allows one to predict from the physical parameters of the collimator alone how well the collimator will reproduce various sized spherical voids of activity in the image plane. The collimator performance program can be used to compare the performance of various collimator types, to study the effects of source depth on collimator performance, and to assist in the design of collimators. The theory of the collimator performance equation is discussed, a comparison between the experimental and theoretical LSF values is made, and examples of the application of the technique are presented

  2. Misleading Performance Claims in Parallel Computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-05-29

    In a previous humorous note entitled 'Twelve Ways to Fool the Masses,' I outlined twelve common ways in which performance figures for technical computer systems can be distorted. In this paper and accompanying conference talk, I give a reprise of these twelve 'methods' and give some actual examples that have appeared in peer-reviewed literature in years past. I then propose guidelines for reporting performance, the adoption of which would raise the level of professionalism and reduce the level of confusion, not only in the world of device simulation but also in the larger arena of technical computing.

  3. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, Heather M.; Manuzatto, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  4. Building a Prototype of LHC Analysis Oriented Computing Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Della Ricca, G.; Donvito, G.; Paganoni, M.

    2012-12-01

    A Consortium between four LHC Computing Centers (Bari, Milano, Pisa and Trieste) has been formed in 2010 to prototype Analysis-oriented facilities for CMS data analysis, profiting from a grant from the Italian Ministry of Research. The Consortium aims to realize an ad-hoc infrastructure to ease the analysis activities on the huge data set collected at the LHC Collider. While “Tier2” Computing Centres, specialized in organized processing tasks like Monte Carlo simulation, are nowadays a well established concept, with years of running experience, site specialized towards end user chaotic analysis activities do not yet have a defacto standard implementation. In our effort, we focus on all the aspects that can make the analysis tasks easier for a physics user not expert in computing. On the storage side, we are experimenting on storage techniques allowing for remote data access and on storage optimization on the typical analysis access patterns. On the networking side, we are studying the differences between flat and tiered LAN architecture, also using virtual partitioning of the same physical networking for the different use patterns. Finally, on the user side, we are developing tools and instruments to allow for an exhaustive monitoring of their processes at the site, and for an efficient support system in case of problems. We will report about the results of the test executed on different subsystem and give a description of the layout of the infrastructure in place at the site participating to the consortium.

  5. Building a Prototype of LHC Analysis Oriented Computing Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Della Ricca, G; Donvito, G; Paganoni, M

    2012-01-01

    A Consortium between four LHC Computing Centers (Bari, Milano, Pisa and Trieste) has been formed in 2010 to prototype Analysis-oriented facilities for CMS data analysis, profiting from a grant from the Italian Ministry of Research. The Consortium aims to realize an ad-hoc infrastructure to ease the analysis activities on the huge data set collected at the LHC Collider. While “Tier2” Computing Centres, specialized in organized processing tasks like Monte Carlo simulation, are nowadays a well established concept, with years of running experience, site specialized towards end user chaotic analysis activities do not yet have a defacto standard implementation. In our effort, we focus on all the aspects that can make the analysis tasks easier for a physics user not expert in computing. On the storage side, we are experimenting on storage techniques allowing for remote data access and on storage optimization on the typical analysis access patterns. On the networking side, we are studying the differences between flat and tiered LAN architecture, also using virtual partitioning of the same physical networking for the different use patterns. Finally, on the user side, we are developing tools and instruments to allow for an exhaustive monitoring of their processes at the site, and for an efficient support system in case of problems. We will report about the results of the test executed on different subsystem and give a description of the layout of the infrastructure in place at the site participating to the consortium.

  6. High performance parallel computers for science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Edel, M.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Hance, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 Mflops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction

  7. Performative Computation-aided Design Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Tang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a collaborative research and teaching project between the University of Cincinnati, Perkins+Will’s Tech Lab, and the University of North Carolina Greensboro. The primary investigation focuses on the simulation, optimization, and generation of architectural designs using performance-based computational design approaches. The projects examine various design methods, including relationships between building form, performance and the use of proprietary software tools for parametric design.

  8. High performance computing on vector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Roller, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Presents the developments in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. This book covers trends in hardware and software development in general and specifically the vector-based systems and heterogeneous architectures. It presents innovative fields like coupled multi-physics or multi-scale simulations.

  9. High-performance computing in seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The scientific, technical, and economic importance of the issues discussed here presents a clear agenda for future research in computational seismology. In this way these problems will drive advances in high-performance computing in the field of seismology. There is a broad community that will benefit from this work, including the petroleum industry, research geophysicists, engineers concerned with seismic hazard mitigation, and governments charged with enforcing a comprehensive test ban treaty. These advances may also lead to new applications for seismological research. The recent application of high-resolution seismic imaging of the shallow subsurface for the environmental remediation industry is an example of this activity. This report makes the following recommendations: (1) focused efforts to develop validated documented software for seismological computations should be supported, with special emphasis on scalable algorithms for parallel processors; (2) the education of seismologists in high-performance computing technologies and methodologies should be improved; (3) collaborations between seismologists and computational scientists and engineers should be increased; (4) the infrastructure for archiving, disseminating, and processing large volumes of seismological data should be improved.

  10. High performance computing in linear control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in both theory and applications of all important areas of control. The theory is rich and very sophisticated. Some beautiful applications of control theory are presently being made in aerospace, biomedical engineering, industrial engineering, robotics, economics, power systems, etc. Unfortunately, the same assessment of progress does not hold in general for computations in control theory. Control Theory is lagging behind other areas of science and engineering in this respect. Nowadays there is a revolution going on in the world of high performance scientific computing. Many powerful computers with vector and parallel processing have been built and have been available in recent years. These supercomputers offer very high speed in computations. Highly efficient software, based on powerful algorithms, has been developed to use on these advanced computers, and has also contributed to increased performance. While workers in many areas of science and engineering have taken great advantage of these hardware and software developments, control scientists and engineers, unfortunately, have not been able to take much advantage of these developments

  11. Analytical performance modeling for computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Y C

    2013-01-01

    This book is an introduction to analytical performance modeling for computer systems, i.e., writing equations to describe their performance behavior. It is accessible to readers who have taken college-level courses in calculus and probability, networking and operating systems. This is not a training manual for becoming an expert performance analyst. Rather, the objective is to help the reader construct simple models for analyzing and understanding the systems that they are interested in.Describing a complicated system abstractly with mathematical equations requires a careful choice of assumpti

  12. Computer performance optimization systems, applications, processes

    CERN Document Server

    Osterhage, Wolfgang W

    2013-01-01

    Computing power performance was important at times when hardware was still expensive, because hardware had to be put to the best use. Later on this criterion was no longer critical, since hardware had become inexpensive. Meanwhile, however, people have realized that performance again plays a significant role, because of the major drain on system resources involved in developing complex applications. This book distinguishes between three levels of performance optimization: the system level, application level and business processes level. On each, optimizations can be achieved and cost-cutting p

  13. A methodology for performing computer security reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunteman, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    DOE Order 5637.1, ''Classified Computer Security,'' requires regular reviews of the computer security activities for an ADP system and for a site. Based on experiences gained in the Los Alamos computer security program through interactions with DOE facilities, we have developed a methodology to aid a site or security officer in performing a comprehensive computer security review. The methodology is designed to aid a reviewer in defining goals of the review (e.g., preparation for inspection), determining security requirements based on DOE policies, determining threats/vulnerabilities based on DOE and local threat guidance, and identifying critical system components to be reviewed. Application of the methodology will result in review procedures and checklists oriented to the review goals, the target system, and DOE policy requirements. The review methodology can be used to prepare for an audit or inspection and as a periodic self-check tool to determine the status of the computer security program for a site or specific ADP system. 1 tab

  14. A methodology for performing computer security reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunteman, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on DIE Order 5637.1, Classified Computer Security, which requires regular reviews of the computer security activities for an ADP system and for a site. Based on experiences gained in the Los Alamos computer security program through interactions with DOE facilities, the authors have developed a methodology to aid a site or security officer in performing a comprehensive computer security review. The methodology is designed to aid a reviewer in defining goals of the review (e.g., preparation for inspection), determining security requirements based on DOE policies, determining threats/vulnerabilities based on DOE and local threat guidance, and identifying critical system components to be reviewed. Application of the methodology will result in review procedures and checklists oriented to the review goals, the target system, and DOE policy requirements. The review methodology can be used to prepare for an audit or inspection and as a periodic self-check tool to determine the status of the computer security program for a site or specific ADP system

  15. HIGH PERFORMANCE PHOTOGRAMMETRIC PROCESSING ON COMPUTER CLUSTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Adrov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Most cpu consuming tasks in photogrammetric processing can be done in parallel. The algorithms take independent bits as input and produce independent bits as output. The independence of bits comes from the nature of such algorithms since images, stereopairs or small image blocks parts can be processed independently. Many photogrammetric algorithms are fully automatic and do not require human interference. Photogrammetric workstations can perform tie points measurements, DTM calculations, orthophoto construction, mosaicing and many other service operations in parallel using distributed calculations. Distributed calculations save time reducing several days calculations to several hours calculations. Modern trends in computer technology show the increase of cpu cores in workstations, speed increase in local networks, and as a result dropping the price of the supercomputers or computer clusters that can contain hundreds or even thousands of computing nodes. Common distributed processing in DPW is usually targeted for interactive work with a limited number of cpu cores and is not optimized for centralized administration. The bottleneck of common distributed computing in photogrammetry can be in the limited lan throughput and storage performance, since the processing of huge amounts of large raster images is needed.

  16. Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettsome, Annette K.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface

  17. Cloud Computing for Maintenance Performance Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Kour, Ravdeep; Karim, Ramin; Parida, Aditya

    2013-01-01

    Cloud Computing is an emerging research area. It can be utilised for acquiring an effective and efficient information logistics. This paper uses cloud-based technology for the establishment of information logistics for railway system which requires information based on data from different data sources (e.g. railway maintenance, railway operation, and railway business data). In order to improve the performance of the maintenance process relevant data from various sources need to be acquired, f...

  18. High Performance Computing Operations Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupps, Kimberly C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The High Performance Computing Operations Review (HPCOR) meeting—requested by the ASC and ASCR program headquarters at DOE—was held November 5 and 6, 2013, at the Marriott Hotel in San Francisco, CA. The purpose of the review was to discuss the processes and practices for HPC integration and its related software and facilities. Experiences and lessons learned from the most recent systems deployed were covered in order to benefit the deployment of new systems.

  19. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center 2009 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B. (CLS-CI)

    2011-05-13

    Now in its seventh year of operation, the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) continues to be an integral component of science and engineering research at Argonne, supporting a diverse portfolio of projects for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. The LCRC's ongoing mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting high-performance computing application use and development. This report describes scientific activities carried out with LCRC resources in 2009 and the broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. The LCRC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz. Committee members are appointed by the Associate Laboratory Directors and span a range of computational disciplines. The 350-node LCRC cluster, Jazz, began production service in April 2003 and has been a research work horse ever since. Hosting a wealth of software tools and applications and achieving high availability year after year, researchers can count on Jazz to achieve project milestones and enable breakthroughs. Over the years, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. In fiscal year 2009, there were 49 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory research and almost all research divisions.

  20. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center : 2005 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Coghlan, S. C; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-06-30

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. The first goal of the LCRC was to deploy a mid-range supercomputing facility to support the unmet computational needs of the Laboratory. To this end, in September 2002, the Laboratory purchased a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the fifty fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2005, there were 62 active projects on Jazz involving over 320 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to improve the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure

  1. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolakis, John; Brun, René; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro; Carminati, Federico

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a 'High Performance' implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on the development of a highperformance prototype for particle transport. Achieving a good concurrency level on the emerging parallel architectures without a complete redesign of the framework can only be done by parallelizing at event level, or with a much larger effort at track level. Apart the shareable data structures, this typically implies a multiplication factor in terms of memory consumption compared to the single threaded version, together with sub-optimal handling of event processing tails. Besides this, the low level instruction pipelining of modern processors cannot be used efficiently to speedup the program. We have implemented a framework that allows scheduling vectors of particles to an arbitrary number of computing resources in a fine grain parallel approach. The talk will review the current optimisation activities within the SFT group with a particular emphasis on the development perspectives towards a simulation framework able to profit

  2. Development of a computer system at La Hague center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimaud, Robert; Malet, Georges; Ollivier, Francis; Fabre, J.-C.; Valois, Philippe; Desgranges, Patrick; Anfossi, Gilbert; Gentizon, Michel; Serpollet, Roger.

    1977-01-01

    The U.P.2 plant, built at La Hague Center is intended mainly for the reprocessing of spent fuels coming from (as metal) graphite-gas reactors and (as oxide) light-water, heavy-water and breeder reactors. In each of the five large nuclear units the digital processing of measurements was dealt with until 1974 by CAE 3030 data processors. During the period 1974-1975 a modern industrial computer system was set up. This system, equipped with T 2000/20 material from the Telemecanique company, consists of five measurement acquisition devices (for a total of 1500 lines processed) and two central processing units (CPU). The connection of these two PCU (Hardware and Software) enables an automatic connection of the system either on the first CPU or on the second one. The system covers, at present, data processing, threshold monitoring, alarm systems, display devices, periodical listing, and specific calculations concerning the process (balances etc), and at a later stage, an automatic control of certain units of the Process [fr

  3. A High Performance VLSI Computer Architecture For Computer Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Wen-Tai

    1988-10-01

    A VLSI computer architecture, consisting of multiple processors, is presented in this paper to satisfy the modern computer graphics demands, e.g. high resolution, realistic animation, real-time display etc.. All processors share a global memory which are partitioned into multiple banks. Through a crossbar network, data from one memory bank can be broadcasted to many processors. Processors are physically interconnected through a hyper-crossbar network (a crossbar-like network). By programming the network, the topology of communication links among processors can be reconfigurated to satisfy specific dataflows of different applications. Each processor consists of a controller, arithmetic operators, local memory, a local crossbar network, and I/O ports to communicate with other processors, memory banks, and a system controller. Operations in each processor are characterized into two modes, i.e. object domain and space domain, to fully utilize the data-independency characteristics of graphics processing. Special graphics features such as 3D-to-2D conversion, shadow generation, texturing, and reflection, can be easily handled. With the current high density interconnection (MI) technology, it is feasible to implement a 64-processor system to achieve 2.5 billion operations per second, a performance needed in most advanced graphics applications.

  4. NINJA: Java for High Performance Numerical Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Moreira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available When Java was first introduced, there was a perception that its many benefits came at a significant performance cost. In the particularly performance-sensitive field of numerical computing, initial measurements indicated a hundred-fold performance disadvantage between Java and more established languages such as Fortran and C. Although much progress has been made, and Java now can be competitive with C/C++ in many important situations, significant performance challenges remain. Existing Java virtual machines are not yet capable of performing the advanced loop transformations and automatic parallelization that are now common in state-of-the-art Fortran compilers. Java also has difficulties in implementing complex arithmetic efficiently. These performance deficiencies can be attacked with a combination of class libraries (packages, in Java that implement truly multidimensional arrays and complex numbers, and new compiler techniques that exploit the properties of these class libraries to enable other, more conventional, optimizations. Two compiler techniques, versioning and semantic expansion, can be leveraged to allow fully automatic optimization and parallelization of Java code. Our measurements with the NINJA prototype Java environment show that Java can be competitive in performance with highly optimized and tuned Fortran code.

  5. RISC Processors and High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David H.; Saini, Subhash; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This tutorial will discuss the top five RISC microprocessors and the parallel systems in which they are used. It will provide a unique cross-machine comparison not available elsewhere. The effective performance of these processors will be compared by citing standard benchmarks in the context of real applications. The latest NAS Parallel Benchmarks, both absolute performance and performance per dollar, will be listed. The next generation of the NPB will be described. The tutorial will conclude with a discussion of future directions in the field. Technology Transfer Considerations: All of these computer systems are commercially available internationally. Information about these processors is available in the public domain, mostly from the vendors themselves. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks and their results have been previously approved numerous times for public release, beginning back in 1991.

  6. Computer fan performance enhancement via acoustic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenblatt, David, E-mail: davidg@technion.ac.il [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Avraham, Tzahi; Golan, Maayan [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Computer fan effectiveness was increased by introducing acoustic perturbations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acoustic perturbations controlled blade boundary layer separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum frequencies corresponded with airfoils studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exploitation of flow instabilities was responsible for performance improvements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak pressure and peak flowrate were increased by 40% and 15% respectively. - Abstract: A novel technique for increasing computer fan effectiveness, based on introducing acoustic perturbations onto the fan blades to control boundary layer separation, was assessed. Experiments were conducted in a specially designed facility that simultaneously allowed characterization of fan performance and introduction of the perturbations. A parametric study was conducted to determine the optimum control parameters, namely those that deliver the largest increase in fan pressure for a given flowrate. The optimum reduced frequencies corresponded with those identified on stationary airfoils and it was thus concluded that the exploitation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, commonly observed on airfoils, was responsible for the fan blade performance improvements. The optimum control inputs, such as acoustic frequency and sound pressure level, showed some variation with different fan flowrates. With the near-optimum control conditions identified, the full operational envelope of the fan, when subjected to acoustic perturbations, was assessed. The peak pressure and peak flowrate were increased by up to 40% and 15% respectively. The peak fan efficiency increased with acoustic perturbations but the overall system efficiency was reduced when the speaker input power was accounted for.

  7. Computer fan performance enhancement via acoustic perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenblatt, David; Avraham, Tzahi; Golan, Maayan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computer fan effectiveness was increased by introducing acoustic perturbations. ► Acoustic perturbations controlled blade boundary layer separation. ► Optimum frequencies corresponded with airfoils studies. ► Exploitation of flow instabilities was responsible for performance improvements. ► Peak pressure and peak flowrate were increased by 40% and 15% respectively. - Abstract: A novel technique for increasing computer fan effectiveness, based on introducing acoustic perturbations onto the fan blades to control boundary layer separation, was assessed. Experiments were conducted in a specially designed facility that simultaneously allowed characterization of fan performance and introduction of the perturbations. A parametric study was conducted to determine the optimum control parameters, namely those that deliver the largest increase in fan pressure for a given flowrate. The optimum reduced frequencies corresponded with those identified on stationary airfoils and it was thus concluded that the exploitation of Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities, commonly observed on airfoils, was responsible for the fan blade performance improvements. The optimum control inputs, such as acoustic frequency and sound pressure level, showed some variation with different fan flowrates. With the near-optimum control conditions identified, the full operational envelope of the fan, when subjected to acoustic perturbations, was assessed. The peak pressure and peak flowrate were increased by up to 40% and 15% respectively. The peak fan efficiency increased with acoustic perturbations but the overall system efficiency was reduced when the speaker input power was accounted for.

  8. Argonne's Laboratory computing resource center : 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Drugan, C. D.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2006, there were 76 active projects on Jazz involving over 380 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff

  9. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windus, T L; Crosby, L D; Kathmann, S M

    2008-01-01

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, we describe the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A 'master-slave' solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are described

  10. Analysis of parallel computing performance of the code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lei; Wang Kan; Yu Ganglin

    2006-01-01

    Parallel computing can reduce the running time of the code MCNP effectively. With the MPI message transmitting software, MCNP5 can achieve its parallel computing on PC cluster with Windows operating system. Parallel computing performance of MCNP is influenced by factors such as the type, the complexity level and the parameter configuration of the computing problem. This paper analyzes the parallel computing performance of MCNP regarding with these factors and gives measures to improve the MCNP parallel computing performance. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of high-performance computing software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, S.; Dongarra, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rowan, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The absence of unbiased and up to date comparative evaluations of high-performance computing software complicates a user`s search for the appropriate software package. The National HPCC Software Exchange (NHSE) is attacking this problem using an approach that includes independent evaluations of software, incorporation of author and user feedback into the evaluations, and Web access to the evaluations. We are applying this approach to the Parallel Tools Library (PTLIB), a new software repository for parallel systems software and tools, and HPC-Netlib, a high performance branch of the Netlib mathematical software repository. Updating the evaluations with feed-back and making it available via the Web helps ensure accuracy and timeliness, and using independent reviewers produces unbiased comparative evaluations difficult to find elsewhere.

  12. M-center growth in alkali halides: computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, M.; Jaque, F.; Agullo-Lopez, F.

    1983-01-01

    The heterogeneous interstitial nucleation model previously proposed to explain F-center growth curves in irradiated alkali halides has been extended to account for M-center kinetics. The interstitials produced during the primary irradiation event are assumed to be trapped at impurities and interstitial clusters or recombine with F and M centers. For M-center formation two cases have been considered: (a) diffusion and aggregation of F centers, and (b) statistical generation and pairing of F centers. Process (b) is the only one consistent with the quadratic relationship between M and F center concentrations. However, to account for the F/M ratios experimentally observed as well as for the role of dose-rate, a modified statistical model involving random creation and association of F + -F pairs has been shown to be adequate. (author)

  13. User's guide for remote access of the Performance Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.R.; Kostelnik, K.M.

    1991-03-01

    The Performance Assessment Center (PAC) was established by the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program to provide technical assistance to support the development of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. This user's manual provides guidance to remote users of the PAC. Information is presented on how remote users may most effectively access and use the systems available at the Performance Assessment Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Access requirements and operating procedures are presented to assist the first-time PAC user. This manual also provides brief descriptions of each code available on the system

  14. The inner workings of performance management in danish job centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl-Thingvad, Signe

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses how a central Performance Management system in the Danish job centers affects the employees’ perception of accountability, autonomy, common goals and dialogue. Dysfunctional behavioral effects are explored in qualitative analyses based on 4 case studies. Results indicate...... that the expected positive effects of performance management do not materialize at the Danish job centers because focus in the implementation process gradually shifts from results to process goals. This is related to a series of dysfunctional behavioral effects which instead of creating commitment frustrate...

  15. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolakis, John; Carminati, Federico; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a 'High Performance' implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on th...

  16. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L; Yvernault, Benjamin C; Boyd, Brian D; Damon, Stephen M; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N; Phillips, Nicholas S; Rogers, Baxter P; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and REDCap to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Research and development of grid computing technology in center for computational science and e-systems of Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    Center for Computational Science and E-systems of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) has carried out R and D of grid computing technology. Since 1995, R and D to realize computational assistance for researchers called Seamless Thinking Aid (STA) and then to share intellectual resources called Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) have been conducted, leading to construct an intelligent infrastructure for the atomic energy research called Atomic Energy Grid InfraStructure (AEGIS) under the Japanese national project 'Development and Applications of Advanced High-Performance Supercomputer'. It aims to enable synchronization of three themes: 1) Computer-Aided Research and Development (CARD) to realize and environment for STA, 2) Computer-Aided Engineering (CAEN) to establish Multi Experimental Tools (MEXT), and 3) Computer Aided Science (CASC) to promote the Atomic Energy Research and Investigation (AERI). This article reviewed achievements in R and D of grid computing technology so far obtained. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Financial centers and firm performance during the crisis period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; El Ouadrhiri, Khadija

    2014-01-01

    How does location of a firm’s headquarter impact its performance during the crisis period? This paper answers this question by using the data from India. Our results show that firms headquartered in Mumbai, the main financial center of the country, significantly outperform other firms during...

  19. A High Performance COTS Based Computer Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patte, Mathieu; Grimoldi, Raoul; Trautner, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Using Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) electronic components for space applications is a long standing idea. Indeed the difference in processing performance and energy efficiency between radiation hardened components and COTS components is so important that COTS components are very attractive for use in mass and power constrained systems. However using COTS components in space is not straightforward as one must account with the effects of the space environment on the COTS components behavior. In the frame of the ESA funded activity called High Performance COTS Based Computer, Airbus Defense and Space and its subcontractor OHB CGS have developed and prototyped a versatile COTS based architecture for high performance processing. The rest of the paper is organized as follows: in a first section we will start by recapitulating the interests and constraints of using COTS components for space applications; then we will briefly describe existing fault mitigation architectures and present our solution for fault mitigation based on a component called the SmartIO; in the last part of the paper we will describe the prototyping activities executed during the HiP CBC project.

  20. Performance evaluation of a computed radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussilhe, J.; Fallet, E. [Carestream Health France, 71 - Chalon/Saone (France); Mango, St.A. [Carestream Health, Inc. Rochester, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Computed radiography (CR) standards have been formalized and published in Europe and in the US. The CR system classification is defined in those standards by - minimum normalized signal-to-noise ratio (SNRN), and - maximum basic spatial resolution (SRb). Both the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast sensitivity of a CR system depend on the dose (exposure time and conditions) at the detector. Because of their wide dynamic range, the same storage phosphor imaging plate can qualify for all six CR system classes. The exposure characteristics from 30 to 450 kV, the contrast sensitivity, and the spatial resolution of the KODAK INDUSTREX CR Digital System have been thoroughly evaluated. This paper will present some of the factors that determine the system's spatial resolution performance. (authors)

  1. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  2. Center for computation and visualization of geometric structures. [Annual], Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-12

    The mission of the Center is to establish a unified environment promoting research, education, and software and tool development. The work is centered on computing, interpreted in a broad sense to include the relevant theory, development of algorithms, and actual implementation. The research aspects of the Center are focused on geometry; correspondingly the computational aspects are focused on three (and higher) dimensional visualization. The educational aspects are likewise centered on computing and focused on geometry. A broader term than education is `communication` which encompasses the challenge of explaining to the world current research in mathematics, and specifically geometry.

  3. Talented Students' Satisfaction with the Performance of the Gifted Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mamoud Al–Zoubi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to identify talented students' levels of satisfaction with the performance of the gifted centers. The sample of the study consisted of (142 gifted and talented students enrolled in the Najran Centers for Gifted in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to the sample of the study. The results revealed that talented students were highly satisfied with the administration and teachers, whereas they were only moderately satisfied with enrichment activities, teaching methods, student relationships and facilities and equipment. Moreover, results also showed that there were no significant differences could be attributed to gender or to the level of schooling.

  4. High-Performance Computing Paradigm and Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Laurence T

    2006-01-01

    With hyperthreading in Intel processors, hypertransport links in next generation AMD processors, multi-core silicon in today's high-end microprocessors from IBM and emerging grid computing, parallel and distributed computers have moved into the mainstream

  5. Threat and vulnerability analysis and conceptual design of countermeasures for a computer center under construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozen, A.; Musacchio, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This project involved the assessment of a new computer center to be used as the main national data processing facility of a large European bank. This building serves as the principal facility in the country with all other branches utilizing the data processing center. As such, the building is a crucial target which may attract terrorist attacks. Threat and vulnerability assessments were performed as a basis to define and overall fully-integrated security system of passive and active countermeasures for the facility. After separately assessing the range of threats and vulnerabilities, a combined matrix of threats and vulnerabilities was used to identify the crucial combinations. A set of architectural-structural passive measures was added to the active components of the security system

  6. Modeling Remote I/O versus Staging Tradeoff in Multi-Data Center Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslu, Ibrahim H

    2014-01-01

    In multi-data center computing, data to be processed is not always local to the computation. This is a major challenge especially for data-intensive Cloud computing applications, since large amount of data would need to be either moved the local sites (staging) or accessed remotely over the network (remote I/O). Cloud application developers generally chose between staging and remote I/O intuitively without making any scientific comparison specific to their application data access patterns since there is no generic model available that they can use. In this paper, we propose a generic model for the Cloud application developers which would help them to choose the most appropriate data access mechanism for their specific application workloads. We define the parameters that potentially affect the end-to-end performance of the multi-data center Cloud applications which need to access large datasets over the network. To test and validate our models, we implemented a series of synthetic benchmark applications to simulate the most common data access patterns encountered in Cloud applications. We show that our model provides promising results in different settings with different parameters, such as network bandwidth, server and client capabilities, and data access ratio

  7. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  8. Center for Advanced Energy Studies: Computer Assisted Virtual Environment (CAVE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The laboratory contains a four-walled 3D computer assisted virtual environment - or CAVE TM — that allows scientists and engineers to literally walk into their data...

  9. Diamond NV centers for quantum computing and quantum networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Childress, L.; Hanson, R.

    2013-01-01

    The exotic features of quantum mechanics have the potential to revolutionize information technologies. Using superposition and entanglement, a quantum processor could efficiently tackle problems inaccessible to current-day computers. Nonlocal correlations may be exploited for intrinsically secure

  10. Data center network performance evaluation in ns3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrus, Bogdan-Mihai; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    In the following paper we present the analysis of highly interconnected topologies like hypercube and torus and how they can be implemented in data centers in order to cope with the rapid increase and demands for performance of the internal traffic. By replicating the topologies in NS3 and subjec......In the following paper we present the analysis of highly interconnected topologies like hypercube and torus and how they can be implemented in data centers in order to cope with the rapid increase and demands for performance of the internal traffic. By replicating the topologies in NS3...... and subjecting them to uniformly distributed traffic routed by shortest path algorithms we are able to extract statistics related to average throughput, latency and loss rate that show the decrease in the average throughput per connection is only about 5% for the hypercube compared to 16% for the 3D torus when...

  11. Improved custom statistics visualization for CA Performance Center data

    CERN Document Server

    Talevi, Iacopo

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of my project is to understand and experiment the possibilities that CA Performance Center (CA PC) offers for creating custom applications to display stored information through interesting visual means, such as maps. In particular, I have re-written some of the network statistics web pages in order to fetch data from new statistics modules in CA PC, which has its own API, and stop using the RRD data.

  12. A general framework for performance guaranteed green data center networking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ting; Xia, Yu; Muppala, Jogesh; Hamdi, Mounir; Foufou, Sebti

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of resource allocation and routing, this paper aims to save as much energy as possible in data center networks. We present a general framework, based on the blocking island paradigm, to try to maximize the network power conservation and minimize sacrifices of network performance and reliability. The bandwidth allocation mechanism together with power-aware routing algorithm achieve a bandwidth guaranteed tighter network. Besides, our fast efficient heuristics for allocatin...

  13. Changing the batch system in a Tier 1 computing center: why and how

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierici, Andrea; Dal Pra, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    At the Italian Tierl Center at CNAF we are evaluating the possibility to change the current production batch system. This activity is motivated mainly because we are looking for a more flexible licensing model as well as to avoid vendor lock-in. We performed a technology tracking exercise and among many possible solutions we chose to evaluate Grid Engine as an alternative because its adoption is increasing in the HEPiX community and because it's supported by the EMI middleware that we currently use on our computing farm. Another INFN site evaluated Slurm and we will compare our results in order to understand pros and cons of the two solutions. We will present the results of our evaluation of Grid Engine, in order to understand if it can fit the requirements of a Tier 1 center, compared to the solution we adopted long ago. We performed a survey and a critical re-evaluation of our farming infrastructure: many production softwares (accounting and monitoring on top of all) rely on our current solution and changing it required us to write new wrappers and adapt the infrastructure to the new system. We believe the results of this investigation can be very useful to other Tier-ls and Tier-2s centers in a similar situation, where the effort of switching may appear too hard to stand. We will provide guidelines in order to understand how difficult this operation can be and how long the change may take.

  14. Fast Performance Computing Model for Smart Distributed Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Younas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs are becoming the more prominent solution compared to fossil fuels cars technology due to its significant role in Greenhouse Gas (GHG reduction, flexible storage, and ancillary service provision as a Distributed Generation (DG resource in Vehicle to Grid (V2G regulation mode. However, large-scale penetration of PEVs and growing demand of energy intensive Data Centers (DCs brings undesirable higher load peaks in electricity demand hence, impose supply-demand imbalance and threaten the reliability of wholesale and retail power market. In order to overcome the aforementioned challenges, the proposed research considers smart Distributed Power System (DPS comprising conventional sources, renewable energy, V2G regulation, and flexible storage energy resources. Moreover, price and incentive based Demand Response (DR programs are implemented to sustain the balance between net demand and available generating resources in the DPS. In addition, we adapted a novel strategy to implement the computational intensive jobs of the proposed DPS model including incoming load profiles, V2G regulation, battery State of Charge (SOC indication, and fast computation in decision based automated DR algorithm using Fast Performance Computing resources of DCs. In response, DPS provide economical and stable power to DCs under strict power quality constraints. Finally, the improved results are verified using case study of ISO California integrated with hybrid generation.

  15. DOE research in utilization of high-performance computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzbee, B.L.; Worlton, W.J.; Michael, G.; Rodrigue, G.

    1980-12-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) and other Government research laboratories depend on high-performance computer systems to accomplish their programatic goals. As the most powerful computer systems become available, they are acquired by these laboratories so that advances can be made in their disciplines. These advances are often the result of added sophistication to numerical models whose execution is made possible by high-performance computer systems. However, high-performance computer systems have become increasingly complex; consequently, it has become increasingly difficult to realize their potential performance. The result is a need for research on issues related to the utilization of these systems. This report gives a brief description of high-performance computers, and then addresses the use of and future needs for high-performance computers within DOE, the growing complexity of applications within DOE, and areas of high-performance computer systems warranting research. 1 figure

  16. 14th annual Results and Review Workshop on High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nagel, Wolfgang E; Resch, Michael M; Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2011; High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '11

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in simulation on supercomputers. Leading researchers present results achieved on systems of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) for the year 2011. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering, ranging from CFD to computational physics and chemistry, to computer science, with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting results for both vector systems and microprocessor-based systems, the book allows readers to compare the performance levels and usability of various architectures. As HLRS

  17. High performance computing system in the framework of the Higgs boson studies

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Nikita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Higgs boson physics is one of the most important and promising fields of study in modern High Energy Physics. To perform precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties, the use of fast and efficient instruments of Monte Carlo event simulation is required. Due to the increasing amount of data and to the growing complexity of the simulation software tools, the computing resources currently available for Monte Carlo simulation on the LHC GRID are not sufficient. One of the possibilities to address this shortfall of computing resources is the usage of institutes computer clusters, commercial computing resources and supercomputers. In this paper, a brief description of the Higgs boson physics, the Monte-Carlo generation and event simulation techniques are presented. A description of modern high performance computing systems and tests of their performance are also discussed. These studies have been performed on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid and Kurchatov Institute Data Processing Center, including Tier...

  18. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  19. Performance of Air Pollution Models on Massively Parallel Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, John; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, Jerzy

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on the computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gain detailed insight about the performance of the three computers when used to solve large-scale scientific problems...

  20. Action-Centered Team Leadership Influences More than Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Frank C.; Avital, Michel; Martz, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – Building on a social-technical approach to project management, the authors aim to examine the effect of action-centered leadership attributes on team member's learning, knowledge collaboration and job satisfaction during IT-related projects. Design/methodology/approach – Structural...... collaboration along with individual performance and job satisfaction, and ultimately project success. Research limitations/implications – The action-centered leadership practices construct, developed in this study, can be a good surrogate measure of what is required to be an effective leader in an IT project...... equation modeling was utilized to assess the work environment of team members as well as the leadership practices of their respective project team leaders. Data were collected with a survey questionnaire from 327 team members in a variety of organizations in 15 industry sectors including financial services...

  1. Conception of a computer for the nuclear medical department of the Augsburg hospital center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, G.; Heidenreich, P.

    1984-01-01

    A computer system based on the Siemens R30 process computer has been employed at the Institute of Nuclear Medicine of the Augsburg Hospital Center since early 1981. This system, including the development and testing of organ-specific evaluation programs, was used as a basis for the conception of the new computer system for the department of nuclear medicine of the Augsburg Hospital Center. The computer system was extended and installed according to this conception when the new 1400-bed hospital was opened in the 3rd phase of construction in autumn 1982. (orig.) [de

  2. Peregrine System | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    classes of nodes that users access: Login Nodes Peregrine has four login nodes, each of which has Intel E5 /scratch file systems, the /mss file system is mounted on all login nodes. Compute Nodes Peregrine has 2592

  3. Center for Computer Security newsletter. Volume 2, Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-05-01

    The Fifth Computer Security Group Conference was held November 16 to 18, 1982, at the Knoxville Hilton in Knoxville, Tennessee. Attending were 183 people, representing the Department of Energy, DOE contractors, other government agencies, and vendor organizations. In these papers are abridgements of most of the papers presented in Knoxville. Less than half-a-dozen speakers failed to furnish either abstracts or full-text papers of their Knoxville presentations.

  4. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : state of Utah final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Utah. The document discusses evaluation findings in the followin...

  5. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : Washington State final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch - Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Washington. The document discusses evaluation findings in the foll...

  6. Information and psychomotor skills knowledge acquisition: A student-customer-centered and computer-supported approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Anita; Tobin, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This presentation will discuss coupling commercial and customized computer-supported teaching aids to provide BSN nursing students with a friendly customer-centered self-study approach to psychomotor skill acquisition.

  7. Performance evaluation of two highly interconnected Data Center networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrus, Bogdan-Mihai; Mihai Poncea, Ovidiu; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the analysis of highly interconnected topologies like hypercube and torus and how they can be implemented in data centers in order to cope with the rapid increase and demands for performance of the internal traffic. By replicating the topologies and subjecting them...... to uniformly distributed traffic routed by shortest path algorithms, we are able to extract relevant statistics related to average throughput, latency and loss rate. A decrease in throughput per connection of only about 5% for the hypercube compared to 16% for the 3D torus was measured when the size...

  8. Comparing Performance of Public and Cooperative Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farahbakhsh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health cooperatives in similar structure of health network in Iran, give primary health cares to defined population with supervisory of public sector. Materials and method: This study compares health system performance between public (PHC and cooperative (CHC health centers. Results: Client's satisfaction was 4.14 in CHC and 3.9 in PHC in 5 point Likert scale. The mean for daily health services of CHC and PHC were 110.8 and 85 respectively. Conclusion: Health cooperatives are appropriate strategy for downsizing of government in health sector

  9. Performing an allreduce operation on a plurality of compute nodes of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Ahmad [Rochester, MN

    2012-04-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for performing an allreduce operation on a plurality of compute nodes of a parallel computer. Each compute node includes at least two processing cores. Each processing core has contribution data for the allreduce operation. Performing an allreduce operation on a plurality of compute nodes of a parallel computer includes: establishing one or more logical rings among the compute nodes, each logical ring including at least one processing core from each compute node; performing, for each logical ring, a global allreduce operation using the contribution data for the processing cores included in that logical ring, yielding a global allreduce result for each processing core included in that logical ring; and performing, for each compute node, a local allreduce operation using the global allreduce results for each processing core on that compute node.

  10. Implementing an Affordable High-Performance Computing for Teaching-Oriented Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Goldschmidt, Kathleen; Elleithy, Yasser; Lee, Jeongkyu

    2013-01-01

    With the advances in computing power, high-performance computing (HPC) platforms have had an impact on not only scientific research in advanced organizations but also computer science curriculum in the educational community. For example, multicore programming and parallel systems are highly desired courses in the computer science major. However,…

  11. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  12. Intention and Usage of Computer Based Information Systems in Primary Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosizah; Kuntoro; Basuki N., Hari

    2016-01-01

    The computer-based information system (CBIS) is adopted by almost all of in health care setting, including the primary health center in East Java Province Indonesia. Some of softwares available were SIMPUS, SIMPUSTRONIK, SIKDA Generik, e-puskesmas. Unfortunately they were most of the primary health center did not successfully implemented. This…

  13. Performance Analysis of Cloud Computing Architectures Using Discrete Event Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, John C.; Golomb, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing offers the economic benefit of on-demand resource allocation to meet changing enterprise computing needs. However, the flexibility of cloud computing is disadvantaged when compared to traditional hosting in providing predictable application and service performance. Cloud computing relies on resource scheduling in a virtualized network-centric server environment, which makes static performance analysis infeasible. We developed a discrete event simulation model to evaluate the overall effectiveness of organizations in executing their workflow in traditional and cloud computing architectures. The two part model framework characterizes both the demand using a probability distribution for each type of service request as well as enterprise computing resource constraints. Our simulations provide quantitative analysis to design and provision computing architectures that maximize overall mission effectiveness. We share our analysis of key resource constraints in cloud computing architectures and findings on the appropriateness of cloud computing in various applications.

  14. Personality Profiles of Effective Leadership Performance in Assessment Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Alissa D; Lanza, Stephanie T; Bernthal, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most research examining the relationship between effective leadership and personality has focused on individual personality traits. However, profiles of personality traits more fully describe individuals, and these profiles may be important as they relate to leadership. This study used latent class analysis to examine how personality traits combine and interact to form subpopulations of leaders, and how these subpopulations relate to performance criteria. Using a sample of 2,461 executive-level leaders, six personality profiles were identified: Unpredictable Leaders with Low Diligence (7.3%); Conscientious, Backend Leaders (3.6%); Unpredictable Leaders (8.6%); Creative Communicators (20.8%); Power Players (32.4%); and Protocol Followers (27.1%). One profile performed well on all criteria in an assessment center; remaining profiles exhibited strengths and weaknesses across criteria. Implications and future directions for research are highlighted.

  15. Factors related to the performance of Specialized Dental Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Christiane de Azevedo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC have the mission to expand access to public medium complexity dental care and support the primary health care actions at this level of complexity. However, it is necessary to ensure the quality of services and to evaluate such services continuously to identify weaknesses and strengths that support the processes of leadership/management. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of studies on the assessment of oral health in specialized care that may indicate which factors should be investigated. Therefore, this integrated literature review sought to explore the plethora of publications on the evaluation of SDCC in the LILACS and MEDLINE data bases in October 2013 to identify factors possibly related to the performance of such health services. Thus, 13 references were included in this review pointing to forms of organization and management of work processes related to the creation of healthcare networks (operation of regulation centers and setting up of health consortiums. They include the contextual characteristics of the places where SDCCs are located (population size, Family Health Strategy coverage, Municipal Human Development Index, governance, governing capacity were factors that influenced the SDCCs performance.

  16. A Descriptive Study towards Green Computing Practice Application for Data Centers in IT Based Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Jnr. Bokolo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The progressive upsurge in demand for processing and computing power has led to a subsequent upsurge in data center carbon emissions, cost incurred, unethical waste management, depletion of natural resources and high energy utilization. This raises the issue of the sustainability attainment in data centers of Information Technology (IT based industries. Green computing practice can be applied to facilitate sustainability attainment as IT based industries utilizes data centers to provide services to staffs, practitioners and end users. But it is a known fact that enterprise servers utilize huge quantity of energy and incur other expenditures in cooling operations and it is difficult to address the needs of accuracy and efficiency in data centers while yet encouraging a greener application practice alongside cost reduction. Thus this research study focus on the practice application of Green computing in data centers which houses servers and as such presents the Green computing life cycle strategies and best practices to be practiced for better management in data centers in IT based industries. Data was collected through questionnaire from 133 respondents in industries that currently operate their in-house data centers. The analysed data was used to verify the Green computing life cycle strategies presented in this study. Findings from the data shows that each of the life cycles strategies is significant in assisting IT based industries apply Green computing practices in their data centers. This study would be of interest to knowledge and data management practitioners as well as environmental manager and academicians in deploying Green data centers in their organizations.

  17. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  18. Inclusive vision for high performance computing at the CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gazendam, A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available and computationally intensive applications. A number of different technologies and standards were identified as core to the open and distributed high-performance infrastructure envisaged...

  19. ASSURED CLOUD COMPUTING UNIVERSITY CENTER OFEXCELLENCE (ACC UCOE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    89 26: GENERAL STRUCTURE FOR EVIDENCE- BASED TRYST JUDGEMENT ............................ 92 27: HADOOP/YARN SYSTEM PERFORMANCE...network. Table 3. Specifications of the used equipment for evaluation Our mobile-cloud application model is based on the actor model of...for both virtual machines and containers. Multi- organizational policy- based monitoring and network traffic isolation through software defined

  20. Advanced Certification Program for Computer Graphic Specialists. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkland Coll., Champaign, IL.

    A pioneer program in computer graphics was implemented at Parkland College (Illinois) to meet the demand for specialized technicians to visualize data generated on high performance computers. In summer 1989, 23 students were accepted into the pilot program. Courses included C programming, calculus and analytic geometry, computer graphics, and…

  1. Performance of the TRISTAN computer control network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiso, H.; Abe, K.; Akiyama, A.; Katoh, T.; Kikutani, E.; Kurihara, N.; Kurokawa, S.; Oide, K.; Shinomoto, M.

    1985-01-01

    An N-to-N token ring network of twenty-four minicomputers controls the TRISTAN accelerator complex. The computers are linked by optical fiber cables with 10 Mbps transmission speed. The software system is based on the NODAL, a multi-computer interpreter language developed at CERN SPS. Typical messages exchanged between computers are NODAL programs and NODAL variables transmitted by the EXEC and the REMIT commands. These messages are exchanged as a cluster of packets whose maximum size is 512 bytes. At present, eleven minicomputers are connected to the network and the total length of the ring is 1.5 km. In this condition, the maximum attainable throughput is 980 kbytes/s. The response of a pair of an EXEC and a REMIT transactions which transmit a NODAL array A and one line of program 'REMIT A' and immediately remit the A is measured to be 95+0.039/chi/ ms, where /chi/ is the array size in byte. In ordinary accelerator operations, the maximum channel utilization is 2%, the average packet length is 96 bytes and the transmission rate is 10 kbytes/s

  2. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  3. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  4. A high performance scientific cloud computing environment for materials simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, K.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the development of a scientific cloud computing (SCC) platform that offers high performance computation capability. The platform consists of a scientific virtual machine prototype containing a UNIX operating system and several materials science codes, together with essential interface tools (an SCC toolset) that offers functionality comparable to local compute clusters. In particular, our SCC toolset provides automatic creation of virtual clusters for parallel computing, including tools for execution and monitoring performance, as well as efficient I/O utilities that enable seamless connections to and from the cloud. Our SCC platform is optimized for the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). We present benchmarks for prototypical scientific applications and demonstrate performance comparable to local compute clusters. To facilitate code execution and provide user-friendly access, we have also integrated cloud computing capability in a JAVA-based GUI. Our SCC platform may be an alternative to traditional HPC resources for materials science or quantum chemistry applications.

  5. Performance evaluation for compressible flow calculations on five parallel computers of different architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Toshiya.

    1997-03-01

    A two-dimensional explicit Euler solver has been implemented for five MIMD parallel computers of different machine architectures in Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. These parallel computers are Fujitsu VPP300, NEC SX-4, CRAY T94, IBM SP2, and Hitachi SR2201. The code was parallelized by several parallelization methods, and a typical compressible flow problem has been calculated for different grid sizes changing the number of processors. Their effective performances for parallel calculations, such as calculation speed, speed-up ratio and parallel efficiency, have been investigated and evaluated. The communication time among processors has been also measured and evaluated. As a result, the differences on the performance and the characteristics between vector-parallel and scalar-parallel computers can be pointed, and it will present the basic data for efficient use of parallel computers and for large scale CFD simulations on parallel computers. (author)

  6. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center) target system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Bridge, A.; Sanchez, R.J.; Brewton, R.J.; Woods, R.; Hughes, H.G. III

    1989-01-01

    The authors measured neutron beam fluxes at LANSCE using gold foil activation techniques. They did an extensive computer simulation of the as-built LANSCE Target/Moderator/Reflector/Shield geometry. They used this mockup in a Monte Carlo calculation to predict LANSCE neutronic performance for comparison with measured results. For neutron beam fluxes at 1 eV, the ratio of measured data to calculated varies from ∼0.6-0.9. The computed 1 eV neutron leakage at the moderator surface is 3.9 x 10 10 n/eV-sr-s-μA for LANSCE high-intensity water moderators. The corresponding values for the LANSCE high-resolution water moderator and the liquid hydrogen moderator are 3.3 and 2.9 x 10 10 , respectively. LANSCE predicted moderator intensities (per proton) for a tungsten target are essentially the same as ISIS predicted moderator intensities for a depleted uranium target. The calculated LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal (E 13 n/cm 2 -s. The unique LANSCE split-target/flux-trap-moderator system is performing exceedingly well. The system has operated without a target or moderator change for over three years at nominal proton currents of 25 μA of 800-MeV protons. 17 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Performance Aspects of Synthesizable Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleuniger, Pascal

    Embedded systems are used in a broad range of applications that demand high performance within severely constrained mechanical, power, and cost requirements. Embedded systems implemented in ASIC technology tend to provide the highest performance, lowest power consumption and lowest unit cost. How...

  8. A high performance scientific cloud computing environment for materials simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Jorissen, Kevin; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of a scientific cloud computing (SCC) platform that offers high performance computation capability. The platform consists of a scientific virtual machine prototype containing a UNIX operating system and several materials science codes, together with essential interface tools (an SCC toolset) that offers functionality comparable to local compute clusters. In particular, our SCC toolset provides automatic creation of virtual clusters for parallel computing, including...

  9. Whatever works: a systematic user-centered training protocol to optimize brain-computer interfacing individually.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth V C Friedrich

    Full Text Available This study implemented a systematic user-centered training protocol for a 4-class brain-computer interface (BCI. The goal was to optimize the BCI individually in order to achieve high performance within few sessions for all users. Eight able-bodied volunteers, who were initially naïve to the use of a BCI, participated in 10 sessions over a period of about 5 weeks. In an initial screening session, users were asked to perform the following seven mental tasks while multi-channel EEG was recorded: mental rotation, word association, auditory imagery, mental subtraction, spatial navigation, motor imagery of the left hand and motor imagery of both feet. Out of these seven mental tasks, the best 4-class combination as well as most reactive frequency band (between 8-30 Hz was selected individually for online control. Classification was based on common spatial patterns and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. The number and time of classifier updates varied individually. Selection speed was increased by reducing trial length. To minimize differences in brain activity between sessions with and without feedback, sham feedback was provided in the screening and calibration runs in which usually no real-time feedback is shown. Selected task combinations and frequency ranges differed between users. The tasks that were included in the 4-class combination most often were (1 motor imagery of the left hand (2, one brain-teaser task (word association or mental subtraction (3, mental rotation task and (4 one more dynamic imagery task (auditory imagery, spatial navigation, imagery of the feet. Participants achieved mean performances over sessions of 44-84% and peak performances in single-sessions of 58-93% in this user-centered 4-class BCI protocol. This protocol is highly adjustable to individual users and thus could increase the percentage of users who can gain and maintain BCI control. A high priority for future work is to examine this protocol with severely

  10. Center type performance of differentiable vector fields in R2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabanal, Roland

    2007-08-01

    Let X : R 2 / D → R 2 be a differentiable vector field, where D is compact. If the eigenvalues of the jacobian matrix DX z are (nonzero) purely imaginary, for all z element of R 2 / D . Then, X + v has a center type performance at infinity, for some v element of R 2 . More precisely, X + v has a periodic trajectory Γ subset of R2/ D which is surrounding D such that in the unbounded component of (R 2 / D )/ Γ all the trajectories of X + v are nontrivial cycles. In the case of global vector fields Y : R 2 → R 2 with Y (0) = 0, we prove that such eigenvalue condition implies the topological equivalency of Y with the linear vector field (x, y) → (-y, x). (author)

  11. Business Performer-Centered Design of User Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Kênia; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    Business Performer-Centered Design of User Interfaces is a new design methodology that adopts business process (BP) definition and a business performer perspective for managing the life cycle of user interfaces of enterprise systems. In this methodology, when the organization has a business process culture, the business processes of an organization are firstly defined according to a traditional methodology for this kind of artifact. These business processes are then transformed into a series of task models that represent the interactive parts of the business processes that will ultimately lead to interactive systems. When the organization has its enterprise systems, but not yet its business processes modeled, the user interfaces of the systems help derive tasks models, which are then used to derive the business processes. The double linking between a business process and a task model, and between a task model and a user interface model makes it possible to ensure traceability of the artifacts in multiple paths and enables a more active participation of business performers in analyzing the resulting user interfaces. In this paper, we outline how a human-perspective is used tied to a model-driven perspective.

  12. InfoMall: An Innovative Strategy for High-Performance Computing and Communications Applications Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kim; Fox, Geoffrey

    1994-01-01

    Describes the InfoMall, a program led by the Northeast Parallel Architectures Center (NPAC) at Syracuse University (New York). The InfoMall features a partnership of approximately 24 organizations offering linked programs in High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) technology integration, software development, marketing, education and…

  13. The effective use of virtualization for selection of data centers in a cloud computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Santhosh; Parthiban, Latha

    2018-04-01

    Data centers are the places which consist of network of remote servers to store, access and process the data. Cloud computing is a technology where users worldwide will submit the tasks and the service providers will direct the requests to the data centers which are responsible for execution of tasks. The servers in the data centers need to employ the virtualization concept so that multiple tasks can be executed simultaneously. In this paper we proposed an algorithm for data center selection based on energy of virtual machines created in server. The virtualization energy in each of the server is calculated and total energy of the data center is obtained by the summation of individual server energy. The tasks submitted are routed to the data center with least energy consumption which will result in minimizing the operational expenses of a service provider.

  14. High performance computing system in the framework of the Higgs boson studies

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Nikita; The ATLAS collaboration; Velikhov, Vasily; Konoplich, Rostislav

    2017-01-01

    The Higgs boson physics is one of the most important and promising fields of study in the modern high energy physics. It is important to notice, that GRID computing resources become strictly limited due to increasing amount of statistics, required for physics analyses and unprecedented LHC performance. One of the possibilities to address the shortfall of computing resources is the usage of computer institutes' clusters, commercial computing resources and supercomputers. To perform precision measurements of the Higgs boson properties in these realities, it is also highly required to have effective instruments to simulate kinematic distributions of signal events. In this talk we give a brief description of the modern distribution reconstruction method called Morphing and perform few efficiency tests to demonstrate its potential. These studies have been performed on the WLCG and Kurchatov Institute’s Data Processing Center, including Tier-1 GRID site and supercomputer as well. We also analyze the CPU efficienc...

  15. Software Systems for High-performance Quantum Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; Britt, Keith A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing promises new opportunities for solving hard computational problems, but harnessing this novelty requires breakthrough concepts in the design, operation, and application of computing systems. We define some of the challenges facing the development of quantum computing systems as well as software-based approaches that can be used to overcome these challenges. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we present models for the quantum programming and execution models, the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems, and the realization of software stacks for quantum networking. This leads to a discussion of the role that conventional computing plays in the quantum paradigm and how some of the current challenges for exascale computing overlap with those facing quantum computing.

  16. Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Anxiety, Performance and Personal Outcomes of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktag, Isil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the computer self-efficacy, performance outcome, personal outcome, and affect and anxiety level of physical education teachers. Influence of teaching experience, computer usage and participation of seminars or in-service programs on computer self-efficacy level were determined. The subjects of this study…

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  18. A novel patient-centered "intention-to-treat" metric of U.S. lung transplant center performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Dawn A; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Lederer, David J

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of pretransplantation outcomes, 1-year posttransplantation survival is typically considered the primary metric of lung transplant center performance in the United States. We designed a novel lung transplant center performance metric that incorporates both pre- and posttransplantation survival time. We performed an ecologic study of 12 187 lung transplant candidates listed at 56 U.S. lung transplant centers between 2006 and 2012. We calculated an "intention-to-treat" survival (ITTS) metric as the percentage of waiting list candidates surviving at least 1 year after transplantation. The median center-level 1-year posttransplantation survival rate was 84.1%, and the median center-level ITTS was 66.9% (mean absolute difference 19.6%, 95% limits of agreement 4.3 to 35.1%). All but 10 centers had ITTS values that were significantly lower than 1-year posttransplantation survival rates. Observed ITTS was significantly lower than expected ITTS for 7 centers. These data show that one third of lung transplant candidates do not survive 1 year after transplantation, and that 12% of centers have lower than expected ITTS. An "intention-to-treat" survival metric may provide a more realistic expectation of patient outcomes at transplant centers and may be of value to transplant centers and policymakers. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Annual report of R and D activities in Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering and Center for Computational Science and e-Systems from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities in Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), JAERI in the former half of the fiscal year 2005 (April 1, 2005 - Sep. 30, 2006) and those in Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), JAEA, in the latter half of the fiscal year 2005(Oct 1, 2005 - March 31, 2006). In the former half term, the activities have been performed by 5 research groups, Research Group for Computational Science in Atomic Energy, Research Group for Computational Material Science in Atomic Energy, R and D Group for Computer Science, R and D Group for Numerical Experiments, and Quantum Bioinformatics Group in CCSE. At the beginning of the latter half term, these 5 groups were integrated into two offices, Simulation Technology Research and Development Office and Computer Science Research and Development Office at the moment of the unification of JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) and JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the latter-half term activities were operated by the two offices. A big project, ITBL (Information Technology Based Laboratory) project and fundamental computational research for atomic energy plant were performed mainly by two groups, the R and D Group for Computer Science and the Research Group for Computational Science in Atomic Energy in the former half term and their integrated office, Computer Science Research and Development Office in the latter half one, respectively. The main result was verification by using structure analysis for real plant executable on the Grid environment, and received Honorable Mentions of Analytic Challenge in the conference 'Supercomputing (SC05)'. The materials science and bioinformatics in atomic energy research field were carried out by three groups, Research Group for Computational Material Science in Atomic Energy, R and D Group for Computer Science, R and D Group for Numerical Experiments, and Quantum Bioinformatics

  20. Computer performance evaluation of FACOM 230-75 computer system, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Minoru; Asai, Kiyoshi

    1980-08-01

    In this report are described computer performance evaluations for FACOM230-75 computers in JAERI. The evaluations are performed on following items: (1) Cost/benefit analysis of timesharing terminals, (2) Analysis of the response time of timesharing terminals, (3) Analysis of throughout time for batch job processing, (4) Estimation of current potential demands for computer time, (5) Determination of appropriate number of card readers and line printers. These evaluations are done mainly from the standpoint of cost reduction of computing facilities. The techniques adapted are very practical ones. This report will be useful for those people who are concerned with the management of computing installation. (author)

  1. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, A.; Limaye, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula's "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA's SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT's experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  2. High Performance Computing Modernization Program Kerberos Throughput Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-26

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5524--17-9751 High Performance Computing Modernization Program Kerberos Throughput Test ...NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 2. REPORT TYPE1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 6. AUTHOR(S) 8. PERFORMING...PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT High Performance Computing Modernization Program Kerberos Throughput Test Report Daniel G. Gdula* and

  3. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2011-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and

  4. Performance evaluation of computer and communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Le Boudec, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    … written by a scientist successful in performance evaluation, it is based on his experience and provides many ideas not only to laymen entering the field, but also to practitioners looking for inspiration. The work can be read systematically as a textbook on how to model and test the derived hypotheses on the basis of simulations. Also, separate parts can be studied, as the chapters are self-contained. … the book can be successfully used either for self-study or as a supplementary book for a lecture. I believe that different types of readers will like it: practicing engineers and resea

  5. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality.

  6. Research Activity in Computational Physics utilizing High Performance Computing: Co-authorship Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sul-Ah; Jung, Youngim

    2016-10-01

    The research activities of the computational physicists utilizing high performance computing are analyzed by bibliometirc approaches. This study aims at providing the computational physicists utilizing high-performance computing and policy planners with useful bibliometric results for an assessment of research activities. In order to achieve this purpose, we carried out a co-authorship network analysis of journal articles to assess the research activities of researchers for high-performance computational physics as a case study. For this study, we used journal articles of the Scopus database from Elsevier covering the time period of 2004-2013. We extracted the author rank in the physics field utilizing high-performance computing by the number of papers published during ten years from 2004. Finally, we drew the co-authorship network for 45 top-authors and their coauthors, and described some features of the co-authorship network in relation to the author rank. Suggestions for further studies are discussed.

  7. Impact of configuration management system of computer center on support of scientific projects throughout their lifecycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.V.; Yuzhanin, N.V.; Zolotarev, V.I.; Ezhakova, T.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this article the problem of scientific projects support throughout their lifecycle in the computer center is considered in every aspect of support. Configuration Management system plays a connecting role in processes related to the provision and support of services of a computer center. In view of strong integration of IT infrastructure components with the use of virtualization, control of infrastructure becomes even more critical to the support of research projects, which means higher requirements for the Configuration Management system. For every aspect of research projects support, the influence of the Configuration Management system is reviewed and development of the corresponding elements of the system is described in the present paper.

  8. Impact of configuration management system of computer center on support of scientific projects throughout their lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, A. V.; Iuzhanin, N. V.; Zolotarev, V. I.; Ezhakova, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this article the problem of scientific projects support throughout their lifecycle in the computer center is considered in every aspect of support. Configuration Management system plays a connecting role in processes related to the provision and support of services of a computer center. In view of strong integration of IT infrastructure components with the use of virtualization, control of infrastructure becomes even more critical to the support of research projects, which means higher requirements for the Configuration Management system. For every aspect of research projects support, the influence of the Configuration Management system is being reviewed and development of the corresponding elements of the system is being described in the present paper.

  9. Quantum Accelerators for High-performance Computing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S. [ORNL; Britt, Keith A. [ORNL; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A. [ORNL

    2017-11-01

    We define some of the programming and system-level challenges facing the application of quantum processing to high-performance computing. Alongside barriers to physical integration, prominent differences in the execution of quantum and conventional programs challenges the intersection of these computational models. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we discuss recent advances in programming and execution models for hybrid quantum-classical computing. We discuss a novel quantum-accelerator framework that uses specialized kernels to offload select workloads while integrating with existing computing infrastructure. We elaborate on the role of the host operating system to manage these unique accelerator resources, the prospects for deploying quantum modules, and the requirements placed on the language hierarchy connecting these different system components. We draw on recent advances in the modeling and simulation of quantum computing systems with the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems and the realization of software stacks for controlling quantum devices. Finally, we present simulation results that describe the expected system-level behavior of high-performance computing systems composed from compute nodes with quantum processing units. We describe performance for these hybrid systems in terms of time-to-solution, accuracy, and energy consumption, and we use simple application examples to estimate the performance advantage of quantum acceleration.

  10. A Heterogeneous High-Performance System for Computational and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    expand the research infrastructure at the institution but also to enhance the high -performance computing training provided to both undergraduate and... cloud computing, supercomputing, and the availability of cheap memory and storage led to enormous amounts of data to be sifted through in forensic... High -Performance Computing (HPC) tools that can be integrated with existing curricula and support our research to modernize and dramatically advance

  11. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Daniel C; Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (plearning to their respective training programs.

  12. Technical Data Management Center: a focal point for meteorological and other environmental transport computing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, B.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    The Technical Data Management Center, collecting, packaging, analyzing, and distributing information, computer technology and data which includes meteorological and other environmental transport work is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, within the Engineering Physics Division. Major activities include maintaining a collection of computing technology and associated literature citations to provide capabilities for meteorological and environmental work. Details of the activities on behalf of TDMC's sponsoring agency, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are described

  13. Quantum Accelerators for High-Performance Computing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Britt, Keith A.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Humble, Travis S.

    2017-01-01

    We define some of the programming and system-level challenges facing the application of quantum processing to high-performance computing. Alongside barriers to physical integration, prominent differences in the execution of quantum and conventional programs challenges the intersection of these computational models. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we discuss recent advances in programming and execution models for hybrid quantum-classical computing. We discuss a novel quantu...

  14. High Performance Networks From Supercomputing to Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Abts, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Datacenter networks provide the communication substrate for large parallel computer systems that form the ecosystem for high performance computing (HPC) systems and modern Internet applications. The design of new datacenter networks is motivated by an array of applications ranging from communication intensive climatology, complex material simulations and molecular dynamics to such Internet applications as Web search, language translation, collaborative Internet applications, streaming video and voice-over-IP. For both Supercomputing and Cloud Computing the network enables distributed applicati

  15. The Internet and Computer User Profile: a questionnaire for determining intervention targets in occupational therapy at mental health vocational centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Sivan; Hadas-Lidor, Noami; Rosenberg, Limor

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the assessment tool "Internet and Computer User Profile" questionnaire (ICUP) is presented and validated. It was developed in order to gather information for setting intervention goals to meet current demands. Sixty-eight subjects aged 23-68 participated in the study. The study group (n = 28) was sampled from two vocational centers. The control group consisted of 40 participants from the general population that were sampled by convenience sampling based on the demographics of the study group. Subjects from both groups answered the ICUP questionnaire. Subjects of the study group answered the General Self- Efficacy (GSE) questionnaire and performed the Assessment of Computer Task Performance (ACTP) test in order to examine the convergent validity of the ICUP. Twenty subjects from both groups retook the ICUP questionnaire in order to obtain test-retest results. Differences between groups were tested using multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) tests. Pearson and Spearman's tests were used for calculating correlations. Cronbach's alpha coefficient and k equivalent were used to assess internal consistency. The results indicate that the questionnaire is valid and reliable. They emphasize that the layout of the ICUP items facilitates in making a comprehensive examination of the client's perception regarding his participation in computer and internet activities. Implications for Rehabiliation The assessment tool "Internet and Computer User Profile" (ICUP) questionnaire is a novel assessment tool that evaluates operative use and individual perception of computer activities. The questionnaire is valid and reliable for use with participants of vocational centers dealing with mental illness. It is essential to facilitate access to computers for people with mental illnesses, seeing that they express similar interest in computers and internet as people from the general population of the same age. Early intervention will be particularly effective for young

  16. Enabling High-Performance Computing as a Service

    KAUST Repository

    AbdelBaky, Moustafa; Parashar, Manish; Kim, Hyunjoo; Jordan, Kirk E.; Sachdeva, Vipin; Sexton, James; Jamjoom, Hani; Shae, Zon-Yin; Pencheva, Gergina; Tavakoli, Reza; Wheeler, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    With the right software infrastructure, clouds can provide scientists with as a service access to high-performance computing resources. An award-winning prototype framework transforms the Blue Gene/P system into an elastic cloud to run a

  17. Multicore Challenges and Benefits for High Performance Scientific Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M.B. Nielsen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, performance gains in processors were achieved largely by improvements in clock speeds and instruction level parallelism. Thus, applications could obtain performance increases with relatively minor changes by upgrading to the latest generation of computing hardware. Currently, however, processor performance improvements are realized by using multicore technology and hardware support for multiple threads within each core, and taking full advantage of this technology to improve the performance of applications requires exposure of extreme levels of software parallelism. We will here discuss the architecture of parallel computers constructed from many multicore chips as well as techniques for managing the complexity of programming such computers, including the hybrid message-passing/multi-threading programming model. We will illustrate these ideas with a hybrid distributed memory matrix multiply and a quantum chemistry algorithm for energy computation using Møller–Plesset perturbation theory.

  18. Enabling high performance computational science through combinatorial algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Erik G; Bozdag, Doruk; Catalyurek, Umit V; Devine, Karen D; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H; Hovland, Paul D; Pothen, Alex; Strout, Michelle Mills

    2007-01-01

    The Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations (CSCAPES) Institute is developing algorithms and software for combinatorial problems that play an enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. Discrete algorithms will be increasingly critical for achieving high performance for irregular problems on petascale architectures. This paper describes recent contributions by researchers at the CSCAPES Institute in the areas of load balancing, parallel graph coloring, performance improvement, and parallel automatic differentiation

  19. Enabling high performance computational science through combinatorial algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Erik G [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Bozdag, Doruk [Biomedical Informatics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Catalyurek, Umit V [Biomedical Informatics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University (United States); Devine, Karen D [Discrete Algorithms and Math Department, Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Gebremedhin, Assefaw H [Computer Science and Center for Computational Science, Old Dominion University (United States); Hovland, Paul D [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Pothen, Alex [Computer Science and Center for Computational Science, Old Dominion University (United States); Strout, Michelle Mills [Computer Science, Colorado State University (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations (CSCAPES) Institute is developing algorithms and software for combinatorial problems that play an enabling role in scientific and engineering computations. Discrete algorithms will be increasingly critical for achieving high performance for irregular problems on petascale architectures. This paper describes recent contributions by researchers at the CSCAPES Institute in the areas of load balancing, parallel graph coloring, performance improvement, and parallel automatic differentiation.

  20. CENTER CONDITIONS AND CYCLICITY FOR A FAMILY OF CUBIC SYSTEMS: COMPUTER ALGEBRA APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferčec, Brigita; Mahdi, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Using methods of computational algebra we obtain an upper bound for the cyclicity of a family of cubic systems. We overcame the problem of nonradicality of the associated Bautin ideal by moving from the ring of polynomials to a coordinate ring. Finally, we determine the number of limit cycles bifurcating from each component of the center variety.

  1. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  2. Micromagnetics on high-performance workstation and mobile computational platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, S.; Chang, R.; Couture, S.; Menarini, M.; Escobar, M. A.; Kuteifan, M.; Lubarda, M.; Gabay, D.; Lomakin, V.

    2015-05-01

    The feasibility of using high-performance desktop and embedded mobile computational platforms is presented, including multi-core Intel central processing unit, Nvidia desktop graphics processing units, and Nvidia Jetson TK1 Platform. FastMag finite element method-based micromagnetic simulator is used as a testbed, showing high efficiency on all the platforms. Optimization aspects of improving the performance of the mobile systems are discussed. The high performance, low cost, low power consumption, and rapid performance increase of the embedded mobile systems make them a promising candidate for micromagnetic simulations. Such architectures can be used as standalone systems or can be built as low-power computing clusters.

  3. Architecture and Programming Models for High Performance Intensive Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    commands from the data processing center to the sensors is needed. It has been noted that the ubiquity of mobile communication devices offers the...commands from a Processing Facility by way of mobile Relay Stations. The activity of each component of this model other than the Merge module can be...evaluation of the initial system implementation. Gao also was in charge of the development of Fresh Breeze architecture backend on new many-core computers

  4. Accurate Computation of Periodic Regions' Centers in the General M-Set with Integer Index Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two methods for accurately computing the periodic regions' centers. One method fits for the general M-sets with integer index number, the other fits for the general M-sets with negative integer index number. Both methods improve the precision of computation by transforming the polynomial equations which determine the periodic regions' centers. We primarily discuss the general M-sets with negative integer index, and analyze the relationship between the number of periodic regions' centers on the principal symmetric axis and in the principal symmetric interior. We can get the centers' coordinates with at least 48 significant digits after the decimal point in both real and imaginary parts by applying the Newton's method to the transformed polynomial equation which determine the periodic regions' centers. In this paper, we list some centers' coordinates of general M-sets' k-periodic regions (k=3,4,5,6 for the index numbers α=−25,−24,…,−1 , all of which have highly numerical accuracy.

  5. Computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for shared-memory parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2015-09-01

    The computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation is investigated for three types of current shared-memory parallel computer devices: many integrated core (MIC) processors, graphics processing units (GPUs), and multi-core CPUs. We are especially interested in efficient shared-memory allocation methods for each chipset, because the efficient data access patterns differ between compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming for GPUs and OpenMP programming for MIC processors and multi-core CPUs. We first introduce several parallel implementation techniques for the SPH code, and then examine these on our target computer architectures to determine the most effective algorithms for each processor unit. In addition, we evaluate the effective computing performance and power efficiency of the SPH simulation on each architecture, as these are critical metrics for overall performance in a multi-device environment. In our benchmark test, the GPU is found to produce the best arithmetic performance as a standalone device unit, and gives the most efficient power consumption. The multi-core CPU obtains the most effective computing performance. The computational speed of the MIC processor on Xeon Phi approached that of two Xeon CPUs. This indicates that using MICs is an attractive choice for existing SPH codes on multi-core CPUs parallelized by OpenMP, as it gains computational acceleration without the need for significant changes to the source code.

  6. High-performance scientific computing in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, Kevin; Vila, Fernando; Rehr, John

    2011-03-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to open up high-performance computational science to a much broader class of researchers, owing to its ability to provide on-demand, virtualized computational resources. However, before such approaches can become commonplace, user-friendly tools must be developed that hide the unfamiliar cloud environment and streamline the management of cloud resources for many scientific applications. We have recently shown that high-performance cloud computing is feasible for parallelized x-ray spectroscopy calculations. We now present benchmark results for a wider selection of scientific applications focusing on electronic structure and spectroscopic simulation software in condensed matter physics. These applications are driven by an improved portable interface that can manage virtual clusters and run various applications in the cloud. We also describe a next generation of cluster tools, aimed at improved performance and a more robust cluster deployment. Supported by NSF grant OCI-1048052.

  7. COMPUTERS: Teraflops for Europe; EEC Working Group on High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-03-15

    In little more than a decade, simulation on high performance computers has become an essential tool for theoretical physics, capable of solving a vast range of crucial problems inaccessible to conventional analytic mathematics. In many ways, computer simulation has become the calculus for interacting many-body systems, a key to the study of transitions from isolated to collective behaviour.

  8. COMPUTERS: Teraflops for Europe; EEC Working Group on High Performance Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    In little more than a decade, simulation on high performance computers has become an essential tool for theoretical physics, capable of solving a vast range of crucial problems inaccessible to conventional analytic mathematics. In many ways, computer simulation has become the calculus for interacting many-body systems, a key to the study of transitions from isolated to collective behaviour

  9. Establishment of computed tomography reference dose levels in Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Kyrozi, E.; Syrigou, T.; Mastorakou, I.; Kottou, S.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to apply European Commission (EC) Reference Dose Levels (RDL) in Computed Tomography (CT) examinations at Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center (OCSC). These are weighted CT Dose Index (CTDI w ) for a single slice and Dose-Length Product (DLP) for a complete examination. During the period 1998-1999, the total number of CT examinations, every type of CT examination, patient related data and technical parameters of the examinations were recorded. The most frequent examinations were chosen for investigation which were the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. CTDI measurements were performed and CTDI w and DLP were calculated. Third Quartile values of CTDI w were chosen to be 43mGy for head, 8mGy for chest, and 22mGy for abdomen and pelvis examinations. Third quartile values of DLP were chosen to be 740mGycm for head, 370mGycm for chest, 490mGycm for abdomen and 420mGycm for pelvis examination. Results confirm that OCSC follows successfully the proposed RDL for the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations in terms of radiation dose. (author)

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...

  11. Contemporary high performance computing from petascale toward exascale

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    A continuation of Contemporary High Performance Computing: From Petascale toward Exascale, this second volume continues the discussion of HPC flagship systems, major application workloads, facilities, and sponsors. The book includes of figures and pictures that capture the state of existing systems: pictures of buildings, systems in production, floorplans, and many block diagrams and charts to illustrate system design and performance.

  12. Connecting Performance Analysis and Visualization to Advance Extreme Scale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, Peer-Timo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mohr, Bernd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schulz, Martin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pasccci, Valerio [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gamblin, Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunst, Holger [Dresden Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2015-07-29

    The characterization, modeling, analysis, and tuning of software performance has been a central topic in High Performance Computing (HPC) since its early beginnings. The overall goal is to make HPC software run faster on particular hardware, either through better scheduling, on-node resource utilization, or more efficient distributed communication.

  13. Human performance models for computer-aided engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, Jerome I. (Editor); Card, Stuart K. (Editor); Hochberg, Julian (Editor); Huey, Beverly Messick (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses a topic important to the field of computational human factors: models of human performance and their use in computer-based engineering facilities for the design of complex systems. It focuses on a particular human factors design problem -- the design of cockpit systems for advanced helicopters -- and on a particular aspect of human performance -- vision and related cognitive functions. By focusing in this way, the authors were able to address the selected topics in some depth and develop findings and recommendations that they believe have application to many other aspects of human performance and to other design domains.

  14. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  15. Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Use of computers and Internet among people with severe mental illnesses at peer support centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, Mary F; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Ferron, Joelle C; Ustinich, Lee; Kelly, Michael; Grinley, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Peer support centers are an ideal setting where people with severe mental illnesses can access the Internet via computers for online health education, peer support, and behavioral treatments. The purpose of this study was to assess computer use and Internet access in peer support agencies. A peer-assisted survey assessed the frequency with which consumers in all 13 New Hampshire peer support centers (n = 702) used computers to access Internet resources. During the 30-day survey period, 200 of the 702 peer support consumers (28%) responded to the survey. More than 3 quarters (78.5%) of respondents had gone online to seek information in the past year. About half (49%) of respondents were interested in learning about online forums that would provide information and peer support for mental health issues. Peer support centers may be a useful venue for Web-based approaches to education, peer support, and intervention. Future research should assess facilitators and barriers to use of Web-based resources among people with severe mental illness in peer support centers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Routing performance analysis and optimization within a massively parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen

    2013-04-16

    An apparatus, program product and method optimize the operation of a massively parallel computer system by, in part, receiving actual performance data concerning an application executed by the plurality of interconnected nodes, and analyzing the actual performance data to identify an actual performance pattern. A desired performance pattern may be determined for the application, and an algorithm may be selected from among a plurality of algorithms stored within a memory, the algorithm being configured to achieve the desired performance pattern based on the actual performance data.

  18. On-demand provisioning of HEP compute resources on cloud sites and shared HPC centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erli, G.; Fischer, F.; Fleig, G.; Giffels, M.; Hauth, T.; Quast, G.; Schnepf, M.; Heese, J.; Leppert, K.; Arnaez de Pedro, J.; Sträter, R.

    2017-10-01

    This contribution reports on solutions, experiences and recent developments with the dynamic, on-demand provisioning of remote computing resources for analysis and simulation workflows. Local resources of a physics institute are extended by private and commercial cloud sites, ranging from the inclusion of desktop clusters over institute clusters to HPC centers. Rather than relying on dedicated HEP computing centers, it is nowadays more reasonable and flexible to utilize remote computing capacity via virtualization techniques or container concepts. We report on recent experience from incorporating a remote HPC center (NEMO Cluster, Freiburg University) and resources dynamically requested from the commercial provider 1&1 Internet SE into our intitute’s computing infrastructure. The Freiburg HPC resources are requested via the standard batch system, allowing HPC and HEP applications to be executed simultaneously, such that regular batch jobs run side by side to virtual machines managed via OpenStack [1]. For the inclusion of the 1&1 commercial resources, a Python API and SDK as well as the possibility to upload images were available. Large scale tests prove the capability to serve the scientific use case in the European 1&1 datacenters. The described environment at the Institute of Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP) at KIT serves the needs of researchers participating in the CMS and Belle II experiments. In total, resources exceeding half a million CPU hours have been provided by remote sites.

  19. The Role of the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) is an information analysis center that collects, archives, evaluates, synthesizes and distributes information, data and codes that are used in various nuclear technology applications. RSICC retains more than 2,000 packages that have been provided by contributors from various agencies. RSICC’s customers obtain access to such computing codes (source and/or executable versions) and processed nuclear data files to promote on-going research, to help ensure nuclear and radiological safety, and to advance nuclear technology. The role of such information analysis centers is critical for supporting and sustaining nuclear education and training programmes both domestically and internationally, as the majority of RSICC’s customers are students attending U.S. universities. RSICC also supports and promotes workshops and seminars in nuclear science and technology to further the use and/or development of computational tools and data. Additionally, RSICC operates a secure CLOUD computing system to provide access to sensitive export-controlled modeling and simulation (M&S) tools that support both domestic and international activities. This presentation will provide a general review of RSICC’s activities, services, and systems that support knowledge management and education and training in the nuclear field. (author

  20. GPU-based high-performance computing for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Ziegenhein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in radiotherapy therapy demand high computation powers to solve challenging problems in a timely fashion in a clinical environment. The graphics processing unit (GPU), as an emerging high-performance computing platform, has been introduced to radiotherapy. It is particularly attractive due to its high computational power, small size, and low cost for facility deployment and maintenance. Over the past few years, GPU-based high-performance computing in radiotherapy has experienced rapid developments. A tremendous amount of study has been conducted, in which large acceleration factors compared with the conventional CPU platform have been observed. In this paper, we will first give a brief introduction to the GPU hardware structure and programming model. We will then review the current applications of GPU in major imaging-related and therapy-related problems encountered in radiotherapy. A comparison of GPU with other platforms will also be presented. (topical review)

  1. Radiation Shielding Information Center: a source of computer codes and data for fusion neutronics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), established in 1962 to collect, package, analyze, and disseminate information, computer codes, and data in the area of radiation transport related to fission, is now being utilized to support fusion neutronics technology. The major activities include: (1) answering technical inquiries on radiation transport problems, (2) collecting, packaging, testing, and disseminating computing technology and data libraries, and (3) reviewing literature and operating a computer-based information retrieval system containing material pertinent to radiation transport analysis. The computer codes emphasize methods for solving the Boltzmann equation such as the discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques, both of which are widely used in fusion neutronics. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  2. The Role of Computers in Research and Development at Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseman, Carol D. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a compilation of presentations given at a workshop on the role cf computers in research and development at the Langley Research Center. The objectives of the workshop were to inform the Langley Research Center community of the current software systems and software practices in use at Langley. The workshop was organized in 10 sessions: Software Engineering; Software Engineering Standards, methods, and CASE tools; Solutions of Equations; Automatic Differentiation; Mosaic and the World Wide Web; Graphics and Image Processing; System Design Integration; CAE Tools; Languages; and Advanced Topics.

  3. Computer Simulation Performed for Columbia Project Cooling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jasim

    2005-01-01

    This demo shows a high-fidelity simulation of the air flow in the main computer room housing the Columbia (10,024 intel titanium processors) system. The simulation asseses the performance of the cooling system and identified deficiencies, and recommended modifications to eliminate them. It used two in house software packages on NAS supercomputers: Chimera Grid tools to generate a geometric model of the computer room, OVERFLOW-2 code for fluid and thermal simulation. This state-of-the-art technology can be easily extended to provide a general capability for air flow analyses on any modern computer room. Columbia_CFD_black.tiff

  4. Design of Over Center Valves Based on Predictable Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.; Pedersen, P.

    2004-01-01

    A typical oil hydraulic over center valve system and a time domain simulation model is introduced together with a hypothesis that flow force compensation should reduce the inherent oscillatory behavior of such hydraulic systems. A few results are shown from a parameter study that confirms...

  5. Performance evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variable Rate Irrigation (VRI) for center pivots offers potential to match specific application rates to non-uniform soil conditions along the length of the lateral. The benefit of such systems is influenced by the areal extent of these variations and the smallest scale to which the irrigation syste...

  6. Parameters that affect parallel processing for computational electromagnetic simulation codes on high performance computing clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hongsik

    What is the impact of multicore and associated advanced technologies on computational software for science? Most researchers and students have multicore laptops or desktops for their research and they need computing power to run computational software packages. Computing power was initially derived from Central Processing Unit (CPU) clock speed. That changed when increases in clock speed became constrained by power requirements. Chip manufacturers turned to multicore CPU architectures and associated technological advancements to create the CPUs for the future. Most software applications benefited by the increased computing power the same way that increases in clock speed helped applications run faster. However, for Computational ElectroMagnetics (CEM) software developers, this change was not an obvious benefit - it appeared to be a detriment. Developers were challenged to find a way to correctly utilize the advancements in hardware so that their codes could benefit. The solution was parallelization and this dissertation details the investigation to address these challenges. Prior to multicore CPUs, advanced computer technologies were compared with the performance using benchmark software and the metric was FLoting-point Operations Per Seconds (FLOPS) which indicates system performance for scientific applications that make heavy use of floating-point calculations. Is FLOPS an effective metric for parallelized CEM simulation tools on new multicore system? Parallel CEM software needs to be benchmarked not only by FLOPS but also by the performance of other parameters related to type and utilization of the hardware, such as CPU, Random Access Memory (RAM), hard disk, network, etc. The codes need to be optimized for more than just FLOPs and new parameters must be included in benchmarking. In this dissertation, the parallel CEM software named High Order Basis Based Integral Equation Solver (HOBBIES) is introduced. This code was developed to address the needs of the

  7. Teaching Scientific Computing: A Model-Centered Approach to Pipeline and Parallel Programming with C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiras Dolgopolovas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an approach to the introduction into pipeline and parallel computing, using a model of the multiphase queueing system. Pipeline computing, including software pipelines, is among the key concepts in modern computing and electronics engineering. The modern computer science and engineering education requires a comprehensive curriculum, so the introduction to pipeline and parallel computing is the essential topic to be included in the curriculum. At the same time, the topic is among the most motivating tasks due to the comprehensive multidisciplinary and technical requirements. To enhance the educational process, the paper proposes a novel model-centered framework and develops the relevant learning objects. It allows implementing an educational platform of constructivist learning process, thus enabling learners’ experimentation with the provided programming models, obtaining learners’ competences of the modern scientific research and computational thinking, and capturing the relevant technical knowledge. It also provides an integral platform that allows a simultaneous and comparative introduction to pipelining and parallel computing. The programming language C for developing programming models and message passing interface (MPI and OpenMP parallelization tools have been chosen for implementation.

  8. A Perspective on Computational Human Performance Models as Design Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    The design of interactive systems, including levels of automation, displays, and controls, is usually based on design guidelines and iterative empirical prototyping. A complementary approach is to use computational human performance models to evaluate designs. An integrated strategy of model-based and empirical test and evaluation activities is particularly attractive as a methodology for verification and validation of human-rated systems for commercial space. This talk will review several computational human performance modeling approaches and their applicability to design of display and control requirements.

  9. High performance computing and communications: FY 1997 implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage, with bipartisan support, of the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. The original Program, in which eight Federal agencies participated, has now grown to twelve agencies. This Plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` FY 1996 HPCC accomplishments and FY 1997 HPCC plans. Section 3 of this Plan provides an overview of the HPCC Program. Section 4 contains more detailed definitions of the Program Component Areas, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each PCA. Appendix A provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  10. Visualization and Data Analysis for High-Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, Christopher Meyer [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-27

    This is a set of slides from a guest lecture for a class at the University of Texas, El Paso on visualization and data analysis for high-performance computing. The topics covered are the following: trends in high-performance computing; scientific visualization, such as OpenGL, ray tracing and volume rendering, VTK, and ParaView; data science at scale, such as in-situ visualization, image databases, distributed memory parallelism, shared memory parallelism, VTK-m, "big data", and then an analysis example.

  11. The psychology of computer displays in the modern mission control center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Work at NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) has demonstrated the need for increased consideration of psychological factors in the design of computer displays for the WATR mission control center. These factors include color perception, memory load, and cognitive processing abilities. A review of relevant work in the human factors psychology area is provided to demonstrate the need for this awareness. The information provided should be relevant in control room settings where computerized displays are being used.

  12. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries.

  13. Knowledge management: Role of the the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Timothy

    2017-09-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is an information analysis center that collects, archives, evaluates, synthesizes and distributes information, data and codes that are used in various nuclear technology applications. RSICC retains more than 2,000 software packages that have been provided by code developers from various federal and international agencies. RSICC's customers (scientists, engineers, and students from around the world) obtain access to such computing codes (source and/or executable versions) and processed nuclear data files to promote on-going research, to ensure nuclear and radiological safety, and to advance nuclear technology. The role of such information analysis centers is critical for supporting and sustaining nuclear education and training programs both domestically and internationally, as the majority of RSICC's customers are students attending U.S. universities. Additionally, RSICC operates a secure CLOUD computing system to provide access to sensitive export-controlled modeling and simulation (M&S) tools that support both domestic and international activities. This presentation will provide a general review of RSICC's activities, services, and systems that support knowledge management and education and training in the nuclear field.

  14. Visual Analysis of Cloud Computing Performance Using Behavioral Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muelder, Chris; Zhu, Biao; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Hongxin; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2016-02-29

    Cloud computing is an essential technology to Big Data analytics and services. A cloud computing system is often comprised of a large number of parallel computing and storage devices. Monitoring the usage and performance of such a system is important for efficient operations, maintenance, and security. Tracing every application on a large cloud system is untenable due to scale and privacy issues. But profile data can be collected relatively efficiently by regularly sampling the state of the system, including properties such as CPU load, memory usage, network usage, and others, creating a set of multivariate time series for each system. Adequate tools for studying such large-scale, multidimensional data are lacking. In this paper, we present a visual based analysis approach to understanding and analyzing the performance and behavior of cloud computing systems. Our design is based on similarity measures and a layout method to portray the behavior of each compute node over time. When visualizing a large number of behavioral lines together, distinct patterns often appear suggesting particular types of performance bottleneck. The resulting system provides multiple linked views, which allow the user to interactively explore the data by examining the data or a selected subset at different levels of detail. Our case studies, which use datasets collected from two different cloud systems, show that this visual based approach is effective in identifying trends and anomalies of the systems.

  15. Congenital Heart Surgery Case Mix Across North American Centers and Impact on Performance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Marshall L; O'Brien, Sean M; Hill, Kevin D; Gaies, Michael G; Romano, Jennifer C; Shahian, David M; Mayer, John E; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2016-11-01

    Performance assessment in congenital heart surgery is challenging due to the wide heterogeneity of disease. We describe current case mix across centers, evaluate methodology inclusive of all cardiac operations versus the more homogeneous subset of Society of Thoracic Surgeons benchmark operations, and describe implications regarding performance assessment. Centers (n = 119) participating in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2010 through 2014) were included. Index operation type and frequency across centers were described. Center performance (risk-adjusted operative mortality) was evaluated and classified when including the benchmark versus all eligible operations. Overall, 207 types of operations were performed during the study period (112,140 total cases). Few operations were performed across all centers; only 25% were performed at least once by 75% or more of centers. There was 7.9-fold variation across centers in the proportion of total cases comprising high-complexity cases (STAT 5). In contrast, the benchmark operations made up 36% of cases, and all but 2 were performed by at least 90% of centers. When evaluating performance based on benchmark versus all operations, 15% of centers changed performance classification; 85% remained unchanged. Benchmark versus all operation methodology was associated with lower power, with 35% versus 78% of centers meeting sample size thresholds. There is wide variation in congenital heart surgery case mix across centers. Metrics based on benchmark versus all operations are associated with strengths (less heterogeneity) and weaknesses (lower power), and lead to differing performance classification for some centers. These findings have implications for ongoing efforts to optimize performance assessment, including choice of target population and appropriate interpretation of reported metrics. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A comprehensive approach to decipher biological computation to achieve next generation high-performance exascale computing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D.; Schiess, Adrian B.; Howell, Jamie; Baca, Michael J.; Partridge, L. Donald; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wolfley, Steven L.; Dagel, Daryl James; Spahn, Olga Blum; Harper, Jason C.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Mickel, Patrick R.; Lohn, Andrew; Marinella, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    The human brain (volume=1200cm3) consumes 20W and is capable of performing > 10^16 operations/s. Current supercomputer technology has reached 1015 operations/s, yet it requires 1500m^3 and 3MW, giving the brain a 10^12 advantage in operations/s/W/cm^3. Thus, to reach exascale computation, two achievements are required: 1) improved understanding of computation in biological tissue, and 2) a paradigm shift towards neuromorphic computing where hardware circuits mimic properties of neural tissue. To address 1), we will interrogate corticostriatal networks in mouse brain tissue slices, specifically with regard to their frequency filtering capabilities as a function of input stimulus. To address 2), we will instantiate biological computing characteristics such as multi-bit storage into hardware devices with future computational and memory applications. Resistive memory devices will be modeled, designed, and fabricated in the MESA facility in consultation with our internal and external collaborators.

  17. High performance computing and communications: FY 1996 implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-16

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. Twelve federal agencies, in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and research laboratories, have developed the Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1995 and FY 1996. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  18. Multi-Language Programming Environments for High Performance Java Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Getov; Paul Gray; Sava Mintchev; Vaidy Sunderam

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments in processor capabilities, software tools, programming languages and programming paradigms have brought about new approaches to high performance computing. A steadfast component of this dynamic evolution has been the scientific community’s reliance on established scientific packages. As a consequence, programmers of high‐performance applications are reluctant to embrace evolving languages such as Java. This paper describes the Java‐to‐C Interface (JCI) tool which provides ...

  19. Computational modelling of expressive music performance in hexaphonic guitar

    OpenAIRE

    Siquier, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Computational modelling of expressive music performance has been widely studied in the past. While previous work in this area has been mainly focused on classical piano music, there has been very little work on guitar music, and such work has focused on monophonic guitar playing. In this work, we present a machine learning approach to automatically generate expressive performances from non expressive music scores for polyphonic guitar. We treated guitar as an hexaphonic instrument, obtaining ...

  20. Enabling High-Performance Computing as a Service

    KAUST Repository

    AbdelBaky, Moustafa

    2012-10-01

    With the right software infrastructure, clouds can provide scientists with as a service access to high-performance computing resources. An award-winning prototype framework transforms the Blue Gene/P system into an elastic cloud to run a representative HPC application. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Computer science of the high performance; Informatica del alto rendimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraleda, A.

    2008-07-01

    The high performance computing is taking shape as a powerful accelerator of the process of innovation, to drastically reduce the waiting times for access to the results and the findings in a growing number of processes and activities as complex and important as medicine, genetics, pharmacology, environment, natural resources management or the simulation of complex processes in a wide variety of industries. (Author)

  2. Performativity, Fabrication and Trust: Exploring Computer-Mediated Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Based on research conducted in an English secondary school, this paper explores computer-mediated moderation as a performative tool. The Module Assessment Meeting (MAM) was the moderation approach under investigation. I mobilise ethnographic data generated by a key informant, and triangulated with that from other actors in the setting, in order to…

  3. Running Interactive Jobs on Peregrine | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    shell prompt, which allows users to execute commands and scripts as they would on the login nodes. Login performed on the compute nodes rather than on login nodes. This page provides instructions and examples of , start GUIs etc. and the commands will execute on that node instead of on the login node. The -V option

  4. Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work developed and simulated a mathematical model for a mobile wireless computational Grid architecture using networks of queuing theory. This was in order to evaluate the performance of theload-balancing three tier hierarchical configuration. The throughput and resource utilizationmetrics were measured and the ...

  5. The performance of low-cost commercial cloud computing as an alternative in computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackston, Russell; Fortenberry, Ryan C

    2015-05-05

    The growth of commercial cloud computing (CCC) as a viable means of computational infrastructure is largely unexplored for the purposes of quantum chemistry. In this work, the PSI4 suite of computational chemistry programs is installed on five different types of Amazon World Services CCC platforms. The performance for a set of electronically excited state single-point energies is compared between these CCC platforms and typical, "in-house" physical machines. Further considerations are made for the number of cores or virtual CPUs (vCPUs, for the CCC platforms), but no considerations are made for full parallelization of the program (even though parallelization of the BLAS library is implemented), complete high-performance computing cluster utilization, or steal time. Even with this most pessimistic view of the computations, CCC resources are shown to be more cost effective for significant numbers of typical quantum chemistry computations. Large numbers of large computations are still best utilized by more traditional means, but smaller-scale research may be more effectively undertaken through CCC services. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Performance evaluation of scientific programs on advanced architecture computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.W.; Messina, P.; Baille, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Recently a number of advanced architecture machines have become commercially available. These new machines promise better cost-performance then traditional computers, and some of them have the potential of competing with current supercomputers, such as the Cray X/MP, in terms of maximum performance. This paper describes an on-going project to evaluate a broad range of advanced architecture computers using a number of complete scientific application programs. The computers to be evaluated include distributed- memory machines such as the NCUBE, INTEL and Caltech/JPL hypercubes, and the MEIKO computing surface, shared-memory, bus architecture machines such as the Sequent Balance and the Alliant, very long instruction word machines such as the Multiflow Trace 7/200 computer, traditional supercomputers such as the Cray X.MP and Cray-2, and SIMD machines such as the Connection Machine. Currently 11 application codes from a number of scientific disciplines have been selected, although it is not intended to run all codes on all machines. Results are presented for two of the codes (QCD and missile tracking), and future work is proposed

  7. High-performance computing in accelerating structure design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zenghai; Folwell, Nathan; Ge Lixin; Guetz, Adam; Ivanov, Valentin; Kowalski, Marc; Lee, Lie-Quan; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Schussman, Greg; Stingelin, Lukas; Uplenchwar, Ravindra; Wolf, Michael; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok

    2006-01-01

    Future high-energy accelerators such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC) will accelerate multi-bunch beams of high current and low emittance to obtain high luminosity, which put stringent requirements on the accelerating structures for efficiency and beam stability. While numerical modeling has been quite standard in accelerator R and D, designing the NLC accelerating structure required a new simulation capability because of the geometric complexity and level of accuracy involved. Under the US DOE Advanced Computing initiatives (first the Grand Challenge and now SciDAC), SLAC has developed a suite of electromagnetic codes based on unstructured grids and utilizing high-performance computing to provide an advanced tool for modeling structures at accuracies and scales previously not possible. This paper will discuss the code development and computational science research (e.g. domain decomposition, scalable eigensolvers, adaptive mesh refinement) that have enabled the large-scale simulations needed for meeting the computational challenges posed by the NLC as well as projects such as the PEP-II and RIA. Numerical results will be presented to show how high-performance computing has made a qualitative improvement in accelerator structure modeling for these accelerators, either at the component level (single cell optimization), or on the scale of an entire structure (beam heating and long-range wakefields)

  8. Contributing to the design of run-time systems dedicated to high performance computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perache, M.

    2006-10-01

    In the field of intensive scientific computing, the quest for performance has to face the increasing complexity of parallel architectures. Nowadays, these machines exhibit a deep memory hierarchy which complicates the design of efficient parallel applications. This thesis proposes a programming environment allowing to design efficient parallel programs on top of clusters of multi-processors. It features a programming model centered around collective communications and synchronizations, and provides load balancing facilities. The programming interface, named MPC, provides high level paradigms which are optimized according to the underlying architecture. The environment is fully functional and used within the CEA/DAM (TERANOVA) computing center. The evaluations presented in this document confirm the relevance of our approach. (author)

  9. Physician performance feedback in a Canadian academic center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Dennis; Worthington, James; McGuire, Shaun; Burgetz, Stephanie; Forster, Alan J; Patey, Andrea; Gerin-Lajoie, Caroline; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Roth, Virginia

    2017-10-02

    Purpose This paper aims at the implementation and early evaluation of a comprehensive, formative annual physician performance feedback process in a large academic health-care organization. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods approach was used to introduce a formative feedback process to provide physicians with comprehensive feedback on performance and to support professional development. This initiative responded to organization-wide engagement surveys through which physicians identified effective performance feedback as a priority. In 2013, physicians primarily affiliated with the organization participated in a performance feedback process, and physician satisfaction and participant perceptions were explored through participant survey responses and physician leader focus groups. Training was required for physician leaders prior to conducting performance feedback discussions. Findings This process was completed by 98 per cent of eligible physicians, and 30 per cent completed an evaluation survey. While physicians endorsed the concept of a formative feedback process, process improvement opportunities were identified. Qualitative analysis revealed the following process improvement themes: simplify the tool, ensure leaders follow process, eliminate redundancies in data collection (through academic or licensing requirements) and provide objective quality metrics. Following physician leader training on performance feedback, 98 per cent of leaders who completed an evaluation questionnaire agreed or strongly agreed that the performance feedback process was useful and that training objectives were met. Originality/value This paper introduces a physician performance feedback model, leadership training approach and first-year implementation outcomes. The results of this study will be useful to health administrators and physician leaders interested in implementing physician performance feedback or improving physician engagement.

  10. An Analysis of Cloud Computing with Amazon Web Services for the Atmospheric Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J. L.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA science and engineering efforts rely heavily on compute and data handling systems. The nature of NASA science data is such that it is not restricted to NASA users, instead it is widely shared across a globally distributed user community including scientists, educators, policy decision makers, and the public. Therefore NASA science computing is a candidate use case for cloud computing where compute resources are outsourced to an external vendor. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a commercial cloud computing service developed to use excess computing capacity at Amazon, and potentially provides an alternative to costly and potentially underutilized dedicated acquisitions whenever NASA scientists or engineers require additional data processing. AWS desires to provide a simplified avenue for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public. AWS has been extensively used by JPL for a wide range of computing needs and was previously tested on a NASA Agency basis during the Nebula testing program. Its ability to support the Langley Science Directorate needs to be evaluated by integrating it with real world operational needs across NASA and the associated maturity that would come with that. The strengths and weaknesses of this architecture and its ability to support general science and engineering applications has been demonstrated during the previous testing. The Langley Office of the Chief Information Officer in partnership with the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has established a pilot business interface to utilize AWS cloud computing resources on a organization and project level pay per use model. This poster discusses an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the pilot business interface from a project level perspective by specifically using a processing scenario involving the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project.

  11. Lifetime-Aware Cloud Data Centers: Models and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Chiaraviglio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a model to evaluate the server lifetime in cloud data centers (DCs. In particular, when the server power level is decreased, the failure rate tends to be reduced as a consequence of the limited number of components powered on. However, the variation between the different power states triggers a failure rate increase. We therefore consider these two effects in a server lifetime model, subject to an energy-aware management policy. We then evaluate our model in a realistic case study. Our results show that the impact on the server lifetime is far from negligible. As a consequence, we argue that a lifetime-aware approach should be pursued to decide how and when to apply a power state change to a server.

  12. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians.Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM in July and August of 2012.Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate. Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035. The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%, e-Books (45%, and board study (32%. Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010, review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019, and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001.Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks.Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  13. Static Memory Deduplication for Performance Optimization in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangyong Jia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In a cloud computing environment, the number of virtual machines (VMs on a single physical server and the number of applications running on each VM are continuously growing. This has led to an enormous increase in the demand of memory capacity and subsequent increase in the energy consumption in the cloud. Lack of enough memory has become a major bottleneck for scalability and performance of virtualization interfaces in cloud computing. To address this problem, memory deduplication techniques which reduce memory demand through page sharing are being adopted. However, such techniques suffer from overheads in terms of number of online comparisons required for the memory deduplication. In this paper, we propose a static memory deduplication (SMD technique which can reduce memory capacity requirement and provide performance optimization in cloud computing. The main innovation of SMD is that the process of page detection is performed offline, thus potentially reducing the performance cost, especially in terms of response time. In SMD, page comparisons are restricted to the code segment, which has the highest shared content. Our experimental results show that SMD efficiently reduces memory capacity requirement and improves performance. We demonstrate that, compared to other approaches, the cost in terms of the response time is negligible.

  14. Static Memory Deduplication for Performance Optimization in Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Gangyong; Han, Guangjie; Wang, Hao; Yang, Xuan

    2017-04-27

    In a cloud computing environment, the number of virtual machines (VMs) on a single physical server and the number of applications running on each VM are continuously growing. This has led to an enormous increase in the demand of memory capacity and subsequent increase in the energy consumption in the cloud. Lack of enough memory has become a major bottleneck for scalability and performance of virtualization interfaces in cloud computing. To address this problem, memory deduplication techniques which reduce memory demand through page sharing are being adopted. However, such techniques suffer from overheads in terms of number of online comparisons required for the memory deduplication. In this paper, we propose a static memory deduplication (SMD) technique which can reduce memory capacity requirement and provide performance optimization in cloud computing. The main innovation of SMD is that the process of page detection is performed offline, thus potentially reducing the performance cost, especially in terms of response time. In SMD, page comparisons are restricted to the code segment, which has the highest shared content. Our experimental results show that SMD efficiently reduces memory capacity requirement and improves performance. We demonstrate that, compared to other approaches, the cost in terms of the response time is negligible.

  15. Computational Analysis on Performance of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M. A. H. M.; Adnan, F.; Ismail, A. R.; Kardigama, K.; Salaam, H. A.; Ahmad, Z.; Johari, N. H.; Anuar, Z.; Azmi, N. S. N.

    2012-09-01

    Application of thermal energy storage (TES) system reduces cost and energy consumption. The performance of the overall operation is affected by diffuser design. In this study, computational analysis is used to determine the thermocline thickness. Three dimensional simulations with different tank height-to-diameter ratio (HD), diffuser opening and the effect of difference number of diffuser holes are investigated. Medium HD tanks simulations with double ring octagonal diffuser show good thermocline behavior and clear distinction between warm and cold water. The result show, the best performance of thermocline thickness during 50% time charging occur in medium tank with height-to-diameter ratio of 4.0 and double ring octagonal diffuser with 48 holes (9mm opening ~ 60%) acceptable compared to diffuser with 6mm ~ 40% and 12mm ~ 80% opening. The conclusion is computational analysis method are very useful in the study on performance of thermal energy storage (TES).

  16. Computational Analysis on Performance of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M A H M; Ismail, A R; Kardigama, K; Salaam, H A; Ahmad, Z; Johari, N H; Anuar, Z; Azmi, N S N; Adnan, F

    2012-01-01

    Application of thermal energy storage (TES) system reduces cost and energy consumption. The performance of the overall operation is affected by diffuser design. In this study, computational analysis is used to determine the thermocline thickness. Three dimensional simulations with different tank height-to-diameter ratio (HD), diffuser opening and the effect of difference number of diffuser holes are investigated. Medium HD tanks simulations with double ring octagonal diffuser show good thermocline behavior and clear distinction between warm and cold water. The result show, the best performance of thermocline thickness during 50% time charging occur in medium tank with height-to-diameter ratio of 4.0 and double ring octagonal diffuser with 48 holes (9mm opening ∼ 60%) acceptable compared to diffuser with 6mm ∼ 40% and 12mm ∼ 80% opening. The conclusion is computational analysis method are very useful in the study on performance of thermal energy storage (TES).

  17. Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Gartung, P.; Jones, C. D.

    2017-10-01

    In 2012 CMS evaluated which underlying concurrency technology would be the best to use for its multi-threaded framework. The available technologies were evaluated on the high throughput computing systems dominating the resources in use at that time. A skeleton framework benchmarking suite that emulates the tasks performed within a CMSSW application was used to select Intel’s Thread Building Block library, based on the measured overheads in both memory and CPU on the different technologies benchmarked. In 2016 CMS will get access to high performance computing resources that use new many core architectures; machines such as Cori Phase 1&2, Theta, Mira. Because of this we have revived the 2012 benchmark to test it’s performance and conclusions on these new architectures. This talk will discuss the results of this exercise.

  18. Rotary engine performance computer program (RCEMAP and RCEMAPPC): User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.; Willis, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a user's guide for a computer code that simulates the performance of several rotary combustion engine configurations. It is intended to assist prospective users in getting started with RCEMAP and/or RCEMAPPC. RCEMAP (Rotary Combustion Engine performance MAP generating code) is the mainframe version, while RCEMAPPC is a simplified subset designed for the personal computer, or PC, environment. Both versions are based on an open, zero-dimensional combustion system model for the prediction of instantaneous pressures, temperature, chemical composition and other in-chamber thermodynamic properties. Both versions predict overall engine performance and thermal characteristics, including bmep, bsfc, exhaust gas temperature, average material temperatures, and turbocharger operating conditions. Required inputs include engine geometry, materials, constants for use in the combustion heat release model, and turbomachinery maps. Illustrative examples and sample input files for both versions are included.

  19. A performance model for the communication in fast multipole methods on high-performance computing platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda; Yokota, Rio; Keyes, David E.

    2016-01-01

    model and the actual communication time on four high-performance computing (HPC) systems, when latency, bandwidth, network topology, and multicore penalties are all taken into account. To our knowledge, this is the first formal characterization

  20. Scalability of DL_POLY on High Performance Computing Platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabakane, Mabule S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Mabakanea_19979_2017.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 33716 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Mabakanea_19979_2017.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 SACJ 29(3) December... when using many processors within the compute nodes of the supercomputer. The type of the processors of compute nodes and their memory also play an important role in the overall performance of the parallel application running on a supercomputer. DL...

  1. Component-based software for high-performance scientific computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, Yuri; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bernholdt, David E; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Gannon, Dennis; Janssen, Curtis L; Kenny, Joseph P; Krishnan, Manojkumar; Kohl, James A; Kumfert, Gary; McInnes, Lois Curfman; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steven G; Rasmussen, Craig; Windus, Theresa L

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in both computational hardware and multidisciplinary science have given rise to an unprecedented level of complexity in scientific simulation software. This paper describes an ongoing grass roots effort aimed at addressing complexity in high-performance computing through the use of Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE). Highlights of the benefits and accomplishments of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum and SciDAC ISIC are given, followed by an illustrative example of how the CCA has been applied to drive scientific discovery in quantum chemistry. Thrusts for future research are also described briefly.

  2. Performance measurements in 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.V.; Cooper, W.A.; Gruber, R.; Schwenn, U.

    1989-10-01

    The 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability code TERPSICHORE has been designed to take advantage of vector and microtasking capabilities of the latest CRAY computers. To keep the number of operations small most efficient algorithms have been applied in each computational step. The program investigates the stability properties of fusion reactor relevant plasma configurations confined by magnetic fields. For a typical 3D HELIAS configuration that has been considered we obtain an overall performance in excess of 1 Gflops on an eight processor CRAY-YMP machine. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs

  3. Component-based software for high-performance scientific computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, Yuri; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bernholdt, David E; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Gannon, Dennis; Janssen, Curtis L; Kenny, Joseph P; Krishnan, Manojkumar; Kohl, James A; Kumfert, Gary; McInnes, Lois Curfman; Nieplocha, Jarek; Parker, Steven G; Rasmussen, Craig; Windus, Theresa L

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in both computational hardware and multidisciplinary science have given rise to an unprecedented level of complexity in scientific simulation software. This paper describes an ongoing grass roots effort aimed at addressing complexity in high-performance computing through the use of Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE). Highlights of the benefits and accomplishments of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum and SciDAC ISIC are given, followed by an illustrative example of how the CCA has been applied to drive scientific discovery in quantum chemistry. Thrusts for future research are also described briefly

  4. Nuclear forces and high-performance computing: The perfect match

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu, T; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-01-01

    High-performance computing is now enabling the calculation of certain hadronic interaction parameters directly from Quantum Chromodynamics, the quantum field theory that governs the behavior of quarks and gluons and is ultimately responsible for the nuclear strong force. In this paper we briefly describe the state of the field and show how other aspects of hadronic interactions will be ascertained in the near future. We give estimates of computational requirements needed to obtain these goals, and outline a procedure for incorporating these results into the broader nuclear physics community.

  5. Initial constructs for patient-centered outcome measures to evaluate brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Elena M; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Peters, Betts; Patrick, Donald L

    2016-10-01

    The authors describe preliminary work toward the creation of patient-centered outcome (PCO) measures to evaluate brain-computer interface (BCI) as an assistive technology (AT) for individuals with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI). In Phase 1, 591 items from 15 existing measures were mapped to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In Phase 2, qualitative interviews were conducted with eight people with SSPI and seven caregivers. Resulting text data were coded in an iterative analysis. Most items (79%) were mapped to the ICF environmental domain; over half (53%) were mapped to more than one domain. The ICF framework was well suited for mapping items related to body functions and structures, but less so for items in other areas, including personal factors. Two constructs emerged from qualitative data: quality of life (QOL) and AT. Component domains and themes were identified for each. Preliminary constructs, domains and themes were generated for future PCO measures relevant to BCI. Existing instruments are sufficient for initial items but do not adequately match the values of people with SSPI and their caregivers. Field methods for interviewing people with SSPI were successful, and support the inclusion of these individuals in PCO research. Implications for Rehabilitation Adapted interview methods allow people with severe speech and physical impairments to participate in patient-centered outcomes research. Patient-centered outcome measures are needed to evaluate the clinical implementation of brain-computer interface as an assistive technology.

  6. Computer Vision Syndrome among Call Center Employees at Telecommunication Company in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghea Nursyifa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS at the workplace has increased within decades due to theprolonged use of computers. Knowledge of CVS is necessary in order to develop an awareness of how to prevent and alleviate itsprevalence . The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of CVS among call center employees and to explore the most frequent CVS symptom experienced by the workers. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted during the period of September to November 2014 at Telecommunication Company in Bandung using a questionnaire consisting of 30 questions. Out of the 30 questions/statements, 15 statements were about knowledge of CVS and other 15 questions were about the occurrence of CVS and its symptoms. In this study 125 call center employees participated as respondents using consecutive sampling. The level of knowledge was divided into 3 categories: good (76–100%, fair (75–56% and poor (<56%. The collected data was presented in frequency tabulation. Results: There was 74.4% of the respondents had poor knowledge of CVS. The most symptom experienced by the respondents was asthenopia. Conclusions: The CVS occurs in call center employees with various symptoms and signs. This situation is not supported by good knowledge of the syndrome which can hamper prevention programs.

  7. Bringing high-performance computing to the biologist's workbench: approaches, applications, and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehmen, C S; Cannon, W R

    2008-01-01

    Data-intensive and high-performance computing are poised to significantly impact the future of biological research which is increasingly driven by the prevalence of high-throughput experimental methodologies for genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and other areas. Large centers such as NIH's National Center for Biotechnology Information, The Institute for Genomic Research, and the DOE's Joint Genome Institute) have made extensive use of multiprocessor architectures to deal with some of the challenges of processing, storing and curating exponentially growing genomic and proteomic datasets, thus enabling users to rapidly access a growing public data source, as well as use analysis tools transparently on high-performance computing resources. Applying this computational power to single-investigator analysis, however, often relies on users to provide their own computational resources, forcing them to endure the learning curve of porting, building, and running software on multiprocessor architectures. Solving the next generation of large-scale biology challenges using multiprocessor machines-from small clusters to emerging petascale machines-can most practically be realized if this learning curve can be minimized through a combination of workflow management, data management and resource allocation as well as intuitive interfaces and compatibility with existing common data formats

  8. Computer-aided performance monitoring program at Diablo Canyon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.; Glynn, R. III; Kessler, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the thermal performance monitoring program at Pacific Gas ampersand Electric Company's (PG ampersand E's) Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. The plant performance monitoring program at Diablo Canyon uses the THERMAC performance monitoring and analysis computer software provided by Expert-EASE Systems. THERMAC is used to collect performance data from the plant process computers, condition that data to adjust for measurement errors and missing data points, evaluate cycle and component-level performance, archive the data for trend analysis and generate performance reports. The current status of the program is that, after a fair amount of open-quotes tuningclose quotes of the basic open-quotes thermal kitclose quotes models provided with the initial THERMAC installation, we have successfully baselined both units to cycle isolation test data from previous reload cycles. Over the course of the past few months, we have accumulated enough data to generate meaningful performance trends and, as a result, have been able to use THERMAC to track a condenser fouling problem that was costing enough megawatts to attract corporate-level attention. Trends from THERMAC clearly related the megawatt loss to a steadily degrading condenser cleanliness factor and verified the subsequent gain in megawatts after the condenser was cleaned. In the future, we expect to rebaseline THERMAC to a beginning of cycle (BOC) data set and to use the program to help track feedwater nozzle fouling

  9. Performance Measurements in a High Throughput Computing Environment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2145966; Gribaudo, Marco

    The IT infrastructures of companies and research centres are implementing new technologies to satisfy the increasing need of computing resources for big data analysis. In this context, resource profiling plays a crucial role in identifying areas where the improvement of the utilisation efficiency is needed. In order to deal with the profiling and optimisation of computing resources, two complementary approaches can be adopted: the measurement-based approach and the model-based approach. The measurement-based approach gathers and analyses performance metrics executing benchmark applications on computing resources. Instead, the model-based approach implies the design and implementation of a model as an abstraction of the real system, selecting only those aspects relevant to the study. This Thesis originates from a project carried out by the author within the CERN IT department. CERN is an international scientific laboratory that conducts fundamental researches in the domain of elementary particle physics. The p...

  10. Overview of Parallel Platforms for Common High Performance Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fryza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with various parallel platforms used for high performance computing in the signal processing domain. More precisely, the methods exploiting the multicores central processing units such as message passing interface and OpenMP are taken into account. The properties of the programming methods are experimentally proved in the application of a fast Fourier transform and a discrete cosine transform and they are compared with the possibilities of MATLAB's built-in functions and Texas Instruments digital signal processors with very long instruction word architectures. New FFT and DCT implementations were proposed and tested. The implementation phase was compared with CPU based computing methods and with possibilities of the Texas Instruments digital signal processing library on C6747 floating-point DSPs. The optimal combination of computing methods in the signal processing domain and new, fast routines' implementation is proposed as well.

  11. Heat exchanger performance analysis programs for the personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Numerous utility industry heat exchange calculations are repetitive and thus lend themselves to being performed on a Personal Computer. These programs may be regarded as engineering tools which, when put together, can form a Toolbox. However, the practicing Results Engineer in the utility industry desires not only programs that are robust as well as easy to use but can also be used both on desktop and laptop PC's. The latter also offer the opportunity to take the computer into the plant or control room, and use it there to process test or operating data right on the spot. Most programs evolve through the needs which arise in the course of day-to-day work. This paper describes several of the more useful programs of this type and outlines some of the guidelines to be followed when designing personal computer programs for use by the practicing Results Engineer

  12. Performance of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Environment, Energy, and Resources Center; Jones, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provides information and data resources in support of the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program. CDIAC also serves as a resource of global change information for a broader international commonly of researchers, policymakers, managers, educators, and students. The number of requests for CDIAC`s data products, information services, and publications has grown over the years and represents multidisciplinary interests in the physical, life, and social sciences and from diverse work settings in government, business, and academia. CDIAC`s staff addresses thousands of requests yearly for data and information resources. In response to these requests, CDIAC has distributed tens of thousands of data products, technical reports, newsletters, and other information resources worldwide since 1982. This paper describes CDIAC, examines CDIAC`s user community, and describes CDIAC`s response to requests for information. The CDIAC Information System, which serves as a comprehensive PC-based inventory and information management tracking system, is also described.

  13. Threshold-based queuing system for performance analysis of cloud computing system with dynamic scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shorgin, Sergey Ya.; Pechinkin, Alexander V.; Samouylov, Konstantin E.; Gaidamaka, Yuliya V.; Gudkova, Irina A.; Sopin, Eduard S.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is promising technology to manage and improve utilization of computing center resources to deliver various computing and IT services. For the purpose of energy saving there is no need to unnecessarily operate many servers under light loads, and they are switched off. On the other hand, some servers should be switched on in heavy load cases to prevent very long delays. Thus, waiting times and system operating cost can be maintained on acceptable level by dynamically adding or removing servers. One more fact that should be taken into account is significant server setup costs and activation times. For better energy efficiency, cloud computing system should not react on instantaneous increase or instantaneous decrease of load. That is the main motivation for using queuing systems with hysteresis for cloud computing system modelling. In the paper, we provide a model of cloud computing system in terms of multiple server threshold-based infinite capacity queuing system with hysteresis and noninstantanuous server activation. For proposed model, we develop a method for computing steady-state probabilities that allow to estimate a number of performance measures

  14. Threshold-based queuing system for performance analysis of cloud computing system with dynamic scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorgin, Sergey Ya.; Pechinkin, Alexander V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Samouylov, Konstantin E.; Gaidamaka, Yuliya V.; Gudkova, Irina A.; Sopin, Eduard S. [Telecommunication Systems Department, Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    Cloud computing is promising technology to manage and improve utilization of computing center resources to deliver various computing and IT services. For the purpose of energy saving there is no need to unnecessarily operate many servers under light loads, and they are switched off. On the other hand, some servers should be switched on in heavy load cases to prevent very long delays. Thus, waiting times and system operating cost can be maintained on acceptable level by dynamically adding or removing servers. One more fact that should be taken into account is significant server setup costs and activation times. For better energy efficiency, cloud computing system should not react on instantaneous increase or instantaneous decrease of load. That is the main motivation for using queuing systems with hysteresis for cloud computing system modelling. In the paper, we provide a model of cloud computing system in terms of multiple server threshold-based infinite capacity queuing system with hysteresis and noninstantanuous server activation. For proposed model, we develop a method for computing steady-state probabilities that allow to estimate a number of performance measures.

  15. SCEAPI: A unified Restful Web API for High-Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongqiang, Cao; Haili, Xiao; Shasha, Lu; Yining, Zhao; Xiaoning, Wang; Xuebin, Chi

    2017-10-01

    The development of scientific computing is increasingly moving to collaborative web and mobile applications. All these applications need high-quality programming interface for accessing heterogeneous computing resources consisting of clusters, grid computing or cloud computing. In this paper, we introduce our high-performance computing environment that integrates computing resources from 16 HPC centers across China. Then we present a bundle of web services called SCEAPI and describe how it can be used to access HPC resources with HTTP or HTTPs protocols. We discuss SCEAPI from several aspects including architecture, implementation and security, and address specific challenges in designing compatible interfaces and protecting sensitive data. We describe the functions of SCEAPI including authentication, file transfer and job management for creating, submitting and monitoring, and how to use SCEAPI in an easy-to-use way. Finally, we discuss how to exploit more HPC resources quickly for the ATLAS experiment by implementing the custom ARC compute element based on SCEAPI, and our work shows that SCEAPI is an easy-to-use and effective solution to extend opportunistic HPC resources.

  16. User-centered design in brain-computer interfaces-a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Martijn; Riccio, Angela; Risetti, Monica; Dähne, Sven; Ramsay, Andrew; Williamson, John; Mattia, Donatella; Tangermann, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The array of available brain-computer interface (BCI) paradigms has continued to grow, and so has the corresponding set of machine learning methods which are at the core of BCI systems. The latter have evolved to provide more robust data analysis solutions, and as a consequence the proportion of healthy BCI users who can use a BCI successfully is growing. With this development the chances have increased that the needs and abilities of specific patients, the end-users, can be covered by an existing BCI approach. However, most end-users who have experienced the use of a BCI system at all have encountered a single paradigm only. This paradigm is typically the one that is being tested in the study that the end-user happens to be enrolled in, along with other end-users. Though this corresponds to the preferred study arrangement for basic research, it does not ensure that the end-user experiences a working BCI. In this study, a different approach was taken; that of a user-centered design. It is the prevailing process in traditional assistive technology. Given an individual user with a particular clinical profile, several available BCI approaches are tested and - if necessary - adapted to him/her until a suitable BCI system is found. Described is the case of a 48-year-old woman who suffered from an ischemic brain stem stroke, leading to a severe motor- and communication deficit. She was enrolled in studies with two different BCI systems before a suitable system was found. The first was an auditory event-related potential (ERP) paradigm and the second a visual ERP paradigm, both of which are established in literature. The auditory paradigm did not work successfully, despite favorable preconditions. The visual paradigm worked flawlessly, as found over several sessions. This discrepancy in performance can possibly be explained by the user's clinical deficit in several key neuropsychological indicators, such as attention and working memory. While the auditory paradigm relies

  17. Dynamic Performance Optimization for Cloud Computing Using M/M/m Queueing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizheng Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful development of cloud computing has attracted more and more people and enterprises to use it. On one hand, using cloud computing reduces the cost; on the other hand, using cloud computing improves the efficiency. As the users are largely concerned about the Quality of Services (QoS, performance optimization of the cloud computing has become critical to its successful application. In order to optimize the performance of multiple requesters and services in cloud computing, by means of queueing theory, we analyze and conduct the equation of each parameter of the services in the data center. Then, through analyzing the performance parameters of the queueing system, we propose the synthesis optimization mode, function, and strategy. Lastly, we set up the simulation based on the synthesis optimization mode; we also compare and analyze the simulation results to the classical optimization methods (short service time first and first in, first out method, which show that the proposed model can optimize the average wait time, average queue length, and the number of customer.

  18. High performance parallel computers for science: New developments at the Fermilab advanced computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.

    1988-08-01

    Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program (ACP) has been developing highly cost effective, yet practical, parallel computers for high energy physics since 1984. The ACP's latest developments are proceeding in two directions. A Second Generation ACP Multiprocessor System for experiments will include $3500 RISC processors each with performance over 15 VAX MIPS. To support such high performance, the new system allows parallel I/O, parallel interprocess communication, and parallel host processes. The ACP Multi-Array Processor, has been developed for theoretical physics. Each $4000 node is a FORTRAN or C programmable pipelined 20 MFlops (peak), 10 MByte single board computer. These are plugged into a 16 port crossbar switch crate which handles both inter and intra crate communication. The crates are connected in a hypercube. Site oriented applications like lattice gauge theory are supported by system software called CANOPY, which makes the hardware virtually transparent to users. A 256 node, 5 GFlop, system is under construction. 10 refs., 7 figs

  19. Simple, parallel, high-performance virtual machines for extreme computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokoufe Nejad, Bijan; Ohl, Thorsten; Reuter, Jurgen

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a high-performance virtual machine (VM) written in a numerically fast language like Fortran or C to evaluate very large expressions. We discuss the general concept of how to perform computations in terms of a VM and present specifically a VM that is able to compute tree-level cross sections for any number of external legs, given the corresponding byte code from the optimal matrix element generator, O'Mega. Furthermore, this approach allows to formulate the parallel computation of a single phase space point in a simple and obvious way. We analyze hereby the scaling behaviour with multiple threads as well as the benefits and drawbacks that are introduced with this method. Our implementation of a VM can run faster than the corresponding native, compiled code for certain processes and compilers, especially for very high multiplicities, and has in general runtimes in the same order of magnitude. By avoiding the tedious compile and link steps, which may fail for source code files of gigabyte sizes, new processes or complex higher order corrections that are currently out of reach could be evaluated with a VM given enough computing power.

  20. Performance monitoring for brain-computer-interface actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurger, Aaron; Gale, Steven; Gozel, Olivia; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-02-01

    When presented with a difficult perceptual decision, human observers are able to make metacognitive judgements of subjective certainty. Such judgements can be made independently of and prior to any overt response to a sensory stimulus, presumably via internal monitoring. Retrospective judgements about one's own task performance, on the other hand, require first that the subject perform a task and thus could potentially be made based on motor processes, proprioceptive, and other sensory feedback rather than internal monitoring. With this dichotomy in mind, we set out to study performance monitoring using a brain-computer interface (BCI), with which subjects could voluntarily perform an action - moving a cursor on a computer screen - without any movement of the body, and thus without somatosensory feedback. Real-time visual feedback was available to subjects during training, but not during the experiment where the true final position of the cursor was only revealed after the subject had estimated where s/he thought it had ended up after 6s of BCI-based cursor control. During the first half of the experiment subjects based their assessments primarily on the prior probability of the end position of the cursor on previous trials. However, during the second half of the experiment subjects' judgements moved significantly closer to the true end position of the cursor, and away from the prior. This suggests that subjects can monitor task performance when the task is performed without overt movement of the body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High performance stream computing for particle beam transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, R; Bailey, D; Higham, J; Salt, M

    2008-01-01

    Understanding modern particle accelerators requires simulating charged particle transport through the machine elements. These simulations can be very time consuming due to the large number of particles and the need to consider many turns of a circular machine. Stream computing offers an attractive way to dramatically improve the performance of such simulations by calculating the simultaneous transport of many particles using dedicated hardware. Modern Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are powerful and affordable stream computing devices. The results of simulations of particle transport through the booster-to-storage-ring transfer line of the DIAMOND synchrotron light source using an NVidia GeForce 7900 GPU are compared to the standard transport code MAD. It is found that particle transport calculations are suitable for stream processing and large performance increases are possible. The accuracy and potential speed gains are compared and the prospects for future work in the area are discussed

  2. Unravelling the structure of matter on high-performance computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieu, T.D.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1992-11-01

    The various phenomena and the different forms of matter in nature are believed to be the manifestation of only a handful set of fundamental building blocks-the elementary particles-which interact through the four fundamental forces. In the study of the structure of matter at this level one has to consider forces which are not sufficiently weak to be treated as small perturbations to the system, an example of which is the strong force that binds the nucleons together. High-performance computers, both vector and parallel machines, have facilitated the necessary non-perturbative treatments. The principles and the techniques of computer simulations applied to Quantum Chromodynamics are explained examples include the strong interactions, the calculation of the mass of nucleons and their decay rates. Some commercial and special-purpose high-performance machines for such calculations are also mentioned. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Annual report of R and D activities in Center for Computational Science and e-Systems from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This report provides an overview of the research and development activities of the Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), JAEA in fiscal year 2006 (April 1, 2006 - March 31, 2007). These research and development activities have been performed by the Simulation Technology Research and Development Office and the Computer Science Research and Development Office. The primary results of the research and development activities are the development of simulation techniques for a virtual earthquake testbed, an intelligent infrastructure for atomic energy research, computational biological disciplines to predict DNA repair function of protein, and material models for a neutron detection device, crack propagation, and gas bubble formation in nuclear fuel. (author)

  4. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art.

  5. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art

  6. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  7. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries. An important activity of RSICC is its participation in international efforts on computational and experimental benchmarks. An example is the Shielding Integral Benchmarks Archival Database (SINBAD), which includes shielding benchmarks for fission, fusion and accelerators. RSICC is funded by the United States Department of Energy, Department of Homeland Security and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  8. A performance evaluation of the IBM 370/XT personal computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of the IBM 370/XT personal computer is given. This evaluation focuses primarily on the use of the 370/XT for scientific and technical applications and applications development. A measurement of the capabilities of the 370/XT was performed by means of test programs which are presented. Also included is a review of facilities provided by the operating system (VM/PC), along with comments on the IBM 370/XT hardware configuration.

  9. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. OBJECTIVE: Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. METHOD: Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children. All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. RESULTS: Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. CONCLUSION: The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics research at the United Technologies Research Center requiring supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of research activities at the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented. The requirement and use of various levels of computers, including supercomputers, for the CFD activities is described. Examples of CFD directed toward applications to helicopters, turbomachinery, heat exchangers, and the National Aerospace Plane are included. Helicopter rotor codes for the prediction of rotor and fuselage flow fields and airloads were developed with emphasis on rotor wake modeling. Airflow and airload predictions and comparisons with experimental data are presented. Examples are presented of recent parabolized Navier-Stokes and full Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic shock-wave/boundary layer interaction, and hydrogen/air supersonic combustion. In addition, other examples of CFD efforts in turbomachinery Navier-Stokes methodology and separated flow modeling are presented. A brief discussion of the 3-tier scientific computing environment is also presented, in which the researcher has access to workstations, mid-size computers, and supercomputers.

  11. Information systems performance evaluation, introducing a two-level technique: Case study call centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham A. Baraka

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper was to introduce a new technique that can support decision makers in the call centers industry to evaluate, and analyze the performance of call centers. The technique presented is derived from the research done on measuring the success or failure of information systems. Two models are mainly adopted namely: the Delone and Mclean model first introduced in 1992 and the Design Reality Gap model introduced by Heeks in 2002. Two indices are defined to calculate the performance of the call center; the success index and the Gap Index. An evaluation tool has been developed to allow call centers managers to evaluate the performance of their call centers in a systematic analytical approach; the tool was applied on 4 call centers from different areas, simple applications such as food ordering, marketing, and sales, technical support systems, to more real time services such as the example of emergency control systems. Results showed the importance of using information systems models to evaluate complex systems as call centers. The models used allow identifying the dimensions for the call centers that are facing challenges, together with an identification of the individual indicators in these dimensions that are causing the poor performance of the call center.

  12. The Erasmus Computing Grid - Building a Super-Computer Virtually for Free at the Erasmus Medical Center and the Hogeschool Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); L.V. de Zeeuw (Luc)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe Set-Up of the 20 Teraflop Erasmus Computing Grid: To meet the enormous computational needs of live- science research as well as clinical diagnostics and treatment the Hogeschool Rotterdam and the Erasmus Medical Center are currently setting up one of the largest desktop

  13. Neuroanatomical correlates of brain-computer interface performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kazumi; DaSalla, Charles Sayo; Honda, Manabu; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-04-15

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) offer a potential means to replace or restore lost motor function. However, BCI performance varies considerably between users, the reasons for which are poorly understood. Here we investigated the relationship between sensorimotor rhythm (SMR)-based BCI performance and brain structure. Participants were instructed to control a computer cursor using right- and left-hand motor imagery, which primarily modulated their left- and right-hemispheric SMR powers, respectively. Although most participants were able to control the BCI with success rates significantly above chance level even at the first encounter, they also showed substantial inter-individual variability in BCI success rate. Participants also underwent T1-weighted three-dimensional structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI data were subjected to voxel-based morphometry using BCI success rate as an independent variable. We found that BCI performance correlated with gray matter volume of the supplementary motor area, supplementary somatosensory area, and dorsal premotor cortex. We suggest that SMR-based BCI performance is associated with development of non-primary somatosensory and motor areas. Advancing our understanding of BCI performance in relation to its neuroanatomical correlates may lead to better customization of BCIs based on individual brain structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High performance computer code for molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levay, I.; Toekesi, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation is a widely used technique for modeling complicated physical phenomena. Since 2005 we are developing a MD simulations code for PC computers. The computer code is written in C++ object oriented programming language. The aim of our work is twofold: a) to develop a fast computer code for the study of random walk of guest atoms in Be crystal, b) 3 dimensional (3D) visualization of the particles motion. In this case we mimic the motion of the guest atoms in the crystal (diffusion-type motion), and the motion of atoms in the crystallattice (crystal deformation). Nowadays, it is common to use Graphics Devices in intensive computational problems. There are several ways to use this extreme processing performance, but never before was so easy to programming these devices as now. The CUDA (Compute Unified Device) Architecture introduced by nVidia Corporation in 2007 is a very useful for every processor hungry application. A Unified-architecture GPU include 96-128, or more stream processors, so the raw calculation performance is 576(!) GFLOPS. It is ten times faster, than the fastest dual Core CPU [Fig.1]. Our improved MD simulation software uses this new technology, which speed up our software and the code run 10 times faster in the critical calculation code segment. Although the GPU is a very powerful tool, it has a strongly paralleled structure. It means, that we have to create an algorithm, which works on several processors without deadlock. Our code currently uses 256 threads, shared and constant on-chip memory, instead of global memory, which is 100 times slower than others. It is possible to implement the total algorithm on GPU, therefore we do not need to download and upload the data in every iteration. On behalf of maximal throughput, every thread run with the same instructions

  15. An Application-Based Performance Evaluation of NASAs Nebula Cloud Computing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Subhash; Heistand, Steve; Jin, Haoqiang; Chang, Johnny; Hood, Robert T.; Mehrotra, Piyush; Biswas, Rupak

    2012-01-01

    The high performance computing (HPC) community has shown tremendous interest in exploring cloud computing as it promises high potential. In this paper, we examine the feasibility, performance, and scalability of production quality scientific and engineering applications of interest to NASA on NASA's cloud computing platform, called Nebula, hosted at Ames Research Center. This work represents the comprehensive evaluation of Nebula using NUTTCP, HPCC, NPB, I/O, and MPI function benchmarks as well as four applications representative of the NASA HPC workload. Specifically, we compare Nebula performance on some of these benchmarks and applications to that of NASA s Pleiades supercomputer, a traditional HPC system. We also investigate the impact of virtIO and jumbo frames on interconnect performance. Overall results indicate that on Nebula (i) virtIO and jumbo frames improve network bandwidth by a factor of 5x, (ii) there is a significant virtualization layer overhead of about 10% to 25%, (iii) write performance is lower by a factor of 25x, (iv) latency for short MPI messages is very high, and (v) overall performance is 15% to 48% lower than that on Pleiades for NASA HPC applications. We also comment on the usability of the cloud platform.

  16. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final detailed test plan : WSDOT deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment". This document defines the objective, approach,...

  17. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final test plans : state of Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : state of Utah". This document defines the objective, approach, an...

  18. Scalability of DL_POLY on High Performance Computing Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabule Samuel Mabakane

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study on the scalability of several versions of the molecular dynamics code (DL_POLY performed on South Africa‘s Centre for High Performance Computing e1350 IBM Linux cluster, Sun system and Lengau supercomputers. Within this study different problem sizes were designed and the same chosen systems were employed in order to test the performance of DL_POLY using weak and strong scalability. It was found that the speed-up results for the small systems were better than large systems on both Ethernet and Infiniband network. However, simulations of large systems in DL_POLY performed well using Infiniband network on Lengau cluster as compared to e1350 and Sun supercomputer.

  19. Scintillator performance considerations for dedicated breast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) is an emerging clinical modality that can eliminate tissue superposition and has the potential for improved sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. It is performed without physical compression of the breast. Most of the dedicated BCT systems use large-area detectors operating in cone-beam geometry and are referred to as cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) systems. The large-area detectors in CBBCT systems are energy-integrating, indirect-type detectors employing a scintillator that converts x-ray photons to light, followed by detection of optical photons. A key consideration that determines the image quality achieved by such CBBCT systems is the choice of scintillator and its performance characteristics. In this work, a framework for analyzing the impact of the scintillator on CBBCT performance and its use for task-specific optimization of CBBCT imaging performance is described.

  20. Effects of organizational scheme and labeling on task performance in product-centered and user-centered retail Web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Marc L; Sanchez, Julian

    2004-01-01

    As companies increase the quantity of information they provide through their Web sites, it is critical that content is structured with an appropriate architecture. However, resource constraints often limit the ability of companies to apply all Web design principles completely. This study quantifies the effects of two major information architecture principles in a controlled study that isolates the incremental effects of organizational scheme and labeling on user performance and satisfaction. Sixty participants with a wide range of Internet and on-line shopping experience were recruited to complete a series of shopping tasks on a prototype retail shopping Web site. User-centered labels provided a significant benefit in performance and satisfaction over labels obtained through company-centered methods. User-centered organization did not result in improved performance except when the label quality was poor. Significant interactions suggest specific guidelines for allocating resources in Web site design. Applications of this research include the design of Web sites for any commercial application, particularly E-commerce.

  1. What Physicists Should Know About High Performance Computing - Circa 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Donald

    2002-08-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) is a dynamic, cross-disciplinary field that traditionally has involved applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and others primarily from the various disciplines that have been major users of HPC resources - physics, chemistry, engineering, with increasing use by those in the life sciences. There is a technological dynamic that is powered by economic as well as by technical innovations and developments. This talk will discuss practical ideas to be considered when developing numerical applications for research purposes. Even with the rapid pace of development in the field, the author believes that these concepts will not become obsolete for a while, and will be of use to scientists who either are considering, or who have already started down the HPC path. These principles will be applied in particular to current parallel HPC systems, but there will also be references of value to desktop users. The talk will cover such topics as: computing hardware basics, single-cpu optimization, compilers, timing, numerical libraries, debugging and profiling tools and the emergence of Computational Grids.

  2. Evaluating trauma center structural performance: The experience of a Canadian provincial trauma system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Moore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indicators of structure, process, and outcome are required to evaluate the performance of trauma centers to improve the quality and efficiency of care. While periodic external accreditation visits are part of most trauma systems, a quantitative indicator of structural performance has yet to be proposed. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a trauma center structural performance indicator using accreditation report data. Materials and Methods: Analyses were based on accreditation reports completed during on-site visits in the Quebec trauma system (1994-2005. Qualitative report data was retrospectively transposed onto an evaluation grid and the weighted average of grid items was used to quantify performance. The indicator of structural performance was evaluated in terms of test-retest reliability (kappa statistic, discrimination between centers (coefficient of variation, content validity (correlation with accreditation decision, designation level, and patient volume and forecasting (correlation between visits performed in 1994-1999 and 1998-2005. Results: Kappa statistics were >0.8 for 66 of the 73 (90% grid items. Mean structural performance score over 59 trauma centers was 47.4 (95% CI: 43.6-51.1. Two centers were flagged as outliers and the coefficient of variation was 31.2% (95% CI: 25.5% to 37.6%, showing good discrimination. Correlation coefficients of associations with accreditation decision, designation level, and volume were all statistically significant (r = 0.61, -0.40, and 0.24, respectively. No correlation was observed over time (r = 0.03. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of quantifying trauma center structural performance using accreditation reports. The proposed performance indicator shows good test-retest reliability, between-center discrimination, and construct validity. The observed variability in structural performance across centers and over-time underlines the importance of

  3. Using high performance interconnects in a distributed computing and mass storage environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, M.

    1994-01-01

    Detector Collaborations of the HERA Experiments typically involve more than 500 physicists from a few dozen institutes. These physicists require access to large amounts of data in a fully transparent manner. Important issues include Distributed Mass Storage Management Systems in a Distributed and Heterogeneous Computing Environment. At the very center of a distributed system, including tens of CPUs and network attached mass storage peripherals are the communication links. Today scientists are witnessing an integration of computing and communication technology with the open-quote network close-quote becoming the computer. This contribution reports on a centrally operated computing facility for the HERA Experiments at DESY, including Symmetric Multiprocessor Machines (84 Processors), presently more than 400 GByte of magnetic disk and 40 TB of automoted tape storage, tied together by a HIPPI open-quote network close-quote. Focussing on the High Performance Interconnect technology, details will be provided about the HIPPI based open-quote Backplane close-quote configured around a 20 Gigabit/s Multi Media Router and the performance and efficiency of the related computer interfaces

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Computations With Zonal Navier-Stokes Flow Solver (ZNSFLOW) Common High Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI) Software

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edge, Harris

    1999-01-01

    ...), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) 6 project. Under the project, a proven zonal Navier-Stokes solver was rewritten for scalable parallel performance on both shared memory and distributed memory high performance computers...

  5. High performance computing and communications: FY 1995 implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally established following passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991 signed on December 9, 1991. Ten federal agencies in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and laboratories have developed the HPCC Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1994 and FY 1995. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency. Although the Department of Education is an official HPCC agency, its current funding and reporting of crosscut activities goes through the Committee on Education and Health Resources, not the HPCC Program. For this reason the Implementation Plan covers nine HPCC agencies.

  6. Managing the Shopping Center Ambience Attributes by Using Importance-Performance Analysis: The Case from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelica Marković

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined customers’ perceived importance and performance of shopping center ambience on the examples of the Mercator shopping center and Sad Novi Bazaar shopping center in Novi Sad, Serbia. The shopping center ambience was examined through exterior and interior attributes. It was found that a number of them are very important to customers and their shopping behavior. According to the present research, the most important exterior attributes are: address and location, parking availability, congestion and traffic, exterior display windows and entrances. The most important interior attributes are: cleanliness, temperature, merchandise, lighting, music, scents, absence of tobacco smoke, width of aisles and P.A. usage. The paper also provided information for two studied shopping centers with ambience attributes that performed well or not and everything was presented on the importance-performance grids, which can serve managers as guidelines for further development.

  7. An Audit on the Appropriateness of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Referrals in a Tertiary Cardiac Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderazi, Ahmed Ali; Lynch, Mary

    2017-01-01

    In response to growing concerns regarding the overuse of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in the clinical setting, multiple societies, including the American College of Cardiology Foundation, have jointly published revised criteria regarding the appropriate use of this imaging modality. However, previous research indicates significant discrepancies in the rate of adherence to these guidelines. To assess the appropriateness of CCTA referrals in a tertiary cardiac center in Bahrain. This retrospective clinical audit examined the records of patients referred to CCTA between the April 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 in Mohammed bin Khalifa Cardiac Center. Using information from medical records, each case was meticulously audited against guidelines to categorize it as appropriate, inappropriate, or uncertain. Of the 234 records examined, 176 (75.2%) were appropriate, 47 (20.1%) were uncertain, and 11 (4.7%) were inappropriate. About 74.4% of all referrals were to investigate coronary artery disease (CAD). The most common indication that was deemed appropriate was the detection of CAD in the setting of suspected ischemic equivalent in patients with an intermediate pretest probability of CAD (65.9%). Most referrals deemed inappropriate were requested to detect CAD in asymptomatic patients at low or intermediate risk of CAD (63.6%). This audit demonstrates a relatively low rate of inappropriate CCTA referrals, indicating the appropriate and efficient use of this resource in the Mohammed bin Khalifa Cardiac Center. Agreement on and reclassification of "uncertain" cases by guideline authorities would facilitate a deeper understanding of referral appropriateness.

  8. Examining the Fundamental Obstructs of Adopting Cloud Computing for 9-1-1 Dispatch Centers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Abdulaziz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine the unknown fears of embracing cloud computing which stretches across measurements like fear of change from leaders and the complexity of the technology in 9-1-1 dispatch centers in USA. The problem that was addressed in the study was that many 9-1-1 dispatch centers in USA are still using old…

  9. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliosa, Andre; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Silva-Souza, Yara Teresinha Correa; Alfredo, Edson, E-mail: ysousa@unaerp.br [Universidade de Ribeirao Preto (UNAERP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Versiani, Marco Aurelio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odoentologia

    2015-03-01

    The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10), according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR), Liberator (LB), ProTaper (PT), and Twisted File (TF). The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (α = 0.05). The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR); -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB); -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT); -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF). The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR); -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB); -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT); -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF). Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape. (author)

  10. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André PAGLIOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10, according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR, Liberator (LB, ProTaper (PT, and Twisted File (TF. The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (α = 0.05. The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05 in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR; -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB; -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT; -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF. The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR; -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB; -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT; -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF. Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05. It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape.

  11. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagliosa, Andre; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Silva-Souza, Yara Teresinha Correa; Alfredo, Edson; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Versiani, Marco Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10), according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR), Liberator (LB), ProTaper (PT), and Twisted File (TF). The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (α = 0.05). The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR); -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB); -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT); -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF). The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR); -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB); -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT); -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF). Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape. (author)

  12. DEISA2: supporting and developing a European high-performance computing ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederer, H

    2008-01-01

    The DEISA Consortium has deployed and operated the Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications. Through the EU FP7 DEISA2 project (funded for three years as of May 2008), the consortium is continuing to support and enhance the distributed high-performance computing infrastructure and its activities and services relevant for applications enabling, operation, and technologies, as these are indispensable for the effective support of computational sciences for high-performance computing (HPC). The service-provisioning model will be extended from one that supports single projects to one supporting virtual European communities. Collaborative activities will also be carried out with new European and other international initiatives. Of strategic importance is cooperation with the PRACE project, which is preparing for the installation of a limited number of leadership-class Tier-0 supercomputers in Europe. The key role and aim of DEISA will be to deliver a turnkey operational solution for a persistent European HPC ecosystem that will integrate national Tier-1 centers and the new Tier-0 centers

  13. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  14. Performance of an extrapolation chamber in computed tomography standard beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Maysa C.; Silva, Natália F.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2017-01-01

    Among the medical uses of ionizing radiations, the computed tomography (CT) diagnostic exams are responsible for the highest dose values to the patients. The dosimetry procedure in CT scanner beams makes use of pencil ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm. The aim of its calibration is to compare the values that are obtained with the instrument to be calibrated and a standard reference system. However, there is no primary standard system for this kind of radiation beam. Therefore, an extrapolation ionization chamber built at the Calibration Laboratory (LCI), was used to establish a CT primary standard. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests (short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, polarity effect and ion collection efficiency) in the standard X-rays beams established for computed tomography at the LCI. (author)

  15. Performance of an extrapolation chamber in computed tomography standard beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Maysa C.; Silva, Natália F.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mcastro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Among the medical uses of ionizing radiations, the computed tomography (CT) diagnostic exams are responsible for the highest dose values to the patients. The dosimetry procedure in CT scanner beams makes use of pencil ionization chambers with sensitive volume lengths of 10 cm. The aim of its calibration is to compare the values that are obtained with the instrument to be calibrated and a standard reference system. However, there is no primary standard system for this kind of radiation beam. Therefore, an extrapolation ionization chamber built at the Calibration Laboratory (LCI), was used to establish a CT primary standard. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests (short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, polarity effect and ion collection efficiency) in the standard X-rays beams established for computed tomography at the LCI. (author)

  16. Management and performance features of cancer centers in Europe: A fuzzy-set analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke; Lobo, Mariana Fernandes; van Dijk, Joris; Lepage-Nefkens, Isabelle; Laranja-Pontes, Jose; da Conceicao Goncalves, Vitor; van Harten, Willem H.; Rocha-Goncalves, Francisco Nuno

    2016-01-01

    The specific aim of this study is to identify the performance features of cancer centers in the European Union by using a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The fsQCA method represents cases (cancer centers) as a combination of explanatory and outcome conditions. This study uses

  17. Evaluating computer program performance on the CRAY-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudsinski, L.; Pieper, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Advanced Scientific Computers Project of Argonne's Applied Mathematics Division has two objectives: to evaluate supercomputers and to determine their effect on Argonne's computing workload. Initial efforts have focused on the CRAY-1, which is the only advanced computer currently available. Users from seven Argonne divisions executed test programs on the CRAY and made performance comparisons with the IBM 370/195 at Argonne. This report describes these experiences and discusses various techniques for improving run times on the CRAY. Direct translations of code from scalar to vector processor reduced running times as much as two-fold, and this reduction will become more pronounced as the CRAY compiler is developed. Further improvement (two- to ten-fold) was realized by making minor code changes to facilitate compiler recognition of the parallel and vector structure within the programs. Finally, extensive rewriting of the FORTRAN code structure reduced execution times dramatically, in three cases by a factor of more than 20; and even greater reduction should be possible by changing algorithms within a production code. It is condluded that the CRAY-1 would be of great benefit to Argonne researchers. Existing codes could be modified with relative ease to run significantly faster than on the 370/195. More important, the CRAY would permit scientists to investigate complex problems currently deemed infeasibile on traditional scalar machines. Finally, an interface between the CRAY-1 and IBM computers such as the 370/195, scheduled by Cray Research for the first quarter of 1979, would considerably facilitate the task of integrating the CRAY into Argonne's Central Computing Facility. 13 tables

  18. Pain, Work-related Characteristics, and Psychosocial Factors among Computer Workers at a University Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti, Míriam Raquel Meira; Felicio, Lilian Ramiro; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho; Ribeiro da Silva, Dalila Terrinha; Vigário Dos Santos, Patrícia

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Complaint of pain is common in computer workers, encouraging the investigation of pain-related workplace factors. This study investigated the relationship among work-related characteristics, psychosocial factors, and pain among computer workers from a university center. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects (median age, 32.0 years; interquartile range, 26.8-34.5 years) were subjected to measurement of bioelectrical impedance; photogrammetry; workplace measurements; and pain complaint, quality of life, and motivation questionnaires. [Results] The low back was the most prevalent region of complaint (76.9%). The number of body regions for which subjects complained of pain was greater in the no rest breaks group, which also presented higher prevalences of neck (62.5%) and low back (100%) pain. There were also observed associations between neck complaint and quality of life; neck complaint and head protrusion; wrist complaint and shoulder angle; and use of a chair back and thoracic pain. [Conclusion] Complaint of pain was associated with no short rest breaks, no use of a chair back, poor quality of life, high head protrusion, and shoulder angle while using the mouse of a computer.

  19. Concurrent validity of an automated algorithm for computing the center of pressure excursion index (CPEI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Michelle A; Gibbons, Mandi W; Song, Jinsup; Hillstrom, Howard J; Choe, Kersti H; Pasquale, Maria R

    2018-01-01

    Center of Pressure Excursion Index (CPEI), a parameter computed from the distribution of plantar pressures during stance phase of barefoot walking, has been used to assess dynamic foot function. The original custom program developed to calculate CPEI required the oversight of a user who could manually correct for certain exceptions to the computational rules. A new fully automatic program has been developed to calculate CPEI with an algorithm that accounts for these exceptions. The purpose of this paper is to compare resulting CPEI values computed by these two programs on plantar pressure data from both asymptomatic and pathologic subjects. If comparable, the new program offers significant benefits-reduced potential for variability due to rater discretion and faster CPEI calculation. CPEI values were calculated from barefoot plantar pressure distributions during comfortable paced walking on 61 healthy asymptomatic adults, 19 diabetic adults with moderate hallux valgus, and 13 adults with mild hallux valgus. Right foot data for each subject was analyzed with linear regression and a Bland-Altman plot. The automated algorithm yielded CPEI values that were linearly related to the original program (R 2 =0.99; Pcomputation methods. Results of this analysis suggest that the new automated algorithm may be used to calculate CPEI on both healthy and pathologic feet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New developments in delivering public access to data from the National Center for Computational Toxicology at the EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology integrate advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to examine the toxicity of chemicals and help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. The goal of this researc...

  1. Transportation management center data capture for performance and mobility measures guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The Guide to Transportation Management Center (TMC) Data Capture for Performance and Mobility Measures is a two-volume document consisting of this summary Guidebook and a Reference Manual. These documents provide technical guidance and recommended pr...

  2. Transportation management center data capture for performance and mobility measures reference manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The Guide to Transportation Management Center (TMC) Data Capture for Performance and Mobility Measures is a two-volume document consisting of a summary Guidebook and this Reference Manual. These documents provide technical guidance and recommended pr...

  3. A checkpoint compression study for high-performance computing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibtesham, Dewan [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Ferreira, Kurt B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Scalable System Software Dept.; Arnold, Dorian [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    2015-02-17

    As high-performance computing systems continue to increase in size and complexity, higher failure rates and increased overheads for checkpoint/restart (CR) protocols have raised concerns about the practical viability of CR protocols for future systems. Previously, compression has proven to be a viable approach for reducing checkpoint data volumes and, thereby, reducing CR protocol overhead leading to improved application performance. In this article, we further explore compression-based CR optimization by exploring its baseline performance and scaling properties, evaluating whether improved compression algorithms might lead to even better application performance and comparing checkpoint compression against and alongside other software- and hardware-based optimizations. Our results highlights are: (1) compression is a very viable CR optimization; (2) generic, text-based compression algorithms appear to perform near optimally for checkpoint data compression and faster compression algorithms will not lead to better application performance; (3) compression-based optimizations fare well against and alongside other software-based optimizations; and (4) while hardware-based optimizations outperform software-based ones, they are not as cost effective.

  4. Resilient and Robust High Performance Computing Platforms for Scientific Computing Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yier [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2017-07-14

    As technology advances, computer systems are subject to increasingly sophisticated cyber-attacks that compromise both their security and integrity. High performance computing platforms used in commercial and scientific applications involving sensitive, or even classified data, are frequently targeted by powerful adversaries. This situation is made worse by a lack of fundamental security solutions that both perform efficiently and are effective at preventing threats. Current security solutions fail to address the threat landscape and ensure the integrity of sensitive data. As challenges rise, both private and public sectors will require robust technologies to protect its computing infrastructure. The research outcomes from this project try to address all these challenges. For example, we present LAZARUS, a novel technique to harden kernel Address Space Layout Randomization (KASLR) against paging-based side-channel attacks. In particular, our scheme allows for fine-grained protection of the virtual memory mappings that implement the randomization. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by hardening a recent Linux kernel with LAZARUS, mitigating all of the previously presented side-channel attacks on KASLR. Our extensive evaluation shows that LAZARUS incurs only 0.943% overhead for standard benchmarks, and is therefore highly practical. We also introduced HA2lloc, a hardware-assisted allocator that is capable of leveraging an extended memory management unit to detect memory errors in the heap. We also perform testing using HA2lloc in a simulation environment and find that the approach is capable of preventing common memory vulnerabilities.

  5. SDN Data Center Performance Evaluation of Torus and Hypercube Interconnecting Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrus, Bogdan-Mihai; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Mehmeri, Victor

    2015-01-01

    — By measuring throughput, delay, loss-rate and jitter, we present how SDN framework yields a 45% performance increase in highly interconnected topologies like torus and hypercube compared to current Layer2 switching technologies, applied to data center architectures......— By measuring throughput, delay, loss-rate and jitter, we present how SDN framework yields a 45% performance increase in highly interconnected topologies like torus and hypercube compared to current Layer2 switching technologies, applied to data center architectures...

  6. Evaluation of Flagging Criteria of United States Kidney Transplant Center Performance: How to Best Define Outliers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schold, Jesse D; Miller, Charles M; Henry, Mitchell L; Buccini, Laura D; Flechner, Stuart M; Goldfarb, David A; Poggio, Emilio D; Andreoni, Kenneth A

    2017-06-01

    Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients report cards of US organ transplant center performance are publicly available and used for quality oversight. Low center performance (LP) evaluations are associated with changes in practice including reduced transplant rates and increased waitlist removals. In 2014, Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients implemented new Bayesian methodology to evaluate performance which was not adopted by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). In May 2016, CMS altered their performance criteria, reducing the likelihood of LP evaluations. Our aims were to evaluate incidence, survival rates, and volume of LP centers with Bayesian, historical (old-CMS) and new-CMS criteria using 6 consecutive program-specific reports (PSR), January 2013 to July 2015 among adult kidney transplant centers. Bayesian, old-CMS and new-CMS criteria identified 13.4%, 8.3%, and 6.1% LP PSRs, respectively. Over the 3-year period, 31.9% (Bayesian), 23.4% (old-CMS), and 19.8% (new-CMS) of centers had 1 or more LP evaluation. For small centers (evaluations (52 vs 13 PSRs) for 1-year mortality with Bayesian versus new-CMS criteria. For large centers (>183 transplants/PSR), there were 3-fold additional LP evaluations for 1-year mortality with Bayesian versus new-CMS criteria with median differences in observed and expected patient survival of -1.6% and -2.2%, respectively. A significant proportion of kidney transplant centers are identified as low performing with relatively small survival differences compared with expected. Bayesian criteria have significantly higher flagging rates and new-CMS criteria modestly reduce flagging. Critical appraisal of performance criteria is needed to assess whether quality oversight is meeting intended goals and whether further modifications could reduce risk aversion, more efficiently allocate resources, and increase transplant opportunities.

  7. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, G.; Plessel, T.; Merritt, F.; Watson, V.

    1989-01-01

    Hardware, software, and techniques used by the Fluid Dynamics Division (NASA) for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, which can be applied to the visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about the Space Shuttle, are discussed. Three visualization techniques applied, post-processing, tracking, and steering, are described, as well as the post-processing software packages used, PLOT3D, SURF (Surface Modeller), GAS (Graphical Animation System), and FAST (Flow Analysis software Toolkit). Using post-processing methods a flow simulation was executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation was complete, the results were processed for viewing. It is shown that the high-resolution, high-performance three-dimensional workstation combined with specially developed display and animation software provides a good tool for analyzing flow field solutions obtained from supercomputers. 7 refs

  8. Real-time Tsunami Inundation Prediction Using High Performance Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recently off-shore tsunami observation stations based on cabled ocean bottom pressure gauges are actively being deployed especially in Japan. These cabled systems are designed to provide real-time tsunami data before tsunamis reach coastlines for disaster mitigation purposes. To receive real benefits of these observations, real-time analysis techniques to make an effective use of these data are necessary. A representative study was made by Tsushima et al. (2009) that proposed a method to provide instant tsunami source prediction based on achieving tsunami waveform data. As time passes, the prediction is improved by using updated waveform data. After a tsunami source is predicted, tsunami waveforms are synthesized from pre-computed tsunami Green functions of linear long wave equations. Tsushima et al. (2014) updated the method by combining the tsunami waveform inversion with an instant inversion of coseismic crustal deformation and improved the prediction accuracy and speed in the early stages. For disaster mitigation purposes, real-time predictions of tsunami inundation are also important. In this study, we discuss the possibility of real-time tsunami inundation predictions, which require faster-than-real-time tsunami inundation simulation in addition to instant tsunami source analysis. Although the computational amount is large to solve non-linear shallow water equations for inundation predictions, it has become executable through the recent developments of high performance computing technologies. We conducted parallel computations of tsunami inundation and achieved 6.0 TFLOPS by using 19,000 CPU cores. We employed a leap-frog finite difference method with nested staggered grids of which resolution range from 405 m to 5 m. The resolution ratio of each nested domain was 1/3. Total number of grid points were 13 million, and the time step was 0.1 seconds. Tsunami sources of 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake were tested. The inundation prediction up to 2 hours after the

  9. Computational Environments and Analysis methods available on the NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Foster, C.; Minchin, S. A.; Pugh, T.; Lewis, A.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful in-situ computational environment to enable both high performance computing and data-intensive science across a wide spectrum of national environmental data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress in addressing harmonisation of the underlying data collections for future transdisciplinary research that enable accurate climate projections. NCI makes available 10+ PB major data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. The data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. This computational environment supports a catalogue of integrated reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. To enable transdisciplinary research on this scale, data needs to be harmonised so that researchers can readily apply techniques and software across the corpus of data available and not be constrained to work within artificial disciplinary boundaries. Future challenges will

  10. Towards Portable Large-Scale Image Processing with High-Performance Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yuankai; Blaber, Justin; Damon, Stephen M; Boyd, Brian D; Bao, Shunxing; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Noguera, Camilo Bermudez; Chaganti, Shikha; Nath, Vishwesh; Greer, Jasmine M; Lyu, Ilwoo; French, William R; Newton, Allen T; Rogers, Baxter P; Landman, Bennett A

    2018-05-03

    High-throughput, large-scale medical image computing demands tight integration of high-performance computing (HPC) infrastructure for data storage, job distribution, and image processing. The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has constructed a large-scale image storage and processing infrastructure that is composed of (1) a large-scale image database using the eXtensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT), (2) a content-aware job scheduling platform using the Distributed Automation for XNAT pipeline automation tool (DAX), and (3) a wide variety of encapsulated image processing pipelines called "spiders." The VUIIS CCI medical image data storage and processing infrastructure have housed and processed nearly half-million medical image volumes with Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education (ACCRE), which is the HPC facility at the Vanderbilt University. The initial deployment was natively deployed (i.e., direct installations on a bare-metal server) within the ACCRE hardware and software environments, which lead to issues of portability and sustainability. First, it could be laborious to deploy the entire VUIIS CCI medical image data storage and processing infrastructure to another HPC center with varying hardware infrastructure, library availability, and software permission policies. Second, the spiders were not developed in an isolated manner, which has led to software dependency issues during system upgrades or remote software installation. To address such issues, herein, we describe recent innovations using containerization techniques with XNAT/DAX which are used to isolate the VUIIS CCI medical image data storage and processing infrastructure from the underlying hardware and software environments. The newly presented XNAT/DAX solution has the following new features: (1) multi-level portability from system level to the application level, (2) flexible and dynamic software

  11. Mixed-Language High-Performance Computing for Plasma Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanming Lu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Java is receiving increasing attention as the most popular platform for distributed computing. However, programmers are still reluctant to embrace Java as a tool for writing scientific and engineering applications due to its still noticeable performance drawbacks compared with other programming languages such as Fortran or C. In this paper, we present a hybrid Java/Fortran implementation of a parallel particle-in-cell (PIC algorithm for plasma simulations. In our approach, the time-consuming components of this application are designed and implemented as Fortran subroutines, while less calculation-intensive components usually involved in building the user interface are written in Java. The two types of software modules have been glued together using the Java native interface (JNI. Our mixed-language PIC code was tested and its performance compared with pure Java and Fortran versions of the same algorithm on a Sun E6500 SMP system and a Linux cluster of Pentium~III machines.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... zones connected by open areas with pressure and buoyancy driven air flow. The two programs are interconnected in an iterative procedure. The paper shows also an evaluation of the air quality in the main area of the buildings based on CFD predictions. It is shown that an interconnection between a CFD...

  13. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially

  14. Performance Evaluation of Resource Management in Cloud Computing Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Bruno Guazzelli; Estrella, Julio Cezar; Ferreira, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Filho, Dionisio Machado Leite; Nakamura, Luis Hideo Vasconcelos; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Santana, Marcos José; Santana, Regina Helena Carlucci

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a computational model in which resource providers can offer on-demand services to clients in a transparent way. However, to be able to guarantee quality of service without limiting the number of accepted requests, providers must be able to dynamically manage the available resources so that they can be optimized. This dynamic resource management is not a trivial task, since it involves meeting several challenges related to workload modeling, virtualization, performance modeling, deployment and monitoring of applications on virtualized resources. This paper carries out a performance evaluation of a module for resource management in a cloud environment that includes handling available resources during execution time and ensuring the quality of service defined in the service level agreement. An analysis was conducted of different resource configurations to define which dimension of resource scaling has a real influence on client requests. The results were used to model and implement a simulated cloud system, in which the allocated resource can be changed on-the-fly, with a corresponding change in price. In this way, the proposed module seeks to satisfy both the client by ensuring quality of service, and the provider by ensuring the best use of resources at a fair price.

  15. Performance of scientific computing platforms with MCNP4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, H.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Several computing platforms were evaluated with the MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The DEC AlphaStation 500/500 was the fastest to run MCNP4B. Compared to the HP 9000-735, the fastest platform 4 yr ago, the AlphaStation is 335% faster, the HP C180 is 133% faster, the SGI Origin 2000 is 82% faster, the Cray T94/4128 is 1% faster, the IBM RS/6000-590 is 93% as fast, the DEC 3000/600 is 81% as fast, the Sun Sparc20 is 57% as fast, the Cray YMP 8/8128 is 57% as fast, the sun Sparc5 is 33% as fast, and the Sun Sparc2 is 13% as fast. All results presented are reproducible and allow for comparison to computer platforms not included in this study. Timing studies are seen to be very problem dependent. The performance gains resulting from advances in software were also investigated. Various compilers and operating systems were seen to have a modest impact on performance, whereas hardware improvements have resulted in a factor of 4 improvement. MCNP4B also ran approximately as fast as MCNP4A

  16. Performance Evaluation of Resource Management in Cloud Computing Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Guazzelli Batista

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a computational model in which resource providers can offer on-demand services to clients in a transparent way. However, to be able to guarantee quality of service without limiting the number of accepted requests, providers must be able to dynamically manage the available resources so that they can be optimized. This dynamic resource management is not a trivial task, since it involves meeting several challenges related to workload modeling, virtualization, performance modeling, deployment and monitoring of applications on virtualized resources. This paper carries out a performance evaluation of a module for resource management in a cloud environment that includes handling available resources during execution time and ensuring the quality of service defined in the service level agreement. An analysis was conducted of different resource configurations to define which dimension of resource scaling has a real influence on client requests. The results were used to model and implement a simulated cloud system, in which the allocated resource can be changed on-the-fly, with a corresponding change in price. In this way, the proposed module seeks to satisfy both the client by ensuring quality of service, and the provider by ensuring the best use of resources at a fair price.

  17. A Framework for Debugging Geoscience Projects in a High Performance Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, C.; Matott, L.

    2012-12-01

    High performance computing (HPC) infrastructure has become ubiquitous in today's world with the emergence of commercial cloud computing and academic supercomputing centers. Teams of geoscientists, hydrologists and engineers can take advantage of this infrastructure to undertake large research projects - for example, linking one or more site-specific environmental models with soft computing algorithms, such as heuristic global search procedures, to perform parameter estimation and predictive uncertainty analysis, and/or design least-cost remediation systems. However, the size, complexity and distributed nature of these projects can make identifying failures in the associated numerical experiments using conventional ad-hoc approaches both time- consuming and ineffective. To address these problems a multi-tiered debugging framework has been developed. The framework allows for quickly isolating and remedying a number of potential experimental failures, including: failures in the HPC scheduler; bugs in the soft computing code; bugs in the modeling code; and permissions and access control errors. The utility of the framework is demonstrated via application to a series of over 200,000 numerical experiments involving a suite of 5 heuristic global search algorithms and 15 mathematical test functions serving as cheap analogues for the simulation-based optimization of pump-and-treat subsurface remediation systems.

  18. Play for Performance: Using Computer Games to Improve Motivation and Test-Taking Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Alan R.; Bhagwatwar, Akshay; Minas, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of testing, especially certification and high-stakes testing, has increased substantially over the past decade. Building on the "serious gaming" literature and the psychology "priming" literature, we developed a computer game designed to improve test-taking performance using psychological priming. The game primed…

  19. An ergonomic evaluation of a call center performed by disabled agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chia-Fen; Lin, Yen-Hui

    2008-08-01

    Potential ergonomic hazards for 27 disabled call center agents engaged in computer-telephone interactive tasks were evaluated for possible associations between the task behaviors and work-related disorders. Data included task description, 300 samples of performance, a questionnaire on workstation design, body-part discomfort rating, perceived stress, potential job stressors, and direct measurement of environmental factors. Analysis indicated agents were frequently exposed to prolonged static sitting and repetitive movements, together with unsupported back and flexed neck, causing musculoskeletal discomforts. Visual fatigue (85.2% of agents), discomfort of ears (66.7%), and musculoskeletal discomforts (59.3%) were the most pronounced and prevalent complaints after prolonged working. 17 of 27 agents described job pressure as high or very high, and dealing with difficult customers and trying to fulfill the customers' needs within the time standard were main stressors. Further work on surrounding noise, earphone use, possible hearing loss of experienced agents, training programs, feasible solutions for visual fatigue, musculoskeletal symptoms, and psychosocial stress should be conducted.

  20. Department of Energy Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division: High Performance Computing and Communications Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, The DOE Program in HPCC), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW).

  1. Department of Energy: MICS (Mathematical Information, and Computational Sciences Division). High performance computing and communications program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, {open_quotes}The DOE Program in HPCC{close_quotes}), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW). The information pointed to by the URL is updated frequently, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for the latest information.

  2. Integrated modeling tool for performance engineering of complex computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gary; Ball, Duane; Hoyt, Susan; Steele, Oscar

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes Advanced System Technologies' accomplishments on the Phase 2 SBIR contract NAS7-995. The technical objectives of the report are: (1) to develop an evaluation version of a graphical, integrated modeling language according to the specification resulting from the Phase 2 research; and (2) to determine the degree to which the language meets its objectives by evaluating ease of use, utility of two sets of performance predictions, and the power of the language constructs. The technical approach followed to meet these objectives was to design, develop, and test an evaluation prototype of a graphical, performance prediction tool. The utility of the prototype was then evaluated by applying it to a variety of test cases found in the literature and in AST case histories. Numerous models were constructed and successfully tested. The major conclusion of this Phase 2 SBIR research and development effort is that complex, real-time computer systems can be specified in a non-procedural manner using combinations of icons, windows, menus, and dialogs. Such a specification technique provides an interface that system designers and architects find natural and easy to use. In addition, PEDESTAL's multiview approach provides system engineers with the capability to perform the trade-offs necessary to produce a design that meets timing performance requirements. Sample system designs analyzed during the development effort showed that models could be constructed in a fraction of the time required by non-visual system design capture tools.

  3. Multi-Language Programming Environments for High Performance Java Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Getov

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in processor capabilities, software tools, programming languages and programming paradigms have brought about new approaches to high performance computing. A steadfast component of this dynamic evolution has been the scientific community’s reliance on established scientific packages. As a consequence, programmers of high‐performance applications are reluctant to embrace evolving languages such as Java. This paper describes the Java‐to‐C Interface (JCI tool which provides application programmers wishing to use Java with immediate accessibility to existing scientific packages. The JCI tool also facilitates rapid development and reuse of existing code. These benefits are provided at minimal cost to the programmer. While beneficial to the programmer, the additional advantages of mixed‐language programming in terms of application performance and portability are addressed in detail within the context of this paper. In addition, we discuss how the JCI tool is complementing other ongoing projects such as IBM’s High‐Performance Compiler for Java (HPCJ and IceT’s metacomputing environment.

  4. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools

  5. Performance characteristics of a Kodak computed radiography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, C D; Peppler, W W; Dobbins, J T

    1999-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a photostimulable phosphor based computed radiographic (CR) system were studied. The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the Kodak Digital Science computed radiography (CR) system (Eastman Kodak Co.-model 400) were measured and compared to previously published results of a Fuji based CR system (Philips Medical Systems-PCR model 7000). To maximize comparability, the same measurement techniques and analysis methods were used. The DQE at four exposure levels (30, 3, 0.3, 0.03 mR) and two plate types (standard and high resolution) were calculated from the NPS and MTF measurements. The NPS was determined from two-dimensional Fourier analysis of uniformly exposed plates. The presampling MTF was determined from the Fourier transform (FT) of the system's finely sampled line spread function (LSF) as produced by a narrow slit. A comparison of the slit type ("beveled edge" versus "straight edge") and its effect on the resulting MTF measurements was also performed. The results show that both systems are comparable in resolution performance. The noise power studies indicated a higher level of noise for the Kodak images (approximately 20% at the low exposure levels and 40%-70% at higher exposure levels). Within the clinically relevant exposure range (0.3-3 mR), the resulting DQE for the Kodak plates ranged between 20%-50% lower than for the corresponding Fuji plates. Measurements of the presampling MTF with the two slit types have shown that a correction factor can be applied to compensate for transmission through the relief edges.

  6. A hypothesis on the formation of the primary ossification centers in the membranous neurocranium: a mathematical and computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A

    2013-01-21

    This article develops a model of the appearance and location of the primary centers of ossification in the calvaria. The model uses a system of reaction-diffusion equations of two molecules (BMP and Noggin) whose behavior is of type activator-substrate and its solution produces Turing patterns, which represents the primary ossification centers. Additionally, the model includes the level of cell maturation as a function of the location of mesenchymal cells. Thus the mature cells can become osteoblasts due to the action of BMP2. Therefore, with this model, we can have two frontal primary centers, two parietal, and one, two or more occipital centers. The location of these centers in the simplified computational model is highly consistent with those centers found at an embryonic level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment 2015: Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Ashley D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Bland, Arthur S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Gary, Jeff D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Hack, James J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; McNally, Stephen T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Rogers, James H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Smith, Brian E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Straatsma, T. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Thach, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Tichenor, Suzy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility; Wells, Jack C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    2016-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to surpass its operational target goals: supporting users; delivering fast, reliable systems; creating innovative solutions for high-performance computing (HPC) needs; and managing risks, safety, and security aspects associated with operating one of the most powerful computers in the world. The results can be seen in the cutting-edge science delivered by users and the praise from the research community. Calendar year (CY) 2015 was filled with outstanding operational results and accomplishments: a very high rating from users on overall satisfaction that ties the highest-ever mark set in CY 2014; the greatest number of core-hours delivered to research projects; the largest percentage of capability usage since the OLCF began tracking the metric in 2009; and success in delivering on the allocation of 60, 30, and 10% of core hours offered for the INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment), ALCC (Advanced Scientific Computing Research Leadership Computing Challenge), and Director’s Discretionary programs, respectively. These accomplishments, coupled with the extremely high utilization rate, represent the fulfillment of the promise of Titan: maximum use by maximum-size simulations. The impact of all of these successes and more is reflected in the accomplishments of OLCF users, with publications this year in notable journals Nature, Nature Materials, Nature Chemistry, Nature Physics, Nature Climate Change, ACS Nano, Journal of the American Chemical Society, and Physical Review Letters, as well as many others. The achievements included in the 2015 OLCF Operational Assessment Report reflect first-ever or largest simulations in their communities; for example Titan enabled engineers in Los Angeles and the surrounding region to design and begin building improved critical infrastructure by enabling the highest-resolution Cybershake map for Southern

  8. Supervisors' Performance Ratings Correlated with Selected Personal Characteristics of Attendants in a Mental Retardation Developmental Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Joseph; And Others

    A research study investigated the relationship between personal characteristics and selected demographic data of 75 attendants in a mental retardation developmental center and the assessment by 24 administrators of the attendants' job performance. Instruments used included a 20-item Direct Care Performance Scale and the Demographic Data Scale,…

  9. The Woven Body: Embodying Text in Performance Art and the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifenburg, J. Michael; Allgood, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on Lindsey Allgood's scripts, journal entries, and images of a specific participatory performance piece she executed, we argue for seeing performance art as a form of embodied text. Such an assertion is particularly pertinent for postsecondary writing center praxis as it allows for the mindful intersections of the body and writing during…

  10. On the practice of ignoring center-patient interactions in evaluating hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varewyck, Machteld; Vansteelandt, Stijn; Eriksson, Marie; Goetghebeur, Els

    2016-01-30

    We evaluate the performance of medical centers based on a continuous or binary patient outcome (e.g., 30-day mortality). Common practice adjusts for differences in patient mix through outcome regression models, which include patient-specific baseline covariates (e.g., age and disease stage) besides center effects. Because a large number of centers may need to be evaluated, the typical model postulates that the effect of a center on outcome is constant over patient characteristics. This may be violated, for example, when some centers are specialized in children or geriatric patients. Including interactions between certain patient characteristics and the many fixed center effects in the model increases the risk for overfitting, however, and could imply a loss of power for detecting centers with deviating mortality. Therefore, we assess how the common practice of ignoring such interactions impacts the bias and precision of directly and indirectly standardized risks. The reassuring conclusion is that the common practice of working with the main effects of a center has minor impact on hospital evaluation, unless some centers actually perform substantially better on a specific group of patients and there is strong confounding through the corresponding patient characteristic. The bias is then driven by an interplay of the relative center size, the overlap between covariate distributions, and the magnitude of the interaction effect. Interestingly, the bias on indirectly standardized risks is smaller than on directly standardized risks. We illustrate our findings by simulation and in an analysis of 30-day mortality on Riksstroke. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High performance computing network for cloud environment using simulators

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, N. Ajith; Hemalatha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is the next generation computing. Adopting the cloud computing is like signing up new form of a website. The GUI which controls the cloud computing make is directly control the hardware resource and your application. The difficulty part in cloud computing is to deploy in real environment. Its' difficult to know the exact cost and it's requirement until and unless we buy the service not only that whether it will support the existing application which is available on traditional...

  12. Performance characteristics of single effect lithium bromide/ water absorption chiller for small data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Abhishek Arun Babu

    A medium data center consists of servers performing operations such as file sharing, collaboration and email. There are a large number of small and medium data centers across the world which consume more energy and are less efficient when compared to large data center facilities of companies such as GOOGLE, APPLE and FACEBOOK. Such companies are making their data center facilities more environmental friendly by employing renewable energy solutions such as wind and solar to power the data center or in data center cooling. This not only reduces the carbon footprint significantly but also decreases the costs incurred over a period of time. Cooling of data center play a vital role in proper functioning of the servers. It is found that cooling consumes about 50% of the total power consumed by the data center. Traditional method of cooling includes the use of mechanical compression chillers which consume lot of power and is not desirable. In order to eliminate the use of mechanical compressor chillers renewable energy resources such as solar and wind should be employed. One such technology is solar thermal cooling by means of absorption chiller which is powered by solar energy. The absorption chiller unit can be coupled with either flat plate or evacuated tube collectors in order to achieve the required inlet temperature for the generator of the absorption chiller unit. In this study a modular data center is considered having a cooling load requirement of 23kw. The performance characteristics of a single stage Lithium Bromide/ water refrigeration is presented in this study considering the cooling load of 23kw. Performance characteristics of each of the 4 heat exchangers within the unit is discussed which helps in customizing the unit according to the users' specific needs. This analysis helps in studying the importance of different properties such as the effect of inlet temperatures of hot water for generator, inlet temperatures of cooling water for absorber and

  13. High performance computing environment for multidimensional image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A Ravishankar; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2007-07-10

    The processing of images acquired through microscopy is a challenging task due to the large size of datasets (several gigabytes) and the fast turnaround time required. If the throughput of the image processing stage is significantly increased, it can have a major impact in microscopy applications. We present a high performance computing (HPC) solution to this problem. This involves decomposing the spatial 3D image into segments that are assigned to unique processors, and matched to the 3D torus architecture of the IBM Blue Gene/L machine. Communication between segments is restricted to the nearest neighbors. When running on a 2 Ghz Intel CPU, the task of 3D median filtering on a typical 256 megabyte dataset takes two and a half hours, whereas by using 1024 nodes of Blue Gene, this task can be performed in 18.8 seconds, a 478x speedup. Our parallel solution dramatically improves the performance of image processing, feature extraction and 3D reconstruction tasks. This increased throughput permits biologists to conduct unprecedented large scale experiments with massive datasets.

  14. Improving Software Performance in the Compute Unified Device Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru PIRJAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes several aspects regarding the improvement of software performance for applications written in the Compute Unified Device Architecture CUDA. We address an issue of great importance when programming a CUDA application: the Graphics Processing Unit’s (GPU’s memory management through ranspose ernels. We also benchmark and evaluate the performance for progressively optimizing a transposing matrix application in CUDA. One particular interest was to research how well the optimization techniques, applied to software application written in CUDA, scale to the latest generation of general-purpose graphic processors units (GPGPU, like the Fermi architecture implemented in the GTX480 and the previous architecture implemented in GTX280. Lately, there has been a lot of interest in the literature for this type of optimization analysis, but none of the works so far (to our best knowledge tried to validate if the optimizations can apply to a GPU from the latest Fermi architecture and how well does the Fermi architecture scale to these software performance improving techniques.

  15. Influence of socioeconomic status on trauma center performance evaluations in a Canadian trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Turgeon, Alexis F; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Murat, Valérie; Lavoie, André

    2011-09-01

    Trauma center performance evaluations generally include adjustment for injury severity, age, and comorbidity. However, disparities across trauma centers may be due to other differences in source populations that are not accounted for, such as socioeconomic status (SES). We aimed to evaluate whether SES influences trauma center performance evaluations in an inclusive trauma system with universal access to health care. The study was based on data collected between 1999 and 2006 in a Canadian trauma system. Patient SES was quantified using an ecologic index of social and material deprivation. Performance evaluations were based on mortality adjusted using the Trauma Risk Adjustment Model. Agreement between performance results with and without additional adjustment for SES was evaluated with correlation coefficients. The study sample comprised a total of 71,784 patients from 48 trauma centers, including 3,828 deaths within 30 days (4.5%) and 5,549 deaths within 6 months (7.7%). The proportion of patients in the highest quintile of social and material deprivation varied from 3% to 43% and from 11% to 90% across hospitals, respectively. The correlation between performance results with or without adjustment for SES was almost perfect (r = 0.997; 95% CI 0.995-0.998) and the same hospital outliers were identified. We observed an important variation in SES across trauma centers but no change in risk-adjusted mortality estimates when SES was added to adjustment models. Results suggest that after adjustment for injury severity, age, comorbidity, and transfer status, disparities in SES across trauma center source populations do not influence trauma center performance evaluations in a system offering universal health coverage. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computing. The PRIMA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malony, Allen D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Computer and Information Science; Wolf, Felix G. [Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, Julich (Germany). Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH

    2014-01-31

    The growing number of cores provided by today’s high-­end computing systems present substantial challenges to application developers in their pursuit of parallel efficiency. To find the most effective optimization strategy, application developers need insight into the runtime behavior of their code. The University of Oregon (UO) and the Juelich Supercomputing Centre of Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) develop the performance analysis tools TAU and Scalasca, respectively, which allow high-­performance computing (HPC) users to collect and analyze relevant performance data – even at very large scales. TAU and Scalasca are considered among the most advanced parallel performance systems available, and are used extensively across HPC centers in the U.S., Germany, and around the world. The TAU and Scalasca groups share a heritage of parallel performance tool research and partnership throughout the past fifteen years. Indeed, the close interactions of the two groups resulted in a cross-­fertilization of tool ideas and technologies that pushed TAU and Scalasca to what they are today. It also produced two performance systems with an increasing degree of functional overlap. While each tool has its specific analysis focus, the tools were implementing measurement infrastructures that were substantially similar. Because each tool provides complementary performance analysis, sharing of measurement results is valuable to provide the user with more facets to understand performance behavior. However, each measurement system was producing performance data in different formats, requiring data interoperability tools to be created. A common measurement and instrumentation system was needed to more closely integrate TAU and Scalasca and to avoid the duplication of development and maintenance effort. The PRIMA (Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis) project was proposed over three years ago as a joint international effort between UO and FZJ to

  17. Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computing: the PRIMA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malony, Allen D. [Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Oregon; Wolf, Felix G. [Juelich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Juelich

    2014-01-31

    The growing number of cores provided by today’s high-end computing systems present substantial challenges to application developers in their pursuit of parallel efficiency. To find the most effective optimization strategy, application developers need insight into the runtime behavior of their code. The University of Oregon (UO) and the Juelich Supercomputing Centre of Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) develop the performance analysis tools TAU and Scalasca, respectively, which allow high-performance computing (HPC) users to collect and analyze relevant performance data – even at very large scales. TAU and Scalasca are considered among the most advanced parallel performance systems available, and are used extensively across HPC centers in the U.S., Germany, and around the world. The TAU and Scalasca groups share a heritage of parallel performance tool research and partnership throughout the past fifteen years. Indeed, the close interactions of the two groups resulted in a cross-fertilization of tool ideas and technologies that pushed TAU and Scalasca to what they are today. It also produced two performance systems with an increasing degree of functional overlap. While each tool has its specific analysis focus, the tools were implementing measurement infrastructures that were substantially similar. Because each tool provides complementary performance analysis, sharing of measurement results is valuable to provide the user with more facets to understand performance behavior. However, each measurement system was producing performance data in different formats, requiring data interoperability tools to be created. A common measurement and instrumentation system was needed to more closely integrate TAU and Scalasca and to avoid the duplication of development and maintenance effort. The PRIMA (Performance Refactoring of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis) project was proposed over three years ago as a joint international effort between UO and FZJ to accomplish

  18. Trends in high-performance computing for engineering calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, M B; Reguly, I

    2014-08-13

    High-performance computing has evolved remarkably over the past 20 years, and that progress is likely to continue. However, in recent years, this progress has been achieved through greatly increased hardware complexity with the rise of multicore and manycore processors, and this is affecting the ability of application developers to achieve the full potential of these systems. This article outlines the key developments on the hardware side, both in the recent past and in the near future, with a focus on two key issues: energy efficiency and the cost of moving data. It then discusses the much slower evolution of system software, and the implications of all of this for application developers. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Power/energy use cases for high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelly, Suzanne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Steven [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elmore, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Munch, Kristin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Power and Energy have been identified as a first order challenge for future extreme scale high performance computing (HPC) systems. In practice the breakthroughs will need to be provided by the hardware vendors. But to make the best use of the solutions in an HPC environment, it will likely require periodic tuning by facility operators and software components. This document describes the actions and interactions needed to maximize power resources. It strives to cover the entire operational space in which an HPC system occupies. The descriptions are presented as formal use cases, as documented in the Unified Modeling Language Specification [1]. The document is intended to provide a common understanding to the HPC community of the necessary management and control capabilities. Assuming a common understanding can be achieved, the next step will be to develop a set of Application Programing Interfaces (APIs) to which hardware vendors and software developers could utilize to steer power consumption.

  20. Topology and computational performance of attractor neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, Patrick N.; Menzinger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    To explore the relation between network structure and function, we studied the computational performance of Hopfield-type attractor neural nets with regular lattice, random, small-world, and scale-free topologies. The random configuration is the most efficient for storage and retrieval of patterns by the network as a whole. However, in the scale-free case retrieval errors are not distributed uniformly among the nodes. The portion of a pattern encoded by the subset of highly connected nodes is more robust and efficiently recognized than the rest of the pattern. The scale-free network thus achieves a very strong partial recognition. The implications of these findings for brain function and social dynamics are suggestive

  1. Laser performance operations model (LPOM): a computational system that automates the setup and performance analysis of the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M; House, R; Williams, W; Haynam, C; White, R; Orth, C; Sacks, R [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)], E-mail: shaw7@llnl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 MJ, 500-TW, 351-nm laser system together with a 10-m diameter target chamber with room for many target diagnostics. NIF will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. A computational system, the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM) has been developed and deployed that automates the laser setup process, and accurately predict laser energetics. LPOM determines the settings of the injection laser system required to achieve the desired main laser output, provides equipment protection, determines the diagnostic setup, and supplies post shot data analysis and reporting.

  2. Measuring transplant center performance: The goals are not controversial but the methods and consequences can be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Colleen; Schold, Jesse D

    2017-03-01

    Risks of regulatory scrutiny has generated widespread concern about increasingly risk averse transplant center behaviors regarding both donor and candidate acceptance patterns. To address potential unintended consequences threatening access to care, we discuss recent changes in regulatory metrics and potential improvements in quality oversight of transplant centers. Despite many recent changes to one-year patient and graft survival regulatory criteria, the capacity to accurately identify true underperforming centers and avoiding false positive flagging remains an area of great concern. Numerous studies have demonstrated restrictions in transplant volume and access following transplant center flagging. Current regulatory criteria are limited in their capacity to accurately identify poorly performing centers and potentially encourage risk-averse behavior by transplant centers. Efforts to address these concerns should focus on (1) improving risk-adjustment models with better data which captures the acuity of candidate and donor risk, (2) reconsidering primary outcomes measured to assess comprehensive transplant center performance, (3) improving education to address rational or perceived disincentives, and (4) using data more effectively to share best practices.

  3. Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Visitors Center, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Visitors Center, also known as the Dan Schaefer Federal Building, is a high-performance building located in Golden, Colorado. The 6,400-square-foot building incorporates passive solar heating, energy-efficient lighting, an evaporative cooling system, and other technologies to minimize energy costs and environmental impact. The Visitors Center displays a variety of interactive exhibits on energy efficiency and renewable energy, and the building includes an auditorium, a public reading room, and office space

  4. A collaborative brain-computer interface for improving human performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Wang

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG based brain-computer interfaces (BCI have been studied since the 1970s. Currently, the main focus of BCI research lies on the clinical use, which aims to provide a new communication channel to patients with motor disabilities to improve their quality of life. However, the BCI technology can also be used to improve human performance for normal healthy users. Although this application has been proposed for a long time, little progress has been made in real-world practices due to technical limits of EEG. To overcome the bottleneck of low single-user BCI performance, this study proposes a collaborative paradigm to improve overall BCI performance by integrating information from multiple users. To test the feasibility of a collaborative BCI, this study quantitatively compares the classification accuracies of collaborative and single-user BCI applied to the EEG data collected from 20 subjects in a movement-planning experiment. This study also explores three different methods for fusing and analyzing EEG data from multiple subjects: (1 Event-related potentials (ERP averaging, (2 Feature concatenating, and (3 Voting. In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively. Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC, which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

  5. Rethinking Human-Centered Computing: Finding the Customer and Negotiated Interactions at the Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Roxana; O'Neill, John; Mirmalek, Zara

    2003-01-01

    The breakdown in the air transportation system over the past several years raises an interesting question for researchers: How can we help improve the reliability of airline operations? In offering some answers to this question, we make a statement about Huuman-Centered Computing (HCC). First we offer the definition that HCC is a multi-disciplinary research and design methodology focused on supporting humans as they use technology by including cognitive and social systems, computational tools and the physical environment in the analysis of organizational systems. We suggest that a key element in understanding organizational systems is that there are external cognitive and social systems (customers) as well as internal cognitive and social systems (employees) and that they interact dynamically to impact the organization and its work. The design of human-centered intelligent systems must take this outside-inside dynamic into account. In the past, the design of intelligent systems has focused on supporting the work and improvisation requirements of employees but has often assumed that customer requirements are implicitly satisfied by employee requirements. Taking a customer-centric perspective provides a different lens for understanding this outside-inside dynamic, the work of the organization and the requirements of both customers and employees In this article we will: 1) Demonstrate how the use of ethnographic methods revealed the important outside-inside dynamic in an airline, specifically the consequential relationship between external customer requirements and perspectives and internal organizational processes and perspectives as they came together in a changing environment; 2) Describe how taking a customer centric perspective identifies places where the impact of the outside-inside dynamic is most critical and requires technology that can be adaptive; 3) Define and discuss the place of negotiated interactions in airline operations, identifying how these

  6. FY 1995 Blue Book: High Performance Computing and Communications: Technology for the National Information Infrastructure

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — The Federal High Performance Computing and Communications HPCC Program was created to accelerate the development of future generations of high performance computers...

  7. The contribution of high-performance computing and modelling for industrial development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sithole, Happy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Performance Computing and Modelling for Industrial Development Dr Happy Sithole and Dr Onno Ubbink 2 Strategic context • High-performance computing (HPC) combined with machine Learning and artificial intelligence present opportunities to non...

  8. Enabling Efficient Climate Science Workflows in High Performance Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, H.; Byna, S.; Wehner, M. F.; Gu, J.; O'Brien, T. A.; Loring, B.; Stone, D. A.; Collins, W.; Prabhat, M.; Liu, Y.; Johnson, J. N.; Paciorek, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A typical climate science workflow often involves a combination of acquisition of data, modeling, simulation, analysis, visualization, publishing, and storage of results. Each of these tasks provide a myriad of challenges when running on a high performance computing environment such as Hopper or Edison at NERSC. Hurdles such as data transfer and management, job scheduling, parallel analysis routines, and publication require a lot of forethought and planning to ensure that proper quality control mechanisms are in place. These steps require effectively utilizing a combination of well tested and newly developed functionality to move data, perform analysis, apply statistical routines, and finally, serve results and tools to the greater scientific community. As part of the CAlibrated and Systematic Characterization, Attribution and Detection of Extremes (CASCADE) project we highlight a stack of tools our team utilizes and has developed to ensure that large scale simulation and analysis work are commonplace and provide operations that assist in everything from generation/procurement of data (HTAR/Globus) to automating publication of results to portals like the Earth Systems Grid Federation (ESGF), all while executing everything in between in a scalable environment in a task parallel way (MPI). We highlight the use and benefit of these tools by showing several climate science analysis use cases they have been applied to.

  9. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  10. Vocal symptoms, voice activity, and participation profile and professional performance of call center operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Tatiana Carvalho; Oliveira, Gisele; Lourenço, Luciana; Behlau, Mara

    2012-03-01

    To analyze the phonatory and laryngopharyngeal symptoms reported by call center operators; and quantify the impact of these symptoms on quality of life, and the association between these issues and professional performance, number of monthly calls, and number of missed workdays. Call center operators (n=157) from a billing call center completed the Vocal Signs and Symptoms Questionnaire and the Brazilian version of the Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP). The company provided data regarding professional performance, average number of monthly calls, and number of missed workdays for each employee. The mean number of current symptoms (6.8) was greater in the operators than data for the general population (1.7). On average, 4.2 symptoms were attributed to occupational factors. The average number of symptoms did not correlate with professional performance (P=0.571). However, fewer symptoms correlated with decreased missed workdays and higher mean monthly call figures. The VAPP scores were relatively low, suggesting little impact of voice difficulties on call center operator's quality of life. However, subjects with elevated VAPP scores also had poorer professional performance. The presence of vocal symptoms does not necessarily relate to decreased professional performance. However, an association between higher vocal activity limitation and participation scores and poorer professional performance was observed. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High-Performance Compute Infrastructure in Astronomy: 2020 Is Only Months Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, B.; Deelman, E.; Juve, G.; Rynge, M.; Vöckler, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    By 2020, astronomy will be awash with as much as 60 PB of public data. Full scientific exploitation of such massive volumes of data will require high-performance computing on server farms co-located with the data. Development of this computing model will be a community-wide enterprise that has profound cultural and technical implications. Astronomers must be prepared to develop environment-agnostic applications that support parallel processing. The community must investigate the applicability and cost-benefit of emerging technologies such as cloud computing to astronomy, and must engage the Computer Science community to develop science-driven cyberinfrastructure such as workflow schedulers and optimizers. We report here the results of collaborations between a science center, IPAC, and a Computer Science research institute, ISI. These collaborations may be considered pathfinders in developing a high-performance compute infrastructure in astronomy. These collaborations investigated two exemplar large-scale science-driver workflow applications: 1) Calculation of an infrared atlas of the Galactic Plane at 18 different wavelengths by placing data from multiple surveys on a common plate scale and co-registering all the pixels; 2) Calculation of an atlas of periodicities present in the public Kepler data sets, which currently contain 380,000 light curves. These products have been generated with two workflow applications, written in C for performance and designed to support parallel processing on multiple environments and platforms, but with different compute resource needs: the Montage image mosaic engine is I/O-bound, and the NASA Star and Exoplanet Database periodogram code is CPU-bound. Our presentation will report cost and performance metrics and lessons-learned for continuing development. Applicability of Cloud Computing: Commercial Cloud providers generally charge for all operations, including processing, transfer of input and output data, and for storage of data

  12. Energy-Efficient Management of Data Center Resources for Cloud Computing: A Vision, Architectural Elements, and Open Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Beloglazov, Anton; Abawajy, Jemal

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is offering utility-oriented IT services to users worldwide. Based on a pay-as-you-go model, it enables hosting of pervasive applications from consumer, scientific, and business domains. However, data centers hosting Cloud applications consume huge amounts of energy, contributing to high operational costs and carbon footprints to the environment. Therefore, we need Green Cloud computing solutions that can not only save energy for the environment but also reduce operational cos...

  13. High Performance Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research Target 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Wasserman, Harvey [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)

    2013-05-01

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,500 users working on some 650 projects that involve nearly 600 codes in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-­scale computing and storage resources NERSC provides support and expertise that help scientists make efficient use of its systems. The latest review revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing BER computing and storage needs.

  14. Astigmatic single photon emission computed tomography imaging with a displaced center of rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Smith, M.F.; Stone, C.D.; Jaszczak, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    A filtered backprojection algorithm is developed for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with an astigmatic collimator having a displaced center of rotation. The astigmatic collimator has two perpendicular focal lines, one that is parallel to the axis of rotation of the gamma camera and one that is perpendicular to this axis. Using SPECT simulations of projection data from a hot rod phantom and point source arrays, it is found that a lack of incorporation of the mechanical shift in the reconstruction algorithm causes errors and artifacts in reconstructed SPECT images. The collimator and acquisition parameters in the astigmatic reconstruction formula, which include focal lengths, radius of rotation, and mechanical shifts, are often partly unknown and can be determined using the projections of a point source at various projection angles. The accurate determination of these parameters by a least squares fitting technique using projection data from numerically simulated SPECT acquisitions is studied. These studies show that the accuracy of parameter determination is improved as the distance between the point source and the axis of rotation of the gamma camera is increased. The focal length to the focal line perpendicular to the axis of rotation is determined more accurately than the focal length to the focal line parallel to this axis. copyright 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine

  15. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Ann E [ORNL; Barker, Ashley D [ORNL; Bland, Arthur S Buddy [ORNL; Boudwin, Kathlyn J. [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Kendall, Ricky A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL; White, Julia C [ORNL; Hudson, Douglas L [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation

  16. CICART Center For Integrated Computation And Analysis Of Reconnection And Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    CICART is a partnership between the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and Dartmouth College. CICART addresses two important science needs of the DoE: the basic understanding of magnetic reconnection and turbulence that strongly impacts the performance of fusion plasmas, and the development of new mathematical and computational tools that enable the modeling and control of these phenomena. The principal participants of CICART constitute an interdisciplinary group, drawn from the communities of applied mathematics, astrophysics, computational physics, fluid dynamics, and fusion physics. It is a main premise of CICART that fundamental aspects of magnetic reconnection and turbulence in fusion devices, smaller-scale laboratory experiments, and space and astrophysical plasmas can be viewed from a common perspective, and that progress in understanding in any of these interconnected fields is likely to lead to progress in others. The establishment of CICART has strongly impacted the education and research mission of a new Program in Integrated Applied Mathematics in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at UNH by enabling the recruitment of a tenure-track faculty member, supported equally by UNH and CICART, and the establishment of an IBM-UNH Computing Alliance. The proposed areas of research in magnetic reconnection and turbulence in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas include the following topics: (A) Reconnection and secondary instabilities in large high-Lundquist-number plasmas, (B) Particle acceleration in the presence of multiple magnetic islands, (C) Gyrokinetic reconnection: comparison with fluid and particle-in-cell models, (D) Imbalanced turbulence, (E) Ion heating, and (F) Turbulence in laboratory (including fusion-relevant) experiments. These theoretical studies make active use of three high-performance computer simulation codes: (1) The Magnetic Reconnection Code, based on extended two-fluid (or Hall MHD) equations, in an Adaptive Mesh

  17. CICART Center For Integrated Computation And Analysis Of Reconnection And Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2016-03-27

    CICART is a partnership between the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and Dartmouth College. CICART addresses two important science needs of the DoE: the basic understanding of magnetic reconnection and turbulence that strongly impacts the performance of fusion plasmas, and the development of new mathematical and computational tools that enable the modeling and control of these phenomena. The principal participants of CICART constitute an interdisciplinary group, drawn from the communities of applied mathematics, astrophysics, computational physics, fluid dynamics, and fusion physics. It is a main premise of CICART that fundamental aspects of magnetic reconnection and turbulence in fusion devices, smaller-scale laboratory experiments, and space and astrophysical plasmas can be viewed from a common perspective, and that progress in understanding in any of these interconnected fields is likely to lead to progress in others. The establishment of CICART has strongly impacted the education and research mission of a new Program in Integrated Applied Mathematics in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at UNH by enabling the recruitment of a tenure-track faculty member, supported equally by UNH and CICART, and the establishment of an IBM-UNH Computing Alliance. The proposed areas of research in magnetic reconnection and turbulence in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas include the following topics: (A) Reconnection and secondary instabilities in large high-Lundquist-number plasmas, (B) Particle acceleration in the presence of multiple magnetic islands, (C) Gyrokinetic reconnection: comparison with fluid and particle-in-cell models, (D) Imbalanced turbulence, (E) Ion heating, and (F) Turbulence in laboratory (including fusion-relevant) experiments. These theoretical studies make active use of three high-performance computer simulation codes: (1) The Magnetic Reconnection Code, based on extended two-fluid (or Hall MHD) equations, in an Adaptive Mesh

  18. Comparing the performance of SIMD computers by running large air pollution models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, J.

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on these computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gained detailed insight about the performance of the computers involved when used to solve large-scale scientific...... problems that involve several types of numerical computations. The computers used in our study are the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5, and the MasPar MP-2216...

  19. Annual report of R and D activities in center for promotion of computational science and engineering from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities in Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), JAERI, in the fiscal year 2004 (April 1, 2004 - March 31, 2005). The activities have been performed by Research Group for Computational Science in Atomic Energy, Research Group for Computational Material Science in Atomic Energy, R and D Group for Computer Science, R and D Group for Numerical Experiments, and Quantum Bioinformatics Group in CCSE. The ITBL (Information Technology Based Laboratory) project is performed mainly by the R and D Group for Computer Science and the Research Group for Computational Science in Atomic Energy. According to the mid-term evaluation for the ITBL project conducted by the MEXT, the achievement of the ITBL infrastructure software developed by JAERI has been remarked as outstanding at the 13th Information Science and Technology Committee in the Subdivision on R and D Planning and Evaluation of the Council for Science and Technology on April 26th, 2004. (author)

  20. Towards the development of run times leveraging virtualization for high performance computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakhate, F.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using virtualization to improve the efficiency of data centers. This success is rooted in virtualization's excellent fault tolerance and isolation properties, in the overall flexibility it brings, and in its ability to exploit multi-core architectures efficiently. These characteristics also make virtualization an ideal candidate to tackle issues found in new compute cluster architectures. However, in spite of recent improvements in virtualization technology, overheads in the execution of parallel applications remain, which prevent its use in the field of high performance computing. In this thesis, we propose a virtual device dedicated to message passing between virtual machines, so as to improve the performance of parallel applications executed in a cluster of virtual machines. We also introduce a set of techniques facilitating the deployment of virtualized parallel applications. These functionalities have been implemented as part of a runtime system which allows to benefit from virtualization's properties in a way that is as transparent as possible to the user while minimizing performance overheads. (author)

  1. High performance computing in power and energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaitan, Siddhartha Kumar [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Gupta, Anshul (eds.) [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The twin challenge of meeting global energy demands in the face of growing economies and populations and restricting greenhouse gas emissions is one of the most daunting ones that humanity has ever faced. Smart electrical generation and distribution infrastructure will play a crucial role in meeting these challenges. We would need to develop capabilities to handle large volumes of data generated by the power system components like PMUs, DFRs and other data acquisition devices as well as by the capacity to process these data at high resolution via multi-scale and multi-period simulations, cascading and security analysis, interaction between hybrid systems (electric, transport, gas, oil, coal, etc.) and so on, to get meaningful information in real time to ensure a secure, reliable and stable power system grid. Advanced research on development and implementation of market-ready leading-edge high-speed enabling technologies and algorithms for solving real-time, dynamic, resource-critical problems will be required for dynamic security analysis targeted towards successful implementation of Smart Grid initiatives. This books aims to bring together some of the latest research developments as well as thoughts on the future research directions of the high performance computing applications in electric power systems planning, operations, security, markets, and grid integration of alternate sources of energy, etc.

  2. The Future of Software Engineering for High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    DOE ASCR requested that from May through mid-July 2015 a study group identify issues and recommend solutions from a software engineering perspective transitioning into the next generation of High Performance Computing. The approach used was to ask some of the DOE complex experts who will be responsible for doing this work to contribute to the study group. The technique used was to solicit elevator speeches: a short and concise write up done as if the author was a speaker with only a few minutes to convince a decision maker of their top issues. Pages 2-18 contain the original texts of the contributed elevator speeches and end notes identifying the 20 contributors. The study group also ranked the importance of each topic, and those scores are displayed with each topic heading. A perfect score (and highest priority) is three, two is medium priority, and one is lowest priority. The highest scoring topic areas were software engineering and testing resources; the lowest scoring area was compliance to DOE standards. The following two paragraphs are an elevator speech summarizing the contributed elevator speeches. Each sentence or phrase in the summary is hyperlinked to its source via a numeral embedded in the text. A risk one liner has also been added to each topic to allow future risk tracking and mitigation.

  3. Current configuration and performance of the TFTR computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.; Barnes, D.J.; Daniels, R.; Davis, S.; Reid, A.; Snyder, T.; Oliaro, G.; Stark, W.; Thompson, J.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Developments in the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) computer support system since its startup phases are described. Early emphasis on tokamak process control have been augmented by improved physics data handling, both on-line and off-line. Data acquisition volume and rate have been increased, and data is transmitted automatically to a new VAX-based off-line data reduction system. The number of interface points has increased dramatically, as has the number of man-machine interfaces. The graphics system performance has been accelerated by the introduction of parallelism, and new features such as shadowing and device independence have been added. To support multicycle operation for neutral beam conditioning and independence, the program control system has been generalized. A status and alarm system, including calculated variables, is in the installation phase. System reliability has been enhanced by both the redesign of weaker components and installation of a system status monitor. Development productivity has been enhanced by the addition of tools

  4. Lightweight Provenance Service for High-Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Ross, Robert

    2017-09-09

    Provenance describes detailed information about the history of a piece of data, containing the relationships among elements such as users, processes, jobs, and workflows that contribute to the existence of data. Provenance is key to supporting many data management functionalities that are increasingly important in operations such as identifying data sources, parameters, or assumptions behind a given result; auditing data usage; or understanding details about how inputs are transformed into outputs. Despite its importance, however, provenance support is largely underdeveloped in highly parallel architectures and systems. One major challenge is the demanding requirements of providing provenance service in situ. The need to remain lightweight and to be always on often conflicts with the need to be transparent and offer an accurate catalog of details regarding the applications and systems. To tackle this challenge, we introduce a lightweight provenance service, called LPS, for high-performance computing (HPC) systems. LPS leverages a kernel instrument mechanism to achieve transparency and introduces representative execution and flexible granularity to capture comprehensive provenance with controllable overhead. Extensive evaluations and use cases have confirmed its efficiency and usability. We believe that LPS can be integrated into current and future HPC systems to support a variety of data management needs.

  5. The outcome of the first 1000 cases of LASIK performed at the king Hussein Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallat, W [King Hussein Medical Centre, Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Ophthalmology

    2011-07-01

    The current study evaluates the refractive and visual outcome of patients who had laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) performed at the refractive center at King Hussein Medical centre in Jordan. The predictability of LASIK surgery in terms of refractive and visual outcome results is very good with mild regression in refraction over time. (author).

  6. The outcome of the first 1000 cases of LASIK performed at the king Hussein Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallat, W

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluates the refractive and visual outcome of patients who had laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) performed at the refractive center at King Hussein Medical centre in Jordan. The predictability of LASIK surgery in terms of refractive and visual outcome results is very good with mild regression in refraction over time. (author).

  7. Performance Evaluation of Extension Education Centers in Universities Based on the Balanced Scorecard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance…

  8. Performance of Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Gout in a Multi-Center Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogdie, Alexis; Taylor, William J; Neogi, Tuhina

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the performance of ultrasound for the diagnosis of gout using presence of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals as the gold standard. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Study for Updated Gout Classification Criteria (SUGAR), a large, multi-center observational cross-sectional stu...

  9. Solar collector performance evaluated outdoors at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The study of solar reflector performance reported is related to a project in which solar collectors are to be provided for the solar heating and cooling system of an office building at NASA's Langley Research Center. The solar collector makes use of a liquid consisting of 50% ethylene glycol and 50% water. A conventional air-liquid heat exchanger is employed. Collector performance and solar insolation data are recorded along with air temperature, wind speed and direction, and relative humidity.

  10. Big Data and High-Performance Computing in Global Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    Much of our knowledge of Earth's interior is based on seismic observations and measurements. Adjoint methods provide an efficient way of incorporating 3D full wave propagation in iterative seismic inversions to enhance tomographic images and thus our understanding of processes taking place inside the Earth. Our aim is to take adjoint tomography, which has been successfully applied to regional and continental scale problems, further to image the entire planet. This is one of the extreme imaging challenges in seismology, mainly due to the intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated. We have started low-resolution inversions (T > 30 s and T > 60 s for body and surface waves, respectively) with a limited data set (253 carefully selected earthquakes and seismic data from permanent and temporary networks) on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Recent improvements in our 3D global wave propagation solvers, such as a GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package, will enable us perform higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer duration (~180 m) simulations to take the advantage of high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves, thereby improving imbalanced ray coverage as a result of the uneven global distribution of sources and receivers. Our ultimate goal is to use all earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue within the magnitude range of our interest and data from all available seismic networks. To take the full advantage of computational resources, we need a solid framework to manage big data sets during numerical simulations, pre-processing (i.e., data requests and quality checks, processing data, window selection, etc.) and post-processing (i.e., pre-conditioning and smoothing kernels, etc.). We address the bottlenecks in our global seismic workflow, which are mainly coming from heavy I/O traffic during simulations and the pre- and post-processing stages, by defining new data

  11. Brain-computer interface signal processing at the Wadsworth Center: mu and sensorimotor beta rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J; Krusienski, Dean J; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2006-01-01

    The Wadsworth brain-computer interface (BCI), based on mu and beta sensorimotor rhythms, uses one- and two-dimensional cursor movement tasks and relies on user training. This is a real-time closed-loop system. Signal processing consists of channel selection, spatial filtering, and spectral analysis. Feature translation uses a regression approach and normalization. Adaptation occurs at several points in this process on the basis of different criteria and methods. It can use either feedforward (e.g., estimating the signal mean for normalization) or feedback control (e.g., estimating feature weights for the prediction equation). We view this process as the interaction between a dynamic user and a dynamic system that coadapt over time. Understanding the dynamics of this interaction and optimizing its performance represent a major challenge for BCI research.

  12. Performance studies of four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2011-01-01

    Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has been proposed to characterize the breathing motion of tumors before radiotherapy treatment. However, when the acquired cone beam projection data are retrospectively gated into several respiratory phases, the available data to reconstruct each phase is under-sampled and thus causes streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images. To solve the under-sampling problem and improve image quality in 4DCBCT, various methods have been developed. This paper presents performance studies of three different 4DCBCT methods based on different reconstruction algorithms. The aims of this paper are to study (1) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the data acquisition time of a 4DCBCT scan and (2) the relationship between the accuracy of the extracted motion trajectories and the number of phase bins used to sort projection data. These aims will be applied to three different 4DCBCT methods: conventional filtered backprojection reconstruction (FBP), FBP with McKinnon-Bates correction (MB) and prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction. A hybrid phantom consisting of realistic chest anatomy and a moving elliptical object with known 3D motion trajectories was constructed by superimposing the analytical projection data of the moving object to the simulated projection data from a chest CT volume dataset. CBCT scans with gantry rotation times from 1 to 4 min were simulated, and the generated projection data were sorted into 5, 10 and 20 phase bins before different methods were used to reconstruct 4D images. The motion trajectories of the moving object were extracted using a fast free-form deformable registration algorithm. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the extracted motion trajectories were evaluated for all simulated cases to quantitatively study the performance. The results demonstrate (1) longer acquisition times result in more accurate motion delineation

  13. Annual report of R and D activities in Center for Computational Science and e-Systems from April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an overview of research and development activities in Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), JAEA, during the fiscal years 2007 and 2008 (Apr 1, 2007 - March 31, 2009). These research and development activities have been performed by the Simulation Technology R and D Office and Computer Science R and D Office. These activities include development of secure computational infrastructure for atomic energy research based on the grid technology, large scale seismic analysis of an entire nuclear reactor structure, large scale fluid dynamics simulation of J-PARC mercury target, large scale plasma simulation for nuclear fusion reactor, large scale atomic and subatomic simulations of nuclear fuels and materials for safety assessment, large scale quantum simulations of superconductor for the design of new devices and fundamental understanding of superconductivity, development of protein database for the identification of radiation-resistance gene, and large scale atomic simulation of proteins. (author)

  14. Department of Energy research in utilization of high-performance computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzbee, B.L.; Worlton, W.J.; Michael, G.; Rodrigue, G.

    1980-08-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) and other Government research laboratories depend on high-performance computer systems to accomplish their programmatic goals. As the most powerful computer systems become available, they are acquired by these laboratories so that advances can be made in their disciplines. These advances are often the result of added sophistication to numerical models, the execution of which is made possible by high-performance computer systems. However, high-performance computer systems have become increasingly complex, and consequently it has become increasingly difficult to realize their potential performance. The result is a need for research on issues related to the utilization of these systems. This report gives a brief description of high-performance computers, and then addresses the use of and future needs for high-performance computers within DOE, the growing complexity of applications within DOE, and areas of high-performance computer systems warranting research. 1 figure

  15. A performance model for the communication in fast multipole methods on high-performance computing platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda

    2016-03-04

    Exascale systems are predicted to have approximately 1 billion cores, assuming gigahertz cores. Limitations on affordable network topologies for distributed memory systems of such massive scale bring new challenges to the currently dominant parallel programing model. Currently, there are many efforts to evaluate the hardware and software bottlenecks of exascale designs. It is therefore of interest to model application performance and to understand what changes need to be made to ensure extrapolated scalability. The fast multipole method (FMM) was originally developed for accelerating N-body problems in astrophysics and molecular dynamics but has recently been extended to a wider range of problems. Its high arithmetic intensity combined with its linear complexity and asynchronous communication patterns make it a promising algorithm for exascale systems. In this paper, we discuss the challenges for FMM on current parallel computers and future exascale architectures, with a focus on internode communication. We focus on the communication part only; the efficiency of the computational kernels are beyond the scope of the present study. We develop a performance model that considers the communication patterns of the FMM and observe a good match between our model and the actual communication time on four high-performance computing (HPC) systems, when latency, bandwidth, network topology, and multicore penalties are all taken into account. To our knowledge, this is the first formal characterization of internode communication in FMM that validates the model against actual measurements of communication time. The ultimate communication model is predictive in an absolute sense; however, on complex systems, this objective is often out of reach or of a difficulty out of proportion to its benefit when there exists a simpler model that is inexpensive and sufficient to guide coding decisions leading to improved scaling. The current model provides such guidance.

  16. The European computer model for optronic system performance prediction (ECOMOS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, S.; Bijl, P.; Labarre, L.; Repasi, E.; Wittenstein, W.; Bürsing, H.

    2017-01-01

    ECOMOS is a multinational effort within the framework of an EDA Project Arrangement. Its aim is to provide a generally accepted and harmonized European computer model for computing nominal Target Acquisition (TA) ranges of optronic imagers operating in the Visible or thermal Infrared (IR). The

  17. Pediatric echocardiograms performed at primary centers: Diagnostic errors and missing links!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraf, Rahul P; Suresh, PV; Maheshwari, Sunita; Shah, Sejal S

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the accuracy of pediatric echocardiograms done at non-tertiary centers and to evaluate the relationship of inaccurate interpretations with age, echocardiogram performer and complexity of congenital heart disease (CHD). The echocardiogram reports of 182 consecutive children with CHD (5 days-16 years) who were evaluated at a non-tertiary center and subsequently referred to our center were reviewed. Age of the child at echocardiogram, echocardiogram performer and complexity of CHD were noted. These reports were compared with echocardiogram done at our center. Discrepancies were noted and categorized. To assess our own error rate, we compared our echocardiogram reports with the findings obtained during surgery (n = 172), CT scan (n = 9) or cardiac catheterization reports (n = 1). Most of the children at the non-tertiary center (92%) underwent echocardiogram by personnel other than a pediatric cardiologist. Overall, diagnostic errors were found in 69/182 (38%) children. Moderate and major discrepancies affecting the final management were found in 42/182 (23%) children. Discrepancies were higher when the echocardiogram was done by personnel other than pediatric cardiologist (P < 0.01) and with moderate and high complexity lesions (P = 0.0001). There was no significant difference in proportion of these discrepancies in children ≤ 1 year vs. >1 year of age. A significant number of pediatric echocardiograms done at non-tertiary centers had discrepancies that affected the management of these children. More discrepancies were seen when the echocardiogram performer was not a pediatric cardiologist and with complex CHD

  18. Analysis of kinematic movement characteristics of the common center of athlete's body mass while performing the crouch start

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla Shesterova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the basic conditions for minimizing the cost of effort to accelerate the movement speed of the common center of athlete's body mass in the specified direction of his movement. Material & Methods: the study used video footage for short distances of the world's leading sprinters and athletes of various qualifications. To solve the problems, we used: a method for estimating the angles between biosigns and storyboard video, method of analogies, method of the theory of similarity and dimension, the method of computer modeling, statistical analysis, estimation of physical stress and strength impulse using the method of estimating the interdependence of the developed effort on the angle of expansion between the corresponding biokinematic links. Results: it sets the basic position kinematics movement common center of the athlete's body mass (CCM, which improves the efficiency of performance crouch start. The results of the dynamics of the movement of a common force vector are presented, which determines the direction of movement of the body's CCM in three-dimensional space, ensuring its movement along the center line of the run are presented. On the basis of the observed dynamics of the change in the direction of the resultant force vector, when a crouch start is performed, it is established that the trajectory of its movement is a helicoid. Conclusion: movement of the common center of body mass is carried out along the helicoid with subsequent reduction of its radius. Changes in the length of the helix forming the radius are systematic and reflect the energy efficiency of the running costs. The dynamics of the helicoidal movement of the generating vector is observed in each supporting phase of the running step, which makes it possible to assess the stability of the dynamic stereotype manifestation of the running step, and to judge by these indicators about the degree of athlete fatigue at the distance.

  19. Financial performance among adult day centers: results of a national demonstration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifler, B V; Henry, R S; Rushing, J; Yates, M K; Cox, N J; Bradham, D D; McFarlane, M

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the financial performance (defined as percent of total expenses covered by net operating revenue) of 16 adult day centers participating in a national demonstration program on day services for people with dementia, including examination of possible predictors of financial performance. Participating sites submitted quarterly financial and utilization reports to the National Program Office. Descriptive statistics summarize the factors believed to influence financial performance. Sites averaged meeting 35% of expenses from self-pay and 29% from government (mainly Medicaid) revenue, totaling 64% of all (cash plus in-kind) expenses met by operating revenue. Examination of center characteristics suggests that factors related to meeting consumer needs, such as being open a full day (i.e., 7:30 am to 6:00 pm) rather than shorter hours, and providing transportation, may be related to improved utilization and, thus, improved financial performance. Higher fees were not related to lower enrollment, census, or revenue. Adult day centers are able to achieve financial viability through a combination of operating (i.e., fee-for-service) and non-operating revenue. Operating revenue is enhanced by placing emphasis on consumer responsiveness, such as being open a full day. Because higher fees were not related to lower utilization, centers should set fees to reflect actual costs. The figure of 64% of expenses met by operating revenue is conservative inasmuch as sites included in-kind revenue as expenses in their budgeting calculations, and percent of cash expenses met by operating revenue would be higher (approximately 75% for this group of centers).

  20. Performance management of high performance computing for medical image processing in Amazon Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shunxing; Damon, Stephen M.; Landman, Bennett A.; Gokhale, Aniruddha

    2016-03-01

    Adopting high performance cloud computing for medical image processing is a popular trend given the pressing needs of large studies. Amazon Web Services (AWS) provide reliable, on-demand, and inexpensive cloud computing services. Our research objective is to implement an affordable, scalable and easy-to-use AWS framework for the Java Image Science Toolkit (JIST). JIST is a plugin for Medical- Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization (MIPAV) that provides a graphical pipeline implementation allowing users to quickly test and develop pipelines. JIST is DRMAA-compliant allowing it to run on portable batch system grids. However, as new processing methods are implemented and developed, memory may often be a bottleneck for not only lab computers, but also possibly some local grids. Integrating JIST with the AWS cloud alleviates these possible restrictions and does not require users to have deep knowledge of programming in Java. Workflow definition/management and cloud configurations are two key challenges in this research. Using a simple unified control panel, users have the ability to set the numbers of nodes and select from a variety of pre-configured AWS EC2 nodes with different numbers of processors and memory storage. Intuitively, we configured Amazon S3 storage to be mounted by pay-for- use Amazon EC2 instances. Hence, S3 storage is recognized as a shared cloud resource. The Amazon EC2 instances provide pre-installs of all necessary packages to run JIST. This work presents an implementation that facilitates the integration of JIST with AWS. We describe the theoretical cost/benefit formulae to decide between local serial execution versus cloud computing and apply this analysis to an empirical diffusion tensor imaging pipeline.

  1. Performance Management of High Performance Computing for Medical Image Processing in Amazon Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shunxing; Damon, Stephen M; Landman, Bennett A; Gokhale, Aniruddha

    2016-02-27

    Adopting high performance cloud computing for medical image processing is a popular trend given the pressing needs of large studies. Amazon Web Services (AWS) provide reliable, on-demand, and inexpensive cloud computing services. Our research objective is to implement an affordable, scalable and easy-to-use AWS framework for the Java Image Science Toolkit (JIST). JIST is a plugin for Medical-Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization (MIPAV) that provides a graphical pipeline implementation allowing users to quickly test and develop pipelines. JIST is DRMAA-compliant allowing it to run on portable batch system grids. However, as new processing methods are implemented and developed, memory may often be a bottleneck for not only lab computers, but also possibly some local grids. Integrating JIST with the AWS cloud alleviates these possible restrictions and does not require users to have deep knowledge of programming in Java. Workflow definition/management and cloud configurations are two key challenges in this research. Using a simple unified control panel, users have the ability to set the numbers of nodes and select from a variety of pre-configured AWS EC2 nodes with different numbers of processors and memory storage. Intuitively, we configured Amazon S3 storage to be mounted by pay-for-use Amazon EC2 instances. Hence, S3 storage is recognized as a shared cloud resource. The Amazon EC2 instances provide pre-installs of all necessary packages to run JIST. This work presents an implementation that facilitates the integration of JIST with AWS. We describe the theoretical cost/benefit formulae to decide between local serial execution versus cloud computing and apply this analysis to an empirical diffusion tensor imaging pipeline.

  2. Diagnostic performance of combined noninvasive coronary angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging using 320 row detector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavere, Andrea L; Simon, Gregory G; George, Richard T

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a promising modality for widespread clinical application because of its noninvasive nature and high diagnostic accuracy as found in previous studies using 64 to 320 simultaneous detector rows. It is, however, limited in its ability...... to detect myocardial ischemia. In this article, we describe the design of the CORE320 study ("Combined coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial perfusion evaluation using 320 detector row computed tomography"). This prospective, multicenter, multinational study is unique in that it is designed to assess...... the diagnostic performance of combined 320-row CTA and myocardial CT perfusion imaging (CTP) in comparison with the combination of invasive coronary angiography and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). The trial is being performed at 16 medical centers located in 8...

  3. SCELib2: the new revision of SCELib, the parallel computational library of molecular properties in the single center approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, N.; Morelli, G.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we present the new version of the SCELib program (CPC Catalogue identifier ADMG) a full numerical implementation of the Single Center Expansion (SCE) method. The physics involved is that of producing the SCE description of molecular electronic densities, of molecular electrostatic potentials and of molecular perturbed potentials due to a point negative or positive charge. This new revision of the program has been optimized to run in serial as well as in parallel execution mode, to support a larger set of molecular symmetries and to permit the restart of long-lasting calculations. To measure the performance of this new release, a comparative study has been carried out on the most powerful computing architectures in serial and parallel runs. The results of the calculations reported in this paper refer to real cases medium to large molecular systems and they are reported in full details to benchmark at best the parallel architectures the new SCELib code will run on. Program summaryTitle of program: SCELib2 Catalogue identifier: ADGU Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADGU Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Reference to previous versions: Comput. Phys. Commun. 128 (2) (2000) 139 (CPC catalogue identifier: ADMG) Does the new version supersede the original program?: Yes Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: HP ES45 and rx2600, SUN ES4500, IBM SP and any single CPU workstation based on Alpha, SPARC, POWER, Itanium2 and X86 processors Installations: CASPUR, local Operating systems under which the program has been tested: HP Tru64 V5.X, SUNOS V5.8, IBM AIX V5.X, Linux RedHat V8.0 Programming language used: C Memory required to execute with typical data: 10 Mwords. Up to 2000 Mwords depending on the molecular system and runtime parameters No. of bits in a word: 64 No. of processors used: 1 to 32 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes

  4. The ongoing investigation of high performance parallel computing in HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Peach, Kenneth J; Böck, R K; Dobinson, Robert W; Hansroul, M; Norton, Alan Robert; Willers, Ian Malcolm; Baud, J P; Carminati, F; Gagliardi, F; McIntosh, E; Metcalf, M; Robertson, L; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1993-01-01

    Past and current exploitation of parallel computing in High Energy Physics is summarized and a list of R & D projects in this area is presented. The applicability of new parallel hardware and software to physics problems is investigated, in the light of the requirements for computing power of LHC experiments and the current trends in the computer industry. Four main themes are discussed (possibilities for a finer grain of parallelism; fine-grain communication mechanism; usable parallel programming environment; different programming models and architectures, using standard commercial products). Parallel computing technology is potentially of interest for offline and vital for real time applications in LHC. A substantial investment in applications development and evaluation of state of the art hardware and software products is needed. A solid development environment is required at an early stage, before mainline LHC program development begins.

  5. Distributed metadata in a high performance computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Xuezhao; Tang, Haiying

    2017-07-11

    A computer-executable method, system, and computer program product for managing meta-data in a distributed storage system, wherein the distributed storage system includes one or more burst buffers enabled to operate with a distributed key-value store, the co computer-executable method, system, and computer program product comprising receiving a request for meta-data associated with a block of data stored in a first burst buffer of the one or more burst buffers in the distributed storage system, wherein the meta data is associated with a key-value, determining which of the one or more burst buffers stores the requested metadata, and upon determination that a first burst buffer of the one or more burst buffers stores the requested metadata, locating the key-value in a portion of the distributed key-value store accessible from the first burst buffer.

  6. Software Applications on the Peregrine System | High-Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) Statistics and analysis High-level modeling system for mathematical reactivity. Gurobi Optimizer Statistics and analysis Solver for mathematical programming LAMMPS Chemistry and , reactivities, and vibrational, electronic and NMR spectra. R Statistical Computing Environment Statistics and

  7. Spying on real-time computers to improve performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taff, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The sampled program-counter histogram, an established technique for shortening the execution times of programs, is described for a real-time computer. The use of a real-time clock allows particularly easy implementation. (Auth.)

  8. 76 FR 60939 - Metal Fatigue Analysis Performed by Computer Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Software AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory issue summary; request for comment... computer software package, WESTEMS TM , to demonstrate compliance with Section III, ``Rules for... Software Addressees All holders of, and applicants for, a power reactor operating license or construction...

  9. Benchmark Numerical Toolkits for High Performance Computing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational codes in physics and engineering often use implicit solution algorithms that require linear algebra tools such as Ax=b solvers, eigenvalue,...

  10. Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... Abstract. This work developed and simulated a mathematical model for a mobile wireless computational Grid ... which mobile modes will process the tasks .... evaluation are analytical modelling, simulation ... MATLAB 7.10.0.

  11. Predicting Structures of Ru-Centered Dyes: A Computational Screening Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredin, Lisa A; Allison, Thomas C

    2016-04-07

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) represent a means for harvesting solar energy to produce electrical power. Though a number of light harvesting dyes are in use, the search continues for more efficient and effective compounds to make commercially viable DSCs a reality. Computational methods have been increasingly applied to understand the dyes currently in use and to aid in the search for improved light harvesting compounds. Semiempirical quantum chemistry methods have a well-deserved reputation for giving good quality results in a very short amount of computer time. The most recent semiempirical models such as PM6 and PM7 are parametrized for a wide variety of molecule types, including organometallic complexes similar to DSC chromophores. In this article, the performance of PM6 is tested against a set of 20 molecules whose geometries were optimized using a density functional theory (DFT) method. It is found that PM6 gives geometries that are in good agreement with the optimized DFT structures. In order to reduce the differences between geometries optimized using PM6 and geometries optimized using DFT, the PM6 basis set parameters have been optimized for a subset of the molecules. It is found that it is sufficient to optimize the basis set for Ru alone to improve the agreement between the PM6 results and the DFT results. When this optimized Ru basis set is used, the mean unsigned error in Ru-ligand bond lengths is reduced from 0.043 to 0.017 Å in the set of 20 test molecules. Though the magnitude of these differences is small, the effect on the calculated UV/vis spectra is significant. These results clearly demonstrate the value of using PM6 to screen DSC chromophores as well as the value of optimizing PM6 basis set parameters for a specific set of molecules.

  12. Introducing remarks upon the analysis of computer systems performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, D.

    1980-05-01

    Some of the basis ideas of analytical techniques to study the behaviour of computer systems are presented. Single systems as well as networks of computers are viewed as stochastic dynamical systems which may be modelled by queueing networks. Therefore this report primarily serves as an introduction to probabilistic methods for qualitative analysis of systems. It is supplemented by an application example of Chandy's collapsing method. (orig.) [de

  13. FY 1992 Blue Book: Grand Challenges: High Performance Computing and Communications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — High performance computing and computer communications networks are becoming increasingly important to scientific advancement, economic competition, and national...

  14. FY 1993 Blue Book: Grand Challenges 1993: High Performance Computing and Communications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — High performance computing and computer communications networks are becoming increasingly important to scientific advancement, economic competition, and national...

  15. Human resources management in fitness centers and their relationship with the organizational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human capital is essential in organizations providing sports services. However, there are few studies that examine what practices are carried out and whether they, affect sports organizations achieve better results are. Therefore the aim of this paper is to analyze the practices of human resource management in private fitness centers and the relationship established with organizational performance.Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaire to 101 managers of private fitness centers in Spain, performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and linear regressions between the variables.Findings: In organizations of fitness, the findings show that training practices, reward, communication and selection are positively correlated with organizational performance.Research limitations/implications: The fact that you made a convenience sampling in a given country and reduce the extrapolation of the results to the market.Originality/value: First, it represents a contribution to the fact that there are no studies analyzing the management of human resources in sport organizations from the point of view of the top leaders. On the other hand, allows fitness center managers to adopt practices to improve organizational performance.

  16. A study of kinematic cues and anticipatory performance in tennis using computational manipulation and computer graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hirofumi; Fukuhara, Kazunobu; Kusubori, Seiji; Ishii, Motonobu

    2011-09-01

    Computer graphics of digital human models can be used to display human motions as visual stimuli. This study presents our technique for manipulating human motion with a forward kinematics calculation without violating anatomical constraints. A motion modulation of the upper extremity was conducted by proportionally modulating the anatomical joint angular velocity calculated by motion analysis. The effect of this manipulation was examined in a tennis situation--that is, the receiver's performance of predicting ball direction when viewing a digital model of the server's motion derived by modulating the angular velocities of the forearm or that of the elbow during the forward swing. The results showed that the faster the server's forearm pronated, the more the receiver's anticipation of the ball direction tended to the left side of the serve box. In contrast, the faster the server's elbow extended, the more the receiver's anticipation of the ball direction tended to the right. This suggests that tennis players are sensitive to the motion modulation of their opponent's racket-arm.

  17. Deep Recurrent Model for Server Load and Performance Prediction in Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent neural network (RNN has been widely applied to many sequential tagging tasks such as natural language process (NLP and time series analysis, and it has been proved that RNN works well in those areas. In this paper, we propose using RNN with long short-term memory (LSTM units for server load and performance prediction. Classical methods for performance prediction focus on building relation between performance and time domain, which makes a lot of unrealistic hypotheses. Our model is built based on events (user requests, which is the root cause of server performance. We predict the performance of the servers using RNN-LSTM by analyzing the log of servers in data center which contains user’s access sequence. Previous work for workload prediction could not generate detailed simulated workload, which is useful in testing the working condition of servers. Our method provides a new way to reproduce user request sequence to solve this problem by using RNN-LSTM. Experiment result shows that our models get a good performance in generating load and predicting performance on the data set which has been logged in online service. We did experiments with nginx web server and mysql database server, and our methods can been easily applied to other servers in data center.

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  19. On the impact of quantum computing technology on future developments in high-performance scientific computing

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, Matthias; Vuik, Cornelis

    2017-01-01

    Quantum computing technologies have become a hot topic in academia and industry receiving much attention and financial support from all sides. Building a quantum computer that can be used practically is in itself an outstanding challenge that has become the ‘new race to the moon’. Next to researchers and vendors of future computing technologies, national authorities are showing strong interest in maturing this technology due to its known potential to break many of today’s encryption technique...

  20. Reducing power consumption while performing collective operations on a plurality of compute nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN; Peters, Amanda E [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian E [Rochester, MN

    2011-10-18

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while performing collective operations on a plurality of compute nodes that include: receiving, by each compute node, instructions to perform a type of collective operation; selecting, by each compute node from a plurality of collective operations for the collective operation type, a particular collective operation in dependence upon power consumption characteristics for each of the plurality of collective operations; and executing, by each compute node, the selected collective operation.

  1. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  2. Canal transportation and centering ability of protaper and self-adjusting file system in long oval canals: An ex-vivo cone-beam computed tomography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dipali Yogesh; Wadekar, Swati Ishwara; Dadpe, Ashwini Manish; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Choudhary, Lalit Jayant; Kalra, Dheeraj Deepak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the shaping ability of ProTaper (PT) and Self-Adjusting File (SAF) system using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to assess their performance in oval-shaped root canals. Sixty-two mandibular premolars with single oval canals were divided into two experimental groups ( n = 31) according to the systems used: Group I - PT and Group II - SAF. Canals were evaluated before and after instrumentation using CBCT to assess centering ratio and canal transportation at three levels. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, post hoc Tukey's test, and t -test. The SAF showed better centering ability and lesser canal transportation than the PT only in the buccolingual plane at 6 and 9 mm levels. The shaping ability of the PT was best in the apical third in both the planes. The SAF had statistically significant better centering and lesser canal transportation in the buccolingual as compared to the mesiodistal plane at the middle and coronal levels. The SAF produced significantly less transportation and remained centered than the PT at the middle and coronal levels in the buccolingual plane of oval canals. In the mesiodistal plane, the performance of both the systems was parallel.

  3. Certification of version 1.2 of the PORFLO-3 code for the WHC scientific and engineering computational center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, N.W.

    1994-01-01

    Version 1.2 of the PORFLO-3 Code has migrated from the Hanford Cray computer to workstations in the WHC Scientific and Engineering Computational Center. The workstation-based configuration and acceptance testing are inherited from the CRAY-based configuration. The purpose of this report is to document differences in the new configuration as compared to the parent Cray configuration, and summarize some of the acceptance test results which have shown that the migrated code is functioning correctly in the new environment

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  5. Performance analysis of cloud computing services for many-tasks scientific computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iosup, A.; Ostermann, S.; Yigitbasi, M.N.; Prodan, R.; Fahringer, T.; Epema, D.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is an emerging commercial infrastructure paradigm that promises to eliminate the need for maintaining expensive computing facilities by companies and institutes alike. Through the use of virtualization and resource time sharing, clouds serve with a single set of physical resources a

  6. A performance analysis of EC2 cloud computing services for scientific computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostermann, S.; Iosup, A.; Yigitbasi, M.N.; Prodan, R.; Fahringer, T.; Epema, D.H.J.; Avresky, D.; Diaz, M.; Bode, A.; Bruno, C.; Dekel, E.

    2010-01-01

    Cloud Computing is emerging today as a commercial infrastructure that eliminates the need for maintaining expensive computing hardware. Through the use of virtualization, clouds promise to address with the same shared set of physical resources a large user base with different needs. Thus, clouds

  7. Computer Access and Computer Use for Science Performance of Racial and Linguistic Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mido; Kim, Sunha

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of computer access and computer use on the science achievement of elementary school students, with focused attention on the effects for racial and linguistic minority students. The study used the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K) database and conducted statistical analyses with proper weights and…

  8. On the impact of quantum computing technology on future developments in high-performance scientific computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Möller, M.; Vuik, C.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum computing technologies have become a hot topic in academia and industry receiving much attention and financial support from all sides. Building a quantum computer that can be used practically is in itself an outstanding challenge that has become the ‘new race to the moon’. Next to

  9. Automated procedure for performing computer security risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Lim, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Computers, the invisible backbone of nuclear safeguards, monitor and control plant operations and support many materials accounting systems. Our automated procedure to assess computer security effectiveness differs from traditional risk analysis methods. The system is modeled as an interactive questionnaire, fully automated on a portable microcomputer. A set of modular event trees links the questionnaire to the risk assessment. Qualitative scores are obtained for target vulnerability, and qualitative impact measures are evaluated for a spectrum of threat-target pairs. These are then combined by a linguistic algebra to provide an accurate and meaningful risk measure. 12 references, 7 figures

  10. Validation and computing and performance studies for the ATLAS simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We present the validation of the ATLAS simulation software pro ject. Software development is controlled by nightly builds and several levels of automatic tests to ensure stability. Computing validation, including CPU time, memory, and disk space required per event, is benchmarked for all software releases. Several different physics processes and event types are checked to thoroughly test all aspects of the detector simulation. The robustness of the simulation software is demonstrated by the production of 500 million events on the World-wide LHC Computing Grid in the last year.

  11. Performance predictions for solar-chemical convertors by computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttmer, J.D.; Trachtenberg, I.

    1985-08-01

    A computer model which simulates the operation of Texas Instruments solar-chemical convertor (SCC) was developed. The model allows optimization of SCC processes, material, and configuration by facilitating decisions on tradeoffs among ease of manufacturing, power conversion efficiency, and cost effectiveness. The model includes various algorithms which define the electrical, electrochemical, and resistance parameters and which describ the operation of the discrete components of the SCC. Results of the model which depict the effect of material and geometric changes on various parameters are presented. The computer-calculated operation is compared with experimentall observed hydrobromic acid electrolysis rates.

  12. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open innovation successes and collaborative projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-11-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, setting the course for development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the successful execution of the strategy, driving organizational change through open innovation efforts and collaborative projects, including efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  13. CUDA/GPU Technology : Parallel Programming For High Performance Scientific Computing

    OpenAIRE

    YUHENDRA; KUZE, Hiroaki; JOSAPHAT, Tetuko Sri Sumantyo

    2009-01-01

    [ABSTRACT]Graphics processing units (GP Us) originally designed for computer video cards have emerged as the most powerful chip in a high-performance workstation. In the high performance computation capabilities, graphic processing units (GPU) lead to much more powerful performance than conventional CPUs by means of parallel processing. In 2007, the birth of Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and CUDA-enabled GPUs by NVIDIA Corporation brought a revolution in the general purpose GPU a...

  14. Performance comparison between Java and JNI for optimal implementation of computational micro-kernels

    OpenAIRE

    Halli , Nassim; Charles , Henri-Pierre; Méhaut , Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    International audience; General purpose CPUs used in high performance computing (HPC) support a vector instruction set and an out-of-order engine dedicated to increase the instruction level parallelism. Hence, related optimizations are currently critical to improve the performance of applications requiring numerical computation. Moreover, the use of a Java run-time environment such as the HotSpot Java Virtual Machine (JVM) in high performance computing is a promising alternative. It benefits ...

  15. Running Batch Jobs on Peregrine | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    and run your application. Users typically create or edit job scripts using a text editor such as vi Using Resource Feature to Request Different Node Types Peregrine has several types of compute nodes , which differ in the amount of memory and number of processor cores. The majority of the nodes have 24

  16. Understanding and Improving the Performance Consistency of Distributed Computing Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yigitbasi, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing adoption of distributed systems in both academia and industry, and with the increasing computational and storage requirements of distributed applications, users inevitably demand more from these systems. Moreover, users also depend on these systems for latency and throughput

  17. Simulating elastic light scattering using high performance computing methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Verbraeck, A.; Kerckhoffs, E.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Coupled Dipole method, as originally formulated byPurcell and Pennypacker, is a very powerful method tosimulate the Elastic Light Scattering from arbitraryparticles. This method, which is a particle simulationmodel for Computational Electromagnetics, has one majordrawback: if the size of the

  18. Computer-Supported Instruction in Enhancing the Performance of Dyscalculics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Praveen; Raja, B. William Dharma

    2010-01-01

    The use of instructional media is an essential component of teaching-learning process which contributes to the efficiency as well as effectiveness of the teaching-learning process. Computer-supported instruction has a very important role to play as an advanced technological instruction as it employs different instructional techniques like…

  19. High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    processors, effectively), and 512GB memory . The second has 24 CPU cores, dual -thread, (48 processors, effectively), and 512GB memory . The third has...28 CPU cores, dual -thread, (56 processors, effectively), and 256GB memory . Mr. Arthur Newhall ofWHOI worked with the vendors to secure the best...Headrick Office ofNaval Research, Code 322 One Liberty Center 875 North Randolph Street, Suite 4125 Arlington, VA 22203 Dear Dr. Headrick

  20. Computer modeling with randomized-controlled trial data informs the development of person-centered aged care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Lynn; Vickland, Victor; Stein-Parbury, Jane; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Kenny, Patricia; Brodaty, Henry

    2015-10-01

    To answer questions on the essential components (services, operations and resources) of a person-centered aged care home (iHome) using computer simulation. iHome was developed with AnyLogic software using extant study data obtained from 60 Australian aged care homes, 900+ clients and 700+ aged care staff. Bayesian analysis of simulated trial data will determine the influence of different iHome characteristics on care service quality and client outcomes. Interim results: A person-centered aged care home (socio-cultural context) and care/lifestyle services (interactional environment) can produce positive outcomes for aged care clients (subjective experiences) in the simulated environment. Further testing will define essential characteristics of a person-centered care home.

  1. Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Canal Centering Ability and Transportation after Preparation with Twisted File and Bio RaCe Instrumentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiamars Honardar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Use of rotary Nickel-Titanium (NiTi instruments for endodontic preparation has introduced a new era in endodontic practice, but this issue has undergone dramatic modifications in order to achieve improved shaping abilities. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has made it possible to accurately evaluate geometrical changes following canal preparation. This study was carried out to compare canal centering ability and transportation of Twisted File and BioRaCe rotary systems by means of cone-beam computed tomography.Thirty root canals from freshly extracted mandibular and maxillary teeth were selected. Teeth were mounted and scanned before and after preparation by CBCT at different apical levels. Specimens were divided into 2 groups of 15. In the first group Twisted File and in the second, BioRaCe was used for canal preparation. Canal transportation and centering ability after preparation were assessed by NNT Viewer and Photoshop CS4 software. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test and two-way ANOVA.All samples showed deviations from the original axes of the canals. No significant differences were detected between the two rotary NiTi instruments for canal centering ability in all sections. Regarding canal transportation however, a significant difference was seen in the BioRaCe group at 7.5mm from the apex.Under the conditions of this in vitro study, Twisted File and BioRaCe rotary NiTi files retained original canal geometry.

  2. PERFORMANCE BASED PAY AS A DETERMINANT OF JOB SATISFACTION: A STUDY IN MALAYSIA GIATMARA CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman ISMAIL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compensation management literature highlights that performance based payhas two major characteristics: participation in pay systems and adequacy ofpay. The ability of management to properly implement such pay systems maylead to increased job satisfaction in organizations. Though, the nature of thisrelationship is interesting, little is known about the influence of performancebased pay on job satisfaction in compensation management literature.Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the relationship between payfor performance and job satisfaction in Malaysian GIATMARA centers. Theresults of exploratory factor analysis confirmed that measurement scalesused in this study satisfactorily met the standards of validity and reliabilityanalyses. An outcome of stepwise regression analysis shows thatdeterminant of job satisfaction is performance based pay. Further, this resultconfirms that pay for performance is an important antecedent for jobsatisfaction in the studied organizations.

  3. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on resident physicians. Further study is needed better understand how tablet computers and other mobile devices may assist in medical education and patient care.

  4. Soft Computing Techniques for the Protein Folding Problem on High Performance Computing Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, Antonio; Muñoz, Andrés; Bueno-Crespo, Andrés; García-Valverde, Teresa; Sánchez, Antonia; Arcas-Túnez, Francisco; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Cecilia, José M

    2016-01-01

    The protein-folding problem has been extensively studied during the last fifty years. The understanding of the dynamics of global shape of a protein and the influence on its biological function can help us to discover new and more effective drugs to deal with diseases of pharmacological relevance. Different computational approaches have been developed by different researchers in order to foresee the threedimensional arrangement of atoms of proteins from their sequences. However, the computational complexity of this problem makes mandatory the search for new models, novel algorithmic strategies and hardware platforms that provide solutions in a reasonable time frame. We present in this revision work the past and last tendencies regarding protein folding simulations from both perspectives; hardware and software. Of particular interest to us are both the use of inexact solutions to this computationally hard problem as well as which hardware platforms have been used for running this kind of Soft Computing techniques.

  5. Development of an evaluation performance scale for social educators in child protection centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Fernández Millán

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In a context of economic crisis, as in the case of Spain, the evaluation of the performance of employees in any field is a key tool for improving worker efficiency. For those professions that are developed in order to provide basic social services to the people of its importance is even greater. Thereby, this study is focused on developing a Performance Rating Scale of Social Workers using BARS technique. Design/methodology/approach: We asked 11 experts to list those competencies they believed necessary to perform this task efficiently. Thereafter, we selected competencies what coincide with an Interjudge arrangement of at least 3. Then each competency was associated with two critical incidents and developed corresponding behavioral anchors. In addition, the scale has a collection of personal data such as age and time off work, often used as indicators defining performance. Finally, the scale was tested to a sample of 128 Social Workers working in interim child care centers and children and youth correctional centers. Findings and Originality/value: The results show that the scale meets the criteria required for validation psychometric (α= 0,873. Also, the scale could be factored (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin=0,810. Three dimensions were obtained: team work, interpersonal skills and competencies of the work. Research limitations/implications: An appreciation of the lack of covariation between external criteria used as identifiers of good performance (age and number of sick leave and the employee's competence. This confirms the inadequacy of these criteria to predict performance. Necessitating the development of performance evaluation tools that include absenteeism and experience as predictors of performance measures. Practical implications: The inadequacy may be due to the usually confusion between work experience - seniority and sick leave - absenteeism. Originality/value: The study helps define the figure and the competences of social

  6. Innovation in user-centered skills and performance improvement for sustainable complex service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    In order to leverage individual and organizational learning and to remain competitive in current turbulent markets it is important for employees, managers, planners and leaders to perform at high levels over time. Employee competence and skills are extremely important matters in view of the general shortage of talent and the mobility of employees with talent. Two factors emerged to have the greatest impact on the competitiveness of complex service systems: improving managerial and employee's knowledge attainment for skills, and improving the training and development of the workforce. This paper introduces the knowledge-based user-centered service design approach for sustainable skill and performance improvement in education, design and modeling of the next generation of complex service systems. The rest of the paper cover topics in human factors and sustainable business process modeling for the service industry, and illustrates the user-centered service system development cycle with the integration of systems engineering concepts in service systems. A roadmap for designing service systems of the future is discussed. The framework introduced in this paper is based on key user-centered design principles and systems engineering applications to support service competitiveness.

  7. Performing a local reduction operation on a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Faraj, Daniel A.

    2012-12-11

    A parallel computer including compute nodes, each including two reduction processing cores, a network write processing core, and a network read processing core, each processing core assigned an input buffer. Copying, in interleaved chunks by the reduction processing cores, contents of the reduction processing cores' input buffers to an interleaved buffer in shared memory; copying, by one of the reduction processing cores, contents of the network write processing core's input buffer to shared memory; copying, by another of the reduction processing cores, contents of the network read processing core's input buffer to shared memory; and locally reducing in parallel by the reduction processing cores: the contents of the reduction processing core's input buffer; every other interleaved chunk of the interleaved buffer; the copied contents of the network write processing core's input buffer; and the copied contents of the network read processing core's input buffer.

  8. The European computer model for optronic system performance prediction (ECOMOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keßler, Stefan; Bijl, Piet; Labarre, Luc; Repasi, Endre; Wittenstein, Wolfgang; Bürsing, Helge

    2017-10-01

    ECOMOS is a multinational effort within the framework of an EDA Project Arrangement. Its aim is to provide a generally accepted and harmonized European computer model for computing nominal Target Acquisition (TA) ranges of optronic imagers operating in the Visible or thermal Infrared (IR). The project involves close co-operation of defence and security industry and public research institutes from France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and Sweden. ECOMOS uses and combines well-accepted existing European tools to build up a strong competitive position. This includes two TA models: the analytical TRM4 model and the image-based TOD model. In addition, it uses the atmosphere model MATISSE. In this paper, the central idea of ECOMOS is exposed. The overall software structure and the underlying models are shown and elucidated. The status of the project development is given as well as a short discussion of validation tests and an outlook on the future potential of simulation for sensor assessment.

  9. A high level language for a high performance computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The proposed computational aerodynamic facility will join the ranks of the supercomputers due to its architecture and increased execution speed. At present, the languages used to program these supercomputers have been modifications of programming languages which were designed many years ago for sequential machines. A new programming language should be developed based on the techniques which have proved valuable for sequential programming languages and incorporating the algorithmic techniques required for these supercomputers. The design objectives for such a language are outlined.

  10. WinHPC System Configuration | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    ), login node (WinHPC02) and worker/compute nodes. The head node acts as the file, DNS, and license server . The login node is where the users connect to access the cluster. Node 03 has dual Intel Xeon E5530 2008 R2 HPC Edition. The login node, WinHPC02, is where users login to access the system. This is where

  11. Effects of Task Performance and Task Complexity on the Validity of Computational Models of Attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, L. de; Maanen, P.P. van; Dongen, K. van

    2008-01-01

    Computational models of attention can be used as a component of decision support systems. For accurate support, a computational model of attention has to be valid and robust. The effects of task performance and task complexity on the validity of three different computational models of attention were

  12. Gender Differences in Attitudes toward Computers and Performance in the Accounting Information Systems Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenard, Mary Jane; Wessels, Susan; Khanlarian, Cindi

    2010-01-01

    Using a model developed by Young (2000), this paper explores the relationship between performance in the Accounting Information Systems course, self-assessed computer skills, and attitudes toward computers. Results show that after taking the AIS course, students experience a change in perception about their use of computers. Females'…

  13. An urban energy performance evaluation system and its computer implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yuan, Guan; Long, Ruyin; Chen, Hong

    2017-12-15

    To improve the urban environment and effectively reflect and promote urban energy performance, an urban energy performance evaluation system was constructed, thereby strengthening urban environmental management capabilities. From the perspectives of internalization and externalization, a framework of evaluation indicators and key factors that determine urban energy performance and explore the reasons for differences in performance was proposed according to established theory and previous studies. Using the improved stochastic frontier analysis method, an urban energy performance evaluation and factor analysis model was built that brings performance evaluation and factor analysis into the same stage for study. According to data obtained for the Chinese provincial capitals from 2004 to 2013, the coefficients of the evaluation indicators and key factors were calculated by the urban energy performance evaluation and factor analysis model. These coefficients were then used to compile the program file. The urban energy performance evaluation system developed in this study was designed in three parts: a database, a distributed component server, and a human-machine interface. Its functions were designed as login, addition, edit, input, calculation, analysis, comparison, inquiry, and export. On the basis of these contents, an urban energy performance evaluation system was developed using Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2015. The system can effectively reflect the status of and any changes in urban energy performance. Beijing was considered as an example to conduct an empirical study, which further verified the applicability and convenience of this evaluation system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance Analysis of Ivshmem for High-Performance Computing in Virtual Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Pavle; Richter, Harald

    2018-01-01

    High-Performance computing (HPC) is rarely accomplished via virtual machines (VMs). In this paper, we present a remake of ivshmem which can change this. Ivshmem was a shared memory (SHM) between virtual machines on the same server, with SHM-access synchronization included, until about 5 years ago when newer versions of Linux and its virtualization library libvirt evolved. We restored that SHM-access synchronization feature because it is indispensable for HPC and made ivshmem runnable with contemporary versions of Linux, libvirt, KVM, QEMU and especially MPICH, which is an implementation of MPI - the standard HPC communication library. Additionally, MPICH was transparently modified by us to get ivshmem included, resulting in a three to ten times performance improvement compared to TCP/IP. Furthermore, we have transparently replaced MPI_PUT, a single-side MPICH communication mechanism, by an own MPI_PUT wrapper. As a result, our ivshmem even surpasses non-virtualized SHM data transfers for block lengths greater than 512 KBytes, showing the benefits of virtualization. All improvements were possible without using SR-IOV.

  15. High Performance Computing (HPC) Challenge (HPCC) Benchmark Suite Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dongarra, J. J

    2005-01-01

    .... The applications of performance modeling are numerous, including evaluation of algorithms, optimization of code implementation, parallel library development, and comparison of system architectures...

  16. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Breast Cancer: A Multi-Center Demonstrator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Floyd, Carey

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus has been to gather data from multiple sites in order to verify and whether the artificial neural network computer aid to the diagnosis of breast cancer can be translated between locations...

  17. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (HUCAM/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio de Morais. Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2017-03-15

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  18. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens; Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo

    2017-01-01

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  19. Summary of researches being performed in the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science on computer science and information technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the informatization notion (which assumes automation of majority of human activities applying computers, computer networks, information technologies towards the notion of {\\it Global Information Society} (GIS challenges the determination of new paradigms of society: automation and intellectualization of production, new level of education and teaching, formation of new styles of work, active participation in decision making, etc. To assure transition to GIS for any society, including that from Republic of Moldova, requires both special training and broad application of progressive technologies and information systems. Methodological aspects concerning impact of GIS creation over the citizen, economic unit, national economy in the aggregate demands a profound study. Without systematic approach to these aspects the GIS creation would have confront great difficulties. Collective of researchers from the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science (IMCS of Academy of Sciences of Moldova, which work in the field of computer science, constitutes the center of advanced researches and activates in those directions of researches of computer science which facilitate technologies and applications without of which the development of GIS cannot be assured.

  20. COMPUTER-IMPLEMENTED METHOD OF PERFORMING A SEARCH USING SIGNATURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of processing a query vector and a data vector), comprising: generating a set of masks and a first set of multiple signatures and a second set of multiple signatures by applying the set of masks to the query vector and the data vector, respectively, and generating...... candidate pairs, of a first signature and a second signature, by identifying matches of a first signature and a second signature. The set of masks comprises a configuration of the elements that is a Hadamard code; a permutation of a Hadamard code; or a code that deviates from a Hadamard code...

  1. Computational performance of a projection and rescaling algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Javier; Soheili, Negar

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents a computational implementation of a {\\em projection and rescaling algorithm} for finding most interior solutions to the pair of feasibility problems \\[ \\text{find} \\; x\\in L\\cap\\mathbb{R}^n_{+} \\;\\;\\;\\; \\text{ and } \\; \\;\\;\\;\\; \\text{find} \\; \\hat x\\in L^\\perp\\cap\\mathbb{R}^n_{+}, \\] where $L$ denotes a linear subspace in $\\mathbb{R}^n$ and $L^\\perp$ denotes its orthogonal complement. The projection and rescaling algorithm is a recently developed method that combines a {\\...

  2. Using High Performance Computing to Support Water Resource Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, David G. [RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States); Lembert, Robert J. [RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States); May, Deborah W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leek, James R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Syme, James [RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In recent years, decision support modeling has embraced deliberation-withanalysis— an iterative process in which decisionmakers come together with experts to evaluate a complex problem and alternative solutions in a scientifically rigorous and transparent manner. Simulation modeling supports decisionmaking throughout this process; visualizations enable decisionmakers to assess how proposed strategies stand up over time in uncertain conditions. But running these simulation models over standard computers can be slow. This, in turn, can slow the entire decisionmaking process, interrupting valuable interaction between decisionmakers and analytics.

  3. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open Innovation Successes and Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, which resulted in the development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the open innovation successes and collaborative projects developed over this timeframe, including the efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC), which was established to advance human health and performance innovations for spaceflight and societal benefit via collaboration in new markets.

  4. Failure detection in high-performance clusters and computers using chaotic map computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nageswara S.

    2015-09-01

    A programmable media includes a processing unit capable of independent operation in a machine that is capable of executing 10.sup.18 floating point operations per second. The processing unit is in communication with a memory element and an interconnect that couples computing nodes. The programmable media includes a logical unit configured to execute arithmetic functions, comparative functions, and/or logical functions. The processing unit is configured to detect computing component failures, memory element failures and/or interconnect failures by executing programming threads that generate one or more chaotic map trajectories. The central processing unit or graphical processing unit is configured to detect a computing component failure, memory element failure and/or an interconnect failure through an automated comparison of signal trajectories generated by the chaotic maps.

  5. Personality traits affect teaching performance of attending physicians: results of a multi-center observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; van Aken, Marcel A G; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied effects of personality traits on job performance and academic performance in medicine. However, up till date, research in clinical teaching practice did not use quantitative methods and did not account for specialty differences. We empirically studied the relationship of attending physicians' personality traits with their teaching performance across surgical and non-surgical specialties. We conducted a survey across surgical and non-surgical specialties in eighteen medical centers in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated attending physicians' overall teaching performance, as well as the specific domains learning climate, professional attitude, communication, evaluation, and feedback, using the validated 21-item System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ). Attending physicians self-evaluated their personality traits on a 5-point scale using the validated 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI), yielding the Five Factor model: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness and openness. Overall, 622 (77%) attending physicians and 549 (68%) residents participated. Extraversion positively related to overall teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.02). Openness was negatively associated with scores on feedback for surgical specialties only (B: -0.10, 95% CI: -0.15 to -0.05, Pwork on development paths of attending physicians in medical education.

  6. Variables associated with the performance of Centers for Dental Specialties in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellazzi, Karine Laura; Balbino, Edna Cesar; Guerra, Luciane Miranda; Vazquez, Fabiana de Lima; Bulgareli, Jaqueline Vilela; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Centers for Dental Specialties (CDS) in the country and associations with sociodemographic indicators of the municipalities, structural variables of services and primary health care organization in the years 2004-2009. The study used secondary data from procedures performed in the CDS to the specialties of periodontics, endodontics, surgery and primary care. Bivariate analysis by χ2 test was used to test the association between the dependent variable (performance of the CDS) with the independents. Then, Poisson regression analysis was performed. With regard to the overall achievement of targets, it was observed that the majority of CDS (69.25%) performance was considered poor/regular. The independent factors associated with poor/regular performance of CDS were: municipalities belonging to the Northeast, South and Southeast regions, with lower Human Development Index (HDI), lower population density, and reduced time to deployment. HDI and population density are important for the performance of the CDS in Brazil. Similarly, the peculiarities related to less populated areas as well as regional location and time of service implementation CDS should be taken into account in the planning of these services.

  7. Computational Modeling of Human Multiple-Task Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kieras, David E; Meyer, David

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report for a project that was a continuation of an earlier, long-term project on the development and validation of the EPIC cognitive architecture for modeling human cognition and performance...

  8. Performance Evaluation of the Myrias SPS-2 Computer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McBryan, Oliver A; Pozo, Roldan

    1990-01-01

    .... The highlight of the software environment is the virtual shared memory environment. We have analyzed the performance of the shared memory environment by studying system efficiency as a function of both number of processors in use and of paging activity...

  9. Computer-based laparoscopic and robotic surgical simulators: performance characteristics and perceptions of new users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, David W; Romanelli, John R; Kuhn, Jay N; Thompson, Renee E; Bush, Ron W; Seymour, Neal E

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to define perceptions of the need and the value of new simulation devices for laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgery. The initial experience of surgeons using both robotic and nonrobotic laparoscopic simulators to perform an advanced laparoscopic skill was evaluated. At the 2006 Society of American Gastroesophageal Surgeons (SAGES) meeting, 63 Learning Center attendees used a new virtual reality robotic surgery simulator (SEP Robot) and either a computer-enhanced laparoscopic simulator (ProMIS) or a virtual reality simulator (SurgicalSIM). Demographic and training data were collected by an intake survey. Subjects then were assessed during one iteration of laparoscopic suturing and knot-tying on the SEP Robot and either the ProMIS or the SurgicalSIM. A posttask survey determined users' impressions of task realism, interface quality, and educational value. Performance data were collected and comparisons made between user-defined groups, different simulation platforms, and posttask survey responses. The task completion rate was significantly greater for experts than for nonexperts on the virtual reality platforms (SurgicalSIM: 100% vs 36%; SEP Robot: 93% vs 63%; p platforms, whereas simulator metrics best discriminated expertise for the videoscopic platform. Similar comparisons for the virtual reality platforms were not feasible because of the low task completion rate for nonexperts. The added degrees of freedom associated with the robotic surgical simulator instruments facilitated completion of the task by nonexperts. All platforms were perceived as effective training tools.

  10. Diagnostic performance of 64-slice multidetector coronary computed tomographic angiography in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jug, Borut; Gupta, Mohit; Papazian, Jenny; Li, Dong; Tsang, Janet; Bhatia, Harpreet; Karlsberg, Ronald; Budoff, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Diagnostic approach to chest pain in women is challenging, but still under-investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of 64-slice multidetector coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in women with chest pain. We included 606 patients--255 women and 351 men (mean age 61 ± 12 years for both)--who had been referred for a CCTA and an invasive coronary angiography (diagnostic standard) because of chest pain, either as part of clinical work-up in two urban medical centers or as part of the multicenter ACCURACY trial. On a patient-based model, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value to detect ≥50% and ≥70% stenosis were 98%, 84%, 87%, and 97% and 96%, 83%, 77%, and 97%, respectively, for women and 97%, 83%, 89%, and 95% and 94%, 91%, 90%, and 94%, respectively, for men. There were no statistically significant differences between men and women in diagnostic performance measures except for the PPV of detecting a ≥70% stenosis (P = .007). In women with chest pain, 64-slice multidetector CCTA is at least as sensitive and specific as in men. Our findings suggest that CCTA is a promising diagnostic tool for timely detection and/or exclusion of CAD in symptomatic intermediate-risk female populations.

  11. Analysis of Application Power and Schedule Composition in a High Performance Computing Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Phillips, Caleb [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Purkayastha, Avi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wunder, Nick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-05

    As the capacity of high performance computing (HPC) systems continues to grow, small changes in energy management have the potential to produce significant energy savings. In this paper, we employ an extensive informatics system for aggregating and analyzing real-time performance and power use data to evaluate energy footprints of jobs running in an HPC data center. We look at the effects of algorithmic choices for a given job on the resulting energy footprints, and analyze application-specific power consumption, and summarize average power use in the aggregate. All of these views reveal meaningful power variance between classes of applications as well as chosen methods for a given job. Using these data, we discuss energy-aware cost-saving strategies based on reordering the HPC job schedule. Using historical job and power data, we present a hypothetical job schedule reordering that: (1) reduces the facility's peak power draw and (2) manages power in conjunction with a large-scale photovoltaic array. Lastly, we leverage this data to understand the practical limits on predicting key power use metrics at the time of submission.

  12. Measurements and predictions of the air distribution systems in high compute density (Internet) data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jinkyun [HIMEC (Hanil Mechanical Electrical Consultants) Ltd., Seoul 150-103 (Korea); Department of Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Lim, Taesub; Kim, Byungseon Sean [Department of Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea)

    2009-10-15

    When equipment power density increases, a critical goal of a data center cooling system is to separate the equipment exhaust air from the equipment intake air in order to prevent the IT server from overheating. Cooling systems for data centers are primarily differentiated according to the way they distribute air. The six combinations of flooded and locally ducted air distribution make up the vast majority of all installations, except fully ducted air distribution methods. Once the air distribution system (ADS) is selected, there are other elements that must be integrated into the system design. In this research, the design parameters and IT environmental aspects of the cooling system were studied with a high heat density data center. CFD simulation analysis was carried out in order to compare the heat removal efficiencies of various air distribution systems. The IT environment of an actual operating data center is measured to validate a model for predicting the effect of different air distribution systems. A method for planning and design of the appropriate air distribution system is described. IT professionals versed in precision air distribution mechanisms, components, and configurations can work more effectively with mechanical engineers to ensure the specification and design of optimized cooling solutions. (author)

  13. Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

    1996-12-31

    A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

  14. Risk factors for computer visual syndrome (CVS) among operators of two call centers in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Eduardo Costa; Ferreira Junior, Mario; Rocha, Lys Esther

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate work conditions, to estimate the prevalence and to describe risk factors associated with Computer Vision Syndrome among two call centers' operators in São Paulo (n = 476). The methods include a quantitative cross-sectional observational study and an ergonomic work analysis, using work observation, interviews and questionnaires. The case definition was the presence of one or more specific ocular symptoms answered as always, often or sometimes. The multiple logistic regression model, were created using the stepwise forward likelihood method and remained the variables with levels below 5% (p vision (43.5%). The prevalence of Computer Vision Syndrome was 54.6%. Associations verified were: being female (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.1), lack of recognition at work (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.8), organization of work in call center (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.7) and high demand at work (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.3). The organization and psychosocial factors at work should be included in prevention programs of visual syndrome among call centers' operators.

  15. Root Canal Transportation and Centering Ability of Nickel-Titanium Rotary Instruments in Mandibular Premolars Assessed Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede-Neto, Iussif; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; de Oliveira, Durvalino; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), transportation and centralization of different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments. One hundred and twenty eight mandibular premolars were selected and instrumented using the following brands of NiTi files: WaveOne, WaveOne Gold, Reciproc, ProTaper Next, ProTaper Gold, Mtwo, BioRaCe and RaCe. CBCT imaging was performed before and after root canal preparation to obtain measurements of mesial and distal dentin walls and calculations of root canal transportation and centralization. A normal distribution of data was confirmed by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene tests, and results were assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was set at 5%. ProTaper Gold produced the lowest canal transportation values, and RaCe, the highest. ProTaper Gold files also showed the highest values for centering ability, whereas BioRaCe showed the lowest. No significant differences were found across the different instruments in terms of canal transportation and centering ability (P > 0.05). Based on the methodology employed, all instruments used for root canal preparation of mandibular premolars performed similarly with regard to canal transportation and centering ability.

  16. Computer analysis of sodium cold trap design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1983-11-01

    Normal steam-side corrosion of steam-generator tubes in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) results in liberation of hydrogen, and most of this hydrogen diffuses through the tubes into the heat-transfer sodium and must be removed by the purification system. Cold traps are normally used to purify sodium, and they operate by cooling the sodium to temperatures near the melting point, where soluble impurities including hydrogen and oxygen precipitate as NaH and Na 2 O, respectively. A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions

  17. Computational study of performance characteristics for truncated conical aerospike nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Prasanth P.; Suryan, Abhilash; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2017-12-01

    Aerospike nozzles are advanced rocket nozzles that can maintain its aerodynamic efficiency over a wide range of altitudes. It belongs to class of altitude compensating nozzles. A vehicle with an aerospike nozzle uses less fuel at low altitudes due to its altitude adaptability, where most missions have the greatest need for thrust. Aerospike nozzles are better suited to Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) missions compared to conventional nozzles. In the current study, the flow through 20% and 40% aerospike nozzle is analyzed in detail using computational fluid dynamics technique. Steady state analysis with implicit formulation is carried out. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The results are compared with experimental results from previous work. The transition from open wake to closed wake happens in lower Nozzle Pressure Ratio for 20% as compared to 40% aerospike nozzle.

  18. Electromagnetic Modeling of Human Body Using High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Cho-Kuen; Beall, Mark; Ge, Lixin; Kim, Sanghoek; Klaas, Ottmar; Poon, Ada

    Realistic simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in the actual human body can expedite the investigation of the phenomenon of harvesting implanted devices using wireless powering coupled from external sources. The parallel electromagnetics code suite ACE3P developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is based on the finite element method for high fidelity accelerator simulation, which can be enhanced to model electromagnetic wave propagation in the human body. Starting with a CAD model of a human phantom that is characterized by a number of tissues, a finite element mesh representing the complex geometries of the individual tissues is built for simulation. Employing an optimal power source with a specific pattern of field distribution, the propagation and focusing of electromagnetic waves in the phantom has been demonstrated. Substantial speedup of the simulation is achieved by using multiple compute cores on supercomputers.

  19. The impact of short prehospital times on trauma center performance benchmarking: An ecologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James P; Mann, N Clay; Hoeft, Christopher J; Buick, Jason; Karanicolas, Paul; Rizoli, Sandro; Hunt, John P; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-04-01

    Emergency medical service (EMS) prehospital times vary between regions, yet the impact of local prehospital times on trauma center (TC) performance is unknown. To inform external benchmarking efforts, we explored the impact of EMS prehospital times on the risk-adjusted rate of emergency department (ED) death and overall hospital mortality at urban TCs across the United States. We used a novel ecologic study design, linking EMS data from the National EMS Information System to TCs participating in the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) by destination zip code. This approach provided EMS times for populations of injured patients transported to TQIP centers. We defined the exposure of interest as the 90th percentile total prehospital time (PHT) for each TC. TCs were then stratified by PHT quartile. Analyses were limited to adult patients with severe blunt or penetrating trauma, transported directly by land to urban TQIP centers. Random-intercept multilevel modeling was used to evaluate the risk-adjusted relationship between PHT quartile and the outcomes of ED death and overall hospital mortality. During the study period, 119,740 patients met inclusion criteria at 113 TCs. ED death occurred in 1% of patients, and overall mortality was 7.2%. Across all centers, the median PHT was 61 minutes (interquartile range, 53-71 minutes). After risk adjustment, TCs in regions with the shortest quartile of PHTs (<53 minutes) had significantly greater odds of ED death compared with those with the longest PHTs (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-2.78). However, there was no association between PHT and overall TC mortality. At urban TCs, local EMS prehospital times are a significant predictor of ED death. However, no relationship exists between prehospital time and overall TC risk-adjusted mortality. Therefore, there is no evidence for the inclusion of EMS prehospital time in external benchmarking analyses.

  20. Causal Analysis for Performance Modeling of Computer Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lemeire

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Causal modeling and the accompanying learning algorithms provide useful extensions for in-depth statistical investigation and automation of performance modeling. We enlarged the scope of existing causal structure learning algorithms by using the form-free information-theoretic concept of mutual information and by introducing the complexity criterion for selecting direct relations among equivalent relations. The underlying probability distribution of experimental data is estimated by kernel density estimation. We then reported on the benefits of a dependency analysis and the decompositional capacities of causal models. Useful qualitative models, providing insight into the role of every performance factor, were inferred from experimental data. This paper reports on the results for a LU decomposition algorithm and on the study of the parameter sensitivity of the Kakadu implementation of the JPEG-2000 standard. Next, the analysis was used to search for generic performance characteristics of the applications.