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Sample records for perform invasive procedures

  1. Procedures minimally invasive image-guided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Guevara, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    A literature review focused on minimally invasive procedures, has been performed at the Department of Radiology at the Hospital Calderon Guardia. A multidisciplinary team has been raised for decision making. The materials, possible complications and the available imaging technique such as ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, have been determined according to the procedure to be performed. The revision has supported medical interventions didactically enjoying the best materials, resources and conditions for a successful implementation of procedures and results [es

  2. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  3. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecker, A.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Haage, P.; Huppert, P.; Landwehr, P.; Loose, R.; Reimer, P.; Tacke, J.; Vorwerk, D.; Fischer, J.

    2012-01-01

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  4. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asy...

  5. Intensive care unit audit: invasive procedure surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariama Amaral Michels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and objective: currently, Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs constitute a serious public health problem. It is estimated that for every ten hospitalized patients, one will have infection after admission, generating high costs resulting from increased length of hospitalization, additional diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The intensive care unit (ICU, due to its characteristics, is one of the most complex units of the hospital environment, a result of the equipment, the available technology, the severity of inpatients and the invasive procedures the latter are submitted to. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adherence to specifi c HAI prevention measures in invasive ICU procedures. Methods: This study had a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory approach. Among the risk factors for HAIs are the presence of central venous access, indwelling vesical catheter and mechanical ventilation, and, therefore, the indicators were calculated for patients undergoing these invasive procedures, through a questionnaire standardized by the Hospital Infection Control Commission (HICC. Results: For every 1,000 patients, 15 had catheter-related bloodstream infection, 6.85 had urinary tract infection associated with indwelling catheter in the fi rst half of 2010. Conclusion: most HAIs cannot be prevented, for reasons inherent to invasive procedures and the patients. However, their incidence can be reduced and controlled. The implementation of preventive measures based on scientifi c evidence can reduce HAIs signifi cantly and sustainably, resulting in safer health care services and reduced costs. The main means of prevention include the cleaning of hands, use of epidemiological block measures, when necessary, and specifi c care for each infection site. KEYWORDS Nosocomial infection. Intensive care units.

  6. Readability of Invasive Procedure Consent Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Naqvi, Syed S; Ghanian, Soha; Eberson, Craig P; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-12-01

    Informed consent is a pillar of ethical medicine which requires patients to fully comprehend relevant issues including the risks, benefits, and alternatives of an intervention. Given the average reading skill of US adults is at the 8th grade level, the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommend patient information materials should not exceed a 6th grade reading level. We hypothesized that text provided in invasive procedure consent forms would exceed recommended readability guidelines for medical information. To test this hypothesis, we gathered procedure consent forms from all surgical inpatient hospitals in the state of Rhode Island. For each consent form, readability analysis was measured with the following measures: Flesch Reading Ease Formula, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Fog Scale, SMOG Index, Coleman-Liau Index, Automated Readability Index, and Linsear Write Formula. These readability scores were used to calculate a composite Text Readability Consensus Grade Level. Invasive procedure consent forms were found to be written at an average of 15th grade level (i.e., third year of college), which is significantly higher than the average US adult reading level of 8th grade (p readability guidelines for patient materials of 6th grade (p readability levels which makes comprehension difficult or impossible for many patients. Efforts to improve the readability of procedural consent forms should improve patient understanding regarding their healthcare decisions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Minimally invasive aesthetic procedures in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina1, Alberto Goldman21Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande du Sul, BrazilAbstract: Age is a significant factor in modifying specific needs when it comes to medical aesthetic procedures. In this review we will focus on young adults in their third decade of life and review minimally invasive aesthetic procedures other than cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. Correction of asymmetries, correction after body modifying procedures, and facial sculpturing are important issues for young adults. The implication of aesthetic medicine as part of preventive medicine is a major ethical challenge that differentiates aesthetic medicine from fashion.Keywords: acne scars, ice pick scars, boxcar scars, fillers 

  8. Complications of minimally invasive cosmetic procedures: Prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, facial rejuvenation procedures to circumvent traditional surgery have become increasingly popular. Office-based, minimally invasive procedures can promote a youthful appearance with minimal downtime and low risk of complications. Injectable botulinum toxin (BoNT, soft-tissue fillers, and chemical peels are among the most popular non-invasive rejuvenation procedures, and each has unique applications for improving facial aesthetics. Despite the simplicity and reliability of office-based procedures, complications can occur even with an astute and experienced injector. The goal of any procedure is to perform it properly and safely; thus, early recognition of complications when they do occur is paramount in dictating prevention of long-term sequelae. The most common complications from BoNT and soft-tissue filler injection are bruising, erythema and pain. With chemical peels, it is not uncommon to have erythema, irritation and burning. Fortunately, these side effects are normally transient and have simple remedies. More serious complications include muscle paralysis from BoNT, granuloma formation from soft-tissue filler placement and scarring from chemical peels. Thankfully, these complications are rare and can be avoided with excellent procedure technique, knowledge of facial anatomy, proper patient selection, and appropriate pre- and post-skin care. This article reviews complications of office-based, minimally invasive procedures, with emphasis on prevention and management. Practitioners providing these treatments should be well versed in this subject matter in order to deliver the highest quality care.

  9. Are minimally invasive procedures harder to acquire than conventional surgical procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Ellen; Kolkman, Wendela; le Cessie, Saskia; Jansen, Frank Willem

    2011-01-01

    It is frequently suggested that minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is harder to acquire than conventional surgery. To test this hypothesis, residents' learning curves of both surgical skills are compared. Residents had to be assessed using a general global rating scale of the OSATS (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills) for every procedure they performed as primary surgeon during a 3-month clinical rotation in gynecological surgery. Nine postgraduate-year-4 residents collected a total of 319 OSATS during the 2 years and 3 months investigation period. These assessments concerned 129 MIS (laparoscopic and hysteroscopic) and 190 conventional (open abdominal and vaginal) procedures. Learning curves (in this study defined as OSATS score plotted against procedure-specific caseload) for MIS and conventional surgery were compared using a linear mixed model. The MIS curve revealed to be steeper than the conventional curve (1.77 vs. 0.75 OSATS points per assessed procedure; 95% CI 1.19-2.35 vs. 0.15-1.35, p < 0.01). Basic MIS procedures do not seem harder to acquire during residency than conventional surgical procedures. This may have resulted from the incorporation of structured MIS training programs in residency. Hopefully, this will lead to a more successful implementation of the advanced MIS procedures. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  11. Qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins; Qualifizierungsleitlinie der Deutschen Roentgengesellschaft (DRG) und der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Interventionelle Radiologie und minimalinvasive Therapie (DeGIR) zur Durchfuehrung interventionell-radiologischer minimalinvasiver Verfahren an Arterien und Venen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecker, A. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Gross-Fengels, W. [Asklepiosklinik, Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Haage, P. [Helios-Kliniken, Wuppertal (Germany); Huppert, P. [Klinikum Darmstadt (Germany); Landwehr, P. [Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany); Reimer, P. [Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany); Tacke, J. [Klinikum Passau (Germany); Vorwerk, D. [Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany); Fischer, J.

    2012-06-15

    The topics covered in the qualification guideline of the German X-ray association (DRG) und the German association for interventional radiology and minimal invasive therapy (DeGIR) for the performance of interventional-radiological minimal invasive procedures on arteries and veins are the following: Practical qualification: aorta iliac vessels and vessels in the upper and lower extremities, kidney and visceral arteries, head and neck arteries, dialysis shunts, veins and pulmonary arteries, aorta aneurysms and peripheral artery aneurysms. Knowledge acquisition concerning radiation protection: legal fundamentals, education and training, knowledge actualization and quality control, definition of the user and the procedure, competence preservation.

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy: An emerging minimally invasive procedure for achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, Yalini; Ujiki, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of achalasia. Due to the improvements in endoscopic technology and techniques, this procedure allows for submucosal tunneling to safely endoscopically create a myotomy across the hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter. In the hands of skilled operators and experienced centers, the most common complications of this procedure are related to insufflation and accumulation of gas in the chest and abdominal cavities with relatively low risks of devastating complications such as perforation or delayed bleeding. Several centers worldwide have demonstrated the feasibility of this procedure in not only early achalasia but also other indications such as redo myotomy, sigmoid esophagus and spastic esophagus. Short-term outcomes have showed great clinical efficacy comparable to laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM). Concerns related to postoperative gastroesophageal reflux remain, however several groups have demonstrated comparable clinical and objective measures of reflux to LHM. Although long-term outcomes are necessary to better understand durability of the procedure, POEM appears to be a promising new procedure. PMID:26468336

  13. Value of prophylactic antibiotics for invasive dental procedures unclear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlen, Glenn K; Keenan, Analia Veitz

    2014-03-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) would be included where available. Due to the low incidence of bacterial endocarditis it was anticipated that few such trials would be found. Cohort and case-control studies were included where suitably matched control or comparison groups had been studied. Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion then assessed risk of bias and extracted data from the included study. Only one case controlled study met the inclusion criteria. It collected all the cases of endocarditis in the Netherlands over two years, finding a total of 24 people who developed endocarditis within 180 days of an invasive dental procedure, definitely requiring prophylaxis according to current guidelines, and who were at increased risk of endocarditis due to a pre-existing cardiac problem. This study included participants who died because of the endocarditis (using proxies). Controls attended local cardiology outpatient clinics for similar cardiac problems, had undergone an invasive dental procedure within the past 180 days, and were matched by age with the cases. No significant effect of penicillin prophylaxis on the incidence of endocarditis could be seen. No data were found on other outcomes. There remains no evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis is either effective or ineffective against bacterial endocarditis in people considered at risk who are about to undergo an invasive dental procedure. It is not clear whether the potential harms and costs of penicillin administration outweigh any beneficial effect. Ethically, practitioners need to discuss the potential benefits and harms of antibiotic prophylaxis with their patients before a decision is made about administration.

  14. Recommendations to improve radiation safety during invasive cardiovascular procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Patricia; Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Nocetti, Diego

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present guidelines aimed to improve radiation safety during invasive cardiovascular procedures. Unwanted effects upon patients and medical personnel are conventionally classified. A program of Quality Assurance is proposed, an aspect of which is a program for radiologic protection, including operator protection, radiation monitoring, shielding and personnel training. Permanent and specific actions should be taken at every cardiovascular lab, before, during and after interventions. In order to implement these guidelines and actions, a fundamental step is a review of current legislation. Specific programs for quality control and radiologic protection along with a definition of acceptable radiation exposure doses are required

  15. Treatment of intervertebral disc degenerative disease using percutaneous nucleotomy–an overview of less invasive procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Jeromel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Less invasive treatment methods for intervertebral disc disease and decompression of neural structures as a consequence of contained disc herniation represent an alternative to surgical procedure. Percutaneus nucleotomy uses a percutaneous approach to the intervertebral disc. The article presents the evolution of numerous procedureds in clinical practice.Methods: Percutaneous nucleoplasty is a fluoroscopy-guided procedure which enables controlled and safe entrance into the intervertebral disc. The procedure is performed under strict aseptic conditions, using a local anaesthesia with the patient under analgosedation. Based on the principle of therapeutic intradiscal action, the procedures can be divided into three groups: chemical (chemonucleolysis with chimopapain, alcohol, ozone, mechanical (automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy – APLD, arthroscopic discectomy and thermical methods (laser, radiofrequency ablation, intradiscal electrothermal annuloplasty – IDET, Coblation®.Results: Percutaneous nucleotomy by the majority of the mentioned procedures results in a therapeutic effect (reduction of pain and decompression of neural structures. Fast recovery represents a major advantage of less invasive treatment.Conclusions: Less invasive method (nucleotomy using different procedures represents a successful alternative approach to surgical discectomy. Proper patient selection and safe technique are mandatory in order to achieve a good clinical outcome.

  16. Inspection system performance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure establishes requirements to administer a performance demonstration test. The test is to demonstrate that the double-shell tank inspection system (DSTIS) supplied by the contractor performs in accordance with the WHC-S-4108, Double-Shell Tank Ultrasonic Inspection Performance Specification, Rev. 2-A, January, 1995. The inspection system is intended to provide ultrasonic (UT) and visual data to determine integrity of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) site underground waste tanks. The robotic inspection system consists of the following major sub-systems (modules) and components: Mobile control center; Deployment module; Cable management assembly; Robot mechanism; Ultrasonic testing system; Visual testing system; Pneumatic system; Electrical system; and Control system

  17. Procedural virtual reality simulation in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våpenstad, Cecilie; Buzink, Sonja N

    2013-02-01

    Simulation of procedural tasks has the potential to bridge the gap between basic skills training outside the operating room (OR) and performance of complex surgical tasks in the OR. This paper provides an overview of procedural virtual reality (VR) simulation currently available on the market and presented in scientific literature for laparoscopy (LS), flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy (FGE), and endovascular surgery (EVS). An online survey was sent to companies and research groups selling or developing procedural VR simulators, and a systematic search was done for scientific publications presenting or applying VR simulators to train or assess procedural skills in the PUBMED and SCOPUS databases. The results of five simulator companies were included in the survey. In the literature review, 116 articles were analyzed (45 on LS, 43 on FGE, 28 on EVS), presenting a total of 23 simulator systems. The companies stated to altogether offer 78 procedural tasks (33 for LS, 12 for FGE, 33 for EVS), of which 17 also were found in the literature review. Although study type and used outcomes vary between the three different fields, approximately 90 % of the studies presented in the retrieved publications for LS found convincing evidence to confirm the validity or added value of procedural VR simulation. This was the case in approximately 75 % for FGE and EVS. Procedural training using VR simulators has been found to improve clinical performance. There is nevertheless a large amount of simulated procedural tasks that have not been validated. Future research should focus on the optimal use of procedural simulators in the most effective training setups and further investigate the benefits of procedural VR simulation to improve clinical outcome.

  18. Ghanaian nurses' knowledge of invasive procedural pain and its effect on children, parents and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anim-Boamah, Oboshie; Aziato, Lydia; Adabayeri, Victoria May

    2017-09-11

    To explore Ghanaian nurses' knowledge of invasive procedural pain in children who are in hospital and to identify the effect of unrelieved pain on children, parents and nurses. An exploratory, descriptive and qualitative design was adopted. A purposive sampling technique was used and individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 registered nurses from four children's units at a hospital in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Thematic and content analyses were performed. Four themes emerged: types of invasive procedure; pain expression; pain assessment; and effects of unrelieved pain. Participants had adequate knowledge of painful invasive procedures, however, they were not aware of the range of available validated pain assessment tools, using observations and body language instead to assess pain. Ghanaian nurses require education on the use of validated rating scales to assess procedural pain in children. The inclusion of pain assessment and management in pre-registration curricula could improve knowledge. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  19. Minimally Invasive Procedures - Direct and Video-Assisted Forms in the Treatment of Heart Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Josué Viana Neto; Melo, Emanuel Carvalho; Silva, Juliana Fernandes; Rebouças, Leonardo Lemos; Corrêa, Larissa Chagas; Germano, Amanda de Queiroz; Machado, João José Aquino

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiovascular procedures have been progressively used in heart surgery. To describe the techniques and immediate results of minimally invasive procedures in 5 years. Prospective and descriptive study in which 102 patients were submitted to minimally invasive procedures in direct and video-assisted forms. Clinical and surgical variables were evaluated as well as the in hospital follow-up of the patients. Fourteen patients were operated through the direct form and 88 through the video-assisted form. Between minimally invasive procedures in direct form, 13 had aortic valve disease. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 43 had mitral valve disease, 41 atrial septal defect and four tumors. In relation to mitral valve disease, we replaced 26 and reconstructed 17 valves. Aortic clamp, extracorporeal and procedure times were, respectively, 91,6 ± 21,8, 112,7 ± 27,9 e 247,1 ± 20,3 minutes in minimally invasive procedures in direct form. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 71,6 ± 29, 99,7 ± 32,6 e 226,1 ± 42,7 minutes. Considering intensive care and hospitalization times, these were 41,1 ± 14,7 hours and 4,6 ± 2 days in minimally invasive procedures in direct and 36,8 ± 16,3 hours and 4,3 ± 1,9 days in minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms procedures. Minimally invasive procedures were used in two forms - direct and video-assisted - with safety in the surgical treatment of video-assisted, atrial septal defect and tumors of the heart. These procedures seem to result in longer surgical variables. However, hospital recuperation was faster, independent of the access or pathology

  20. The affordability of minimally invasive procedures in major lung resection: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondé, Henri; Laurent, Marc; Gillibert, André; Sarsam, Omar-Matthieu; Varin, Rémi; Grimandi, Gaël; Peillon, Christophe; Baste, Jean-Marc

    2017-09-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are used for the surgical treatment of lung cancer. Two techniques are proposed: video-assisted thoracic surgery or robotic-assisted thoracic surgery. Our goal was to study the economic impact of our long-standing program for minimally invasive procedures for major lung resection. We conducted a single-centre, 1-year prospective cost study. Patients who underwent lobectomy or segmentectomy were included. Patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes were collected. Medical supply expenses based on the microcosting method and capital depreciation were estimated. Total cost was evaluated using a national French database. One hundred twelve patients were included, 57 with and 55 without robotic assistance. More segmentectomies were performed with robotic assistance. The median length of stay was 5 days for robotic-assisted and 6 days for video-assisted procedures (P = 0.13). The duration of median chest drains (4 days, P = 0.36) and of operating room time (255 min, P = 0.55) was not significantly different between the groups. The overall conversion rate to thoracotomy was 9%, significantly higher in the video-assisted group than in the robotic group (16% vs 2%, P = 0.008). No difference was observed in postoperative complications. The cost of most robotic-assisted procedures ranged from €10 000 to €12 000 (median €10 972) and that of most video-assisted procedures ranged from €8 000 to €10 000 (median €9 637) (P = 0.007); median medical supply expenses were €3 236 and €2 818, respectively (P = 0.004). The overall mean cost of minimally invasive techniques (€11 759) was significantly lower than the mean French cost of lung resection surgical procedures (€13 424) (P = 0.001). The cost at our centre of performing minimally invasive surgical procedures appeared lower than the cost nationwide. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery demonstrated acceptable additional costs

  1. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspe, Heiner

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany. Objective: Against this background the aim of the following assessment is: * Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures. * To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures. * If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc

  2. Comparison of pancuronium and vecuronium for fetal neuromuscular blockade during invasive procedures.

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    Watson, W J; Atchison, S R; Harlass, F E

    1996-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents, used to arrest fetal motion for invasive intrauterine procedures, may cause temporary fetal heart rate changes. After 21 invasive procedures using either pancuronium bromide or vecuronium bromide, post-procedure fetal heart rate tracings were retrospectively compared. Pancuronium was associated with an increased fetal heart rate and decreased beat-to-beat variability for 2.5 hours after its use, whereas vecuronium caused no fetal heart rate changes. Vecuronium bromide offers advantages over pancuronium, because the decreased effect on the fetal heart allows better assessment of fetal well-being immediately following invasive intrauterine procedures.

  3. How can we reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV during invasive obstetric procedures?

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    C N Mnyani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antenatal invasive obstetric procedures may be diagnostic or therapeutic, and are performed at different stages of pregnancy for various indications. The commonest indication for an invasive procedure during pregnancy is for fetal karyotyping when a chromosomal abnormality or a genetic defect is suspected, either from the couple’s history or from ultrasound assessment of the fetus. Other less common but equally important indications may be diagnostic (fetoscopy, fetal tissue sampling, estimation of fetal haemoglobin or therapeutic (aspiration of various fetal cavities, fetal blood transfusion and embryo reductions. In a high HIV prevalence setting like South Africa, a significant proportion of pregnant women in need of invasive procedures will be HIV-infected.

  4. Association of code status discussion with invasive procedures among advanced-stage cancer and noncancer patients

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    Sasaki A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Akinori Sasaki,1 Eiji Hiraoka,1 Yosuke Homma,2 Osamu Takahashi,3 Yasuhiro Norisue,4 Koji Kawai,5 Shigeki Fujitani4 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center, Urayasu City, Chiba, 3Department of Internal Medicine, St. Luke’s International Hospital, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 4Department of Critical Care Medicine, Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center, Urayasu City, Chiba, 5Department of Gastroenterology, Ito Municipal Hospital, Ito City, Shizuoka, Japan Background: Code status discussion is associated with a decrease in invasive procedures among terminally ill cancer patients. We investigated the association between code status discussion on admission and incidence of invasive procedures, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, and opioid use among inpatients with advanced stages of cancer and noncancer diseases. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study in a single center, Ito Municipal Hospital, Japan. Participants were patients who were admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine between October 1, 2013 and August 30, 2015, with advanced-stage cancer and noncancer. We collected demographic data and inquired the presence or absence of code status discussion within 24 hours of admission and whether invasive procedures, including central venous catheter placement, intubation with mechanical ventilation, and CPR for cardiac arrest, and opioid treatment were performed. We investigated the factors associated with CPR events by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Among the total 232 patients, code status was discussed with 115 patients on admission, of which 114 (99.1% patients had do-not-resuscitate (DNR orders. The code status was not discussed with the remaining 117 patients on admission, of which 69 (59% patients had subsequent code status discussion with resultant DNR orders. Code status discussion on admission decreased the incidence of central venous

  5. Comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Boris; Dedy, Nicolas J; Bonrath, Esther M; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-05-01

    There is no comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum to address cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills for an advanced minimally invasive procedure. 1) To develop and provide evidence of validity for a comprehensive simulation-enhanced training (SET) curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure; (2) to demonstrate transfer of acquired psychomotor skills from a simulation laboratory to live porcine model; and (3) to compare training outcomes of SET curriculum group and chief resident group. University. This prospective single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial allocated 20 intermediate-level surgery residents to receive either conventional training (control) or SET curriculum training (intervention). The SET curriculum consisted of cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical training modules. Psychomotor skills in a live anesthetized porcine model in the OR was the primary outcome. Knowledge of advanced minimally invasive and bariatric surgery and nontechnical skills in a simulated OR crisis scenario were the secondary outcomes. Residents in the SET curriculum group went on to perform a laparoscopic jejunojejunostomy in the OR. Cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills of SET curriculum group were also compared to a group of 12 chief surgery residents. SET curriculum group demonstrated superior psychomotor skills in a live porcine model (56 [47-62] versus 44 [38-53], Ppsychomotor skills in the live porcine model and in the OR in a human patient (56 [47-62] versus 63 [61-68]; P = .21). SET curriculum group demonstrated inferior knowledge (13 [11-15] versus 16 [14-16]; P<.05), equivalent psychomotor skill (63 [61-68] versus 68 [62-74]; P = .50), and superior nontechnical skills (41 [38-45] versus 34 [27-35], P<.01) compared with chief resident group. Completion of the SET curriculum resulted in superior training outcomes, compared with conventional surgery training. Implementation of the SET curriculum can standardize training

  6. Management around invasive procedures in mastocytosis : An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Maud A. W.; Arends, Nicolette J. T.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; van Hagen, P. Martin; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Elberink, Hanneke N. G. Oude; Pasmans, Suzanne G. M. A.; van Daele, Paul L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Mastocytosis is a chronic hematologic disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of aberrant mast cells and typically involves the skin and/or bone marrow. Patients with mastocytosis are at increased risk of anaphylaxis. Based on theoretical assumptions, medical procedures

  7. Diagnosis with near infrared spectroscopy during minimally invasive procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Nachabé (Rami)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe goal of this dissertation is to present the potential of diffuse optical spectroscopy technique to characterize and differentiate types of tissue, including dysplastic and cancerous tissues, when measuring the tissue spectra during a surgical or an interventional procedure under

  8. The legal guardians' dilemma: Decision making associated with invasive non-life-saving procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background ICU patients frequently undergo non-life-saving invasive procedures. When patient informed consent cannot be obtained, legal guardianship (LG), often from a close relative, may be required by law. The objective of this cohort study was to investigate the attitudes of LGs of ICU patients regarding the process of decision making for invasive non-life-saving procedures. Methods The study was conducted from May 2009 until June 2010 in general medical/surgical ICUs in two large Israeli medical centers. All 64 LGs who met the study criteria agreed to participate in the study. Three questionnaires were administered: a demographic data questionnaire, the Family Satisfaction with ICU 34 Questionnaire, and the Attitudes towards the LG Decision Making Process questionnaire, developed by the authors. Results The sample consisted of 64 LGs. Most participants were married (n = 56, 87.5%), male (n = 33, 51.6%), who had either a high school (n = 24, 37.5%) or college (n = 19, 29.7%) education, and were at a mean age of 49.2 (±11.22). Almost all of the procedures performed were tracheotomies (n = 63, 98.4%). About two-thirds of the LGs preferred decisions to be made by the medical staff after discussing options with them (n = 42, 65.6%) and about three-fifths stated that decisions could be made without the need for the appointment of an LG (n = 37, 57.8%). Attitudes towards ease of obtaining information and honesty of information were more positive compared to those of consistency and understanding of information. Conclusions The legal guardianship process requires better communication and more understandable information in order to assist LGs in making decisions for others in at times vague and stressful situations. PMID:23006738

  9. Operative vaginal delivery and invasive procedures in pregnancy among women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Helen; Francis, Kate; Harding, Kate; Tookey, Pat A; Thorne, Claire

    2017-03-01

    To describe the use and outcomes of operative delivery and invasive procedures in pregnancy amongst women living with HIV. The National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC) is a comprehensive population-based surveillance study in the UK and Ireland. The NSHPC has collected data on operative delivery since 2008, and invasive procedures in pregnancy (amniocentesis, cordocentesis, chorionic villus sampling) from 2012. Descriptive analyses were conducted on 278 pregnancies expected to deliver from 1 January 2008 with outcome reported to the NSHPC by 31 March 2016. Among 9372 pregnancies in 2008-2016, there were 9072 livebirths with 251 operative deliveries and 27 invasive procedures in pregnancy reported. Information was available for 3023/3490 vaginal deliveries, and use of forceps or vacuum reported in 251deliveries (8.2%), increasing over calendar time to almost 10% by 2014-16. Forceps were used twice as often as vacuum delivery, and forceps use increased over time. One infant delivered operatively is known to have acquired HIV. From 2012 there were 4063 pregnancies resulting in 3952 livebirths, 83 terminations and 28 stillbirths. 2163/4063 had information on use (or not) of invasive procedures in pregnancy. Amniocentesis was reported in 25/2163 pregnancies, there was one report of chorionic villus sampling and one of cordocentesis. There were no reported transmissions following invasive procedures in pregnancy. This is the largest study to date to report on operative delivery in women living with HIV on combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), and provides an up-to-date picture of invasive procedures during pregnancy in this group. Findings from this comprehensive national study are reassuring but numbers are currently low; on-going monitoring is crucial as obstetric care of women with HIV becomes normalised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical study of treatment of cerebral hemorrhage: remove the intracranial hematoma with a minimal invasive procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Dongfeng; He Yunguang; Hu Wen; Lin Yang; Yang Danyang; Chen Shaokai; Ma Shaobing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility and factors of minimal invasive intracranial hematoma removing procedure as a treatment of cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: From May, 2000 to September, 2003, 33 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage underwent minimal invasive intracranial hematoma removing procedure and from May, 1997 to September, 2000, 27 patients with cerebral hemorrhage received conservative treatments. Two groups were compared and analyzed. The quantity of hemorrhage and the indication of procedure were also studied. Results: State of an illness has no significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05). The rate of recovery were higher in the group undergoing the procedure (57.6%) than in the control group (14.8%) (P<0.05). The rate of handicap were lower in the procedure group (24.0%) than in the control group (60.0%) (P<0.05). The mortality were also lower in the procedure group (24.2%) than in the control group (63.0%) (P<0.01). In the control group no patient with a hematoma larger than 70 ml survived. In the procedure group patients with hematoma larger than 70 ml had less chance of survival than the other patients (P<0.01). The mortality rate were respectively 50%, 5.6%, 33.3% when the procedure was done in super early, early, delayed stage. The mortality rate was higher in the super early stage than in early stage (P<0.05). Conclusion: The minimal invasive intracranial hematoma removing procedure has a better clinical outcome than the conservative treatment. The procedure reduces obviously mortality rate and increase the quality of survival. Multiple puncturing and draining or craniotomy are recommended to remove huge hematoma. The earlier treatment brings better clinical effects. This technique is simple, less invasive and provides good clinical outcome, which is worth recommendation

  11. Performance audit procedures for opacity monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaisance, S.J.; Peeler, J.W.

    1987-04-01

    This manual contains monitor-specific performance audit procedures and data forms for use in conducting audits of installed opacity continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS). General auditing procedures and acceptance limits for various audit criteria are discussed. Practical considerations and common problems encountered in conducting audits are delineated, and recommendations are included to optimize the successful completion of performance audits. Performance audit procedures and field-data forms were developed for six common opacity CEMS: (1) Lear Siegler, Inc. Model RM-41; (2) Lear Siegler, Inc. Model RM-4; (3) Dynatron Model 1100; (4) Thermo Electron, Inc. Model 400; (5) Thermo Electron, Inc. Model 1000A; and (6) Enviroplan Model D-R280 AV. Generic audit procedures are included for use in evaluating opacity CEMS with multiple transmissometers and combiner devices. In addition, several approaches for evaluating the zero-alignment or clear-path zero response are described. The zero-alignment procedures are included since the factor is fundamental to the accuracy of opacity monitoring data, even though the zero-alignment checks cannot usually be conducted during a performance audit

  12. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  13. Incorporating Minimally Invasive Procedures into an Aesthetic Surgery Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarasso, Alan; Nikfarjam, Jeremy; Abramowitz, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    Minimally invasive procedures in an aesthetic practice have grown over the past decade. Plastic surgery practices are embracing the incorporation of injectables and lasers as adjuncts to their surgical procedures. The use of botulinum toxin, hyaluronic acid fillers, and lasers has made a significant impact on the authors' practice. The authors describe the important considerations, consultation goals, and procedural steps with injectables and fillers. The novel use of deoxycholic acid injections is also described. The authors strongly think that as options continue to expand, plastic surgeons will benefit from taking an active role in adopting these new innovations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimal invasive single-site surgery in colorectal procedures: Current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Michele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive single-site (MISS surgery has recently been applied to colorectal surgery. We aimed to assess the current state of the art and the adequacy of preliminary oncological results. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Science databases. Keywords used were "Single Port" or "Single-Incision" or "LaparoEndoscopic Single Site" or "SILS™" and "Colon" or "Colorectal" and "Surgery". Results: Twenty-nine articles on colorectal MISS surgery have been published from July 2008 to July 2010, presenting data on 149 patients. One study reported analgesic requirement. The final incision length ranged from 2.5 to 8 cm. Only two studies reported fascial incision length. There were two port site hernias in a series of 13 patients (15.38%. Two "fully laparoscopic" MISS procedures with preparation and achievement of the anastomosis completely intracorporeally are reported. Future site of ileostomy was used as the sole access for the procedures in three studies. Lymph node harvesting, resection margins and length of specimen were sufficient in oncological cases. Conclusions: MISS colorectal surgery is a challenging procedure that seems to be safe and feasible, but the existing clinical evidence is limited. In selected cases, and especially when an ileostomy is planned, colorectal surgery may be an ideal indication for MISS surgery leading to a no-scar surgery. Despite preliminary oncological results showing the feasibility of MISS surgery, we want to stress the need to standardize the technique and carefully evaluate its application in oncosurgery under ethical committee control.

  15. The Effect of Microneedle Thickness on Pain During Minimally Invasive Facial Procedures: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Billur; Ozel, Bora; Bulam, Hakan; Guney, Kirdar; Tuncer, Serhan; Cenetoglu, Seyhan

    2014-07-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are becoming increasingly popular because they require minimal downtime and are effective for achieving a more youthful appearance. The choice of needle for minimally invasive procedures can be a major factor in the patient's comfort level, which in turn affects the physician's comfort level. In this comparative study, the authors assessed levels of pain and bruising after participants were injected with 30-gauge or 33-gauge (G) microneedles, which are commonly used for minimally invasive injection procedures. Twenty healthy volunteers were recruited for this prospective study. Eight injection points (4 on each side of the face) were determined for each patient. All participants received injections of saline with both microneedles in a randomized, blinded fashion. Levels of pain and bruising were assessed and analyzed for significance. The highest level of pain was in the malar region, and the lowest level was in the glabella. Although all pain scores were lower for the 33-G microneedle, the difference was significant only for the forehead. Because most minimally invasive procedures require multiple injections during the same sitting, the overall procedure was evaluated as well. Assessment of the multiple-injection process demonstrated a significant difference in pain level, favoring the 33-G needle. Although the difference in bruising was not statistically significant between the 2 needles, the degree of bruising was lower with the 33-G needle. For procedures that involve multiple injections to the face (such as mesotherapy and injection of botulinum toxin A), thinner needles result in less pain, making the overall experience more comfortable for the patient and the physician. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  16. Association Between Allergies and Psychiatric Disorders in Patients Undergoing Invasive Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Dwight; Wu, Stephanie E; Oklu, Rahmi; Erinjeri, Joseph; Deipolyi, Amy R

    Associations between allergies and psychiatric disorders have been reported in the context of depression and suicide; psychiatric disorders may affect pain perception. To investigate the relationship of allergies with psychiatric disorders and pain perception in the context of invasive procedures, specifically during tunneled hemodialysis catheter placement. We identified 89 patients (51 men, 38 women), mean age 66 years (range: 23-96), who underwent tunneled hemodialysis catheter placement (1/2014-2/2015), recording numeric rating scale pain scores, medications, psychiatric history, allergies, and smoking status. Of 89 patients, 47 patients had no allergies, and 42 had ≥1 allergy. Patients with allergies were more likely to have a pre-existing psychiatric disorder compared to those without allergies, odds ratio 2.6 (95% CI: 1.0-6.8). Having allergies did not affect procedural sedation or postprocedural pain scores. Multiple logistic regression with age, sex, smoking, presence of allergies, psychiatric history, inpatient/outpatient status, procedure time, and procedural sedation administration as inputs and postprocedural pain as the outcome showed that the only independent predictor was receiving procedural sedation (P = 0.005). Findings corroborate anecdotal reports of allergies as a marker for psychiatric history. However, having allergies was not associated with increased pain or need for more sedation. Further studies could prospectively assess whether allergies and psychiatric disorders affect patient/doctor perceptions beyond pain during invasive procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Invasive procedure for clarification of pulmonary nodules; Invasive Verfahren zur Abklaerung pulmonaler Rundherde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, A.H. [Universitaetsklinikum, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The management of solitary lung nodules poses a common clinical problem and biopsy is often required. Several guidelines provide slightly different recommendations and there are no uniform recommendations regarding the ideal technique of puncture guidance (e.g. percutaneous versus bronchoscopic or thoracoscopic). Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) and core biopsy are well established techniques. Both can be performed under CT and to some extent ultrasound guidance. Diagnostic accuracies of FNA and core biopsy for malignant lesions are around 95 %. Core biopsy is superior to FNA for establishing a specific diagnosis with a diagnostic yield of 81-88 % versus 17-21 %. In clinical routine practice core biopsy is the superior tool when compared to FNA. Central lesions in close proximity to bronchi may be biopsied with endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided bronchoscopy. In all other lesions percutaneous, ideally CT-guided biopsy should be the method of first choice. (orig.) [German] Solitaere Lungenrundherde stellen ein haeufiges differenzialdiagnostisches Problem dar, das oftmals mit der Bildgebung alleine nicht endgueltig zu loesen ist und eine Biopsie erfordert. Die Indikation zur Biopsie variiert zwischen den Leitlinien, und die beste Technik der Biopsie (perkutan vs. bronchoskopisch vs. thorakoskopisch) ist oftmals nicht eindeutig. Feinnadelaspirations- (FNA) und Stanzbiopsie stehen als lange etablierte Standardtechniken zur Verfuegung. Beide koennen CT- und bedingt ultraschallgesteuert durchgefuehrt werden. Die diagnostische Aussagekraft fuer die Diagnose maligner Tumoren liegt fuer beide Techniken bei 95 %. Die Stanzbiopsie ist jedoch der FNA fuer die spezifische Diagnose benigner Prozesse mit einer Genauigkeit von 82-88 vs. 17-21 % ueberlegen. Die Stanzbiopsie ist gegenueber der FNA das in der klinischen Routine ueberlegene Werkzeug. Bei sehr zentralen Herden in Nachbarschaft zu einem Bronchus kann primaer eine bronchoskopische EBUS-gesteuerte (endobronchialer

  18. Aging well--the role of minimally invasive aesthetic dermatological procedures in women over 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Payne, Christopher Rowland

    2010-03-01

    The western world is getting older. Aging well has become the new target of preventative medicine. Aesthetic dermatology can contribute to this quest. Females over 65 represent an important and growing group of consumers of cosmetic procedures. In this group, there is a paucity of scientific evaluation of aesthetic procedures. To review the use of minimally invasive procedures for facial rejuvenation in women over 65. Drawing from both the literature and personal experience, the opportunities, modifications, and limitations of minimally invasive techniques for facial rejuvenation in older women are considered. In this older age group, dermal fillers, chemical and laser peels, and nonablative photorejuvenation remain useful and can each be used as stand-alone treatments. In this age group, botulinum toxin (BTX) injections are more often used in combination with other procedures. With respect to aesthetic procedures, women over 65 are different from younger women. More scientific investigation is necessary to better meet needs of this growing part of the population. Available data suggest that aesthetic dermatology can make a major contribution to the complex matter of aging well.

  19. Building America House Performance Analysis Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Farrar-Nagy, S.; Anderson, R.; Judkoff, R.

    2001-10-29

    As the Building America Program has grown to include a large and diverse cross section of the home building industry, accurate and consistent analysis techniques have become more important to help all program partners as they perform design tradeoffs and calculate energy savings for prototype houses built as part of the program. This document illustrates some of the analysis concepts proven effective and reliable for analyzing the transient energy usage of advanced energy systems as well as entire houses. The analysis procedure described here provides a starting point for calculating energy savings of a prototype house relative to two base cases: builder standard practice and regional standard practice. Also provides building simulation analysis to calculate annual energy savings based on side-by-side short-term field testing of a prototype house.

  20. Perioral rejuvenation: restoration of attractiveness in aging females by minimally invasive procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany Abstract: Lips and the perioral area are of outstanding importance in youthful appearance, attractiveness, and beauty. In contrast to younger and middle aged females, there is only scant published data on minimally invasive procedures to restore and revitalize lips and perioral soft tissue in elderly females. In this review we report the signs of aging in this particular region and the underlying anatomy. We review studies on lip restoration in younger females and present our techniques for elderly women. With an individually tailored approach, elderly females benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Keywords: facial aging, perioral soft tissue, lips, dermal fillers, anatomy

  1. Early benefits of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in comparison with the traditional open procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Rečnik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackgroundLumbar interbody fusion is a standard operative procedure in orthopedic spine surgery. Morphological and functional changes in the multifidus muscle after an open procedure have led to the development of a minimally invasive technique, after which no such muscle changes were observed. MethodsSixty-four patients, with clinical and radiological criteria for one-level transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion were enrolled in our prospective randomized study between December 2011 and March 2014. They were randomized into two groups: open approach (33 patients vs. minimally invasive approach (31 patients; one patient was excluded from each group due to postoperative complications. Independent samples T-test was used to compare average values of increase in creatin kinase (CK, which is an enzymatic marker of muscle injury, average surgical time, loss of blood during and after surgery, back pain according to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and day of discharge from the hospital. ResultsStatistically important (P< 0.001 lower blood loss (188 ml vs. 527 ml total, less CK increase (15 ukat/L vs. 29 ukat/L, lower VAS score after surgery (7.3 vs. 8.7 and earlier discharge from the hospital (3.5 days vs. 5.2 days were observed in the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion group. No significant difference in average surgical time was recorded. Conclusions Our results suggest, that minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion causes is associated with less muscle damage, lower blood loss, less post surgical pain and faster early rehabilitation, which is in accordance with previous studies.

  2. Manual of extravascular minimally invasive interventional procedures of the liver and biliary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Mena, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    The use of interventional radiology and image-guided surgery has increased. Interventional radiologists are involved in patient treatment, well as in the diagnosis of the disease carrying his knowledge to the tumor treatment and procedures more invasive. Large amount of didactic material there are available, but the country lacks a manual to standardize interventional radiological techniques carried out. Also, those that could be instituted and adapted effectively in the management of hepatobiliary pathology of the Sistema de Salud Publica in Costa Rica, that covers the main procedures and adopt guidelines in a standardized way. A manual of procedures minimally invasive radiologic extravascular of the liver and biliary tract, is presented with broad bibliographic support that directs, standardizes and is adaptable to the needs and own resources of Costa Rica. Interventional radiology has been a non surgical alternative of a low index of complications, useful for the management of some health problems, avoids surgery and certainly lower costs. An alternative to surgical treatment of many conditions is offered, thereby reducing complications (morbidity) and can eliminate the need for hospitalization, in some cases. The development of new materials has allowed the most common working tools of the medical field are improved and become increasingly more efficient in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, improving the training of radiologists in the interventional field. (author) [es

  3. Motivations for seeking minimally invasive cosmetic procedures in an academic outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanko, Joseph F; Taglienti, Anthony J; Wilson, Anthony J; Sarwer, David B; Margolis, David J; Dai, Julia; Percec, Ivona

    2015-11-01

    The demand for minimally invasive cosmetic procedures has continued to rise, yet few studies have examined this patient population. This study sought to define the demographics, social characteristics, and motivations of patients seeking minimally invasive facial cosmetic procedures. A prospective, single-institution cohort study of 72 patients was conducted from 2011 through 2014 at an urban academic medical center. Patients were aged 25 through 70 years; presented for botulinum toxin or soft tissue filler injections; and completed demographic, informational, and psychometric questionnaires before treatment. Descriptive statistics were conducted using Stata statistical software. The average patient was 47.8 years old, was married, had children, was employed, possessed a college or advanced degree, and reported an above-average income. Most patients felt that the first signs of aging occurred around their eyes (74.6%), and a similar percentage expressed this area was the site most desired for rejuvenation. Almost one-third of patients experienced a "major life event" within the preceding year, nearly half had sought prior counseling from a mental health specialist, and 23.6% were being actively prescribed psychiatric medication at the time of treatment. Patients undergoing injectable aesthetic treatments in an urban outpatient academic center were mostly employed, highly educated, affluent women who believed that their procedure would positively impact their appearance. A significant minority experienced a major life event within the past year, which an astute clinician should address during the initial patient consultation. This study helps to better understand the psychosocial factors characterizing this patient population. 4 Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Survey of prenatal counselling practices regarding aneuploidy risk modification, invasive diagnostic procedure risks, and procedure eligibility criteria in Canadian centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Danna; Davies, Gregory; Armour, Christine M

    2012-07-01

    To explore prenatal practices related to aneuploidy screening, risk modification, and invasive diagnostic procedures across Canadian centres. We conducted a survey of members of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian College of Medical Genetics, and the Canadian Society of Maternal Fetal Medicine, who provide direct counselling or management of prenatal patients in Canada. Eighty-two of 157 respondents indicated that their centre's definition of advanced maternal age was ≥ 35 years, with 33/157 respondents reporting an advanced maternal age definition of ≥ 40 years. The majority of respondents reported that prenatal serum screening for aneuploidy is provincially funded in their province or territory (121/147). The majority of respondents who reported that prenatal screening is not provincially funded (17/147) were from Quebec (14/17). Thirty-nine of 123 respondents reported that their centre defines increased nuchal translucency as ≥ 3.0 mm, whereas 49/123 reported a definition of ≥ 3.5 mm. Sixty-four of 150 respondents reported that the aneuploidy risk provided by serum screening is modified by a soft marker likelihood ratio, whereas 46/150 respondents reported that both age-related and serum screening risks are modified. Fifty-nine of 124 respondents reported that their centre will modify aneuploidy risk after a normal ultrasound; the most commonly cited negative likelihood ratio was 0.5. The most commonly reported procedure-related risk for chorionic villus sampling was 1/100 (123/147) and for amniocentesis was 1/200 (73/142). This study demonstrates inconsistencies in prenatal practices and access to screening programs across Canada. The information gained from this study will inform policy advisors developing prenatal practice guidelines at both the provincial and national levels.

  5. An Audit of Gynaecological Procedures Performed at Aminu Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Audit of all gynecological procedures as one of the commonest operations performed in medical practice is not routinely done in developing countries, including Nigeria. Aim: The study was aimed at determining the rate of all gynecological procedures performed; the common gynecological procedures and ...

  6. Relationships between cardiac innervation/perfusion imbalance and ventricular arrhythmias: impact on invasive electrophysiological parameters and ablation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Menichetti, Francesca; Soldati, Ezio; Liga, Riccardo; Vannozzi, Andrea; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Marzullo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic innervation parameters at myocardial scintigraphy and intra-cavitary electrophysiological data in patients with ventricular arrhythmias (VA) submitted to invasive electrophysiological study and ablation procedure. Sixteen subjects underwent invasive electrophysiological study with electroanatomical mapping (EAM) followed by trans-catheter ablations of VA. Before ablation all patients were studied with a combined evaluation of regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic innervation by means of tomographic "9"9"mTc-tetrofosmin and "1"2"3I- metaiodobenzylguanidine cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) scintigraphies, respectively. Off-line spatial co-registration of CZT perfusion and innervation data with the three-dimensional EAM reconstruction was performed in every patient. CZT revealed the presence of myocardial scar in 55 (20 %) segments. Of the viable myocardial segments, 131 (60 %) presented a preserved adrenergic innervation, while 86 (40 %) showed a significantly depressed innervation (i.e. innervation/perfusion mismatch). On EAM, the invasively measured intra-cavitary voltage was significantly lower in scarred segments than in viable ones (1.7 ± 1.5 mV vs. 4.0 ± 2.2 mV, P < 0.001). Interestingly, among the viable segments, those showing an innervation/perfusion mismatch presented a significantly lower intra-cavitary voltage than those with preserved innervation (1.9 ± 2.5 mV vs. 4.7 ± 2.3 mV, P < 0.001). Intra-cardiac ablation was performed in 63 (23 %) segments. On multivariate analysis, after correction for scar burden, the segments showing an innervation/perfusion mismatch remained the most frequent ablation targets (OR 5.6, 95 % CI 1.5-20.8; P = 0.009). In patients with VA, intra-cavitary electrical abnormalities frequently originate at the level of viable myocardial segments with depressed sympathetic innervation that frequently represents the ultimate ablation target. (orig.)

  7. Relationships between cardiac innervation/perfusion imbalance and ventricular arrhythmias: impact on invasive electrophysiological parameters and ablation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Menichetti, Francesca; Soldati, Ezio; Liga, Riccardo; Vannozzi, Andrea; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia [University Hospital of Pisa, Cardio-Thoracic and Vascular Department, Pisa (Italy); Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); CNR, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To assess the relationship between regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic innervation parameters at myocardial scintigraphy and intra-cavitary electrophysiological data in patients with ventricular arrhythmias (VA) submitted to invasive electrophysiological study and ablation procedure. Sixteen subjects underwent invasive electrophysiological study with electroanatomical mapping (EAM) followed by trans-catheter ablations of VA. Before ablation all patients were studied with a combined evaluation of regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic innervation by means of tomographic {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and {sup 123}I- metaiodobenzylguanidine cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) scintigraphies, respectively. Off-line spatial co-registration of CZT perfusion and innervation data with the three-dimensional EAM reconstruction was performed in every patient. CZT revealed the presence of myocardial scar in 55 (20 %) segments. Of the viable myocardial segments, 131 (60 %) presented a preserved adrenergic innervation, while 86 (40 %) showed a significantly depressed innervation (i.e. innervation/perfusion mismatch). On EAM, the invasively measured intra-cavitary voltage was significantly lower in scarred segments than in viable ones (1.7 ± 1.5 mV vs. 4.0 ± 2.2 mV, P < 0.001). Interestingly, among the viable segments, those showing an innervation/perfusion mismatch presented a significantly lower intra-cavitary voltage than those with preserved innervation (1.9 ± 2.5 mV vs. 4.7 ± 2.3 mV, P < 0.001). Intra-cardiac ablation was performed in 63 (23 %) segments. On multivariate analysis, after correction for scar burden, the segments showing an innervation/perfusion mismatch remained the most frequent ablation targets (OR 5.6, 95 % CI 1.5-20.8; P = 0.009). In patients with VA, intra-cavitary electrical abnormalities frequently originate at the level of viable myocardial segments with depressed sympathetic innervation that frequently represents the ultimate ablation target

  8. Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

  9. Long-term professional performance of minimally invasive surgery post-graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Paula Loureiro

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the contribution of a post-graduation program in surgeons professional careers. METHODS: participants were asked to answer a questionnaire with questions related to possible changes in their professional performance after the end of the course. RESULTS: forty-three (76.7% of the 56 participants eligible for the study responded to the questionnaires. Most participants, 32 (74.4%, had previous contact with laparoscopic surgery; however, only 14 (32.5% reported the experience as primary surgeon. The expectations on the course were reached or exceeded for 36 (83.7% participants. Thirty-seven (86% incorporated minimally invasive procedures in their daily surgical practice, 37 (86% reported improvements in their income above 10% and 12% reported income increase of over 100%, directly related to their increase of laparoscopic activity. CONCLUSION: the program in minimally invasive surgery provides a high level of satisfaction to its participants, enables them to perform more complex technical procedures, such as sutures, and improves their professional economic performance.

  10. Micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS: a review of surgical procedures using stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillunat LE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lutz E Pillunat,1 Carl Erb,2 Anselm GM Jünemann,3 Friedemann Kimmich4 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, 2Augenklinik am Wittenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany; 4eyecons, Karlsruhe, Germany Abstract: Over the last decade several novel surgical treatment options and devices for glaucoma have been developed. All these developments aim to cause as little trauma as possible to the eye, to safely, effectively, and sustainably reduce intraocular pressure (IOP, to produce reproducible results, and to be easy to adopt. The term “micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS” was used for summarizing all these procedures. Currently MIGS is gaining more and more interest and popularity. The possible reduction of the number of glaucoma medications, the ab interno approach without damaging the conjunctival tissue, and the probably safer procedures compared to incisional surgical methods may explain the increased interest in MIGS. The use of glaucoma drainage implants for lowering IOP in difficult-to-treat patients has been established for a long time, however, a variety of new glaucoma micro-stents are being manufactured by using various materials and are available to increase aqueous outflow via different pathways. This review summarizes published results of randomized clinical studies and extensive case report series on these devices, including Schlemm’s canal stents (iStent®, iStent® inject, Hydrus, suprachoroidal stents (CyPass®, iStent® Supra, and subconjunctival stents (XEN. The article summarizes the findings of published material on efficacy and safety for each of these approaches. Keywords: glaucoma, micro-invasive glaucoma surgery, MIGS, iStent, iStent inject, CyPass, Hydrus, XEN

  11. Efficiency of performing pulmonary procedures in a shared endoscopy unit: procedure time, turnaround time, delays, and procedure waiting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Lee, Mui Yok; Wang, Chunhong; Hussein, Nurmalah B M; Selvi, Kalai; Tee, Augustine

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of performing pulmonary procedures in the endoscopy unit in a large teaching hospital. A prospective study from May 20 to July 19, 2013, was designed. The main outcome measures were procedure delays and their reasons, duration of procedural steps starting from patient's arrival to endoscopy unit, turnaround time, total case durations, and procedure wait time. A total of 65 procedures were observed. The most common procedure was BAL (61%) followed by TBLB (31%). Overall procedures for 35 (53.8%) of 65 patients were delayed by ≥ 30 minutes, 21/35 (60%) because of "spillover" of the gastrointestinal and surgical cases into the time block of pulmonary procedure. Time elapsed between end of pulmonary procedure and start of the next procedure was ≥ 30 minutes in 8/51 (16%) of cases. In 18/51 (35%) patients there was no next case in the room after completion of the pulmonary procedure. The average idle time of the room after the end of pulmonary procedure and start of next case or end of shift at 5:00 PM if no next case was 58 ± 53 minutes. In 17/51 (33%) patients the room's idle time was >60 minutes. A total of 52.3% of patients had the wait time >2 days and 11% had it ≥ 6 days, reason in 15/21 (71%) being unavailability of the slot. Most pulmonary procedures were delayed due to spillover of the gastrointestinal and surgical cases into the block time allocated to pulmonary procedures. The most common reason for difficulty encountered in scheduling the pulmonary procedure was slot unavailability. This caused increased procedure waiting time. The strategies to reduce procedure delays and turnaround times, along with improved scheduling methods, may have a favorable impact on the volume of procedures performed in the unit thereby optimizing the existing resources.

  12. Building America Performance Analysis Procedures: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-06-01

    To measure progress toward multi-year research goals, cost and performance trade-offs are evaluated through a series of controlled field and laboratory experiments supported by energy analysis techniques using test data to calibrate simulation models.

  13. Summary of functional and performance test procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitzel, Jens; Gülzow, Erich; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    Different Test Modules (TM) are defined for the functional and performance characterization of a PEMFC stack. The master document TM2.00 defines requirements and methodology for parameter variation, stability and data acquisition.......Different Test Modules (TM) are defined for the functional and performance characterization of a PEMFC stack. The master document TM2.00 defines requirements and methodology for parameter variation, stability and data acquisition....

  14. 40 CFR 63.309 - Performance tests and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance tests and procedures. 63.309 Section 63.309 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Standards for Coke Oven Batteries § 63.309 Performance tests and procedures. (a) Except as otherwise...

  15. Building America Performance Analysis Procedures: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Anderson, R.; Judkoff, R.; Christensen, C.; Eastment, M.; Norton, P.; Reeves, P.; Hancock, E.

    2004-06-01

    To measure progress toward multi-year Building America research goals, cost and performance trade-offs are evaluated through a series of controlled field and laboratory experiments supported by energy analysis techniques that use test data to''calibrate'' energy simulation models. This report summarizes the guidelines for reporting such analytical results using the Building America Research Benchmark (Version 3.1) in studies that also include consideration of current Regional and Builder Standard Practice. Version 3.1 of the Benchmark is generally consistent with the 1999 Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Reference Home, with additions that allow evaluation of all home energy uses.

  16. Cognition and procedure representational requirements for predictive human performance models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, K.

    1992-01-01

    Models and modeling environments for human performance are becoming significant contributors to early system design and analysis procedures. Issues of levels of automation, physical environment, informational environment, and manning requirements are being addressed by such man/machine analysis systems. The research reported here investigates the close interaction between models of human cognition and models that described procedural performance. We describe a methodology for the decomposition of aircrew procedures that supports interaction with models of cognition on the basis of procedures observed; that serves to identify cockpit/avionics information sources and crew information requirements; and that provides the structure to support methods for function allocation among crew and aiding systems. Our approach is to develop an object-oriented, modular, executable software representation of the aircrew, the aircraft, and the procedures necessary to satisfy flight-phase goals. We then encode in a time-based language, taxonomies of the conceptual, relational, and procedural constraints among the cockpit avionics and control system and the aircrew. We have designed and implemented a goals/procedures hierarchic representation sufficient to describe procedural flow in the cockpit. We then execute the procedural representation in simulation software and calculate the values of the flight instruments, aircraft state variables and crew resources using the constraints available from the relationship taxonomies. The system provides a flexible, extensible, manipulative and executable representation of aircrew and procedures that is generally applicable to crew/procedure task-analysis. The representation supports developed methods of intent inference, and is extensible to include issues of information requirements and functional allocation. We are attempting to link the procedural representation to models of cognitive functions to establish several intent inference methods

  17. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kröpil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fürst, Günter

    2011-01-01

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 ± 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  18. Patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, D.; Hristova-Popova, J.; Avramova-Cholakova, S.; Deyanova, Ts.; Dobrikov, R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to evaluate patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures. All the data were collected in the Emergency Hospital 'N. I. Pirogov'. While recording data for the patients, a real time dosimetry measurement of the medical staff was made. Air kerma-area product (KAP) was recorded for intravenous pyelogram (IVP), percutaneous nephrostomy (PN) and ureteral 'double-J' stenting. Patient data sex, age and weight were also taken. Staff doses were estimated with the system RaySafe i2. It contains four dosimeters, with a wireless connection to a real time display. The dosimeters were worn on the unprotected upper part of the body and measured the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). The mean KAP values for the procedures are: 3.21 Gy.cm 2 for IVP, 10.37 Gy.cm 2 for PN and 4.15 Gy.cm 2 for 'double-J' respectively. The highest staff dose for PN and 'double-J' is received by the urologist (160 μSv and 47.3 μSv, respectively), while for the IVP the radiographer has the highest exposure (20 μSv). Each member of the medical staff was on a different position in respect to the X-ray tube and the patient, which is the main reason for the differences in the staff doses. The variations in the mean patient and staff doses are mostly due to the interventions themselves, their complexity and the individual treatment of every patient. RaySafe i2 is very useful as guideline for making a choice of a better position and in the decreasing of radiation exposure to the staff

  19. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy after Spinal Anesthesia for a Minimally Invasive Urologic Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Lilitsis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a patient who suffered from Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM immediately after the initiation of subarachnoid anesthesia for a minimally invasive urologic procedure (tension-free vaginal tape (TVT surgery for stress urine incontinence. TCM mimics acute coronary syndrome and is caused by an exaggerated sympathetic reaction to significant emotional or physical stress. Our patient suffered from chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, and hemodynamic instability immediately following subarachnoid anesthesia and later in the postanesthesia care unit. Blood troponin was elevated and new electrocardiographic changes appeared indicative of cardiac ischemia. Cardiac ultrasound indicated left ventricular apical akinesia and ballooning with severely affected contractility. The patient was admitted to coronary intensive care for the proper care and finally was discharged. TCM was attributed to high emotional preoperative stress for which no premedication had been administered to the patient. In conclusion, adequate premedication and anxiety management are not only a measure to alleviate psychological stress of surgical patients, but, more importantly, an imperative mean to suppress sympathetic nerve system response and its cardiovascular consequences.

  20. Enhancement of human papilloma virus type 16 E7 specific T cell responses by local invasive procedures in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; van Baarle, D; Hoogeboom, BN; Reesink, N; Klip, H; Schuuring, E; Nijhuis, E; Pawlita, M; Bungener, L; de Vries-Idema, J; Nijman, H; Miedema, F; Daemen, T; van der Zee, A

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that local invasive procedures may alter the natural course of (pre)malignant cervical disease. This could be due to partial excision of the lesions, or via induction of cellular immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV) by the local invasive procedures. We studied the

  1. Prospective Cohort Study Investigating Changes in Body Image, Quality of Life, and Self-Esteem Following Minimally Invasive Cosmetic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanko, Joseph F; Dai, Julia; Gelfand, Joel M; Sarwer, David B; Percec, Ivona

    2018-04-13

    Minimally invasive cosmetic injectable procedures are increasingly common. However, a few studies have investigated changes in psychosocial functioning following these treatments. To assess changes in body image, quality of life, and self-esteem following cosmetic injectable treatment with soft tissue fillers and neuromodulators. Open, prospective study of 75 patients undergoing cosmetic injectable procedures for facial aging to evaluate changes in psychosocial functioning within 6 weeks of treatment. Outcome measures included the Derriford appearance scale (DAS-24), body image quality of life inventory (BIQLI), and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale. Body image dissatisfaction, as assessed by the DAS-24, improved significantly 6 weeks after the treatment. Body image quality of life, as assessed by the BIQLI, improved, but the change did not reach statistical significance. Self-esteem was unchanged after the treatment. Minimally invasive cosmetic injectable procedures were associated with reductions in body image dissatisfaction. Future research, using recently developed cosmetic surgery-specific instruments, may provide further insight into the psychosocial benefits of minimally invasive procedures.

  2. Procedure automation: the effect of automated procedure execution on situation awareness and human performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, Gisle; Svengren, Haakan; Heimdal, Jan O.; Nilsen, Svein; Hulsund, John-Einar; Bisio, Rossella; Debroise, Xavier

    2004-04-01

    As advised by the procedure workshop convened in Halden in 2000, the Halden Project conducted an experiment on the effect of automation of Computerised Procedure Systems (CPS) on situation awareness and human performance. The expected outcome of the study was to provide input for guidance on CPS design, and to support the Halden Project's ongoing research on human reliability analysis. The experiment was performed in HAMMLAB using the HAMBO BWR simulator and the COPMA-III CPS. Eight crews of operators from Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3 participated. Three research questions were investigated: 1) Does procedure automation create Out-Of-The-Loop (OOTL) performance problems? 2) Does procedure automation affect situation awareness? 3) Does procedure automation affect crew performance? The independent variable, 'procedure configuration', had four levels: paper procedures, manual CPS, automation with breaks, and full automation. The results showed that the operators experienced OOTL problems in full automation, but that situation awareness and crew performance (response time) were not affected. One possible explanation for this is that the operators monitored the automated procedure execution conscientiously, something which may have prevented the OOTL problems from having negative effects on situation awareness and crew performance. In a debriefing session, the operators clearly expressed their dislike for the full automation condition, but that automation with breaks could be suitable for some tasks. The main reason why the operators did not like the full automation was that they did not feel being in control. A qualitative analysis addressing factors contributing to response time delays revealed that OOTL problems did not seem to cause delays, but that some delays could be explained by the operators having problems with the freeze function of the CPS. Also other factors such as teamwork and operator tendencies were of importance. Several design implications were drawn

  3. What limits the performance of current invasive Brain Machine Interfaces?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gytis eBaranauskas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a brain-machine interface (BMI or a computer-brain interface is simple: BMI creates a communication pathway for a direct control by brain of an external device. In reality BMIs are very complex devices and only recently the increase in computing power of microprocessors enabled a boom in BMI research that continues almost unabated to this date, the high point being the insertion of electrode arrays into the brains of 5 human patients in a clinical trial run by Cyberkinetics with few other clinical tests still in progress. Meanwhile several EEG-based BMI devices (non-invasive BMIs were launched commercially. Modern electronics and dry electrode technology made possible to drive the cost of some of these devices below few hundred dollars. However, the initial excitement of the direct control by brain waves of a computer or other equipment is dampened by large efforts required for learning, high error rates and slow response speed. All these problems are directly related to low information transfer rates typical for such EEG-based BMIs. In invasive BMIs employing multiple electrodes inserted into the brain one may expect much higher information transfer rates than in EEG-based BMIs because, in theory, each electrode provides an independent information channel. However, although invasive BMIs require more expensive equipment and have ethical problems related to the need to insert electrodes in the live brain, such financial and ethical costs are often not offset by a dramatic improvement in the information transfer rate. Thus the main topic of this review is why in invasive BMIs an apparently much larger information content obtained with multiple extracellular electrodes does not translate into much higher rates of information transfer? This paper explores possible answers to this question by concluding that more research on what movement parameters are encoded by neurons in motor cortex is needed before we can enjoy the next

  4. Somatic hospital contacts, invasive cardiac procedures, and mortality from heart disease in patients with severe mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Gasse, Christiane; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2009-07-01

    Excess mortality from heart disease is observed in patients with severe mental disorder. This excess mortality may be rooted in adverse effects of pharmacological or psychotropic treatment, lifestyle factors, or inadequate somatic care. To examine whether persons with severe mental disorder, defined as persons admitted to a psychiatric hospital with bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophrenia, are in contact with hospitals and undergoing invasive procedures for heart disease to the same degree as the nonpsychiatric general population, and to determine whether they have higher mortality rates of heart disease. A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons born in Denmark was followed up from 1994 to 2007. Rates of mortality, somatic contacts, and invasive procedures were estimated by survival analysis. Incidence rate ratios of heart disease admissions and heart disease mortality as well as probability of invasive cardiac procedures. The incidence rate ratio of heart disease contacts in persons with severe mental disorder compared with the rate for the nonpsychiatric general population was only slightly increased, at 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.14). In contrast, their excess mortality rate ratio from heart disease was 2.90 (95% confidence interval, 2.71-3.10). Five years after the first contact for somatic heart disease, the risk of dying of heart disease was 8.26% for persons with severe mental disorder (aged mental disorder as compared with the nonpsychiatric general population (7.04% vs 12.27%, respectively). Individuals with severe mental disorder had only negligible excess rates of contact for heart disease. Given their excess mortality from heart disease and lower rates of invasive procedures after first contact, it would seem that the treatment for heart disease offered to these individuals in Denmark is neither sufficiently efficient nor sufficiently intensive. This undertreatment may explain part of their excess

  5. Psychomotor skills assessment in practicing surgeons experienced in performing advanced laparoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anthony G; Smith, C Daniel; Bowers, Steven P; Seymour, Neal E; Pearson, Adam; McNatt, Steven; Hananel, David; Satava, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has introduced a new and unique set of psychomotor skills for a surgeon to acquire and master. Although assessment technologies have been proposed, precise and objective psychomotor skills assessment of surgeons performing laparoscopic procedures has not been detailed. Two hundred ten surgeons attending the 2001 annual meeting of the American College of Surgeons in New Orleans who reported having completed more than 50 laparoscopic procedures participated. Subjects were required to complete one box-trainer laparoscopic cutting task and a similar virtual reality task. These tasks were specifically designed to test only psychomotor and not cognitive skills. Both tasks were completed twice. Performance of tasks was assessed and analyzed. Demographic and laparoscopic experience data were also collected. Complete data were available on 195 surgeons. In this group, surgeons performed the box-trainer task better with their dominant hand (p psychomotor skills is now possible. Surgeons who had performed more than 50 laparoscopic procedures showed considerable variability in their performance on a simple laparoscopic and virtual reality task. Approximately 10% of surgeons tested performed the task significantly worse than the group's average performance. Studies such as this may form the methodology for establishing criteria levels and performance objectives in objective assessment of the technical skills component of determining surgical competence.

  6. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Surgeons Performing Minimally Invasive Surgery: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleblas, C.C.J.; Man, A.M. de; Haak, L. van den; Vierhout, M.E.; Jansen, F.W.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to review musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) prevalence among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery. BACKGROUND: Advancements in laparoscopic surgery have primarily focused on enhancing patient benefits. However, compared with open surgery, laparoscopic

  7. Locomotor performance of cane toads differs between native-range and invasive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala, Georgia; Christian, Keith; Brown, Gregory; Shine, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Invasive species provide a robust opportunity to evaluate how animals deal with novel environmental challenges. Shifts in locomotor performance-and thus the ability to disperse-(and especially, the degree to which it is constrained by thermal and hydric extremes) are of special importance, because they might affect the rate that an invader can spread. We studied cane toads ( Rhinella marina ) across a broad geographical range: two populations within the species' native range in Brazil, two invasive populations on the island of Hawai'i and eight invasive populations encompassing the eastern, western and southern limits of the toad invasion in Australia. A toad's locomotor performance on a circular raceway was strongly affected by both its temperature and its hydration state, but the nature and magnitude of those constraints differed across populations. In their native range, cane toads exhibited relatively low performance (even under optimal test conditions) and a rapid decrease in performance at lower temperatures and hydration levels. At the other extreme, performance was high in toads from southern Australia, and virtually unaffected by desiccation. Hawai'ian toads broadly resembled their Brazilian conspecifics, plausibly reflecting similar climatic conditions. The invasion of Australia has been accompanied by a dramatic enhancement in the toads' locomotor abilities, and (in some populations) by an ability to maintain locomotor performance even when the animal is cold and/or dehydrated. The geographical divergences in performance among cane toad populations graphically attest to the adaptability of invasive species in the face of novel abiotic challenges.

  8. Interactive effects of herbivory and competition intensity determine invasive plant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing; Siemann, Evan

    2012-10-01

    Herbivory can reduce plant fitness, and its effects can be increased by competition. Though numerous studies have examined the joint effects of herbivores and competitors on plant performance, these interactive effects are seldom considered in the context of plant invasions. Here, we examined variation in plant performance within a competitive environment in response to both specialist and generalist herbivores using Chinese tallow as a model species. We combined tallow plants from native and invasive populations to form all possible pairwise combinations, and designated invasive populations as stronger neighbours and native populations as weaker neighbours. We found that when no herbivory was imposed, invasive populations always had higher total biomass than natives, regardless of their neighbours, which is consistent with our assumption of increased competitive ability. Defoliation by either generalist or specialist herbivores suppressed plant growth but the effects of specialists were generally stronger for invasive populations. Invasive populations had their lowest biomass when fed upon by specialists while simultaneously competing with stronger neighbours. The root/shoot ratios of invasive populations were lower than those of native populations under almost all conditions, and invasive plants were taller than native plants overall, especially when herbivores were present, suggesting that invasive populations may adopt an "aboveground first" strategy to cope with herbivory and competition. These results suggest that release from herbivores, especially specialists, improves an invader's performance and helps to increase its competitive ability. Therefore, increasing interspecific competition intensity by planting a stronger neighbour while simultaneously releasing a specialist herbivore may be an especially effective method of managing invasive plants.

  9. Core Competencies or a Competent Core? A Scoping Review and Realist Synthesis of Invasive Bedside Procedural Skills Training in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydges, Ryan; Stroud, Lynfa; Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S; Imrie, Kevin; Hatala, Rose

    2017-11-01

    Invasive bedside procedures are core competencies for internal medicine, yet no formal training guidelines exist. The authors conducted a scoping review and realist synthesis to characterize current training for lumbar puncture, arthrocentesis, paracentesis, thoracentesis, and central venous catheterization. They aimed to collate how educators justify using specific interventions, establish which interventions have the best evidence, and offer directions for future research and training. The authors systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and ERIC through April 2015. Studies were screened in three phases; all reviews were performed independently and in duplicate. The authors extracted information on learner and patient demographics, study design and methodological quality, and details of training interventions and measured outcomes. A three-step realist synthesis was performed to synthesize findings on each study's context, mechanism, and outcome, and to identify a foundational training model. From an initial 6,671 studies, 149 studies were further reduced to 67 (45%) reporting sufficient information for realist synthesis. Analysis yielded four types of procedural skills training interventions. There was relative consistency across contexts and significant differences in mechanisms and outcomes across the four intervention types. The medical procedural service was identified as an adaptable foundational training model. The observed heterogeneity in procedural skills training implies that programs are not consistently developing residents who are competent in core procedures. The findings suggest that researchers in education and quality improvement will need to collaborate to design training that develops a "competent core" of proceduralists using simulation and clinical rotations.

  10. Comparing open and minimally invasive surgical procedures for oesophagectomy in the treatment of cancer: the ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) feasibility study and pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Chris; Avery, Kerry; Berrisford, Richard; Barham, Paul; Noble, Sian M; Fernandez, Aida Moure; Hanna, George; Goldin, Robert; Elliott, Jackie; Wheatley, Timothy; Sanders, Grant; Hollowood, Andrew; Falk, Stephen; Titcomb, Dan; Streets, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    Localised oesophageal cancer can be curatively treated with surgery (oesophagectomy) but the procedure is complex with a risk of complications, negative effects on quality of life and a recovery period of 6-9 months. Minimal-access surgery may accelerate recovery. The ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study aimed to establish the feasibility of, and methodology for, a definitive trial comparing minimally invasive and open surgery for oesophagectomy. Objectives were to quantify the number of eligible patients in a pilot trial; develop surgical manuals as the basis for quality assurance; standardise pathological processing; establish a method to blind patients to their allocation in the first week post surgery; identify measures of postsurgical outcome of importance to patients and clinicians; and establish the main cost differences between the surgical approaches. Pilot parallel three-arm randomised controlled trial nested within feasibility work. Two UK NHS departments of upper gastrointestinal surgery. Patients aged ≥ 18 years with histopathological evidence of oesophageal or oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer or high-grade dysplasia, referred for oesophagectomy or oesophagectomy following neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. Oesophagectomy, with patients randomised to open surgery, a hybrid open chest and minimally invasive abdomen or totally minimally invasive access. The primary outcome measure for the pilot trial was the number of patients recruited per month, with the main trial considered feasible if at least 2.5 patients per month were recruited. During 21 months of recruitment, 263 patients were assessed for eligibility; of these, 135 (51%) were found to be eligible and 104 (77%) agreed to participate, an average of five patients per month. In total, 41 patients were allocated to open surgery, 43 to the hybrid procedure and 20 to totally minimally invasive surgery. Recruitment is continuing

  11. A study of psychomotor skills in minimally invasive surgery: what differentiates expert and nonexpert performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Våpenstad, Cecilie; Chmarra, Magdalena Karolina; Langø, Thomas; Kuhry, Esther; Mårvik, Ronald

    2013-03-01

    A high level of psychomotor skills is required to perform minimally invasive surgery (MIS) safely. To assure high quality of skills, it is important to be able to measure and assess these skills. For that, it is necessary to determine aspects that indicate the difference between performances at various levels of proficiency. Measurement and assessment of skills in MIS are best done in an automatic and objective way. The goal of this study was to investigate a set of nine motion-related metrics for their relevance to assess psychomotor skills in MIS during the performance of a labyrinth task. Thirty-two surgeons and medical students were divided into three groups according to their level of experience in MIS; experts (>500 MIS procedures), intermediates (31-500 MIS), and novices (no experience in MIS). The participants performed the labyrinth task in the D-box Basic simulator (D-Box Medical, Lier, Norway). The task required bimanual maneuvering and threading a needle through a labyrinth of 10 holes. Nine motion-related metrics were used to assess the MIS skills of each participant. Experts (n = 7) and intermediates (n = 14) performed significantly better than the novices (n = 11) in terms of time and parameters measuring the amount of instrument movement. The experts had significantly better bimanual dexterity, which indicated that they made more simultaneous movements of the two instruments compared to the intermediates and novices. The experts also performed the task with a shorter instrument path length with the nondominant hand than the intermediates. The surgeon's performance in MIS can be distinguished from a novice by metrics such as time and path length. An experienced surgeon in MIS can be differentiated from a less experienced one by the higher ability to control the instrument in the nondominant hand and the higher degree of simultaneous (coordinated) movements of the two instruments.

  12. Managers’ Perception on Budget Participation, Procedural Justice and Managerial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sady Mazzioni

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is analyzing the influence of budget participation on the relationship between procedural justice and managerial performance in organizations in Santa Catarina. In order to achieve the objective, a descriptive quantitative research was carried out, based on a questionnaire, with 5 and 7-pont Likert scale, answered by 44 managers. For data treatment, it was used the statistical package Smart PLS to determine, by regression technique, the contribution of each variable (participation and procedural justice on the dependent variable (performance. Descriptive statistics points to a greater awareness regarding the possibility of participation in budgeting process and a less meaningful feeling regarding superiors’ procedural justice, leaving the assessment of managerial performance in an intermediate condition. Initially, it was found that the correlations between independent (procedural justice and intervening (budget participation variables, and between intervening and dependent (managerial performance variables are statistically meaningful. However, the correlation between independent and dependent variables was not statistically meaningful. The results of using structural equation (path analysis indicated that one of the assumptions of the indirect effect was not confirmed, that is, the relationship between independent and dependent variables should diminish after being controlled by the intervening variable. In the present study, the reverse situation was observed, starting from a non-significant correlation and reaching a significant negative correlation, after the effect of the intervening variable.

  13. MAPS evaluation report and procedures governing interviews and performance appraisals

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following various improvements to the MAPS report and to the procedures governing interviews and performance appraisals (announced in the CERN Bulletin 48-49/2005), a third information session has been organized for all staff members on Tuesday, 31 January at 10 a.m.: AB Auditorium P (864-1-D02), Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  14. Good governance: Performance values and procedural values in conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, G.; Paanakker, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    Good governance codes usually end with a list of public values no one could oppose. A recurrent issue is that not all of these values—however desirable they are—can be achieved at the same time. With its focus on performance and procedural values of governance, this article zooms in on the conflict

  15. Impact of Cell-Free Fetal DNA Screening on Patients’ Choice of Invasive Procedures after a Positive California Prenatal Screen Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forum T. Shah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, maternal serum analyte levels paired with sonographic fetal nuchal translucency measurement was the most accurate prenatal screen available for Trisomies 18 and 21, (91% and 94% detection and false positive rates of 0.31% and 4.5% respectively. Women with positive California Prenatal Screening Program (CPSP results have the option of diagnostic testing to determine definitively if the fetus has a chromosomal abnormality. Cell-free fetal (cff- DNA screening for Trisomies 13, 18, and 21 was first offered in 2012, allowing women with positive screens to choose additional screening before diagnostic testing. Cff-DNA sensitivity rates are as high as 99.9% and 99.1%, with false positive rates of 0.4% and 0.1%, for Trisomies 18 and 21, respectively. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2012 on 500 CPSP referrals at the University of California, San Diego Thornton Hospital. Data were collected prior to and after the introduction of cff-DNA. There was a significant increase in the number of participants who chose to pursue additional testing and a decrease in the number of invasive procedures performed after cff-DNA screening was available. We conclude that as fetal aneuploidy screening improves, the number of invasive procedures will continue to decrease.

  16. Federated or cached searches: providing expected performance from multiple invasive species databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jim; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Simpson, Annie; Newman, Gregory J.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species are a universal global problem, but the information to identify them, manage them, and prevent invasions is stored around the globe in a variety of formats. The Global Invasive Species Information Network is a consortium of organizations working toward providing seamless access to these disparate databases via the Internet. A distributed network of databases can be created using the Internet and a standard web service protocol. There are two options to provide this integration. First, federated searches are being proposed to allow users to search “deep” web documents such as databases for invasive species. A second method is to create a cache of data from the databases for searching. We compare these two methods, and show that federated searches will not provide the performance and flexibility required from users and a central cache of the datum are required to improve performance.

  17. Cost analysis when open surgeons perform minimally invasive hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P; Kantartzis, Kelly L; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Bonidie, Michael J; Lee, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The costs to perform a hysterectomy are widely variable. Our objective was to determine hysterectomy costs by route and whether traditionally open surgeons lower costs when performing laparoscopy versus robotics. Hysterectomy costs including subcategories were collected from 2011 to 2013. Costs were skewed, so 2 statistical transformations were performed. Costs were compared by surgeon classification (open, laparoscopic, or robotic) and surgery route. A total of 4,871 hysterectomies were performed: 34.2% open, 50.7% laparoscopic, and 15.1% robotic. Laparoscopic hysterectomy had the lowest total costs (P depreciation included (P < .001) but similar costs if these variables were excluded. Although laparoscopic hysterectomy had lowest costs overall, robotics may be no more costly than laparoscopic hysterectomy when performed by surgeons who predominantly perform open hysterectomy.

  18. MAPS evaluation report and procedures governing interviews and performance appraisals

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following various improvements made to the MAPS report and to the procedures governing interviews and performance appraisals (announced in the CERN Weekly Bulletin 48-49/2005), three information sessions have been organized for all staff members: 24 January 10:00: AB Auditorium P (864-1-D02), 26 January 14:00: Main Amphitheatre, 31 January 10:00: AB Auditorium P (864-1-D02). Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  19. Minimally invasive orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Kaban, Leonard B; Troulis, Maria J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is defined as the discipline in which operative procedures are performed in novel ways to diminish the sequelae of standard surgical dissections. The goals of minimally invasive surgery are to reduce tissue trauma and to minimize bleeding, edema, and injury, thereby improving the rate and quality of healing. In orthognathic surgery, there are two minimally invasive techniques that can be used separately or in combination: (1) endoscopic exposure and (2) distraction osteogenesis. This article describes the historical developments of the fields of orthognathic surgery and minimally invasive surgery, as well as the integration of the two disciplines. Indications, techniques, and the most current outcome data for specific minimally invasive orthognathic surgical procedures are presented.

  20. Quality and extent of informed consent for invasive procedures: a pilot study at the institutional level in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, H Hanzade; Işik, Elif; Vural, Ezgi; Vehid, Hayriye; Brezis, Mayer

    2015-02-01

    To assess the quality of informed consent for patients undergoing invasive procedures and to reveal patient preferences for being informed about the potential risks of treatment and alternatives to treatment. This study was planned as a pilot study. Hospitalized patients' perceptions and expectations about the informed-consent process were explored in a general surgery department. The prepared questionnaire was completed by patients via interview. Inpatient services of the general surgery department of a large academic hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. The study population consisted of hospitalized patients in a general surgery department who underwent invasive procedures in March 2013. Recognition of consent forms by the patients, rate of patients' recall of risks, rate of patients who were willing to be involved in decision making, and rate of patients who were satisfied with the whole decision-making process were measured. All patients signed consent forms. Most patients did not properly read the consent form since they trusted their physician. Potential exposure to risk seemed to be important for patient expectations. Paternalism seemed to dominate our clinical setting. The informed-consent process was definitely a separate issue from signing the consent forms. We conclude that the informed-consent process should be modified to be more functional and appropriate to human psychology. We suggest that education is necessary for informed consent to promote better quality and safety in health care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  1. The thermal dependency of locomotor performance evolves rapidly within an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala, Georgia K; Brown, Gregory P; Christian, Keith A; Hudson, Cameron M; Shine, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Biological invasions can stimulate rapid shifts in organismal performance, via both plasticity and adaptation. We can distinguish between these two proximate mechanisms by rearing offspring from populations under identical conditions and measuring their locomotor abilities in standardized trials. We collected adult cane toads ( Rhinella marina ) from invasive populations that inhabit regions of Australia with different climatic conditions. We bred those toads and raised their offspring under common-garden conditions before testing their locomotor performance. At high (but not low) temperatures, offspring of individuals from a hotter location (northwestern Australia) outperformed offspring of conspecifics from a cooler location (northeastern Australia). This disparity indicates that, within less than 100 years, thermal performance in cane toads has adapted to the novel abiotic challenges that cane toads have encountered during their invasion of tropical Australia.

  2. Evaluation of accuracy in implant site preparation performed in single- or multi-step drilling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marheineke, Nadine; Scherer, Uta; Rücker, Martin; von See, Constantin; Rahlf, Björn; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Stoetzer, Marcus

    2018-06-01

    Dental implant failure and insufficient osseointegration are proven results of mechanical and thermal damage during the surgery process. We herein performed a comparative study of a less invasive single-step drilling preparation protocol and a conventional multiple drilling sequence. Accuracy of drilling holes was precisely analyzed and the influence of different levels of expertise of the handlers and additional use of drill template guidance was evaluated. Six experimental groups, deployed in an osseous study model, were representing template-guided and freehanded drilling actions in a stepwise drilling procedure in comparison to a single-drill protocol. Each experimental condition was studied by the drilling actions of respectively three persons without surgical knowledge as well as three highly experienced oral surgeons. Drilling actions were performed and diameters were recorded with a precision measuring instrument. Less experienced operators were able to significantly increase the drilling accuracy using a guiding template, especially when multi-step preparations are performed. Improved accuracy without template guidance was observed when experienced operators were executing single-step versus multi-step technique. Single-step drilling protocols have shown to produce more accurate results than multi-step procedures. The outcome of any protocol can be further improved by use of guiding templates. Operator experience can be a contributing factor. Single-step preparations are less invasive and are promoting osseointegration. Even highly experienced surgeons are achieving higher levels of accuracy by combining this technique with template guidance. Hereby template guidance enables a reduction of hands-on time and side effects during surgery and lead to a more predictable clinical diameter.

  3. Minimally invasive myotomy for the treatment of esophageal achalasia: evolution of the surgical procedure and the therapeutic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresadola, Vittorio; Feo, Carlo V

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus, characterized by the absence of peristalsis in the esophageal body and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, which may be hypertensive. The cause of this disease is unknown; therefore, the aim of the therapy is to improve esophageal emptying by eliminating the outflow resistance caused by the lower esophageal sphincter. This goal can be accomplished either by pneumatic dilatation or surgical myotomy, which are the only long-term effective therapies for achalasia. Historically, pneumatic dilatation was preferred over surgical myotomy because of the morbidity associated with a thoracotomy or a laparotomy. However, with the development of minimally invasive techniques, the surgical approach has gained widespread acceptance among patients and gastroenterologists and, consequently, the role of surgery has changed. The aim of this study was to review the changes occurred in the surgical treatment of achalasia over the last 2 decades; specifically, the development of minimally invasive techniques with the evolution from a thoracoscopic approach without an antireflux procedure to a laparoscopic myotomy with a partial fundoplication, the changes in the length of the myotomy, and the modification of the therapeutic algorithm.

  4. What is the optimal minimally invasive surgical procedure for endometrial cancer staging in the obese and morbidly obese woman?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Paola A; Cantrell, Leigh A; Shafer, Aaron; Abaid, Lisa N; Mendivil, Alberto; Boggess, John F

    2008-10-01

    Thirty-three percent of U.S. women are either obese or morbidly obese. This is associated with an increased risk of death from all causes and is also associated with an increased risk of endometrial carcinoma. We sought to compare minimally invasive surgical techniques for staging the obese and morbidly obese woman with endometrial cancer. Consecutive robotic endometrial cancer staging procedures were collected from 2005-2007 and were compared to consecutive laparoscopic cases (2000-2004). Demographics including age, weight, body mass index (BMI), operative time, estimated blood loss, lymph node retrieval, hospital stay and complications were collected and compared. During the study period, there were 36 obese and 13 morbidly obese women who underwent surgery with the DaVinci robotic system and 25 obese and 7 morbidly obese women who underwent traditional laparoscopy. For both the obese and morbidly obese patient, robotic surgery was associated with shorter operative time (p=0.0004), less blood loss (ptool for the comprehensive surgical staging of the obese and morbidly obese woman with endometrial cancer. As this patient population is at increased risk of death from all causes, including post-operative complications, all efforts should be made to improve their outcomes and minimally invasive surgery provides a useful platform by which this can occur.

  5. Effects of Camera Arrangement on Perceptual-Motor Performance in Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, Patricia R.; Griswold, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is performed for a growing number of treatments. Whereas open surgery requires large incisions, MIS relies on small incisions through which instruments are inserted and tissues are visualized with a camera. MIS results in benefits for patients compared with open surgery, but degrades the surgeon's perceptual-motor…

  6. Conspecific plasticity and invasion: invasive populations of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera have performance advantage over native populations only in low soil salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiyi Chen

    Full Text Available Global climate change may increase biological invasions in part because invasive species may have greater phenotypic plasticity than native species. This may be especially important for abiotic stresses such as salt inundation related to increased hurricane activity or sea level rise. If invasive species indeed have greater plasticity, this may reflect genetic differences between populations in the native and introduced ranges. Here, we examined plasticity of functional and fitness-related traits of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera populations from the introduced and native ranges that were grown along a gradient of soil salinity (control: 0 ppt; Low: 5 ppt; Medium: 10 ppt; High: 15 ppt in a greenhouse. We used both norm reaction and plasticity index (PIv to estimate the conspecific phenotypic plasticity variation between invasive and native populations. Overall, invasive populations had higher phenotypic plasticity of height growth rate (HGR, aboveground biomass, stem biomass and specific leaf area (SLA. The plasticity Index (PIv of height growth rate (HGR and SLA each were higher for plants from invasive populations. Absolute performance was always comparable or greater for plants from invasive populations versus native populations with the greatest differences at low stress levels. Our results were consistent with the "Master-of-some" pattern for invasive plants in which the fitness of introduced populations was greater in more benign conditions. This suggests that the greater conspecific phenotypic plasticity of invasive populations compared to native populations may increase invasion success in benign conditions but would not provide a potential interspecific competitive advantage in higher salinity soils that may occur with global climate change in coastal areas.

  7. Conspecific plasticity and invasion: invasive populations of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) have performance advantage over native populations only in low soil salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leiyi; Tiu, Candice J; Peng, Shaolin; Siemann, Evan

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change may increase biological invasions in part because invasive species may have greater phenotypic plasticity than native species. This may be especially important for abiotic stresses such as salt inundation related to increased hurricane activity or sea level rise. If invasive species indeed have greater plasticity, this may reflect genetic differences between populations in the native and introduced ranges. Here, we examined plasticity of functional and fitness-related traits of Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) populations from the introduced and native ranges that were grown along a gradient of soil salinity (control: 0 ppt; Low: 5 ppt; Medium: 10 ppt; High: 15 ppt) in a greenhouse. We used both norm reaction and plasticity index (PIv) to estimate the conspecific phenotypic plasticity variation between invasive and native populations. Overall, invasive populations had higher phenotypic plasticity of height growth rate (HGR), aboveground biomass, stem biomass and specific leaf area (SLA). The plasticity Index (PIv) of height growth rate (HGR) and SLA each were higher for plants from invasive populations. Absolute performance was always comparable or greater for plants from invasive populations versus native populations with the greatest differences at low stress levels. Our results were consistent with the "Master-of-some" pattern for invasive plants in which the fitness of introduced populations was greater in more benign conditions. This suggests that the greater conspecific phenotypic plasticity of invasive populations compared to native populations may increase invasion success in benign conditions but would not provide a potential interspecific competitive advantage in higher salinity soils that may occur with global climate change in coastal areas.

  8. The establishment of enteral nutrition with minimally-invasive interventional procedure under endoscopic or imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng; Cheng Yingsheng

    2010-01-01

    For patients unable to get the necessary nutrition orally, a variety of techniques,including surgical way, to make gastrostomy with tube placement have been employed. For recent years, gastrostomy and tube placement with the help of endoscopic guidance or percutaneous interventional management has been developed, which is superior to surgical procedure in minimizing injuries, decreasing cost and reducing complications. In certain clinical situations, both endoscopic method and interventional method can be employed. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the indications, techniques and skills, advantages and disadvantages of both the endoscopy-guided and the imaging-guided percutaneous gastrojejunostomy for the establishment of enteral nutrition. (authors)

  9. Thermal ecological physiology of native and invasive frog species: do invaders perform better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Pablo A; Puschel, Hans; Acuña, Paz; Bartheld, José L; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasions are recognized as an important biotic component of global change that threatens the composition, structure and functioning of ecosystems, resulting in loss of biodiversity and displacement of native species. Although ecological characteristics facilitating the establishment and spread of non-native species are widely recognized, little is known about organismal attributes underlying invasion success. In this study, we tested the effect of thermal acclimation on thermal tolerance and locomotor performance in the invasive Xenopus laevis and the Chilean native Calyptocephalella gayi . In particular, the maximal righting performance (μ MAX ), optimal temperature ( T O ), lower (CT min ) and upper critical thermal limits (CT max ), thermal breadth ( T br ) and the area under the performance curve (AUC) were studied after 6 weeks acclimation to 10 and 20°C. We observed higher values of μ max and AUC in X. laevis in comparison to C. gayi . On the contrary, the invasive species showed lower values of CT min in comparison to the native one. In contrast, CT max , T O and T br showed no inter-specific differences. Moreover, we found that both species have the ability to acclimate their locomotor performance and lower thermal tolerance limit at low temperatures. Our results demonstrate that X. laevis is a better performer than C. gayi . Although there were differences in CT min , the invasive and native frogs did not differ in their thermal tolerance. Interestingly, in both species the lower and upper critical thermal limits are beyond the minimal and maximal temperatures encountered in nature during the coldest and hottest month, respectively. Overall, our findings suggest that both X. laevis and C. gayi would be resilient to climate warming expectations in Chile.

  10. Pulmonary infiltrates in non-HIV immunocompromised patients: a diagnostic approach using non-invasive and bronchoscopic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rano, A; Agusti, C; Jimenez, P; Angrill, J; Benito, N; Danes, C; Gonzalez, J; Rovira, M; Pumarola, T; Moreno, A; Torres, A

    2001-01-01

    %); and TBAS 35/55 (65%). Bronchoscopic techniques led to the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in 59% of the cases in which they were used: FBAS 16/28 (57%), BAL 68/135 (51%), and PSB 30/125 (24%). The results obtained with the different techniques led to a change in antibiotic treatment in 93 cases (46%). Although changes in treatment did not have an impact on the overall mortality, patients with pulmonary infiltrates of an infectious aetiology in whom the change was made during the first 7 days had a better outcome (29% mortality) than those in whom treatment was changed later (71% mortality; p=0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—Non-invasive and bronchoscopic procedures are useful techniques for the diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. Bronchial aspirates (FBAS and TBAS) and BAL have the highest diagnostic yield and impact on therapeutic decisions.

 PMID:11312407

  11. Effect of family presence on pain and anxiety during invasive nursing procedures in an emergency department: A randomized controlled experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşlekdemir, Burcu; Kaya, Nurten

    2016-01-01

    Patients generally prefer to have their family present during medical or nursing interventions. Family presence is assumed to reduce anxiety, especially during painful interventions. This study employed a randomized controlled experimental design to determine the effects of family presence on pain and anxiety during invasive nursing procedures. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized in the observation unit of the internal medicine section in the emergency department of a university hospital. The sample comprised 138 patients assigned into the experimental and control groups by drawing lots. The invasive nursing procedure was carried out in the presence of family members, for members of the experimental group, and without family members, for members of the control group. Thus, the effects of family presence on pain and anxiety during the administration of an invasive nursing procedure to patients were analyzed. The results showed that members of the experimental and control groups did not differ with respect to the pain and state anxiety scores during the intervention. Family presence does not influence the participants' pain and anxiety during an invasive nursing procedure. Thus, the decision regarding family presence during such procedures should be based on patient preference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Robotic assisted surgery in pediatric gynecology: promising innovation in mini invasive surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Ghassan; Calcaterra, Valeria; Scorletti, Federico; Romano, Piero; Goruppi, Ilaria; Mencherini, Simonetta; Avolio, Luigi; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    Robotic assisted surgery is not yet widely applied in the pediatric field. We report our initial experience regarding the feasibility, safety, benefits, and limitations of robot-assisted surgery in pediatric gynecological patients. Descriptive, retrospective report of experience with pediatric gynecological patients over a period of 12 months. Department of Pediatric Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation. Children and adolescents, with a surgical diagnosis of ovarian and/or tubal lesions. Robot assembly time and operative time, days of hospitalization, time to cessation of pain medication, complication rate, conversion rate to laparoscopic procedure and trocar insertion strategy. Six children and adolescents (2.4-15 yrs), weighing 12-55 kg, underwent robotic assisted surgery for adnexal pathologies: 2 for ovarian cystectomy, 2 for oophorectomy, 1 for right oophorectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy for gonadal disgenesis, 1 for exploration for suspected pelvic malformation. Mean operative time was 117.5 ± 34.9 minutes. Conversion to laparatomy was not necessary in any of the cases. No intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Initial results indicate that robotic assisted surgery is safely applicable in the pediatric gynecological population, although it is still premature to conclude that it provides better clinical outcomes than traditional laparoscopic surgery. Randomized, prospective, comparative studies will help characterize the advantages and disadvantages of this new technology in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of seed traits variation on seedling performance of the invasive weed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmans, William; Mahy, Grégory; Monty, Arnaud

    2016-02-01

    Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for annuals, opportunists or invasive plant species. Seedling performance can vary among mothers or populations in response to environmental conditions or under the influence of seed traits. However, very few studies have investigated seed traits variations and their consequences on seedling performance. Specifically, the following questions have been addressed by this work: 1) How the seed traits of the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. vary among mothers and populations, as well as along the latitude; 2) How do seed traits influence seedling performance; 3) Is the influence on seedlings temperature dependent. With seeds from nine Western Europe ruderal populations, seed traits that can influence seedling development were measured. The seeds were sown into growth chambers with warmer or colder temperature treatments. During seedling growth, performance-related traits were measured. A high variability in seed traits was highlighted. Variation was determined by the mother identity and population, but not latitude. Together, the temperature, population and the identity of the mother had an effect on seedling performance. Seed traits had a relative impact on seedling performance, but this did not appear to be temperature dependent. Seedling performance exhibited a strong plastic response to the temperature, was shaped by the identity of the mother and the population, and was influenced by a number of seed traits.

  14. Robotic-Assisted Procedures in Pediatric Surgery: A Critical Appraisal of the Current Best Evidence in Comparison to Conventional Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmacher, Florian; Till, Holger

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the use of robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) has expanded within pediatric surgery. Although increasing numbers of pediatric RAS case-series have been published, the level of evidence remains unclear, with authors mainly focusing on the comparison with open surgery rather than the corresponding laparoscopic approach. The aim of this study was to critically appraise the published literature comparing pediatric RAS with conventional minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in order to evaluate the current best level of evidence. A systematic literature-based search for studies comparing pediatric RAS with corresponding MIS procedures was performed using multiple electronic databases and sources. The level of evidence was determined using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria. A total of 20 studies met defined inclusion criteria, reporting on five different procedures: fundoplication (n=8), pyeloplasty (n=8), nephrectomy (n=2), gastric banding (n=1), and sleeve gastrectomy (n=1). Included publications comprised 5 systematic reviews and 15 cohort/case-control studies (OCEBM Level 3 and 4, respectively). No studies of OCEBM Level 1 or 2 were identified. Limited evidence indicated reduced operative time (pyeloplasty) and shorter hospital stay (fundoplication) for pediatric RAS, whereas disadvantages were longer operative time (fundoplication, nephrectomy, gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy) and higher total costs (fundoplication and sleeve gastrectomy). There were no differences reported for complications, success rates, or short-term outcomes between pediatric RAS and conventional MIS in these procedures. Inconsistency was found in study design and follow-up with large clinical heterogeneity. The best available evidence for pediatric RAS is currently OCEBM Level 3, relating only to fundoplication and pyeloplasty. Therefore, higher-quality studies and comparative data for other RAS procedures in pediatric surgery are required.

  15. Sources and performance criteria of uncertainty of reference measurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Andrea; Paleari, Renata

    2018-05-29

    This article wants to focus on the today available Reference Measurement Procedures (RMPs) for the determination of various analytes in Laboratory Medicine and the possible tools to evaluate their performance in the laboratories who are currently using them. A brief review on the RMPs has been performed by investigating the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine (JCTLM) database. In order to evaluate their performances, we have checked the organization of three international ring trials, i.e. those regularly performed by the IFCC External Quality assessment scheme for Reference Laboratories in Laboratory Medicine (RELA), by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cholesterol network and by the IFCC Network for HbA 1c . Several RMPs are available through the JCTLM database, but the best way to collect information about the RMPs and their uncertainties is to look at the reference measurement service providers (RMS). This part of the database and the background on how to listed in the database is very helpful for the assessment of expanded uncertainty (MU) and performance in general of RMPs. Worldwide, 17 RMS are listed in the database, and for most of the measurands more than one RMS is able to run the relative RMPs, with similar expanded uncertainties. As an example, for a-amylase, 4 SP offer their services with MU between 1.6 and 3.3%. In other cases (such as total cholesterol, the U may span over a broader range, i.e. from 0.02 to 3.6%). With regard to the performance evaluation, the approach is often heterogenous, and it is difficult to compare the performance of laboratories running the same RMP for the same measurand if involved in more than one EQAS. The reference measurement services have been created to help laboratory professionals and manufacturers to implement the correct metrological traceability, and the JCTLM database is the only correct way to retrieve all the necessary important information to this end. Copyright © 2018

  16. Management of patients taking antiplatelet or anticoagulant medication requiring invasive breast procedures: United Kingdom survey of radiologists' and surgeons' current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, M.G.; Townend, J.N.; Lester, W.A.; England, D.W.; Kearins, O.; Bradley, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the current practice in the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme for invasive diagnostic procedures and surgery in patients taking anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication. Materials and methods: Lead radiologists and surgeons at each breast screening service were surveyed to determine current practice. One hundred and five respondents provided information regarding their services, protocols, and willingness to proceed with combinations of procedures and anti-haemostatic medications. Results: Between units there was wide variation in practice. Within 21 services providing more than one response, 10 (48%) disagreed on whether protocols existed. Decisions to perform biopsies were unrelated to professional group. The taking of a drug history was variable. Surgeons reported more adverse effects than radiologists [21 (48%) versus 12 (26%)], but no difference in self-assessment of knowledge. Conclusion: Both radiologists and surgeons have expressed uncertainty about their understanding of anticoagulant and antiplatelet treatment. This is reflected in a wide range of practice. Guidance regarding the management of these patients is suggested

  17. Transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma in critically ill patients with a coagulopathy before invasive procedures: a randomized clinical trial (CME)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Marcella C.; Arbous, M. Sesmu; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M.; Vink, Roel; Karakus, Atilla; Straat, Marleen; Binnekade, Jan M.; de Jonge, Evert; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic use of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) is common practice in patients with a coagulopathy undergoing an invasive procedure. Evidence that FFP prevents bleeding is lacking, while risks of transfusion-related morbidity after FFP have been well demonstrated. We aimed to assess whether omitting

  18. Selection procedures in sports: Improving predictions of athletes’ future performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartigh, Jan Rudolf; Niessen, Anna; Frencken, Wouter; Meijer, Rob R.

    The selection of athletes has been a central topic in sports sciences for decades. Yet, little consideration has been given to the theoretical underpinnings and predictive validity of the procedures. In this paper, we evaluate current selection procedures in sports given what we know from the

  19. Cultural performances: the zombie invasion, the death of the subject and other disorientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainy C.B. Veloso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers how contemporary cultural performances indicial, the worldwide proliferation of fictional theme of the zombie apocalypse, through comic books, board games, movies, games, television serials, posters, rallies. Since then, reflects the theme and looks at this set of products and actions, limited the issue: the current crisis is a crisis of guidance within a world not interpretable, as demonstrates the zombie invasion? To this end, rests on concepts of cultural performances delimiters (GOFFMAN, 2011; social drama (TURNER, 1974; culture (GEERTZ, 1989; and social crisis (JAMESON, 1997; SENNETT, 1998.

  20. GWAS with longitudinal phenotypes : performance of approximate procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikorska, Karolina; Mostafavi, Nahid; Uitterlinden, André; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Eilers, Paul HC; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of genome-wide association studies with longitudinal data using standard procedures, such as linear mixed model (LMM) fitting, leads to discouragingly long computation times. There is a need to speed up the computations significantly. In our previous work (Sikorska et al: Fast linear mixed

  1. GWAS with longitudinal phenotypes: Performance of approximate procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sikorska (Karolina); N.M. Montazeri (Nahid Mostafavi); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); P.H.C. Eilers (Paul); E.M.E.H. Lesaffre (Emmanuel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAnalysis of genome-wide association studies with longitudinal data using standard procedures, such as linear mixed model (LMM) fitting, leads to discouragingly long computation times. There is a need to speed up the computations significantly. In our previous work (Sikorska et al: Fast

  2. Performance of a procedure for yield estimation in fruit orchards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aravena Zamora, Felipe; Potin, Camila; Wulfsohn, Dvora-Laio

    Early estimation of expected fruit tree yield is important for the market planning and for growers and exporters to plan for labour and boxes. Large variations in tree yield may be found, posing a challenge for accurate yield estimation. We evaluated a multilevel systematic sampling procedure...

  3. Condition and Performance Rating Procedures for Rubble Breakwaters and Jetties

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    coastal community whose excellent ideas helped guide this work. Dr. Michael J. O’Connor is Director of USACERL. Chapter 1 Introduction 1 Introduction...headquarters. Concepts for the condition rating procedures were generated by the authors, the CSAG, and other members of the Corps’ coastal community . These

  4. Information Technology Adoption and Procedural Performance in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfeng

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies two specific topics on information technologies in health care industry. (1) The status and change of integrated health care delivery system level IT spending and hospital level IT adoption between 1999 and 2006. (2) The potential link between hospital level IT adoptions and quality as quantified by procedural performance…

  5. Disparities in Aesthetic Procedures Performed by Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model. The number of residents not achieving case minimums was also calculated. Case logs of 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed. There was marked variability in craniofacial (range, 6.0-15.0), breast (range, 2.4-5.9), trunk/extremity (range, 3.0-16.0), and miscellaneous (range, 2.7-22.0) procedure categories. In 2015, the bottom 10th percentile of integrated and independent/combined residents did not achieve case minimums for botulinum toxin and dermal fillers. Case minimums were achieved for the other aesthetic procedure categories for all graduating years. Significant variability persists for many aesthetic procedure categories during plastic surgery residency training. Greater efforts may be needed to improve the aesthetic surgery experience of plastic surgery residents. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Performance of interventional procedures in a day-hospital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Cho, Hye Seon; Park, Eun Hee; Choi, Gap Suk; Lee, Seon Ju; Kim, Yong Woo; Juhn, Je Ryang

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to describe the practice and results of applying the day-hospital system in an interventional radiology clinic. From Oct. 2004 to Dec. 2005, the day-hospital system was applied to various interventional procedures with using a part of the recovery room of an angiography suite as a facility for hospital admission. The study included 91 cases in 73 patients. The source of the patient referral, the procedures, hospital courses and complications were analyzed and questionnaire surveys were conducted for the available 55 patients. Among the patients, 70% (n=64) were referred form other departments, 5% (n=5) from other hospitals, 5% (n=4) were new patients and 20% (n=18) were re-admissions. The procedures included gastrointestinal, biliary, urinary, hemodialysis related-and implantable port related interventions. 96% (n=87) of the patients were successfully discharged in a day and admission to the general ward was only 4% (n=4). Minor complications occurred after discharges in 3% (n=3). The questionnaire survey revealed that 96% (n=53) of the patients were satisfied with the service and they were not anxious after discharge. Most of common interventional procedures were safely done under the day-hospital system with the patients being highly satisfied. The day-hospital system can be a good tool for establishing admitting privileges for an interventional radiology clinic

  7. How Does Procedural Fairness Affect Performance Evaluation System Satisfaction? (Evidence from a UK Police Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholihin Mahfud

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates whether, and if so, how procedural fairness affects performance evaluation system satisfaction in a UK Police Force. Employing a survey method with samples of detective inspectors and detective chief inspectors with significant managerial responsibilities in a UK Police Force, this study finds that procedural fairness affects performance evaluation system satisfaction. Further analysis reveals that the effect of procedural fairness on performance evaluation system satisfaction is mediated by trust. This study provides empirical evidence on how procedural fairness affects performance evaluation system satisfaction. The results of this study may benefit the designer of performance evaluation systems in police organizations.

  8. Automated procedure for performing computer security risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Lim, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Computers, the invisible backbone of nuclear safeguards, monitor and control plant operations and support many materials accounting systems. Our automated procedure to assess computer security effectiveness differs from traditional risk analysis methods. The system is modeled as an interactive questionnaire, fully automated on a portable microcomputer. A set of modular event trees links the questionnaire to the risk assessment. Qualitative scores are obtained for target vulnerability, and qualitative impact measures are evaluated for a spectrum of threat-target pairs. These are then combined by a linguistic algebra to provide an accurate and meaningful risk measure. 12 references, 7 figures

  9. Temperature-dependent performance of competitive native and alien invasive plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Uhram

    2017-10-01

    To assess the likely impacts of environmental change, the responses of two well-known invasive plant species, native Pueraria lobata and alien Humulus japonicus, to differences in growth temperature were studied in South Korea. Habitat preferences, physiological responses such as photosynthetic rates and chlorophyll contents, growth rates, and nutrient contents were quantified for each species. A competition experiment was conducted to evaluate the temperature preferences of the two species. All results indicated that the alien species H. japonicus can take advantage of elevated temperatures (35 °C) to enhance its competitive advantage against the native species P. lobata. While H. japonicus took advantage of elevated temperatures and preferred high-temperature areas, P. lobata showed reduced performance and dominance in high-temperature areas. Therefore, in future, due to global warming and urbanization, there are possibilities that H. japonicus takes advantage of elevated temperature against P. lobata that could lead to increased H. japonicus coverage over time. Therefore, consistent monitoring of both species especially where P. lobata is dominated are required because both species are found in every continents in the world. Controlling P. lobata requires thorough inspection of H. japonicus presence of the habitat in advance to prevent post P. lobata management invasion of H. japonicus.

  10. Project W-314 performance mock-up test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARRATT, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this Procedure is to assist construction in the pre-operational fabrication and testing of the pit leak detection system and the low point drain assembly by: (1) Control system testing of the pit leak detection system will be accomplished by actuating control switches and verifying that the control signal is initiated, liquid testing and overall operational requirements stated in HNF-SD-W314-PDS-003, ''Project Development Specification for Pit Leak Detection''. (2) Testing of the low point floor drain assembly by opening and closing the drain to and from the ''retracted'' and ''sealed'' positions. Successful operation of this drain will be to verify that the seal does not leak on the ''sealed'' position, the assembly holds liquid until the leak detector actuates and the assembly will operate from on top of the mock-up cover block

  11. Resection of tumors of the neck of the pancreas with venous invasion: the "Whipple at the Splenic Artery (WATSA)" procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasberg, Steven M; Sanchez, Luis A; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan C; Linehan, David C

    2012-05-01

    Tumors of the neck of the pancreas may involve the superior mesenteric and portal veins as well as the termination of the splenic vein. This presents a difficult problem since the pancreas cannot be transected through the neck as is standard in a Whipple procedure. Here, we present our method of resecting such tumors, which we term "Whipple at the Splenic Artery (WATSA)". The superior mesenteric and portal veins are isolated below and above the pancreas, respectively. The pancreas and splenic vein are divided just to the right of the point that the splenic artery contacts the superior border of the pancreas. This plane of transection is approximately 2 cm to the left of the pancreatic neck and away from the tumor. The superior mesenteric artery is cleared from the left side of the patient. With the specimen remaining attached only by the superior mesenteric and portal veins, these structures are clamped and divided. Reconstruction is performed with or without a superficial femoral vein graft. The splenic vein is not reconstructed. Ten cases have been performed to date without mortality. We have previously shown that the pattern of venous collateral development following occlusion of the termination of the splenic vein in the manner described is not similar to that of cases of sinistral (left sided) portal hypertension. Whipple at the splenic artery (WATSA) is a safe method for resection of tumors of the neck of the pancreas with vein involvement. It should be performed in high-volume pancreatic surgery centers.

  12. Procedural sedation analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades. Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interve...

  13. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  14. Performances of domiciliary ventilators compared by using a parametric procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresnel Emeline

    2016-12-01

    Performances of domiciliary ventilators strongly depend not only on the breathing dynamics but also on the ventilator strategy. One given ventilator may be more adequate than another one for a given patient.

  15. Aesthetic procedures in office practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Rebecca

    2009-12-01

    Since the approval of botulinum toxin, dermal fillers, and lasers for cosmetic use, minimally invasive aesthetic procedures have rapidly become the treatments of choice for age-related facial changes. In the past 10 years, aesthetic procedures have increased nearly five-fold. Of the 10.2 million aesthetic treatments performed in 2008, 83 percent were minimally invasive procedures. Botulinum toxin and dermal filler injections, laser hair reduction, chemical peels, laser skin resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and intense pulsed light photorejuvenation were the most commonly performed procedures in 2008. These procedures are effective and associated with minimal discomfort, and they have a low incidence of adverse effects and short recovery times. High patient and physician satisfaction have contributed to their growing popularity and availability in the primary care setting. As patient demand for aesthetic treatments increases, family physicians should be familiar with common minimally invasive aesthetic procedures when advising patients or incorporating aesthetic care into office practice.

  16. Drift algae, an invasive snail and elevated temperature reduce ecological performance of a warm-temperate seagrass, through additive effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffle, H.; Wernberg, T.; Thomsen, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Seagrasses are under pressure from multiple concurrent threats, including rising temperatures, invasive species and nutrient-driven algal accumulations. We quantified the abundance of drift algae and the invasive snail Batillaria australis in 3 Halophila ovalis seagrass beds in the Swan River....... The survey showed that drift algae varied considerably between sites and sampling times, and sites experienced average loads of 0.4 to 0.8 kg fresh wt m(-2) and extreme loads up to 2.5 kg fresh wt m(-2). In contrast, invasive snails were constantly abundant at all sites at all collection times (mean...... reduced the length of the 2nd inter node. We found relatively few significant higher-order interactions, suggesting a dominance of additive effects of stress. We conclude that temperature, drift algae and invasive snails are already affecting the ecological performance of H. ovalis in Swan River...

  17. Revised MITG design, fabrication procedure, and performance predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, A.

    1983-01-01

    The design, analysis, and key features of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG) were described in a 1981 IECEC paper; and the design, fabrication, testing, and post-test analysis of test assemblies simulating prototypical MITG modules were described in preceding papers in these proceedings. These analyses succeeded in identifying and explaining the principal causes of thermal-stress problems encountered in the tests, and in confirming the effectiveness of design changes for alleviating them. The present paper presents additional design improvements for solving these and other problems, and describes new thermoelectric material properties generated by independent laboratories over the past two years. Based on these changes and on a revised fabrication procedure, it presents a reoptimization of the MITG design and computes the power-to-weight ratio for the revised design. That ratio is appreciably lower than the 1981 prediction, primarily because of changes in material properties; but it is still much higher than the specific power of current-generation RTGs

  18. Performance measurement procedures that support innovativeness rather than hamper it

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens-van Drongelen, I.C.; Harkink, E.W.F.P.M.; Blomqvist, Kirsimarja; Ojanen, Ville; Kuittinen, Ossi

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the contemporary challenges in increasing firm-level innovativeness and developing appropriate performance metrics. The authors discuss these challenges and provide a literature review on the innovation enhancing factors in service industries. They subsequently study the case of

  19. Procedural Memory Consolidation in the Performance of Brief Keyboard Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Robert A.; Davis, Carla M.

    2006-01-01

    Using two sequential key press sequences, we tested the extent to which subjects' performance on a digital piano keyboard changed between the end of training and retest on subsequent days. We found consistent, significant improvements attributable to sleep-based consolidation effects, indicating that learning continued after the cessation of…

  20. Is physiological performance a good predictor for fitness? Insights from an invasive plant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Molina-Montenegro

    Full Text Available Is physiological performance a suitable proxy of fitness in plants? Although, several studies have been conducted to measure some fitness-related traits and physiological performance, direct assessments are seldom found in the literature. Here, we assessed the physiology-fitness relationship using second-generation individuals of the invasive plant species Taraxacum officinale from 17 localities distributed in five continents. Specifically, we tested if i the maximum quantum yield is a good predictor for seed-output ii whether this physiology-fitness relationship can be modified by environmental heterogeneity, and iii if this relationship has an adaptive consequence for T. officinale individuals from different localities. Overall, we found a significant positive relationship between the maximum quantum yield and fitness for all localities evaluated, but this relationship decreased in T. officinale individuals from localities with greater environmental heterogeneity. Finally, we found that those individuals from localities where environmental conditions are highly seasonal performed better under heterogeneous environmental conditions. Contrarily, under homogeneous controlled conditions, those individuals from localities with low environmental seasonality performed much better. In conclusion, our results suggest that the maximum quantum yield seem to be good predictors for plant fitness. We suggest that rapid measurements, such as those obtained from the maximum quantum yield, could provide a straightforward proxy of individual's fitness in changing environments.

  1. Procedures for Determining the Performance of Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Systems; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBlasio, R.; Durand, S.; Hansen, R.; Hutchinson, P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Rosenthal, A.; Thomas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the procedures for determining the performance of stand-alone PV systems. The procedures in this document provide a common approach for evaluating whether a given PV system is suitable to perform the function for which it was designed and manufactured to accomplish, and whether it will provide adequate power to run the load. These procedures cover small stand-alone PV systems. They cover complete outdoor system testing. Test results are valid only for the system that is tested

  2. Performance simulations of catalytic converters during the Federal Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.; Shamim, T.; Sengupta, S.; Son, S.; Adamczyk, A.A.

    1999-07-01

    A numerical study is carried out to predict the tailpipe emissions and emission conversion efficiencies of unburned hydrocarbon, nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide flowing through a catalytic converter during the Federal Test Procedure (FTP). The model considers the effect of heat transfer in the catalytic converter, coupled with catalyst chemical kinetics, including an oxygen storage mechanism. The resulting governing equations based on the conservation of mass and energy are solved by a tridiagonal matrix algorithm (TDMA) with a successive line under relaxation method. The numerical scheme for this non-linear problem is found to have good convergence efficiency. The simulation for the complete FTP cycle is accomplished in less than fifteen minutes on a desktop personal computer. A 13-step reaction mechanism plus a nine-step O{sub 2} storage mechanism is used to simulate the chemical kinetics. The energy equations include the heat loss due to conduction and convection plus the energy liberated by chemical reactions. The effect of radiation is assumed to be negligible and is not considered. The results of the numerical model for both the instantaneous and accumulated emissions are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. The conversion efficiencies of HC, CO and NO as predicted by the model are found to be within 5% of those dynamic measurements, and calculated results of accumulated HC, CO and NO{sub x} are in fair agreement with experimental measurements. The transient measurements are also used to check the robustness of the numerical model. The model is found to be robust and hence can simulate various operating conditions of engine output to the converter.

  3. 46 CFR 2.75-70 - Welding procedure and performance qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedure and performance qualifications. 2.75... for Construction Personnel § 2.75-70 Welding procedure and performance qualifications. (a) Welding... requirements for the welding of pressure piping, boilers, pressure vessels, and nonpressure vessel type tanks...

  4. Ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT): a minimally invasive procedure for complex anal fistula: two-year results of a prospective multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileri, Pierpaolo; Giarratano, Gabriella; Franceschilli, Luana; Limura, Elsa; Perrone, Federico; Stazi, Alessandro; Toscana, Claudio; Gaspari, Achille Lucio

    2014-10-01

    The surgical management of anal fistulas is still a matter of discussion and no clear recommendations exist. The present study analyses the results of the ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT) technique in treating complex anal fistulas, in particular healing, fecal continence, and recurrence. Between October 2010 and February 2012, a total of 26 consecutive patients underwent LIFT. All patients had a primary complex anal fistula and preoperatively all underwent clinical examination, proctoscopy, transanal ultrasonography/magnetic resonance imaging, and were treated with the LIFT procedure. For the purpose of this study, fistulas were classified as complex if any of the following conditions were present: tract crossing more than 30% of the external sphincter, anterior fistula in a woman, recurrent fistula, or preexisting incontinence. Patient's postoperative complications, healing time, recurrence rate, and postoperative continence were recorded during follow-up. The minimum follow-up was 16 months. Five patients required delayed LIFT after previous seton. There were no surgical complications. Primary healing was achieved in 19 patients (73%). Seven patients (27%) had recurrence presenting between 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively and required further surgical treatment. Two of them (29%) had previous insertion of a seton. No patients reported any incontinence postoperatively and we did not observe postoperative continence worsening. In our experience, LIFT appears easy to perform, is safe with no surgical complication, has no risk of incontinence, and has a low recurrence rate. These results suggest that LIFT as a minimally invasive technique should be routinely considered for patients affected by complex anal fistula. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Use of performance curves in estimating number of procedures required to achieve proficiency in coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räder, Sune B E W; Jørgensen, Erik; Bech, Bo

    2011-01-01

    .001 for all parameters. To approach the experts' level of DAP and contrast media use, trainees need 394 and 588 procedures, respectively. Performance curves showed large individual differences in the development of competence. Conclusion: On average, trainees needed 300 procedures to reach sufficient level...... needed for trainees to reach recommended reference levels was estimated as 226 and 353, for DAP and use of contrast media, respectively. After 300 procedures, trainees' procedure time, fluoroscopy time, DAP, and contrast media volume were significantly higher compared with experts' performance, P ...Background: Current guidelines in cardiology training programs recommend 100-300 coronary angiography procedures for certification. We aimed to assess the number of procedures needed to reach sufficient proficiency. Methods: Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, dose area product (DAP), and contrast...

  6. Performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis in febrile, neutropenic patients: a multi-state model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Schwarzinger

    Full Text Available The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis expectedly depends on the timing of test results relative to the empirical administration of antifungal therapy during neutropenia, although a dynamic evaluation framework is lacking.We developed a multi-state model describing simultaneously the likelihood of empirical antifungal therapy and the risk of invasive aspergillosis during neutropenia. We evaluated whether the first positive test result with a biomarker is an independent predictor of invasive aspergillosis when both diagnostic information used to treat and risk factors of developing invasive aspergillosis are taken into account over time. We applied the multi-state model to a homogeneous cohort of 185 high-risk patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Patients were prospectively screened for galactomannan antigenemia twice a week for immediate treatment decision; 2,214 serum samples were collected on the same days and blindly assessed for (1->3- β-D-glucan antigenemia and a quantitative PCR assay targeting a mitochondrial locus.The usual evaluation framework of biomarker performance was unable to distinguish clinical benefits of β-glucan or PCR assays. The multi-state model evidenced that the risk of invasive aspergillosis is a complex time function of neutropenia duration and risk management. The quantitative PCR assay accelerated the early detection of invasive aspergillosis (P = .010, independently of other diagnostic information used to treat, while β-glucan assay did not (P = .53.The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis is better apprehended by the evaluation of time-varying predictors in a multi-state model. Our results provide strong rationale for prospective studies testing a preemptive antifungal therapy, guided by clinical, radiological, and bi-weekly blood screening with galactomannan antigenemia and a standardized quantitative PCR assay.

  7. A case-control study to compare the outcome of women treated by two minimally invasive procedures-ultraminilaparotomy myomectomy and laparoscopic myomectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chang Wen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ultraminilaparotomy myomectomy (UMLT-M with less 4 cm transverse skin incision and conventional 3-port wound laparoscopic myomectomy (LM approaches were proposed as alternative minimally invasive procedures in the management of women with symptomatic uterine myomas but few studies have compared the outcomes of both procedures. Materials and methods: Between January 2002 and December 2003, 71 patients undergoing UMLT-M were compared with those 71 women undergoing LM. The last data collection for all patients was done on 31 December 2016. The parameters for comparison included the characteristics of the uterine myomas, surgical parameters, morbidities, and outcomes. Surgical parameters included the operative time (minutes, estimated blood loss (milliliters, time for removal of drainage, percentage of blood transfusion and co-morbidities. Results: Mean operative time in the LM group was significantly longer than that in the UMLT-M group (208.7 ± 65.9 vs. 98.0 ± 28.2 min, p < 0.001. Intra-operative blood loss was significantly higher in the LM group than that in the UMLT-M group (210.9 ± 184.5 vs. 111.7 ± 108.4 ml, p < 0.001. However, more patients had postoperative fever in the UMLT-M group (39.4% vs. 8.5%, p < 0.001. The recurrence rate of myoma at 5-year follow-up was significantly different between two groups (35.2% of UMLT-M vs. 57.7% of LM, p = 0.007, but there was no difference when follow-up time was over ten years. The location of the myoma recurrence was different between two groups with higher recurrence rates in the fundal and lateral sides of uterus in the UMLT-M group and in the anterior wall of uterus in the LM group. However, the overall symptom control, the need of repeated myoma-related surgery and subsequent pregnancy outcome of both groups seemed to be similar in both groups. Conclusions: More operative time and more blood loss reflected that LM demanded skills, experience and equipment

  8. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Surgeons Performing Minimally Invasive Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleblas, Chantal C J; de Man, Anne Marie; van den Haak, Lukas; Vierhout, Mark E; Jansen, Frank Willem; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) prevalence among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery. Advancements in laparoscopic surgery have primarily focused on enhancing patient benefits. However, compared with open surgery, laparoscopic surgery imposes greater ergonomic constraints on surgeons. Recent reports indicate a 73% to 88% prevalence of physical complaints among laparoscopic surgeons, which is greater than in the general working population, supporting the need to address the surgeons' physical health. To summarize the prevalence of MSDs among surgeons performing laparoscopic surgery, we performed a systematic review of studies addressing physical ergonomics as a determinant, and reporting MSD prevalence. On April 15 2016, we searched Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. Meta-analyses were performed using the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method. We identified 35 articles, including 7112 respondents. The weighted average prevalence of complaints was 74% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 65-83]. We found high inconsistency across study results (I = 98.3%) and the overall response rate was low. If all nonresponders were without complaints, the prevalence would be 22% (95% CI 16-30). From the available literature, we found a 74% prevalence of physical complaints among laparoscopic surgeons. However, the low response rates and the high inconsistency across studies leave some uncertainty, suggesting an actual prevalence of between 22% and 74%. Fatigue and MSDs impact psychomotor performance; therefore, these results warrant further investigation. Continuous changes are enacted to increase patient safety and surgical care quality, and should also include efforts to improve surgeons' well-being.

  9. Impact of operator fatigue on endoscopy performance: implications for procedure scheduling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2009-08-01

    With increasing volumes of endoscopic procedures, endoscopists\\' workload has had to increase to meet this escalating demand. The aim of this study was to characterize the impact of endoscopist fatigue on quality of endoscopy performance by comparing outcomes based on chronological procedure order.

  10. 40 CFR 63.8687 - What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluations, and other procedures must I use? 63.8687 Section 63.8687 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use? (a) You must conduct each... run must last at least 1 hour. (e) You must use the following equations to determine compliance with...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7112 - What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluations, and other procedures must I use? 63.7112 Section 63.7112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., design evaluations, and other procedures must I use? (a) You must conduct each performance test in Table... use wet dust suppression to control PM from PSH operations, a visible mist is sometimes generated by...

  12. Proposal for an Evaluation Method for the Performance of Work Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mouda; Mébarek, Djebabra; Wafa, Boulagouas; Makhlouf, Chati

    2016-12-01

    Noncompliance of operators with work procedures is a recurrent problem. This human behavior has been said to be situational and studied by many different approaches (ergonomic and others), which consider the noncompliance with work procedures to be obvious and seek to analyze its causes as well as consequences. The object of the proposed method is to solve this problem by focusing on the performance of work procedures and ensuring improved performance on a continuous basis. This study has multiple results: (1) assessment of the work procedures' performance by a multicriteria approach; (2) the use of a continuous improvement approach as a framework for the sustainability of the assessment method of work procedures' performance; and (3) adaptation of the Stop-Card as a facilitator support for continuous improvement of work procedures. The proposed method emphasizes to put in value the inputs of continuous improvement of the work procedures in relation with the conventional approaches which adopt the obvious evidence of the noncompliance to the working procedures and seek to analyze the cause-effect relationships related to this unacceptable phenomenon, especially in strategic industry.

  13. Myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer: diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 1.5-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechichi, Gilda; Sironi, Sandro; Galimberti, Stefania; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Signorelli, Mauro; Perego, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the preoperative assessment of myometrial invasion by endometrial cancer. In this prospective study, 47 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer underwent preoperative MR imaging and total hysterectomy. The MR protocol included spin-echo multishot T2-weighted, dynamic T1-weighted and DW images acquired with b-values of 0 and 500 s/mm 2 . Myometrial tumour spread was classified as superficial (<50%) or deep (≥50% myometrial thickness). Postoperative histopathological findings served as a reference standard. Indices of diagnostic performance were assessed for each sequence. At histopathological examination, superficial myometrial invasion was found in 34 patients and deep myometrial invasion in 13. In the assessment of tumour invasion, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of T2-weighted images were 92.3%, 76.5%, 60.0% and 96.3%, respectively. The corresponding values for dynamic images were 69.2%, 61.8%, 40.9% and 84.0%, and for DW images 84.6%, 70.6%, 52.4% and 92.3%. T2-weighted and DW imaging proved to be the most accurate techniques for tumour spread determination. DW imaging proved to be accurate in assessing myometrial invasion, and it could replace dynamic imaging as an adjunct to routine T2-weighted imaging for preoperative evaluation of endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  14. Using a multimedia presentation to improve patient understanding and satisfaction with informed consent for minimally invasive vascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, N; Eisenberg, E; Montbriand, J; Jaskolka, J; Roche-Nagle, G

    2017-02-01

    As vascular procedures become more complex, patient understanding of their treatment(s) can become more difficult. We wished to evaluate the utility of multimedia presentations (MPs) to improve patient understanding of their vascular interventions. Patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), peripheral angioplasty, Hickman catheter and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) insertion were randomized into a control group receiving traditional verbal consent, and a MP group that were shown a two minute simplified video of their procedure on an iPad™ computer in addition to the traditional verbal consent. After obtaining consent, all patients completed a questionnaire assessing their comprehension of the procedure, and satisfaction with the consent process. Satisfaction was rated on a 5 point Likert scale with 5 being 'very helpful' in understanding the procedure. Ninety-three patients were recruited for this study, 62% of which were male. The intervention significantly increased total comprehension in all procedure types controlling for procedure type (multimedia vs. control; F = 9.14, P = .003). A second ANOVA showed there was a significant main effect by intervention (F = 44.06, p consent process to be helpful in patient understanding and that there is improved satisfaction. Given the rapid rate of innovation in vascular interventions, increased regular use of MPs to help patients understand their procedures would be beneficial in the care of patients undergoing vascular interventions. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimating the operator's performance time of emergency procedural tasks based on a task complexity measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won Dae; Park, Jink Yun

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand the amount of time required to execute an emergency procedural task in a high-stress situation for managing human performance under emergencies in a nuclear power plant. However, the time to execute an emergency procedural task is highly dependent upon expert judgment due to the lack of actual data. This paper proposes an analytical method to estimate the operator's performance time (OPT) of a procedural task, which is based on a measure of the task complexity (TACOM). The proposed method for estimating an OPT is an equation that uses the TACOM as a variable, and the OPT of a procedural task can be calculated if its relevant TACOM score is available. The validity of the proposed equation is demonstrated by comparing the estimated OPTs with the observed OPTs for emergency procedural tasks in a steam generator tube rupture scenario.

  16. Investigation of the Performance of Multidimensional Equating Procedures for Common-Item Nonequivalent Groups Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu ATAR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of the multidimensional extentions of Stocking-Lord, mean/mean, and mean/sigma equating procedures under common-item nonequivalent groups design was investigated. The performance of those three equating procedures was examined under the combination of various conditions including sample size, ability distribution, correlation between two dimensions, and percentage of anchor items in the test. Item parameter recovery was evaluated calculating RMSE (root man squared error and BIAS values. It was found that Stocking-Lord procedure provided the smaller RMSE and BIAS values for both item discrimination and item difficulty parameter estimates across most conditions.

  17. Determination of the performance of the Kaplan hydraulic turbines through simplified procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pădureanu, I.; Jurcu, M.; Campian, C. V.; Haţiegan, C.

    2018-01-01

    A simplified procedure has been developed, compared to the complex one recommended by IEC 60041 (i.e. index samples), for measurement of the performance of the hydraulic turbines. The simplified procedure determines the minimum and maximum powers, the efficiency at maximum power, the evolution of powers by head and flow and to determine the correct relationship between runner/impeller blade angle and guide vane opening for most efficient operation of double-regulated machines. The simplified procedure can be used for a rapid and partial estimation of the performance of hydraulic turbines for repair and maintenance work.

  18. Standard Guidelines of Care: Performing Procedures in Patients on or Recently Administered with Isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram; Mahadevappa, Omprakash H; Barua, Shyamanta; Majid, Imran; Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Bhat, Ramesh M; Talwar, Suresh; Thurakkal, Salim; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J; Chatterjee, Manas; Ganjoo, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13- cis -retinoic acid) states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I) constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords "isotretinoin," "safety," "scarring," "keloids," "hypertrophic scarring," and "pigmentation." The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued. The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration.

  19. One-Year Surgical Outcomes and Quality of Life after Minimally Invasive Sling Procedures for the Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence: TVT SECUR® vs. CureMesh®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Min; Choe, Jin Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We compared the efficacy and safety of two minimally invasive sling procedures used to treat female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) SECUR® and CureMesh®, and assessed the 1-year surgical outcomes. Materials and Methods Sixty women with SUI were assigned to undergo either the TVT SECUR (n=38) or CureMesh (n=22) procedures between April 2007 and June 2008. Patients were monitored via outpatient visits at 1 month, 3 months, and 1 year after surgery. The efficacy of these procedures was evaluated by the cough test or by a urodynamic study. At these postoperative visits, the patients also completed several questionnaires, including incontinence quality of life, patient's perception of urgency severity, the scored form of the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, visual analog scale, and questions about perceived benefit, satisfaction, and willingness to undergo the same operation again. The objective cure rate was defined as no leakage during the cough test with a full bladder. The subjective cure rate was evaluated by self-assessment of goal achievement performed 1 year postoperatively. Results The two groups were similar in preoperative characteristics and urodynamic parameters. The objective cure rates were similar between TVT SECUR and CureMesh (68.4% vs. 77.3%). All respondents reported improvement after surgery. There were no intra-operative complications. Conclusions Our results showed that the TVT SECUR and CureMesh procedures are both safe and simple to perform and have no significant differences in efficacy. Comparative studies with long-term follow-up are warranted to determine the true efficacy of these procedures. PMID:20495697

  20. Procedure for Measuring and Reporting the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems in Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Hayter, S.

    2005-10-01

    This procedure provides a standard method for measuring and characterizing the long-term energy performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems in buildings and the resulting implications to the building's energy use. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks for evaluating system performance and verifying that performance targets have been achieved. Uses may include comparison of performance with the design intent; comparison with other PV systems in buildings; economic analysis of PV systems in buildings; and the establishment of long-term performance records that enable maintenance staff to monitor trends in energy performance.

  1. A cadaveric procedural anatomy simulation course improves video-based assessment of operative performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Aycart, Mario A; O'Mara, Lynne; Havens, Joaquim; Nehs, Matthew; Shimizu, Naomi; Smink, Douglas S; Gravereaux, Edwin; Gates, Jonathan D; Askari, Reza

    2018-03-01

    Inadequate anatomic knowledge has been cited as a major contributor to declining surgical resident operative competence. We analyzed the impact of a comprehensive, procedurally oriented cadaveric procedural anatomy dissection laboratory on the operative performance of surgery residents, hypothesizing that trainees' performance of surgical procedures would improve after such a dissection course. Midlevel general surgery residents (n = 9) participated in an 8 wk, 16-h surgery faculty-led procedurally oriented cadaver simulation course. Both before and after completion of the course, residents participated in a practical examination, in which they were randomized to perform one of nine Surgical Council on Resident Education-designated "essential" procedures. The procedures were recorded using wearable video technology. Videos were deidentified before evaluation by six faculty raters blinded to examinee and whether performances occurred before or after an examinee had taken the course. Raters used the validated Operative Performance Rating System and Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill scales. After the course residents had higher procedure-specific scores (median, 4.0 versus 2.4, P 4.0 versus 3.0, P = 0.006), respect for tissue (4.0 versus 3.0, P = 0.0004), time and motion (3.0 versus 2.0, P = 0.0007), operation flow (3.0 versus 2.0, P = 0.0005), procedural knowledge (4.0 versus 2.0, P = 0.0001), and overall performance scores (4.0 versus 2.0, P < 0.0001). Operative Performance Rating System and Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill scales averaged by number of items in each were also higher (3.2 versus 2.0, P = 0.0002 and 3.1 versus 2.2, P = 0.002, respectively). A cadaveric procedural anatomy simulation course covering a broad range of open general surgery procedures was associated with significant improvements in trainees' operative performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of malignant seeding at drain sites after invasive procedures (surgery and/or thoracoscopy) by hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salvo, Maurizio; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Pagella, Simonetta; Manfredda, Iren e; Casadio, Caterina; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Literature data show that mesothelioma cells can implant along the surgical pathway of invasive procedures such as thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. We investigated the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy for preventing such malignant seeding. Material and methods. Thirty-two consecutive patients diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma were included in the present retrospective study. All patients underwent surgery and/or thoracoscopy for diagnosis, staging or talc pleurodesis. They were treated with electron external beam radiation therapy (21 Gy in 3 fractions over 1 week), directed to the surgical pathway after the invasive procedure. After completion of radiation treatment, 20 of 32 patients (63%) underwent chemotherapy. Results. After a mean follow-up of 13.6 months (range 3-41) from the end of radiation therapy, no patient had tumour progression in the treated area. The treatment was well tolerated, as only erythema grade I (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG, scale) was noted in 11 patients. Seventeen patients died of disease with local progression after a mean survival time of 12.6 months (range 3-27); thirteen patients are alive with disease after a mean follow-up of 13.9 months (range 4-41); two patients are alive without evidence of disease after a mean follow-up of 16.50 months (range 6-27). Discussion. The present study shows the efficacy and safety of local radiotherapy in preventing malignant seeding after thoracoscopy in patients with pleural mesothelioma although larger prospective trials are probably still needed to validate this treatment approach

  3. Prevention of malignant seeding at drain sites after invasive procedures (surgery and/or thoracoscopy) by hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salvo, Maurizio; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Pagella, Simonetta; Manfredda, Irene; Casadio, Caterina; Krengli, Marco (Radiotherapy, Univ. of Piemonte Orientale-Hospital Maggiore della Carit, Novara (Italy))

    2008-07-15

    Introduction. Literature data show that mesothelioma cells can implant along the surgical pathway of invasive procedures such as thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. We investigated the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy for preventing such malignant seeding. Material and methods. Thirty-two consecutive patients diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma were included in the present retrospective study. All patients underwent surgery and/or thoracoscopy for diagnosis, staging or talc pleurodesis. They were treated with electron external beam radiation therapy (21 Gy in 3 fractions over 1 week), directed to the surgical pathway after the invasive procedure. After completion of radiation treatment, 20 of 32 patients (63%) underwent chemotherapy. Results. After a mean follow-up of 13.6 months (range 3-41) from the end of radiation therapy, no patient had tumour progression in the treated area. The treatment was well tolerated, as only erythema grade I (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG, scale) was noted in 11 patients. Seventeen patients died of disease with local progression after a mean survival time of 12.6 months (range 3-27); thirteen patients are alive with disease after a mean follow-up of 13.9 months (range 4-41); two patients are alive without evidence of disease after a mean follow-up of 16.50 months (range 6-27). Discussion. The present study shows the efficacy and safety of local radiotherapy in preventing malignant seeding after thoracoscopy in patients with pleural mesothelioma although larger prospective trials are probably still needed to validate this treatment approach.

  4. Surgical procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit on critically ill neonates: feasibility and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, M.S.; Jado, A.M.; Al-Bassam, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Transferring unstable, ill neonates to and from the operating rooms carries significant risks and can lead to morbidity. We report on our experience in performing certain procedures in critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We examined the feasibility and safety for such an approach. All surgical procedures performed in the NICU between January 1999 and December 2005 were analyzed in terms of demographic data, diagnosis, preoperative stability of the patient, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Operations were performed at beside in the NICU in critically ill, unstable neonates who needed emergency surgery, in neonates of low birth weight (<1000 gm) and in neonates on special equipments like higher frequency ventilators and nitrous oxide. Thirty-seven surgical procedures were performed including 12 laparotomies, bowel resection and stomies, 7 repairs of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, 4 ligations of patent ductus arteriosus and various others. Birth weights ranged between 850 gm and 3500 gm (mean 2000 gm). Gestational age ranged between 25 to 42 weeks (mean, 33 weeks). Age at surgery was between 1 to 30 days (mean, 30 days). Preoperatively, 19 patients (51.3%) were on inotropic support and all were intubated and mechanically ventilated. There was no mortality related to surgical procedures. Postoperatively, one patient developed wound infection and disruption. Performing major surgical procedures in the NICU is both feasible and safe. It is useful in very low birth weight, critically ill neonates who have definite risk attached to transfer to the operating room. No special area is needed in the NICU to perform complication-free surgery, but designing an operating room within the NICU will be ideal. (author)

  5. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 3, In vivo test phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard describes the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay performance-testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of test phantoms used for calibration of measurement systems for direct bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented

  6. Effect of intra- and interspecific competition on the performance of native and invasive species of Impatiens under varying levels of shade and moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skálová, Hana; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Dvořáčková, Śárka; Pyšek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Many alien plants are thought to be invasive because of unique traits and greater phenotypic plasticity relative to resident species. However, many studies of invasive species are unable to quantify the importance of particular traits and phenotypic plasticity in conferring invasive behavior because traits used in comparative studies are often measured in a single environment and by using plants from a single population. To obtain a deeper insight into the role of environmental factors, local differences and competition in plant invasions, we compared species of Impatiens (Balsaminaceae) of different origin and invasion status that occur in central Europe: native I. noli-tangere and three alien species (highly invasive I. glandulifera, less invasive I. parviflora and potentially invasive I. capensis). In two experiments we harvested late-stage reproductive plants to estimate performance. The first experiment quantified how populations differed in performance under varying light and moisture levels in the absence of competition. The second experiment quantified performance across these environments in the presence of intra- and inter-specific competition. The highly invasive I. glandulifera was the strongest competitor, was the tallest and produced the greatest biomass. Small size and high plasticity were characteristic for I. parviflora. This species appeared to be the second strongest competitor, especially under low soil moisture. The performance of I. capensis was within the range of the other Impatiens species studied, but sometimes limited by alien competitors. Our results suggest that invasion success within the genus Impatiens depends on the ability to grow large under a range of environmental conditions, including competition. The invasive species also exhibited greater phenotypic plasticity across environmental conditions than the native species. Finally, the decreased performance of the native I. noli-tangere in competition with other species studied

  7. Effect of intra- and interspecific competition on the performance of native and invasive species of Impatiens under varying levels of shade and moisture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Skálová

    Full Text Available Many alien plants are thought to be invasive because of unique traits and greater phenotypic plasticity relative to resident species. However, many studies of invasive species are unable to quantify the importance of particular traits and phenotypic plasticity in conferring invasive behavior because traits used in comparative studies are often measured in a single environment and by using plants from a single population. To obtain a deeper insight into the role of environmental factors, local differences and competition in plant invasions, we compared species of Impatiens (Balsaminaceae of different origin and invasion status that occur in central Europe: native I. noli-tangere and three alien species (highly invasive I. glandulifera, less invasive I. parviflora and potentially invasive I. capensis. In two experiments we harvested late-stage reproductive plants to estimate performance. The first experiment quantified how populations differed in performance under varying light and moisture levels in the absence of competition. The second experiment quantified performance across these environments in the presence of intra- and inter-specific competition. The highly invasive I. glandulifera was the strongest competitor, was the tallest and produced the greatest biomass. Small size and high plasticity were characteristic for I. parviflora. This species appeared to be the second strongest competitor, especially under low soil moisture. The performance of I. capensis was within the range of the other Impatiens species studied, but sometimes limited by alien competitors. Our results suggest that invasion success within the genus Impatiens depends on the ability to grow large under a range of environmental conditions, including competition. The invasive species also exhibited greater phenotypic plasticity across environmental conditions than the native species. Finally, the decreased performance of the native I. noli-tangere in competition with other

  8. From Procedural to Object-Oriented Programming (OOP- Performance in OOP: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Govender

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study of introductory pre- and in-service teachers’ performance in object-oriented programming (OOP assessments reveals important issues with regard to learning and teaching OOP, using java. The study is set against the backdrop of the country’s transition of its national IT curriculum from a procedural to an object-oriented programming language. The effect of prior programming experience and performances in different types of questions are examined. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods is used to analyse the data. The effect of prior programming experience of a procedural kind and the type of assessments given is shown to have a marked influence on the performance in programming assessments and teaching of OOP. Many introductory OOP courses are in effect taught procedurally as courses in the small. Therefore educating teachers how to teach programming is a significant educational challenge. Some implications for teaching are therefore suggested

  9. Development of a Laboratory Test Procedure to Evaluate Tack Coat Performance

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIRIM, Yetkin; SMIT, André de Fortier; KORKMAZ, Armagan

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory testing procedure is presented, the results of which may be used for determining the best combination of tack coat type, mixture type, and application rate to be applied in the field for optimum performance. Tack coat related performance results were determined from Hamburg wheel tracking and simple shear tests on laboratory prepared specimens. This study was undertaken to evaluate the shear strength performance of tack coats under laboratory-controlled conditions. The ...

  10. Development of interim test methods and procedures for determining the performance of small photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNutt, P.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; Algra, K.; DeBlasio, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing tests and procedures that will determine if the configuration of a small photovoltaic (PV) system is suitable for its intended use, and if the system will perform as specified. An overview of these procedures is presented in this paper. Development of standard test procedures will allow designers, manufacturers, system integrators, users, and independent laboratories to assess the performance of PV systems under outdoor prevailing conditions. An NREL Technical Report detailing the procedures is under way, and the IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21 (SCC21) has established a project on this subject. The work will be submitted to the IEEE SCC21 and International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Committee 82 (IEC TC82) for consideration as a consensus standard. Certification bodies such as PowerMark and PV Global Approval Program (PVGAP) may adopt the IEC and IEEE documents when testing systems. Developing standardized test methods and procedures at NREL to evaluate the outdoor performance of PV systems will encourage product quality and promote PV standards development. Standardized tests will assure people that PV systems will perform as specified for their intended applications. As confidence in PV systems increases, the successful commercialization of PV will grow internationally.

  11. Parallel analysis of film and TLD application in personal dosimetry of medical staff during application of invasive radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misovic, M.; Boskovic, Z.; Spasic-Jokic, V.

    1997-01-01

    Although both types of dosimeters showed similar results for mentioned category of health care workers we wished to emphasize some advantages in use of TLD and film dosemeters in personal dosimetry. The main advantageous of film for dosimetric purposes are that it can provide visual representation of the radiation field and they are cheap, but there are lot of disadvantages. Advantages of TLD are based on: possibility for re-use, practically for whole users working life, small dimensions suitable for results, high precision and specially wide dose range. They are sensitive on low dose, practically for ten times more than film is. Disadvantages of TLD are based on their previous thermal and radiation history and on the fact that information about dose disappears after reading procedure. Considering advantages and disadvantages of both types of dosemeters we decided to propose TLD for routine hospital practice in personal dosimetry. (author)

  12. Determinants of wound infections for breast procedures: assessment of the risk of wound infection posed by an invasive procedure for subsequent operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, M; Biswas, J; Gupta, S; Alam, N

    2009-12-01

    Wound infection remains a major source of postoperative morbidity leading to prolonged hospital stays and increased total cost, including indirect expenses related to the wound infection. We examined whether there is any higher risk of wound infection in patients undergo a reoperation after an initial operation or excision/incision biopsy. A retrospective review of medical charts of patients with breast operations between January 1990 and July 2008 was carried out. The overall incidence of wound infection was 18.2% (231/1267). The rate of wound infection was (32%) when reoperation was done after previous modified radical mastectomy, 18.9% and 16.8% when the previous operations were lumpectomy/segmenectomy with axillary dissection and simple mastectomy without axillary dissection, respectively and (10.8%) when reoperation was performed after previous biopsy. Reoperation involving axillary dissection was associated with significantly higher rates of wound infection (pprocedure affects the risk of wound infection in subsequent operation in patients with breast cancer. Significantly higher risks of wound infection are seen in those patients who had undergone axillary dissection or modified radical mastectomy.

  13. Standard Guidelines of Care: Performing Procedures in Patients on or Recently Administered with Isotretinoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Venkataram; Mahadevappa, Omprakash H.; Barua, Shyamanta; Majid, Imran; Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Bhat, Ramesh M.; Talwar, Suresh; Thurakkal, Salim; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J.; Chatterjee, Manas; Ganjoo, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Background: Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid) states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. Objective: The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I) constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Materials and Methods: Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords “isotretinoin,” “safety,” “scarring,” “keloids,” “hypertrophic scarring,” and “pigmentation.” The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. Results: The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued. The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. PMID:29491653

  14. Standard guidelines of care: Performing procedures in patients on or recently administered with isotretinoin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, the standard protocol regarding the performance of procedures on patients receiving or having recently received isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid states that the procedures should not be performed. The recommendations in standard books and drug insert require discontinuation of isotretinoin for 6 months before performing cosmetic procedures, including waxing, dermabrasion, chemical peels, laser procedures, or incisional and excisional cold-steel surgery. These recommendations have been followed for over two decades despite little evidence for the stated increased risk of scarring. Objective: The Association of Cutaneous Surgeons (I constituted a task force to review the evidence and to recommend consensus guidelines regarding the safety of skin procedures, including resurfacing, energy-device treatments, and dermatosurgical procedures in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration. Materials and Methods: Data were extracted from the literature through a PubMed search using the keywords “isotretinoin,” “safety,” “scarring,” “keloids,” “hypertrophic scarring,” and “pigmentation.” The evidence was then labeled and circulated to all members of task force for review. Results: The task force is of the opinion that there is insufficient evidence to support the current protocol of avoiding and delaying treatments in the patient group under consideration and recommends that the current practice should be discontinued.The task force concludes that performing procedures such as laser hair removal, fractional lasers for aging and acne scarring, lasers for pigmented skin lesions, fractional radio-frequency microneedling, superficial and medium-depth peels, microdermabrasion, dermaroller, biopsies, radio-frequency ablation, and superficial excisions is safe in patients with concurrent or recent isotretinoin administration.

  15. Internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Mills

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the arena of radiation oncology special procedures, medical physicists are often the focus professionals for implementation and administration of advanced and complex technologies. One of the most vexing and challenging aspects of managing complexity concerns the ongoing internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures. To demonstrate ongoing qualification, a physicist must a document initial training and successful completion of competencies to implement and perform this procedure, b demonstrate familiarity with all aspects of the commissioning and quality assurance process, c demonstrate continuing education respecting this procedure, d demonstrate the peer-reviewed completion of a minimum number of patient special procedures during a specified time span, and e demonstrate satisfactory overall progress toward maintenance of specialty board certification. In many respects, this information complement is similar to that required by an accredited residency program in therapy physics. In this investigation, we report on the design of a management tool to qualify staff radiation oncology physicists to deliver patient procedures.

  16. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 2, In vitro samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed for the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The bioassay testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped develop testing procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the performance criteria by testing the existing measurement capabilities of various bioassay laboratories. This report recommends guidelines for the preparation, handling, storage, distribution, shipping, and documentation of in vitro test samples (artificial urine and fecal matter) for indirect bioassay. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 8 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Eye lens exposure to medical staff performing electrophysiology procedures: dose assessment and correlation to patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Bozovic, Predrag; Arandjic, Danijela; Antic, Vojislav; Selakovic, Jovana; Pavlovic, Sinisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the patient exposure and staff eye dose levels during implantation procedures for all types of pacemaker therapy devices performed under fluoroscopic guidance and to investigate potential correlation between patients and staff dose levels. The mean eye dose during pacemaker/defibrillator implementation was 12 μSv for the first operator, 8.7 μSv for the second operator/nurse and 0.50 μSv for radiographer. Corresponding values for cardiac re-synchronisation therapy procedures were 30, 26 and 2.0 μSv, respectively. Significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product was found for the first operator and radiographers, but not for other staff categories. The study revealed eye dose per procedure and eye dose normalised to patient dose indices for different staff categories and provided an input for radiation protection in electrophysiology procedures. (authors)

  18. When invasive ants meet: effects of outbreeding on queen performance in the tramp ant Cardiocondyla itsukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Jürgen; Frohschammer, Sabine; Bernadou, Abel

    2017-08-18

    Most disturbed habitats in the tropics and subtropics harbor numerous species of invasive ants, and occasionally the same species has been introduced repeatedly from multiple geographical sources. We examined how experimental crossbreeding between sexuals from different populations affects the fitness of queens of the tramp ant Cardiocondyla itsukii, which is widely distributed in Asia and the Pacific Islands. Eggs laid by queens that mated with nestmate males had a higher hatching rate than eggs laid by queens mated to males from neighboring (Hawaii × Kauai) or distant introduced populations (Hawaii/Kauai × Okinawa). Furthermore, inbreeding queens had a longer lifespan and produced a less female-biased offspring sex ratio than queens from allopatric mating. This suggests that the genetic divergence between different source populations may already be so large that in case of multiple invasions eventual crossbreeding might negatively affect the fitness of tramp ants. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. Comparison of the effect of paper and computerized procedures on operator error rate and speed of performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converse, S.A.; Perez, P.B.; Meyer, S.; Crabtree, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Computerized Procedures Manual (COPMA-II) is an advanced procedure manual that can be used to select and execute procedures, to monitor the state of plant parameters, and to help operators track their progress through plant procedures. COPMA-II was evaluated in a study that compared the speed and accuracy of operators' performance when they performed with COPMA-II and traditional paper procedures. Sixteen licensed reactor operators worked in teams of two to operate the Scales Pressurized Water Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University. Each team performed one change of power with each type of procedure to simulate performance under normal operating conditions. Teams then performed one accident scenario with COPMA-II and one with paper procedures. Error rates, performance times, and subjective estimates of workload were collected, and were evaluated for each combination of procedure type and scenario type. For the change of power task, accuracy and response time were not different for COPMA-II and paper procedures. Operators did initiate responses to both accident scenarios fastest with paper procedures. However, procedure type did not moderate response completion time for either accident scenario. For accuracy, performance with paper procedures resulted in twice as many errors as did performance with COPMA-II. Subjective measures of mental workload for the accident scenarios were not affected by procedure type

  20. Contemporary analysis of the intraoperative and perioperative complications of neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Benjamin T; Mallory, Grant W; Abcejo, Arnoley S; Pasternak, Jeffrey; Atkinson, John L D; Meyer, Fredric B; Marsh, W Richard; Link, Michael J; Clarke, Michelle J; Perkins, William; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Historically, performing neurosurgery with the patient in the sitting position offered advantages such as improved visualization and gravity-assisted retraction. However, this position fell out of favor at many centers due to the perceived risk of venous air embolism (VAE) and other position-related complications. Some neurosurgical centers continue to perform sitting-position cases in select patients, often using modern monitoring techniques that may improve procedural safety. Therefore, this paper reports the risks associated with neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position in a modern series. METHODS The authors reviewed the anesthesia records for instances of clinically significant VAE and other complications for all neurosurgical procedures performed in the sitting position between January 1, 2000, and October 8, 2013. In addition, a prospectively maintained morbidity and mortality log of these procedures was reviewed for instances of subdural or intracerebral hemorrhage, tension pneumocephalus, and quadriplegia. Both overall and specific complication rates were calculated in relation to the specific type of procedure. RESULTS In a series of 1792 procedures, the overall complication rate related to the sitting position was 1.45%, which included clinically significant VAE, tension pneumocephalus, and subdural hemorrhage. The rate of any detected VAE was 4.7%, but the rate of VAE requiring clinical intervention was 1.06%. The risk of clinically significant VAE was highest in patients undergoing suboccipital craniotomy/craniectomy with a rate of 2.7% and an odds ratio (OR) of 2.8 relative to deep brain stimulator cases (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-70, p = 0.04). Sitting cervical spine cases had a comparatively lower complication rate of 0.7% and an OR of 0.28 as compared with all cranial procedures (95% CI 0.12-0.67, p < 0.01). Sitting cervical cases were further subdivided into extradural and intradural procedures. The rate of

  1. Teacher Evaluation, Pay for Performance, and Learning around Instruction: Between Dissonant Incentives and Resonant Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintrop, Rick; Ordenes, Miguel; Coghlan, Erin; Pryor, Laura; Madero, Cristobal

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The study examines why the logic of a performance management system, supported by the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, might be faulty. It does this by exploring the nuances of the interplay between teaching evaluations as formative and summative, the use of procedures, tools, and artifacts obligated by the local Teacher Incentive Fund…

  2. 76 FR 54288 - Notice of Procedural Changes to the Performance and Registration Information Systems Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Changes to the Performance and Registration Information Systems Management (PRISM) Program AGENCY: Federal... and information received since the August 9, 2010, notice of procedural change and will allow States and other stakeholders to make necessary changes to their systems and processes pursuant to this...

  3. 75 FR 76254 - Official Performance and Procedural Requirements for Grain Weighing Equipment and Related Grain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration 7 CFR Part 802 [Docket GIPSA-2010-FGIS-0012] RIN 0580-AB19 Official Performance and Procedural Requirements for Grain Weighing Equipment and Related Grain Handling Systems AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards...

  4. The Effects of Learning Procedure, Tempo, and Performance Condition on Transfer of Rhythm Skills in Instrumental Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes study of effects of learning procedures and performance tempo on ability of 64 middle school students to perform previously learned rhythmic passages. Reviews the four learning procedures used for each rhythmic passage. Finds no evidence attributed to learning procedure but significant adverse differences if the tempo was changed from…

  5. Solution procedure and performance evaluation for a water–LiBr absorption refrigeration machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonchala, Jason; Hazledine, Maxwell; Goni Boulama, Kiari

    2014-01-01

    The water–lithium bromide absorption cooling machine was investigated theoretically in this paper. A detailed solution procedure was proposed and validated. A parametric study was conducted over the entire admissible ranges of the desorber, condenser, absorber and evaporator temperatures. The performance of the machine was evaluated based on the circulation ratio which is a measure of the system size and cost, the first law coefficient of performance and the second law exergy efficiency. The circulation ratio and the coefficient of performance were seen to improve as the temperature of the heat source increased, while the second law performance deteriorated. The same qualitative responses were obtained when the temperature of the refrigerated environment was increased. On the other hand, simultaneously raising the condenser and absorber temperatures was seen to result in a severe deterioration of both the circulation ratio and first law coefficient of performance, while the second law performance indicator improved significantly. The influence of the difference between the condenser and absorber exit temperatures, as well as that of the internal recovery heat exchanger on the different performance indicators was also calculated and discussed. - Highlights: • Analysis of a water–LiBr absorption machine, including detailed solution procedure. • Performance assessed using first and second law considerations, as well as flow ratio. • Effects of heat source and refrigerated environment temperatures on the performance. • Effects of the difference between condenser and absorber temperatures. • Effects of internal heat exchanger efficiency on overall cooling machine performance

  6. Open source non-invasive prenatal testing platform and its performance in a public health laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter; Richter, Stine R; Balslev-Harder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to introduce non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal autosomal trisomies and gender in a Danish public health setting, using semi-conductor sequencing and published open source scripts for analysis. METHODS: Plasma-derived DNA from a total of 375...... correlation (R(2)  = 0.72) to Y-chromosomal content of the male fetus samples. DISCUSSION: We have implemented NIPT into Danish health care using published open source scripts for autosomal aneuploidy detection and fetal DNA fraction estimation showing excellent false negative and false positive rates. Seq...

  7. Performance and Health Test Procedure for Grid Energy Storage Systems: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggu, Murali M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Friedl, Andrew [San Diego Gas and Electric; Bialek, Thomas [San Diego Gas and Electric; Schimpe, Michael Robert [Technical University of Munich

    2017-07-27

    A test procedure to evaluate the performance and health of field installations of grid-connected battery energy storage systems (BESS) is described. Performance and health metrics captured in the procedures are: Round-trip efficiency, Standby losses, Response time/accuracy, and Useable Energy/ State of Charge at different discharge/charge rates over the system's lifetime. The procedures are divided into Reference Performance Tests, which require the system to be put in a test mode and are to be conducted in intervals, and Real-time Monitoring tests, which collect data during normal operation without interruption. The procedures can be applied on a wide array of BESS with little modifications and can thus support BESS operators in the management of BESS field installations with minimal interruption and expenditures.can be applied on a wide array of BESS with little modifications and can thus support BESS operators in the management of BESS field installations with minimal interruption and expenditures.

  8. Quality assurance procedure for functional performance of industrial gamma radiography exposure devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, R.; Yadav, R.K.; Rajoo Kumar; Bhatt, B.C.; Sivaraman, G.; Nandkumar, A.N.

    2003-05-01

    An Industrial Gamma Radiography Exposure Device (IGRED) consists of various moving parts and accessories and wear and tear take place often. This may increase the possibility of radiation incidents and result in avoidable radiation exposure. Quality assurance tests of the equipment for functional performance plays a major role in ensuring that the exposure device and its accessories perform their intended functions and satisfy radiation safety requirements to avert potential exposures to operators. Therefore, in India it is practiced as mandatory requirement that each IGRED is tested for its functional performance and only after ascertaining that features of operational safety are satisfactory, loading of the source into the radiography exposure device can be permitted. This procedure which is being. practiced since the late 1970s, has contributed significantly towards the safe use of IGREDs and minimising the occurrence of radiation accidents. The purpose of this document is to highlight the importance of periodic functional performance check of each IGRED as per the checklist for the testing procedures. It is also proposed to entrust this activity to accredited laboratories, which have the necessary infrastructure to carry out this activity. The prerequisites for accreditation of such laboratories to carry out this activity and the testing procedures to be adopted for checking the functional performance of various models of IGREDs used in this country are given in this report. (author)

  9. Development of Probabilistic Performance Evaluation Procedure for Umbilical Lines of Seismically Isolated NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Daegi; Park, Junhee; Choi, Inkil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we proposed a procedure to perform the probabilistic performance evaluation of interface piping system for seismically isolated NPPs, and carried out the preliminary performance evaluation of the target example umbilical line. For EDB level earthquakes, the target performance goal cannot be fulfilled, but we also find out that the result can be changed with respect to the variation of the assumed values, i. e., the distribution of response, and the limit state of piping system. Recently, to design the nuclear power plants (NPPs) more efficiently and safely against the strong seismic load, many researchers focus on the seismic isolation system. For the adoption of seismic isolation system to the NPPs, the seismic performance of isolation devices, structures, and components should be guaranteed firstly. Hence, some researches were performed to determine the seismic performance of such items. For the interface piping system between isolated structure and non-isolated structure, the seismic capacity should be carefully estimated since that the required displacement absorption capacity will be increased significantly by the adoption of the seismic isolation system. Nowadays, in NUREG report, the probabilistic performance criteria for isolated NPP structures and components are proposed. Hence, in this study, we developed the probabilistic performance evaluation method and procedure for interface piping system, and applied the method to an example pipe. The detailed procedure and main results are summarized in next section. For the interface piping system, the seismic capacity should be carefully estimated since that the required displacement absorption capacity will be increased significantly by the adoption of the seismic isolation system

  10. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 1, Quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed in response to a concern expressed by the US Department of Energy and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped define responsibilities and develop procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria for quality assurance at bioassay laboratories. This report recommends elements of quality assurance and quality control responsibilities for the bioassay performance-testing laboratory program, including the qualification and performance of personnel and the calibration, certification, and performance of equipment. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 15 refs

  11. Chemical oil-spill dispersants: evaluation of three laboratory procedures for estimating performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, J.R.; Marsden, P.

    1992-09-01

    The report presents data from studies designed to evaluate characteristics of selected bench-scale test methods for estimating performance of chemical agents for dispersing oil from surface slicks into an underlying water column. In order to mitigate the effect of surface slicks with chemical dispersant agents, however, an on-scene coordinator must have information and an understanding of performance characteristics for available dispersant agents. Performance of candidate dispersant agents can be estimated on the basis of laboratory testing procedures that are designed to evaluate performance of different agents. Data presented in the report assist in the evaluation of candidate test methods for estimating performance of candidate dispersant agents. Three test methods were selected for evaluating performance: the currently accepted Revised Standard EPA test, Environmental Canada's Swirling Flask test, and the IFP-Dilution test

  12. Performance of the Seven-step Procedure in Problem-based Hospitality Management Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichard Zwaal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on the seven-step procedure (SSP in problem-based learning (PBL. The way students apply the seven-step procedure will help us understand how students work in a problem-based learning curriculum. So far, little is known about how students rate the performance and importance of the different steps, the amount of time they spend on each step and the perceived quality of execution of the procedure. A survey was administered to a sample of 101 students enrolled in a problem-based hospitality management program. Results show that students consider step 6 (Collect additional information outside the group to be most important. The highest performance-rating is for step two (Define the problem and the lowest for step four (Draw a systemic inventory of explanations from step three. Step seven is classified as low in performance and high in importance implicating urgent attention. The average amount of time spent on the seven steps is 133 minutes with the largest part of the time spent on self-study outside the group (42 minutes. The assessment of the execution of a set of specific guidelines (the Blue Card did not completely match with the overall performance ratings for the seven steps. The SSP could be improved by reducing the number of steps and incorporating more attention to group dynamics.

  13. Does preoperative breast MRI significantly impact on initial surgical procedure and re-operation rates in patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, K.; Sakellariou, S.; Dawson, N.; Litherland, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes the management of patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Materials and methods: A retrospective, controlled, single-centre analysis of 138 cases of screen-detected ILC was performed. All patients were assessed by a single multidisciplinary team as to whether preoperative MRI altered the initial management decision or reduced re-operation rates. Results: Forty-three percent of patients had preoperative MRI. MRI guided surgical management in 40.7% patients. Primary mastectomy rates were not significantly different between the MRI and non-MRI groups (32% and 30% respectively, p=0.71). The MRI group had a lower secondary surgery rate (6.8% versus 15.2%); however, the results did not reach statistical significance, and there were no unnecessary mastectomies. Conclusion: MRI can be used appropriately to guide primary surgery in screen-detected ILC cases and affects the initial management decision in 40.7% of patients. It does not significantly affect the overall mastectomy rate or re-operation rates, but reduces the likelihood of the latter. As a result of this review, the authors' local policy for the use of MRI in screen-detected ILC patients has been modified. For patients undergoing mastectomy for ILC, MRI is no longer performed routinely to search for contralateral malignancy as this has no proven added benefit. - Highlights: • Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows more accurate tumour assessment and detects additional foci of disease in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). • Over the study's 3 year time frame, MRI guided surgical management of 40.7% screen-detected ILC patients scanned. • No statistically significant difference in mastectomy rates between MRI and non MRI groups. • Observed lower re-operation rate (6.8%-v-15.2%) in MRI group not statistically significant. • No MRI benefit for contralateral disease detection in ILC patients for

  14. Biotic constraints on the establishment and performance of native, naturalized, and invasive plants in Pacific Northwest (USA steppe and forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M. Connolly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Factors that cause differential establishment among naturalized, invasive, and native species are inadequately documented, much less often quantified among different communities. We evaluated the effects of seed addition and disturbance (i.e., understory canopy removal on the establishment and seedling biomass among two naturalized, two invasive, and two native species (1 forb, 1 grass in each group within steppe and low elevation forest communities in eastern Washington, USA. Establishment within each plant immigrant class was enhanced by seed addition: naturalized species showed the greatest difference in establishment between seed addition and no seed addition plots, native and invasive species establishment also increased following seed addition but not to the same magnitude as naturalized species. Within seed addition plots, understory canopy disturbance resulted in significant increases in plant establishment (regardless of plant immigration class relative to undisturbed plots and the magnitude of this effect was comparable between steppe and adjacent forest. However, regardless of disturbance treatment fewer invasive plants established in the forest than in the steppe, whereas native and naturalized plant establishment did not differ between the habitats. Individual biomass of naturalized species were consistently greater in disturbed (canopy removed versus undisturbed control plots and naturalized species were also larger in the steppe than in the forest at the time of harvest. Similar trends in plant size were observed for the native and invasive species, but the differences in biomass for these two immigration classes between disturbance treatments and between habitats were not significant. We found that strong limitations of non-native species is correlated with intact canopy cover within the forest understory, likely driven by the direct or indirect consequences of low light transmittance through the arboreal and understory canopy

  15. Performing MR-guided biopsies in clinical routine: factors that influence accuracy and procedure time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Ruediger; Thomas, Christoph; Rempp, Hansjoerg; Schmidt, Diethard; Claussen, Claus D.; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the accuracy, the duration and factors that influence the duration of MRI-guided liver or soft-tissue biopsies. Nineteen liver biopsies and 19 soft-tissue biopsies performed using 1.5T-MRI guidance were retrospectively analysed. Diagnostic performance and complications were assessed. Intervention time was subdivided into preparation period, puncture period and control period. Correlation between procedure time and target size, skin-to-target-distance, used sequences and interventionalists' experience were analysed. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 0.86, 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. Two minor complications occurred. Overall median procedure time was 103.5 min. Liver biopsies lasted longer than soft-tissue biopsies (mean [soft-tissue] : 73.0 min, mean [liver] : 134.1 min, P [liver] = 0.048, P [soft-tissue] = 0.005) was significantly prolonged for longer skin-to-target-distances. Lower numbers of image acquisitions (P [liver] = 0.0007, P [soft-tissue] = 0.0012) and interventionalists' experience reduces the procedure duration significantly (P < 0.05), besides all false-negative results appeared during the first five biopsies of each individual radiologist. The interventionalists' experience, skin-to-target-distances and number of image acquisition influence the procedure time significantly. (orig.)

  16. Double- vs. single-balloon enteroscopy: single center experience with emphasis on procedural performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Roggel, Moritz; Domagk, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to compare double- (DBE) and single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) in small bowel disorders with respect to procedural performance and clinical impact. This retrospective analysis at a tertial referral center included 1,052 DBEs and 515 SBEs performed in 904 patients over 7 years. Procedural and patients' characteristics were precisely analyzed. Significantly more patients with anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding were investigated by DBE (P recent years of enteroscopy (2008-2011), no difference in small bowel visualization could be observed. The anal insertion depths and complete enteroscopy rates (CER) were comparable. Procedure times were significantly shorter within the SBE procedure (oral: 50 vs. 40 min; anal: 55 vs. 46 min, P Diagnostic yield was significantly higher in the SBE, compared to the DBE group (61.7 vs. 48.2 %; P diagnostic tools and proved to be indispensable in the daily gastroenterological practice. The lower insertion depths, but higher diagnostic yield, of SBE may reflect the more focused selection of patients scheduled for small bowel diagnostics in recent years.

  17. Mechatronic Feasibility of Minimally Invasive, Atraumatic Cochleostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Williamson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic assistance in the context of lateral skull base surgery, particularly during cochlear implantation procedures, has been the subject of considerable research over the last decade. The use of robotics during these procedures has the potential to provide significant benefits to the patient by reducing invasiveness when gaining access to the cochlea, as well as reducing intracochlear trauma when performing a cochleostomy. Presented herein is preliminary work on the combination of two robotic systems for reducing invasiveness and trauma in cochlear implantation procedures. A robotic system for minimally invasive inner ear access was combined with a smart drilling tool for robust and safe cochleostomy; evaluation was completed on a single human cadaver specimen. Access to the middle ear was successfully achieved through the facial recess without damage to surrounding anatomical structures; cochleostomy was completed at the planned position with the endosteum remaining intact after drilling as confirmed by microscope evaluation.

  18. An Investigation of Seventh Grade Students’ Performances on Conceptual, Procedural and Graphical Problems Regarding Circles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfi İncikabı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine seventh grade students’ preferences among the procedural, conceptual and graphical questions in the subject of circles, to define their success levels in their preferences, and to compare students’ success levels in one question type with their performances in other question types. The methodology adopted during this research was case study. Based on criterion-based purposive sampling strategy, 98 middle school students were selected as the participants. Data were collected through an achievement test consisting of nine questions (three per question type. The results obtained from the study indicated that students mostly preferred graphical question types. Moreover, majority of students could not succeeded high levels in their preferred question types. In addition, the students performed better in graphical question types; however, the failure in procedural question types was remarkable. Keywords: Multiple representations, middle school students, mathematics education, circles

  19. A test procedure for energetic and performance analysis of cold appliances for the food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armani, F; Boscolo, A

    2013-01-01

    In this article we present a novel approach for the characterization of cold appliances and in particular of refrigerators based on the standard vapour compression cycle with a reciprocating on/off compressor. The test procedure is based on a virtual instrument that perform both the stimulus and the data acquisition on the device under test. Acquired data is elaborated to fit a semi-empirical model based on the energetic balances between thermal and electrical sub systems and the heat exchanged with the environment. This approach results in a simple method to calculate useful parameters of the refrigerator, such as energetic performance, cooling effect and limit values of thermal loads. The test procedure requires only a few temperatures and the electric power consumption to be monitored, resulting in a low impact on the refrigerator. Preliminary tests showed a good estimation of parameters and prediction of energy consumption and heat extraction capacity of the refrigerator under test

  20. Epidural steroid injection: A procedure ideally suited for performance in the radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Ehara, S.; Weinstein, J.N.; Montgomery, W.J.; Kathol, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Epidural steroid injection, a procedure used for decades for the treatment of low back pain, is often performed blindly by anesthesiologists in the pain clinic setting. The authors believe the radiologist is best equipped to do this procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. With the patient prone, a 22-gauge spinal needle is advanced into the sacral epidural space through the sacral hiatus. The needle position is checked in posteroanterior and lateral projections and a limited epidurogram is obtained. This is followed by administration of 0.125% bupivacaine (16-20 ml) and betamethasone (12-24 mg). More than 200 such examinations have been performed, with a failure rate of less than 5% and with no serious complications

  1. European wind turbine testing procedure developments. Task 1: Measurement method to verify wind turbine performance characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, R.; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Dunbabin, P.

    2001-01-01

    There is currently significant standardisation work ongoing in the context of wind farm energy yield warranty assessment and wind turbine power performance testing. A standards maintenance team is revising the current IEC (EN) 61400-12 Ed 1 standard forwind turbine power performance testing....... The standard is being divided into four documents. Two of them are drafted for evaluation and verification of complete wind farms and of individual wind turbines within wind farms. This document, and the project itdescribes, has been designed to help provide a solid technical foundation for this revised...... standard. The work was wide ranging and addressed 'grey' areas of knowledge, regarding existing methodologies or to carry out basic research in support offundamentally new procedures. The work has given rise to recommendations in all areas of the work, including site calibration procedures, nacelle...

  2. Influence of fabrication procedure on the electrochemical performance of Ag/AgCl reference electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, Daniela [Department of Biomedical and Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, 1 Rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris (France); Brewer, Paul J., E-mail: paul.brewer@npl.co.uk [Analytical Science Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Brown, Richard J.C. [Analytical Science Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Fisicaro, Paola [Department of Biomedical and Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, 1 Rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris (France)

    2011-11-30

    The influence of several parameters in the preparation procedure of thermal-electrolytic Ag/AgCl electrodes on the resulting electrode performance has been studied. In particular, we report the effect on electrode performance of subtle variations in the preparation of silver oxide paste used for electrode manufacture, in thermal annealing conditions employed and in the procedure for electrochemically converting a fraction of the electrode from silver to silver chloride. Scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used to study the characteristics of the electrodes produced. This work reveals a correlation between the electrochemical behaviour and surface physical characteristics - in particular electrode porosity. The outputs of this study have positive implications for improving the accuracy and comparability of primary pH measurement.

  3. European wind turbine testing procedure developments. Task 1: Measurement method to verify wind turbine performance characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, R.; Friis Pedersen, T.; Dunbabin, P.; Antoniou, I.; Frandsen, S.; Klug, H.; Albers, A.; Lee, W.K.

    2001-01-01

    There is currently significant standardisation work ongoing in the context of wind farm energy yield warranty assessment and wind turbine power performance testing. A standards maintenance team is revising the current IEC (EN) 61400-12 Ed 1 standard for wind turbine power performance testing. The standard is being divided into four documents. Two of them are drafted for evaluation and verification of complete wind farms and of individual wind turbines within wind farms. This document, and the project it describes, has been designed to help provide a solid technical foundation for this revised standard. The work was wide ranging and addressed 'grey' areas of knowledge, regarding existing methodologies or to carry out basic research in support of fundamentally new procedures. The work has given rise to recommendations in all areas of the work, including site calibration procedures, nacelle anemometry, multi-variate regression analysis and density normalisation. (au)

  4. Robotic vascular resections during Whipple procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Bassan J; Novak, Stephanie M; Hogg, Melissa E; Zeh, Herbert J

    2018-01-01

    Indications for resection of pancreatic cancers have evolved to include selected patients with involvement of peri-pancreatic vascular structures. Open Whipple procedures have been the standard approach for patients requiring reconstruction of the portal vein (PV) or superior mesenteric vein (SMV). Recently, high-volume centers are performing minimally invasive Whipple procedures with portovenous resections. Our institution has performed seventy robotic Whipple procedures with concomitant vascular resections. This report outlines our technique.

  5. Robotic vascular resections during Whipple procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Bassan J.; Novak, Stephanie M.; Hogg, Melissa E.; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2018-01-01

    Indications for resection of pancreatic cancers have evolved to include selected patients with involvement of peri-pancreatic vascular structures. Open Whipple procedures have been the standard approach for patients requiring reconstruction of the portal vein (PV) or superior mesenteric vein (SMV). Recently, high-volume centers are performing minimally invasive Whipple procedures with portovenous resections. Our institution has performed seventy robotic Whipple procedures with concomitant vas...

  6. Short-term and long-term effects of a minimally invasive transilial vertebral blocking procedure on the lumbosacral morphometry in dogs measured by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Friedrich; Schenk, Henning C; Forterre, Franck

    2017-04-01

    To determine the effects of a minimally invasive transilial vertebral (MTV) blocking procedure on the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the lumbosacral (L7/S1) junction of dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS). Prospective study. 59 client-owned dogs with DLSS. Lumbosacral CT images were acquired with hyperextended pelvic limbs before and after MTV in all dogs. Clinical follow-up was obtained after 1 year, including a neurologic status classified in 4 grades, and if possible, CT. Morphometric measurements (Mean ± SEM) including foraminal area, endplate distance at L7/S1 and LS angle were obtained on sets of reformatted parasagittal and sagittal CT images. The mean foraminal area (ForL) increased from 32.5 ± 1.7 mm 2 to 59.7 ± 1.9 mm 2 on the left and from 31.1 ± 1.4 mm 2 to 59.1 ± 2.0 mm 2 on the right (ForR) side after MTV. The mean endplate distance (EDmd) between L7/S1 increased from 3.7 ± 0.1 mm to 6.0 ± 0.1 mm, and mean lumbosacral angle (LSa) from 148.0 ± 1.1° to 170.0 ± 1.1° after MTV. CT measurements were available 1 year postoperatively in 12 cases: ForL: 41.2 ± 3.1 mm 2 ; ForR: 37.9 ± 3.1 mm 2 ; EDmd: 4.3 ± 0.4 mm, and LSa 157.6 ± 2.1° (values are mean and standard error of mean =  SEM). All 39 dogs with long-term follow-up improved by at least 1 neurologic grade, 9/39 improving by 3 grades, 15/39 by 2 grades, and 15/39 by 1 grade. MTV results in clinical improvement and morphometric enlargement of the foraminal area in dogs with variable degrees of foraminal stenosis. MTV may be a valuable minimally invasive option for treatment of dogs with DLSS. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Developing standard performance testing procedures for MC and A components at a site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, Carolynn

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC and A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements, documentation and the human factor, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC and A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following elements and subsystems or components for a material control and accountability system: (1) MC and A Elements: Information subsystem, Measurement subsystem, NM access subsystem, including a tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated information-gathering subsystem; and (2) Detecting NM Loses Elements: Inventory differences, Shipper/receiver differences, Confirmatory measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or seal violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems (from the list above). Additionally this work includes a review of the status of regulatory requirements for the MC and A system components and potential criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC and A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a pilot Guide for MC and A Performance Testing at the MBAs of SSC RF IPPE.

  8. Meta-analysis of the technical performance of an imaging procedure: guidelines and statistical methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Erich P; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; McShane, Lisa M; Gönen, Mithat; Ye, Jingjing; Buckler, Andrew J; Kinahan, Paul E; Reeves, Anthony P; Jackson, Edward F; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Zahlmann, Gudrun

    2015-02-01

    Medical imaging serves many roles in patient care and the drug approval process, including assessing treatment response and guiding treatment decisions. These roles often involve a quantitative imaging biomarker, an objectively measured characteristic of the underlying anatomic structure or biochemical process derived from medical images. Before a quantitative imaging biomarker is accepted for use in such roles, the imaging procedure to acquire it must undergo evaluation of its technical performance, which entails assessment of performance metrics such as repeatability and reproducibility of the quantitative imaging biomarker. Ideally, this evaluation will involve quantitative summaries of results from multiple studies to overcome limitations due to the typically small sample sizes of technical performance studies and/or to include a broader range of clinical settings and patient populations. This paper is a review of meta-analysis procedures for such an evaluation, including identification of suitable studies, statistical methodology to evaluate and summarize the performance metrics, and complete and transparent reporting of the results. This review addresses challenges typical of meta-analyses of technical performance, particularly small study sizes, which often causes violations of assumptions underlying standard meta-analysis techniques. Alternative approaches to address these difficulties are also presented; simulation studies indicate that they outperform standard techniques when some studies are small. The meta-analysis procedures presented are also applied to actual [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) test-retest repeatability data for illustrative purposes. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. [A Case of Performed Right Colectomy with Pancreato-Duodenectomy for Transverse Colon Cancer Invased to Duodenum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Ryutaro; Enomoto, Masanobu; Tsurui, Kazushige; Kuboyama, Yuu; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Ishizaki, Tetsuo; Katsumata, Kenji; Obikane, Hiyo; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2018-04-01

    There is a clear consensus regarding the combined resection of organs with cancer invasion, patients with colon cancer. However, there are very few reports to our knowledge regarding the use of pancreato-duodenectomy(PD)for colon cancer patients with cancer invasion in the duodenum. We here report a colon cancer patient in whom we performed PD and right hemicolectomy, who showed favorable results with no recurrence. The patient was a 69-year-old woman. Her chief complaint was hypogastric pain. Her previous doctor performed colonoscopy and a colonoscopic biopsy, and detected a type 2 lesion, throughout the entire circumference of the transverse colon near the liver, and she was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. From further imaging analyses, she was diagnosed as having transverse colon cancer with invasion into the superior mesenteric vein(SMV), duodenum, and pancreatic head, and No. 223 lymph node metastasis. The patient's cancer was concluded to be unresectable, and she underwent chemotherapy, namely mFOLFOX6 with cetuxiumab(Cmab). One course of mFOLFOX with Cmab, the patient decided to consult our hospital for a second opinion. We concluded that her cancer was resectable, so we performed PD, right hemicolectomy, and resection and reconstruction of a part of the SMV. The operation time was 5 hours 17 minutes, and total blood loss was 190 mL. The histopathological diagnosis was tub2, T4b(duodenum and, tissue surrounding the SMV), int, INF b, ly1, v2, PN1b, EX(+)/ND(PN+, v+), PM0(25 cm), DM0(14.3 cm), N1(1/ 20), H0, P0, M0, pStage III a. She was discharged 15 days after surgery with no complications, and thereafter received ajduvant chemotherapy(capecitabine with oxaliplatin)as an outpatient. After 3 courses, capecitabine with oxaliplatin was changed to capecitabine because she developed a nervous system disorder, and she was further treated for approximately about 6 months. She is doing well at the time of writing, with no recurrences for 2 years. We suggest that PD

  10. Surgeon-performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Outcomes of 2392 procedures at two tertiary care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mansour, Mazen R; Fung, Eleanor C; Jones, Edward L; Zayan, Nichole E; Wetzel, Timothy D; Martin Del Campo, Sara E; Jalilvand, Anahita D; Suzo, Andrew J; Dettorre, Rebecca R; Fullerton, James K; Meara, Michael P; Mellinger, John D; Narula, Vimal K; Hazey, Jeffrey W

    2018-06-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a common procedure that, in the United States, is traditionally performed by gastroenterologists. We hypothesized that when performed by well-trained surgeons, ERCP can be performed safely and effectively. The objectives of the study were to assess the rate of successful cannulation of the duct of interest and to assess the 30-day complication and mortality rates. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 1858 patients who underwent 2392 ERCP procedures performed by five surgeons between August 2003 and June 2016 in two centers. Demographic and historical data, indications, procedure-related data and 30-day complication and mortality data were collected and analyzed. The mean age was 53.4 (range 7-102) years and 1046 (56.3%) were female. 1430 (59.8%) of ERCP procedures involved a surgical endoscopy fellow. The most common indication was suspected or established uncomplicated common bile duct stones (n = 1470, 61.5%), followed by management of an existing biliary or pancreatic stent (n = 370, 15.5%) and acute biliary pancreatitis (n = 173, 7.2%). A therapeutic intervention was performed in 1564 (65.4%), a standard sphincterotomy in 1244 (52.0%), stent placement in 705 (29.5%) and stone removal in 638 (26.7%). When cannulation was attempted, the rate of successful cannulation was 94.1%. When cannulation was attempted during the patient's first ERCP the cannulation rate was 92.4%. 94 complications occurred (5.4%); the most common complication was post-ERCP pancreatitis in 75 (4.2%), significant gastrointestinal bleeding in 7 (0.4%), ascending cholangitis in 11 (0.6%) and perforation in 1 (0.05%). 11 mortalities occurred (0.5%) but none of which were ERCP-related. When performed by well-trained surgical endoscopists, ERCP is associated with high success rate and acceptable complication rates consistent with previously published reports and in line with societal guidelines.

  11. Evaluation of a minimally invasive procedure for sacroiliac joint fusion – an in vitro biomechanical analysis of initial and cycled properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey DP

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Derek P Lindsey,1 Luis Perez-Orribo,2 Nestor Rodriguez-Martinez,2 Phillip M Reyes,2 Anna Newcomb,2 Alexandria Cable,2 Grace Hickam,2 Scott A Yerby,1 Neil R Crawford21SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA; 2Spinal Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USAIntroduction: Sacroiliac (SI joint pain has become a recognized factor in low back pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a minimally invasive surgical SI joint fusion procedure on the in vitro biomechanics of the SI joint before and after cyclic loading.Methods: Seven cadaveric specimens were tested under the following conditions: intact, posterior ligaments (PL and pubic symphysis (PS cut, treated (three implants placed, and after 5,000 cycles of flexion–extension. The range of motion (ROM in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation was determined with an applied 7.5 N • m moment using an optoelectronic system. Results for each ROM were compared using a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA with a Holm–Šidák post-hoc test.Results: Placement of three fusion devices decreased the flexion–extension ROM. Lateral bending and axial rotation were not significantly altered. All PL/PS cut and post-cyclic ROMs were larger than in the intact condition. The 5,000 cycles of flexion–extension did not lead to a significant increase in any ROMs.Discussion: In the current model, placement of three 7.0 mm iFuse Implants significantly decreased the flexion–extension ROM. Joint ROM was not increased by 5,000 flexion–extension cycles.Keywords: biomechanics, iliosacral, arthrodesis, cadaver

  12. Usefulness of non-lead aprons in radiation protection for physicians performing interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuguchi, M.; Chida, K.; Taura, M.; Inaba, Y.; Ebata, A.; Yamada, S.

    2008-01-01

    At present, interventional radiology (IVR) tends to involve long procedures (long radiation duration), and physicians are near to the source of scattered radiation. Hence, shielding is critical in protecting physicians from radiation. Protective aprons and additional lead-shielding devices, such as table-side lead drapes, are important means of protecting the physician from scattered radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether non-lead aprons are effective in protecting physicians from radiation during IVR procedures. In this study, the radiation protection effects of commercially available protective lead and non-lead aprons, when exposed to diagnostic X rays, are compared. The performance of these non-lead and lead aprons was similar for scattered X rays at tube voltages of 60-120 kV. Properly designed non-lead aprons are thus more suitable for physicians because they weigh ∼20% less than the lead aprons, and are non-toxic. (authors)

  13. Short communication. Effect of soybean meal heat procedures on growth performance of broiler chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tousi-Mojarradi, M.; Seidavi, A.; Dadashbeiki, M.; Roca-Fernandez, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of soybean meal (SBM) heat procedures on growth performance of broiler chickens. A trial was carried out using 200 male Ross 308 strain chickens during 3 feeding periods (starter, grower and finisher, 42 days). The experiment was based on a completely randomized design with 5 treatments giving 4 replications of 10 broilers per treatment. Treatments consisted on: T1 (control, un-processed SBM), T2 (autoclaved SBM: 121 degree centigrade, 20 min), T3 (autoclaved SBM: 121 degree centigrade, 30 min), T4 (roasted SBM: 120 degree centigrade, 20 min) and T5 (microwaved SBM: 46 degree centigrade, 540 watt, 7 min). Growth performance of animals was examined by determining body weight (BW), body weight grain (BWG), feed intake (FI) and feed conversion rate (FCR). Higher BW (p<0.05) and BWG (p<0.05) and lower FCR (p<0.05) were found in broiler chickens fed heat processed SBM diets compared to those fed a raw SBM diet, probably due to higher nutrient availability. However, no differences were found among heat SBM procedures (autoclaving, roasting and microwaving) on growth performance of animals for the starter, grower and finisher periods. From the results of this experiment, it is concluded that further research needs to be developed to establish the effect of temperature-time heat procedures on nutritive value of SBM in terms of levels of anti-nutritional factors (trypsin inhibitor activity and phytic acid) and amino acids profile and its influence on growth performance of broilers. (Author)

  14. Potential role of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera in performing minimally invasive parathyroidectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Lledo, Salvador [University of Valencia, Clinic University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Valencia (Spain); Ferrer-Rebolleda, Jose [Clinic University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Valencia (Spain); Cassinello, Norberto [Clinic University Hospital, Unit of Endocrinologic and Bariatric Surgery, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    Sestamibi scans have increased the use of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) to treat primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) when caused by a parathyroid single adenoma. The greatest concern for surgeons remains the proper identification of pathological glands in a limited surgical field. We have studied the usefulness of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera (MGC) when used intraoperatively to locate parathyroid adenomas. To our knowledge this is the first report published on this subject in the scientific literature. Five patients with PHPT secondary to a single adenoma, positively diagnosed by preoperative sestamibi scans, underwent a MIP. A gamma probe for radioguided surgery and the new hand-held MGC were used consecutively to locate the pathological glands. This new MGC has a module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable collimator and a CsI(Na) scintillating crystal. It has dimensions of around 15 cm x 8 cm x 9 cm and weighs 1 kg. The intraoperative assay of PTH (ioPTH) was used to confirm the complete resection of pathological tissue. All cases were operated on successfully by a MIP. The ioPTH confirmed the excision of all pathological tissues. The MGC proved its usefulness in all patients, even in a difficult case in which the first attempt with the gamma probe failed. In all cases it offered real-time accurate intraoperative images. The hand-held MGC is a useful instrument in MIP for PHPT. It may be used to complement the standard tools used to date, or may even replace them, at least in selected cases of single adenomas. (orig.)

  15. Potential role of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera in performing minimally invasive parathyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Lledo, Salvador; Ferrer-Rebolleda, Jose; Cassinello, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Sestamibi scans have increased the use of minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) to treat primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) when caused by a parathyroid single adenoma. The greatest concern for surgeons remains the proper identification of pathological glands in a limited surgical field. We have studied the usefulness of a new hand-held miniature gamma camera (MGC) when used intraoperatively to locate parathyroid adenomas. To our knowledge this is the first report published on this subject in the scientific literature. Five patients with PHPT secondary to a single adenoma, positively diagnosed by preoperative sestamibi scans, underwent a MIP. A gamma probe for radioguided surgery and the new hand-held MGC were used consecutively to locate the pathological glands. This new MGC has a module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable collimator and a CsI(Na) scintillating crystal. It has dimensions of around 15 cm x 8 cm x 9 cm and weighs 1 kg. The intraoperative assay of PTH (ioPTH) was used to confirm the complete resection of pathological tissue. All cases were operated on successfully by a MIP. The ioPTH confirmed the excision of all pathological tissues. The MGC proved its usefulness in all patients, even in a difficult case in which the first attempt with the gamma probe failed. In all cases it offered real-time accurate intraoperative images. The hand-held MGC is a useful instrument in MIP for PHPT. It may be used to complement the standard tools used to date, or may even replace them, at least in selected cases of single adenomas. (orig.)

  16. Worldwide Alien Invasion: A Methodological Approach to Forecast the Potential Spread of a Highly Invasive Pollinator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L Acosta

    Full Text Available The ecological impacts of alien species invasion are a major threat to global biodiversity. The increasing number of invasion events by alien species and the high cost and difficulty of eradicating invasive species once established require the development of new methods and tools for predicting the most susceptible areas to invasion. Invasive pollinators pose serious threats to biodiversity and human activity due to their close relationship with many plants (including crop species and high potential competitiveness for resources with native pollinators. Although at an early stage of expansion, the bumblebee species Bombus terrestris is becoming a representative case of pollinator invasion at a global scale, particularly given its high velocity of invasive spread and the increasing number of reports of its impacts on native bees and crops in many countries. We present here a methodological framework of habitat suitability modeling that integrates new approaches for detecting habitats that are susceptible to Bombus terrestris invasion at a global scale. Our approach did not include reported invaded locations in the modeling procedure; instead, those locations were used exclusively to evaluate the accuracy of the models in predicting suitability over regions already invaded. Moreover, a new and more intuitive approach was developed to select the models and evaluate different algorithms based on their performance and predictive convergence. Finally, we present a comprehensive global map of susceptibility to Bombus terrestris invasion that highlights priority areas for monitoring.

  17. European Society of Anaesthesiology and European Board of Anaesthesiology guidelines for procedural sedation and analgesia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Lamperti, Massimo; Akeson, Jonas; Santos, Joao; Costa, Joao; De Robertis, Edoardo; Longrois, Dan; Novak-Jankovic, Vesna; Petrini, Flavia; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Veyckemans, Francis; Fuchs-Buder, Thomas; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) has become a widespread practice given the increasing demand to relieve anxiety, discomfort and pain during invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The role of, and credentialing required by, anaesthesiologists and practitioners performing PSA has been

  18. Task clarification, performance feedback, and social praise: Procedures for improving the customer service of bank tellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, C R; Anderson, D C; Abel, D M; Sergio, J P

    1988-01-01

    Customer service for bank tellers was defined in terms of 11 verbal behavior categories. An audio-recording system was used to track the occurrence of behaviors in these categories for six retail banking tellers. Three behavior management interventions (task clarification, performance feedback, and social praise), applied in sequence, were designed to improve overall teller performance with regard to the behavioral categories targeted. Clarification was accomplished by providing clear delineation of the various target categories, with specific examples of the behaviors in each. Feedback entailed presentation of ongoing verbal and visual information regarding teller performance. Praise consisted of verbal recognition of teller performance by branch managers. Results showed that clarification effects emerged quickly, producing an overall increase in desired behaviors of 12% over baseline. Feedback and praise effects occurred more gradually, resulting in overall increases of 6% and 7%, respectively. A suspension of all procedures led to a decline in overall performance, whereas reinstatement of feedback and praise was again accompanied by performance improvement. These findings extend the generality of behavior management applications and help to distinguish between possible antecedent and consequent effects of performance feedback.

  19. Comparison of patient doses in interventional radiology procedures performed in two large hospitals in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, E.; Tsapaki, V.; Tsalafoutas, I. A.; Maurikou, E.; Kottou, S.; Orfanos, A.; Karidas, G.; Fidanis, T.; Zafiriadou, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to determine patient doses in the most common interventional radiology (IR) procedures performed in two large Greek hospitals. A total of 164 patients who underwent 4 types of IR procedures were studied. Fluoroscopy time, total exposure time, number of frames, number of runs, radiation field size, and cumulative dose-area product (DAP) were recorded. The median DAP values for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were 66 and 123 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'A' and 21 and 49 Gy cm 2 for hospital 'B'. For the cerebral arteriographies performed in hospital 'A', the median DAP was 116 Gy cm 2 while for the hepatic embolizations performed in hospital 'B', it was 104 Gy cm 2 . The DAP values observed in hospital 'A' for carotid arteriography and lower limb arteriography were almost three times than those of hospital 'B'. From the data analysis, it is evident that dose optimization in hospital 'A' should be pursued through revision of the techniques used. (authors)

  20. BPH Procedural Treatment: The Case for Value-Based Pay for Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stovsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “pay for performance” (P4P applied to the practice of medicine has become a major foundation in current public and private payer reimbursement strategies for both institutional and individual physician providers. “Pay for performance” programs represent a substantial shift from traditional service-based reimbursement to a system of performance-based provider payment using financial incentives to drive improvements in the quality of care. P4P strategies currently embody rudimentary structure and process (as opposed to outcomes metrics which set relatively low-performance thresholds. P4P strategies that align reimbursement allocation with “free market” type shifts in cognitive and procedural care using evidence-based data and positive reinforcement are more likely to produce large-scale improvements in quality and cost efficiency with respect to clinical urologic care. This paper reviews current paradigms and, using BPH procedural therapy outcomes, cost, and reimbursement data, makes the case for a fundamental change in perspective to value-based pay for performance as a reimbursement system with the potential to align the interests of patients, physicians, and payers and to improve global clinical outcomes while preserving free choice of clinically efficacious treatments.

  1. Validation of a field test for the non-invasive determination of badminton specific aerobic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonisch, M; Hofmann, P; Schwaberger, G; von Duvillard, S P; Klein, W

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To develop a badminton specific test to determine on court aerobic and anaerobic performance. Method: The test was evaluated by using a lactate steady state test. Seventeen male competitive badminton players (mean (SD) age 26 (8) years, weight 74 (10) kg, height 179 (7) cm) performed an incremental field test on the badminton court to assess the heart rate turn point (HRTP) and the individual physical working capacity (PWCi) at 90% of measured maximal heart rate (HRmax). All subjects performed a 20 minute steady state test at a workload just below the PWCi. Results: Significant correlations (pbadminton is possible without HRTP determination. PMID:12663351

  2. A practical procedure to study the performance of a magnetic bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Aijazi, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    A practical procedure that can help in recording, under simulated conditions, the performance of a magnetic bearing is presented. Theoretical background and practical method to record the vibrations in terms of frequency vs displacement. relationship are discussed. The magnetic bearing is subjected to mechanical vibrations using an electromagnetic vibrator powered with sinusoidal current. Frequency of the current is swept at constant rate through a selected band of interest. Bearing response picked up using an NCDT (Non Contact Displacement Transducer) is recorded on an X- Y recorder to assess its suitability for use in the machine. (author)

  3. Neurosurgical conditions and procedures in infancy are associated with mortality and academic performances in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G; Pedersen, Jacob K; Henneberg, Steen W

    2015-01-01

    at assessing the impact of specific neurosurgical conditions and procedures in infancy on mortality and academic achievements in adolescence. METHODS: A nationwide unselected register-based follow-up study of the Danish birth cohorts 1986-1990 compared academic performances of all children having undergone.......00001, P = 0.000077, and P = 0.000064). CONCLUSION: Neurosurgery in infancy was associated with high mortality and significantly impaired academic achievements in adolescence. When studying anesthesia-related neurotoxicity and the developing brain, focus on specific surgeries/conditions is important...

  4. Hanford spent nuclear fuel cold vacuum drying proof of performance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides the test procedure for cold testing of the first article skids for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) process at the Facility. The primary objective of this testing is to confirm design choices and provide data for the initial start-up parameters for the process. The current scope of testing in this document includes design verification, drying cycle determination equipment performance testing of the CVD process and MCC components, heat up and cool-down cycle determination, and thermal model validation

  5. AIChe equipment testing procedure centrifugal compressors : a guide to performance evaluation and site testing

    CERN Document Server

    AIChE

    2013-01-01

    With its engineer-tested procedures and thorough explanations, Centrifugal Compressors is an essential text for anyone engaged in implementing new technology in equipment design, identifying process problems, and optimizing equipment performance.  This condensed book presents a step by step approach to preparing for, planning, executing, and analyzing tests of centrifugal compressors, with an emphasis on methods that can be conducted on-site and with an acknowledgement of the strengths and limitations of these methods. The book opens with an extensive and detailed section offering definitions

  6. An analysis of technical aspects of the arthroscopic Bankart procedure as performed in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Robert T; Presson, Angela P; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intersurgeon variation in technical aspects of performing an arthroscopic Bankart repair. A unique approach with experienced equipment representatives from 3 different arthroscopic companies was used. Experienced representatives were identified by DePuy Mitek, Smith & Nephew, and Arthrex and filled out questionnaires on how their surgeons performed arthroscopic Bankart procedures. This was performed in a blinded fashion with no knowledge of the identities of the specific surgeons or representatives by us. A video on different aspects of the procedure was observed by each representative before filling out the questionnaire to help standardize responses. Data were collected using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture). Data were analyzed as an infrequent observation with 0% to 30% of representatives reporting the observation; sometimes, 31% to 70% reporting the observation; and often, greater than 70% of representatives reporting. Seventy-six percent of representatives had 6 or more years of arthroscopic experience. Forty-three percent of representatives reported that their surgeons use 3 portals for the procedure often. Forty-four percent reported that viewing was performed exclusively from the posterior portal while the surgeon was performing the repair. Seventy-three percent reported that the Hill-Sachs lesion was observed often, and 61% reported that the posterior labrum was evaluated often before the repair. Only 25% of representatives reported that the Bankart lesion was extensively released and mobilized often. Thirty-three percent reported 3 anchors as being used often. Seventy-five percent reported biocomposite anchors as being used often. Single-loaded anchors were reported as being used often by 47%. Eighty-one percent reported that sutures were placed in a simple fashion. Eighty-three percent reported the use of any posterior sutures or anchors for additional plication as infrequent. There is significant

  7. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, Carolynn P.; Bushlya, Anatoly V.; Efimenko, Vladimir F.; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I.

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC and A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC and A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC and A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC and A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC and A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC and A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC and A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  8. Sport Education as a Curriculum Approach to Student Learning of Invasion Games: Effects on Game Performance and Game Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Cláudio; Valério, Carla; Mesquita, Isabel

    2018-01-01

    The teaching and learning of games and sport-based activities has historically been the dominant form of the physical education curricula. With an interest in providing to students meaningful and culturally situated sporting experiences, Sport Education is probably the most implemented and researched pedagogical model worldwide. However, although there is considerable evidence that the model as a curriculum approach can benefit the development of social goals and healthy sport behaviors, not a single study as to date examined students’ game-play development beyond participation in single and isolated teaching units. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine students’ development of Game Performance and Game Involvement during participation in three consecutive Sport Education seasons of invasion games. The participants were an experienced physical education teacher and one seventh-grade class totaling 26 students (10 girls and 16 boys). Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument (Oslin et al., 1998), pre-test to post-tests measures of students’ Game Performance and Game Involvement were collected during their participation in basketball (20 lessons), handball (16 lessons), and football (18 lessons) units. Inter-group differences and pre-test to post-test improvements within each season were analyzed through 2 (time) x group (sport) repeated measures ANOVA tests. There were found significant pre-test to post-test improvements in Game Performance and Game Involvement in the second (handball) and third (football) seasons, but not in the first season (basketball). Students’ Game Performance and Involvement scores of handball and football were significantly higher than their scores while playing basketball. The opportunity for an extended engagement in game-play activities and prolonged membership of students in the same teams throughout three consecutive seasons of Sport Education were key to the outcomes found. The specific configurations of

  9. Computed tomography versus invasive coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napp, Adriane E.; Haase, Robert; Laule, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: More than 3.5 million invasive coronary angiographies (ICA) are performed in Europe annually. Approximately 2 million of these invasive procedures might be reduced by noninvasive tests because no coronary intervention is performed. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate...... angiography (ICA) is the reference standard for detection of CAD.• Noninvasive computed tomography angiography excludes CAD with high sensitivity.• CT may effectively reduce the approximately 2 million negative ICAs in Europe.• DISCHARGE addresses this hypothesis in patients with low-to-intermediate pretest...

  10. Diagnostic value of performing endocervical curettage at the time of colposcopy procedure; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Imannezhad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN as a precursor to invasive cervical cancer suggests a considerable need for accurate screening of the patients for the risk of these lesions. This systematic review aimed to study the diagnostic significance of endocervical curettage (ECC at the time of colposcopy in the detection of CIN 2, 3, and preinvasive lesions.Methods: PubMed was searched to obtain the relevant articles based on the following search term: (endocervical curettage OR ECC AND colposcopy. The most relevant articles were included after studying the title, abstract, and full text of the obtained articles at initial search. Only English language articles published after 1992 with at least 500 patients were included in this study.Result: Among 300 articles identified by the first search, only seven articles were in line with the purpose of this systematic review. Majority of the included studies were retrospective observational studies.Conclusion: Performing ECC has higher sensitivity in women older than 40 years and those with unsatisfactory colposcopy results. However exact diagnostic usefulness of ECC at the time of colposcopy needs to be investigated in further studies.

  11. Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder

  12. A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauth, K.M.; Guzowski, R.V.; Hora, S.C.

    1994-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature

  13. A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauth, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Business Administration & Economics Div.

    1994-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature.

  14. A formal expert judgment procedure for performance assessments of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauth, K.M.; Guzowski, R.V.; Hora, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an experimental facility located in southeastern New Mexico. It has been designed to determine the feasibility of the geologic disposal of defense-generated transuranic waste in a deep bedded-salt formation. The WIPP was also designed for disposal and will operate in that capacity if approved. The WIPP Performance Assessment Department at Sandia National Laboratories has been conducting analyses to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. These analyses sometimes require the use of expert judgment. This Department has convened several expert-judgment panels and from that experience has developed an internal quality-assurance procedure to guide the formal elicitation of expert judgment. This protocol is based on the principles found in the decision-analysis literature

  15. The effects of age, illustrations, and task variables on the performance of procedural assembly tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, R W; Park, D C

    1993-09-01

    Older adults may be disadvantaged in the performance of procedural assembly tasks because of age-related declines in working memory operations. It was hypothesized that adding illustrations to instructional text may lessen age-related performance differences by minimizing processing demands on working memory in the elderly. In the present study, younger and older adults constructed a series of 3-dimensional objects from 3 types of instructions (text only, illustration only, or text and illustrations). Results indicated that instructions consisting of text and illustrations reduced errors in construction for both age groups compared with the other formats. Younger adults, however, outperformed older adults under all instructional format conditions. Measures of spatial and verbal working memory and text comprehension ability accounted for substantial age-related variance across the different format conditions but did not fully account for the age differences observed.

  16. Cost of nursing most frequent procedures performed on severely burned patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita de Oliveira Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the mean direct cost (MDC of the most frequent procedures performed by nursing professionals on severely burned patients in an Intensive Care Unit. Method: exploratory-descriptive quantitative single-case study. The MDC was calculated by multiplying time (timed spent by nursing professionals in the performance of the procedures by the unit cost of direct labor, and adding the costs of material and medicine/solutions. Results: a MDC of US$ 0.65 (SD=0.36 was obtained for "vital signs monitoring"; US$ 10.00 (SD=24.23 for "intravenous drug administration"; US$ 5.90 (SD=2.75 for "measurement of diuresis"; US$ 0.93 (SD=0.42 for "capillary blood glucose monitoring"; and US$ 99.75 (SD=129.55 for "bandaging". Conclusion: the knowledge developed can support managerial decision-making, contribute to the efficiency distribution of the resources involved and, when possible, provide cost-containment or cost-minimization strategies without impairing the quality of nursing care.

  17. Evaluating harvest-based control of invasive fish with telemetry: Performance of sea lamprey traps in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Christopher; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Barber, Jessica M.; Bravener, Gale A; Jones, Michael L.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Physical removal (e.g., harvest via traps or nets) of mature individuals may be a cost-effective or socially acceptable alternative to chemical control strategies for invasive species, but requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of a population over time. We used acoustic telemetry to determine the current and possible future role of traps to control and assess invasive sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus, in the St. Marys River, the connecting channel between Lake Superior and Lake Huron. Exploitation rates (i.e., fractions of an adult sea lamprey population removed by traps) at two upstream locations were compared among three years and two points of entry to the system. Telemetry receivers throughout the drainage allowed trap performance (exploitation rate) to be partitioned into two components: proportion of migrating sea lampreys that visited trap sites (availability) and proportion of available sea lampreys that were caught by traps (local trap efficiency). Estimated exploitation rates were well below those needed to provide population control in the absence of lampricides and were limited by availability and local trap efficiency. Local trap efficiency estimates for acoustic-tagged sea lampreys were lower than analogous estimates regularly obtained using traditional mark–recapture methods, suggesting that abundance had been previously underestimated. Results suggested major changes would be required to substantially increase catch, including improvements to existing traps, installation of new traps, or other modifications to attract and retain more sea lampreys. This case study also shows how bias associated with telemetry tags can be estimated and incorporated in models to improve inferences about parameters that are directly relevant to fishery management.

  18. Improving the performance of the actinic inspection tool with an optimized alignment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K.A.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy is an important tool for the investigation of the performance of EUV masks, for detecting the presence and the characteristics of defects, and for evaluating the effectiveness of defect repair techniques. Aerial image measurement bypasses the difficulties inherent to photoresist imaging and enables high data collection speed and flexibility. It provides reliable and quick feedback for the development of masks and lithography system modeling methods. We operate the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), a EUV microscope installed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AIT is equipped with several high-magnification Fresnel zoneplate lenses, with various numerical aperture values, that enable it image the reflective mask surface with various resolution and magnification settings. Although the AIT has undergone significant recent improvements in terms of imaging resolution and illumination uniformity, there is still room for improvement. In the AIT, an off-axis zoneplate lens collects the light coming from the sample and an image of the sample is projected onto an EUV-sensitive CCD camera. The simplicity of the optical system is particularly helpful considering that the AIT alignment has to be performed every time that a sample or a zoneplate is replaced. The alignment is sensitive to several parameters such as the lens position and orientation, the illumination direction and the sample characteristics. Since the AIT works in high vacuum, there is no direct access to the optics or to the sample during the alignment and the measurements. For all these reasons the alignment procedures and feedback can be complex, and in some cases can reduce the overall data throughput of the system. In this paper we review the main strategies and procedures that have been developed for quick and reliable alignments, and we describe the performance improvements we have achieved, in terms of aberration

  19. Improving the performance of the actinic inspection tool with an optimized alignment procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K.A.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-03-04

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy is an important tool for the investigation of the performance of EUV masks, for detecting the presence and the characteristics of defects, and for evaluating the effectiveness of defect repair techniques. Aerial image measurement bypasses the difficulties inherent to photoresist imaging and enables high data collection speed and flexibility. It provides reliable and quick feedback for the development of masks and lithography system modeling methods. We operate the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), a EUV microscope installed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AIT is equipped with several high-magnification Fresnel zoneplate lenses, with various numerical aperture values, that enable it image the reflective mask surface with various resolution and magnification settings. Although the AIT has undergone significant recent improvements in terms of imaging resolution and illumination uniformity, there is still room for improvement. In the AIT, an off-axis zoneplate lens collects the light coming from the sample and an image of the sample is projected onto an EUV-sensitive CCD camera. The simplicity of the optical system is particularly helpful considering that the AIT alignment has to be performed every time that a sample or a zoneplate is replaced. The alignment is sensitive to several parameters such as the lens position and orientation, the illumination direction and the sample characteristics. Since the AIT works in high vacuum, there is no direct access to the optics or to the sample during the alignment and the measurements. For all these reasons the alignment procedures and feedback can be complex, and in some cases can reduce the overall data throughput of the system. In this paper we review the main strategies and procedures that have been developed for quick and reliable alignments, and we describe the performance improvements we have achieved, in terms of aberration

  20. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Eusebio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy, it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable.

  1. Investigation Procedure of Magnetic Performances of NdFeB Permanent Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calin, Marius-Daniel; Helerea, Elena; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    The permanent magnet applications based on carbon steel magnets, hard ferrites and AlNiCo magnets classes are renewed with new classes of advanced magnetic materials based on rare earth elements, the Sm-Co and NdFeB types. Performance increase of the hard magnetic materials and their use in speci......The permanent magnet applications based on carbon steel magnets, hard ferrites and AlNiCo magnets classes are renewed with new classes of advanced magnetic materials based on rare earth elements, the Sm-Co and NdFeB types. Performance increase of the hard magnetic materials and their use...... in specific applications impose also great advances in the field of magnetic measurement. New researches need to be validated in order to investigate the NdFeB permanent magnets performances, including their stability under different thermal operational regimes. In this paper a specific investigation...... procedure of magnetic performances of NdFeB permanent magnets in correlation with the range of operating temperature is proposed based on modern hysteresisgraph method and impulse magnetization technique....

  2. Criteria and procedures for validating biomathematical models of human performance and fatigue : procedures for analysis of work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Each railroad covered by 49 CFR 228.407 must perform an analysis of the work schedules of its train employees who are engaged in commuter or intercity rail passenger transportation and identify those schedules that, if worked by such a train employee...

  3. Sport Education as a Curriculum Approach to Student Learning of Invasion Games: Effects on Game Performance and Game Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Cláudio; Valério, Carla; Mesquita, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    The teaching and learning of games and sport-based activities has historically been the dominant form of the physical education curricula. With an interest in providing to students meaningful and culturally situated sporting experiences, Sport Education is probably the most implemented and researched pedagogical model worldwide. However, although there is considerable evidence that the model as a curriculum approach can benefit the development of social goals and healthy sport behaviors, not a single study as to date examined students' game-play development beyond participation in single and isolated teaching units. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine students' development of Game Performance and Game Involvement during participation in three consecutive Sport Education seasons of invasion games. The participants were an experienced physical education teacher and one seventh-grade class totaling 26 students (10 girls and 16 boys). Using the Game Performance Assessment Instrument (Oslin et al., 1998), pre-test to post-tests measures of students' Game Performance and Game Involvement were collected during their participation in basketball (20 lessons), handball (16 lessons), and football (18 lessons) units. Inter-group differences and pre-test to post-test improvements within each season were analyzed through 2 (time) x group (sport) repeated measures ANOVA tests. There were found significant pre-test to post-test improvements in Game Performance and Game Involvement in the second (handball) and third (football) seasons, but not in the first season (basketball). Students' Game Performance and Involvement scores of handball and football were significantly higher than their scores while playing basketball. The opportunity for an extended engagement in game-play activities and prolonged membership of students in the same teams throughout three consecutive seasons of Sport Education were key to the outcomes found. The specific configurations of the game

  4. Technical success, technique efficacy and complications of minimally-invasive imaging-guided percutaneous ablation procedures of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Fedeli, Maria Paola; Alì, Marco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review studies concerning imaging-guided minimally-invasive breast cancer treatments. An online database search was performed for English-language articles evaluating percutaneous breast cancer ablation. Pooled data and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Technical success, technique efficacy, minor and major complications were analysed, including ablation technique subgroup analysis and effect of tumour size on outcome. Forty-five studies were analysed, including 1,156 patients and 1,168 lesions. Radiofrequency (n=577; 50%), microwaves (n=78; 7%), laser (n=227; 19%), cryoablation (n=156; 13%) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, n=129; 11%) were used. Pooled technical success was 96% (95%CI 94-97%) [laser=98% (95-99%); HIFU=96% (90-98%); radiofrequency=96% (93-97%); cryoablation=95% (90-98%); microwave=93% (81-98%)]. Pooled technique efficacy was 75% (67-81%) [radiofrequency=82% (74-88); cryoablation=75% (51-90); laser=59% (35-79); HIFU=49% (26-74)]. Major complications pooled rate was 6% (4-8). Minor complications pooled rate was 8% (5-13%). Differences between techniques were not significant for technical success (p=0.449), major complications (p=0.181) or minor complications (p=0.762), but significant for technique efficacy (p=0.009). Tumour size did not impact on variables (p>0.142). Imaging-guided percutaneous ablation techniques of breast cancer have a high rate of technical success, while technique efficacy remains suboptimal. Complication rates are relatively low. • Imaging-guided ablation techniques for breast cancer are 96% technically successful. • Overall technique efficacy rate is 75% but largely inhomogeneous among studies. • Overall major and minor complication rates are low (6-8%).

  5. Preferential streaming of the ductus venosus toward the right atrium is associated with a worse outcome despite a higher rate of invasive procedures in human fetuses with left diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stressig, R; Fimmers, R; Schaible, T; Degenhardt, J; Axt-Fliedner, R; Gembruch, U; Kohl, T

    2013-12-01

    Preferential streaming of the ductus venosus (DV) toward the right atrium has been observed in fetuses with left diaphragmatic hernia (LDH). The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare survival rates to discharge between a group with preferential streaming of the DV toward the right heart and a group in which this abnormal flow pattern was not present. We retrospectively searched our patient records for fetuses with LDH in whom liver position, DV streaming and postnatal outcome information was available. 55 cases were found and divided into two groups: Group I fetuses exhibited abnormal DV streaming toward the right side of the heart; group II fetuses did not. Various prognostic and outcome parameters were compared. 62 % of group I fetuses and 88 % of group II fetuses survived to discharge (p = 0.032). Fetoscopic tracheal balloon occlusion (FETO) was performed in 66 % of group I fetuses and 23 % of group II fetuses (p = 0.003). Postnatal ECMO therapy was performed in 55 % of group I fetuses and 23 % of group II infants (p = 0.025). Moderate to severe chronic lung disease in survivors was observed in 56 % of the survivors of group I and 9 % of the survivors of group II (p = 0.002). Preferential streaming of the DV toward the right heart in human fetuses with left-sided diaphragmatic hernia was associated with a poorer postnatal outcome despite a higher rate of invasive pre- and postnatal procedures compared to fetuses without this flow abnormality. Specifically, abnormal DV streaming was found to be an independent predictor for FETO. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Neither pre-operative education or a minimally invasive procedure have any influence on the recovery time after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biau, David Jean; Porcher, Raphael; Roren, Alexandra; Babinet, Antoine; Rosencher, Nadia; Chevret, Sylvie; Poiraudeau, Serge; Anract, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate pre-operative education versus no education and mini-invasive surgery versus standard surgery to reach complete independence. We conducted a four-arm randomized controlled trial of 209 patients. The primary outcome criterion was the time to reach complete functional independence. Secondary outcomes included the operative time, the estimated total blood loss, the pain level, the dose of morphine, and the time to discharge. There was no significant effect of either education (HR: 1.1; P = 0.77) or mini-invasive surgery (HR: 1.0; 95 %; P = 0.96) on the time to reach complete independence. The mini-invasive surgery group significantly reduced the total estimated blood loss (P = 0.0035) and decreased the dose of morphine necessary for titration in the recovery (P = 0.035). Neither pre-operative education nor mini-invasive surgery reduces the time to reach complete functional independence. Mini-invasive surgery significantly reduces blood loss and the need for morphine consumption.

  7. Randomised controlled trial to assess the effect of a Just-in-Time training on procedural performance: a proof-of-concept study to address procedural skill decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzetti, Jeremy B; Adedipe, Adeyinka A; Gittinger, Matthew J; Rosenman, Elizabeth D; Brolliar, Sarah; Chipman, Anne K; Grand, James A; Fernandez, Rosemarie

    2017-11-01

    A subset of high-risk procedures present significant safety threats due to their (1) infrequent occurrence, (2) execution under time constraints and (3) immediate necessity for patient survival. A Just-in-Time (JIT) intervention could provide real-time bedside guidance to improve high-risk procedural performance and address procedural deficits associated with skill decay. To evaluate the impact of a novel JIT intervention on transvenous pacemaker (TVP) placement during a simulated patient event. This was a prospective, randomised controlled study to determine the effect of a JIT intervention on performance of TVP placement. Subjects included board-certified emergency medicine physicians from two hospitals. The JIT intervention consisted of a portable, bedside computer-based procedural adjunct. The primary outcome was performance during a simulated patient encounter requiring TVP placement, as assessed by trained raters using a technical skills checklist. Secondary outcomes included global performance ratings, time to TVP placement, number of critical omissions and System Usability Scale scores (intervention only). Groups were similar at baseline across all outcomes. Compared with the control group, the intervention group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in the technical checklist score (11.45 vs 23.44, p<0.001, Cohen's d effect size 4.64), the global rating scale (2.27 vs 4.54, p<0.001, Cohen's d effect size 3.76), and a statistically significant reduction in critical omissions (2.23 vs 0.68, p<0.001, Cohen's d effect size -1.86). The difference in time to procedural completion was not statistically significant between conditions (11.15 min vs 12.80 min, p=0.12, Cohen's d effect size 0.65). System Usability Scale scores demonstrated excellent usability. A JIT intervention improved procedure perfromance, suggesting a role for JIT interventions in rarely performed procedures. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in

  8. Ultrathin Sicopion Composite Cation-Exchange Membranes: Characteristics and Electrodialytic Performance following a Conditioning Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ayala-Bribiesca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the properties of Sicopion membranes: an ultrathin (≈20 μm composite cation-exchange membrane (CEM made from sulphonated poly(ether-ether-ketone (SPEEK containing different levels of sulphonic-functionalized silica particles (SFSPs. Sicopion membranes were conditioned according to the French Normalization Association procedure, consisting in a series of acid and alkaline washes, and their electrodialytic characteristics were compared to an existent commercial food-grade membrane (CMX-SB. Electrical conductivity of Sicopion membranes was higher than that of CMX-SB membranes (9.92 versus 6.98 mS/cm, as well as their water content (34.0 versus 27.6%. As the SFSP level was reduced, the ion-exchange capacity (IEC of Sicopion membranes increased. Concerning their electrodialytic performances, Sicopion membranes presented a lower demineralization rate than CMX-SB membranes (35.9 versus 45.5%, due to an OH− leakage through the pores created by dislodging the SFSP particles during the conditioning procedure.

  9. Video observation of procedural skills for assessment of trabeculectomy performed by residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Narges; Chen, Rebecca; Baikpour, Masoud; Moghimi, Sasan

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy and sufficiency of a healthcare system is directly related to the knowledge and skills of graduates working in the system. In this regard, many different assessment methods have been proposed to evaluate various skills of the learners. Video Observation of Procedural Skills (VOPS) is one newly-proposed method. In this study we aimed to compare the results of the VOPS method with the more commonly used Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS). In this prospective study conducted in 2012, all 10 ophthalmology residents of post graduate year 4 were selected for participation. Three months into training in the glaucoma ward, these residents performed trabeculectomy surgery on patients, and their procedural skills were assessed in real time by an expert via the DOPS method. All surgeries were also recorded and later evaluated via the VOPS method by an expert. Bland-Altman plot also was used to compare the two methods and calculating the mean and 95% limit of agreement. Residents have been done a mean of 14.9 ± 3.5 (range 10-20) independent trabeculectomy before the assessments. DOPS grade was positively associated with number of independent trabeculectomy during glaucoma rotation (β=0.227, p = 0.004). The intra-observer reproducibility of VOPS measurements was 0.847 (95% CI: 0.634, 0.961). The mean VOPS grade was significantly lower than the mean DOPS grade (8.4 vs. 8.9, p = 0.02). However, a good correlation was observed between the grades of VOPS and DOPS (r = 0.89, p = 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that all data points fell within the 95% limits of agreement (-1.46, 0.46). The present study showed that VOPS might be considered a feasible, valid, and reliable assessment method for procedural skills of medical students and residents that can be used as an alternative to the DOPS method. However, VOPS might underestimate DOPS in evaluating surgical skills of residents.

  10. Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Early Invasion and Its Effects on Apricot Pollen Grain Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Khalid; Burgos, Lorenzo; Pallas, Vicente; Sanchez-Pina, María Amelia

    2007-08-01

    ABSTRACT The route of infection and the pattern of distribution of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) in apricot pollen were studied. PNRSV was detected both within and on the surface of infected pollen grains. The virus invaded pollen during its early developmental stages, being detected in pollen mother cells. It was distributed uniformly within the cytoplasm of uni- and bicellular pollen grains and infected the generative cell. In mature pollen grains, characterized by their triangular shape, the virus was located mainly at the apertures, suggesting that PNRSV distribution follows the same pattern as the cellular components required for pollen tube germination and cell wall tube synthesis. PNRSV also was localized inside pollen tubes, especially in the growth zone. In vitro experiments demonstrated that infection with PNRSV decreases the germination percentage of pollen grains by more than half and delays the growth of pollen tubes by approximately 24 h. However, although PNRSV infection affected apricot pollen grain performance during germination, the presence of the virus did not completely prevent fertilization, because the infected apricot pollen tubes, once germinated, were able to reach the apricot embryo sacs, which, in the climatic conditions of southeastern Spain, mature later than in other climates. Thus, infected pollen still could play an important role in the vertical transmission of PNRSV in apricot.

  11. Facilities and procedures used for the performance testing of DOE personnel dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R.A.; Hogan, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Yoder, R.C.

    1983-04-01

    Radiological calibration facilities for personnel dosimeter testing were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a capability for evaluating the performance of DOE personnel dosimetry systems. This report includes the testing methodology used. The informational presented here meets requirements specified in draft ANSI N13.11 for the testing laboratory. The capabilities of these facilities include sealed source irradiations for /sup 137/Cs, several beta-particle emitters, /sup 252/Cf, and machine-generated x-ray beams. The x-ray beam capabilities include filtered techniques maintained by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and K-fluorescent techniques. The calibration techniques, dosimeter irradiation procedures, and dose-equivalent calculation methods follow techniques specified by draft ANSI N13.11 where appropriate.

  12. Facilities and procedures used for the performance testing of DOE personnel-dosimetry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R.A.; Hogan, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Yoder, R.C.

    1983-04-01

    Radiological calibration facilities for personnel dosimeter testing were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a capability for evaluating the performance of DOE personnel dosimetry systems. This report includes the testing methodology used. The informational presented here meets requirements specified in draft ANSI N13.11 for the testing laboratory. The capabilities of these facilities include sealed source irradiations for 137 Cs, several beta-particle emitters, 252 Cf, and machine-generated x-ray beams. The x-ray beam capabilities include filtered techniques maintained by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and K-fluorescent techniques. The calibration techniques, dosimeter irradiation procedures, and dose-equivalent calculation methods follow techniques specified by draft ANSI N13.11 where appropriate

  13. Impact of attributed audit on procedural performance in cardiac electrophysiology catheter laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, V; Volkova, E; Shaukat, M; Khan, F; Segal, O; Ahsan, S; Chow, A; Ezzat, V; Finlay, M; Lambiase, P; Lowe, M; Dhinoja, M; Sporton, S; Earley, M J; Hunter, R J; Schilling, R J

    2018-06-01

    Audit has played a key role in monitoring and improving clinical practice. However, audit often fails to drive change as summative institutional data alone may be insufficient to do so. We hypothesised that the practice of attributed audit, wherein each individual's procedural performance is presented will have a greater impact on clinical practice. This hypothesis was tested in an observational study evaluating improvement in fluoroscopy times for AF ablation. Retrospective analyses of fluoroscopy times in AF ablations at the Barts Heart Centre (BHC) from 2012-2017. Fluoroscopy times were compared pre- and post- the introduction of attributed audit in 2012 at St Bartholomew's Hospital (SBH). In order to test the hypothesis, this concept was introduced to a second group of experienced operators from the Heart Hospital (HH) as part of a merger of the two institutions in 2015 and change in fluoroscopy times recorded. A significant drop in fluoroscopy times (33.3 ± 9.14 to 8.95 ± 2.50, p audit. At the time of merger, a significant difference in fluoroscopy times between operators from the two centres was seen in 2015. Each operator's procedural performance was shared openly at the audit meeting. Subsequent audits showed a steady decrease in fluoroscopy times for each operator with the fluoroscopy time (min, mean±SD) decreasing from 13.29 ± 7.3 in 2015 to 8.84 ± 4.8 (p audit can promptsignificant improvement and hence should be adopted in clinical practice.

  14. The Interest of Performing "On-Demand Chest X-rays" after Lung Resection by Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Laura; Bubenheim, Michael; Bernard, Alain; Melki, Jean; Peillon, Christophe; Baste, Jean-Marc

    2017-10-01

    Background  There is a lack of consensus in hospital centers regarding costly daily routine chest X-rays after lung resection by minimally invasive surgery. Indeed, there is no evidence that performing daily chest X-rays prevents postoperative complications. Our objective was to compare chest X-rays performed on demand when there was clinical suspicion of postoperative complications and chest X-rays performed systematically in daily routine practice. Methods  This prospective single-center study compared 55 patients who had on-demand chest X-rays and patients in the literature who had daily routine chest X-rays. Our primary evaluation criterion was length of hospitalization. Results  The length of hospitalization was 5.3 ± 3.3 days for patients who had on-demand X-rays, compared with 4 to 9.7 days for patients who had daily routine X-rays. Time to chest tube removal (4.34 days), overall complication rate (27.2%), reoperation rate (3.6%), and mortality rate (1.8%) were comparable to those in the literature. On average, our patients only had 1.22 ± 1.8 on-demand X-rays, compared with 3.3 X-rays if daily routine protocol had been applied. Patients with complications had more X-rays (3.4 ± 1.8) than patients without complications (0.4 ± 0.7). Conclusion  On-demand chest X-rays do not seem to delay the diagnosis of postoperative complications or increase morbidity-mortality rates. Performing on-demand chest X-rays could not only simplify surgical practice but also have a positive impact on health care expenses. However, a broader randomized study is warranted to validate this work and ultimately lead to national consensus. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Pattern of surgical procedures performed in the orthopaedic units of a tertiary hospital in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas O Adekoya-Cole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH is one of the foremost teaching institutions in Nigeria. It is a recognized training institution for residency training in Nigeria. However, a thorough evaluation of the procedures being undertaken by the orthopaedic teams in this centre and the impact on the type of training being passed on to the resident doctors in training is the focus of this paper. Objectives: To determine the pattern of procedures performed by the orthopaedic units of the Department of Surgery, LUTH with a view to import the findings in re-organizing its structure based on service requirement, manpower allocation and to make recommendation. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data including age, sex, procedures and leading surgeons retrieved from all our operating theatres over a period from 1st January 2010 to 31st December 2011. The data retrieved was analyzed. Results: A total 741 procedures were performed over the 2 year period. More male patients (58.5% had procedures performed on them than the female patients. The mean age of patients treated was 37.2±15.5 years. Trauma related procedures accounted for 68.8% of the total procedures. Open reduction and internal fixation surgical operations were the most common trauma related procedure while ablative surgical operations following Diabetic Mellitus foot syndrome were the most common non-trauma related procedure performed. Conclusion: Trauma related surgery remains the most common procedures in our teaching hospital. Efforts should be made to increase the number of elective operations like Arthroplasties, Arthroscopic operations and Spinal axis correction operations being performed.

  16. Exploring Intervening Influence of Interactional Justice between Procedural Justice and Job Performance: Evidence from South Asian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashraf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the intervening influence of interactional justice between procedural justice and job performance (task, contextual and adaptive performance of the faculty members of Karachi (Pakistan and Dhaka (Bangladesh based government colleges by using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. Data, for this study, has been collected through pre-designed close-ended questionnaire. The intervening variable fully mediated the relationship between procedural justice and job performance. The result of this study indicates that the performance of government college faculty members can be improved by ensuring fair procedures and dignified treatment of faculty members in the working environment. It can be concluded that teachers can accommodate harsh procedures, subject to courteously and fairly communicated. Significance of this study is that it has investigated the least researched areas in Pakistan and Bangladesh. Its findings can be helpful to the government and college administration while making and implementing policies for college education development in both countries

  17. A new test procedure to evaluate the performance of substations for collective heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baetens, Robin; Verhaert, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    The overall heat demand of a single dwelling, existing out of space heating and domestic hot water production, decreases due to higher insulation rates. Because of this, investing in efficient and renewable heat generation becomes less interesting. Therefore, to incorporate renewables or residual heat on a larger scale, district heating or collective heating systems grow in importance. Within this set-up, the substation is responsible for the interaction between local demand for comfort and overall energy performance of the collective heating system. Many different configurations of substations exist, which influence both local comfort and central system performance. Next to that, also hybrids exist with additional local energy input. To evaluate performance of such substations, a new experimental-based test procedure is developed in order to evaluate these different aspects, characterized by the two roles a substation has, namely as heat generator and as heat consumer. The advantage of this approach is that an objective comparison between individual and central systems regarding performance on delivering local comfort can be executed experimentally. The lab set-up consists out of three different subsystems, namely the central system, the domestic hot water consumption and the local space heating. The central system can work with different temperature regimes and control strategies, as these aspects have proven to have the largest influence on actual performance. The domestic hot water system is able to generate similar tap profiles according to eco-design regulation for domestic hot water generation. The space heating system is able to demand a modular heat load.

  18. A new test procedure to evaluate the performance of substations for collective heating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baetens Robin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall heat demand of a single dwelling, existing out of space heating and domestic hot water production, decreases due to higher insulation rates. Because of this, investing in efficient and renewable heat generation becomes less interesting. Therefore, to incorporate renewables or residual heat on a larger scale, district heating or collective heating systems grow in importance. Within this set-up, the substation is responsible for the interaction between local demand for comfort and overall energy performance of the collective heating system. Many different configurations of substations exist, which influence both local comfort and central system performance. Next to that, also hybrids exist with additional local energy input. To evaluate performance of such substations, a new experimental-based test procedure is developed in order to evaluate these different aspects, characterized by the two roles a substation has, namely as heat generator and as heat consumer. The advantage of this approach is that an objective comparison between individual and central systems regarding performance on delivering local comfort can be executed experimentally. The lab set-up consists out of three different subsystems, namely the central system, the domestic hot water consumption and the local space heating. The central system can work with different temperature regimes and control strategies, as these aspects have proven to have the largest influence on actual performance. The domestic hot water system is able to generate similar tap profiles according to eco-design regulation for domestic hot water generation. The space heating system is able to demand a modular heat load.

  19. Minimal Invasive Urologic Surgery and Postoperative Ileus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative ileus (POI is the most common cause of prolonged length of hospital stays (LOS and associated healthcare costs. The advent of minimal invasive technique was a major breakthrough in the urologic landscape with great potential to progress in the future. In the field of gastrointestinal surgery, several studies had reported lower incidence rates for POI following minimal invasive surgery compared to conventional open procedures. In contrast, little is known about the effect of minimal invasive approach on the recovery of bowel motility after urologic surgery. We performed an overview of the potential benefit of minimal invasive approach on POI for urologic procedures. The mechanisms and risk factors responsible for the onset of POI are discussed with emphasis on the advantages of minimal invasive approach. In the urologic field, POI is the main complication following radical cystectomy but it is rarely of clinical significance for other minimal invasive interventions. Laparoscopy or robotic assisted laparoscopic techniques when studied individually may reduce to their own the duration and prevent the onset of POI in a subset of procedures. The potential influence of age and urinary diversion type on postoperative ileus is contradictory in the literature. There is some evidence suggesting that BMI, blood loss, urinary extravasation, existence of a major complication, bowel resection, operative time and transperitoneal approach are independent risk factors for POI. Treatment of POI remains elusive. One of the most important and effective management strategies for patients undergoing radical cystectomy has been the development and use of enhanced recovery programs. An optimal rational strategy to shorten the duration of POI should incorporate minimal invasive approach when appropriate into multimodal fast track programs designed to reduce POI and shorten LOS.

  20. The Impact of a Hybrid Sport Education-Invasion Games Competence Model Soccer Unit on Students' Decision Making, Skill Execution and Overall Game Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Isabel; Farias, Claudio; Hastie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a hybrid Sport Education-Invasion Games Competence Model (SE-IGCM) unit application on students' improvements in decision making, skill execution and overall game performance, during a soccer season. Twenty-six fifth-grade students from a Portuguese public elementary school participated in a…

  1. Work history and radioprotection practices in relation to cancer incidence and mortality in US radiologic technologists performing nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Marie Odile; Doody, Michele M; Van Dyke, Miriam E; Villoing, Daphné; Alexander, Bruce H; Linet, Martha S; Kitahara, Cari M

    2018-05-02

    Technologists working in nuclear medicine (NM) are exposed to higher radiation doses than most other occupationally exposed populations. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of cancer in NM technologists in relation to work history, procedures performed and radioprotection practices. From the US Radiologic Technologists cohort study, 72 755 radiologic technologists who completed a 2003-2005 questionnaire were followed for cancer mortality through 31 December 2012 and for cancer incidence through completion of a questionnaire in 2012-2013. Multivariable-adjusted models were used to estimate HRs for total cancer incidence and mortality by history of ever performing NM procedures and frequency of performing specific diagnostic or therapeutic NM procedures and associated radiation protection measures by decade. During follow-up (mean=7.5 years), 960 incident cancers and 425 cancer deaths were reported among the 22 360 technologists who worked with NM procedures. We observed no increased risk of cancer incidence (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.04) or death (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.19) among workers who ever performed NM procedures. HRs for cancer incidence but not mortality were higher for technologists who began performing therapeutic procedures in 1960 and later compared with the 1950s. Frequency of performing diagnostic or therapeutic NM procedures and use of radioprotection measures were not consistently associated with cancer risk. No clear associations were observed for specific cancers, but results were based on small numbers. Cancer incidence and mortality were not associated with NM work history practices, including greater frequency of procedures performed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Controlling the morphology and performance of FO membrane via adjusting the atmosphere humidity during casting procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hao-Ran; Cao, Gui-Ping; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Huan-Huan; Song, Chen-Chen; Fang, Xu; Wang, Tao

    2018-03-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has received great interest for its considerable potential in a wide range of fields. In this work, the morphology and performance of FO membrane were regulated by adjusting the atmosphere humidity (HC) of casting procedure. The polysulfone support layer was casted under various atmosphere humidity levels ranging from 40% to 80%. By multi-techniques such as SEM, AFM, and XPS, it was proved that the atmosphere humidity had modified the surface morphology and thickness of the skin layer in support layer, which contributed up to 90% of the structure parameter, resulting in distinct morphology, thickness, and cross-linking degree of active layer. The active layer with sparse bead-like wrinkles on the smooth surface of support layer casted at HC = 65% showed the highest water permeability [26.9 (L/m2 h MPa)] and considerable low salt permeability [0.0390 (L/m2 h)]. It was found that the water flux of FO-65 was 27% and 46% higher than that of FO-80 in AL-DS and AL-FS mode, respectively, and the salt rejection was as high as 98%. Our work highlighted the importance of considering the effect of atmosphere humidity during casting when design an FO membrane for appropriate performance.

  3. Influence of step complexity and presentation style on step performance of computerized emergency operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Song [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Zhizhong [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zzli@tsinghua.edu.cn; Song Fei; Luo Wei; Zhao Qianyi; Salvendy, Gavriel [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-02-15

    With the development of information technology, computerized emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are taking the place of paper-based ones. However, ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately since the industrial practice is quite limited yet. This study examined the influence of step complexity and presentation style of EOPs on step performance. A simulated computerized EOP system was developed in two presentation styles: Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination. Step complexity was quantified by a complexity measure model based on an entropy concept. Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. The results of data analysis on the experiment data indicate that step complexity and presentation style could significantly influence step performance (both step error rate and operation time). Regression models were also developed. The regression analysis results imply that operation time of a step could be well predicted by step complexity while step error rate could only partly predicted by it. The result of a questionnaire investigation implies that step error rate was influenced not only by the operation task itself but also by other human factors. These findings may be useful for the design and assessment of computerized EOPs.

  4. Applying GIS and high performance agent-based simulation for managing an Old World Screwworm fly invasion of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M C; Kwan, P W; Sajeev, A S M

    2014-10-01

    Agent-based modelling has proven to be a promising approach for developing rich simulations for complex phenomena that provide decision support functions across a broad range of areas including biological, social and agricultural sciences. This paper demonstrates how high performance computing technologies, namely General-Purpose Computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU), and commercial Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be applied to develop a national scale, agent-based simulation of an incursion of Old World Screwworm fly (OWS fly) into the Australian mainland. The development of this simulation model leverages the combination of massively data-parallel processing capabilities supported by NVidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) and the advanced spatial visualisation capabilities of GIS. These technologies have enabled the implementation of an individual-based, stochastic lifecycle and dispersal algorithm for the OWS fly invasion. The simulation model draws upon a wide range of biological data as input to stochastically determine the reproduction and survival of the OWS fly through the different stages of its lifecycle and dispersal of gravid females. Through this model, a highly efficient computational platform has been developed for studying the effectiveness of control and mitigation strategies and their associated economic impact on livestock industries can be materialised. Copyright © 2014 International Atomic Energy Agency 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff performing vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struelens, L; Schoonjans, W; Vanhavere, F; Schils, F; De Smedt, K

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of doses to hands, legs and eyes are reported for operators in four different hospitals performing vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. The results confirm that occupational doses can be high for interventional spine procedures. Extremity and eye lens doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters positioned on the ring fingers, wrists, legs and near the eyes of interventional radiologists and neurosurgeons, over a period of 15 months. Doses were generally larger on the left side for all positions monitored. The median dose to the left finger was 225 μSv per procedure, although a maximum of 7.3 mSv was found. The median dose to the right finger was 118 μSv, but with an even higher maximum of 7.7 mSv. A median left eye dose of 34 μSv (maximum 836 μSv) was found, while the legs received the lowest doses with a median of 13 μSv (maximum 332 μSv) to the left leg. Annual dose to the hand assessed by the cumulated doses almost reached the annual dose limit of 500 mSv, while annual dose to the eyes exceeded the eye lens dose limit of 20 mSv yr −1 . Different x-ray systems and radiation protection measures were tested, like the use of lead gloves and glasses, tweezers, cement delivery systems and a magnetic navigation system. These measurements showed that doses can be significantly reduced. The use of lead glasses is strongly recommended for protection of the eyes. (paper)

  6. Economic appraisal of the angioplasty procedures performed in 2004 in a high-volume diagnostic and interventional cardiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manari, Antonio; Costa, Elena; Scivales, Alessandro; Ponzi, Patrizia; Di Stasi, Francesca; Guiducci, Vincenzo; Pignatelli, Gianluca; Giacometti, Paola

    2007-10-01

    Growing interest in the use of drug-eluting stents (DESs) in coronary angioplasty has prompted the Healthcare Agency of the Emilia Romagna Region to draw up recommendations for their appropriate clinical use in high-risk patients. Since the adoption of any new technology necessitates economic appraisal, we analysed the resource consumption of the various types of angioplasty procedures and the impact on the budget of a cardiology department. A retrospective economic appraisal was carried out on the coronary angioplasty procedures performed in 2004 in the Department of Interventional Cardiology of Reggio Emilia. On the basis of the principles of activity-based costing, detailed hospital costs were estimated for each procedure and compared with the relevant diagnosis-related group (DRG) reimbursement. In 2004, the Reggio Emilia hospital performed 806 angioplasty procedures for a total expenditure of euro 5,176,268. These were 93 plain old balloon angioplasty procedures (euro 487,329), 401 procedures with bare-metal stents (euro 2,380,071), 249 procedures with DESs (euro 1,827,386) and 63 mixed procedures (euro 481,480). Reimbursements amounted to euro 5,816,748 (11% from plain old balloon angioplasty, 50% from bare-metal stent, 31% from DES and 8% from mixed procedures) with a positive margin of about euro 680,480 between costs incurred and reimbursements obtained, even if the reimbursement for DES and mixed procedures was not covering all the incurred costs. Analysis of the case-mix of procedures revealed that an overall positive margin between costs and DRG reimbursements was achieved. It therefore emerges that adherence to the indications of the Healthcare Agency of the Emilia Romagna Region for the appropriate clinical use of DESs is economically sustainable from the hospital enterprise point of view, although the DRG reimbursements are not able to differentiate among resource consumptions owing to the adoption of innovative technologies.

  7. Management of antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing elective invasive procedures. Proposals from the French Working Group on perioperative haemostasis (GIHP) and the French Study Group on thrombosis and haemostasis (GFHT). In collaboration with the French Society for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine (SFAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Motte, Serge; Steib, Annick; Bonhomme, Fanny; Schlumberger, Sylvie; Lecompte, Thomas; Rosencher, Nadia; Susen, Sophie; Vincentelli, André; Gruel, Yves; Albaladejo, Pierre; Collet, Jean-Philippe

    2018-01-05

    The French Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) and the French Study Group on Haemostasis and Thrombosis (GFHT) in collaboration with the French Society for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine (SFAR) drafted up-to-date proposals for the management of antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing elective invasive procedures. The proposals were discussed and validated by a vote; all proposals but one could be assigned with a high strength. The management of antiplatelet therapy is based on their indication and the procedure. The risk of bleeding related to the procedure can be divided into high, moderate and low categories depending on the possibility of performing the procedure in patients receiving antiplatelet agents (none, monotherapy and dual antiplatelet therapy respectively). If discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy is indicated before the procedure, a last intake of aspirin, clopidogrel, ticagrelor and prasugrel 3, 5, 5 and 7 days before surgery respectively is proposed. The thrombotic risk associated with discontinuation should be assessed according to each specific indication of antiplatelet therapy and is higher for patients receiving dual therapy for coronary artery disease (with further refinements based on a few well-accepted items) than for those receiving monotherapy for cardiovascular prevention, for secondary stroke prevention or for lower extremity arterial disease. These proposals also address the issue of the potential role of platelet functional tests and consider management of antiplatelet therapy for regional anaesthesia, including central neuraxial anaesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks, and for coronary artery surgery. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. A simple procedure to evaluate the performance of fats and oils at frying temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Arellano, D.

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A standard procedure is proposed to evaluate the performance of fats and oils at frying temperatures, taking the advantages provided by the Rancimat apparatus, i. e., standard vessels, temperature correction and temperature homogenity in all vessels resulting from the particular characteristics of the heating block. The results obtained in oil samples of 8 g heated at 180° C for 10 h in triplicate gave coefficients of variation lower than 6% for total polar compounds and polymers. In case of limited amount of oil, it is additionally proposed to use only 2 g of sample provided that a similar surface-to-oil volume ratio is maintained, and coefficients of variation of the same order than those for 8 g samples were thus obtained. Advantages of the procedure as well as potential applications for evaluation of frying fats and oils are Included. As an example, the effect of α-tocopherol on performance of sunflower oils was analyzed.

    Se propone un procedimiento estándar para evaluar el comportamiento de aceites y grasas a temperaturas de fritura. En este procedimiento se utilizan las ventajas del aparato Rancimat, que permite el uso de tubos estándar, la corrección de la temperatura, en su caso, y la igualdad de temperatura en todos los tubos dadas las características del bloque de calentamiento. De los resultados obtenidos en muestras de 8 g de aceite calentadas a 180° C durante 10 h, analizadas por triplicado, se obtuvieron coeficientes de variación inferiores al 6% para la determinación de compuestos polares y polímeros. En caso de limitación en la cantidad de aceite, se propone utilizar 2 g de muestra, manteniendo similares valores para la relación superficie a volumen de aceite, lo que permite obtener valores de alteración y coeficientes de variación del mismo orden. Se analizan finalmente las ventajas globales del procedimiento y sus distintas posibilidades en la evaluación de grasas de fritura. Como ejemplo, se aplica el

  9. Design Procedure and Fabrication of Reproducible Silicon Vernier Devices for High-Performance Refractive Index Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troia, Benedetto; Khokhar, Ali Z; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Reynolds, Scott A; Hu, Youfang; Mashanovich, Goran Z; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we propose a generalized procedure for the design of integrated Vernier devices for high performance chemical and biochemical sensing. In particular, we demonstrate the accurate control of the most critical design and fabrication parameters of silicon-on-insulator cascade-coupled racetrack resonators operating in the second regime of the Vernier effect, around 1.55 μm. The experimental implementation of our design strategies has allowed a rigorous and reliable investigation of the influence of racetrack resonator and directional coupler dimensions as well as of waveguide process variability on the operation of Vernier devices. Figures of merit of our Vernier architectures have been measured experimentally, evidencing a high reproducibility and a very good agreement with the theoretical predictions, as also confirmed by relative errors even lower than 1%. Finally, a Vernier gain as high as 30.3, average insertion loss of 2.1 dB and extinction ratio up to 30 dB have been achieved.

  10. Crush performance of redwood for developing design procedures for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.M.; Hermanson, J.C.; McMurtry, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Containers for the transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials incorporate redwood in impact limiters. Redwood is an excellent energy absorber, but only the most simplistic information exists on its crush properties. Tbe stress-strain interrelationship for any wood species subject to three-dimensional stresses is largely unknown for any all stress condition and wood behavior at both high strains and high strain-rates is known only in general terms. Both stress-strain and crush failure theories have been developed based only on uniaxial load tests. The anisotropy of wood adds an additional complexity to measuring wood response and developing suitable theories to describe it. A long history of wood utilization in the building industry has led to design procedures and property information related to simple uniaxial loadings that do not inflict damage to the wood. This lack of knowledge may be surprising for a material that has a long history of engineered use, but the result is difficulty in utilizing wood in more sophisticated designs such as impact limiters. This study provides a step toward filling the information gap on wood material response for high performance applications such as impact limiters

  11. Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Invasive Candidiasis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Global Emergence ... antifungal drugs. Learn more about C. auris Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a ...

  12. Evaluating the Performance Diagnostic Checklist-Human Services to Assess Incorrect Error-Correction Procedures by Preschool Paraprofessionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Melissa; Sellers, Tyra P.

    2018-01-01

    The Performance Diagnostic Checklist-Human Services (PDC-HS) has been used to assess variables contributing to undesirable staff performance. In this study, three preschool teachers completed the PDC-HS to identify the factors contributing to four paraprofessionals' inaccurate implementation of error-correction procedures during discrete trial…

  13. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimation of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Wayne J; DeMaria, Eric J; Brethauer, Stacy A; Mattar, Samer G; Rosenthal, Raul J; Morton, John M

    2018-03-01

    Bariatric surgery, despite being the most successful long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity, remains underused as only approximately 1% of all patients who qualify for surgery actually undergo surgery. To determine if patients in need are receiving appropriate therapy, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery created a Numbers Taskforce to specify annual rate of use for obesity treatment interventions. The objective of this study was to determine metabolic and bariatric procedure trends since 2011 and to provide the best estimate of the number of procedures performed in the United States in 2016. United States. We reviewed data from the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. In addition, data from industry and outpatient centers were used to estimate outpatient center activity. Data from 2016 were compared with the previous 5 years of data. Compared with 2015, the total number of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in 2016 increased from approximately 196,000 to 216,000. The sleeve gastrectomy trend is increasing, and it continues to be the most common procedure. The gastric bypass and gastric band trends continued to decrease as seen in previous years. The percentage of revision procedures and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch procedures increased slightly. Finally, intragastric balloons placement emerged as a significant contributor to the cumulative total number of procedures performed. There is increasing use of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States from 2011 to 2016, with a nearly 10% increase noted from 2015 to 2016. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-perceived versus objectively measured competence in performing clinical practical procedures by final year medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Katowa-Mukwato, Patricia; Banda, Sekelani

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine and compare the self-perceived and objectively measured competence in performing 14 core-clinical practical procedures by Final Year Medical Students of the University of Zambia. Methods The study included 56 out of 60 graduating University of Zambia Medical Students of the 2012/2013 academic year. Self-perceived competence: students rated their competence on 14 core- clinical practical procedures using a self-administered questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale. Objec...

  15. Distance to invasive heart centre, performance of acute coronary angiography, and angioplasty and associated outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranberg, Tinne; Lippert, Freddy K; Christensen, Erika F; Stengaard, Carsten; Hjort, Jakob; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Petersen, Frants; Jensen, Jan Skov; Bäck, Caroline; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Ravkilde, Jan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether the distance from the site of event to an invasive heart centre, acute coronary angiography (CAG)/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and hospital-level of care (invasive heart centre vs. local hospital) is associated with survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Nationwide historical follow-up study of 41 186 unselected OHCA patients, in whom resuscitation was attempted between 2001 and 2013, identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. We observed an increase in the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR (18% in 2001, 60% in 2013, P acute CAG/PCI (5% in 2001, 27% in 2013, P acute CAG/PCI annually in each region was defined as the CAG/PCI index. The following variables were associated with lower mortality in multivariable analyses: direct admission to invasive heart centre (HR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.89-0.93), CAG/PCI index (HR 0.33, 95% CI: 0.25-0.45), population density above 2000 per square kilometre (HR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98), bystander CPR (HR 0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99) and witnessed OHCA (HR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.85-0.89), whereas distance to the nearest invasive centre was not associated with survival. Admission to an invasive heart centre and regional performance of acute CAG/PCI were associated with improved survival in OHCA patients, whereas distance to the invasive centre was not. These results support a centralized strategy for immediate post-resuscitation care in OHCA patients. © The Author 2017. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. System for monitoring of green roof performance: use of weighing roof segment and non-invasive visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinkova, Vladmira; Dohnal, Michal; Picek, Tomas; Sacha, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the performance of technogenic substrates for green roofs is a significant task in the framework of sustainable urban planning and water/energy management. The potential retention and detention of the anthropogenic, light weight soil systems and their temporal soil structure changes are of major importance. A green roof test segment was built to investigate the benefits of such anthropogenic systems. Adaptable low-cost system allows long-term monitoring of preferred characteristics. Temperature and water balance measurements complemented with meteorological observations and knowledge of physical properties of the substrates provide basis for detailed analysis of thermal and hydrological regime in green roof systems. The first results confirmed the benefits of green roof systems. The reduction of temperature fluctuations as well as rainfall runoff was significant. Depending on numerous factors such substrate material or vegetation cover the test green roof suppressed the roof temperature amplitude for the period analyzed. The ability to completely prevent (light rainfall events) or reduce and delay (medium and heavy rainfall events) the peak runoff was also analyzed. Special attention is being paid to the assessment of soil structural properties related to possible aggregation/disaggregation, root growth, weather conditions and associated structural changes using non-invasive imaging method. X-ray computed microtomography of undisturbed soil samples (taken from experimental segments) is used for description of pore space geometry, evaluation of surface to volume ratio, additionally for description of cracks and macropores as a product of soil flora and fauna activity. The information from computed tomography imaging will be used for numerical modeling of water flow in variable saturated porous media. The research was realized as a part of the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings supported by the EU and with financial support from the Czech

  17. Performance evaluation of different types of particle representation procedures of Particle Swarm Optimization in Job-shop Scheduling Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izah Anuar, Nurul; Saptari, Adi

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses the types of particle representation (encoding) procedures in a population-based stochastic optimization technique in solving scheduling problems known in the job-shop manufacturing environment. It intends to evaluate and compare the performance of different particle representation procedures in Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in the case of solving Job-shop Scheduling Problems (JSP). Particle representation procedures refer to the mapping between the particle position in PSO and the scheduling solution in JSP. It is an important step to be carried out so that each particle in PSO can represent a schedule in JSP. Three procedures such as Operation and Particle Position Sequence (OPPS), random keys representation and random-key encoding scheme are used in this study. These procedures have been tested on FT06 and FT10 benchmark problems available in the OR-Library, where the objective function is to minimize the makespan by the use of MATLAB software. Based on the experimental results, it is discovered that OPPS gives the best performance in solving both benchmark problems. The contribution of this paper is the fact that it demonstrates to the practitioners involved in complex scheduling problems that different particle representation procedures can have significant effects on the performance of PSO in solving JSP.

  18. Evaluation of the performance of MP4-based procedures for a wide range of thermochemical and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Li-Juan; Wan, Wenchao; Karton, Amir, E-mail: amir.karton@uwa.edu.au

    2016-11-30

    We evaluate the performance of standard and modified MPn procedures for a wide set of thermochemical and kinetic properties, including atomization energies, structural isomerization energies, conformational energies, and reaction barrier heights. The reference data are obtained at the CCSD(T)/CBS level by means of the Wn thermochemical protocols. We find that none of the MPn-based procedures show acceptable performance for the challenging W4-11 and BH76 databases. For the other thermochemical/kinetic databases, the MP2.5 and MP3.5 procedures provide the most attractive accuracy-to-computational cost ratios. The MP2.5 procedure results in a weighted-total-root-mean-square deviation (WTRMSD) of 3.4 kJ/mol, whilst the computationally more expensive MP3.5 procedure results in a WTRMSD of 1.9 kJ/mol (the same WTRMSD obtained for the CCSD(T) method in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set). We also assess the performance of the computationally economical CCSD(T)/CBS(MP2) method, which provides the best overall performance for all the considered databases, including W4-11 and BH76.

  19. Industry relationships are associated with performing a greater number of sinus balloon dilation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Bobian, Michael; Harvey, Richard J; Gray, Stacey T; Baredes, Soly; Folbe, Adam J

    2017-09-01

    Industry outreach promotes awareness of novel technologies. However, concerns have been raised that such relationships may also unduly impact medical decision-making. Our objective in this study was to evaluate industry relationships among practitioners who frequently employ balloon dilation (BD), characterizing whether there is any association between financial relationships and BD utilization. Provider utilization data (FY-2014) was accessed for individuals billing BD procedures to Medicare, the largest healthcare payor in the United States. The names of individuals included in these data sets were cross-referenced with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payment site to determine the extent of industry relationships during this same year. Individuals included in this analysis were organized by those with "significant" ($1,000 to $10,000) and "major" (> $10,000) industry relationships. Practice setting, training, and experience were also evaluated. Of the 302 otolaryngologists who billed enough BDs for inclusion in this data set, 99.3% were in private practice, 89.7% were board-certified, 8.3% had facial plastic and reconstructive fellowship training, and 1.3% had rhinology fellowship training. There was a significant increase in BDs performed with increasing BD company financial contributions (analysis of variance, p = 0.0003). Individuals without "significant" relationships with BD companies billed fewer BDs than those with at least "significant" (>$1,000) relationships (57.0 ± 4.3 vs 87.7 ± 10.0, p = 0.001). There is an association between receiving money from industry and the frequency with which otolaryngologists employ BD. Although our analysis demonstrates an association, these results in no way imply causation. Further analysis exploring the reasons for this association may be necessary. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  20. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 240 - Recommended Procedures for Conducting Skill Performance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tailor their testing procedures to the specific operational realities. This appendix contains FRA's..., headlight? —Couple to cars at a safe speed? —Properly control in train slack and buff forces? —Properly use...

  1. Controlling Bleeding from Proximal and Coronary Ostial Anastomoses by Using Blood Cardioplegia Delivering Antegradely while Performing Bentall Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Şener

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Bentall procedure is one of the valved conduit techniques which is used in the treatment of aortic valve diseases accompanied by ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection and it is used commonly around the world. In Bentall procedure, which is a complicated and long surgery, the rate of mortality and morbidity are not only related to the operation itself but also to the complications like major neurological events, myocardial damage and bleeding which take place during the intraoperative and postoperative period. Although the quantity and frequency of bleeding is declined with teflon strips and biological tissue glues, modifications of Bentall procedure are still an important problem. This study was conducted retrospectively with 48 patients in terms of early results of complication of bleeding caused specifically by proximal suture line and coronary ostium anastomosis lines controlled by the method of blood cardioplegia while performing Bentall procedure and supracoronary aort replacement in our clinic.

  2. Infant speech-sound discrimination testing: effects of stimulus intensity and procedural model on measures of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozza, R J

    1987-06-01

    Performance of infants in a speech-sound discrimination task (/ba/ vs /da/) was measured at three stimulus intensity levels (50, 60, and 70 dB SPL) using the operant head-turn procedure. The procedure was modified so that data could be treated as though from a single-interval (yes-no) procedure, as is commonly done, as well as if from a sustained attention (vigilance) task. Discrimination performance changed significantly with increase in intensity, suggesting caution in the interpretation of results from infant discrimination studies in which only single stimulus intensity levels within this range are used. The assumptions made about the underlying methodological model did not change the performance-intensity relationships. However, infants demonstrated response decrement, typical of vigilance tasks, which supports the notion that the head-turn procedure is represented best by the vigilance model. Analysis then was done according to a method designed for tasks with undefined observation intervals [C. S. Watson and T. L. Nichols, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 59, 655-668 (1976)]. Results reveal that, while group data are reasonably well represented across levels of difficulty by the fixed-interval model, there is a variation in performance as a function of time following trial onset that could lead to underestimation of performance in some cases.

  3. Fusion Imaging for Procedural Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Brandon M; Eleid, Mackram F; Thaden, Jeremy J

    2018-05-01

    The field of percutaneous structural heart interventions has grown tremendously in recent years. This growth has fueled the development of new imaging protocols and technologies in parallel to help facilitate these minimally-invasive procedures. Fusion imaging is an exciting new technology that combines the strength of 2 imaging modalities and has the potential to improve procedural planning and the safety of many commonly performed transcatheter procedures. In this review we discuss the basic concepts of fusion imaging along with the relative strengths and weaknesses of static vs dynamic fusion imaging modalities. This review will focus primarily on echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging and its application in commonly performed transcatheter structural heart procedures. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Human performance evaluation: The procedures of ultimate response guideline for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kang-Hung, E-mail: alvinks@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Engery Council, No. 1000, Whenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Sheue-Ling, E-mail: slhwang@ie.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • This study adopts SPAR-H to evaluate HEPs in the URG procedures. • The involvement of URG procedures could reduce CDF significantly. • Upgrading the training level of staff will enhance the reliability effectively. • Aiding the plant manager in making URG decision will enhance the reliability. - Abstract: In the nuclear accident which occurred in Japan on March 11, 2011, several units of Fukushima conventional BWR experienced a total loss of power and water supply triggered by a heavy earthquake and subsequent Tsunami which were outside design models. In the past, when an accident occurred, operators in nuclear power plants (NPP) followed emergency operating procedures (EOPs) or severe accident management guidance (SAMG). However, EOP and SAMG are symptom-based procedures to cope with severe transients and accidents, depending on real-time operational parameters. Ultimate response guidelines (URG), a plant specific interim remedy action plan, was developed to manage accidents caused by compound disasters which exceed design models. The URG guides the plant operators’ conduct of reactor depressurization, core cooling water injection, and containment venting. This study adopts NUREG/CR-6883 (Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Human Reliability Analysis, SPAR-H) to evaluate human error probabilities (HEPs) of action and diagnosis in the current URG procedures. We found the human reliability of URG procedures analyzed by SPAR-H is about 85% (depending on different decision makers). Upgrading the training level of staff or enhancing plant managers ability to decide whether to execute URG will enhance the human reliability of URG procedures.

  5. Complications of hysteroscopic Essure(®) sterilisation: report on 4306 procedures performed in a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povedano, B; Arjona, J E; Velasco, E; Monserrat, J A; Lorente, J; Castelo-Branco, C

    2012-06-01

    To analyse the short-, medium- and long-term complications in women undergoing hysteroscopic tubal sterilisation with the Essure(®) device. Retrospective 7-year study. Office hysteroscopic unit in a teaching hospital. A total of 4306 women whoe underwent the Essure(®) sterilisation procedure from 2003 to 2010. Data on the success of the procedure and complications arising from outpatient hysteroscopic sterilisation using the Essure(®) system were collected from consecutive women undergoing the procedure over a 7-year period. Placement rate, successful bilateral tubal occlusion, perioperative adverse events, early postoperative (during the first 3 months of follow-up) and late complications (after the initial 3 months of follow-up). A total of 4108 (96.8%) women completed the standard 3-month follow-up protocol. Only 534 (13%) women had undergone the procedure within the previous year. There were 115 (out of 4306; 2.7%) recorded complications, none of which resulted in the need for hospitalisation or discharge later than 2 hours after the procedure. Vasovagal syncope was the most frequently encountered adverse event, occurring in 85 (2.0%) of 4306 cases. In 19 cases, one device was expelled, with most expulsions (14 out of 19) being detected before or during the 3-month follow-up. Outpatient hysteroscopic sterilisation using the Essure(®) system is safe, with a low rate of complications. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  6. Prognostic Performance and Reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization Grading Classification Systems in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A European Association of Urology Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Viktor; Čapoun, Otakar; Cohen, Daniel; Hernández, Virginia; Babjuk, Marek; Burger, Max; Compérat, Eva; Gontero, Paolo; Lam, Thomas; MacLennan, Steven; Mostafid, A Hugh; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rouprêt, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Sylvester, Richard; Yuan, Yuhong; Zigeuner, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Tumour grade is an important prognostic indicator in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Histopathological classifications are limited by interobserver variability (reproducibility), which may have prognostic implications. European Association of Urology NMIBC guidelines suggest concurrent use of both 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. To compare the prognostic performance and reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 WHO grading systems for NMIBC. A systematic literature search was undertaken incorporating Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Studies were critically appraised for risk of bias (QUIPS). For prognosis, the primary outcome was progression to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease. Secondary outcomes were disease recurrence, and overall and cancer-specific survival. For reproducibility, the primary outcome was interobserver variability between pathologists. Secondary outcome was intraobserver variability (repeatability) by the same pathologist. Of 3593 articles identified, 20 were included in the prognostic review; three were eligible for the reproducibility review. Increasing tumour grade in both classifications was associated with higher disease progression and recurrence rates. Progression rates in grade 1 patients were similar to those in low-grade patients; progression rates in grade 3 patients were higher than those in high-grade patients. Survival data were limited. Reproducibility of the 2004/2016 system was marginally better than that of the 1973 system. Two studies on repeatability showed conflicting results. Most studies had a moderate to high risk of bias. Current grading classifications in NMIBC are suboptimal. The 1973 system identifies more aggressive tumours. Intra- and interobserver variability was slightly less in the 2004/2016 classification. We could not confirm that the 2004/2016 classification outperforms the 1973 classification in prediction of recurrence and progression. This article

  7. An automated sensitivity analysis procedure for the performance assessment of nuclear waste isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1986-01-01

    To support an effort in making large-scale sensitivity analyses feasible, cost efficient and quantitatively complete, the authors have developed an automated procedure making use of computer calculus. The procedure, called GRESS (GRadient Enhanced Software System), is embodied in a precompiler that can process Fortran computer codes and add derivative-taking capabilities to the normal calculation scheme. In this paper, the automated GRESS procedure is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2, which simulates the migration through a sorption medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain. The sensitivity calculations for a sample problem are verified using comparison with analytical and perturbation analysis results. Conclusions are drawn relative to the applicability of GRESS for more general large-scale sensitivity studies, and the role of such techniques in an overall sensitivity and uncertainty analysis program is discussed

  8. The Moderating Effect of Procedural Justice on the Effectiveness of the Balanced Scorecard in Improving Managerial Performance through Organizational Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyadi Supriyadi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study extends prior studies on the effectiveness of theBalanced Scorecard (BSC to improve managerial performancedone by Lau and Mosser (2008 and Lau and Sholihin (2005.Specifically, the study empirically tests the moderating effects ofprocedural justice on the relationship between the financial andnonfinancial dimensions of BSC and managerial performance. Italso tests the impact of organizational commitment on performance.Based on survey data from 76 respondents, the results indicate thatperceived procedural justice in the use financial and nonfinancialdimensions of the BSC is associated with managers’ organizationalcommitment. It further finds that organizational commitment ispositively related to performance. The study extends the literatureby providing empirical evidence about the moderating effect ofprocedural justice on the relationship between the financial andnonfinancial dimensions of BSC and organizational commitment. Keywords: balanced scorecard; organizational commitment; financial measures;managerial performance; moderating effect; nonfinancial measures;procedural justice

  9. [Spa-based water procedures and complications in the course of their performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persiianova-Dubrova, A L; Badalov, N G; L'vova, N V; Krikorova, S A; Tupitsyna, Iu Iu; Uianaeva, A I; Barashkov, G N; Povazhnaia, E L

    2010-01-01

    The scope of applications of spa-based water procedures have become considerably extended during the recent years; accordingly, the frequency of complications and accidents has increased. The present review considers the possible mechanisms underlying such complications and various factors promoting their development, such as the patients' age and chronic diseases, the use of pharmaceutical products affecting thermoregulation and cardiovascular function. Special attention is given to the influence of alcohol consumption on the frequency of complications, accidents, and sudden death associated with hyperthermal procedures, the possibility of infectious diseases and measures necessary for their prevention.

  10. X-ray exposure hazards for physicians performing ablation procedures and device implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinskis, Germanas; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the survey was to evaluate physician's and authorities policies and clinical practices when using occupational X-ray during ablation procedures and device implantation. This survey shows infrequent use of lead gloves, radiation absorbing pads, and lead glass cabins, but increasing ...

  11. Lower rate of invasive revascularisation in acute coronary syndrome patients with significant stenosis on coronary angiography when angiography is performed on a diagnostics only hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Anders; Galatius, Søren; Madsen, Mette

    Patient Register. We included those examined with CAG in the analysis. Information on distance from the patient's home to nearest invasive centre was obtained from Statistics Denmark along with information on education, personal income, previous medicine use and vital status. Patients were grouped...... of the admission. Result Of 24 910 patients with first ACS, 33% lived less than 21 km from one of the 5 invasive centres, 33% lived between 21-64 km and 33% >64 km away. Revascularisation was performed in 13 964 (73%) of the 18263 patients examined with a CAG. Among those examined with a CAG, the cumulative...... incidence of revascularisation was 79% for the third living closest to a centre vs. 74% for those living farthest away. When adjusting for variables like gender, age, vessel disease and the others mentioned above, there was a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.80 (95% CI 0. 73-0.85, p

  12. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  13. Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) in pregnancies with trisomy 21, 18 and 13 performed in a public setting - factors of importance for correct interpretation of results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig, Tanja S; Ambye, Louise; Werge, Lene

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We have established an open source platform for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) based on massively parallel whole-genome sequencing in a public setting. The objective of this study was to investigate factors of importance for correct interpretation of NIPT results to ensure a high...... sensitivity and specificity. STUDY DESIGN: This investigation is a retrospective case-control study performed in a public NIPT center. The study included 108 aneuploid cases and 165 euploid controls. MPS was performed on circulating cell-free DNA in maternal blood. The pipeline included automated library...

  14. A meta-analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive plant species

    OpenAIRE

    van Kleunen, Mark; Weber, Ewald; Fischer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    A major aim in ecology is identifying determinants of invasiveness. We performed a meta-analysis of 117 field or experimental-garden studies that measured pair-wise trait differences of a total of 125 invasive and 196 non-invasive plant species in the invasive range of the invasive species. We tested whether invasiveness is associated with performance-related traits (physiology, leaf-area allocation, shoot allocation, growth rate, size and fitness), and whether such associations depend on typ...

  15. Return-to-Duty Rates Following Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Performed on Active Duty Military Patients in an Ambulatory Surgery Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Elder; Prada, Stefan; Bereczki, Zoltan; Weiss, Michael; Wade, Chip; Davis, Reginald

    2018-05-21

    Low back pain is a primary health care utilization driver in the US population. Health care evaluation visits for low back pain are as common as medical evaluation for the common cold. Low back pain is the most common reason for reductions in activities of daily living and work activity in the general population. Although these statistics are compelling, in the military population, there is arguably a significantly greater economic impact on the military population, as the cost to train, retain, and deploy a service member is a tremendous cost. The current study retrospectively examines surgical outcomes, return to duty, and patient-centric outcomes among 82 active duty or reserve military patients who underwent an outpatient minimally invasive spine surgery Laminotomy Foraminotomy Decompression for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in an ambulatory surgery center. Overall, our results indicate that within the 82 active duty military service members, 100% of the service members return to duty within 3 mo. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in self-reported pain and disability 12 mo postoperative, whereas the average length of surgery was 62 min with an average estimated blood loss of 30.64 mL. The current study indicates that minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in an ambulatory surgery center setting are an effective option for active duty servicemen to reduce return-to-duty rates and symptomatic back-related pain and disability.

  16. Compliance with focused antenatal care services: do health workers in rural Burkina Faso, Uganda and Tanzania perform all ANC procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Paul; Schmid, Gerhrd; Tientrebeogo, Justin; Moses, Arinaitwe; Kirenga, Silvia; Neuhann, Florian; Müller, Olaf; Sarker, Malabika

    2012-03-01

    To assess health workers' compliance with the procedures set in the focused antenatal care (ANC) guidelines in rural Uganda, Tanzania and Burkina Faso; to compare the compliance within and among the three study sites; and to appraise the logistic and supply of the respective health facilities (HF). The cross-sectional study was conducted in the rural HF in three African countries. This descriptive observational study took place in HF in Nouna, Burkina Faso (5), Iganga, Uganda (6) and Rufiji, Tanzania (7). In total, 788 ANC sessions and service provisions were observed, the duration of each ANC service provision was calculated, and the infrastructures of the respective HF were assessed. Health workers in all HF performed most of the procedures but also omitted certain practices stipulated in the focused ANC guidelines. There was a substantial variation in provision of ANC services among HF within and among the country sites. The findings also revealed that the duration of first visits was ANC guidelines were often out of stock in most facilities. Health workers in all three country sites failed to perform all procedures stipulated in the focused ANC guideline; this could not be always explained by the lack of supplies. It is crucial to point out the necessity of the core procedures of ANC repeatedly. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Procedural sedation analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheta Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades. Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA. The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  18. Evaluation of protocolized angiography in performing the interventional procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jianqiang; Shi Haibin; Liu Sheng; Yang Zhengqiang; Zhou Chungao; Zhou Weizhong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of protocolized angiography,including the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), the celiac artery and the common hepatic artery angiography, in detecting the atypical tumor feeding arteries of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedure. Methods: The clinical data of all patients who received the initial TACE for HCC during the period of January 2005-December 2009 were collected and were retrospectively analyzed. Both the angiograms and procedure reports were reviewed. According to the angiography protocols used in interventional procedure the patients were divided into two groups. Group A included 526 patients who received the protocolized angiography, including the SMA, the celiac artery and the common hepatic artery, while Group B composed of 850 patients who underwent the routine angiography of the common hepatic artery. For all patients in both groups the atypical tumor feeding arteries were searched for when the tumor staining was incomplete. The anatomic variations of tumor feeding arteries were classified and were statistically analyzed. Results: The detection rate of tumor supply from the branches of SMA, left gastric artery, phrenic artery and celiac artery was 14.1%, 6.7%, 4.6% and 0.5% respectively in group A, while it was 8.9%, 3.3%, 2.6% and 0% respectively in group B. Significant difference in all above four detection rates existed between two groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: Compared with the conventional common hepatic arteriography during TACE, the diagnostic protocolized angiography, including the SMA, the celiac artery and the common hepatic artery, can markedly improve the detection rates of atypical tumor feeders of HCC, such as the accessory hepatic artery, which means that the tumor will be occluded more completely and be controlled more promptly. (authors)

  19. Procedure proposed for performance of a probabilistic safety analysis for the event of ''Air plane crash''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    A procedures guide for a probabilistic safety analysis for the external event 'Air plane crash' has been prepared. The method is based on analysis done within the framework of PSA for German NPPs as well as on international documents. Both crashes of military air planes and commercial air planes contribute to the plant risk. For the determination of the plant related crash rate the air traffic will be divided into 3 different categories of air traffic: - The landing and takeoff phase, - the airlane traffic and waiting loop traffic, - the free air traffic, and the air planes into different types and weight classes. (orig./GL) [de

  20. Do absorption and realistic distraction influence performance of component task surgical procedure?

    OpenAIRE

    Pluyter, J.R.; Buzink, S.N.; Rutkowski, A.F.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Surgeons perform complex tasks while exposed to multiple distracting sources that may increase stress in the operating room (e.g., music, conversation, and unadapted use of sophisticated technologies). This study aimed to examine whether such realistic social and technological distracting conditions may influence surgical performance. Methods. Twelve medical interns performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy task with the Xitact LC 3.0 virtual reality simulator under distracting con...

  1. Performance of OCT segmentation procedures to assess morphology and extension in geographic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Christopher; Ahlers, Christian; Sacu, Stefan; Mylonas, Georgios; Sayegh, Ramzi; Golbaz, Isabelle; Matt, Gerlinde; Stock, Géraldine; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    Investigating segmentation procedures and morphological findings in time domain (TD) and current spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) devices in patients with geographic atrophy (GA). Fifty eyes of 46 patients with GA secondary to AMD and 15 control eyes were examined in this prospective noninterventional comparative case series. All patients underwent Stratus (model 3000), Cirrus (Carl Zeiss Meditec), Spectralis (Spectralis HRA+OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) and 3D-OCT-1000 (Topcon). Automated segmentation analyses were compared. An overlay of scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) and three-dimensional retinal thickness (RT) maps were used to investigate whether areas of retinal thinning correspond to areas of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy. Geographic atrophy areas identified in SLO scans were significantly larger than areas of retinal thinning in RT maps. No convincing topographic correlation could be found between areas of retinal thinning and actual GA size as identified in SLO and fundus photography. Spectralis OCT showed significantly more mild and severe segmentation errors than 3D and Cirrus OCT. This study showed substantial limitations in identifying zones of GA reliably when using automatic segmentation procedures in current SD-OCT devices. This limitation should be addressed to visualize and document RPE loss realistically in a frequent disease like GA. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Acta Ophthalmol.

  2. Minimally invasive surgical treatment of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Andrew B; Joseph Woo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is in the midst of a practice revolution. Traditionally, surgery for valvular heart disease consisted of valve replacement via conventional sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the past 20 years, the increasing popularity of less-invasive procedures, accompanied by advancements in imaging, surgical instrumentation, and robotic technology, has motivated and enabled surgeons to develop and perform complex cardiac surgical procedures through small incisions, often eliminating the need for sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. In addition to the benefits of improved cosmesis, minimally invasive mitral valve surgery was pioneered with the intent of reducing morbidity, postoperative pain, blood loss, hospital length of stay, and time to return to normal activity. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art of minimally invasive approaches to the surgical treatment of valvular heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 49 CFR 240.211 - Procedures for making the determination on performance skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance skills. 240.211 Section 240.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... determination on performance skills. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially certifying or recertifying any person... demonstrated, in accordance with the requirements of § 240.127 of this part, the skills to safely operate...

  4. 20 CFR 666.120 - What are the procedures for negotiating annual levels of performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... performance for each core indicator and the customer satisfaction indicators. In negotiating these levels, the... customer satisfaction; (3) The extent to which the levels of performance promote continuous improvement and... other States, taking into account factors including differences in economic conditions, participant...

  5. A Comparison of the Bariatric Procedures that Are Performed in the Treatment of Super Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kohei; Seki, Yosuke; Kasama, Kazunori; Wakamatsu, Kotaro; Umezawa, Akiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Kurokawa, Yoshimochi

    2017-10-01

    We have experienced numerous cases of super morbid obesity (SMO), defined by a BMI of ≥50 kg/m 2 , in which laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) was not able to achieve a sufficient weight loss effect. However, the most appropriate procedure for the treatment of SMO has not yet been established. The subjects included 248 successive patients who underwent surgery at our hospital from June 2006 to December 2012. We divided the subjects into an SMO group (BMI, 50 to <70 kg/m 2 ) and a morbid obesity (MO) group (BMI, 35 to <50 kg/m 2 ). The subjects underwent LSG, LSG with duodenojejunal bypass (LSG/DJB), or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). The weight loss effects, safety of surgery, and metabolic profile changes were compared. Sixty-two subjects were classified into the SMO group (25%). The percent excess weight loss (%EWL) after LSG among the patients in the SMO group was not significantly different from that of patients who underwent other procedures. LSG was associated with a significantly lower success rate in terms of weight loss (%EWL ≥ 50%), in comparison to the weight loss at 1 year after LRYGB and at 2 years after LSG/DJB and LRYGB. Among the patients in the MO group, the %EWL and the rate of successful weight loss did not differ to a statistically significant extent. This study demonstrated that in patients with SMO, LSG/DJB and LRYGB can achieve superior weight loss effects in comparison to LSG.

  6. 40 CFR 63.6120 - What performance tests and other procedures must I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tests or compliance evaluations during periods of startup, shutdown, or malfunction. Performance tests must be conducted at high load, defined as 100 percent plus or minus 10 percent. (d) You must conduct...

  7. Oral Surgical Procedures Performed Safely in Patients With Head and Neck Arteriovenous Malformations: A Retrospective Case Series of 12 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Abdul Basit; Lindsey, Sean; Bovino, Brian; Berenstein, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    This case series describes patients with head and neck arteriovenous malformations who underwent oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures combined with interventional radiology techniques to minimize blood loss. Twelve patients underwent femoral cerebral angiography to visualize the extent of vascular malformation. Before the surgical procedures, surgical sites were devascularized by direct injection of hemostatic or embolic agents. Direct puncture sclerotherapy at the base of surgical sites was performed using Surgiflo or n-butylcyanoacrylate glue. Surgical procedures were carried out in routine fashion. A hemostatic packing of FloSeal, Gelfoam, and Avitene was adapted to the surgical sites. Direct puncture sclerotherapy with Surgiflo or n-butylcyanoacrylate glue resulted in minimal blood loss intraoperatively. Local application of the FloSeal, Gelfoam, and Avitene packing sustained hemostasis and produced excellent healing postoperatively. Patients with arteriovenous malformations can safely undergo routine oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures with minimal blood loss when appropriate endovascular techniques and local hemostatic measures are used by the interventional radiologist and oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlation of hospital magnet status with the quality of physicians performing neurosurgical procedures in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2018-01-24

    The quality of physicians practicing in hospitals recognized for nursing excellence by the American Nurses Credentialing Center has not been studied before. We investigated whether Magnet hospital recognition is associated with higher quality of physicians performing neurosurgical procedures. We performed a cohort study of patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures from 2009-2013, who were registered in the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database. Propensity score adjusted multivariable regression models were used to adjust for known confounders, with mixed effects methods to control for clustering at the facility level. An instrumental variable analysis was used to control for unmeasured confounding and simulate the effect of a randomized trial. During the study period, 185,277 patients underwent neurosurgical procedures, and met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 66,607 (35.6%) were hospitalized in Magnet hospitals, and 118,670 (64.4%) in non-Magnet institutions. Instrumental variable analysis demonstrated that undergoing neurosurgical operations in Magnet hospitals was associated with a 13.6% higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of mortality (95% CI, 13.2% to 14.1%), and a 4.3% higher chance of being treated by a physician with superior performance in terms of length-of-stay (LOS) (95% CI, 3.8% to 4.7%) in comparison to non-Magnet institutions. The same associations were present in propensity score adjusted mixed effects models. Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of neurosurgical patients in New York State we identified an association of Magnet hospital recognition with superior physician performance.

  9. The effects of interaction with the device described by procedural text on recall, true/false, and task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, V A; Mills, C B

    1995-11-01

    In two experiments, subjects interacted to different extents with relevant devices while reading two complex multistep procedural texts and were then tested with task performance time, true/false, and recall measures. While reading, subjects performed the task (read and do), saw the experimenter perform the task (read and see experimenter do), imagined doing the task (read and imagine), looked at the device while reading (read and see), or only read (read only). Van Dijk and Kintsch's (1983) text representation theory led to the prediction that exposure to the task device (in the read-and-do, read-and-see, and read-and-see-experimenter-do conditions) would lead to the development of a stronger situation model and therefore faster task performance, whereas the read-only and read-and-see conditions would lead to a better textbase, and therefore better performance on the true/false and recall tasks. Paivio's (1991) dual coding theory led to the opposite prediction for recall. The results supported the text representation theory with task performance and recall. The read-and-see condition produced consistently good performance on the true/false measure. Amount of text study time contributed to recall performance. These findings support the notion that information available while reading leads to differential development of representations in memory, which, in turn, causes differences in performance on various measures.

  10. Discharges with surgical procedures performed less often than once per month per hospital account for two-thirds of hospital costs of inpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Liam; Dexter, Franklin; Park, Sae-Hwan; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-09-01

    Most surgical discharges (54%) at the average hospital are for procedures performed no more often than once per month at that hospital. We hypothesized that such uncommon procedures would be associated with an even greater percentage of the total cost of performing all surgical procedures at that hospital. Observational study. State of Texas hospital discharge abstract data: 4th quarter of 2015 and 1st quarter of 2016. Inpatients discharged with a major therapeutic ("operative") procedure. For each of N=343 hospitals, counts of discharges, sums of lengths of stay (LOS), sums of diagnosis related group (DRG) case-mix weights, and sums of charges were obtained for each procedure or combination of procedures, classified by International Classification of Diseases version 10 Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS). Each discharge was classified into 2 categories, uncommon versus not, defined as a procedure performed at most once per month versus those performed more often than once per month. Major procedures performed at most once per month per hospital accounted for an average among hospitals of 68% of the total inpatient costs associated with all major therapeutic procedures. On average, the percentage of total costs associated with uncommon procedures was 26% greater than expected based on their share of total discharges (Pcosts among surgical patients can be attributed to procedures performed at most once per month per hospital. The finding that such uncommon procedures account for a large percentage of costs is important because methods of cost accounting by procedure are generally unsuitable for them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New ion exchange resin designs and regeneration procedures yield improved performance for various condensate polishing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmy, S.W.

    2002-01-01

    Condensate polishing is an application with many different design and operational aspects. The past decade has brought new challenges for improved water quality with respect to both soluble and insoluble contaminants. Nonetheless, the endeavors to understand the compositional complexities of the ion exchange resin bead and the convoluted dynamics of ion exchange chemistry and chemical engineering mechanisms occurring within the mixed bed condensate polisher have brought new ideas and expectations for ion exchange resin in deep-bed condensate polishers than ever before. The new products and procedures presented here are a collaboration of a great deal of effort on the part of researchers, consultants, system engineers, station chemists, lab technicians and others. The studies discussed in this paper unequivocally demonstrate the merits of: 1. A specially designed cation resin to achieve greater than 95% insoluble iron removal efficiency, 2. A less-separable mixed resin for improved control of reactor water sulfate in BWR primary cycles, 3. Applying increased levels of regeneration chemicals and retrofitting the service vessels with re-mixing capability to improve the operation of deep-bed condensate polishers in PWR secondary cycles. (authors)

  12. A Rapid and Convenient Procedure to Evaluate Optical Performance of Intraocular Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Schaeffel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new portable lens scanner was developed and tested for measuring focal lengths and relative contrast transfer of mono- and multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs. A photograph of a natural scene was imaged in white light through an IOL in a water-filled cuvette, with their +21D base power largely neutralized by a −20D trial lens, using a USB monochrome video camera that could be focused via a laptop-controlled stepping motor from −8.5 to + 8.0D. The output of 10000 ON-OFF antagonistic “receptive fields” measuring the video image with adjustable diameter was continuously recorded by custom written software to quantify focus and relative contrast. Six monofocal and four multifocal IOLs, as well as two radial refractive gradient (RRG lenses were measured. After calibration with trial lenses the optical powers and relative contrast transfer of mono- and multifocal IOLs were readily measured. Refractive power profiles measured in RRG lenses closely matched data obtained from the manufacturer. The lens scanner uses a rapidly operating procedure, is portable and can be used to verify positions of the focal planes of mono- and multifocal IOLs in less than 3 s.

  13. Evaluating the Procedure for Performing Awake Cystometry in a Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann-Gow, Travis K.; Larson, Troy R.; Woien, Chrissie T.

    2017-01-01

    in both polyethylene and polyurethane tubing with different internal diameters. Subsequently, the best performing tube from both materials was surgically implanted into the dome of the urinary bladder of male C57BL/6 mice. Twelve-hour, overnight micturition frequency was recorded in healthy, intact...

  14. Do absorption and realistic distraction influence performance of component task surgical procedure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluyter, J.R.; Buzink, S.N.; Rutkowski, A.F.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Surgeons perform complex tasks while exposed to multiple distracting sources that may increase stress in the operating room (e.g., music, conversation, and unadapted use of sophisticated technologies). This study aimed to examine whether such realistic social and technological

  15. Design procedures for solid-liquid extractors and the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on extractor performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaninks, J.A.M.

    1979-01-01

    A design method is proposed for countercurrent mass transfer cascades with crossflow stages, and unsteady operated fixed beds in a countercurrent arrangement. The separation performance of these cascades is calculated from mathematical models and compared with a purely countercurrent

  16. 40 CFR 63.5993 - What performance tests and other procedures must I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing General... specified in § 63.7(e)(1). (d) You must conduct three separate test runs for each performance test required... test run must last at least 1 hour. (e) If you are complying with the emission limitations using a...

  17. Using Differential Item Functioning Procedures to Explore Sources of Item Difficulty and Group Performance Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuneman, Janice Dowd; Gerritz, Kalle

    1990-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) methodology for revealing sources of item difficulty and performance characteristics of different groups was explored. A total of 150 Scholastic Aptitude Test items and 132 Graduate Record Examination general test items were analyzed. DIF was evaluated for males and females and Blacks and Whites. (SLD)

  18. Do absorption and realistic distraction influence performance of component task surgical procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluyter, Jon R; Buzink, Sonja N; Rutkowski, Anne-F; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2010-04-01

    Surgeons perform complex tasks while exposed to multiple distracting sources that may increase stress in the operating room (e.g., music, conversation, and unadapted use of sophisticated technologies). This study aimed to examine whether such realistic social and technological distracting conditions may influence surgical performance. Twelve medical interns performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy task with the Xitact LC 3.0 virtual reality simulator under distracting conditions (exposure to music, conversation, and nonoptimal handling of the laparoscope) versus nondistracting conditions (control condition) as part of a 2 x 2 within-subject experimental design. Under distracting conditions, the medical interns showed a significant decline in task performance (overall task score, task errors, and operating time) and significantly increased levels of irritation toward both the assistant handling the laparoscope in a nonoptimal way and the sources of social distraction. Furthermore, individual differences in cognitive style (i.e., cognitive absorption and need for cognition) significantly influenced the levels of irritation experienced by the medical interns. The results suggest careful evaluation of the social and technological sources of distraction in the operation room to reduce irritation for the surgeon and provision of proper preclinical laparoscope navigation training to increase security for the patient.

  19. 40 CFR 63.6620 - What performance tests and other procedures must I use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... an oxidation catalyst, if you comply with the emission limitation to reduce formaldehyde and you are... formaldehyde in the stationary RICE exhaust and you are not using an oxidation catalyst or NSCR, you must... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What performance tests and other...

  20. Performance of transient elastography and serum fibrosis biomarkers for non-invasive evaluation of recurrent fibrosis after liver transplantation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mamatha; Tazari, Mahmood; Sebastiani, Giada

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent fibrosis after liver transplantation (LT) impacts on long-term graft and patient survival. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the accuracy of non-invasive methods to diagnose significant recurrent fibrosis (stage F2-F4) following LT. Studies comparing serum fibrosis biomarkers, namely AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), fibrosis score 4 (FIB-4), or transient elastography (TE) with liver biopsy in LT recipients were systematically identified through electronic databases. In the meta-analysis, we calculated the weighted pooled odds ratio and used a fixed effect model, as there was no significant heterogeneity between studies. Eight studies were included for APRI, four for FIB-4, and twelve for TE. The mean prevalence of significant liver fibrosis was 37.4%. The summary odds ratio was significantly higher for TE (21.17, 95% CI confidence interval 14.10-31.77, p = 1X10-30) as compared to APRI (9.02, 95% CI 5.79-14.07; p = 1X10-30) and FIB-4 (7.08, 95% CI 4.00-12.55; p = 1.93X10-11). In conclusion, TE performs best to diagnose recurrent fibrosis in LT recipients. APRI and FIB-4 can be used as an estimate of significant fibrosis at centres where TE is not available. Longitudinal assessment of fibrosis by means of these non-invasive tests may reduce the need for liver biopsy.

  1. Procedural and declarative memory performance, and the memory consolidation function of sleep, in recent and abstinent Ecstasy/MDMA users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagrove, Mark; Seddon, Jennifer; George, Sophie; Parrott, Andrew C.; Stickgold, Robert; Walker, Matthew; Jones, Katy; Morgan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of ecstasy/MDMA on declarative memory (Rivermead Behavioral Memory task - RBMT), on procedural learning (Finger Tapping Task - FTT), and on the memory consolidation function of sleep for these two tasks. Testing occurred in 2 afternoon testing sessions, 24 hours apart so that a full period of sleep was allowed between them. Groups were: Non-drug taking Controls (n=24); Recent Ecstasy/MDMA users, who had taken ecstasy and/or MDMA 2–3 days before the first testing session (n=25), and Abstinent Ecstasy/MDMA users, who had not taken ecstasy/MDMA for at least 8 days before the first session (n=17). The recent ecstasy/MDMA users performed significantly worse than controls on the RBMT (mean recall 76.1% of control group recall), but did not differ from controls on FTT performance. Correspondingly there was a significant regression between the continuous variable of recency of ecstasy/MDMA use and RBMT performance. However, there was an interaction between ecstasy/MDMA use and subsequent other drug use. Controls had similar RBMT scores to recent ecstasy/MDMA users who did not take other drugs 48 – 24 hours before testing, but scored significantly better than recent ecstasy/MDMA users who took various other drugs (mainly cannabis) 48 – 24 hours before testing. For both tasks the control, recent ecstasy/MDMA and abstinent ecstasy/MDMA users did not differ in their change of performance across 24 hours; there was thus no evidence that ecstasy/MDMA impairs the memory consolidation function of sleep for either declarative or procedural memory. For participants in the two ecstasy/MDMA groups greater lifetime consumption of ecstasy tablets was associated with significantly more deficits in procedural memory. Furthermore, greater lifetime consumption of ecstasy tablets and of cocaine, were also associated with significantly more deficits in declarative memory. PMID:20615932

  2. Self-perceived versus objectively measured competence in performing clinical practical procedures by final year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katowa-Mukwato, Patricia; Banda, Sekelani

    2016-04-30

    To determine and compare the self-perceived and objectively measured competence in performing 14 core-clinical practical procedures by Final Year Medical Students of the University of Zambia. The study included 56 out of 60 graduating University of Zambia Medical Students of the 2012/2013 academic year. Self-perceived competence: students rated their competence on 14 core- clinical practical procedures using a self-administered questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale. Objective competence: it was measured by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) by faculty using predetermined rating scales. Rank order correlation test was performed for self-perceived and objectively measured competence. Two thirds 36 (66.7%) of the participants perceived themselves as moderately competent, 15 (27.8%) rated themselves as highly competent while 3 (5.6%) had low self-perception. With objective competence, the majority 52 (92.8%) were barely competent while 4 (7.2%) were absolutely competent. When overall self-perception was compared to objectively measured competence, there was a discordance which was demonstrated by a negative correlation (Spearman rho -.123). Significant numbers of students reported low self-competence in performing procedures such as endotracheal intubation, gastric lavage and cardiopulmonary resuscitation which most never performed during the clinical years of medical education. In addition, the negative correlation between self-perceived and objectively measured competence demonstrated the inability of students to assess and rate themselves objectively due to fear that others may know their weaknesses and realize that they are not as competent as expected at a specific level of training.

  3. A computational procedure to improve airfoil performance considering shape and flow interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbandi, M.; Taghvaey, M.J.; Schneider, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in shape design issue, there is still room to work on this topic considering different flow field conditions and specific aerodynamic applications. Today, the optimization techniques are known as a major tool to reach the best possible aerodynamic shape for some specific conditions. In general direct optimization techniques, the optimization process is started from choosing a suitable primitive shape and the shape is improved by suitable considerations of the design objectives and constraints. In a similar attempt, we develop a new optimization strategy to improve the airfoil shape for specified applications. The strategy involves several stages. It includes to determine the flow conditions and design parameters, to establish the objective function, to select a suitable primitive shape, to generate a mechanism for inserting gradual shape changes, to generate grids around each defined shape, to solve the flow field for each separate shape, to collect the solution data, to change the discrete data to the continuous distribution functions, to construct the objective function, and to minimize the objective function using the steepest descent approach. No constraint function is incorporated into the constructed objective function. The cruise flight of an aircraft at an specified altitude is supposed to be the flow field conditions around the proposed airfoil. Nevertheless, the flow field is assumed to be viscous and compressible as well as turbulent. The procedure is tested starting from two generic airfoil shapes with and without camber. The developed algorithm works well for both cases; however, it may not converge to identical shapes if the primitive shapes are not identical. (author)

  4. A computational procedure to improve airfoil performance considering shape and flow interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbandi, M.; Taghvaey, M.J. [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: darbandi@sharif.edu; Schneider, G.E. [Univ. of Waterloo, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Despite remarkable progress in shape design issue, there is still room to work on this topic considering different flow field conditions and specific aerodynamic applications. Today, the optimization techniques are known as a major tool to reach the best possible aerodynamic shape for some specific conditions. In general direct optimization techniques, the optimization process is started from choosing a suitable primitive shape and the shape is improved by suitable considerations of the design objectives and constraints. In a similar attempt, we develop a new optimization strategy to improve the airfoil shape for specified applications. The strategy involves several stages. It includes to determine the flow conditions and design parameters, to establish the objective function, to select a suitable primitive shape, to generate a mechanism for inserting gradual shape changes, to generate grids around each defined shape, to solve the flow field for each separate shape, to collect the solution data, to change the discrete data to the continuous distribution functions, to construct the objective function, and to minimize the objective function using the steepest descent approach. No constraint function is incorporated into the constructed objective function. The cruise flight of an aircraft at an specified altitude is supposed to be the flow field conditions around the proposed airfoil. Nevertheless, the flow field is assumed to be viscous and compressible as well as turbulent. The procedure is tested starting from two generic airfoil shapes with and without camber. The developed algorithm works well for both cases; however, it may not converge to identical shapes if the primitive shapes are not identical. (author)

  5. Performance testing of HEPA filters: Progress towards a European standard procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyment, J.

    1997-08-01

    Proposals for a future European testing procedure for {open_quotes}High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters (HEPA and ULPA){close_quotes} are being developed by CEN (Comite Europeen de Normalisation). The new standard will be given the status of national standard in participating countries, conflicting national standards being withdrawn. The standard will comprise 5 parts covering the grouping and classification of HEPA and ULPA filters according to their efficiency, fundamental principles of testing, marking etc (in part 1). Part 2 will cover aerosol production, measurement principles, counting equipment and statistics. Parts 3-5 will cover testing flat sheet media, leak testing of filter elements and the efficiency testing of filter elements respectively. The efficiency test methods allow the use of either homogeneous monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols for the determination of particulate filtration efficiencies as a function of particle size. The particle size at which maximum penetration occurs is first determined in flat sheet media tests; tests on filter elements (constructed using the same filter medium) may be carried out using either a homogeneous monodisperse aerosol of the size at which maximum penetration occurs (MPPS) or a polydisperse aerosol whose median size is close to the MPPS. Tests with monodisperse aerosols may be conducted using condensation nucleus counting equipment; tests using polydisperse test aerosols require the use of optical sizing particle counters. When determining the efficiency of filter elements the downstream aerosol concentrations may be determined from air samples obtained using either an overall method (single point sampling after mixing) or a scan method. The scan method also allows {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} efficiency values to be determined. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Attempted establishment of proficiency levels for laparoscopic performance on a national scale using simulation: the results from the 2004 SAGES Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer-Virtual Reality (MIST-VR) learning center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickle, K R; Ritter, E M; McClusky, D A; Lederman, A; Baghai, M; Gallagher, A G; Smith, C D

    2007-01-01

    The Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer-Virtual Reality (MIST-VR) has been well validated as a training device for laparoscopic skills. It has been demonstrated that training to a level of proficiency on the simulator significantly improves operating room performance of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The purpose of this project was to obtain a national standard of proficiency using the MIST-VR based on the performance of experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Surgeons attending the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) 2004 Annual Scientific Meeting who had performed more than 100 laparoscopic procedures volunteered to participate. All the subjects completed a demographic questionnaire assessing laparoscopic and MIST-VR experience in the learning center of the SAGES 2004 meeting. Each subject performed two consecutive trials of the MIST-VR Core Skills 1 program at the medium setting. Each trial involved six basic tasks of increasing difficulty: acquire place (AP), transfer place (TP), traversal (TV), withdrawal insert (WI), diathermy task (DT), and manipulate diathermy (MD). Trial 1 was considered a "warm-up," and trial 2 functioned as the test trial proper. Subject performance was scored for time, errors, and economy of instrument movement for each task, and a cumulative total score was calculated. Trial 2 data are expressed as mean time in seconds in Table 2. Proficiency levels for laparoscopic skills have now been established on a national scale by experienced laparoscopic surgeons using the MIST-VR simulator. Residency programs, training centers, and practicing surgeons can now use these data as guidelines for performance criterion during MIST-VR skills training.

  7. Chemical protective clothing; a study into the ability of staff to perform lifesaving procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, M.; Jundi, A.; James, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the ability of medical and nursing staff to perform certain tasks while wearing a chemical protection suit with a respirator. Tasks chosen were those that would be required before decontamination. Methods—Ten experienced accident and emergency doctors (middle grade and consultants) and 10 nurses were asked to perform certain tasks that were judged to be life saving, relevant to triage, or necessary to confirm death, on an advanced life support manikin, while wearing a TST-Sweden chemical protection suit. The operators were objectively assessed by one of the authors for achieving each task, then asked to make a subjective assessment of the difficulty experienced. Results—Medical staff were asked to ventilate the manikin using a bag-valve-mask, intubate within 30 seconds, apply monitor electrodes and cables and check cardiac rhythm, apply gel pads and defibrillate safely, and finally, fold the cruciform triage card to show "RED", and attach it to the manikin. All the doctors completed these tasks, except for one, who could only intubate the manikin after several attempts. Nursing staff were asked to open and apply an oxygen mask, adjust oxygen flow, size and insert an oropharyngeal airway, ventilate the manikin using a bag-valve-mask, apply a pressure bandage to a limb, and fold the cruciform triage card to show "YELLOW", and attach it to the manikin. All the nurses completed these tasks. Operators reported varying degrees of difficulty, the most difficult tasks were those requiring fine movements or delicate control. Generally, operators found the butyl rubber gloves cumbersome. Communication difficulties were frequently reported. Although only intubation was formally timed, tasks were perceived to take longer. Some operators found the suits too warm and uncomfortable. Conclusion—Should the need arise, the TST-Sweden chemical protection suits would enable experienced doctors and nurses to perform lifesaving measures effectively

  8. Effect of a procedural video CD and study guide on the practical fixed prosthodontic performance of Iranian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Sakineh; Azari, Abbas; Mahgoli, Hosseinali; Akhoundi, Nasrin

    2012-03-01

    Dental students in programs around the world typically pass preclinical courses before entering the clinic and working on actual patients. Since fixed prosthodontics is a preclinical course that requires a great deal of effort, students may experience a substantial amount of stress that may affect their self-confidence and/or clinical performance. In this study, an instructional video CD (VCD) and study guide depicting the step-by-step procedures involved in a metal-ceramic tooth preparation and provisional crown fabrication was prepared. Students at the Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, were divided randomly into two groups. Group A students trained as usual with live patients, and Group B students were given a copy of the VCD and study guide following a lecture. The students in Group B were encouraged to read the study guide and watch the VCD after live demonstrations. Then, both groups practiced individually on mannequins. At the end of the course, the students completed a sixteen-item questionnaire about their stress level, self-confidence, and knowledge base. The results showed that the students exposed to the extra media performed significantly better on some practical phases, e.g., laboratory procedures. A moderate, insignificant correlation was detected between exposure to media and decreasing the students' stress and self-esteem. We concluded that supplementary teaching aids such as a VCD and study guide may improve the clinical performance of dental students to some extent, but the live demonstration is still preferred by students.

  9. The importance of human performance and procedures in limiting severe accident risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the defense in depth concept and redundancy in safety systems utilized, complex industrial plants, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) can be operated safely. This capability has been demonstrated by many years of safe operation by numerous NPPs in the US and abroad. However, the occurrence of severe accidents has also demonstrated that constant vigilance in a number of areas is necessary to ensure continued safe operation. The areas noted as particularly important are Design, Organization and Management, Maintenance, and Operations (Human Performance). 18 refs

  10. A Computational Procedure for Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Diffusion-Controlled Transdermal Delivery Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Simon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The dynamic performances of two different controlled-release systems were analyzed. In a reservoir-type drug-delivery patch, the transdermal flux is influenced by the properties of the membrane. A constant thermodynamic drug activity is preserved in the donor compartment. Monolithic matrices are among the most inexpensive systems used to direct drug delivery. In these structures, the active pharmaceutical ingredients are encapsulated within a polymeric material. Despite the popularity of these two devices, to tailor the properties of the polymer and additives to specific transient behaviors can be challenging and time-consuming. The heuristic approaches often considered to select the vehicle formulation provide limited insight into key permeation mechanisms making it difficult to predict the device performance. In this contribution, a method to calculate the flux response time in a system consisting of a reservoir and a polymeric membrane was proposed and confirmed. Nearly 8.60 h passed before the metoprolol delivery rate reached ninety-eight percent of its final value. An expression was derived for the time it took to transport the active pharmaceutical ingredient out of the polymer. Ninety-eight percent of alpha-tocopherol acetate was released in 461.4 h following application to the skin. The effective time constant can be computed to help develop optimum design strategies.

  11. Delphi Method Validation of a Procedural Performance Checklist for Insertion of an Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Central Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nicholas; Wittler, Mary; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David

    2016-01-01

    Placement of ultrasound-guided central lines is a critical skill for physicians in several specialties. Improving the quality of care delivered surrounding this procedure demands rigorous measurement of competency, and validated tools to assess performance are essential. Using the iterative, modified Delphi technique and experts in multiple disciplines across the United States, the study team created a 30-item checklist designed to assess competency in the placement of ultrasound-guided internal jugular central lines. Cronbach α was .94, indicating an excellent degree of internal consistency. Further validation of this checklist will require its implementation in simulated and clinical environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Insulation performance data and assessment procedures for steam kiln energy conservation investments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccor, J.V.

    1980-09-01

    For a demonstration project, the costs and benefits of insulating concrete block curing kilns to isolate the kiln thermal mass from the curing cycle are determined. Data were developed on service life of FOAMGLAS insulation, the effect of Johnson burners on the insulation and mounting, performance of an alternative insulation (a rapidly installed, spray-on polyurethane foam), and a simple incentive to promote implementation of industrial energy conservation concepts. Data are tabulated and compared for the FOAMGLAS and CPR 480 polyurethane insulations. Specific studies of insulation that was installed on inside surfaces of kilns to lock the kiln-mass out of the curing cycle are given for Blocklite plant in California, the Ameron pipe plant in California, and the Superlite plant in Phoenix, Arizona. (MCW)

  13. Usefulness of molecular biology performed with formaldehyde-fixed paraffin embedded tissue for the diagnosis of combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in an immunocompromised patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vénissac Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunocompromised patients who develop invasive filamentous mycotic infections can be efficiently treated if rapid identification of the causative fungus is obtained. We report a case of fatal necrotic pneumonia caused by combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in a 66 year-old renal transplant recipient. Aspergillus was first identified during the course of the disease by cytological examination and culture (A. fumigatus of bronchoalveolar fluid. Hyphae of Mucorales (Rhizopus microsporus were subsequently identified by culture of a tissue specimen taken from the left inferior pulmonary lobe, which was surgically resected two days before the patient died. Histological analysis of the lung parenchyma showed the association of two different filamentous mycoses for which the morphological features were evocative of aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the definitive identification of the associative infection was made by polymerase chain reaction (PCR performed on deparaffinized tissue sections using specific primers for aspergillosis and mucormycosis. This case demonstrates that discrepancies between histological, cytological and mycological analyses can occur in cases of combined mycotic infection. In this regard, it shows that PCR on selected paraffin blocks is a very powerful method for making or confirming the association of different filamentous mycoses and that this method should be made available to pathology laboratories.

  14. Quantifying the invasiveness of species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colautti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The success of invasive species has been explained by two contrasting but non-exclusive views: (i intrinsic factors make some species inherently good invaders; (ii species become invasive as a result of extrinsic ecological and genetic influences such as release from natural enemies, hybridization or other novel ecological and evolutionary interactions. These viewpoints are rarely distinguished but hinge on distinct mechanisms leading to different management scenarios. To improve tests of these hypotheses of invasion success we introduce a simple mathematical framework to quantify the invasiveness of species along two axes: (i interspecific differences in performance among native and introduced species within a region, and (ii intraspecific differences between populations of a species in its native and introduced ranges. Applying these equations to a sample dataset of occurrences of 1,416 plant species across Europe, Argentina, and South Africa, we found that many species are common in their native range but become rare following introduction; only a few introduced species become more common. Biogeographical factors limiting spread (e.g. biotic resistance, time of invasion therefore appear more common than those promoting invasion (e.g. enemy release. Invasiveness, as measured by occurrence data, is better explained by inter-specific variation in invasion potential than biogeographical changes in performance. We discuss how applying these comparisons to more detailed performance data would improve hypothesis testing in invasion biology and potentially lead to more efficient management strategies.

  15. Does obesity affect the non-invasive measurement of cardiac output performed by electrical cardiometry in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano-Diaz, Luis; Welisch, Eva; Rauch, Ralf; Miller, Michael; Park, Teresa Sohee; Norozi, Kambiz

    2018-02-01

    Electrical cardiometry (EC) is a non-invasive and inexpensive method for hemodynamic assessment and monitoring. However, its feasibility for widespread clinical use, especially for the obese population, has yet to be determined. In this study, we evaluated the agreement and reliability of EC compared to transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTE) in normal, overweight, and obese children and adolescents. We measured stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) of 131 participants using EC and TTE simultaneously. We further divided these participants according to BMI percentiles for subanalyses: 95% obese (n = 83). Due to small sample size of the overweight group, we combined overweight and obese groups (OW+OB) with no significant change in results (SV and CO) before and after combining groups. There were strong correlations between EC and TTE measurements of SV (r = 0.869 and r = 0.846; p < 0.0001) and CO (r = 0.831 and r = 0.815; p < 0.0001) in normal and OW+OB groups, respectively. Bias and percentage error for CO measurements were 0.240 and 29.7%, and 0.042 and 29.5% in the normal and OW+OB groups, respectively. Indexed values for SV were lower in the OW+OB group than in the normal weight group when measured by EC (p < 0.0001) but no differences were seen when measured by TTE (p = 0.096). In all weight groups, there were strong correlations and good agreement between EC and TTE. However, EC may underestimate hemodynamic measurements in obese participants due to fat tissue.

  16. Stop: a fast procedure for the exact computation of the performance of complex probabilistic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corynen, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    A new set-theoretic method for the exact and efficient computation of the probabilistic performance of complex systems has been developed. The core of the method is a fast algorithm for disjointing a collection of product sets which is intended for systems with more than 1000 components and 100,000 cut sets. The method is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, in which a multidimensional problem is progressively decomposed into lower-dimensional subproblems along its dimensions. The method also uses a particular pointer system that eliminates the need to store the subproblems by only requiring the storage of pointers to those problems. Examples of the algorithm and the divide-and-conquer strategy are provided, and comparisons with other significant methods are made. Statistical complexity studies show that the expected time and space complexity of other methods is O(me/sup n/), but that our method is O(nm 3 log(m)). Problems which would require days of Cray-1 computer time with present methods can now be solved in seconds. Large-scale systems that can only be approximated with other techniques can now also be evaluated exactly

  17. Effect of porous silicon on the performances of silicon solar cells during the porous silicon-based gettering procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, H.; Bessais, B. [Laboratoire de Nanomateriaux et des Systemes pour l' Energie, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Bouaicha, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, des Semi-conducteurs et des Nanostructures, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2009-10-15

    In this work we analyse the effect of porous silicon on the performances of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells during the porous silicon-based gettering procedure. This procedure consists of forming PS layers on both front and back sides of the mc-Si wafers followed by an annealing in an infrared furnace under a controlled atmosphere at different temperatures. Three sets of samples (A, B and C) have been prepared; for samples A and B, the PS films were removed before and after annealing, respectively. In order to optimize the annealing temperature, we measure the defect density at a selected grain boundary (GB) using the dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics across the GB itself. The annealing temperature was optimized to 1000 C. The effect of these treatments on the performances of mc-Si solar cells was studied by means of the current-voltage characteristic (at AM 1.5) and the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The results obtained for cell A and cell B were compared to those obtained on a reference cell (C). (author)

  18. Pancreatic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor after Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Performance of Whipple Procedure: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziret, Mehmet; Çetinkünar, Süleyman; Aktaş, Elife; İrkörücü, Oktay; Bali, İlhan; Erdem, Hasan

    2015-08-03

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in the gastrointestinal system. These types of tumors originate from any part of the tract as well as from the intestine, colon, omentum, mesentery or retroperitoneum. GIST is a rare tumor compared to other types of tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. A 56-year-old male patient was hospitalized due to an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the start of abdominal pain on the same day. In the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that was performed, a solitary mass was found in the second section of the duodenum and a blood vessel (Forrest type 2a) was seen. The extent and location of the mass was detected by abdominal tomography. After hemodynamic recovery, a Whipple procedure was performed without any complications. A subsequent histopathological examination detected a c-kit-positive (CD117) pancreatic GIST with high mitotic index. The most effective treatment method for GISTs is surgical resection. In patients with a head of pancreatic GIST, the Whipple procedure can be used more safely and effectively.

  19. Functioning of Water Users Associations or Pani Panchayat in Orissa: Principle, Procedure, Performance and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The current paper deals with an evaluation of water management through community participation and emergence of Pani Panchayat (PP in a case study of the Vir Bajrang Bali Pani Panchayat under Lift Irrigation Project of the Hirakud Command Area (HCA, Orissa state in Eastern India . The broad objective of this paper is to examine the functioning of Water User Association (WUA or Pani Panchayat promoted by the State and the local traditional irrigation institutions in the HCA, Orissa and to evaluate their functioning & characteristics in the context of local water management. The precise objectives are: (1 to analytically review the Orissa Farmers Management of Irrigation Systems Act and study the functioning of the Pani Panchayat, (2 to examine people's participation (3 study the apparatus of water management and control, and the impact of such management on productivity among the members and (4 to recommend policy interventions to make the formal institutions more successful. The paper concludes that the Pani Panchayats performance as regulatory institutions in charge of water distribution on equitable basis has been weak and unsuccessful. Even though the Pani Panchayat has been initiated and endorsed in the State for more than a couple of years, the acceptance of this model have been lethargic and scattered. As Pani Panchayat is a new concept needing experimentation and experience before finalisation of its content in greater detail, the irrigation agency is not in a position to spell out the different components of the programme in concrete terms. A detailed action plan should be prepared by the irrigation authority in consultation with the water users through Participatory Rural Appraisal method. A feasibility study should be under taken by examining the caste/class conflict, groupism, political differences and history of confrontation and conflict, if any. It is necessary to apply a bottom-up approach instead of a top-down one for

  20. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 2: Collaboration Between Surgeons and Hospital Administrators to Develop a Funds Flow Model for Procedures Performed at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Although plastic surgeons make important contributions to the clinical, educational, and research missions of academic medical centers (AMCs), determining the financial value of a plastic surgery service can be difficult, due to complex cost accounting systems. We analyzed the financial impact of plastic surgery on an AMC, by examining the contribution margins and operating income of surgical procedures. We collaborated with hospital administrators to implement 3 types of strategic changes: (1) growth of areas with high contribution margin, (2) curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin, (3) improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption. Outcome measures included: facility charges, hospital collections, contribution margin, operating margin, and operating room times. We also studied the top 50 Current Procedural Terminology codes (total case number × charge/case), ranking procedures for profitability, as determined by operating margin. During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty; did not pursue any formal marketing; did not change our surgical fees, billing system, or payer mix; and maintained our commitment to indigent care. After rebalancing our case mix, through procedural portfolio planning, average hospital operating income/procedure increased from $-79 to $+816. Volume and diversity of cases increased, with no change in payer mix. Although charges/case decreased, both contribution margin and operating margin increased, due to improved throughput and decreased operating room times. The 5 most profitable procedures for the hospital were hernia repair, mandibular osteotomy, hand skin graft, free fibula flap, and head and neck flap, whereas the 5 least profitable were latissimus breast reconstruction, craniosynostosis repair, free-flap breast reconstruction, trunk skin graft, and cutaneous free flap. Total operating income for the hospital, from plastic surgery procedures, increased

  1. Staging performance of whole-body DWI, PET/CT and PET/MRI in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio Antonio; Daye, Dania; Signore, Alberto; Iannace, Carlo; Vangel, Mark; Luongo, Angelo; Catalano, Marco; Filomena, Mazzeo; Mansi, Luigi; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Fuin, Niccolo; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce Robert

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI), whole-body positron emission tomography with computed tomography (WB-PET/CT), and whole-body positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance imaging (WB-PET/MRI) in staging patients with untreated invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Fifty-one women with newly diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast underwent WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI before treatment. A radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician reviewed in consensus the images from the three modalities and searched for occurrence, number and location of metastases. Final staging, according to each technique, was compared. Pathology and imaging follow-up were used as the reference. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI correctly and concordantly staged 33/51 patients: stage IIA in 7 patients, stage IIB in 8 patients, stage IIIC in 4 patients and stage IV in 14 patients. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI incorrectly and concordantly staged 1/51 patient as stage IV instead of IIIA. Discordant staging was reported in 17/51 patients. WB-PET/MRI resulted in improved staging when compared to WB-PET/CT (50 correctly staged on WB-PET/MRI vs. 38 correctly staged on WB-PET/CT; McNemar's test; p<0.01). Comparing the performance of WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI (43 correct) did not reveal a statistically significant difference (McNemar test, p=0.14). WB-PET/MRI is more accurate in the initial staging of breast cancer than WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT, however, the discrepancies between WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI were not statistically significant. When available, WB-PET/MRI should be considered for staging patient with invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer before and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Diagnostic performance and prognostic significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sun [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ju; Hur, Bo Yun [National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Chan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Chang, Hee Jin; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Dae Yong; Oh, Jae Hwan [National Cancer Centre, Centre for Colorectal Cancer, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Young [National Cancer Centre, Centre for Colorectal Cancer, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of identifying extramural venous invasion (EMVI) in rectal cancer patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and its prognostic significance. During 2008-2010, 200 patients underwent surgery following preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. Two radiologists independently reviewed all pre- and post-CRT MRI retrospectively. We investigated diagnostic performance of pre-CRT MR-EMVI (MR-EMVI) and post-CRT MR-EMVI (yMR-EMVI), based on pathological EMVI as the standard of reference. We assessed correlation between MRI findings and patients' prognosis, such as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Additionally, subgroup analysis in MR- or yMR-EMVI-positive patients was performed to confirm the significance of the severity of EMVI in MRI on patient's prognosis. The sensitivity and specificity of yMR-EMVI were 76.19% and 79.75% (area under the curve: 0.830), respectively. In univariate analysis, yMR-EMVI was the only significant MRI factor in DFS (P = 0.027). The mean DFS for yMR-EMVI (+) patients was significantly less than for yMR-EMVI (-) patients: 57.56 months versus 72.46 months. yMR-EMVI demonstrated good diagnostic performance. yMR-EMVI was the only significant EMVI-related MRI factor that correlated with patients' DFS in univariate analysis; however, it was not significant in multivariate analysis. (orig.)

  3. Epilepsy surgery in children and non-invasive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Kiyotaka; Sawamura, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsunari; Tsuda, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigeya

    2001-01-01

    The technique of EEG recording using subdural and depth electrodes has became established, and such invasive EEG is available for epilepsy surgery. However, a non-invasive procedure is required for evaluation of surgical indication for epilepsy patients, particular for children. We analyzed the relationship between the results of presurgical evaluation and seizure outcome, and investigated the role of invasive EEG in epilepsy surgery for children. Over the past decade, 22 children under 16 years of age have been admitted to our hospital for evaluation of surgical indication. High-resolution MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, video-EEG monitoring, and ictal and interictal SPECT were used for presurgical evaluation. Organic lesions were found on MR images from 19 patients. Invasive EEG was recorded in only one patient with occipital epilepsy, who had no lesion. Surgical indication was determined in 17 children, and 6 temporal lobe and 11 extratemporal lobe resections were performed under intraoperative electrocorticogram monitoring. The surgical outcome was excellent in 14 patients who had Engel's class I or II. Surgical complications occurred in two children who had visual field defects. The results showed that a good surgical outcome could be obtained using an intraoperative electrocorticogram, without presurgical invasive EEG, for localization-related epilepsy in children. The role of invasive EEG should be reevaluated in such children. (author)

  4. Epilepsy surgery in children and non-invasive evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, Kiyotaka; Sawamura, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsunari; Tsuda, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Tatsuya [Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan); Tanaka, Shigeya

    2001-04-01

    The technique of EEG recording using subdural and depth electrodes has became established, and such invasive EEG is available for epilepsy surgery. However, a non-invasive procedure is required for evaluation of surgical indication for epilepsy patients, particular for children. We analyzed the relationship between the results of presurgical evaluation and seizure outcome, and investigated the role of invasive EEG in epilepsy surgery for children. Over the past decade, 22 children under 16 years of age have been admitted to our hospital for evaluation of surgical indication. High-resolution MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, video-EEG monitoring, and ictal and interictal SPECT were used for presurgical evaluation. Organic lesions were found on MR images from 19 patients. Invasive EEG was recorded in only one patient with occipital epilepsy, who had no lesion. Surgical indication was determined in 17 children, and 6 temporal lobe and 11 extratemporal lobe resections were performed under intraoperative electrocorticogram monitoring. The surgical outcome was excellent in 14 patients who had Engel's class I or II. Surgical complications occurred in two children who had visual field defects. The results showed that a good surgical outcome could be obtained using an intraoperative electrocorticogram, without presurgical invasive EEG, for localization-related epilepsy in children. The role of invasive EEG should be reevaluated in such children. (author)

  5. Non-invasive or minimally invasive autopsy compared to conventional autopsy of suspected natural deaths in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokker, Britt M; Wagensveld, Ivo M; Weustink, Annick C; Oosterhuis, J Wolter; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2016-04-01

    Autopsies are used for healthcare quality control and improving medical knowledge. Because autopsy rates are declining worldwide, various non-invasive or minimally invasive autopsy methods are now being developed. To investigate whether these might replace the invasive autopsies conventionally performed in naturally deceased adults, we systematically reviewed original prospective validation studies. We searched six databases. Two reviewers independently selected articles and extracted data. Methods and patient groups were too heterogeneous for meaningful meta-analysis of outcomes. Sixteen of 1538 articles met our inclusion criteria. Eight studies used a blinded comparison; ten included less than 30 appropriate cases. Thirteen studies used radiological imaging (seven dealt solely with non-invasive procedures), two thoracoscopy and laparoscopy, and one sampling without imaging. Combining CT and MR was the best non-invasive method (agreement for cause of death: 70 %, 95%CI: 62.6; 76.4), but minimally invasive methods surpassed non-invasive methods. The highest sensitivity for cause of death (90.9 %, 95%CI: 74.5; 97.6, suspected duplicates excluded) was achieved in recent studies combining CT, CT-angiography and biopsies. Minimally invasive autopsies including biopsies performed best. To establish a feasible alternative to conventional autopsy and to increase consent to post-mortem investigations, further research in larger study groups is needed. • Health care quality control benefits from clinical feedback provided by (alternative) autopsies. • So far, sixteen studies investigated alternative autopsy methods for naturally deceased adults. • Thirteen studies used radiological imaging modalities, eight tissue biopsies, and three CT-angiography. • Combined CT, CT-angiography and biopsies were most sensitive diagnosing cause of death.

  6. Outpatient invasive radiologic procedures - Diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublin, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a ''how-to'' book for radiologists who are planning to, or considering whether to establish outpatient practice in response to DRGs. It provides practical, expert advice on both the administrative and clinical sides of outpatient radiology. It focuses on the essentials of clinical practice in the outpatient setting - and how it differs from inpatient practice

  7. Exploratory Procedures of Tactile Images in Visually Impaired and Blindfolded Sighted Children: How They Relate to Their Consequent Performance in Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinter, Annie; Fernandes, Viviane; Orlandi, Oriana; Morgan, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the types of exploratory procedures employed by children when exploring bidimensional tactile patterns and correlate the use of these procedures with the children's shape drawing performance. 18 early blind children, 20 children with low vision and 24 age-matched blindfolded sighted children aged…

  8. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac., Mexico. and Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares. C. Cip (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in

  9. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  10. Evaluating the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Rodríguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solís Sánches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castañeda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the performance of two neutron spectrum unfolding codes based on iterative procedures and artificial neural networks is evaluated. The first one code based on traditional iterative procedures and called Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry from the Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas (NSDUAZ) use the SPUNIT iterative algorithm and was designed to unfold neutron spectrum and calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and 7 IAEA survey meters. The main feature of this code is the automated selection of the initial guess spectrum trough a compendium of neutron spectrum compiled by the IAEA. The second one code known as Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry with artificial neural networks (NDSann) is a code designed using neural nets technology. The artificial intelligence approach of neural net does not solve mathematical equations. By using the knowledge stored at synaptic weights on a neural net properly trained, the code is capable to unfold neutron spectrum and to simultaneously calculate 15 dosimetric quantities, needing as entrance data, only the rate counts measured with a Bonner spheres system. Similarities of both NSDUAZ and NSDann codes are: they follow the same easy and intuitive user's philosophy and were designed in a graphical interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. Both codes unfold the neutron spectrum expressed in 60 energy bins, calculate 15 dosimetric quantities and generate a full report in HTML format. Differences of these codes are: NSDUAZ code was designed using classical iterative approaches and needs an initial guess spectrum in order to initiate the iterative procedure. In NSDUAZ, a programming routine was designed to calculate 7 IAEA instrument survey meters using the fluence-dose conversion coefficients. NSDann code use artificial neural networks for solving the ill-conditioned equation system of neutron spectrometry problem through synaptic weights of a properly trained neural network. Contrary to iterative procedures, in neural

  11. General and selective isolation procedure for high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of anabolic steroids in tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, A; Marino, A

    1991-12-27

    A multi-residue method has been developed for the determination of anabolic steroids in animal tissue. The analytes are extracted from tissue with methanol and the extract is subjected to two solid-phase extractions, one using a non-specific adsorbing material, such as graphitized carbon black (Carbopack B), and the other Amberlite CG-400 I in the OH form. This procedure allowed the neutral anabolics (testosterone, trenbolone and progesterone) to be isolated and separated from the acidic type (phenolic group), such as diethylstilbestrol, oestradiol, zeranol/zearalenone and their respective metabolites. The determination was effected using high-performance liquid chromatography with different detectors (ultraviolet, fluorimetric and electrochemical). Several analytical parameters were studied: chromatographic conditions, recoveries, evaporation step, solvent flow-rate, cartridges reusability, interference of plastic cartridges. For all the anabolics investigated the recoveries were greater than 83.6%.

  12. Contrasting Effects of Aqueous Tissue Extracts from an Invasive Plant, Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata, on the Performance of Its Sympatric Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Mei Hsu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Bidens pilosa L. var. radiata Sch. Bip., a common weed in lowland Taiwan, is listed as one of the twenty most noxious invasive plants in Taiwan. In this study, we examined the effect of aqueous extracts of leaves, stems and roots of the invasive plant on germination and growth of seedlings (estimated by measuring the elongation of hypocotyls and radicals of the same species and two other sympatric species, B. bipinnata and Ageraturem conyzoides. The objective of this study was to understand whether the aqueous tissue extracts affected the performance of the target species and whether these effects varied among tissue types and among target species. We found that the germination percentage of seeds of B. bipinnata was significantly reduced by root and leaf extracts, that of B. pilosa var. radiata was also significantly reduced by the application of root extract, while that of A. conyzoides was not affected by any of the three tissue extracts. The application of stem and leaf extracts inhibited the elongation of radicals of B. pilosa var. radiata, consequently, the growth of seedlings of this species was decreased in these two treatments. Though the elongation of hypocotyls was stimulated by leaf extract, the overall growth of seedlings of B. bipinnata was not affected by any tissue extract. In contrast, all three extracts stimulated the elongation of hypocotyls and radicals of A. conyzoides, consequently, the overall growth of seedlings of this plant was promoted by all three extracts. These results revealed that aqueous extracts from tissue of B. pilosa var. radiata had differential effect on the emergence and seedling growth of the three target species. The inhibition effect of its root and leaf extracts on the germination of B. bipinnata may partially explain the overwhelming dominance of B. pilosa var. radiata over B. bipinnata when they are sympatric.

  13. Time Management in the Operating Room: An Analysis of the Dedicated Minimally Invasive Surgery Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kenneth C.; Machaidze, Zurab

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dedicated minimally invasive surgery suites are available that contain specialized equipment to facilitate endoscopic surgery. Laparoscopy performed in a general operating room is hampered by the multitude of additional equipment that must be transported into the room. The objective of this study was to compare the preparation times between procedures performed in traditional operating rooms versus dedicated minimally invasive surgery suites to see whether operating room efficiency is improved in the specialized room. Methods: The records of 50 patients who underwent laparoscopic procedures between September 2000 and April 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-three patients underwent surgery in a general operating room and 18 patients in an minimally invasive surgery suite. Nine patients were excluded because of cystoscopic procedures undergone prior to laparoscopy. Various time points were recorded from which various time intervals were derived, such as preanesthesia time, anesthesia induction time, and total preparation time. A 2-tailed, unpaired Student t test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean preanesthesia time was significantly faster in the minimally invasive surgery suite (12.2 minutes) compared with that in the traditional operating room (17.8 minutes) (P=0.013). Mean anesthesia induction time in the minimally invasive surgery suite (47.5 minutes) was similar to time in the traditional operating room (45.7 minutes) (P=0.734). The average total preparation time for the minimally invasive surgery suite (59.6 minutes) was not significantly faster than that in the general operating room (63.5 minutes) (P=0.481). Conclusion: The amount of time that elapses between the patient entering the room and anesthesia induction is statically shorter in a dedicated minimally invasive surgery suite. Laparoscopic surgery is performed more efficiently in a dedicated minimally invasive surgery suite versus a traditional operating room. PMID

  14. A comparison of pelvic retroperitoneal pneumography and computed tomography in the assessment of extramural invasion of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibara, Nobuaki; Kimura, Osamu; Nishidoi, Hideaki; Ikeguchi, Masahide; Sugezawa, Akira; Sumi, Kenichi; Ohta, Michio; Koga, Shigemasa

    1988-01-01

    Pelvic retroperitoneal pneumography (PRP) and pelvic computed tomography (CT) were performed on 33 patients with rectal carcinoma in order to compare the usefulness of the two diagnostic procedures in the preoperative assessment of local malignant extramural invasion. Six PRP-negative patients in whom no free air was visualized in the retroperitoneal space surrounding the mass, were all assessed as having extramural invasion by CT scan and all had histologic evidence of invasion. Of 27 PRP-positive patients in whom free air was seen surrounding the mass, 18 were diagnosed as having extramural invasion on CT, 15 of whom had histologic proof of invasion. In the remaining 9 PRP-positive patients, there was no evidence of extramural invasion on the CT scans, but 5 patients showed evidence of invasion histologically. PRP, when positive, had an unacceptably high rate of being false positive and was therefore unreliable in assessing extramural invasion, whereas CT was able to detect, to some extent, extramural invasion which PRP failed to demonstrate. Based on these findings, we conclude that CT is more useful than PRP in the preoperative assessment of extramural invasion of rectal carcinoma, but is of limited diagnostic value when negative. (author)

  15. Influence of the Thermal Inertia in the European Simplified Procedures for the Assessment of Buildings’ Energy Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Evangelisti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to highlight the importance of thermal inertia in buildings. Nowadays, it is possible to use energy analysis software to simulate the building energy performance. Considering Italian standards, these analyses are based on the UNI TS 11300 that defines the procedures for the national implementation of the UNI EN ISO 13790. These standards require an energy analysis under steady-state condition, underestimating the thermal inertia of the building. In order to understand the inertial behavior of walls, a cubic Test-Cell was modelled through the dynamic calculation code TRNSYS and three different wall types were tested. Different stratigraphies, characterized by the same thermal transmittance value, composed by massive elements and insulating layers in different order, were simulated. Through TRNSYS, it was possible to define maximum surface temperatures and to calculate thermal lag between maximum values, both external and internal. Moreover, the attenuation between external surface temperatures and internal ones during summer (July was calculated. Finally, the comparison between Test-Cell’s annual energy demands, performed by using a commercial code based on the Italian standard UNITS 11300 and the dynamic code, TRNSYS, was carried out.

  16. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure for analysis of monosaccharides from plant gum binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauk, Volodymyr; Pluháček, Tomáš; Havlíček, Vladimír; Lemr, Karel

    2017-10-09

    The ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPSFC/MS) procedure for analysis of native monosaccharides was developed. Chromatographic conditions were investigated to separate a mixture of four hexoses, three pentoses, two deoxyhexoses and two uronic acids. Increasing water content in methanol modifier to 5% and formic acid to 4% improved peak shapes of neutral monosaccharides and allowed complete elution of highly polar uronic acids in a single run. An Acquity HSS C18SB column outperformed other three tested stationary phases (BEH (silica), BEH 2-ethylpyridine, CSH Fluoro-Phenyl) in terms of separation of isomers and analysis time (4.5 min). Limits of detection were in the range 0.01-0.12 ng μL -1 . Owing to separation of anomers, identification of critical pairs (arabinose-xylose and glucose-galactose) was possible. Feasibility of the new method was demonstrated on plant-derived polysaccharide binders. Samples of watercolor paints, painted paper and three plant gums widely encountered in painting media (Arabic, cherry and tragacanth) were decomposed prior the analysis by microwave-assisted hydrolysis at 40 bar initial pressure using 2 mol L -1 trifluoroacetic acid. Among tested temperatures, 120 °C ensured appropriate hydrolysis efficiency for different types of gum and avoided excessive degradation of labile monosaccharides. Procedure recovery tested on gum Arabic was 101% with an RSD below 8%. Aqueous hydrolysates containing monosaccharides in different ratios specific to each type of plant gum were diluted or analyzed directly. Filtration of samples before hydrolysis reduced interferences from a paper support and identification of gum Arabic in watercolor-painted paper samples was demonstrated. Successful identification of pure gum Arabic was confirmed for sample quantities as little as 1 μg. Two classification approaches were compared and principal component analysis was superior to analysis based on peak area

  18. Validation of Non-Invasive Waste Assay System (Gamma Box Counter) Performance at AECL Whiteshell Laboratories - 13136

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attas, E.M.; Bialas, E.; Rhodes, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in solid form, resulting from decommissioning and operations activities at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories (WL), is packaged in B-25 and B-1000 standard waste containers and characterized before it is shipped to an on-site interim storage facility, pending AECL decisions on long term management of its LLW. Assay of the waste packages before shipment contributes to an inventory of the interim storage facility and provides data to support acceptance at a future repository. A key characterization step is a gamma spectrometric measurement carried out under standard conditions using an automated, multi-detector Waste Assay System (WAS), purchased from Antech Corporation. A combination of ORTEC gamma acquisition software and custom software is used in this system to incorporate multiple measurements from two collimated high-resolution detectors. The software corrects the intensities of the gamma spectral lines for geometry and attenuation, and generates a table of calculated activities or limits of detection for a user-defined list of radioisotopes that may potentially be present. Validation of WAS performance was a prerequisite to routine operation. Documentation of the validation process provides assurance of the quality of the results produced, which may be needed one or two decades after they were generated. Aspects of the validation included setting up a quality control routine, measurements of standard point sources in reproducible positions, study of the gamma background, optimization of user-selectable software parameters, investigation of the effect of non-uniform distribution of materials and radionuclides, and comparison of results with measurements made using other gamma detector systems designed to assay bulk materials. The following key components of the validation process have been established. A daily quality control routine has been instituted, to verify stability of the gamma detector operation and the background levels

  19. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  20. [Robotic-assisted minimally invasive abdominothoracal oesophageal resection with intrathoracic anastomosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberts, J-H; Aselmann, H; Schafmayer, C; Jünemann, K-P; Becker, T

    2014-02-01

    Ivor Lewis oesophagectomy is one of the approaches used worldwide for treating oesophageal cancer. The adoption of minimally invasive oesophagectomy has increased worldwide since its first description more than 15 years ago. However, minimally invasive oesophagectomy with a chest anastomosis has advantages. By using a four-arm robotic platform, not only the preparation of the gastric tube and mobilisation of the oesophagus but also the intrathoracic anastomosis of the oesophagogastrostomy can be performed in a comfortable and safe way. The indication for oesophageal resection is oesophageal cancer. The operative procedure comprises robotic-assisted abdominothoracal oesophageal resection with reconstruction by a gastric tube and intrathoracic anastomosis (Ivor Lewis procedure). Robotic abdominal and thoracic minimally invasive esophagectomy is feasible, and safe with a complete lymph node dissection. Especially the intrathoracic anastomosis of the oesophagogastrostomy can be performed in a comfortable and safe way. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. A new characterization procedure for computed radiography performance levels based on EPS, SNR and basic spatial resolution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewert, Uwe; Zscherpel, Uwe; Baer, Sylke

    2016-01-01

    The standards EN 14784-1:2005 and ISO 16371-1:2011 describe the classification of Computed Radiography systems for industrial applications. After 10 years of classification experience, it can be concluded that all certified NDT CR systems achieve the best classification result: IP 1. The measured basic spatial resolution is different depending on the manufacturer's brand and the IP used. Therefore, a revision was recommended to obtain a better gradation for the different brands. Users in USA and Europe classify the CR systems based on different parameters. Consequently, a new revision of ASTM E 2446-15 was finalized in 2015, which describes the characterization of CR systems based on CR performance levels. The key parameters are the normalized Signal to Noise Ratio (SNRN), the interpolated basic spatial resolution (iSR b detector ) and the achieved equivalent penetrameter sensitivity (aEPS). A series of further tests is required for complete characterization by manufacturers or certifying laboratories. This includes e.g.: geometric distortion, laser jitter, PMT non-linearity, scanner slippage, shading or banding, erasure, burn-In, spatial linearity, artefacts, imaging plate response variation and imaging plate fading. ASTM E 2445-15 describes several tests, for users to perform periodic quality assurance. The measurement procedures are described and the resulting values as CR speed, achieved contrast sensitivity and efficiency are discussed. The results will be presented graphically in a spider net graph in the qualification/certification statement. A revision of the related CEN and ISO standards is discussed.

  2. Emergency procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Emergency Procedures: emergency equipment, emergency procedures; emergency procedure involving X-Ray equipment; emergency procedure involving radioactive sources

  3. Transvaginal mesh procedures for pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jens-Erik

    2011-02-01

    To provide an update on transvaginal mesh procedures, newly available minimally invasive surgical techniques for pelvic floor repair. The discussion is limited to minimally invasive transvaginal mesh procedures. PubMed and Medline were searched for articles published in English, using the key words "pelvic organ prolapse," transvaginal mesh," and "minimally invasive surgery." Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis, and articles were incorporated in the guideline to May 2010. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on the Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table 1). Counselling for the surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse should consider all benefits, harms, and costs of the surgical procedure, with particular emphasis on the use of mesh. 1. Patients should be counselled that transvaginal mesh procedures are considered novel techniques for pelvic floor repair that demonstrate high rates of anatomical cure in uncontrolled short-term case series. (II-2B) 2. Patients should be informed of the range of success rates until stronger evidence of superiority is published. (II-2B) 3. Training specific to transvaginal mesh procedures should be undertaken before procedures are performed. (III-C) 4. Patients should undergo thorough preoperative counselling regarding (a) the potential serious adverse sequelae of transvaginal mesh repairs, including mesh exposure, pain, and dyspareunia; and (b) the limited data available

  4. Precision analysis of a multi-slice ultrasound sensor for non-invasive 3D kinematic analysis of knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Md Abdullah; Lambert, Andrew J; Pickering, Mark R; Scarvell, J M; Smith, P N

    2012-01-01

    Currently the standard clinical practice for measuring the motion of bones in a knee joint with sufficient precision involves implanting tantalum beads into the bones to act as fiducial markers prior to imaging using X-ray equipment. This procedure is invasive in nature and exposure to ionizing radiation imposes a cancer risk and the patient's movements are confined to a narrow field of view. In this paper, an ultrasound based system for non-invasive kinematic evaluation of knee joints is proposed. The results of an initial analysis show that this system can provide the precision required for non-invasive motion analysis while the patient performs normal physical activities.

  5. Performance evaluation of automated urine microscopy as a rapid, non-invasive approach for the diagnosis of non-gonococcal urethritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Marcus J; Nori, Achyuta V; Patel, Sheel; Laing, Ken; Ajayi, Margarita; Copas, Andrew J; Butcher, Philip D; Hay, Phillip; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gram-stained urethral smear (GSUS), the standard point-of-care test for non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is operator dependent and poorly specific. The performance of rapid automated urine flow cytometry (AUFC) of first void urine (FVU) white cell counts (UWCC) for predicting Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis urethral infections was assessed and its application to asymptomatic infection was evaluated. Methods Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, determining FVU-UWCC threshold for predicting M. genitalium or C. trachomatis infection was performed on 208 ‘training’ samples from symptomatic patients and subsequently validated using 228 additional FVUs obtained from prospective unselected patients. Results An optimal diagnostic threshold of >29 UWC/µL gave sensitivities and specificities for either infection of 81.5% (95% CI 65.1% to 91.6%) and 85.8% (79.5% to 90.4%), respectively, compared with 86.8% (71.1% to 95%) and 64.7% (56.9% to 71.7%), respectively, for GSUS, using the training set samples. FVU-UWCC demonstrated sensitivities and specificities of 69.2% (95% CI 48.1% to 84.9%) and 92% (87.2% to 95.2%), respectively, when using validation samples. In asymptomatic patients where GSUS was not used, AUFC would have enabled more infections to be detected compared with clinical considerations only (71.4% vs 28.6%; p=0.03). The correlation between UWCC and bacterial load was stronger for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis (τ=0.426, p≤0.001 vs τ=0.295, p=0.022, respectively). Conclusions AUFC offers improved specificity over microscopy for predicting C. trachomatis or M. genitalium infection. Universal AUFC may enable non-invasive diagnosis of asymptomatic NGU at the PoC. The degree of urethral inflammation exhibits a stronger association with pathogen load for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis. PMID:25614466

  6. [Minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Sun, Taicun; Huang, Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the recent minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The recent literature at home and abroad concerning minimally invasive approach for CSR was reviewed and summarized. There were two techniques of minimally invasive approach for CSR at present: percutaneous puncture techniques and endoscopic techniques. The degenerate intervertebral disc was resected or nucleolysis by percutaneous puncture technique if CSR was caused by mild or moderate intervertebral disc herniations. The cervical microendoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy was an effective minimally invasive approach which could provide a clear view. The endoscopy techniques were suitable to treat CSR caused by foraminal osteophytes, lateral disc herniations, local ligamentum flavum thickening and spondylotic foraminal stenosis. The minimally invasive procedure has the advantages of simple handling, minimally invasive and low incidence of complications. But the scope of indications is relatively narrow at present.

  7. Using an Individual Procedure Score Before and After the Advanced Surgical Skills Exposure for Trauma Course Training to Benchmark a Hemorrhage-Control Performance Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Shalin, Valerie; Pugh, Kristy; Chen, Hegang; Puche, Adam; Pasley, Jason; Sarani, Babak; Henry, Sharon; Bowyer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Test with an individual procedure score (IPS) to assess whether an unpreserved cadaver trauma training course, including upper and lower limb vascular exposure, improves correct identification of surgical landmarks, underlying anatomy, and shortens time to vascular control. Prospective study of performance of 3 vascular exposure and control procedures (axillary, brachial, and femoral arteries) using IPS metrics by 2 colocated and trained evaluators before and after training with the Advanced Surgical Skills Exposure for Trauma (ASSET) course. IPS, including identification of anatomical landmarks, incisions, underlying structures, and time to completion of each procedure was compared before and after training using repeated measurement models. Audio-video instrumented cadaver laboratory at University of Maryland School of Medicine. A total of 41 second to sixth year surgical residents from surgical programs throughout Mid-Atlantic States who had not previously taken the ASSET course were enrolled, 40 completed the pre- and post-ASSET performance evaluations. After ASSET training, all components of IPS increased and time shortened for each of the 3 artery exposures. Procedure steps performed correctly increased 57%, anatomical knowledge increased 43% and skin incision to passage of a vessel loop twice around the correct vessel decreased by a mean of 2.5 minutes. An overall vascular trauma readiness index, a comprehensive IPS score for 3 procedures increased 28% with ASSET Training. Improved knowledge of surface landmarks and underlying anatomy is associated with increased IPS, faster procedures, more accurate incision placement, and successful vascular control. Structural recognition during specific procedural steps and anatomical knowledge were key points learned during the ASSET course. Such training may accelerate acquisition of specific trauma surgery skills to compensate for shortened training hours, infrequent exposure to major vascular injuries, or when just

  8. [Can Topical Negative Pressure Therapy be Performed as a Cost-Effective General Surgery Procedure in the German DRG System?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirche, Z; Xiong, L; Hirche, C; Willis, S

    2016-04-01

    Topical negative pressure therapy (TNPT) has been established for surgical wound therapy with different indications. Nevertheless, there is only sparse evidence regarding its therapeutic superiority or cost-effectiveness in the German DRG system (G-DRG). This study was designed to analyse the cost-effectiveness of TNPT in the G-DRG system with a focus on daily treatment costs and reimbursement in a general surgery care setting. In this retrospective study, we included 176 patients, who underwent TNPT between 2007 and 2011 for general surgery indications. Analysis of the cost-effectiveness involved 149 patients who underwent a simulation to calculate the reimbursement with or without TNPT by a virtual control group in which the TNP procedure was withdrawn for DRG calculation. This was followed by a calculation of costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent and material costs. Comparison between the "true" and the virtual group enabled calculation of the effective remaining surplus per case. Total reimbursement by included TNPT cases was 2,323 ,70.04 €. Costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent were 102,669.20 €. In 41 cases there was a cost-effectiveness (27.5%) with 607,422.03 € with TNP treatment, while the control group without TNP generated revenues of 442,015.10 €. Costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent were 47,376.68 €. In the final account we could generate a cost-effectiveness of 6759 € in 5 years per 149 patients by TNPT. In 108 cases there was no cost-effectiveness (72.5%). TNPT applied in a representative general surgery setting allows for wound therapy without a major financial burden. Based on the costs for wound dressings and TNPT rent, a primarily medically based decision when to use TNPT can be performed in a balanced product cost accounting. This study does not analyse the superiority of TNPT in wound care, so further prospective studies are required which focus on therapeutic superiority and cost-effectiveness. Georg Thieme

  9. Resolving whether botanic gardens are on the road to conservation or a pathway for plant invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    A global conservation goal is to understand the pathways through which invasive species are introduced into new regions. Botanic gardens are a pathway for the introduction of invasive non-native plants, but a quantitative assessment of the risks they pose has not been performed. I analyzed data on the living collections of over 3000 botanic gardens worldwide to quantify the temporal trend in the representation of non-native species; the relative composition of threatened, ornamental, or invasive non-native plant species; and the frequency with which botanic gardens implement procedures to address invasive species. While almost all of the world's worst invasive non-native plants occurred in one or more living collections (99%), less than one-quarter of red-listed threatened species were cultivated (23%). Even when cultivated, individual threatened species occurred in few living collections (7.3), while non-native species were on average grown in 6 times as many botanic gardens (44.3). As a result, a botanic garden could, on average, cultivate four times as many invasive non-native species (20) as red-listed threatened species (5). Although the risk posed by a single living collection is small, the probability of invasion increases with the number of botanic gardens within a region. Thus, while both the size of living collections and the proportion of non-native species cultivated have declined during the 20th century, this reduction in risk is offset by the 10-fold increase in the number of botanic gardens established worldwide. Unfortunately, botanic gardens rarely implement regional codes of conduct to prevent plant invasions, few have an invasive species policy, and there is limited monitoring of garden escapes. This lack of preparedness is of particular concern given the rapid increase in living collections worldwide since 1950, particularly in South America and Asia, and highlights past patterns of introduction will be a poor guide to determining future

  10. Performance evaluation of automated urine microscopy as a rapid, non-invasive approach for the diagnosis of non-gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Marcus J; Nori, Achyuta V; Patel, Sheel; Laing, Ken; Ajayi, Margarita; Copas, Andrew J; Butcher, Philip D; Hay, Phillip; Sadiq, Syed Tariq

    2015-05-01

    Gram-stained urethral smear (GSUS), the standard point-of-care test for non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is operator dependent and poorly specific. The performance of rapid automated urine flow cytometry (AUFC) of first void urine (FVU) white cell counts (UWCC) for predicting Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis urethral infections was assessed and its application to asymptomatic infection was evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, determining FVU-UWCC threshold for predicting M. genitalium or C. trachomatis infection was performed on 208 'training' samples from symptomatic patients and subsequently validated using 228 additional FVUs obtained from prospective unselected patients. An optimal diagnostic threshold of >29 UWC/µL gave sensitivities and specificities for either infection of 81.5% (95% CI 65.1% to 91.6%) and 85.8% (79.5% to 90.4%), respectively, compared with 86.8% (71.1% to 95%) and 64.7% (56.9% to 71.7%), respectively, for GSUS, using the training set samples. FVU-UWCC demonstrated sensitivities and specificities of 69.2% (95% CI 48.1% to 84.9%) and 92% (87.2% to 95.2%), respectively, when using validation samples. In asymptomatic patients where GSUS was not used, AUFC would have enabled more infections to be detected compared with clinical considerations only (71.4% vs 28.6%; p=0.03). The correlation between UWCC and bacterial load was stronger for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis (τ=0.426, p≤0.001 vs τ=0.295, p=0.022, respectively). AUFC offers improved specificity over microscopy for predicting C. trachomatis or M. genitalium infection. Universal AUFC may enable non-invasive diagnosis of asymptomatic NGU at the PoC. The degree of urethral inflammation exhibits a stronger association with pathogen load for M. genitalium compared with C. trachomatis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. The diagnostic performance of CT-derived fractional flow reserve for evaluation of myocardial ischaemia confirmed by invasive fractional flow reserve: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Tang, X; Peng, L; Luo, Y; Dong, R; Liu, J

    2015-05-01

    To review the literature on the diagnostic accuracy of CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT) for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease, with invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard. A PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane cross-search was performed. The pooled diagnostic accuracy of FFRCT, with FFR as the reference standard, was primarily analysed, and then compared with that of CT angiography (CTA). The thresholds to diagnose ischaemia were FFR ≤0.80 or CTA ≥50% stenosis. Data extraction, synthesis, and statistical analysis were performed by standard meta-analysis methods. Three multicentre studies (NXT Trial, DISCOVER-FLOW study and DeFACTO study) were included, examining 609 patients and 1050 vessels. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR-), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for FFRCT were 89% (85-93%), 71% (65-75%), 70% (65-75%), 90% (85-93%), 3.31 (1.79-6.14), 0.16 (0.11-0.23), and 21.21 (9.15-49.15) at the patient-level, and 83% (78-63%), 78% (75-81%), 61% (56-65%), 92% (89-90%), 4.02 (1.84-8.80), 0.22 (0.13-0.35), and 19.15 (5.73-63.93) at the vessel-level. At per-patient analysis, FFRCT has similar sensitivity but improved specificity, PPV, NPV, LR+, LR-, and DOR versus those of CTA. At per-vessel analysis, FFRCT had a slightly lower sensitivity, similar NPV, but improved specificity, PPV, LR+, LR-, and DOR compared with those of CTA. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves for FFRCT was 0.8909 at patient-level and 0.8865 at vessel-level, versus 0.7402 for CTA at patient-level. FFRCT, which was associated with improved diagnostic accuracy versus CTA, is a viable alternative to FFR for detecting coronary ischaemic lesions. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The diagnostic performance of CT-derived fractional flow reserve for evaluation of myocardial ischaemia confirmed by invasive fractional flow reserve: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Tang, X.; Peng, L.; Luo, Y.; Dong, R.; Liu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To review the literature on the diagnostic accuracy of CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR CT ) for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease, with invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: A PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane cross-search was performed. The pooled diagnostic accuracy of FFR CT , with FFR as the reference standard, was primarily analysed, and then compared with that of CT angiography (CTA). The thresholds to diagnose ischaemia were FFR ≤0.80 or CTA ≥50% stenosis. Data extraction, synthesis, and statistical analysis were performed by standard meta-analysis methods. Results: Three multicentre studies (NXT Trial, DISCOVER-FLOW study and DeFACTO study) were included, examining 609 patients and 1050 vessels. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), positive likelihood ratio (LR+), negative likelihood ratio (LR−), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for FFR CT were 89% (85–93%), 71% (65–75%), 70% (65–75%), 90% (85–93%), 3.31 (1.79–6.14), 0.16 (0.11–0.23), and 21.21 (9.15–49.15) at the patient-level, and 83% (78–63%), 78% (75–81%), 61% (56–65%), 92% (89–90%), 4.02 (1.84–8.80), 0.22 (0.13–0.35), and 19.15 (5.73–63.93) at the vessel-level. At per-patient analysis, FFR CT has similar sensitivity but improved specificity, PPV, NPV, LR+, LR−, and DOR versus those of CTA. At per-vessel analysis, FFR CT had a slightly lower sensitivity, similar NPV, but improved specificity, PPV, LR+, LR−, and DOR compared with those of CTA. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves for FFR CT was 0.8909 at patient-level and 0.8865 at vessel-level, versus 0.7402 for CTA at patient-level. Conclusions: FFR CT , which was associated with improved diagnostic accuracy versus CTA, is a viable alternative to FFR for detecting coronary ischaemic lesions

  13. Performance of Density Functional Theory Procedures for the Calculation of Proton-Exchange Barriers: Unusual Behavior of M06-Type Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Bun; Gilbert, Andrew T B; Gill, Peter M W; Radom, Leo

    2014-09-09

    We have examined the performance of a variety of density functional theory procedures for the calculation of complexation energies and proton-exchange barriers, with a focus on the Minnesota-class of functionals that are generally highly robust and generally show good accuracy. A curious observation is that M05-type and M06-type methods show an atypical decrease in calculated barriers with increasing proportion of Hartree-Fock exchange. To obtain a clearer picture of the performance of the underlying components of M05-type and M06-type functionals, we have investigated the combination of MPW-type and PBE-type exchange and B95-type and PBE-type correlation procedures. We find that, for the extensive E3 test set, the general performance of the various hybrid-DFT procedures improves in the following order: PBE1-B95 → PBE1-PBE → MPW1-PBE → PW6-B95. As M05-type and M06-type procedures are related to PBE1-B95, it would be of interest to formulate and examine the general performance of an alternative Minnesota DFT method related to PW6-B95.

  14. Helping Female Juveniles Improve their On-Task Behavior and Academic Performance Using a Self-Management Procedure in a Correctional Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Stacy; Joseph, Laurice M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to teach female juvenile offenders with disabilities a self-management procedure to help improve on-task behavior and academic performance during independent practice of math calculation facts. Students were taught to set goals and were provided with incentives for goal attainment. A reversal single-case design…

  15. [Conversional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, R; Bothe, C; Junghans, T; Pratschke, J; Benzing, C; Krenzien, F

    2016-10-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the therapy of choice in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are showing higher rates of treatment failure, reducing obesity-associated morbidity and body weight insufficiently. Moreover, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can occur refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to RYGB can be reasonable as long as specific conditions are fulfilled.Endoscopic procedures are currently being applied to revise bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20 % of cases. Transoral outlet reduction is the minimally invasive method of choice to reduce gastrojejunal anastomosis of the alimentary limb. The diameter of a gastric sleeve can be unwantedly enlarged as well; that can be reduced by placement of a longitudinal full-thickness suture.Severe hypoglycemic episodes can be present in patients following RYGB. Hypoglycemic episodes have to be diagnosed first and can be treated conventionally. Alternatively, a laparoscopic approach according to Branco-Zorron can be used for non-responders. Hypoglycemic episodes can thus be prevented and body weight reduction can be assured.Conversional and endoscopic procedures can be used in patients with treatment failure following bariatric surgery. Note that non-invasive approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional procedure is performed.

  16. Evaluation of time lapse for establishing distal tubal occlusion diagnosis during hysterosalpingography procedure performed by using water soluble contrast media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Kahyaoglu

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: Although a trend exists towards shorter time period intervals between the first uterine visualization and distal tubal filling graphy among patients with tubal patency, rather than patients with distal tubal occlusion confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy, clinically reliable objective time period intervals for finalizing the HSG procedure and proceeding with diagnostic laparoscopy due to distal tubal occlusion diagnosis on HSG could not be detected.

  17. 29 CFR 1928.53 - Protective enclosures for wheel-type agricultural tractors-test procedures and performance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... accomplished by using a 4,410-lb (2,000-kg) weight acting as a pendulum. The impact face of the weight shall be... the test; and (G) When any cables, props, or blocking shift or break during the test, the test shall... structure may be used to complete the test procedure; and (C) Impact at side. The blocking and restraining...

  18. 29 CFR 1928.52 - Protective frames for wheel-type agricultural tractors-test procedures and performance requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a 4,410-lb (2,000-kg) weight acting as a pendulum. The impact face of the weight shall be 27 ± 1 in..., or blocking shift or break during the test, the test shall be repeated. (ii) H = Vertical height of... test procedure; and (C) Impact at side. The blocking and restraining shall conform to paragraphs (d)(3...

  19. Exhaled hydrogen peroxide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : an analysis of its applicability as a non-invasive biomarker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, Wendy Johanna Cornelia van

    2003-01-01

    Several non-invasive biomarkers have been used to investigate the pathophysiology, treatment and prognosis of COPD. However, for most markers there is no standardized procedure and few randomised studies have been performed with COPD patients. We have developed an efficient, sensitive and

  20. Performance of cone beam computed tomography in comparison to conventional imaging techniques for the detection of bone invasion in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, C; Müller-Richter, U D A; Buck, A K; Mottok, A; Ritter, C; Schneider, P; Metzen, D; Heuschmann, P; Malzahn, U; Kübler, A C; Herrmann, K; Bluemel, C

    2015-01-01

    Detecting bone invasion in oral cancer is crucial for therapy planning and the prognosis. The present study evaluated cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detecting bone invasion in comparison to standard imaging techniques. A total of 197 patients with diagnoses of oral cancer underwent CBCT as part of preoperative staging between January 2007 and April 2013. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CBCT were compared with panoramic radiography (PR), multi-slice computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bone scintigraphy (BS) using McNemar's test. Histopathology and clinical follow-up served as references for the presence of bone invasion. CBCT and BS (84.8% and 89.3%, respectively), as well as CBCT and CT/MRI (83.2%), showed comparable accuracy (P = 0.188 and P = 0.771). CBCT was significantly superior to PR, which was reconstructed based on a CBCT dataset (74.1%, P = 0.002). In detecting bone invasion, CBCT was significantly more accurate than PR and was comparable to BS and CT/MRI. However, each method has certain advantages, and the best combination of imaging methods must be evaluated in prospective clinic trials. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Intra- and Interspecific Competition on the Performance of Native and Invasive Species of Impatiens under Varying Levels of Shade and Moisture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Hana; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Dvořáčková, Šárka; Pyšek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2013), e62842 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0563; GA ČR GA206/07/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : phenotypic plasticity * traits * plant invasions Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  2. Procedural justice, supervisor autonomy support, work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance: the mediating role of need satisfaction and perceived organizational support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Colombat, Philippe; Michinov, Estelle; Pronost, Anne-Marie; Fouquereau, Evelyne

    2013-11-01

    To test a model linking procedural justice, supervisor autonomy support, need satisfaction, organizational support, work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance. Research in industrial and organizational psychology has shown that procedural justice and supervisor autonomy support lead to positive outcomes. However, very little research related to this subject has been conducted in healthcare settings. Moreover, few studies have examined mechanisms that could account for these positive relationships. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. Convenience sampling was used and a sample of 500 nurses working in haematology, oncology and haematology/oncology units in France was surveyed in 2011. The final sample consisted of 323 nurses (64.6% response rate). The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modelling. Procedural justice and supervisor autonomy support significantly and positively influenced need satisfaction and perceived organizational support, which in turn positively predicted work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance. Organizations could deliver training programmes for their managers aimed at enhancing the use of fair procedures in allocating outcomes and developing their autonomy-supportive behaviours to improve nurses' work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Robot-assisted procedures in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedictis, Alessandro; Trezza, Andrea; Carai, Andrea; Genovese, Elisabetta; Procaccini, Emidio; Messina, Raffaella; Randi, Franco; Cossu, Silvia; Esposito, Giacomo; Palma, Paolo; Amante, Paolina; Rizzi, Michele; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE During the last 3 decades, robotic technology has rapidly spread across several surgical fields due to the continuous evolution of its versatility, stability, dexterity, and haptic properties. Neurosurgery pioneered the development of robotics, with the aim of improving the quality of several procedures requiring a high degree of accuracy and safety. Moreover, robot-guided approaches are of special interest in pediatric patients, who often have altered anatomy and challenging relationships between the diseased and eloquent structures. Nevertheless, the use of robots has been rarely reported in children. In this work, the authors describe their experience using the ROSA device (Robotized Stereotactic Assistant) in the neurosurgical management of a pediatric population. METHODS Between 2011 and 2016, 116 children underwent ROSA-assisted procedures for a variety of diseases (epilepsy, brain tumors, intra- or extraventricular and tumor cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and movement and behavioral disorders). Each patient received accurate preoperative planning of optimal trajectories, intraoperative frameless registration, surgical treatment using specific instruments held by the robotic arm, and postoperative CT or MR imaging. RESULTS The authors performed 128 consecutive surgeries, including implantation of 386 electrodes for stereo-electroencephalography (36 procedures), neuroendoscopy (42 procedures), stereotactic biopsy (26 procedures), pallidotomy (12 procedures), shunt placement (6 procedures), deep brain stimulation procedures (3 procedures), and stereotactic cyst aspiration (3 procedures). For each procedure, the authors analyzed and discussed accuracy, timing, and complications. CONCLUSIONS To the best their knowledge, the authors present the largest reported series of pediatric neurosurgical cases assisted by robotic support. The ROSA system provided improved safety and feasibility of minimally invasive approaches, thus optimizing the surgical

  4. Smartphone-assisted minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Mauricio; Petito, Carlo Emanuel; Tutihashi, Rafael; Paiva, Wellingson; Abramovicz Mandel, Suzana; Gomes Pinto, Fernando Campos; Ferreira de Andrade, Almir; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha

    2018-03-13

    OBJECTIVE Advances in video and fiber optics since the 1990s have led to the development of several commercially available high-definition neuroendoscopes. This technological improvement, however, has been surpassed by the smartphone revolution. With the increasing integration of smartphone technology into medical care, the introduction of these high-quality computerized communication devices with built-in digital cameras offers new possibilities in neuroendoscopy. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of smartphone-endoscope integration in performing different types of minimally invasive neurosurgery. METHODS The authors present a new surgical tool that integrates a smartphone with an endoscope by use of a specially designed adapter, thus eliminating the need for the video system customarily used for endoscopy. The authors used this novel combined system to perform minimally invasive surgery on patients with various neuropathological disorders, including cavernomas, cerebral aneurysms, hydrocephalus, subdural hematomas, contusional hematomas, and spontaneous intracerebral hematomas. RESULTS The new endoscopic system featuring smartphone-endoscope integration was used by the authors in the minimally invasive surgical treatment of 42 patients. All procedures were successfully performed, and no complications related to the use of the new method were observed. The quality of the images obtained with the smartphone was high enough to provide adequate information to the neurosurgeons, as smartphone cameras can record images in high definition or 4K resolution. Moreover, because the smartphone screen moves along with the endoscope, surgical mobility was enhanced with the use of this method, facilitating more intuitive use. In fact, this increased mobility was identified as the greatest benefit of the use of the smartphone-endoscope system compared with the use of the neuroendoscope with the standard video set. CONCLUSIONS Minimally invasive approaches

  5. Minimally Invasive Parathyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee F. Starker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP is an operative approach for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT. Currently, routine use of improved preoperative localization studies, cervical block anesthesia in the conscious patient, and intraoperative parathyroid hormone analyses aid in guiding surgical therapy. MIP requires less surgical dissection causing decreased trauma to tissues, can be performed safely in the ambulatory setting, and is at least as effective as standard cervical exploration. This paper reviews advances in preoperative localization, anesthetic techniques, and intraoperative management of patients undergoing MIP for the treatment of pHPT.

  6. Procedure for field axes measurement, beam indication adjustment, and figure of convergence determination within performance tests for radiation therapy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quast, U; Krause, K; Rassow, J [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Klinische Strahlenphysik

    1976-09-01

    A routine measuring procedure for the verification of radiation field axes and figure of convergence within a spatial resolution of +- 0.5 mm is described. Measurements are done in two parallel planes in a certain distance before and behind the presumed isocentre. The used test arrangement permits rapid check and controlled adjustment of the alignment of beam or isocentre indicating devices for all isocentric radiation therapy equipment.

  7. Head-camera video recordings of trauma core competency procedures can evaluate surgical resident's technical performance as well as colocated evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Pasley, Jason; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Hagegeorge, George; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    Unbiased evaluation of trauma core competency procedures is necessary to determine if residency and predeployment training courses are useful. We tested whether a previously validated individual procedure score (IPS) for individual procedure vascular exposure and fasciotomy (FAS) performance skills could discriminate training status by comparing IPS of evaluators colocated with surgeons to blind video evaluations. Performance of axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), and femoral artery (FA) vascular exposures and lower extremity FAS on fresh cadavers by 40 PGY-2 to PGY-6 residents was video-recorded from head-mounted cameras. Two colocated trained evaluators assessed IPS before and after training. One surgeon in each pretraining tertile of IPS for each procedure was randomly identified for blind video review. The same 12 surgeons were video-recorded repeating the procedures less than 4 weeks after training. Five evaluators independently reviewed all 96 randomly arranged deidentified videos. Inter-rater reliability/consistency, intraclass correlation coefficients were compared by colocated versus video review of IPS, and errors. Study methodology and bias were judged by Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. There were no differences (p ≥ 0.5) in IPS for AA, FA, FAS, whether evaluators were colocated or reviewed video recordings. Evaluator consistency was 0.29 (BA) - 0.77 (FA). Video and colocated evaluators were in total agreement (p = 1.0) for error recognition. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.73 to 0.92, dependent on procedure. Correlations video versus colocated evaluations were 0.5 to 0.9. Except for BA, blinded video evaluators discriminated (p competency. Prognostic study, level II.

  8. Non-invasive assessment of exercise performance in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: is there a CF specific muscle defect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Mark; Narang, Indra; Edwards, Liz; Bush, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction is increasingly recognized as complicating respiratory disease, but this is difficult to measure non-invasively. Can skeletal muscle function and efficiency be measured during exercise non-invasively using respiratory mass spectrometry (RMS); and is the known exercise dysfunction in cystic fibrosis (CF) children related in part to a disease specific defect of skeletal muscle, or a non-specific manifestation of chronic airway infection and inflammation. Calculations of effective pulmonary blood flow and stroke volume, blood oxygen content and oxygen dispatch from the lungs, skeletal muscle oxygen extraction and consumption, anerobic threshold and capacity, and gross, net and work efficiency in 106 controls and 36 children (18 CF) with bronchiectasis, all aged from 8 to 17 years. Normal values for control subjects are tabulated. CF and non-CF bronchiectatic subjects had similar physiology, and skeletal muscle abnormalities could not be detected. Reduced oxygen dispatch from the lungs, due to an inability to raise stroke volume, without an increase in functional residual capacity was the major factor in reduced exercise ability. Non-invasive RMS can be used to determine skeletal muscle function in children. The changes observed in CF subjects were very similar to non-CF bronchiectatic subjects and thus a CF specific defect was not demonstrated.

  9. Minimally invasive thyroidectomy (MIT): indications and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docimo, Giovanni; Salvatore Tolone, Salvatore; Gili, Simona; d'Alessandro, A; Casalino, G; Brusciano, L; Ruggiero, Roberto; Docimo, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    To establish if the indication for different approaches for thyroidectomy and the incision length provided by means of pre-operative assessment of gland volume and size of nodules resulted in safe and effective outcomes and in any notable aesthetic or quality-of-life impact on patients. Ninehundred eightytwo consecutive patients, undergoing total thyroidectomy, were enrolled. The thyroid volume and maximal nodule diameter were measured by means of ultrasounds. Based on ultrasounds findings, patients were divided into three groups: minimally invasive video assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT), minimally invasive thyroidectomy (MIT) and conventional thyroidectomy (CT) groups. The data concerning the following parameters were collected: operative time, postoperative complications, postoperative pain and cosmetic results. The MIVAT group included 179 patients, MIT group included 592 patients and CT group included 211 patients. Incidence of complications did not differ significantly in each group. In MIVAT and MIT group, the perception of postoperative pain was less intense than CT group. The patients in the MIVAT (7±1.5) and MIT (8±2) groups were more satisfied with the cosmetic results than those in CT group (5±1.3) (p= MIT is a technique totally reproducible, and easily convertible to perform surgical procedures in respect of the patient, without additional complications, increased costs, and with better aesthetic results.

  10. Procedural discourse performance in adults with severe traumatic brain injury at 3 and 6 months post injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Elin; Togher, Leanne; Kenny, Belinda; Fromm, Davida; Forbes, Margaret; MacWhinney, Brian; McDonald, Skye; Tate, Robyn; Turkstra, Lyn; Power, Emma

    2018-01-01

    There is limited research on communicative recovery during the early stages after a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adults. In the current study 43 people with severe TBI described a simple procedure at 3 and 6 months post injury and this was compared to the description provided by 37 healthy speakers. Linguistic productivity and the presence of macrostructural discourse elements were analysed. No change occurred in productivity in the TBI group between the two time points. There was increased use of relevant information (macrostructure) over time for the TBI group, reflecting improvement. People with TBI differed from controls in speech rate and in two out of three macrostructural categories at both time points, indicating difficulties even after 12 weeks of recovery. Overall, the quality, rather than the quantity of discourse was disordered for participants with TBI. Findings indicate that procedural discourse is sensitive to discourse deficits of people with TBI and can be used to map recovery during the sub-acute phase.

  11. Ultra High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC: a review of material properties and design procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. T. Buttignol

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper does a review of the recent achievements on the knowledge of UHPFRC properties and in the development of design procedures. UHPFRC is defined as a new material, with unique properties (high ductility, low permeability, very high strength capacity in compression, higher toughness in comparison to conventional concrete. It is important to know both material and mechanical properties to fully take advantage of its outstanding properties for structural applications. However, since this is a new material, the current design codes are not well suited and should be reviewed before being applied to UHPFRC. In the first part, the following material properties are addressed: hydration process; permeability; fibers role; mix design; fiber-matrix bond properties workability; mixing procedure; and curing. In the second part, the mechanical properties of the material are discussed, together with some design recommendations. The aspects herein examined are: size effect; compressive and flexural strength; tensile stress-strain relation; shear and punching shear capacity; creep and shrinkage; fracture energy; steel bars anchorage and adherence. Besides, the tensile mechanical characterization is described using inverse analysis based on bending tests data. In the last part, material behavior at high temperature is discussed, including physical-chemical transformations of the concrete, spalling effect, and transient creep. In the latter case, a new Load Induced Thermal Strain (LITS semi-empirical model is described and compared with UHPC experimental results.

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khouja, Lutfi T; Baron, Eli M; Johnson, J Patrick; Kim, Terrence T; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-06-01

    Medical care has been evolving with the increased influence of a value-based health care system. As a result, more emphasis is being placed on ensuring cost-effectiveness and utility in the services provided to patients. This study looks at this development in respect to minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) costs. A literature review using PubMed, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) was performed. Papers were included in the study if they reported costs associated with minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). If there was no mention of cost, CEA, cost-utility analysis (CUA), quality-adjusted life year (QALY), quality, or outcomes mentioned, then the article was excluded. Fourteen studies reporting costs associated with MISS in 12,425 patients (3675 undergoing minimally invasive procedures and 8750 undergoing open procedures) were identified through PubMed, the CEA Registry, and NHS EED. The percent cost difference between minimally invasive and open approaches ranged from 2.54% to 33.68%-all indicating cost saving with a minimally invasive surgical approach. Average length of stay (LOS) for minimally invasive surgery ranged from 0.93 days to 5.1 days compared with 1.53 days to 12 days for an open approach. All studies reporting EBL reported lower volume loss in an MISS approach (range 10-392.5 ml) than in an open approach (range 55-535.5 ml). There are currently an insufficient number of studies published reporting the costs of MISS. Of the studies published, none have followed a standardized method of reporting and analyzing cost data. Preliminary findings analyzing the 14 studies showed both cost saving and better outcomes in MISS compared with an open approach. However, more Level I CEA/CUA studies including cost/QALY evaluations with specifics of the techniques utilized need to be reported in a standardized manner to make more accurate conclusions on the cost effectiveness of

  13. A transition from using multi-step procedures to a fully integrated system for performing extracorporeal photopheresis: A comparison of costs and efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Nabih; Leblond, Veronique; Ouzegdouh, Maya; Button, Paul

    2017-12-01

    The Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital Hemobiotherapy Department, Paris, France, has been providing extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) since November 2011, and started using the Therakos ® CELLEX ® fully integrated system in 2012. This report summarizes our single-center experience of transitioning from the use of multi-step ECP procedures to the fully integrated ECP system, considering the capacity and cost implications. The total number of ECP procedures performed 2011-2015 was derived from department records. The time taken to complete a single ECP treatment using a multi-step technique and the fully integrated system at our department was assessed. Resource costs (2014€) were obtained for materials and calculated for personnel time required. Time-driven activity-based costing methods were applied to provide a cost comparison. The number of ECP treatments per year increased from 225 (2012) to 727 (2015). The single multi-step procedure took 270 min compared to 120 min for the fully integrated system. The total calculated per-session cost of performing ECP using the multi-step procedure was greater than with the CELLEX ® system (€1,429.37 and €1,264.70 per treatment, respectively). For hospitals considering a transition from multi-step procedures to fully integrated methods for ECP where cost may be a barrier, time-driven activity-based costing should be utilized to gain a more comprehensive understanding the full benefit that such a transition offers. The example from our department confirmed that there were not just cost and time savings, but that the time efficiencies gained with CELLEX ® allow for more patient treatments per year. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Clinical Apheresis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Percutaneous release of the plantar fascia. New surgical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Plantar fasciopathy presents with pain at the plantar and medial aspect of the heel. If chronic, it can negatively impact on quality of life. Plantar fasciopathy is not always self-limiting, and can be debilitating. Surgical management involves different procedures. We describe a percutaneous plantar fascia release. A minimally invasive access to the plantar tuberosity of the calcaneus is performed, and a small scalpel blade is used to release the fascia. With this procedure, skin healing problems, nerve injuries, infection and prolonged recovery time are minimised, allowing early return to normal activities. V.

  15. Does procedure profitability impact whether an outpatient surgery is performed at an ambulatory surgery center or hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotzke, Michael Robert; Courtemanche, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are small (typically physician owned) healthcare facilities that specialize in performing outpatient surgeries and therefore compete against hospitals for patients. Physicians who own ASCs could treat their most profitable patients at their ASCs and less profitable patients at hospitals. This paper asks if the profitability of an outpatient surgery impacts where a physician performs the surgery. Using a sample of Medicare patients from the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, we find that higher profit surgeries do have a higher probability of being performed at an ASC compared to a hospital. After controlling for surgery type, a 10% increase in a surgery's profitability is associated with a 1.2 to 1.4 percentage point increase in the probability the surgery is performed at an ASC. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effectiveness of FISK, an invasiveness screening tool for non-native freshwater fishes, to perform risk identification assessments in the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, David; Ribeiro, Filipe; Leunda, Pedro M; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Copp, Gordon H

    2013-08-01

    Risk assessments are crucial for identifying and mitigating impacts from biological invasions. The Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (FISK) is a risk identification (screening) tool for freshwater fishes consisting of two subject areas: biogeography/history and biology/ecology. According to the outcomes, species can be classified under particular risk categories. The aim of this study was to apply FISK to the Iberian Peninsula, a Mediterranean climate region highly important for freshwater fish conservation due to a high level of endemism. In total, 89 fish species were assessed by three independent assessors. Results from receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that FISK can discriminate reliably between noninvasive and invasive fishes for Iberia, with a threshold of 20.25, similar to those obtained in several regions around the world. Based on mean scores, no species was categorized as "low risk," 50 species as "medium risk," 17 as "moderately high risk," 11 as "high risk," and 11 as "very high risk." The highest scoring species was goldfish Carassius auratus. Mean certainty in response was above the category "mostly certain," ranging from tinfoil barb Barbonymus schwanenfeldii with the lowest certainty to eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki with the highest level. Pair-wise comparison showed significant differences between one assessor and the other two on mean certainty, with these two assessors showing a high coincidence rate for the species categorization. Overall, the results suggest that FISK is a useful and viable tool for assessing risks posed by non-native fish in the Iberian Peninsula and contributes to a "watch list" in this region. © 2013 Crown copyright This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  17. Virtual and augmented medical imaging environments: enabling technology for minimally invasive cardiac interventional guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A; White, James; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gérard M; Peters, Terry M

    2010-01-01

    Virtual and augmented reality environments have been adopted in medicine as a means to enhance the clinician's view of the anatomy and facilitate the performance of minimally invasive procedures. Their value is truly appreciated during interventions where the surgeon cannot directly visualize the targets to be treated, such as during cardiac procedures performed on the beating heart. These environments must accurately represent the real surgical field and require seamless integration of pre- and intra-operative imaging, surgical tracking, and visualization technology in a common framework centered around the patient. This review begins with an overview of minimally invasive cardiac interventions, describes the architecture of a typical surgical guidance platform including imaging, tracking, registration and visualization, highlights both clinical and engineering accuracy limitations in cardiac image guidance, and discusses the translation of the work from the laboratory into the operating room together with typically encountered challenges.

  18. The Therapy Beneath the Fun: Medical Clowning During Invasive Examinations on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Shoshi; Tener, Dafna; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; On, Avi; Lang-Franco, Nessia

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative research presented here is part of a larger project on the significance of medical clowning during invasive examinations in children in the Department of Gastroenterology and the Center for the Sexually Abused in a hospital in Israel. It investigated what makes up the essence of medical clowning, what skills and techniques are used by medical clowns, and whether their work contains therapeutic elements. A total of 9 children undergoing invasive examinations and 9 of their accompanying parents participated in semistructured interviews, which were analyzed using a thematic analysis methodology assisted by an Atlas-ti software program. The interviews revealed that the medical clowning intervention during invasive examinations was essentially therapeutic, with the clown using theatrical and clowning tools to incorporate therapeutic elements such as empowerment, reversal of role, reframing, and building a therapeutic alliance. In addition, during the invasive examinations, the medical clowning followed the model of brief crisis intervention therapy. The study advances the need to incorporate medical clowns as an integral part of medical teams performing invasive procedures and to include clowns in all stages of the hospital visit when children undergo invasive examinations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. A minimally invasive smile enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Fred H

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry refers to a wide variety of dental treatments. On the restorative aspect of dental procedures, direct resin bonding can be a very conservative treatment option for the patient. When tooth structure does not need to be removed, the patient benefits. Proper treatment planning is essential to determine how conservative the restorative treatment will be. This article describes the diagnosis, treatment options, and procedural techniques in the restoration of 4 maxillary anterior teeth with direct composite resin. The procedural steps are reviewed with regard to placing the composite and the variety of colors needed to ensure a natural result. Finishing and polishing of the composite are critical to ending with a natural looking dentition that the patient will be pleased with for many years.

  20. Metaanalysis of Diagnostic Performance of Computed Coronary Tomography Angiography, Computed Tomography Perfusion and Computed Tomography-Fractional Flow Reserve in Functional Myocardial Ischemia Assessment versus Invasive Fractional Flow Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Lipinski, Michael J.; Flors, Lucia F.; Shaw, Peter; Kramer, Christopher M.; Salerno, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We sought to compare the diagnostic performance of computed coronary tomography angiography (CCTA), computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and computed tomography fractional flow reserve (CT-FFR) for assessing the functional significance of coronary stenosis as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR), in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. CCTA has proven clinically useful for excluding obstructive CAD due to its high sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV), however the ability of CTA to identify functionally significant CAD has remained challenging. We searched PubMed/Medline for studies evaluating CCTA, CTP or CT-FFR for the non-invasive detection of obstructive CAD as compared to catheter-derived FFR as the reference standard. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, likelihood ratios (LR), odds ratio (OR) of all diagnostic tests were assessed. Eighteen studies involving a total of 1535 patients were included. CTA demonstrated a pooled sensitivity of 0.92, specificity 0.43, PPV of 0.56 and NPV of 0.87 on a per-patient level. CT-FFR and CTP increased the specificity to 0.72 and 0.77 respectively (P=0.004 and P=0.0009)) resulting in higher point estimates for PPV 0.70 and 0.83 respectively. There was no improvement in the sensitivity. The CTP protocol involved more radiation (3.5 mSv CCTA VS 9.6 mSv CTP) and a higher volume of iodinated contrast (145 mL). In conclusion, CTP and CT-FFR improve the specificity of CCTA for detecting functionally significant stenosis as defined by invasive FFR on a per-patient level; both techniques could advance the ability to non-invasively detect the functional significance of coronary lesions. PMID:26347004

  1. Harmine treatment enhances short-term memory in old rats: Dissociation of cognition and the ability to perform the procedural requirements of maze testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennenga, Sarah E; Gerson, Julia E; Dunckley, Travis; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Harmine is a naturally occurring monoamine oxidase inhibitor that has recently been shown to selectively inhibit the dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). We investigated the cognitive effects of 1mg (low) Harmine and 5mg (high) Harmine using the delayed-match-to-sample (DMS) asymmetrical 3-choice water maze task to evaluate spatial working and recent memory, and the Morris water maze task (MM) to test spatial reference memory. Animals were also tested on the visible platform task, a water-escape task with the same motor, motivational, and reinforcement components as the other tasks used to evaluate cognition, but differing in its greater simplicity and that the platform was visible above the surface of the water. A subset of the Harmine-high treated animals showed clear motor impairments on all behavioral tasks, and the visible platform task confirmed a lack of competence to perform the procedural components of water maze testing. After excluding animals from the high dose group that could not perform the procedural components of a swim task, it was revealed that both high- and low-dose treatment with Harmine enhanced performance on the latter portion of DMS testing, but had no effect on MM performance. Thus, this study demonstrates the importance of confirming motor and visual competence when studying animal cognition, and verifies the one-day visible platform task as a reliable measure of ability to perform the procedural components necessary for completion of a swim task. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Update on procedure-related risks for prenatal diagnosis techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabor, Ann; Alfirevic, Zarko

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: As a consequence of the introduction of effective screening methods, the number of invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures is steadily declining. The aim of this review is to summarize the risks related to these procedures. Material and Methods: Review of the literature. Results: Data...... from randomised controlled trials as well as from systematic reviews and a large national registry study are consistent with a procedure-related miscarriage rate of 0.5-1.0% for amniocentesis as well as for chorionic villus sampling (CVS). In single-center studies performance may be remarkably good due...... not be performed before 15 + 0 weeks' gestation. CVS on the other hand should not be performed before 10 weeks' gestation due to a possible increase in risk of limb reduction defects. Discussion: Experienced operators have a higher success rate and a lower complication rate. The decreasing number of prenatal...

  3. Resuspension of mild to moderate jawline laxity using a minimally invasive technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaccia, Emil; Khan, Azim J; Herron, Joel B; Scarborough, Dwight A

    2003-08-01

    A practical approach for superficial musculoapponeurotic system plication and neck lift is indicated for early aging changes of jawline. A single or series of small punches or single incisions at the earlobe and then minor undermining to lift the superficial musculoapponeurotic system followed by removal of skin laxity in neck and jowl result in a seamless scar via a simple V to Y closure. A minimally invasive procedure was performed easily under local anesthesia in an office/ambulatory surgery center setting.

  4. Influence of family history of colorectal cancer on health behavior and performance of early detection procedures: the SUN Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ochoa, Eva; Gómez-Acebo, Ines; Beunza, Juan-José; Rodríguez-Cundín, Paz; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Llorca, Javier

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between family history of colorectal cancer and both health behavior and screening procedures in a population cohort. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of 15,169 participants belonging to a prospective cohort study (the SUN Project) based on two self-reported questionnaires: one of them related to lifestyle and the other a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We explored the influence of family history of colorectal cancer in lifestyles (consumption of alcohol, weight, and diet) and medical management behaviors (screening of chronic diseases). People with family history of colorectal cancer increased their number of colorectal cancer screening tests (adjusted odds ratio for fecal occult blood test: 1.98, 95% confidence interval: 1.48-2.65; and adjusted odds ratio for colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy: 3.42, 2.69-4.36); nevertheless, health behavior changes in diet of relatives of colorectal cancer patients were undetectable. We show that individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer increase their compliance with screening tests, although they exhibit no better health-related behaviors than people without family history of colorectal cancer. Further prospective studies are required to confirm these results and to identify tools to empower the subjects to change their risk profile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Battery Usage and Thermal Performance of the Toyota Prius and Honda Insight for Various Chassis Dynamometer Test Procedures: Preprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, K. J.; Mihalic, M.; Zolot, M.

    2001-01-01

    This study describes the results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) chassis dynamometer testing of a 2000 model year Honda Insight and 2001 model year Toyota Prius. The tests were conducted for the purpose of evaluating the battery thermal performance, assessing the impact of air conditioning on fuel economy and emissions, and providing information for NREL's Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)

  6. 40 CFR 63.2161 - What performance tests and other procedures must I use if I monitor brew ethanol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Manufacturing of Nutritional Yeast Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2161 What performance tests... equation as specified in paragraph (f) of this section. (2) For each fermentation stage, conduct one run of... fermentation stages do not have to be from the same production run. (3) Do the test at a point in the exhaust...

  7. Realistic Job Previews: Can a Procedure to Reduce Turnover Also Influence the Relationship between Abilities and Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanous, John P.

    1978-01-01

    The current state of theory, research, and practice in realistic job previews (RJP) for recruitment is still immature. RJPs have been used to reduce employee turnover, but not necessarily to influence the job performance of newcomers. This research looks at the background, research results, and unanswered issues. (Author/RK)

  8. Lessons we learn from review of urological procedures performed during three decades in a spinal cord injury patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Hughes, Peter L; Singh, Gurpreet; Mansour, Paul; Oo, Tun

    2009-12-16

    We review urological procedures performed on a spinal cord injury patient during three decades. A 23-year-old male patient sustained T-12 paraplegia in 1971. In 1972, intravenous urography showed both kidneys functioning well; division of external urethral sphincter was performed. In 1976, reimplantation of left ureter (Lich-Gregoir) was carried out for vesicoureteric reflux. As reflux persisted, left ureter was reimplanted by psoas hitch-Boari flap technique in 1978. This patient suffered from severe pain in legs; intrathecal injection of phenol was performed twice in 1979. The segment bearing the scarred spinal cord was removed in September 1982. This patient required continuous catheter drainage. Deep median sphincterotomy was performed in 1984. As the left kidney showed little function, left nephroureterectomy was performed in 1986. In an attempt to obviate the need for an indwelling catheter, bladder neck resection and tri-radiate sphincterotomy were carried out in 1989; but these procedures proved futile. UroLume prosthesis was inserted and splinted the urethra from prostatic apex to bulb in October 1990. As mucosa was apposing distal to stent, in November 1990, second UroLume stent was hitched inside distal end of first. In March 1991, urethroscopy showed the distal end of the distal stent had fragmented; loose wires were removed. In April 1991, this patient developed sweating, shivering and haematuria. Urine showed Pseudomonas. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Suprapubic cystostomy was done again the next day, as the catheter was pulled out accidentally during night. Subsequently, a 16 Fr Silastic catheter was passed per urethra and suprapubic catheter was removed. In July 1993, Urocoil stent was put inside UroLume stent with distal end of Urocoil stent lying free in urethra. In September 1993, this patient was struggling to pass urine. Urocoil stent had migrated to bladder; therefore, Urocoil stent was removed and a Memotherm stent was deployed. This

  9. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with skull base invasion : intratumoral direct puncture embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Young; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho; Park, Kee Hyun [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the utility and efficacy of percutaneous direct glue embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with skull base invasion. In nine cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with invasion of the skull base, embolization under general anethesia was performed. Using an 18G spinal needle, direct puncture were made via the transnasal or mandibular sciatic notch. A glue-lipiodol mixture (1:1 -1:3) was injected slowly for 15 to 30 seconds under fluoroscopic control; the number of post-embolization angiography and the distribution of embolic materials was assessed on CT within 1-3 days. The mass was surgically removed 3 to 7 days after embolization. Direct glue embolization of juvenile angiofibroma with skull base invasion appears to be a simple and safe procedure. The technique could be used for other hypervascular lesions in the base of the skull or parapharyngeal space. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  10. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with skull base invasion : intratumoral direct puncture embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hye Young; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho; Park, Kee Hyun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the utility and efficacy of percutaneous direct glue embolization for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with skull base invasion. In nine cases of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas with invasion of the skull base, embolization under general anethesia was performed. Using an 18G spinal needle, direct puncture were made via the transnasal or mandibular sciatic notch. A glue-lipiodol mixture (1:1 -1:3) was injected slowly for 15 to 30 seconds under fluoroscopic control; the number of post-embolization angiography and the distribution of embolic materials was assessed on CT within 1-3 days. The mass was surgically removed 3 to 7 days after embolization. Direct glue embolization of juvenile angiofibroma with skull base invasion appears to be a simple and safe procedure. The technique could be used for other hypervascular lesions in the base of the skull or parapharyngeal space. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  11. Robotic pancreas drainage procedure for chronic pancreatitis: robotic lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Puestow procedure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adeel S; Siddiqui, Imran; Vrochides, Dionisios; Martinie, John B

    2018-01-01

    Lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ), also known as the Puestow procedure, is a complex surgical procedure reserved for patients with refractory chronic pancreatitis (CP) and a dilated pancreatic duct. Traditionally, this operation is performed through an open incision, however, recent advancements in minimally invasive techniques have made it possible to perform the surgery using laparoscopic and robotic techniques with comparable safety. Though we do not have enough data yet to prove superiority of one over the other, the robotic approach appears to have an advantage over the laparoscopic technique in better visualization through 3-dimensional (3D) imaging and availability of wristed instruments for more precise actions, which may translate into superior outcomes. This paper is a description of our technique for robotic LPJ in patients with refractory CP. Important principles of patient selection, preoperative workup, surgical technique and post-operative management are discussed. A short video with a case presentation and highlights of the important steps of the surgery is included.

  12. Teaching Young Children with Special Needs and Their Peers to Play Board Games: Effects of a Least to Most Prompting Procedure to Increase Independent Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Temple, Janet; Jung, Sunhwa; Sainato, Diane M

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effects of a least to most prompting procedure on the performance of board game steps and game-related on-task behavior of young children with special needs and their typically developing peers. This study was conducted employing a concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. After teaching the board game steps using a systematic prompting strategy, the participants demonstrated increases in the performance of board game steps and game-related on-task behavior. In addition, the participants maintained high levels of performance and game-related on-task behavior during post-game training. The effects of teaching board games using prompting strategies, implications for practice, and areas for future study are presented.

  13. Evaluation of the tumor registration error in biopsy procedures performed under real-time PET/CT guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchon, Louise M; Apte, Adytia; Schmidtlein, C Ross; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Dogan, Snjezana; Hatt, Mathieu; Visvikis, Dimitris; Humm, John L; Solomon, Stephen B; Kirov, Assen S

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify tumor displacement during real-time PET/CT guided biopsy and to investigate correlations between tumor displacement and false-negative results. 19 patients who underwent real-time 18 F-FDG PET-guided biopsy and were found positive for malignancy were included in this study under IRB approval. PET/CT images were acquired for all patients within minutes prior to biopsy to visualize the FDG-avid region and plan the needle insertion. The biopsy needle was inserted and a post-insertion CT scan was acquired. The two CT scans acquired before and after needle insertion were registered using a deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm. The DIR deformation vector field (DVF) was used to calculate the mean displacement between the pre-insertion and post-insertion CT scans for a region around the tip of the biopsy needle. For 12 patients one biopsy core from each was tracked during histopathological testing to investigate correlations of the mean displacement between the two CT scans and false-negative or true-positive biopsy results. For 11 patients, two PET scans were acquired; one at the beginning of the procedure, pre-needle insertion, and an additional one with the needle in place. The pre-insertion PET scan was corrected for intraprocedural motion by applying the DVF. The corrected PET was compared with the post-needle insertion PET to validate the correction method. The mean displacement of tissue around the needle between the pre-biopsy CT and the postneedle insertion CT was 5.1 mm (min = 1.1 mm, max = 10.9 mm and SD = 3.0 mm). For mean displacements larger than 7.2 mm, the biopsy cores gave false-negative results. Correcting pre-biopsy PET using the DVF improved the PET/CT registration in 8 of 11 cases. The DVF obtained from DIR of the CT scans can be used for evaluation and correction of the error in needle placement with respect to the FDG-avid area. Misregistration between the pre-biopsy PET and the CT acquired with the

  14. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  15. A new modeling procedure for circuit design and performance prediction of evaporator coils using CO2 as refrigerant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbi Bendaoud, Adlane; Ouzzane, Mohamed; Aidoun, Zine; Galanis, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of environmentally damaging synthetic refrigerants due to their ODP or GWI potential by natural refrigerants such as CO 2 is now up in the research agenda. Moreover, current energy supply concerns make of efficiency another first priority issue to dictate new stringent design criteria for industrial and commercial equipment. Heat exchangers are the most important components in refrigeration systems where they are used as evaporators or condensers and their design and operation have a considerable impact on overall system performance. Hence, it is important to better understand their thermal and hydrodynamic behaviour in order to improve their design and operation. Numerical simulation represents a very efficient tool for achieving this objective. In this paper, a new modeling approach, accounting for the heat transfer the hydrodynamics of the problem and intended to predict the dynamic behaviour of a refrigeration coil under dry conditions is proposed. A related FORTRAN program was developed, allowing the study of a large range of complex refrigerant circuit configurations. The equations describing these aspects are strongly coupled, and their decoupling is reached by using an original method of resolution. Circuits may have several inlets, outlets, bifurcations and feed one or several other tubes inlets. The coil was subdivided into several elementary control volumes and its analysis provided detailed information in X, Y and Z directions. Validation was performed with data from a CO 2 secondary refrigeration loop test bench built in CanmetENERGY Laboratories. These data were predicted satisfactorily over the operating range corresponding to refrigeration applications. Exemplary simulations were then performed on an evaporator typically employed in supermarkets, showing the effect of circuiting on operation and performance. Even though circuiting is common practice in refrigeration this simulation shows that care must be exercised in making the

  16. Performance of intra-procedural 18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT-guided biopsies for lesions suspected of malignancy but poorly visualized with other modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelis, F.; Silk, M.; Takaki, H.; Durack, J.C.; Erinjeri, J.P.; Sofocleous, C.T.; Siegelbaum, R.H.; Maybody, M.; Solomon, S.B.; Schoder, H.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and the diagnostic success rate of percutaneous biopsies performed under intra-procedural 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance for lesions difficult to see with conventional cross-sectional imaging. From 2011 to 2013, consecutive clinically indicated percutaneous PET/CT-guided biopsies of 106 masses (mean size, 3.3 cm; range, 0.7-15.9 cm; SD, 2.9 cm) in bones (n = 33), liver (n = 26), soft tissues (n = 18), lung (n = 15) and abdomen (n = 14) were reviewed. The biopsy procedures were performed following injection of a mean of 255 MBq (SD, 74) FDG. Mean maximal standardized uptake value (SUV) of lesions was 8.8 (SD, 6.3). A systematic review of the histopathological results and outcomes was performed. Biopsies were positive for malignancy in 76 cases (71.7 %, 76/106) and for benign tissue in 30 cases (28.3 %, 30/106). Immediate results were considered adequate for 100 PET/CT biopsies (94.3 %, 100/106) requiring no further exploration, and for the six others (5.7 %, 6/106) benign diagnoses were confirmed after surgery (n = 4) or follow-up (n = 2). The consequent overall sensitivity and the diagnostic success of biopsy were therefore 100 %. No significant differences in terms of detection of malignancy were observed between the different locations. Lesions > 2 cm or with SUV > 4 were not significantly more likely to be malignant. Complications occurred after four biopsies (3.7 %, 4/106). Intra-procedural PET/CT guidance appears as a safe and effective method and allows high diagnostic success of percutaneous biopsies for metabolically active lesions. (orig.)

  17. Prenatal diagnostic procedures used in pregnancies with congenital malformations in 14 regions of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; de Vigan, Catherine; Scarano, Gioacchino; de Walle, Hermien; Gillerot, Yves; Stoll, Claude; Addor, Marie-Claude; Stone, David; Gener, Blanca; Feijoo, Maria; Mosquera-Tenreiro, Carmen; Gatt, Miriam; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Baena, Neus; Dolk, Helen

    2004-11-01

    To investigate outcomes of ultrasound investigations (US) and invasive diagnostic procedures in cases of congenital malformations (CM), and to compare the use of invasive prenatal test techniques (amniocentesis (AC) versus chorionic villus sampling (CVS)) among European populations. Analysis of data from population-based registries of CM. 25 400 cases of CM recorded by 14 EUROCAT registries covering a total population of 1,013,352 births 1995-99. US were performed in 91% of cases, and positively detected CM in 35% of cases. AC was performed in 24% of the cases and CVS in 3% of cases. Thirty-eight percent of invasive tests gave positive results. Fifty-two percent of cases with maternal age > or = 35 years had an invasive test performed compared to 20% of cases with younger mothers. Considerable variation was found between registries in the uptake rate of invasive tests in cases with older maternal age and on the use of invasive tests with only four regions employing CVS techniques in at least a third of the cases having invasive tests. For chromosomal anomalies US gave positive results in 46% of cases with maternal age or = 35 years with US performed. Prenatal US was performed in 91% of all pregnancies with CM but the test was only positive in a third of the cases. There was large regional variation in the uptake rate of invasive tests with maternal age of 35 years or more. For every CVS carried out there were nine AC tests. US is an important tool in the prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal anomalies in Europe. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The use of nanoparticles in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures: review of manufacturing procedures and performance improvement for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-07-01

    Membrane separations are powerful tools for various applications, including wastewater treatment and the removal of contaminants from drinking water. The performance of membranes is mainly limited by material properties. Recently, successful attempts have been made to add nanoparticles or nanotubes to polymers in membrane synthesis, with particle sizes ranging from 4 nm up to 100 nm. Ceramic membranes have been fabricated with catalytic nanoparticles for synergistic effects on the membrane performance. Breakthrough effects that have been reported in the field of water and wastewater treatment include fouling mitigation, improvement of permeate quality and flux enhancement. Nanomaterials that have been used include titania, alumina, silica, silver and many others. This paper reviews the role of engineered nanomaterials in (pressure driven) membrane technology for water treatment, to be applied in drinking water production and wastewater recycling. Benefits and drawbacks are described, which should be taken into account in further studies on potential risks related to release of nanoparticles into the environment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The use of nanoparticles in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures: Review of manufacturing procedures and performance improvement for water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeonghwan [Department of Environmental Engineering, INHA University, Nam-gu, Yonghyun-dong 253, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Van der Bruggen, Bart, E-mail: bart.vanderbruggen@cit.kuleuven.b [K.U. Leuven, Department of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory for Applied Physical Chemistry and Environmental Technology, W. de Croylaan 46, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Membrane separations are powerful tools for various applications, including wastewater treatment and the removal of contaminants from drinking water. The performance of membranes is mainly limited by material properties. Recently, successful attempts have been made to add nanoparticles or nanotubes to polymers in membrane synthesis, with particle sizes ranging from 4 nm up to 100 nm. Ceramic membranes have been fabricated with catalytic nanoparticles for synergistic effects on the membrane performance. Breakthrough effects that have been reported in the field of water and wastewater treatment include fouling mitigation, improvement of permeate quality and flux enhancement. Nanomaterials that have been used include titania, alumina, silica, silver and many others. This paper reviews the role of engineered nanomaterials in (pressure driven) membrane technology for water treatment, to be applied in drinking water production and wastewater recycling. Benefits and drawbacks are described, which should be taken into account in further studies on potential risks related to release of nanoparticles into the environment. - Nanoparticles show a great potential for application in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures, in view of fouling mitigation and catalytic breakdown processes.

  20. The use of nanoparticles in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures: Review of manufacturing procedures and performance improvement for water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Membrane separations are powerful tools for various applications, including wastewater treatment and the removal of contaminants from drinking water. The performance of membranes is mainly limited by material properties. Recently, successful attempts have been made to add nanoparticles or nanotubes to polymers in membrane synthesis, with particle sizes ranging from 4 nm up to 100 nm. Ceramic membranes have been fabricated with catalytic nanoparticles for synergistic effects on the membrane performance. Breakthrough effects that have been reported in the field of water and wastewater treatment include fouling mitigation, improvement of permeate quality and flux enhancement. Nanomaterials that have been used include titania, alumina, silica, silver and many others. This paper reviews the role of engineered nanomaterials in (pressure driven) membrane technology for water treatment, to be applied in drinking water production and wastewater recycling. Benefits and drawbacks are described, which should be taken into account in further studies on potential risks related to release of nanoparticles into the environment. - Nanoparticles show a great potential for application in polymeric and ceramic membrane structures, in view of fouling mitigation and catalytic breakdown processes.

  1. Host defence against disseminated and invasive candida albicans infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is the primary etiologic agent of disseminated and invasive candidiasis. The incidence of disseminated and invasive candidiasis has paralleled the use of modern medical procedures that adversely affect the immune system, and highlights the difficulty of treating

  2. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum in an adolescent with a history of a median sternotomy as an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Huckaby

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The report by Nuss et al., in 1998 of their 10-year experience with minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum introduced the possibility of a less invasive approach for the correction of chest wall abnormalities. This procedure is now well-accepted around the world, although serious complications such as intraoperative cardiac perforation and postoperative bar displacement have been reported. The Nuss procedure has been performed concurrently with sternotomy for cardiac operations. However, there have been no reports of minimally invasive pectus excavatum correction in a child with a remote history of a median sternotomy. With IRB approval (Protocol #1308002283 we report the successful completion of a Nuss procedure in an adolescent with a history of a median sternotomy in infancy. During the procedure, thoracoscopy on the right side revealed significant adhesions of the lung and pericardium to the posterior sternum. Additional trocars were placed bilaterally to facilitate visualization and to allow for lysis of the adhesions with bipolar cautery. Passage of the bar was accomplished uneventfully and the patient has an excellent cosmetic outcome 28 months following the operation. We believe that a previous median sternotomy should not be viewed as a contraindication to the minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum.

  3. Workshop on spent fuel performance, radionuclide chemistry and geosphere transport parameters, Lidingoe 2008: Overview and evaluation of recent SKB procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, Guenther; Stenhouse, Mike; Brown, Paul; Ekberg, Christian; Jegou, Christophe; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-08-01

    The safety assessment for disposal of spent nuclear fuel canister in the Swedish bedrock should thoroughly address the time period after a containment failure. Such a failure could be expected as a result of corrosion damage or mechanical failure due to rock movement. This report mainly covers some issues connected to parameters used for radionuclide transport calculations in the areas of spent fuel performance (for fuel in contact with groundwater), radionuclide chemistry, and sorption and geosphere transport parameters. Some examples of topics that are elaborated in some detail include statistical treatment of measurement data (for sorption measurements), handling of uncertainties in speciation calculations, use of triangular distributions in safety assessment and physical processes in connection with spent fuel aging. The results emerged from discussions among international experts at a workshop in May 2008. The purpose of this work is providing an overview of ongoing work within the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), to provide ideas and suggestions for methodology development and to develop review capability within the SSM. The authors conclude that SKB's treatment of uncertainty in speciation calculations has improved, but that additional efforts in the area of error propagation are recommended. In efforts to condense the scope of utilised thermodynamic databases, the authors recommend that exclusion criteria should be explicitly stated. In the area of sorption, there is a need for more thorough analysis of errors in order to establish uncertainty ranges. The most essential improvements concern dose-limiting nuclides (e.g. Ra-226). Triangular distributions are often featured in SKB safety assessment, but it is not clear that the use of such distributions is based on a firm understanding of its properties. Regarding fuel performance, while safety assessment parameters are supported by measurement data there is still a need for better

  4. Workshop on spent fuel performance, radionuclide chemistry and geosphere transport parameters, Lidingoe 2008: Overview and evaluation of recent SKB procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinrath, Guenther; Stenhouse, Mike; Brown, Paul; Ekberg, Christian; Jegou, Christophe; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-08-15

    The safety assessment for disposal of spent nuclear fuel canister in the Swedish bedrock should thoroughly address the time period after a containment failure. Such a failure could be expected as a result of corrosion damage or mechanical failure due to rock movement. This report mainly covers some issues connected to parameters used for radionuclide transport calculations in the areas of spent fuel performance (for fuel in contact with groundwater), radionuclide chemistry, and sorption and geosphere transport parameters. Some examples of topics that are elaborated in some detail include statistical treatment of measurement data (for sorption measurements), handling of uncertainties in speciation calculations, use of triangular distributions in safety assessment and physical processes in connection with spent fuel aging. The results emerged from discussions among international experts at a workshop in May 2008. The purpose of this work is providing an overview of ongoing work within the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), to provide ideas and suggestions for methodology development and to develop review capability within the SSM. The authors conclude that SKB's treatment of uncertainty in speciation calculations has improved, but that additional efforts in the area of error propagation are recommended. In efforts to condense the scope of utilised thermodynamic databases, the authors recommend that exclusion criteria should be explicitly stated. In the area of sorption, there is a need for more thorough analysis of errors in order to establish uncertainty ranges. The most essential improvements concern dose-limiting nuclides (e.g. Ra-226). Triangular distributions are often featured in SKB safety assessment, but it is not clear that the use of such distributions is based on a firm understanding of its properties. Regarding fuel performance, while safety assessment parameters are supported by measurement data there is still a need for better

  5. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  6. Comparison of two extraction procedures for determination of drugs of abuse in human saliva by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, P; Morales, L; Vázquez, C; Lago, M; Bermejo, A M

    2008-11-01

    High performance liquid chromatography in combination with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was used to determine morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, methadone and 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3,-diphenylpyrrolidine in human saliva. For comparison, samples were prepared by either liquid-liquid extraction in Toxitubes A or microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), by mixing 1 ml of saliva with 10 ml of chloroform and operating at 100 degrees C for 10 min. Acetonitrile and 0.02 m phosphate buffer at pH 6.5 were used as mobile phase in HPLC in gradient mode. The detector response was linear over the drug concentration range of 0.05-2.0 microg ml(-1) in human saliva. The analytical method was validated by determining its precision and accuracy (n = 5), which were lower than 5% as relative standard deviation and 6% as relative error. Limits of detection ranged from 10 to 35 ng ml(-1); mean recoveries of drugs were from 53 to 95% with Toxitubes A and from 83 to 100% with MAE at two different concentrations (0.1 and 1.0 microg ml(-1)). The proposed method was applied to 24 saliva samples from individuals poisoned with opiates and/or cocaine.

  7. A prospective clinical trial to compare the performance of dried blood spots prenatal screening for Down's syndrome with conventional non-invasive testing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiying; Jiang, Yulin; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Shanying; Hao, Na; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Xiaojin; Ma, Liangkun

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate, side by side, the efficiency of dried blood spots (DBSs) against serum screening for Down's syndrome, and then, to construct a two-tier strategy by topping up the fetal cell-free DNA (cfDNA) secondary screening over the high-risk women marked by the primary blood testing to build a practical screening tactic to identify fetal Down's syndrome. One thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven low-risk Chinese women, with singleton pregnancy, were enrolled for the study. Alpha-fetoprotein and free beta human chorionic gonadotropin were measured for the serum as well as for the parallel DBS samples. Partial high-risk pregnant women identified by primary blood testing (n = 38) were also subject to the secondary cfDNA screening. Diagnostic amniocentesis was utilized to confirm the screening results. The true positive rate for Down's syndrome detection was 100% for both blood screening methods; however, the false-positive rate was 3.0% for DBS and 4.0% for serum screening, respectively. DBS correlated well with serum screening on Down's syndrome detection. Three out of 38 primary high-risk women displayed chromosomal abnormalities by cfDNA analysis, which were confirmed by amniocentesis. Either the true detection rate or the false-positive rate for Down's syndrome between DBS and the serum test is comparable. In addition, blood primary screening aligned with secondary cfDNA analysis, a "before and after" two-tier screening strategy, can massively decrease the false-positive rate, which, then, dramatically reduces the demand for invasive diagnostic operation. Impact statement Children born with Down's syndrome display a wide range of mental and physical disability. Currently, there is no effective treatment to ease the burden and anxiety of the Down's syndrome family and the surrounding society. This study is to evaluate the efficiency of dried blood spots against serum screening for Down's syndrome and to construct a two-tier strategy by topping up the fetal

  8. Can evaluation of a dental procedure at the outset of learning predict later performance at the preclinical level? A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Polyzois, Ioannis

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of conventional pre-clinical training in dentistry and to determine if evaluation of a dental procedure at the beginning of dental training can be a predictor for future performance. A group of second year dental students with no previous experience in operative dentistry were asked to prepare a conventional class I cavity on a lower first molar typodont. Their first preparation was carried out after an introductory lecture and a demonstration and their second at the end of conventional training. The prepared typodonts were coded and blindly scored for the traditional assessment criteria of outline form, retention form, smoothness, cavity depth and cavity margin angulation. Once the codes were broken, a paired t-test was used to compare the difference between the means of before and after scores (P<0.0001) and a Pearson\\'s linear correlation to test the association (r=0.4). From the results of this study, we could conclude that conventional preclinical training results in a significant improvement in the manual skills of the dental students and that the dental procedure used had only a limited predictive value for later performance at the preclinical level.

  9. Resection of large invasive pituitary adenomas with individualized approach under neuronavigator guidance:a report of 17 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-min CHENG; Jian-wen GU; Yong-qin KUANG; Wei-qi HE; Xue-min XING; Hai-dong HUANG; Yuan MA; Xun XIA; Tao YANG; Xiu-zhong ZHANG; Lin CHENG; Fan-jun ZENG

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the operative method and therapeutic efficacy of surgical resection of large invasive pituitary adenomas with individualized approach under neuronavigator guidance.Methods Seventeen patients(10 males and 7 females,aged from 22 to 78 years with a mean of 39.2±9.2 years) suffering from large invasive pituitary adenoma of higher than Hardy IV grade hospitalized from 2004 to 2009 were involved in the present study.All procedures were performed with the assistance of neuronavi...

  10. Upside-down stomach – results of mini-invasive surgical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cestmir Neoral

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The authors evaluate the results of mini-invasive therapy in patients diagnosed with upside-down stomach. Material and methods: From 1998 to 2008, a total of 27 patients diagnosed with upside-down stomach were surgicallytreated at the 1st Department of Surgery, University Hospital Olomouc. Before the operation, patients wereexamined endoscopically and a barium swallow was performed. In all 27 patients (100%, the operation was performedelectively laparoscopically. The principle of the operation in all cases was reposition of the stomach into theabdominal cavity, resection of the hernial sac and hiatoplasty. In addition, in 15 patients (56% with reflux symptomsor endoscopic findings of reflux oesophagitis, fundoplication in Nissen’s modification was also performed. Fundopexywas indicated in 12 patients (44%. Results: In all patients (100%, the operation was performed mini-invasively; conversion to an open procedure wasnever necessary. In 3 cases (11%, the left pleural cavity was opened during the operation; this was treated by introducinga chest drain. The operation mortality in the patient set was zero; morbidity was 11%. A year after the operation,patients were re-examined, and follow-up endoscopy and barium swallow were performed. Conclusions: In all patients diagnosed with upside-down stomach, surgical treatment is indicated due to the risk ofdeveloping severe complications. Mini-invasive surgical therapy in the hands of an experienced surgeon is a safe procedurewhich offers patients all the benefits of mini-invasive therapy with promising short- and long-term results.

  11. Scope of physician procedures independently billed by mid-level providers in the office setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldiron, Brett; Ratnarathorn, Mondhipa

    2014-11-01

    Mid-level providers (nurse practitioners and physician assistants) were originally envisioned to provide primary care services in underserved areas. This study details the current scope of independent procedural billing to Medicare of difficult, invasive, and surgical procedures by medical mid-level providers. To understand the scope of independent billing to Medicare for procedures performed by mid-level providers in an outpatient office setting for a calendar year. Analyses of the 2012 Medicare Physician/Supplier Procedure Summary Master File, which reflects fee-for-service claims that were paid by Medicare, for Current Procedural Terminology procedures independently billed by mid-level providers. Outpatient office setting among health care providers. The scope of independent billing to Medicare for procedures performed by mid-level providers. In 2012, nurse practitioners and physician assistants billed independently for more than 4 million procedures at our cutoff of 5000 paid claims per procedure. Most (54.8%) of these procedures were performed in the specialty area of dermatology. The findings of this study are relevant to safety and quality of care. Recently, the shortage of primary care clinicians has prompted discussion of widening the scope of practice for mid-level providers. It would be prudent to temper widening the scope of practice of mid-level providers by recognizing that mid-level providers are not solely limited to primary care, and may involve procedures for which they may not have formal training.

  12. Quantization Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J. A.; Martin, R.

    1976-01-01

    We present in this work a review of the conventional quantization procedure, the proposed by I.E. Segal and a new quantization procedure similar to this one for use in non linear problems. We apply this quantization procedures to different potentials and we obtain the appropriate equations of motion. It is shown that for the linear case the three procedures exposed are equivalent but for the non linear cases we obtain different equations of motion and different energy spectra. (Author) 16 refs

  13. Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: One Year Clinical and Radiographic Results Following Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kube, Richard A; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Recalcitrant sacroiliac joint pain responds well to minimally-invasive surgical (MIS) techniques, although long-term radiographic and fusion data are limited. To evaluate the one-year clinical results from a cohort of patients with chronic sacroiliac (SI) joint pain unresponsive to conservative therapies who have undergone minimally invasive SI joint fusion. SI joint fusion was performed between May 2011 and January 2014. Outcomes included radiographic assessment of fusion status, leg and back pain severity via visual analog scale (VAS), disability via Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and complication rate. Outcomes were measured at baseline and at follow-up appointments 6 months and 12 months post-procedure. Twenty minimally invasive SI joint fusion procedures were performed on 18 patients (mean age: 47.2 (14.2), mean BMI: 29.4 (5.3), 56% female). At 12 months, the overall fusion rate was 88%. Back and leg pain improved from 81.7 to 44.1 points (p<0.001) and from 63.6 to 27.7 points (p=0.001), respectively. Disability scores improved from 61.0 to 40.5 (p=0.009). Despite a cohort containing patients with multiple comorbidities and work-related injuries, eight patients (50%) achieved the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in back pain at 12 months, with 9 (69%) patients realizing this improvement in leg pain and 8 (57%) realizing the MCID in ODI scores at 12 months. No major complications were reported. Minimally invasive SI joint surgery is a safe and effective procedure, with a high fusion rate, a satisfactory safety profile and significant improvements in pain severity and disability reported through 12 months post-procedure.

  14. Performance of the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II: a meta-analysis of 22 studies involving 145,592 cardiac surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Pietro; Mastro, Florinda; Scrascia, Giuseppe; Whitlock, Richard; Paparella, Domenico

    2014-12-01

    A systematic review of the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (euroSCORE) II performance for prediction of operative mortality after cardiac surgery has not been performed. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies based on the predictive accuracy of the euroSCORE II. We searched the Embase and PubMed databases for all English-only articles reporting performance characteristics of the euroSCORE II. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, the observed/expected mortality ratio, and observed-expected mortality difference with their 95% confidence intervals were analyzed. Twenty-two articles were selected, including 145,592 procedures. Operative mortality occurred in 4293 (2.95%), whereas the expected events according to euroSCORE II were 4802 (3.30%). Meta-analysis of these studies provided an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.792 (95% confidence interval, 0.773-0.811), an estimated observed/expected ratio of 1.019 (95% confidence interval, 0.899-1.139), and observed-expected difference of 0.125 (95% confidence interval, -0.269 to 0.519). Statistical heterogeneity was detected among retrospective studies including less recent procedures. Subgroups analysis confirmed the robustness of combined estimates for isolated valve procedures and those combined with revascularization surgery. A significant overestimation of the euroSCORE II with an observed/expected ratio of 0.829 (95% confidence interval, 0.677-0.982) was observed in isolated coronary artery bypass grafting and a slight underestimation of predictions in high-risk patients (observed/expected ratio 1.253 and observed-expected difference 1.859). Despite the heterogeneity, the results from this meta-analysis show a good overall performance of the euroSCORE II in terms of discrimination and accuracy of model predictions for operative mortality. Validation of the euroSCORE II in prospective populations needs to be further studied for a continuous

  15. Augmented reality-assisted bypass surgery: embracing minimal invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Bijlenga, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The overlay of virtual images on the surgical field, defined as augmented reality, has been used for image guidance during various neurosurgical procedures. Although this technology could conceivably address certain inherent problems of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures, this potential has not been explored to date. We evaluate the usefulness of an augmented reality-based setup, which could help in harvesting donor vessels through their precise localization in real-time, in performing tailored craniotomies, and in identifying preoperatively selected recipient vessels for the purpose of anastomosis. Our method was applied to 3 patients with Moya-Moya disease who underwent superficial temporal artery-to-middle cerebral artery anastomoses and 1 patient who underwent an occipital artery-to-posteroinferior cerebellar artery bypass because of a dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery. Patients' heads, skulls, and extracranial and intracranial vessels were segmented preoperatively from 3-dimensional image data sets (3-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, angio-magnetic resonance imaging, angio-computed tomography), and injected intraoperatively into the operating microscope's eyepiece for image guidance. In each case, the described setup helped in precisely localizing donor and recipient vessels and in tailoring craniotomies to the injected images. The presented system based on augmented reality can optimize the workflow of extracranial-to-intracranial bypass procedures by providing essential anatomical information, entirely integrated to the surgical field, and help to perform minimally invasive procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lower rate of invasive revascularisation after coronary angiography, following acute coronary syndrome, the longer distance you live from an invasive centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Anders; Galatius, Søren; Madsen, Mette

    guidelines for the treatment of ACS. There are 5 tertiary invasive centres performing CAG, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 8 hospitals with diagnostic units performing CAG only, and a further 36 hospitals without these facilities receiving patients...... in tertiles according to distance to centre. From the Danish Heart Registry procedures (CAG, PCI and CABG) were identified along with information on the result of CAG. A Cox proportional-hazard models with revascularisation as outcome was used to estimate the difference related to distance within 60 days...

  17. Invasiveness as a barrier to self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Malchoff, Carl; Abbott, Gina

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated the degree to which the invasive characteristic of glucose monitoring is a barrier to self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). A paper-and-pencil Measure of Invasiveness as a reason for Skipping SMBG (MISS) was created and administered to 339 people with diabetes. The correlations between MISS scores and actual SMBG frequency, percent adherence to SMBG recommendations, SMBG anxiety, SMBG burden, and knowledge of the importance of glycemic control for avoiding diabetes complications were each explored. On a scale of 0-28, the average MISS score was M = 4.3 (SD = 5.4, range 0-28). Fully 63% (nearly two-thirds) of respondents reported skipping SMBG because of the invasiveness of the procedure. MISS scores were negatively related to percent adherence to healthcare provider SMBG recommendations as measured by memory function of automated meters (Spearman's r= -0.47, P diabetes vascular complications. Invasiveness is a common and serious barrier to SMBG. These findings suggest that people with diabetes would perform SMBG more frequently and have improved quality of life with non-invasive SMBG.

  18. Deeply invasive candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Rex, J.H.; Bennett, J.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of invasive candidiasis is on the rise because of increasing numbers of immunocompromised hosts and more invasive medical technology. Recovery of Candida spp from several body sites in a critically ill or immunocompromised patient should raise the question of disseminated disease.

  19. Cryptic invasions: a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morais, Pedro Miguel; Reichard, Martin

    613-614, February (2018), s. 1438-1448 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-05872S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Conspecific invader * Biological invasions * Bibliometric * Invasiveness Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  20. Factors influencing plant invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette Ortega; Dean Pearson

    2009-01-01

    Invasiveness of spotted knapweed and biological control agents. Dean and Yvette are examining the influence of drought on the invasiveness of spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa) and its susceptibility to herbivory by biological control agents. In collaboration with the University of Montana and Forest Health Protection, researchers have constructed 150...

  1. The Feasibility of Real-Time Intraoperative Performance Assessment With SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning): Early Experience From a Multi-institutional Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnen, Jordan D; George, Brian C; Williams, Reed G; Schuller, Mary C; DaRosa, Debra A; Torbeck, Laura; Mullen, John T; Meyerson, Shari L; Auyang, Edward D; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Choi, Jennifer N; Choti, Michael A; Endean, Eric D; Foley, Eugene F; Mandell, Samuel P; Meier, Andreas H; Smink, Douglas S; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul E; Soper, Nathaniel J; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Lillemoe, Keith D; Dunnington, Gary L; Fryer, Jonathan P

    Intraoperative performance assessment of residents is of growing interest to trainees, faculty, and accreditors. Current approaches to collect such assessments are limited by low participation rates and long delays between procedure and evaluation. We deployed an innovative, smartphone-based tool, SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning), to make real-time intraoperative performance assessment feasible for every case in which surgical trainees participate, and hypothesized that SIMPL could be feasibly integrated into surgical training programs. Between September 1, 2015 and February 29, 2016, 15 U.S. general surgery residency programs were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved trial. SIMPL was made available after 70% of faculty and residents completed a 1-hour training session. Descriptive and univariate statistics analyzed multiple dimensions of feasibility, including training rates, volume of assessments, response rates/times, and dictation rates. The 20 most active residents and attendings were evaluated in greater detail. A total of 90% of eligible users (1267/1412) completed training. Further, 13/15 programs began using SIMPL. Totally, 6024 assessments were completed by 254 categorical general surgery residents (n = 3555 assessments) and 259 attendings (n = 2469 assessments), and 3762 unique operations were assessed. There was significant heterogeneity in participation within and between programs. Mean percentage (range) of users who completed ≥1, 5, and 20 assessments were 62% (21%-96%), 34% (5%-75%), and 10% (0%-32%) across all programs, and 96%, 75%, and 32% in the most active program. Overall, response rate was 70%, dictation rate was 24%, and mean response time was 12 hours. Assessments increased from 357 (September 2015) to 1146 (February 2016). The 20 most active residents each received mean 46 assessments by 10 attendings for 20 different procedures. SIMPL can be feasibly integrated into surgical training programs

  2. Alien invasive birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, B; Vangeluwe, D; van den Berg, T

    2010-08-01

    A bird species is regarded as alien invasive if it has been introduced, intentionally or accidentally, to a location where it did not previously occur naturally, becomes capable of establishing a breeding population without further intervention by humans, spreads and becomes a pest affecting the environment, the local biodiversity, the economy and/or society, including human health. European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) and Red-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer) have been included on the list of '100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species', a subset of the Global Invasive Species Database. The 'Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe' project has selected Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri) and Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) as among 100 of the worst invasive species in Europe. For each of these alien bird species, the geographic range (native and introduced range), the introduction pathway, the general impacts and the management methods are presented.

  3. THE INTERVENING EFFECTS OF PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS AND INTERPERSONAL TRUST ON THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MULTIPLE MEASURES-BASED PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MANAGERS' JOB SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Sholihin

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Criticisms directed at the use of financial measures alone for performance evaluation have led to much interest in the use of nonfinancial performance measures to balance the financial measures. Hence, much recent research has been directed to investigate the effectiveness sand behavioral consequences of a mix of financial and nonfinancial measures (e.g. the Balanced Scorecard approach in contemporary settings. However, there is evidence from prior studies to suggest that the manner or how performance measures are used may affect the subordinates' behavior and work-related attitudes indirectly through the subordinates' perception of the justness of these measures and the interpersonal trust these measures promote. There is also evidence to indicate that it is the extent of the subordinates' agreement with the performance measures used in the evaluation, rather than the measures per se, which affects their behavior and work-related attitudes. Subordinates are more likely to agree with performance measures which they regard as fair and which enhance their trust in their superiors. This study therefore investigates if the effects of a mix of financial and nonfinancial measures (such as those used in the Balanced Scorecard approach on subordinates' job satisfaction are indirect through the subordinates' perception of the greater extent of fairness (justness in the evaluation process and the greater extent of trust such a mix of measures promotes. The results, based on a sample of 70 managers, support the expectation that a mix of financial and nonfinancial has no direct effect on subordinates’ job satisfaction. Instead, the effects of such a mix of performance measures on subordinates’ job satisfaction are indirect through the enhancement of the subordinates’ favorable perceptions of procedural fairness and interpersonal trust.

  4. An efficient preparative procedure for main flavonoids from the peel of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim. using polyamide resin followed by semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aifeng; Sun, Ailing; Liu, Renmin; Zhang, Yongqing; Cui, Jichun

    2014-08-15

    In this study, a simple and efficient preparative procedure was developed for preparation of seven flavonoids from the peel of Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim. using polyamide resin followed by semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography (SPHPLC). First, the ethyl acetate fraction from the peel of T. kirilowii Maxim. obtained "prefractionation" using polyamide resin, which yielded two subfractions. And then the two subfractions were isolated by SPHPLC with an isocratic elution of methanol-water. Finally, seven known flavonoids were purified from 35 g of ethyl acetate extract including quercetin-3-O-[α-l-rhamnose (1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl]-5-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (19 mg), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (24 mg), apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (10mg), diosmetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (45 mg), luteolin (21 mg), apigenin (15 mg), and diosmetin (56 mg). The purities of the compounds were determined by HPLC and the chemical structures were confirmed by UV and NMR analysis. In the present study, a simple, effective, and rapid procedure was established for preparative separation of multiple components from the peel of T. kirilowii Maxim. Furthermore, it was scalable and economical, so it was a promising basis for large-scale preparation of flavonoids from other plant extracts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Comparative Performance in Single-Port Versus Multiport Minimally Invasive Surgery, and Small Versus Large Operative Working Spaces: A Preclinical Randomized Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Seneci, Carlo A; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P; Nandi, Dipankar; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2016-04-01

    Surgical approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery, which utilize small operative working spaces, and are necessarily single-port, are particularly demanding with standard instruments and have not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare simultaneously surgical performance in single-port versus multiport approaches, and small versus large working spaces. Ten novice, 4 intermediate, and 1 expert surgeons were recruited from a university hospital. A preclinical randomized crossover study design was implemented, comparing performance under the following conditions: (1) multiport approach and large working space, (2) multiport approach and intermediate working space, (3) single-port approach and large working space, (4) single-port approach and intermediate working space, and (5) single-port approach and small working space. In each case, participants performed a peg transfer and pattern cutting tasks, and each task repetition was scored. Intermediate and expert surgeons performed significantly better than novices in all conditions (P Performance in single-port surgery was significantly worse than multiport surgery (P performance in the intermediate versus large working space. In single-port surgery, there was a converse trend; performances in the intermediate and small working spaces were significantly better than in the large working space. Single-port approaches were significantly more technically challenging than multiport approaches, possibly reflecting loss of instrument triangulation. Surprisingly, in single-port approaches, in which triangulation was no longer a factor, performance in large working spaces was worse than in intermediate and small working spaces. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Skill qualifications in pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaka, Tadashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Nio, Masaki; Segawa, Osamu; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Terakura, Hirotsugu; Take, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryuichiro; Yagi, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    In 2006, The Japanese Society of Pediatric Endoscopic Surgeons devised a plan to develop a pediatric endoscopic surgical skill qualification (ESSQ) system. This system is controlled by The Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery. The standard requirement for skills qualification is the ability of each applicant to complete common types of laparoscopic surgery. The main goal of the system is to decrease complications of laparoscopic surgery by evaluating the surgical skills of each applicant and subsequently certify surgeons with adequate skills to perform laparoscopic operations safely. A committee of pediatric ESSQ created a checklist to assess the applicant's laparoscopic surgical skills. Skills are assessed in a double-blinded fashion by evaluating an unedited video recording of a fundoplication for pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. The initial pediatric ESSQ system was started in 2008. In 2008 and 2009, respectively, 9 out of 17 (53%) and 6 out of 12 (50%) applicants were certified as expert pediatric laparoscopic surgeons. Our ultimate goal is to provide safe and appropriate pediatric minimally invasive procedures and to avoid severe complications. To prove the predictive validity of this system, a survey of the outcomes of operations performed by certified pediatric surgeons is required.

  7. [Minimally invasive coronary artery surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaquett, R; Howard, M; Irarrázaval, M J; Morán, S; Maturana, G; Becker, P; Medel, J; Sacco, C; Lema, G; Canessa, R; Cruz, F

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing interest to perform a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) on a beating heart through a minimally invasive access to the chest cavity. To report the experience with minimally invasive coronary artery surgery. Analysis of 11 patients aged 48 to 79 years old with single vessel disease that, between 1996 and 1997, had a LIMA graft to the LAD performed through a minimally invasive left anterior mediastinotomy, without cardiopulmonary bypass. A 6 to 10 cm left parasternal incision was done. The LIMA to the LAD anastomosis was done after pharmacological heart rate and blood pressure control and a period of ischemic pre conditioning. Graft patency was confirmed intraoperatively by standard Doppler techniques. Patients were followed for a mean of 11.6 months (7-15 months). All patients were extubated in the operating room and transferred out of the intensive care unit on the next morning. Seven patients were discharged on the third postoperative day. Duplex scanning confirmed graft patency in all patients before discharge; in two patients, it was confirmed additionally by arteriography. There was no hospital mortality, no perioperative myocardial infarction and no bleeding problems. After follow up, ten patients were free of angina, in functional class I and pleased with the surgical and cosmetic results. One patient developed atypical angina on the seventh postoperative month and a selective arteriography confirmed stenosis of the anastomosis. A successful angioplasty of the original LAD lesion was carried out. A minimally invasive left anterior mediastinotomy is a good surgical access to perform a successful LIMA to LAD graft without cardiopulmonary bypass, allowing a shorter hospital stay and earlier postoperative recovery. However, a larger experience and a longer follow up is required to define its role in the treatment of coronary artery disease.

  8. Transplant tourism and invasive fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Al Salmi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deceased and live-related renal transplants (RTXs are approved procedures that are performed widely throughout the world. In certain regions, commercial RTX has become popular, driven by financial greed. Methods: This retrospective, descriptive study was performed at the Royal Hospital from 2013 to 2015. Data were collected from the national kidney transplant registry of Oman. All transplant cases retrieved were divided into two groups: live-related RTX performed in Oman and commercial-unrelated RTX performed abroad. These groups were then divided again into those with and without evidence of fungal infection, either in the wound or renal graft. Results: A total of 198 RTX patients were identified, of whom 162 (81.8% had undergone a commercial RTX that was done abroad. Invasive fungal infections (IFIs were diagnosed in 8% of patients who had undergone a commercial RTX; of these patients, 76.9% underwent a nephrectomy and 23.1% continued with a functioning graft. None of the patients with RTXs performed at the Royal Hospital contracted an IFI. The most common fungal isolates were Aspergillus species (including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, and Aspergillus nigricans, followed by Zygomycetes. However, there was no evidence of fungal infection including Aspergillus outside the graft site. Computed tomography (CT findings showed infarction of the graft, renal artery thrombosis, aneurysmal dilatation of the external iliac artery, fungal ball, or just the presence of a perigraft collection. Of the total patients with IFIs, 23.1% died due to septic shock and 53.8% were alive and on hemodialysis. The remaining 23.1% who did not undergo nephrectomy demonstrated acceptable graft function. Conclusions: This is the largest single-center study on commercial RTX reporting the highest number of patients with IFI acquired over a relatively short period of time. Aspergillus spp were the main culprit fungi, with no

  9. A novel, non-invasive diagnostic clinical procedure for the determination of an oxygenation status of chronic lower leg ulcers using peri-ulceral transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure measurements: results of its application in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnikol, Wolfgang K R; Pötzschke, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The basis for the new procedure is the simultaneous transcutaneous measurement of the peri-ulceral oxygen partial pressure (tcPO(2)), using a minimum of 4 electrodes which are placed as close to the wound margin as possible, additionally, as a challenge the patient inhales pure oxygen for approximately 15 minutes. In order to evaluate the measurement data and to characterise the wounds, two new oxygen parameters were defined: (1) the oxygen characteristic (K-PO(2)), and (2) the oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of a chronic wound. The first of these is the arithmetic mean of the two lowest tcPO(2) measurement values, and the second is the variation coefficient of the four measurement values. Using the K-PO(2) parameter, a grading of wound hypoxia can be obtained. To begin with, the physiologically regulated (and still compensated) hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 35 and 40 mmHg is distinguished from the pathological decompensated hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 0 and 35 mmHg; the first of these still stimulates self-healing (within the limits of the oxygen balance). The decompensated hypoxia can be (arbitrarily) divided into "simple" hypoxia (Grade I), intense hypoxia (Grade II) and extreme hypoxia (Grade III), with the possibility of intermediate grades (I/II and II/III).Measurements were carried out using the new procedure on the skin of the right inner ankle of 21 healthy volunteers of various ages, and in 17 CVI (chronic venous insufficiency) wounds. Sixteen of the 17 CVI wounds (i.e., 94%) were found to be pathologically hypoxic, a state which was not found in any of the healthy volunteers. The oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of the individual chronic wounds increased exponentially as a function of the hypoxia grading (K-PO(2)), with a 10-fold increase with extreme hypoxia in contrast to a constant value of approximately 14% in the healthy volunteers. This pronounced oxygen inhomogeneity explains inhomogeneous wound healing, resulting in the so

  10. Effect of patient's age on the profitability of inpatient cardiac catheterization: a contribution margin analysis of frequently performed procedures over a 5-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plehn, Gunnar; Butz, Thomas; Maagh, Petra; Meissner, Axel

    2017-01-18

    Due to a continuing age shift in the German society hospital providers are concerned about the additional costs associated with the treatment of elderly patients. It is not clear if cardiac catheterization in aged patients leads to higher resource utilization and if DRG-revenues do compensate for this factor. Procedure-related and administrative data of all patients who underwent cardiac catheterization at a tertiary heart center between 2007 and 2011 were collected and analyzed. Then a profitability analysis was performed by comparing the case related variable costs with the Diagnosis-related group (DRG) per case revenues. A particular emphasis was placed on a comparative analysis of identical clusters of procedures. The most frequently performed catheterization procedure (n = 1800) was associated with significantly higher material expenditure in very old patients (178 ± 48 €) than in old (171 ± 28; p = 0.001) and young patients (172 ± 39; p = 0.046). Furthermore, radiation time and the length of hospital stay were increased in very old patients (3.5 ± 3.8 min and 6.2 ± 4.8 days) compared to old (2.7 ± 2.8 min and 4.6 ± 3.8 days; p < 0.001) and young patients (2.5 ± 2.5 min and 4.5 ± 3.9 days; p < 0.001). Due to higher DRG revenues very old patients achieved higher absolute contribution margins (2065 ± 1033 €) than old (1804 ± 1902 €; p < 0.001) and young patients (1771 ± 902 €; p < 0.001). However, the contribution margins per day were significantly smaller (440 ± 226 €) than those in old (488 ± 234 €; p = 0.001) and young patients (484 ± 206 €; p = 0.001). Catheterization of very old patients is related to lower contribution margins per day despite higher material and time expenditures. Since efforts to reduce the length of hospital stay of these patients are limited, this may result in a competitive disadvantage of hospitals which

  11. The 50 Most Cited Articles in Invasive Neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Max; Doran, Joseph; Paskhover, Boris; Mammis, Antonios

    2018-03-14

    Bibliometric analysis is a commonly used analytic tool for objective determination of the most influential and peer-recognized articles within a given field. This study is the first bibliometric analysis of the literature in the field of invasive neuromodulation, excluding deep brain stimulation. The objectives of this study are to identify the 50 most cited articles in invasive neuromodulation, provide an overview of the literature to assist in clinical education, and evaluate the effect of impact factor on manuscript recognition. Bibliometric analysis was performed using the Science Citation Index from the Institute for Scientific Information, accessed through the Web of Science. Search terms relevant to the field of invasive neuromodulation were used to identify the 50 most cited journal articles between 1900 and 2016. The median number of citations was 236 (range, 173-578). The most common topics among the articles were vagus nerve stimulation (n = 24), spinal cord stimulation (n = 9), and motor cortex stimulation (n = 6). Median journal impact factor was 5.57. Most of these articles (n = 19) contained level I, II, or III evidence. This analysis provides a brief look into the most cited articles within the field, many of which evaluated innovated procedures and therapies that helped to drive surgical neuromodulation forward. These landmark articles contain vital clinical and educational information that remains relevant to clinicians and students within the field and provide insight into areas of expanding research. Journal impact factor may play a significant role in determining the literary relevance and general awareness of invasive neuromodulation studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. From mini-invasive to non-invasive treatment using monopolar radiofrequency: the next orthopaedic frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Terry L

    2009-10-01

    Tendinopathy arises from a failed tendon healing process. Current non-invasive therapeutic alternatives are anti-inflammatory in nature, and outcomes are unpredictable. The benefit of invasive alternatives resides in the induction of the healing response. A new technology that uses non-invasive monopolar capacitive coupled radiofrequency has demonstrated the ability to raise temperatures in tendons and ligaments above 50 degrees C, the threshold for collagen modulation, tissue shrinkage and recruitment of macrophages, fibroblasts, and heat shock protein factors, without damaging the overlying structures, resulting in activation of the wound healing response. Monopolar capacitive-coupled radiofrequency offers a new non-invasive choice for tendinopathies and sprained ligaments. It does not interfere with subsequent surgical procedures should they become necessary.

  13. A new blind snake of the genus Letheobia (Serpentes: Typhlopidae) from Rwanda with redescriptions of L. gracilis (Sternfeld, 1910) and L. graueri (Sternfeld, 1912) and the introduction of a non-invasive preparation procedure for scanning electron microscopy in zoology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehling, J Maximilian; Hinkel, Harald H; Ensikat, Hans-jÜrgen; Babilon, Kenny; Fischer, Eberhard

    2018-02-11

    A new species of blind snake in the genus Letheobia is described from Akagera National Park in eastern Rwanda. The new species is most similar to species of the L. gracilis complex, particularly L. gracilis and L. graueri. It differs from all other species of the genus by a unique combination of morphological characters, including the highest number of middorsal scale rows (834) and the most extreme elongation (total-length/midbody-width ratio 131) of all species in the genus and of any species of snake in the world; 22-22-22 longitudinal scale rows; snout in dorsal profile rounded, in lateral profile bluntly rounded with an angular horizontal edge ventrally; rostral broad, posteriorly rounded; eyes invisible; supralabial imbrication pattern T-0; tail short (1.3 percent of total length) with an apical spine; and a pink life colouration. The holotype of the new species was collected in gallery forest at a lake shore surrounded by savanna at 1300 m elevation. We produced scanning electron microscope images of the heads of the investigated specimens applying a liquid-substitution preparation procedure which does not require coating or drying and thus does not irreversibly damage the investigated samples. The obtained images allow an easy and more accurate examination of the scalation.

  14. Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A. Ross

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study was to review the author’s large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases (n=1231 were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases. There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery.

  15. Minimally invasive redo mitral valve surgery without aortic crossclamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Rodrigo; Brofman, Paulo Roberto Slud; Oliveira, Sergio; Patrial Neto, Luiz; Rosa, Matheus; Lima, Victor Hugo; Binder, Luis Fernando; Sanches, Aline

    2013-01-01

    Reoperations of the mitral valve have a higher rate of complications when compared with the first surgery. With the field of video-assisted techniques for the first surgery of mitral valve became routine, reoperation cases began to arouse interest for this less invasive procedures. To assess the results and the technical difficulties in 10 patients undergoing minimally invasive redo mitral valve surgery. Cardiopulmonary bypass was installed through a cannula placed in the femoral vessels and right internal jugular vein, conducted in 28 degrees of temperature in ventricular fibrillation. A right lateral thoracotomy with 5 to 6 cm in the third or fourth intercostal space was done, pericardium was displaced only at the point of atriotomy. The aorta was not clamped. Ten patients with mean age of 56.9 ± 10.5 years, four were in atrial fibrilation rhythm and six in sinusal. Average time between first operation and reoperations was 11 ± 3.43 years. The mean EuroSCORE group was 8.3 ± 1.82. The mean ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary bypass was respectively 70.9 ± 17.66 min and 109.4 ± 25.37 min. The average length of stay was 7.6 ± 1.5 days. There were no deaths in this series. Mitral valve reoperation can be performed through less invasive techniques with good immediate results, low morbidity and mortality. However, this type of surgery requires a longer duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, especially in cases where the patient already has prosthesis. The presence of a minimal aortic insufficiency also makes this procedure technically more challenging.

  16. Myocardial Protection and Financial Considerations of Custodiol Cardioplegia in Minimally Invasive and Open Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Brian W; Buss, Randall W; DiGiorgi, Paul L; Laviano, Brittany N; Yaeger, Nalani A; Lucas, M Lee; Comas, George M

    Single-dose antegrade crystalloid cardioplegia with Custodiol-HTK (histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate) has been used for many years. Its safety and efficacy were established in experimental and clinical studies. It is beneficial in complex valve surgery because it provides a long period of myocardial protection with a single dose. Thus, valve procedures (minimally invasive or open) can be performed with limited interruption. The aim of this study is to compare the use of Custodiol-HTK cardioplegia with traditional blood cardioplegia in patients undergoing minimally invasive and open valve surgery. A single-institution, retrospective case-control review was performed on patients who underwent valve surgery in Lee Memorial Health System at either HealthPark Medical Center or Gulf Coast Medical Center from July 1, 2011, through March 7, 2015. A total of 181 valve cases (aortic or mitral) performed using Custodiol-HTK cardioplegia were compared with 181 cases performed with traditional blood cardioplegia. Each group had an equal distribution of minimally invasive and open valve cases. Right chest thoracotomy or partial sternotomy was performed on minimally invasive valve cases. Demographics, perioperative data, clinical outcomes, and financial data were collected and analyzed. Patient outcomes were superior in the Custodiol-HTK cardioplegia group for blood transfusion, stroke, and hospital readmission within 30 days (P < 0.05). No statistical differences were observed in the other outcomes categories. Hospital charges were reduced on average by $3013 per patient when using Custodiol-HTK cardioplegia. Use of Custodiol-HTK cardioplegia is safe and cost-effective when compared with traditional repetitive blood cardioplegia in patients undergoing minimally invasive and open valve surgery.

  17. Prenatal diagnostic procedures used in pregnancies with congenital malformations in 14 regions of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garne, E; Loane, M; de Vigan, C; Scarano, G; de Walle, H; Gillerot, Y; Stoll, C; Addor, MC; Stone, D; Gener, B; Feijoo, M; Mosquera-Tenreiro, C; Gatt, M; Queisser-Luft, A; Baena, N; Dolk, H

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate outcomes of ultrasound investigations (US) and invasive diagnostic procedures in cases of congenital malformations (CM), and to compare the use of invasive prenatal test techniques (amniocentesis (AC) versus chorionic villus sampling (CVS)) among European populations. Design

  18. Thermal Ablation of T1c Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comparative Assessment of Technical Performance, Procedural Outcome, and Safety of Microwave Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation, and Cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Arellano, Ronald S

    2018-04-06

    To evaluate perioperative outcomes of thermal ablation with microwave (MW), radiofrequency (RF), and cryoablation for stage T1c renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A retrospective analysis of 384 patients (mean age, 71 y; range, 22-88 y) was performed between October 2006 and October 2016. Mean radius, exophytic/endophytic, nearness to collecting system or sinus, anterior/posterior, and location relative to polar lines; preoperative aspects and dimensions used for anatomic classification; and centrality index scores were 6.3, 7.9, and 2.7, respectively. Assessment of pre- and postablation serum blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate was performed to assess functional outcomes. Linear regression analyses were performed to compare sedation medication dosages among the three treatment cohorts. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to compare rates of residual disease and complications among treatment modalities. A total of 437 clinical stage T1N0M0 biopsy-proven RCCs measuring 1.2-6.9 cm were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided MW ablation (n = 44; 10%), RF ablation (n = 347; 79%), or cryoablation (n = 46; 11%). There were no significant differences in patient demographic or tumor characteristics among cohorts. Complication rates and immediate renal function changes were similar among the three ablation modalities (P = .46 and P = .08, respectively). MW ablation was associated with significantly decreased ablation time (P < .05), procedural time (P < .05), and dosage of sedative medication (P < .05) compared with RF ablation and cryoablation. CT-guided percutaneous MW ablation is comparable to RF ablation or cryoablation for the treatment of stage T1N0M0 RCC with regard to treatment response and is associated with shorter treatment times and less sedation than RF ablation or cryoablation. In addition, the safety profile of CT-guided MW ablation is noninferior to those of RF ablation or

  19. Interventional spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  20. Manual Control for Medical Instruments in Minimally Invasive Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, C.

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of new technologies, surgical procedures have been varying from free access in open surgery towards limited access in minimal invasive surgery. During such procedures, surgeons have to manoeuver the instruments from outside the patient while looking at the monitor. Long and

  1. Fluid challenge: tracking changes in cardiac output with blood pressure monitoring (invasive or non-invasive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Perrotin, Dominique; Wolff, Michel; Boulain, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    To assess whether invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (BP) monitoring allows the identification of patients who have responded to a fluid challenge, i.e., who have increased their cardiac output (CO). Patients with signs of circulatory failure were prospectively included. Before and after a fluid challenge, CO and the mean of four intra-arterial and oscillometric brachial cuff BP measurements were collected. Fluid responsiveness was defined by an increase in CO ≥10 or ≥15% in case of regular rhythm or arrhythmia, respectively. In 130 patients, the correlation between a fluid-induced increase in pulse pressure (Δ500mlPP) and fluid-induced increase in CO was weak and was similar for invasive and non-invasive measurements of BP: r² = 0.31 and r² = 0.29, respectively (both p area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.82 (0.74-0.88), similar (p = 0.80) to that of non-invasive Δ500mlPP [AUC of 0.81 (0.73-0.87)]. Outside large gray zones of inconclusive values (5-23% for invasive Δ500mlPP and 4-35% for non-invasive Δ500mlPP, involving 35 and 48% of patients, respectively), the detection of responsiveness or unresponsiveness to fluid was reliable. Cardiac arrhythmia did not impair the performance of invasive or non-invasive Δ500mlPP. Other BP-derived indices did not outperform Δ500mlPP. As evidenced by large gray zones, BP-derived indices poorly reflected fluid responsiveness. However, in our deeply sedated population, a high increase in invasive pulse pressure (>23%) or even in non-invasive pulse pressure (>35%) reliably detected a response to fluid. In the absence of a marked increase in pulse pressure (<4-5%), a response to fluid was unlikely.

  2. Invasive aspergillosis in near drowning nonneutropenic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munta, Kartik; Gopal, Palepu B N; Vigg, Ajit

    2015-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed people has been well documented, but to diagnose and treat in an immunocompetent individual after near drowning, it requires early suspicion and proper empirical treatment. We report a case diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis with systemic dissemination of the infection to the brain, gluteal muscles, and kidneys after a fall in a chemical tank of a paper manufacturing company. He was ventilated for acute respiratory distress syndrome and managed with antibiotics and vasopressors. Due to nonresolving pneumonia and positive serum galactomannan, trans-tracheal biopsy was performed which confirmed invasive aspergillosis and was treated with antifungals. With the availability of galactomannan assay and better radiological investigative modalities, occurrence of such invasive fungal infections in cases of drowning patients should be considered early in such patients and treated with appropriate antifungals.

  3. Impact of novel techniques on minimally invasive adrenal surgery: trends and outcomes from a contemporary international large series in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Nicola; Autorino, Riccardo; Lee, Hak; Porpiglia, Francesco; Sun, Yinghao; Greco, Francesco; Jeff Chueh, S; Han, Deok Hyun; Cindolo, Luca; Ferro, Matteo; Chen, Xiang; Branco, Anibal; Fornara, Paolo; Liao, Chun-Hou; Miyajima, Akira; Kyriazis, Iason; Puglisi, Marco; Fiori, Cristian; Yang, Bo; Fei, Guo; Altieri, Vincenzo; Jeong, Byong Chang; Berardinelli, Francesco; Schips, Luigi; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Chen, Zhi; Haber, Georges-Pascal; He, Yao; Oya, Mototsugu; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Brandao, Luis; Challacombe, Benjamin; Kaouk, Jihad; Darweesh, Ithaar

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate contemporary international trends in the implementation of minimally invasive adrenalectomy and to assess contemporary outcomes of different minimally invasive techniques performed at urologic centers worldwide. A retrospective multinational multicenter study of patients who underwent minimally invasive adrenalectomy from 2008 to 2013 at 14 urology institutions worldwide was included in the analysis. Cases were categorized based on the minimally invasive adrenalectomy technique: conventional laparoscopy (CL), robot-assisted laparoscopy (RAL), laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS), and mini-laparoscopy (ML). The rates of the four treatment modalities were determined according to the year of surgery, and a regression analysis was performed for trends in all surgical modalities. Overall, a total of 737 adrenalectomies were performed across participating institutions and included in this analysis: 337 CL (46 % of cases), 57 ML (8 %), 263 LESS (36 %), and 80 RA (11 %). Overall, 204 (28 %) operations were performed with a retroperitoneal approach. The overall number of adrenalectomies increased from 2008 to 2013 (p = 0.05). A transperitoneal approach was preferred in all but the ML group (p Asia and South America reported the highest rate in LESS procedures, and RAL was adopted to larger extent in the USA. LESS had the fastest increase in utilization at 6 %/year. The rate of RAL procedures increased at slower rates (2.2 %/year), similar to ML (1.7 %/year). Limitations of this study are the retrospective design and the lack of a cost analysis. Several minimally invasive surgical techniques for the management of adrenal masses are successfully implemented in urology institutions worldwide. CL and LESS seem to represent the most commonly adopted techniques, whereas ML and RAL are growing at a slower rate. All the MIS techniques can be safely and effectively performed for a variety of adrenal disease.

  4. Is medical perspective on clinical governance practices associated with clinical units’ performance and mortality? A cross-sectional study through a record-linkage procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Sarchielli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of the knowledge and application as well as perceived utility by doctors of clinical governance tools in order to explore their impact on clinical units’ performance measured through mortality rates and efficiency indicators. Methods: This research is a cross-sectional study with a deterministic record-linkage procedure. The sample includes n = 1250 doctors (n = 249 chiefs of clinical units; n = 1001 physicians working in six public hospitals located in the Emilia-Romagna Region in Italy. Survey instruments include a checklist and a research-made questionnaire which were used for data collection about doctors’ knowledge and application as well as perceived utility of clinical governance tools. The analysis was based on clinical units’ performance indicators which include patients’ mortality, extra-region active mobility rate, average hospital stay, bed occupancy, rotation and turnover rates, and the comparative performance index as efficiency indicators. Results: The clinical governance tools are known and applied differently in all the considered clinical units. Significant differences emerged between roles and organizational levels at which the medical leadership is carried out. The levels of knowledge and application of clinical governance practices are correlated with the clinical units’ efficiency indicators (bed occupancy rate, bed turnover interval, and extra-region mobility. These multiple linear regression analyses highlighted that the clinical governance knowledge and application is correlated with clinical units’ mortality rates (odds ratio, −8.677; 95% confidence interval, −16.654, −0.700. Conclusion: The knowledge and application, as well as perceived utility by medical professionals of clinical governance tools, are associated with the mortality rates of their units and with some efficiency indicators. However, the medical frontline staff seems to not consider homogeneously useful

  5. Factors of Influence on the Performance of a Short-Latency Non-Invasive Brain Switch: Evidence in Healthy Individuals and Implication for Motor Function Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren eXu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfacing (BCI has recently been applied as a rehabilitation approach for patients with motor disorders, such as stroke. In these closed-loop applications, a brain switch detects the motor intention from brain signals, e.g. scalp EEG, and triggers a neuroprosthetic device, either to deliver sensory feedback or to mimic real movements, thus re-establishing the compromised sensory-motor control loop and promoting neural plasticity. In this context, single trial detection of motor intention with short latency is a prerequisite. The performance of the event detection from EEG recordings is mainly determined by three factors: the type of motor imagery (e.g., repetitive, ballistic, the frequency band (or signal modality used for discrimination (e.g., alpha, beta, gamma, and MRCP, i.e. movement-related cortical potential, and the processing technique (e.g., time-series analysis, sub-band power estimation. In this study, we investigated single trial EEG traces during movement imagination on healthy individuals, and provided a comprehensive analysis of the performance of a short-latency brain switch when varying these three factors. The morphological investigation showed a cross-subject consistency of a prolonged negative phase in MRCP, and a delayed beta rebound in sensory-motor rhythms during repetitive tasks. The detection performance had the greatest accuracy when using ballistic MRCP with time-series analysis. In this case, the true positive rate was ~70% for a detection latency of ~200 ms. The results presented here are of practical relevance for designing BCI systems for motor function rehabilitation.

  6. Should total hip arthroplasty be performed acutely in the treatment of acetabular fractures in elderly or used as a salvage procedure only?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Hamlin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total hip arthroplasty (THA is now an increasingly common procedure for people sustaining acetabular fractures. The incidence of acetabular fractures among the elderly population is increasing, and contemporary treatment aims to avoid the risks of prolonged incumbency associated with poor bone stock for fixation or inability to comply with limited weightbearing in this patient group. The concept of acute hip arthroplasty as a treatment for acetabular fracture is, therefore, becoming more topical and relevant. Our systematic review investigates whether THAs for acetabular fractures should be performed acutely, with a short delay, or as a late procedure for posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA if it develops. Materials and Methods: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines were followed when undertaking this systematic review. Detailed searches were performed on three different databases, using keywords, such as “acetabular fracture,” “acetabular trauma,” “total hip arthroplasty,” “hip arthroplasty,” and “hip prosthesis.” Studies from 1975 to September 2016 were included in the study. All studies included in the review were independently critically appraised by two of the authors. Results: Forty three studies were included in this review. Only two of them actually compared acute and delayed THAs for acetabular fractures with the rest focusing on one or the other. Results were comparable between acute and late THAs in terms of aseptic loosening, operative time, blood loss, Harris Hip Score, and ability to mobilize postoperatively without aid. Complication rates, however, were much higher in the acute group. Conclusion: Evidence based on this topic is scarce and therefore we have to be cautious about drawing a definitive conclusion. The findings of this systematic review do suggest, however, that acute THAs should be considered in elderly patients, where fixation is not possible, or

  7. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...... operations were completed as mini-sternotomies, 4 died later of noncardiac causes. The aortic cross-clamp and perfusion times were significantly different across all groups (P replacement...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  8. Interoperative efficiency in minimally invasive surgery suites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Det, M J; Meijerink, W J H J; Hoff, C; Pierie, J P E N

    2009-10-01

    Performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in a conventional operating room (OR) requires additional specialized equipment otherwise stored outside the OR. Before the procedure, the OR team must collect, prepare, and connect the equipment, then take it away afterward. These extra tasks pose a thread to OR efficiency and may lengthen turnover times. The dedicated MIS suite has permanently installed laparoscopic equipment that is operational on demand. This study presents two experiments that quantify the superior efficiency of the MIS suite in the interoperative period. Preoperative setup and postoperative breakdown times in the conventional OR and the MIS suite in an experimental setting and in daily practice were analyzed. In the experimental setting, randomly chosen OR teams simulated the setup and breakdown for a standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and a complex laparoscopic sigmoid resection (LS). In the clinical setting, the interoperative period for 66 LCs randomly assigned to the conventional OR or the MIS suite were analyzed. In the experimental setting, the setup and breakdown times were significantly shorter in the MIS suite. The difference between the two types of OR increased for the complex procedure: 2:41 min for the LC (p < 0.001) and 10:47 min for the LS (p < 0.001). In the clinical setting, the setup and breakdown times as a whole were not reduced in the MIS suite. Laparoscopic setup and breakdown times were significantly shorter in the MIS suite (mean difference, 5:39 min; p < 0.001). Efficiency during the interoperative period is significantly improved in the MIS suite. The OR nurses' tasks are relieved, which may reduce mental and physical workload and improve job satisfaction and patient safety. Due to simultaneous tasks of other disciplines, an overall turnover time reduction could not be achieved.

  9. A new non-invasive and relocatable immobilization frame for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.; Tsokas, C.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A newly developed non-invasive immobilization frame for stereotactic radiotherapy is presented, which is intended to be used for both imaging (computed tomography (CT) and angiography) and radiotherapeutic procedures. Materials and methods: The frame is made of duraluminium so as to be stable and light and it has an elliptical shape. The immobilization is achieved using three stable locations on the patient's head, i.e. the upper dentition, the nose and the back of the neck. The fixation on the three locations ensures complete immobilization in all directions. Results: The immobilization frame can be fitted as many times as is needed to most heads. In order to assess the accuracy of relocation, repeated fittings on two volunteers and on 22 patients undergoing stereotactic treatment were performed (more than 200 mountings in total), which showed maximum anterior-posterior, inferior-superior and lateral reproducibility in positioning of less than 1 mm in all cases. Conclusions and discussion: The in-house-constructed stereotactic frame is simple to use, easily made, non-invasive, relocatable and well tolerated by the patients, providing the possibility of multiple fractions. The major advantage of using such a non-invasive stereotactic frame is the flexibility in timing the different diagnostic procedures (CT and angiography) as well as providing the possibility to extend the use to large brain lesions (treatment without an additional collimator) where a high precision is also required. It also offers significant labour and cost saving over the invasive frames and the majority of the non-invasive frames. To date, 22 patients with ages varying between 12 and 70 years have been treated using this method. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Minimally invasive splenectomy: an update and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamme, Gary; Birch, Daniel W.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) has become an established standard of care in the management of surgical diseases of the spleen. The present article is an update and review of current procedures and controversies regarding minimally invasive splenectomy. We review the indications and contraindications for LS as well as preoperative considerations. An individual assessment of the procedures and outcomes of multiport laparoscopic splenectomy, hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy, robotic splenectomy, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic splenectomy and single-port splenectomy is included. Furthermore, this review examines postoperative considerations after LS, including the postoperative course of uncomplicated patients, postoperative portal vein thrombosis, infections and malignancy. PMID:23883500

  11. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettlich, Bianca F

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) seems to have many benefits for human patients and is currently used for various minor and major spine procedures. For MISS, a change in access strategy to the target location is necessary and it requires intraoperative imaging, special instrumentation, and magnification. Few veterinary studies have evaluated MISS for canine patients for spinal decompression procedures. This article discusses the general requirements for MISS and how these can be applied to veterinary spinal surgery. The current veterinary MISS literature is reviewed and suggestions are made on how to apply MISS to different spinal locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thymoma and minimally invasive surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajc, T.; Spalek, P.; Lucenic, M.; Benej, R.; Harustiak, S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the current thymoma classification schemes, diagnosis and surgical treatment options. Many minimally invasive techniques do not provide sufficient extensiveness when compared to complete sternotomy. The Zieliński technique combines transcervical, subxiphoidal and bilateral thoracoscopic approach in a hybrid procedure (MMIT, maximal minimally invasive thymectomy) based on double sternal traction, and allows for removal of the thymus gland, the thymoma and all the relevant mediastinal adipose tissue, thus adhering to principles of oncological radicality. Of the 28 patients undergoing MMIT there were 7 with myasthenia associated thymoma (MGAT) and 5 with a thymoma and no myasthenia, tumors staged Masaoka I-II. Apart from one temporary recurrent nerve palsy there were no postoperative complications. The largest thymoma measured 70 x 65 x 55 mm. Adjuvant radiotherapy was applied in 5 patients. Ectopic thymic tissue was identified in 100 % of patients with thymoma and no myasthenia and in 42.9 % of MGAT patients. Until now there were no recurrences, however, the follow-up median is very short, the longest follow-up period being 30 months. MMIT is a safe technique suitable also for Masaoka I-II thymoma patients and for some specific cases with Masaoka III stage (lung parenchyma invasion). The authors approach all the anterior mediastinal tumors with no mediastinal lymphadenopathy and no myasthenia as a potential thymoma and always attempt the MMIT procedure starting as VATS procedure on the side of tumor. (author)

  13. Peyton’s four-step approach: differential effects of single instructional steps on procedural and memory performance – a clarification study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krautter M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Markus Krautter,1 Ronja Dittrich,2 Annette Safi,2 Justine Krautter,1 Imad Maatouk,2 Andreas Moeltner,2 Wolfgang Herzog,2 Christoph Nikendei2 1Department of Nephrology, 2Department of General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, University of Heidelberg Medical Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Although Peyton’s four-step approach is a widely used method for skills-lab training in undergraduate medical education and has been shown to be more effective than standard instruction, it is unclear whether its superiority can be attributed to a specific single step. Purpose: We conducted a randomized controlled trial to investigate the differential learning outcomes of the separate steps of Peyton’s four-step approach. Methods: Volunteer medical students were randomly assigned to four different groups. Step-1 group received Peyton’s Step 1, Step-2 group received Peyton’s Steps 1 and 2, Step-3 group received Peyton’s Steps 1, 2, and 3, and Step-3mod group received Peyton’s Steps 1 and 2, followed by a repetition of Step 2. Following the training, the first independent performance of a central venous catheter (CVC insertion using a manikin was video-recorded and scored by independent video assessors using binary checklists. The day after the training, memory performance during delayed recall was assessed with an incidental free recall test. Results: A total of 97 participants agreed to participate in the trial. There were no statistically significant group differences with regard to age, sex, completed education in a medical profession, completed medical clerkships, preliminary memory tests, or self-efficacy ratings. Regarding checklist ratings, Step-2 group showed a superior first independent performance of CVC placement compared to Step-1 group (P<0.001, and Step-3 group showed a superior performance to Step-2 group (P<0.009, while Step-2 group and Step-3mod group did not differ (P=0.055. The findings were similar in the incidental

  14. Unusual population attributes of invasive red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) in Japan: do they have a performance advantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Mari; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Mine, Kanako; Ueno, Shintaro; Kamezaki, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    The slider turtle (Trachemys scripta Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792) is native to the USA and Mexico. Due to the popularity of their colorful hatchlings as pets, they have been exported worldwide and are now present on all continents, except Antarctica. Slider turtles are well-established in Japan and occupy aquatic habitats in urban and agricultural areas, to the detriment of native turtles with which they compete. We asked the overall question, do slider turtles in Japan have a performance advantage because they are liberated from the numerous competing turtle species in their native range and released from many of their natural predators? Traits compared included various measures of adult body size (mean, maximum), female size at maturity as measured by size of gravid females, clutch size, population density and biomass, sex ratio, and sexual size dimorphism, the latter two a partial reflection of growth and maturity differences between the sexes. We sampled slider turtle populations in three habitats in Japan and compared population attributes with published data for the species from throughout its native range in the USA. Mean male body sizes were at the lower end of values from the USA suggesting that males in Japan may mature at smaller body sizes. The smallest gravid females in Japan mature at smaller body sizes but have mean clutch sizes larger than some populations in the USA. Compared to most populations in the USA, slider turtles achieve higher densities and biomasses in Japanese wetlands, especially the lotic system we sampled. Sex ratios were female-biased, the opposite of what is reported for many populations in protected areas of the USA. Sexual size dimorphism was enhanced relative to native populations with females as the larger sex. The enhanced dimorphism is likely a result of earlier size of maturity in Japanese males and the large size of mature (gravid) Japanese females. Slider turtles appear to have a performance advantage over native turtles in

  15. A minimally invasive surgical approach for large cyst-like periapical lesions: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Naseem; Logani, Ajay; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Various conservative approaches have been utilized to manage large periapical lesions. This article presents a relatively new, very conservative technique known as surgical fenestration which is both diagnostic and curative. The technique involves partially excising the cystic lining, gently curetting the cystic cavity, performing copious irrigation, and closing the surgical site. This technique allows for decompression and allows the clinician the freedom to take a biopsy of the lesion, as well as perform other procedures such as root resection and retrograde sealing, if required. As the procedure does not perform a complete excision of the cystic lining, it is both minimally invasive and cost-effective. The technique and the concepts involved are reviewed in 4 cases treated with this novel surgical approach.

  16. Performance of Droplet Digital PCR in Non-Invasive Fetal RHD Genotyping - Comparison with a Routine Real-Time PCR Based Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Svobodová

    Full Text Available Detection and characterization of circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA from maternal circulation requires an extremely sensitive and precise method due to very low cffDNA concentration. In our study, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR was implemented for fetal RHD genotyping from maternal plasma to compare this new quantification alternative with real-time PCR (qPCR as a golden standard for quantitative analysis of cffDNA. In the first stage of study, a DNA quantification standard was used. Clinical samples, including 10 non-pregnant and 35 pregnant women, were analyzed as a next step. Both methods' performance parameters-standard curve linearity, detection limit and measurement precision-were evaluated. ddPCR in comparison with qPCR has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for analysing of cffDNA and determination of fetal RhD status from maternal circulation, results of both methods strongly correlated. Despite the more demanding workflow, ddPCR was found to be slightly more precise technology, as evaluated using quantitative standard. Regarding the clinical samples, the precision of both methods equalized with decreasing concentrations of tested DNA samples. In case of cffDNA with very low concentrations, variance parameters of both techniques were comparable. Detected levels of fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma were slightly higher than expected and correlated significantly with gestational age as measured by both methods (ddPCR r = 0.459; qPCR r = 0.438.

  17. The Kjeldahl method as a primary reference procedure for total protein in certified reference materials used in clinical chemistry. II. Selection of direct Kjeldahl analysis and its preliminary performance parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinklárková, Bára; Chromý, Vratislav; Šprongl, Luděk; Bittová, Miroslava; Rikanová, Milena; Ohnútková, Ivana; Žaludová, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    To select a Kjeldahl procedure suitable for the determination of total protein in reference materials used in laboratory medicine, we reviewed in our previous article Kjeldahl methods adopted by clinical chemistry and found an indirect two-step analysis by total Kjeldahl nitrogen corrected for its nonprotein nitrogen and a direct analysis made on isolated protein precipitates. In this article, we compare both procedures on various reference materials. An indirect Kjeldahl method gave falsely lower results than a direct analysis. Preliminary performance parameters qualify the direct Kjeldahl analysis as a suitable primary reference procedure for the certification of total protein in reference laboratories.

  18. Role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy post invasive coronary angiography in patients with myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harisankar, C.N.B.; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Kamaleshwaran, K.K.; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Baljinder; Mahajan, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    The presence of severe hypokinesia or akinesia and near complete stenotic lesions on coronary angiography, in a patient with acute myocardial infarction raises a question of viability in the involved territory and its response to revascularization. The decision of revascularization can be effectively taken after myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Aim: To evaluate the role of MPS in patients with acute or recent myocardial infarction after invasive coronary angiography. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients (27 Males, 8 Females; Mean age 54 years) with acute myocardial infarction, who underwent invasive angiography, were included prospectively. Invasive angiography was attempted during the episode of acute chest pain in 20 patients. Fifteen patients underwent angiography without MPS because of non-availability of MPS at the time of initial presentation in the referring hospital. Revascularization was deferred because of complete/near complete block of artery with hypokinesia/akinesia of the distal LV segments in 32/35 patients and 50 to 70% block in 3/35. These patients were subjected to MPS. Results: Twenty patients underwent stress MPS and 15 underwent nitrate-augmented rest re-distribution study (RR study). Imaging was performed using the hybrid SPECT/CT system. The average defect size of the perfusion defect was 34% (5 - 57% range). Sixteen patients (46%) had fixed perfusion defects. Reversible ischemia was present in 19 (54%). Ten patients had a 10% of the LV myocardium, and underwent the invasive revascularization procedure. Conclusion: MPS is invaluable in patients who have total/near total occlusion of the coronary artery and distal segment hypokinesia or akinesia on invasive angiography. One in four patients, deemed to have non-viable myocardium, underwent an invasive revascularization after undergoing MPS. (author)

  19. TU-D-209-06: Head and Neck Tissue Dose From X-Ray Scatter to Physicians Performing Cardiovascular Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Schueler, B; Grams, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Sturchio, G [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to characterize the spatial distribution of scatter radiation to the head and neck of a physician performing an x-ray interventional procedure and assess brain, eye lens, and carotid artery dose. Methods: Radiographic x-ray beams were tuned to match the peak energy (56 to 106 keV) and HVL (3.5 to 6.5 mm Al) of x-ray scatter originating from a patient during a fluoroscopic procedure. The radiographic beam was directed upon a Rando phantom from an inferior-left location to mimic a typical patient-operator geometric relationship. A lead-equivalent protective garment was secured to the phantom. Direct exposure Gafchromic film (XRQA2) was placed between the transverse plane layers of the head and neck region of the phantom and exposed with 4 scatter-equivalent radiographic beams. A 3×3 cm{sup 2} film placed at the left collar of the phantom was used to monitor incident dose in the position of a radiation monitoring badge. The films were converted to 2D dose distribution maps using FilmQA Pro software and an Epson 11000-XL scanner. The 2D dose distributions maps were normalized by the left collar dose and the percent of left collar dose (%LCD) was calculated for select tissues. Results: The dose maps had high dynamic range (10{sub 4}) and spatial detail. Considering all transverse planes and 4 scatter beam qualities, the median %LCD values were: whole brain 8.5%, left brain 13%, right brain 5.4%, left eye lens 67%, right eye lens 25%, left carotid artery 72%, and right carotid artery 28%. Conclusion: Scatter radiation dose to an operator can be simulated using a tuned radiographic beam and used to expose a phantom and Gafchromic film, thereby creating detailed 2D dose distribution maps. This work facilitates individualized estimation of dose to select head and neck tissues based on an operator’s radiation monitoring badge value.

  20. A Simple Model to Assess the Probability of Invasion in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast Diagnosed by Needle Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldřich Coufal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was to develop a clinical prediction model for assessing the probability of having invasive cancer in the definitive surgical resection specimen in patients with biopsy diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast, to facilitate decision making regarding axillary surgery. Methods. In 349 women with DCIS, predictors of invasion in the definitive resection specimen were identified. A model to predict the probability of invasion was developed and subsequently simplified to divide patients into two risk categories. The model’s performance was validated on another patient population. Results. Multivariate logistic regression revealed four independent predictors of invasion: (i suspicious (microinvasion in the biopsy specimen; (ii visibility of the lesion on ultrasonography; (iii size of the lesion on mammography >30 mm; (iv clinical palpability of the lesion. The actual frequency of invasion in the high-risk patient group in the test and validation population was 52.6% and 48.3%, respectively; in the low-risk group it was 16.8% and 7.1%, respectively. Conclusion. The model proved to have good performance. In patients with a low probability of invasion, an axillary procedure can be omitted without a substantial risk of additional surgery.

  1. Multidetector CT of Locally Invasive Advanced Gastric Cancer: Value of Oblique Coronal Reconstructed Images for the Assessment of Local Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Hee; Kim, Ah Yong; Kim, Hye Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Yu, Eun Sil; Jang, Yoon Jin; Park, Seong Ho; Shin, Yong Moon; Ha, Hyun Kwon [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of oblique coronal reconstructed CT images to determine the local invasion of advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Thirty-four consecutive patients, who were suspected to have locally invasive advanced gastric cancer (more than T3 stage) on a preoperative MDCT scan and underwent a diagnostic or curative laparotomy, were enrolled in this study. Two reviewers performed an independent blind review of three series of MDCT images in random order; axial (AXI), conventional coronal (CCI), and oblique coronal (OCI) (parallel to long axis of gastric body and pancreas) images. In assessing the local invasion, the reader's confidence for the local invasion of AGC was graded using a five point scale (1 = definitely negative, 5 = definitely positive: T4). With surgical findings and histopathological proofs as reference standards, the diagnostic performance of the three different plans of CT images was employed for the verification of local invasion of AGC on a preoperative CT scan using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. Agreements between the two reviewers were analyzed using weighted kappa statistics. Results: In 19 out of 34 patients, local invasion was confirmed surgically or histopathologically (13 pancreas invasion, 6 liver invasion, 4 major vascular invasion, 3 colon and mesocolon invasion, and 2 spleen invasion). The diagnostic performance of OCI was superior to AXI or CCI in the local invasion of AGC. The differences in the area under the curve of AXI (0.770 {+-} 0.087, 0.700 {+-} 0.094), CCI (0.884 {+-} 0.058, 0.958 {+-} 0.038), and OCI (0.954 {+-} 0.050, 0.956 {+-} 0.049), were statistically significant for both reviewers. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for OCI ({kappa}= .973), which was greater than CCI (({kappa}= .839), and AXI (({kappa}= .763). On a CT scan, OCI might be a useful imaging technique in evaluating locally invasive advanced gastric cancer.

  2. Intrauterine transfusion and non-invasive treatment options for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn - review on current management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Carolien; van Kamp, Inge; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) remains a serious pregnancy complication which can lead to severe fetal anemia, hydrops and perinatal death. Areas covered: This review focusses on the current prenatal management, treatment with intrauterine transfusion (IUT) and promising non-invasive treatment options for HDFN. Expert commentary: IUTs are the cornerstone in prenatal management of HDFN and have significantly improved perinatal outcome in the past decades. IUT is now a relatively safe procedure, however the risk of complications is still high when performed early in the second trimester. Non-invasive management using intravenous immunoglobulin may be a safe alternative and requires further investigation.

  3. Biological invasions: recommendations for U.S. policy and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, David M; Williams, Susan; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Hayes, Keith R; Leung, Brian; Reichard, Sarah; Mack, Richard N; Moyle, Peter B; Smith, Maggie; Andow, David A; Carlton, James T; McMichael, Anthony

    2006-12-01

    The Ecological Society of America has evaluated current U.S. national policies and practices on biological invasions in light of current scientific knowledge. Invasions by harmful nonnative species are increasing in number and area affected; the damages to ecosystems, economic activity, and human welfare are accumulating. Without improved strategies based on recent scientific advances and increased investments to counter invasions, harm from invasive species is likely to accelerate. Federal leadership, with the cooperation of state and local governments, is required to increase the effectiveness of prevention of invasions, detect and respond quickly to new potentially harmful invasions, control and slow the spread of existing invasions, and provide a national center to ensure that these efforts are coordinated and cost effective. Specifically, the Ecological Society of America recommends that the federal government take the following six actions: (1) Use new information and practices to better manage commercial and other pathways to reduce the transport and release of potentially harmful species; (2) Adopt more quantitative procedures for risk analysis and apply them to every species proposed for importation into the country; (3) Use new cost-effective diagnostic technologies to increase active surveillance and sharing of information about invasive species so that responses to new invasions can be more rapid and effective; (4) Create new legal authority and provide emergency funding to support rapid responses to emerging invasions; (5) Provide funding and incentives for cost-effective programs to slow the spread of existing invasive species in order to protect still uninvaded ecosystems, social and industrial infrastructure, and human welfare; and (6) Establish a National Center for Invasive Species Management (under the existing National Invasive Species Council) to coordinate and lead improvements in federal, state, and international policies on invasive species

  4. An Economic Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing in the US General Pregnancy Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Benn

    Full Text Available Analyze the economic value of replacing conventional fetal aneuploidy screening approaches with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT in the general pregnancy population.Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared conventional screening to NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA analysis in the annual US pregnancy population. Sensitivity and specificity for fetal aneuploidies, trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and monosomy X, were estimated using published data and modeling of both first- and second trimester screening. Costs were assigned for each prenatal test component and for an affected birth. The overall cost to the healthcare system considered screening costs, the number of aneuploid cases detected, invasive procedures performed, procedure-related euploid losses, and affected pregnancies averted. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of variation in parameters. Costs were reported in 2014 US Dollars.Replacing conventional screening with NIPT would reduce healthcare costs if it can be provided for $744 or less in the general pregnancy population. The most influential variables were timing of screening entry, screening costs, and pregnancy termination rates. Of the 13,176 affected pregnancies undergoing screening, NIPT detected 96.5% (12,717/13,176 of cases, compared with 85.9% (11,314/13,176 by conventional approaches. NIPT reduced invasive procedures by 60.0%, with NIPT and conventional methods resulting in 24,596 and 61,430 invasive procedures, respectively. The number of procedure-related euploid fetal losses was reduced by 73.5% (194/264 in the general screening population.Based on our analysis, universal application of NIPT would increase fetal aneuploidy detection rates and can be economically justified. Offering this testing to all pregnant women is associated with substantial prenatal healthcare benefits.

  5. First Robotic SPECT for Minimally Invasive Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Bernhard; Sprung, Julian; Pinto, Francisco; Frisch, Benjamin; Wendler, Thomas; Simon, Hervé; Mengus, Laurent; van den Berg, Nynke S; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; Navab, Nassir

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present the usage of a drop-in gamma probe for intra-operative Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging in the scope of minimally invasive robot-assisted interventions. The probe is designed to be inserted and reside inside the abdominal cavity during the intervention. It is grasped during the procedure using a robotic laparoscopic gripper enabling full six degrees of freedom handling by the surgeon. We demonstrate the first deployment of the tracked probe for intra-operative in-patient robotic SPECT enabling augmented-reality image guidance. The hybrid mechanical- and image-based in-patient probe tracking is shown to have an accuracy of 0.2 mm. The overall system performance is evaluated and tested with a phantom for gynecological sentinel lymph node interventions and compared to ground-truth data yielding a mean reconstruction accuracy of 0.67 mm.

  6. Comparison of the performance of natural latex membranes prepared with different procedures and PTFE membrane in guided bone regeneration (GBR) in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Jonas M L; Ferreira, Juliana F; Marques, Leonardo; Holgado, Leandro; Graeff, Carlos F O; Kinoshita, Angela

    2014-09-01

    This work assessed the performance of membranes made of natural latex extracted from Hevea brasiliensis prepared with three different methods: polymerized immediately after collection without the use of ammonia (L1); polymerized after preservation in ammonia solution (L2); and polymerized after storage in ammonia, followed by Soxhlet technique for the extraction of substances (L3). Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane was used as control. Two 10-mm diameter bone defects were surgically made in the calvaria of thirty adult male New Zealand rabbits. Defects (total n = 60) were treated with guided bone regeneration (GBR) using L1, L2, L3 or PTFE membranes (n = 15 for each membrane). Ten animals were euthanized after 7, 20 and 60 days postoperatively so that five samples (n = 5) of each treatment were collected at each time, and bone regeneration was assessed microscopically. The microscopic analysis revealed defects filled with blood clot and new bone formation at the margins of the defect in all 7-day samples, while 20-day defects were mainly filled with fibrous connective tissue. After 60 days defects covered with L1 membranes showed a significantly larger bone formation area in comparison to the other groups (P PTFE membranes was also investigated in six additional rabbits. The animals were subjected to the same surgical procedure for the confection of one 10-mm diameter bone defect that was treated with L1 (n = 3) or PTFE (n = 3). Fifty-three days later, a second surgery was performed to make a second defect, which was treated with the same type of membrane used in the first surgery. Seven days later, the animals were euthanized and samples analyzed. No differences among L1 and PTFE samples collected from sensitized and non-sensitized animals were found (P > 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis). Therefore, the results demonstrated that latex membranes presented performance comparable to PTFE membranes, and that L1 membranes induced higher bone formation. L1 and

  7. A comparison of conservative and invasive dental approaches in the treatment of tension-type headache.