WorldWideScience

Sample records for pelvic floor descent

  1. Surgical reconstruction of pelvic floor descent: anatomic and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Bschleipfer, T; Liedl, B; Gunnemann, A; Petros, P; Weidner, W

    2010-01-01

    The human pelvic floor is a complex structure and pelvic floor dysfunction is seen frequently in females. This review focuses on the surgical reconstruction of the pelvic floor employing recent findings on functional anatomy. A selective literature research was performed by the authors. Pelvic floor activity is regulated by 3 main muscular forces that are responsible for vaginal tension and suspension of the pelvic floor organs, bladder and rectum. A variety of symptoms can derive from pelvic floor dysfunctions, such as urinary urge and stress incontinence, abnormal bladder emptying, fecal incontinence, obstructive bowel disease syndrome and pelvic pain. These symptoms mainly derive, for different reasons, from laxity in the vagina or its supporting ligaments as a result of altered connective tissue. Pelvic floor reconstruction is nowadays driven by the concept that in case of pelvic floor symptoms, restoration of the anatomy will translate into restoration of the physiology and ultimately improve patients' symptoms. The surgical reconstruction of the anatomy is almost exclusively focused on the restoration of the lax pelvic floor ligaments. Exact preoperative identification of the anatomical lesions is necessary to allow for exact anatomical reconstruction with respect to the muscular forces of the pelvic floor. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Traditional Gymnastic Exercises for the Pelvic Floor Often Lead to Bladder Neck Descent - a Study Using Perineal Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeßler, Kaven; Junginger, Bärbel

    2017-07-01

    The aims of physiotherapy in stress incontinent women are to improve pelvic floor function and the continence mechanism including bladder neck support and urethral closure pressure. In Germany, traditional conservative treatment often includes gymnastic exercises with unclear effects on the bladder neck. The aim of this study was to sonographically assess bladder neck movements during selected exercises. Fifteen healthy, continent women without previous vaginal births, who were able to voluntarily contract their pelvic floor muscels performed the shoulder bridge, the abdominal press, tiptoe and the Pilates clam exercises. The first set was performed without any additional instructions. During the second set directions were given to activate the pelvic floor before beginning each exercise and to maintain the contraction throughout the exercise. Bladder neck movement was measured on perineal ultrasound using a validated method with the pubic symphysis as a reference point. The median age of participants was 32 years, median BMI was 23. Eight women were nulliparous and seven had given birth to 1 - 2 children via caesarean section. When exercises were performed without voluntary pelvic floor contraction the bladder neck descended on average between 2.3 and 4.4 mm, and with pelvic floor contraction prior to the exercise only between 0.5 and 2.1 mm (p > 0.05 except for abdominal press p = 0.007). The Pilates clam exercise and toe stand stabilised the bladder neck most effectively. Bladder neck descent often occurs during pelvic floor gymnastic exercises as traditionally performed in Germany, and a voluntary pelvic floor contraction during the exercises does not necessarily prevent this.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Moshiri, Mariam; Lee, Jean H; Bhargava, Puneet; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction is largely a complex problem of multiparous and postmenopausal women and is associated with pelvic floor or organ descent. Physical examination can underestimate the extent of the dysfunction and misdiagnose the disorders. Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as a promising tool to evaluate the dynamics of the pelvic floor and use for surgical triage and operative planning. This article reviews the anatomy and pathology of pelvic floor dysfunction, typical imaging findings, and the current role of functional MR imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pelvic floor muscle function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the level of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) referred by gynaecologists and urologists for in-hospital pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and to identity associated factors for a low level of PFM...

  6. Functional imaging of the pelvic floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienemann, Andreas E-mail: andreaslienemann@web.de; Fischer, Tanja

    2003-08-01

    Introduction/Objective: Pelvic floor dysfunction and associated pelvic organ prolapse represent a major problem in our present-day society, mostly afflicting parous women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is assuming an increasingly important role in the more accurate delineation of the extent of the problem. This article briefly reviews one of the main radiological methods for the dynamic evaluation of the pelvic floor: functional cine MRI. Methods and Material: Out of the literature the smallest common denominator for functional cine MRI can be defined as follows: high field system; patient either in supine or sitting position; fast gradient echo sequence; midsagittal slice orientation; either a stack of slices or repeated measurements at the same slice position with the patient at rest or straining; image analysis using the pubococcygeal reference line. Results: All except two publications stress the usefulness of functional cine MRI in the evaluation of patients with organ descent and prolapse. This well accepted method allows for the visualization of all relevant structures in the anterior, middle and posterior compartment. It is especially useful in the detection of enteroceles, and provides a reliable postoperative follow-up tool. Isolated urinary or stool incontinence are not an indication for functional cine MRI, as is the case in patients with equivocal clinical findings. To date it does not allow for real 3D imaging of the pelvic floor or sufficient determination of fascial defects. Discussion: Functional cine MRI of the pelvic floor is a promising new imaging method for the detection of organ descent and prolapse in patients with equivocal clinical findings. The combination of function and morphology allows for an innovative view of the pelvic floor, and thus adds to our understanding of the various interactions of the structures.

  7. Pelvic floor physical therapy in urogynecologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarinos, Rhonda K

    2003-08-01

    Physical therapists are uniquely qualified to treat pelvic floor dysfunction with conservative management techniques. Techniques associated with incontinence and support functions of the pelvic floor include bladder training and pelvic floor rehabilitation: pelvic floor exercises, biofeedback therapy, and pelvic floor electrical stimulation. Pain associated with mechanical pelvic floor dysfunction can be treated by physical therapists utilizing various manual techniques and modalities. Research documents that conservative management is effective in treating many conditions associated with pelvic floor dysfunction. Research should be conducted to determine if addressing diastasis recti and contracture of the pelvic floor musculature should be a component of the standard physical therapy protocol.

  8. Functional anatomy of pelvic floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rocca Rossetti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Generally, descriptions of the pelvic floor are discordant, since its complex structures and the complexity of pathological disorders of such structures; commonly the descriptions are sectorial, concerning muscles, fascial developments, ligaments and so on. On the contrary to understand completely nature and function of the pelvic floor it is necessary to study it in the most unitary view and in the most global aspect, considering embriology, philogenesy, anthropologic development and its multiple activities others than urological, gynaecological and intestinal ones. Recent acquirements succeeded in clarifying many aspects of pelvic floor activity, whose musculature has been investigated through electromyography, sonography, magnetic resonance, histology, histochemistry, molecular research. Utilizing recent research concerning not only urinary and gynecologic aspects but also those regarding statics and dynamics of pelvis and its floor, it is now possible to study this important body part as a unit; that means to consider it in the whole body economy to which maintaining upright position, walking and behavior or physical conduct do not share less than urinary, genital, and intestinal functions. It is today possible to consider the pelvic floor as a musclefascial unit with synergic and antagonistic activity of muscular bundles, among them more or less interlaced, with multiple functions and not only the function of pelvic cup closure.

  9. [Functional aspects of pelvic floor surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Gunnemann, A; Liedl, B; Weidner, W

    2009-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunctions are frequently seen in females. The human pelvic floor is a complex structure and heavily stressed throughout female life. Recent findings in the functional anatomy of the pelvic floor have led to a much better understand-ing, on the basis of which enormous improvements in the therapeutic options have arisen. The pelvic floor activity is regulated by three main muscular forces that are responsible for vaginal tension and suspension of the pelvic floor -organs, bladder and rectum. For different reasons laxity in the vagina or its supporting ligaments as a result of altered connective tissue can distort this functional anatomy. A variety of symptoms can derive from these pelvic floor dysfunctions, such as urinary urge and stress incontinence, abnormal bladder emptying, faecal incontinence, obstructive bowel disease syndrome and pelvic pain. Pelvic floor reconstruction is nowadays driven by the concept that in the case of pelvic floor symptoms restoration of the anatomy will translate into restoration of the physiology and ultimately improve the patients' symptoms. The exact surgical reconstruction of the anatomy is there-fore almost exclusively focused on the restoration of the lax pelvic floor ligaments. An exact identification of the anatomic lesions preoperatively is eminently necessary, to allow for an exact anatomic reconstruction with respect to the muscular forces of the pelvic floor. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart * New York.

  10. Mode of delivery and Pelvic floor disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, R.; Neelam, H.; Bashir, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare pelvic floor dysfunction in non pregnant women who had delivered vaginally versus those with cesarean delivery. Methodology: The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders among non pregnant women was assesses by using a standardized tool pelvic floor distress inventory short form (PFDI-20). Data was collected from Jinnah Hospital Lahore, Pakistan. Results: Total numbers of participants were 278. 47.12% subjects had moderate, 36.69% miner and 16.19% had severe pelvic floor dysfunction. The symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse were more prevalent (mean value is 59.1876) than Urinary Distress (mean value is 40.5426), while the Colorectal-Anal Distress (mean value is 35.9150) were least prevalent. Conclusion: Pelvic floor disorders are very common among females and are strongly associated with mode of delivery. Although spontaneous vaginal birth was extensively associated with pelvic floor disorders the instrumental delivery affects most. (author)

  11. Biomechanics of the pelvic floor musculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janda, S.

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis was motivated by two main goals. The first research goal of the thesis was to understand the complex biomechanical behaviour of the pelvic floor muscles. The second goal was to study the mechanism of the pelvic organ prolapse (genital prolapse). The pelvic floor in humans is a

  12. Laparoscopic Pelvic Floor Repair Using Polypropylene Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Shien Weng

    2008-09-01

    Conclusion: Laparoscopic pelvic floor repair using a single piece of polypropylene mesh combined with uterosacral ligament suspension appears to be a feasible procedure for the treatment of advanced vaginal vault prolapse and enterocele. Fewer mesh erosions and postoperative pain syndromes were seen in patients who had no previous pelvic floor reconstructive surgery.

  13. Imaging pelvic floor disorders. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoker, Jaap; Taylor, Stuart A.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2008-01-01

    This volume builds on the success of the first edition of imaging pelvic floor disorders and is aimed at those practitioners with an interest in the imaging, diagnosis and treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction. Concise textual information from acknowledged experts is complemented by high-quality diagrams and images to provide a thorough update of this rapidly evolving field. Introductory chapters fully elucidate the anatomical basis underlying disorders of the pelvic floor. State of the art imaging techniques and their application in pelvic floor dysfunction are then discussed in detail. Additions since the first edition include consideration of the effect of aging and new chapters on perineal ultrasound, functional MRI and MRI of the levator muscles. The closing sections of the book describe the modern clinical management of pelvic floor dysfunction, including prolapse, urinary and faecal incontinence and constipation, with specific emphasis on the integration of diagnostic and treatment algorithms. (orig.)

  14. Imaging pelvic floor disorders. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, Jaap [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Specialist X-Ray; DeLancey, John O.L. (eds.) [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). L4000 Women' s Hospital

    2008-07-01

    This volume builds on the success of the first edition of imaging pelvic floor disorders and is aimed at those practitioners with an interest in the imaging, diagnosis and treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction. Concise textual information from acknowledged experts is complemented by high-quality diagrams and images to provide a thorough update of this rapidly evolving field. Introductory chapters fully elucidate the anatomical basis underlying disorders of the pelvic floor. State of the art imaging techniques and their application in pelvic floor dysfunction are then discussed in detail. Additions since the first edition include consideration of the effect of aging and new chapters on perineal ultrasound, functional MRI and MRI of the levator muscles. The closing sections of the book describe the modern clinical management of pelvic floor dysfunction, including prolapse, urinary and faecal incontinence and constipation, with specific emphasis on the integration of diagnostic and treatment algorithms. (orig.)

  15. Pelvic floor and sexual male dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pischedda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The pelvic floor is a complex multifunctional structure that corresponds to the genito- urinary-anal area and consists of muscle and connective tissue. It supports the urinary, fecal, sexual and reproductive functions and pelvic statics. The symptoms caused by pelvic floor dysfunction often affect the quality of life of those who are afflicted, worsening significantly more aspects of daily life. In fact, in addition to providing support to the pelvic organs, the deep floor muscles support urinary continence and intestinal emptying whereas the superficial floor muscles are involved in the mechanism of erection and ejaculation. So, conditions of muscle hypotonia or hypertonicity may affect the efficiency of the pelvic floor, altering both the functionality of the deep and superficial floor muscles. In this evolution of knowledge it is possible imagine how the rehabilitation techniques of pelvic floor muscles, if altered and able to support a voiding or evacuative or sexual dysfunction, may have a role in improving the health and the quality of life.

  16. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pedraza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1 initial baseline phase; (2 rapid contraction phase; (3 tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4 late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1 down-training; (2 accessory muscle isolation; (3 discrimination training; (4 muscle strengthening; (5 endurance training; and (6 electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Dynamic pelvic floor MRI provides detailed pictures ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  18. Pelvic floor electrophysiology patterns associated with faecal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hussein Al-Moghazy Sultan

    2012-12-28

    Dec 28, 2012 ... pelvic floor electrophysiological abnormalities associated with. FI were illustrated in ... detection of a localized anal sphincter defect clinically and ..... Woods R, Voyvodic F, Schloithe A, Sage M, Wattchow D. Anal sphincter ...

  19. Assessment of pelvic floor dysfunctions using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Salah Darwish

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is an ideal, non invasive technique which does not require patient preparation for evaluation of pelvic floor. It acts as one stop shop for diagnosing single or multiple pelvic compartment involvement in patients with pelvic floor dysfunction.

  20. Biomimetic matrices for pelvic floor repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vashaghian, M.

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapsed (POP) is a dysfunctional disease in female pelvic floor that affects a lot of women worldwide, and reduces their quality of life. Currently, trans-vaginal knitted polypropylene meshes are used as secondary treatment, for anatomical correction of the dysfunctional tissues.

  1. Effect of pelvic floor rehabilitation technique in preventing the postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Qiong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of pelvic floor rehabilitation technique in preventing the postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction and on the sexual life quality. Methods: A total of 286 puerpera with pelvic floor dysfunction who were admitted in our hospital from May, 2014 to May, 2015 42 d after delivery were included in the study, and randomized into the treatment group and the control group with 143 cases in each group. After guidance, the puerpera in the control group were given pelvic floor muscle training by themselves at home. On this basis, the puerpera in the treatment group were treated by the pelvic floor rehabilitation apparatus. The puerpera in the two groups were treated for 4 weeks. The pelvic floor function before treatment, 6 months and 1 year after delivery was detected. The color Doppler ultrasound apparatus was used to detect BSD, PUVA, UVJ-M, and BND 3 months after delivery. Results: BND, PUVA-R, PUVA-S, and UVJ-M 3 months after delivery in the treatment groups were significantly lower than those in the control group, while BSD-S was significantly higher than that in the control group. The improvement of type I and II muscle fiber fatigue (%, POP-Q degree, AP indication point (cm, and vaginal dynamic pressure (cmH2O was significantly superior to that in the control group. The comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength classification before treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. After treatment, the pelvic floor muscle in the two groups was significantly strengthened, and the proportion of V grade patients was significantly increased when compared with before treatment. Conclusions: The postpartum early pelvic floor rehabilitation technique can effectively enhance the pelvic floor function, and prevent the postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction, with an accurate efficacy; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  2. Recognition and Management of Nonrelaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Faubion, Stephanie S.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2012-01-01

    Nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction is not widely recognized. Unlike in pelvic floor disorders caused by relaxed muscles (eg, pelvic organ prolapse or urinary incontinence, both of which often are identified readily), women affected by nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction may present with a broad range of nonspecific symptoms. These may include pain and problems with defecation, urination, and sexual function, which require relaxation and coordination of pelvic floor muscles and urinary and ...

  3. Imaging of the posterior pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoker, Jaap; Bartram, Clive I.; Halligan, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Disorders of the posterior pelvic floor are relatively common. The role of imaging in this field is increasing, especially in constipation, prolapse and anal incontinence, and currently imaging is an integral part of the investigation of these pelvic floor disorders. Evacuation proctography provides both structural and functional information for rectal voiding and prolapse. Dynamic MRI may be a valuable alternative as the pelvic floor muscles are visualised, and it is currently under evaluation. Endoluminal imaging is important in the management of anal incontinence. Both endosonography and endoanal MRI can be used for detection of anal sphincter defects. Endoanal MRI has the advantage of simultaneously evaluating external sphincter atrophy, which is an important predictive factor for the outcome of sphincter repair. Many aspects of constipation and prolapse remain incompletely understood and treatment is partly empirical; however, imaging has a central role in management to place patients into treatment-defined groups. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of the posterior pelvic floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, Jaap [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bartram, Clive I.; Halligan, Steve [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St. Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-04-01

    Disorders of the posterior pelvic floor are relatively common. The role of imaging in this field is increasing, especially in constipation, prolapse and anal incontinence, and currently imaging is an integral part of the investigation of these pelvic floor disorders. Evacuation proctography provides both structural and functional information for rectal voiding and prolapse. Dynamic MRI may be a valuable alternative as the pelvic floor muscles are visualised, and it is currently under evaluation. Endoluminal imaging is important in the management of anal incontinence. Both endosonography and endoanal MRI can be used for detection of anal sphincter defects. Endoanal MRI has the advantage of simultaneously evaluating external sphincter atrophy, which is an important predictive factor for the outcome of sphincter repair. Many aspects of constipation and prolapse remain incompletely understood and treatment is partly empirical; however, imaging has a central role in management to place patients into treatment-defined groups. (orig.)

  5. Validation of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 in Danish women with pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    To translate the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20) and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7) and to evaluate their psychometric properties in Danish women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse....

  6. Knowledge of the pelvic floor in nulliparous women

    OpenAIRE

    Neels, Hedwig; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Proper pelvic floor function is important to avoid serious dysfunctions including incontinence, prolapse, and sexual problems. The current study evaluated the knowledge of young nulliparous women about their pelvic floor and identified what additional information they wanted. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional survey, a validated, 36 item questionnaire was distributed to 212 nulliparous women. The questionnaire addressed demography, pelvic floor muscles, pelvic floor dys...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic floor dysfunction - joint recommendations of the ESUR and ESGAR Pelvic Floor Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Sayed, Rania Farouk [Cairo University Hospitals, Genitourinary and Pelvic Floor MR Imaging Unit, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt); Alt, Celine D. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Maccioni, Francesca [Sapienza University Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Meissnitzer, Matthias [University Hospital Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Masselli, Gabriele [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology Dea, Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Manganaro, Lucia; Vinci, Valeria [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I Hospital, Rome (Italy); Weishaupt, Dominik [Triemli Hospital Zurich, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Collaboration: On behalf of the ESUR and ESGAR Pelvic Floor Working Group

    2017-05-15

    To develop recommendations that can be used as guidance for standardized approach regarding indications, patient preparation, sequences acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and grading of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). The technique included critical literature between 1993 and 2013 and expert consensus about MRI protocols by the pelvic floor-imaging working group of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) from one Egyptian and seven European institutions. Data collection and analysis were achieved in 5 consecutive steps. Eighty-two items were scored to be eligible for further analysis and scaling. Agreement of at least 80 % was defined as consensus finding. Consensus was reached for 88 % of 82 items. Recommended reporting template should include two main sections for measurements and grading. The pubococcygeal line (PCL) is recommended as the reference line to measure pelvic organ prolapse. The recommended grading scheme is the ''Rule of three'' for Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP), while a rectocele and ARJ descent each has its specific grading system. This literature review and expert consensus recommendations can be used as guidance for MR imaging and reporting of PFD. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic floor dysfunction - joint recommendations of the ESUR and ESGAR Pelvic Floor Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sayed, Rania Farouk; Alt, Celine D.; Maccioni, Francesca; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Masselli, Gabriele; Manganaro, Lucia; Vinci, Valeria; Weishaupt, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    To develop recommendations that can be used as guidance for standardized approach regarding indications, patient preparation, sequences acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and grading of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). The technique included critical literature between 1993 and 2013 and expert consensus about MRI protocols by the pelvic floor-imaging working group of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) from one Egyptian and seven European institutions. Data collection and analysis were achieved in 5 consecutive steps. Eighty-two items were scored to be eligible for further analysis and scaling. Agreement of at least 80 % was defined as consensus finding. Consensus was reached for 88 % of 82 items. Recommended reporting template should include two main sections for measurements and grading. The pubococcygeal line (PCL) is recommended as the reference line to measure pelvic organ prolapse. The recommended grading scheme is the ''Rule of three'' for Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP), while a rectocele and ARJ descent each has its specific grading system. This literature review and expert consensus recommendations can be used as guidance for MR imaging and reporting of PFD. (orig.)

  9. Pelvic floor function during and after first pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummen, H.J. van

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects the first pregnancy and childbirth on the pelvic floor. Pregnancy and vaginal delivery can negatively affect pelvic floor function. Micturition symptoms, defecation symptoms and sexual dysfunction are all signs of an impaired pelvic floor function. These symptoms are

  10. Pelvic floor dyssynergia: efficacy of biofeedback training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadel Hak, Nabil; El-Hemaly, Mohamed; Hamdy, Emad; El-Raouf, Ahmed Abd; Atef, Ehab; Salah, Tarek; El-Hanafy, Ehab; Sultan, Ahmad; Haleem, Magdy; Hamed, Hala

    2011-03-01

    Paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor during attempts to defaecate is described as pelvic floor dyssynergia (anismus). It is a behavioural disorder (no associated morphological or neurological abnormalities); consequently, biofeedback training has been recommended as a behavioural therapy for such a disorder. The aim of the present study was to evaluate long-term satisfaction of patients diagnosed with pelvic floor dyssynergia after biofeedback. Sixty patients (35 females and 25 males) with a mean age of 30±12years and a 4year duration of constipation were included. Forty-five patients had normal colonic transit and 15 patients had slow colonic transit. History, physical examination and barium enema were done to exclude constipation secondary to organic causes. Colonic and pelvic floor functions (colon-transit time, anorectal manometry, EMG and defaecography) were performed before and after biofeedback treatments. Patients were treated on a weekly basis with an average of (6±2) sessions. At the end of sessions, 55 out of 60 patients (91.6%) reported a subjectively overall improvement. Symptoms of dyschezia were reported less frequently after biofeedback. Age and gender were not predictive factors of outcome. No symptoms at initial assessment were predictive for patient's satisfaction but the only factor of predictive value was the diagnosis of anismus and the motivated patient who wanted to continue the sessions. Biofeedback remains a morbidity free, low-cost and effective outpatient therapy for well-motivated patients complaining of functional constipation and diagnosed as pelvic floor dyssynergia. Copyright © 2011 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common, with 1 in 4 US women reporting moderate to severe symptoms of urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or fecal incontinence. Given the high societal burden of these disorders, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial. Physical activity is one such potentially modifiable risk factor; the large number of girls and women participating in sport and strenuous training regimens increases the need to understand associated risks and benefits of these exposures. The aim of this review was to summarize studies reporting the association between physical activity and pelvic floor disorders. Most studies are cross-sectional and most include small numbers of participants. The primary findings of this review include that urinary incontinence during exercise is common and is more prevalent in women during high-impact sports. Mild to moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, decreases both the odds of having and the risk of developing urinary incontinence. In older women, mild to moderate activity also decreases the odds of having fecal incontinence; however, young women participating in high-intensity activity are more likely to report anal incontinence than less active women. Scant data suggest that in middle-aged women, lifetime physical activity increases the odds of stress urinary incontinence slightly and does not increase the odds of pelvic organ prolapse. Women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are more likely to report a history of heavy work than controls; however, women recruited from the community with pelvic organ prolapse on examination report similar lifetime levels of strenuous activity as women without this examination finding. Data are insufficient to determine whether strenuous activity while young predisposes to pelvic floor disorders later in life. The existing literature suggests that most physical activity does not harm the pelvic floor and does provide numerous health benefits for

  12. Comparison between dynamic cystocolpoproctography and dynamic pelvic floor MRI: pros and cons: which is the "functional" examination for anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinte, Dean D T; Hale, Douglass S; Sandrasegaran, Kumar

    2013-10-01

    "Functional" imaging of anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction has assumed an important role in the diagnosis and management of these disorders. Although defecography has been widely practiced for decades to evaluate the dynamics of rectal emptying, debate concerning its clinical relevance, how it should be done and interpreted continues. Due to the recognition of the association of defecatory disorders with pelvic organ prolapse in women, the need to evaluate the pelvic floor as a unit has arisen. To meet this need, defecography has been extended to include not only evaluation of defecation disorders but also the rest of the pelvic floor by opacifying the small bowel, vagina, and the urinary bladder. The term "dynamic cystocolpoproctography" (DCP) has been appropriately applied to this examination. Rectal emptying performed with DCP provides the maximum stress to the pelvic floor resulting in complete levator ani relaxation. In addition to diagnosing defecatory disorders, this method of examination demonstrates maximum pelvic organ descent and provides organ-specific quantification of organ prolapse, information that is only inferred by means of physical examination. It has been found to be of clinical value in patients with defecation disorders and the diagnosis of associated prolapse in other compartments that are frequently unrecognized by history taking and the limitations of physical examination. Pelvic floor anatomy is complex and DCP does not show the anatomical details pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides. Technical advances allowing acquisition of dynamic rapid MRI sequences has been applied to pelvic floor imaging. Early reports have shown that pelvic MRI may be a useful tool in pre-operative planning of these disorders and may lead to a change in surgical therapy. Predictions of hypothetical increase cancer incidence and deaths in patients exposed to radiation, the emergence of pelvic floor MRI in addition to questions relating to the

  13. [Quality of life in women with pelvic floor dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segedi, Ljiljana Mladenović; Ilić, Katarina Parezanović; Curcić, Aleksandar; Visnjevac, Nemanja

    2011-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction is a frequent problem affecting more than 50% of women in peri- and postmenopause. Considering that ageing and menopause befall in the significant factors causing this issue, as well as the expected longevity of women in the world and in our country, pelvic floor dysfunction prevelence is foreseen to be even higher. The aim of the study was to evaluate impact of the symptoms of pelvic dysfunction on quality of life and examine body image satisfaction in adult women with pelvic organ prolapse presenting to tertiary care clinic for surgical treatment. This prospective case-control study included 50 patients who presented to tertiary care gynecology clinic for surgical treatment and 50 controls with normal pelvic floor support and without urinary incontinence who presented tertiary care gynecology clinic for other reasons. Both, patients and controls, completed two quastionnaires recommended for the evaluation of symptoms (Pelvic floor distress inventory - short forms) and quality of life impact (Pelvic floor impact questionnaire - short form) of pelvic organ prolapse, and Body Image Scale. The patients scored significantly worse on the prolapse, urinary, colorectal scales and overall score of Pelvic floor distress inventory--20 than controls subjects (134.91 vs 78.08; p self-conscious (78% vs 42%; p body. There was a positive correlation between decreased quality of life and body image in women with pelvic dysfunction. Women with pelvic floor dysfunction have decreased quality of life and body image.

  14. Pelvic floor dysfunction, and effects of pregnancy and mode of delivery on pelvic floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bozkurt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD, although seems to be simple, is a complex process that develops secondary to multifactorial factors. The incidence of PFD is increasing with increasing life expectancy. PFD is a term that refers to a broad range of clinical scenarios, including lower urinary tract excretory and defecation disorders, such as urinary and anal incontinence, overactive bladder, and pelvic organ prolapse, as well as sexual disorders. It is a financial burden on the health care system and disrupts women's quality of life. Strategies applied to decrease PFD are focused on the course of pregnancy, mode and management of delivery, and pelvic exercise methods. Many studies in the literature define traumatic birth, usage of forceps, length of the second stage of delivery, and sphincter damage as modifiable risk factors for PFD. Maternal age, fetal position, and fetal head circumference are nonmodifiable risk factors. Although numerous studies show that vaginal delivery affects pelvic floor structures and their functions in a negative way, there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend elective cesarean delivery in order to prevent development of PFD. PFD is a heterogeneous pathological condition, and the effects of pregnancy, vaginal delivery, cesarean delivery, and possible risk factors of PFD may be different from each other. Observational studies have identified certain obstetrical exposures as risk factors for pelvic floor disorders. These factors often coexist; therefore, the isolated effects of these variables on the pelvic floor are difficult to study. The routine use of episiotomy for many years in order to prevent PFD is not recommended anymore; episiotomy should be used in selected cases, and the mediolateral procedures should be used if needed.

  15. Recognition and Management of Nonrelaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2012-01-01

    Nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction is not widely recognized. Unlike in pelvic floor disorders caused by relaxed muscles (eg, pelvic organ prolapse or urinary incontinence, both of which often are identified readily), women affected by nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction may present with a broad range of nonspecific symptoms. These may include pain and problems with defecation, urination, and sexual function, which require relaxation and coordination of pelvic floor muscles and urinary and anal sphincters. These symptoms may adversely affect quality of life. Focus on the global symptom complex, rather than the individual symptoms, may help the clinician identify the condition. The primary care provider is in a position to intervene early, efficiently, and effectively by (1) recognizing the range of symptoms that might suggest nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction, (2) educating patients, (3) performing selective tests when needed to confirm the diagnosis, and (4) providing early referral for physical therapy. PMID:22305030

  16. Assessment of a semiautomated pelvic floor measurement model for evaluating pelvic organ prolapse on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, S; Lai-Yuen, S; Bao, P; Weitzenfeld, A; Greene, K; Kedar, R; Hart, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the performance of a semiautomated pelvic floor measurement algorithmic model on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images compared with manual pelvic floor measurements for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) evaluation. We examined 15 MRIs along the midsagittal view. Five reference points used for pelvic floor measurements were identified both manually and using our semiautomated measurement model. The two processes were compared in terms of accuracy and precision. The semiautomated pelvic floor measurement model provided highly consistent and accurate locations for all reference points on MRI. Results also showed that the model can identify the reference points faster than the manual-point identification process. The semiautomated pelvic floor measurement model can be used to facilitate and improve the process of pelvic floor measurements on MRI. This will enable high throughput analysis of MRI data to improve the correlation analysis with clinical outcomes and potentially improve POP assessment.

  17. Contribution of pelvic floor muscles to stiffness of the pelvic ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Hoek van Dijke, G; van Gurp, M; Mulder, P; Snijders, C.J.; Stoeckart, R.

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A biomechanical study in embalmed specimens, on the relation between applied tension in the pelvic floor muscles, stiffness of the pelvic ring and generation of movement in the sacroiliac joints. OBJECTIVE: To gain insight into the effect of tension in the pelvic floor muscles on

  18. Pelvic floor electrophysiology in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankisi, H; Pugdahl, K; Rasmussen, M M; Clemmensen, D; Rawashdeh, Y F; Christensen, P; Krogh, K; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate sacral peripheral nerve function and continuity of pudendal nerve in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) using pelvic floor electrophysiological tests. Twelve patients with low cervical or thoracic SCI were prospectively included. Quantitative external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle electromyography (EMG), pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (PNTML) testing, bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) testing and pudendal short-latency somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) measurement were performed. In EAS muscle EMG, two patients had abnormal increased spontaneous activity and seven prolonged motor unit potential duration. PNTML was normal in 10 patients. BCR was present with normal latency in 11 patients and with prolonged latency in one. The second component of BCR could be recorded in four patients. SEPs showed absent cortical responses in 11 patients and normal latency in one. Pudendal nerve and sacral lower motor neuron involvement are significantly associated with chronic SCI, most prominently in EAS muscle EMG. The frequent finding of normal PNTML latencies supports earlier concerns on the utility of this test; however, BCR and pudendal SEPs may have clinical relevance. As intact peripheral nerves including pudendal nerve are essential for efficient supportive therapies, pelvic floor electrophysiological testing prior to these interventions is highly recommended. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Motor cortical representation of the pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, A; Wolff, S; van der Horst, C; Kuhtz-Buschbeck, J P

    2011-07-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training involves rhythmical voluntary contractions of the external urethral sphincter and ancillary pelvic floor muscles. The representation of these muscles in the motor cortex has not been located precisely and unambiguously. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine brain activity during slow and fast pelvic floor contractions. Cerebral responses were recorded in 17 healthy male volunteers, 21 to 47 years old, with normal bladder control. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed during metronome paced slow (0.25 Hertz) and fast (0.7 Hertz) contractions of the pelvic floor that mimicked the interruption of voiding. To study the somatotopy of the cortical representations, flexion-extension movements of the right toes were performed as a control task. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during pelvic floor contractions detected activity of the supplementary motor area in the medial wall and of the midcingulate cortex, insula, posterior parietal cortex, putamen, thalamus, cerebellar vermis and upper ventral pons. There were no significant differences in activation between slow and fast contractions. Toe movements involved significantly stronger activity of the paracentral lobule (ie the medial primary motor cortex) than did the pelvic floor contractions. Otherwise the areas active during pelvic floor and leg muscle contractions overlapped considerably. The motor cortical representation of pelvic floor muscles is located mostly in the supplementary motor area. It extends further ventrally and anteriorly than the representation of distal leg muscles. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy for Vulvodynia: A Clinician's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Stephanie A

    2017-09-01

    Vulvar pain affects up to 20% of women at some point in their lives, and most women with vulvar pain have associated pelvic floor impairments. Pelvic floor dysfunction is associated with significant functional limitations in women by causing painful intercourse and urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. A quick screening of the pelvic floor muscles can be performed in the gynecology office and should be used when patients report symptoms of pelvic pain. It is now known the vulvar pain syndromes are heterogeneous in origin; therefore, successful treatment plans are multimodal and include physical therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength using ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tosun, Ozge Celiker; Solmaz, Ulas; Ekin, Atalay; Tosun, Gokhan; Gezer, Cenk; Ergenoglu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Mat, Emre; Malkoc, Mehtap; Askar, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the effect of pelvic floor exercises on pelvic floor muscle strength could be detected via ultrasonography in patients with urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] Of 282 incontinent patients, 116 participated in the study and were randomly divided into a pelvic floor muscle training (n=65) group or control group (n=51). The pelvic floor muscle training group was given pelvic floor exercise training for 12 weeks. Both groups were ev...

  2. Quality of life in women with pelvic floor dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Mladenović-Segedi Ljiljana; Parezanović-Ilić Katarina; Ćurčić Aleksandar; Višnjevac Nemanja

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim. Pelvic floor dysfunction is a frequent problem affecting more than 50% of women in peri- and postmenopause. Considering that ageing and menopause befall in the significant factors causing this issue, as well as the expected longevity of women in the world and in our country, pelvic floor dysfunction prevelence is foreseen to be even higher. The aim of the study was to evaluate impact of the symptoms of pelvic dysfunction on quality of life and examine body image satisfac...

  3. Patients with Pelvic Floor Muscle Spasm Have a Superior Response to Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy at Specialized Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, Alan Scott; Li, Jianbo; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common condition that often requires multimodal therapy. Patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome have a high incidence of pelvic floor spasm, which can be treated with pelvic floor physical therapy. However, this is a specialized skill. We compared outcomes of pelvic floor physical therapy as part of multimodal therapy in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome between those treated at our institution and elsewhere. We identified patients from our chronic pelvic pain syndrome registry with pelvic floor spasm who were seen between 2010 and 2014 for more than 1 visit. Patient phenotype was assessed with the UPOINT system and symptom severity was determined by the National Institutes of Health CPSI. A 6-point decrease in CPSI was used to define patient improvement. A total of 82 patients fit the study criteria. Mean age was 41.6 years (range 19 to 75) and median symptom duration was 24 months (range 3 to 240). Mean CPSI was 26.8 (range 10 to 41), the median number of positive UPOINT domains was 3 (range 1 to 6) and 27 patients (32.9%) were treated locally. At followup 9 patients had refused pelvic floor physical therapy, and 24 and 48 had undergone pelvic floor physical therapy elsewhere and at CCF, respectively. The mean change in CPSI was 1.11 ± 4.1 in patients who refused, -3.46 ± 6.7 in those treated elsewhere and -11.3 ± 7.0 in those treated at CCF (p physical therapy at CCF (OR 4.23, p = 0.002) and symptom duration (OR 0.52, p = 0.03) predicted improvement. Pelvic floor physical therapy can be effective for chronic pelvic pain syndrome in patients with pelvic floor spasm. However, the outcome depends on specialty training and experience of therapists. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Do women with pelvic floor dysfunction referred by gynaecologists and urologists at hospitals complete a pelvic floor muscle training programme?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    For decades women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) have been referred to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), but there is only little information on whether the women complete the programmes and why. The objectives of this study were to investigate to which extent women completed a PFMT...

  5. Pelvic floor muscle training as a persistent nursing intervention: Effect on delivery outcome and pelvic floor myodynamia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Persistent nursing intervention for pregnant/postpartum women helped to shorten the second stage of labour and contributed to the recovery of postpartum pelvic floor myodynamia. The influence of this intervention on the delivery mode, and rates of episiotomy and perineal laceration remains unknown. Medical staff should strengthen health education programmes that involve pelvic floor functional rehabilitation.

  6. The Role of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Male Sexual Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah; Gonzalez, Joshua; Goldstein, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Sexual function is essential to good health and well-being in men. The relationship between male sexual function, pelvic floor function, and pelvic pain is complex and only beginning to be appreciated. The objectives of the current review are to examine these complex relationships, and to demonstrate how pelvic floor physical therapy can potentially improve the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions, including erectile dysfunction and dysfunction of ejaculation and orgasm. Contemporary data on pelvic floor anatomy and function as they relate to the treatment of various male sexual dysfunctions were reviewed. Examination of evidence supporting the association between the male pelvic floor and erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory/orgasmic dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, respectively. Evidence suggests a close relationship between the pelvic floor and male sexual dysfunction and a potential therapeutic benefit from pelvic floor therapy for men who suffer from these conditions. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a necessary tool in a more comprehensive bio-neuromusculoskeletal-psychosocial approach to the treatment of male sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pelvic floor spasm as a cause of voiding dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tricia L C; Ng, L G; Chapple, Christopher R

    2015-07-01

    Pelvic floor disorders can present with lower urinary tract symptoms, bowel, sexual dysfunction, and/or pain. Symptoms of pelvic muscle spasm (nonrelaxing pelvic floor or hypertonicity) vary and can be difficult to recognize. This makes diagnosis and management of these disorders challenging. In this article, we review the current evidence on pelvic floor spasm and its association with voiding dysfunction. To distinguish between the different causes of voiding dysfunction, a video urodynamics study and/or electromyography is often required. Conservative measures include patient education, behavioral modifications, lifestyle changes, and pelvic floor rehabilitation/physical therapy. Disease-specific pelvic pain and pain from pelvic floor spasm needs to be differentiated and treated specifically. Trigger point massage and injections relieves pain in some patients. Botulinum toxin A, sacral neuromodulation, and acupuncture has been reported in the management of patients with refractory symptoms. Pelvic floor spasm and associated voiding problems are heterogeneous in their pathogenesis and are therefore often underrecognized and undertreated; it is therefore essential that a therapeutic strategy needs to be personalized to the individual patient's requirements. Therefore, careful evaluation and assessment of individuals using a multidisciplinary team approach including a trained physical therapist/nurse clinician is essential in the management of these patients.

  8. Association between preterm labour and pelvic floor muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Turhan; Pekgöz, Ipek; Bozkaya, Hasan; Osmanagaoglu, Mehmet A

    2018-03-23

    We hypothesised that the pressure on the cervix increases with advancing gestation and it may lead to a cervical shortening and cause preterm labour in women with weak pelvic floor muscles. The aim of this prospective study was to measure vaginal resting pressure and pelvic floor muscle strength in the first trimester of pregnancy and to investigate their effects on labour. A study was conducted on the pregnant women with a low risk for preterm birth. The pelvic floor muscle strength and vaginal resting pressure were assessed in 320 pregnant women at their first trimester with a vaginal pressure measurement device. Fifty-two pregnant women were hospitalised for tocolytic therapy because of spontaneous preterm labour. Thirty-two of them (10.2%) had a preterm delivery despite the tocolytic therapy. Both the vaginal resting pressure (p = .009, 95%CI: 0.8; 5.9) and the pelvic floor muscle strength (p = .01, 95%CI: 3.5; 13.1) were significantly lower in the women with a preterm labour. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The pelvic floor muscles have an essential role in continence and provide support to the pelvic organs. They also have an impact on labour. The pelvic floor muscles should distend to allow the passage of the foetus during labour. The rotation and flexion of the foetal head is due to the pelvic floor resistance. The effect of a vaginal birth on the pelvic floor's function is readily understood. On the other hand, the effect of the pelvic floor muscle function on labour is still controversial. What do the results of this study add? This prospective study showed that there is a negative association between the pelvic floor muscle strength and preterm labour. This is the first clinical study indicating that weak pelvic floor muscles may cause a preterm labour. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? Pelvic floor physical therapy may be an alternative preventive strategy to reduce

  9. [Continuous improvement of portable domestic pelvic floor neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the pelvic floor function of patients with urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhijing; Zhu, Lan; Lang, Jinghe; Wang, Wei; Shi, Honghui; Pang, Hongxia; Shi, Xinwen

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate continuous improvement of portable domestic pelvic floor neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the pelvic floor function of patients with stress urinary incontinence after short-term pelvic floor electrophysiological treatment in hospital. Totally 60 women with stress urinary incontinence were recruited for this randomized controlled trial. The control group including a total of 30 patients, only received 4 weeks pelvic floor electrophysiological treatment in the hospital. Family consolidation treatment group (experimental group) including 30 patients, after 4-week treatment in hospital, received 12-week of pelvic floor neuromuscular electrical stimulation using portable electrical stimulator at home under the guidance of doctors. In post-treatment 6 months and 9 months, 1-hour pad test was measured for urine leakage, pelvic floor electrical physiological parameters were assessed, and subjective improvement of symptoms of urinary incontinence were evaluated. All these data were analysed to compare the effect of the two groups. In 9 months after treatment, average change of urine leakage, the control group and experiment group were (75±24)% versus (99±3)%, the difference was statistically significant (Pcontinuous improvement of pelvic floor function.

  10. Power to the Pelvis: Strengthening Your Pelvic Floor Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bulging Hernia Keeping Your Gut in Check The Power of Your Pancreas Wise Choices Lower Your Risk of Pelvic Floor Issues Maintain a healthy weight. Avoid constipation and straining by getting enough ...

  11. Surgical Management of Pelvic floor Prolapse in women using Mesh

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAH

    polytetrafluoroethylene) . This article reviews our experience with polypropylene mesh in pelvic floor repair at the. Southern General Hospital Glasgow. The objective was to determine the safety and effectiveness of the prolene mesh in the repair ...

  12. Barriers to Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy Regarding Treatment of High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoorob, Dani; Higgins, Margaret; Swan, Kimberly; Cummings, Jennifer; Dominguez, Sarah; Carey, Erin

    Chronic pelvic pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition with a wide range of etiologies. An estimated 30% to 70% of chronic pelvic cases involve musculoskeletal component pain including high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD). Pelvic floor physical therapy has been shown to be a beneficial treatment for HTPFD, yet many patients do not have access to this treatment. The objective of this study was to identify the barriers preventing patients from following through with the first-line management, physical therapy. Participants with a diagnosis of HTPFD (n = 154) were identified from the list of referrals sent from the obstetrics and gynecology department to an affiliated PFPT center. Participants were contacted and asked to complete a phone survey addressing demographics and perceived barriers to care. Responses were collected in REDCap. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed using a statistical analysis software. Seventy surveys were completed. The top barriers identified by participants were financial constraints (51.4%), perceived lack of utility (37.1%), time constraints (30.0%), and travel issues (18.6%); 84.4% of participants had 1 or more comorbid pain condition. Whereas 51.4% expressed some level of anxiety regarding the PFPT option, only 9.6% of participants did not start treatment because of fear of treatment. The majority of treatment barriers identified were concrete restraints, with insurance noncoverage and time constraints being the top issues. A fair number of participants expressed anxiety about the treatment or felt they received unclear explanations of the treatment. These are areas in which providers can potentially alleviate some barriers to care.

  13. Rehabilitation of the short pelvic floor. II: Treatment of the patient with the short pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, M P; Kotarinos, R

    2003-10-01

    Several urogynecologic syndromes are associated with the clinical finding of a short, painful, tender and weak pelvic floor and a variety of connective tissue abnormalities. Techniques for rehabilitation include the avoidance of perpetuating factors, rehabilitation of extrapelvic musculoskeletal abnormalities, the use of manual techniques and needling to promote resolution of connective tissue problems, closure of any diastasis recti, and transvaginal/transrectal manual release of muscular trigger points and contractures. Therapy can be facilitated by pudendal or epidural nerve block. Patients contribute to their success through home maintenance programs.

  14. Pelvic floor functional disorders in vaginally delivered primiparae

    OpenAIRE

    Antolic, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examined pelvic floor functional disorders in primiparae with single pregnancies, cephalic presentation at term at the Charité delivery department before and during pregnancy as well as after vaginal delivery by means of questionnaire in relation to maternal, neonatal and obstetric risk factors. The pathophysiology of pelvic floor disorders is still not statisfyingly resolved. During pregnancy 74% of primiparae knew about the interrelation between delivery and sexual disorde...

  15. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on pulmonary function

    OpenAIRE

    Han, DongWook; Ha, Misook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength and pulmonary function. In particular, we examined whether pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] Thirty female college students aged 19?21 with no history of nervous or musculoskeletal system injury were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. [Methods] For the pulmonary function test, spirometry items included forced vital capacity and maximal volunta...

  16. Muscle function of the pelvic floor in healthy, puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Pardiñas, M A; Torres-Lacomba, M; Navarro-Brazález, B

    2017-05-01

    To understand the function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) at different ages in healthy women and in puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunctions (PFD) and to ascertain whether there are differences among them. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2016 and included 177 women, 70 of whom had no symptoms of PFD, 53 primiparous mothers in late postpartum and 54 with PFD. The function of the PFM was measured through vaginal palpation (quality of the contraction); manometry (force); dynamometer (tone, strength, and response to stretching), and surface electromyography (neuromuscular activity and resistance). The healthy women showed superior values for PFM tone, maximum strength, neuromuscular activity and resistance than the puerperal mothers and the women with PFD (P.05). The muscle function of the healthy women did not vary significantly with age, except in the case of tone, which was lower in the women older than 46 years (P=.004). Age and births decrease the baseline tone of the PFM in healthy women. Therefore, lower strength, resistance and neuromuscular activity appear to be the main difference between the PFM of women with PFD and the PFM of healthy women. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility...

  18. A comparison between stabilization exercises and pelvic floor muscle training in women with pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriye Özengin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of stabilization exercises and pelvic floor muscle training in women with stage 1 and 2 pelvic organ prolapse. Materials and Methods: In a total 38 women with pelvic organ prolapse whose average age was 45.60 years, pelvic floor muscles were evaluated with electromyography, and prolapse with pelvic organ prolapse quantification system, and the quality of life with prolapse quality of life questionnaire. Afterwards, the subjects were divided into two groups; stabilization exercise group (n=19 and pelvic floor muscle training group (n=19. Stabilization exercise group were given training for 8 weeks, 3 times a week. Pelvic floor muscle training group were given eight-week home exercises. Each group was assessed before training and after eight weeks. Results: An increase was found in the pelvic muscle activation response in the 2 groups (p≤0.05. There was no difference in EMG activity values between the groups (p>0.05. A difference was found in the values Aa, Ba and C in subjects of each group (p≤0.05, and the TVL, Ap, Bp and D values of subjects in pelvic floor muscle training group (p≤0.05 in the before and after pelvic organ prolapse quantification system assessment, however, no difference was found between the groups (p≤0.05. A positive difference was found in the effect of prolapse sub parameter in each of the two groups, and in general health perception sub parameter in subjects of stabilization exercise group (p<0.05 in the prolapse quality of life questionnaire. Conclusions: It was concluded that both training programs increased the pelvic floor muscle strength, provided a decline in prolapse stages. Stabilization exercise has increased general health perception unlike home training, thus, these exercises can be added to the treatment of women with prolapse.

  19. Quality of life in women with pelvic floor dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Segedi Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Pelvic floor dysfunction is a frequent problem affecting more than 50% of women in peri- and postmenopause. Considering that ageing and menopause befall in the significant factors causing this issue, as well as the expected longevity of women in the world and in our country, pelvic floor dysfunction prevelence is foreseen to be even higher. The aim of the study was to evaluate impact of the symptoms of pelvic dysfunction on quality of life and examine body image satisfaction in adult women with pelvic organ prolapse presenting to tertiary care clinic for surgical treatment. Methods. This prospective case-control study included 50 patients who presented to tertiary care gynecology clinic for surgical treatment and 50 controls with normal pelvic floor support and without urinary incontinence who presented tertiary care gynecology clinic for other reasons. Both, patients and controls, completed two quastionnaires recommended for the evaluation of symptoms (Pelvic floor distress inventory - short forms and quality of life impact (Pelvic floor impact questionnaire - short form of pelvic organ prolapse, and Body Image Scale. Results. The patients scored significantly worse on the prolapse, urinary, colorectal scales and overall score of Pelvic floor distress inventory - 20 than controls subjects (134.91 vs 78.08; p < 0.01. The patients also measured significant decrease in condition- specific quality of life (89.23 vs 3.1; p < 0.01. They were more likely to feel self-conscious (78% vs 42%; p < 0.01, less likely to feel physically attractive (78% vs 22%; p < 0.01, more likely to have difficulty looking at themselves naked (70% vs 42%; p < 0.01, less likely to feel sexually attractive (64% vs 32%; p < 0.01, and less likely to feel feminine (56% vs 16%; p < 0.05, than controls. There were no differencies in their feeling of dissatisfaction with appearance when dressed, avoiding people because of appereance and overall dissatisfaction with

  20. Management of disorders of the posterior pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Loren; Aversa, John; Abir, Farshad; Longo, Walter E.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Constipation is a relatively common problem affecting 15 percent of adults in the Western world, and over half of these cases are related to pelvic floor disorders. This article reviews the clinical presentation and diagnostic approach to posterior pelvic floor disorders, including how to image and treat them. METHODS: A Pubmed search using keywords "rectal prolapse," "rectocele," "perineal hernia," and "anismus" was performed, and bibliographies of the revealed articles were cross-referenced to obtain a representative cross-section of the literature, both investigational studies and reviews, that are currently available on posterior pelvic floor disorders. DISCUSSION: Pelvic floor disorders can occur with or without concomitant physical anatomical defects, and there are a number of imaging modalities available to detect such abnormalities in order to decide on the appropriate course of treatment. Depending on the nature of the disorder, operative or non-operative therapy may be indicated. CONCLUSION: Correctly diagnosing pelvic floor disorders can be complex and challenging, and the various imaging modalities as well as clinical history and exam must be considered together in order to arrive at a diagnosis. PMID:16720016

  1. Lifestyle advice with or without pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated the effect of adding pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to a structured lifestyle advice program. METHODS: This was a single-blinded randomized trial of women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) stage ≥ II. Participants were randomized...

  2. The usefulness of MR defecography in the evaluation of pelvic floor dysfunction: our experience using 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Najar, Mahasen S; Ghanem, Ahmed F; AlRyalat, Saif Aldeen S; Al-Ryalat, Nosaiba T; Alhajahjeh, Sultan O

    2017-09-01

    To assess the usefulness of MR defecography in evaluating pelvic floor dysfunction, and to correlate several pelvic organ abnormalities with each other and with patients' symptoms and characteristics. MR defecographic examinations performed in 3T MRI machine of 95 patients (70 females, 25 males; mean age 48) were retrospectively reviewed. Pelvic organ abnormalities from all three compartments were recorded, including the anorectal junction descent, anterior rectocele, and cystocele. These were graded according to the known HMO system in relation to the pubococcygeal line. The correlation between these different abnormalities and their relation to patient symptoms and characteristics were evaluated. Anorectal junction descent and anterior rectocele were most commonly observed, predominantly manifesting in female patients. Both were associated with abnormalities from all compartments. The middle compartment was the least affected, and its abnormality of uterine/vaginal descent tended to occur in association with the anterior compartment abnormality (cystocele). Anismus was low in incidence, and was not associated with other compartments abnormalities. Both enterocele/peritoneocele and intussusception were uncommon. MR defecography is the modality of choice in assessing pelvic floor dysfunction, because it can neatly show various pelvic organ abnormalities from all compartments in a dynamic fashion, which are frequently coexistent. It can even show clinically silent or unsuspected abnormalities which can impact the management of patients.

  3. Sexual function in women with pelvic floor disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) can impact sexual function. This summary provides an overview of the impact of stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse and their treatments on sexual function. In general, interventions that successfully address PFDs will generally improve sexual function as well. However, there are patients whose sexual function will remain unchanged despite treatment, and a small but significant minority who will report worsened sexual function following treatment...

  4. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review i...

  5. Is Bariatric Surgery a Prophylaxis for Pelvic Floor Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomian, Andrzej; Majkusiak, Wojciech; Lisik, Wojciech; Tomasik, Paweł; Horosz, Edyta; Zwierzchowska, Aneta; Kociszewski, Jacek; Barcz, Ewa

    2018-06-01

    Obesity is one of the well-documented risk factors of pelvic floor disorders (PFDs). The PFDs include urinary and fecal incontinence (UI, FI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Surgery-induced weight loss improves different kinds of incontinence as well as POP symptoms. However, there is a lack of evidence how bariatric surgery influences pelvic floor anatomy and function in women without previous PFDs and whether it may be concerned as PFD prophylaxis tool. The present analysis is a prospective, non-randomized case-control study from January 2014 to September 2017. Participants underwent pelvic floor ultrasound examination with bladder neck position estimation at rest, during levator ani tension, and at Valsalva maneuver before surgery and 12-18 months after. Pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) > 2 stage and PFD complaints were the exclusion criteria. Fifty-nine patients underwent bariatric surgery (57 sleeve gastrectomy and 2 gastric bypass). Mean BMI decreased from 43.8 ± 5.9 to 29 ± 4.6 kg/m 2 after surgery (p betterment of bladder neck position at rest, tension, and Valsalva maneuver in women without PFDs. We postulate that bariatric surgery may be a tool for PFD prevention. It does not improve levator ani function and does not limit bladder neck mobility, which implicates that it has no influence on preexisting pelvic dysfunction.

  6. Introduction to the feature section on functional imaging of the pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccioni, Francesca

    2013-10-01

    This is the introduction to the feature section of functional imaging of the pelvic floor, which includes 6 articles, two focused on clinical issues, while four on radiological aspects, mostly on dynamic pelvic floor MRI.

  7. Biomimetic implants for pelvic floor repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vashaghian, Mahshid; Zaat, Sebastianus A. J.; Smit, Theodoor H.; Roovers, Jan-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Polypropylene implants are used for the reconstructive surgery of urogynaecological disorders like pelvic organ prolapse, but severe complications associated with their use have been reported. There is evidence that surface properties and a difference in mechanical stiffness between the implant and

  8. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training: Underutilization in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamin, Eliza; Parrillo, Lisa M; Newman, Diane K; Smith, Ariana L

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are highly prevalent in women of all ages and can greatly impair quality of life. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a viable treatment option for several pelvic floor conditions including urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. PFMT is a program of therapy initiated by an experienced clinician (e.g., women's health or urology nurse practitioner (NP), physical therapist (PT)) that involves exercises for women with stress urinary incontinence (UI) and exercises combined with behavioral or conservative treatments (lifestyle changes, bladder training with urge suppression) for women with urgency or mixed UI. These exercise programs are more comprehensive than simple Kegel exercises. Despite evidence-based research indicating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness for treatment of urinary incontinence, PFMT is not commonly used as a first-line treatment in clinical practice in the USA (Abrams et al., 2012). This article will review PFMT for the treatment of UI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and theorize how this conservative therapy can be utilized more effectively in the USA.

  9. Pelvic floor muscle thickness measured by perineal ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Juul, N; Grønvall, S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle thickness was assessed in nine healthy female physiotherapists by perineal sonography. All measurements were performed as triple-measurements. The aims were to assess the reliability of the measurements and to establish a reference material. The muscle thickness at rest...

  10. Clinical functional evaluation of female's pelvic floor: integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Nociti Lopes Fernandes

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT depends on the correct prescription of intensity, repetition and endurance of muscle contractions, which are provided by an adequate assessment of pelvic floor muscle. Objective: Verify the techniques, resources and strategies used for clinical functional evaluation of female pelvic floor (PF described in literature. Methods: It’s an integrative review of published studies and books from 2010 until December 2015. Relevant articles with complete description of PF evaluation were found through the use of Scielo, LILACS, PubMed and Medline databases. Results: 34 articles that fulfilled all the criteria were selected. Conclusion: The most used techniques, resources and strategies were: anamnesis, physical examination, measurement of pelvic floor muscle activity using Modified Oxford Scale or perineometry, and use of questionnaires to analyze patient's perspective of their own symptoms. Thus, we could use the parameters obtained in the evaluation to plan an ideal PFMT for each patient, so the physiotherapist would have a good database to analyze the evolution and define the end of therapy.

  11. Ultrasound of the pelvic floor during and after first pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veelen, G.A. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective First, to evaluate the reliability of different assessments using three/four-dimensional (3D/4D) transperineal ultrasound in women during and after their first pregnancy. Second, to describe changes in pelvic floor anatomy and function during and after first pregnancy and to provide

  12. Spastic pelvic floor syndrome: Definition in double-exposure defaecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helzel, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    Double-exposure defaecography and the so-called pinching test improve conventional defaecography in the diagnosis of functional rectal outlet disorders. In particular, the pinching test makes quantitative evaluation of the m. puborectalis possible. 'Spastic pelvic floor syndrome' is defined by quantitative parameters in double-exposure defaecography and the pinching test. (orig.) [de

  13. An approach to constipation associated with pelvic floor dysfunction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small group of patients, refractory to medical therapy should be considered for surgery. Should test results show pelvic floor dysfunction, then behavioural modifications such as biofeedback is successful in up to 76% of patients. An algorithmic approach to treatment is associated with an excellent long term outcome.

  14. Organising a clinical service for patients with pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatoor, Dave; Soligo, Marco; Emmanuel, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the multidisciplinary approach to the management of chronic conditions is a reflection of how medicine has evolved from a singular to a plural effort recognising the complex causations and consequences of such disorders. This thinking should not be confined to tertiary centres alone and should be adapted where local expertise is available. Such an approach is especially important in pelvic floor disorders, where the correlation between structure and function is not always straightforward. There is a need to avoid over-investigation by accurate clinical assessment allied to tailored investigation, leading to a step-wise approach to treatment (which may include behavioural, physiotherapy, medical or surgical management). The algorithms here on faecal incontinence, obstetric trauma, pelvic floor prolapse and chronic pelvic pain attempt to provide such a logical approach to patients.

  15. Prevalence of myofascial chronic pelvic pain and the effectiveness of pelvic floor physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Patterson, Betsy; Mahajan, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and the outcome of transvaginal pelvic floor physical therapy for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain caused by myofascial pelvic pain in a tertiary care facility. A retrospective chart review was performed on all women who presented to our facility between January 2005 and December 2007. Those diagnosed with myofascial pelvic pain and referred for transvaginal pelvic floor physical therapy over this 3-year period were evaluated. Participants with an initial pain score of > or = 4, myofascial pelvic pain on examination, and who attended 2 or more physician visits were included in the analysis. Patient physical examination findings, symptoms, and verbal pain ratings were reviewed. In all, 146 (13.2%) of 1,106 initially screened patients were diagnosed with myofascial pain. Seventy-five (51%) of the 146 patients who were referred for physical therapy were included, and 75% had an initial pain score of > or = 7. Pain scores significantly improved proportional to the number of physical therapy visits completed, with 63% of patients reporting significant pain improvement. Transvaginal physical therapy is an effective treatment for chronic pelvic pain resulting from myofascial pelvic pain.

  16. Pelvic floor disorders in gynecological malignancies. An overlooked problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana M. Bodean

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vulvar, and vaginal cancers affect women of a broad age spectrum. Many of these women are still sexually active when their cancer is diagnosed. Treatment options for gynecological malignancies, such as gynecological surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, are proven risk factors for pelvic floor dysfunction. The prevalence of urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and sexual dysfunction before cancer treatment is still unclear. Hypotheses have been raised in the literature that these manifestations could represent early symptoms of pelvic cancers, but most remain overlooked even in cancer surviving patients. The primary focus of therapy is always cancer eradication, but as oncological and surgical treatment options become more successful, the number of cancer survivors increases. The quality of life of patients with gynecological cancers often remains an underrated subject. Pelvic floor disorders are not consistently reported by patients and are frequently overlooked by many clinicians. In this brief review we discuss the importance of pelvic floor dysfunction in patients with gynecological malignant tumors.

  17. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise.

  18. Modern Theories of Pelvic Floor Support : A Topical Review of Modern Studies on Structural and Functional Pelvic Floor Support from Medical Imaging, Computational Modeling, and Electromyographic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Miller, Brandi D; Boone, Timothy B; Zhang, Yingchun

    2018-02-12

    Weakened pelvic floor support is believed to be the main cause of various pelvic floor disorders. Modern theories of pelvic floor support stress on the structural and functional integrity of multiple structures and their interplay to maintain normal pelvic floor functions. Connective tissues provide passive pelvic floor support while pelvic floor muscles provide active support through voluntary contraction. Advanced modern medical technologies allow us to comprehensively and thoroughly evaluate the interaction of supporting structures and assess both active and passive support functions. The pathophysiology of various pelvic floor disorders associated with pelvic floor weakness is now under scrutiny from the combination of (1) morphological, (2) dynamic (through computational modeling), and (3) neurophysiological perspectives. This topical review aims to update newly emerged studies assessing pelvic floor support function among these three categories. A literature search was performed with emphasis on (1) medical imaging studies that assess pelvic floor muscle architecture, (2) subject-specific computational modeling studies that address new topics such as modeling muscle contractions, and (3) pelvic floor neurophysiology studies that report novel devices or findings such as high-density surface electromyography techniques. We found that recent computational modeling studies are featured with more realistic soft tissue constitutive models (e.g., active muscle contraction) as well as an increasing interest in simulating surgical interventions (e.g., artificial sphincter). Diffusion tensor imaging provides a useful non-invasive tool to characterize pelvic floor muscles at the microstructural level, which can be potentially used to improve the accuracy of the simulation of muscle contraction. Studies using high-density surface electromyography anal and vaginal probes on large patient cohorts have been recently reported. Influences of vaginal delivery on the

  19. Efficacy of hypopressive abdominal gymnastics in rehabilitating the pelvic floor of women: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Viñaspre Hernández, R

    2017-12-13

    Hypopressive abdominal gymnastics has been proposed as a new paradigm in rehabilitating the pelvic floor. Its claims contraindicate the recommendation for pelvic floor muscle training during the postpartum period. To determine whether hypopressive abdominal gymnastics is more effective than pelvic floor muscle training or other alternative conservative treatments for rehabilitating the pelvic floor. We consulted the databases of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), PubMed, Scopus, Trip Database and Web of Science. We selected systematic reviews, clinical trials and analytical studies that assessed the efficacy of hypopressive abdominal gymnastics in women. The measured outcomes were the strengthening of the pelvic floor muscles, the incidence of urine incontinence or prolapse and symptom remission. We included 4 clinical trials, whose quality was measured with the PEDro scale. Hypopressive gymnastics is less effective than pelvic floor muscle training for activating pelvic floor muscles, achieving closure of the levator hiatus of the anus and increasing pelvic floor muscle thickness, strength and resistance. The evidence reviewed does not support the recommendation for hypopressive abdominal gymnastics for strengthening the pelvic floor either during the postpartum period or outside that period. Pelvic floor muscle training remains the first-line treatment for pelvic floor dysfunction. There is a lack of quality clinical trials that have evaluated the efficacy of hypopressive abdominal gymnastics. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  1. Training in exercises for pelvic floor muscles of patients with an urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Glybochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Training of muscles of a pelvic bottom under control of biofeedback is applied at 87 patients with an urinary incontinence after a radical prostatectomy. Biofeedback increases management and control of a pelvic floor. At good ability of management of muscles of a pelvic floor the median of restoration was 4 months. Without opportunity of management of muscles of pelvic floor restoration was 9.4 months.

  2. Evaluation of pelvic floor anatomy with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Pringle, K.C.; Bergman, R.A.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Smith, W.C.; Franken, E.A. Jr.; Schreiber, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging allows direct diagnostic imaging of the anorectal sphincter. This report reviews the normal anatomy of the musculature of the pelvic floor as demonstrated by MR imaging with emphasis on its relationship to the rectum and anal canal correlating with cadaver dissection. Anatomic landmarks routinely depicted by MR imaging include the levator ani, striated muscle complex, superficial transverse perineal muscle, and the urogenital diaphragm. The following abnormalities of the sphincteric musculature were also studied: hindgut duplication, hypoplasia, both abnormal and normal placement of the rectum after surgical procedures for anorectal anomalies, rectal inflammation, and displacement of the musculature by mass lesions. MR imaging plays an important role for the preoperative and postoperative evaluation of pelvic floor pathology

  3. The role of tridimensional dynamic ultrasound for pelvic floor evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Portilla, Fernando; Rubio Manzanares Dorado, Mercedes; Pino Díaz, Verónica; Vazquez Monchul, Jorge M; Palacios, Carmen; Díaz Pavón, José M; Sánchez Gil, José M; García Cabrera, Ana María

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic endoanal ultrasound has emerged in recent years as a test that could replace the now existing tests in the diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders. The aim of this paper is to determine the usefulness of echodefecography in the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with symptoms of anorrectal obstruction, and show the results obtained after its implementation in a pelvic floor unit, as a complementary tool that could replace conventional defecography. In this retrospective study we analyzed 66 patients with a mean age of 55 years (19-83), 61 women (92%). All dynamic ultrasound was performed in 3 dimensions and was correlated with symptoms and physical findings in the consultation. A descriptive and inferential study was performed to find a kappa correlation between physical examination and echodefecography. The reasons for consultation were: Anorrectal obstruction syndrome 36 patients (54.5%), pelvic organ prolapse 27 patients (40.9%), and anorrectal obstruction syndrome along with pelvic organ prolapse 3 patients (4.5%). The correlation of the 2 groups indicated that echodefecography diagnosed more patients with grade III rectocele, enteroceles, and anismus than the combination of scan-ultrasound-manometry-proctoscopy (Kappa 0.26, 0.38 and 0.21, 95% CI: from 0,07 to 1.00, 0.15 to 1.00 and from 0.12 to 1.00, respectively) (P<.001). Conversely, echodefecography diagnosed less perineal descense (Kappa 0.28, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.00). Dynamic anal ultrasonography may have a role as a complementary test in patients with pelvic floor disorders, achieving diagnoses that would go undetected by inspection, physical examination and manometry. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as "the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine" and is a common problem in the female population with prevalence rates varying between 10% and 55% in 15- to 64-year-old women. The most frequent form of urinary incontinence in women is stress urinary incontinence, defined as "involuntary leakage on effort or exertion, or on sneezing or coughing". The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature on urinary incontinence and participation in sport and fitness activities with a special emphasis on prevalence and treatment in female elite athletes. Stress urinary incontinence is a barrier to women's participation in sport and fitness activities and, therefore, it may be a threat to women's health, self-esteem and well-being. The prevalence during sports among young, nulliparous elite athletes varies between 0% (golf) and 80% (trampolinists). The highest prevalence is found in sports involving high impact activities such as gymnastics, track and field, and some ball games. A 'stiff' and strong pelvic floor positioned at an optimal level inside the pelvis may be a crucial factor in counteracting the increases in abdominal pressure occurring during high-impact activities. There are no randomised controlled trials or reports on the effect of any treatment for stress urinary incontinence in female elite athletes. However, strength training of the pelvic floor muscles has been shown to be effective in treating stress urinary incontinence in parous females in the general population. In randomised controlled trials, reported cure rates, defined as athletes than in other women. There is a need for more basic research on pelvic floor muscle function during physical activity and the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in female elite athletes.

  5. Transvaginal Pelvic Floor Muscle Injection Technique: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Ehlert, Michael; Sirls, Larry T; Peters, Kenneth

    Women with pelvic floor dysfunction can have tender areas on vaginal examination, which can be treated with trigger-point injections. There are no publications to evaluate the accuracy of pelvic floor muscle injections. Trigger-point injections were performed on 2 fresh cadaveric pelvises using a curved nasal cannula guide and 7-in spinal needle. This was performed using our standard template of 2 sets of injections at the 1-, 3-, and 5-o'clock positions distally and proximally. The first pelvis was dissected to examine dye penetration. Based on these results, we modified our technique and repeated the injections on the second cadaver. We dissected the second pelvis and compared our findings. The 1-o'clock proximal and distal injections stained the obturator internus and externus near the insertion at the ischiopubic ramus. The 3-o'clock injections stained the midbody of the pubococcygeus and puborectalis. The distal 5-o'clock position was too deep and stained the fat of the ischiorectal space. The proximal 5-o'clock injection stained the area of the pudendal nerve. Our goal at the distal 5-o'clock position was to infuse the iliococcygeus muscle, so we shortened the needle depth from 2 to 1 cm beyond the cannula tip. In our second dissection, the distal 5-o'clock injection again stained only the fat of the ischiorectal space. This is the first study to characterize the distribution of pelvic floor muscle injections in a cadaver model and confirms the ability to deliver medications effectively to the pelvic floor muscles.

  6. Awareness and timing of pelvic floor muscle contraction, pelvic exercises and rehabilitation of pelvic floor in lifelong premature ejaculation: 5 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe La Pera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the cure rate of patients with premature ejaculation who underwent a treatment involving: 1 awareness of the pelvic floor muscles 2 learning the timing of execution and maintenance of contraction of the pelvic floor muscles during the sensation of the pre-orgasmic phase 3 pelvic floor rehabilitation (bio feed back, pelvic exercises and electrostimulation. Materials and methods: We recruited 78 patients with lifelong premature ejaculation who completed the training. The patients were informed of the role of the pelvic floor. They were taught to carry out the execution and maintenance of contraction of the pelvic floor muscles during the sensation of the pre-orgasmic phase to control the ejaculatory reflex. In order to improve the awareness, the tone and the endurance of the pelvic floor muscles, patients were treated with the rehabilitation of pelvic floor (RPF consisting mainly in biofeedback, pelvic exercises and in some cases also in electro-stimulation (ES. The training was carried out for a period of about 2-6 months with an average of 2-5 visits per cycle. Results: 54% of patients who completed the training were cured of premature ejaculation and learned over time to be able to postpone the ejaculation reflex. In a subgroup of 26 patients was also measured the IELT which on the average increased from < 2 minutes to >10 minutes. The best results occurred mainly in patients aged less than 35 where the cure rate was 65%. There were no side effects. Conclusions: In this study, approximately half of patients with premature ejaculation were cured after applying the above treatment.This therapy, necessitates a fairly long period of time (2-6 months and a great commitment on the part of the patient, nevertheless it can be a valid and effective treatment for patients with premature ejaculation. This treatment makes the patient independent in that he is not bound to specific times for taking medication. Furthermore there are no

  7. Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy as Primary Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders With Urinary Urgency and Frequency-Predominant Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sonia R; Dessie, Sybil G; Dodge, Laura E; Mckinney, Jessica L; Hacker, Michele R; Elkadry, Eman A

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) as primary treatment of urinary urgency and frequency symptoms We conducted a prospective cohort study of women with urinary urgency and frequency symptoms. Participants underwent PFPT once or twice per week for 10 weeks. Symptom improvement was assessed by validated questionnaires (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-Short Form 20 and Patient Global Impression of Improvement), voiding diaries, and subjective measures. Fifty-seven participants enrolled; 21 (36.8%) withdrew or completed less than 5 weeks of PFPT. Thirty-one (54.4%) of the remaining 36 participants completed 10 weeks of PFPT. The mean age of the study group (n = 36) was 48.9 ± 15.0 years. The primary diagnoses were overactive bladder syndrome (n = 24, 66.7%) and painful bladder syndrome (n = 12, 33.3%). Women attended a median of 14.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 8.0-16.0) PFPT visits over a median of 11.9 weeks (IQR, 10.0-18.1). At baseline, the median Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-Short Form 20 score was 79.2 (IQR, 53.1-122.9), and decreased to 50.0 (IQR, 25.0-88.5; P therapies. The high dropout rates suggest that motivation or logistic factors may play a significant role in the utilization and success of this treatment option.

  8. Assessment of pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Bispo, Ana Paula Santos; Ploger, Christine; Loureiro, Alessandra Fernandes; Sato, Hélio; Kolpeman, Alexander; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Schor, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    To assess function and prevalence of spasms and trigger points of the pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis. One hundred and four (104) patients were assessed. Group 1 (G1) was composed of 52 subjects diagnosed with deep endometriosis proven by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Group 2 (G2) was composed of 52 women with no signs of endometriosis. Subjects from both G1 and G2 were seen at the Division of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis and at Center for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, both at Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), respectively. A full physical therapy evaluation was carried out, including medical history, presence of dyspareunia and physical examination, which included detailed evaluation of pelvic floor muscles and occurrence of muscle spasm, trigger point and muscle function. The average age of the subjects in the study group was 36.4 and 30.9 years in the control group (p = 0.002). A greater prevalence of deep dyspareunia was found in the subjects in the endometriosis group when compared to the control group (p = 0.010). Women in G1 had higher prevalence of muscle spasms. In this group, 53.9 % had spasms-compared to only 17.3 % of women in G2 (p < 0.001). On the other hand, no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.153) was found while searching for the presence of trigger points. Women with deep endometriosis have increased prevalence of pelvic floor muscle spasms when compared to the control group.

  9. Pelvic floor exercises during and after pregnancy: a systematic review of their role in preventing pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée

    2003-06-01

    To review the literature on the origin, anatomical rationale, techniques, and evidence-based effectiveness of peripartum pelvic floor exercises (PFEs) in the prevention of pelvic floor problems including urinary and anal incontinence, and prolapse. Literature was reviewed for background information. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and proceedings of scientific meetings were searched for evidence-based data. A comprehensive literature search was performed to find all studies that involved the use of antepartum and/or postpartum PFEs. For the MEDLINE (1966 to 2002) and CINAHL (1980 to 2002) searches, the following key words were used: urinary incontinence (prevention and control, rehabilitation, therapy), fecal incontinence, exercise or exercise therapy, Kegel, muscle contraction, muscle tonus, muscle development, pelvic floor, pregnancy, puerperium, puerperal disorders. For the EMBASE (1980 to 2002) search, the following key words were used: micturition disorder (prevention, rehab, disease management, therapy), fecal incontinence, labour complication, pregnancy disorder, puerperal disorder, antepartum care, pregnancy, kinesiotherapy, exercise, pelvic floor, bladder. A manual search was performed of available abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the International Continence Society (1997, 1999 to 2002), American Urogynecologic Association (1997 to 1998, 2000 to 2002), and International Urogynecological Association (1997, 1999 to 2002). Twelve studies evaluating the role of antepartum PFE were found, of which 3 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PFEs for the prevention of urinary incontinence to controls were included. Twelve studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for prevention of urinary incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Five studies evaluating postpartum PFEs for the prevention of anal incontinence were reviewed, of which 4 RCTs were included. Participants in the studies were primiparous women. DATA TABULATION AND

  10. Morphological changes after pelvic floor muscle training measured by 3-dimensional ultrasonography: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekken, Ingeborg Hoff; Hoff Braekken, Ingeborg; Majida, Memona; Engh, Marie Ellström; Bø, Kari

    2010-02-01

    To investigate morphological and functional changes after pelvic floor muscle training in women with pelvic organ prolapse. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at a university hospital and a physical therapy clinic. One hundred nine women with pelvic organ prolapse stages I, II, and III were randomly allocated by a computer-generated random number system to pelvic floor muscle training (n=59) or control (n=50). Both groups received lifestyle advice and learned to contract the pelvic floor muscles before and during increases in intraabdominal pressure. In addition the pelvic floor muscle training group did individual strength training with a physical therapist and daily home exercise for 6 months. Primary outcome measures were pelvic floor muscle (pubovisceral muscle) thickness, levator hiatus area, pubovisceral muscle length at rest and Valsalva, and resting position of bladder and rectum, measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography. Seventy-nine percent of women in the pelvic floor muscle training group adhered to at least 80% of the training protocol. Compared with women in the control group, women in the pelvic floor muscle training group increased muscle thickness (difference between groups: 1.9 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.7, Ppelvic floor muscle stiffness. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training can increase muscle volume, close the levator hiatus, shorten muscle length, and elevate the resting position of the bladder and rectum. www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00271297. I.

  11. The pelvic floor muscles: muscle thickness in healthy and urinary-incontinent women measured by perineal ultrasonography with reference to the effect of pelvic floor training. Estrogen receptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    demonstrated that the striated periurethral muscles and the pelvic floor muscles are of paramount importance for the closure function. This emphasizes the importance of well-functioning pelvic floor muscles to obtain continence, and probably explains the rationale for the effect of pelvic floor training...... in treating urinary incontinence. This study presents a review of the literature on female urinary incontinence, continence mechanisms, pelvic floor muscles, and pelvic floor training. Furthermore, a review of the literature on estrogen receptors in the pelvic floor muscles is given. Perineal ultrasonography...... the effect of pelvic floor training. Additionally, a study of the Pelvic floor muscles was performed to assess the presence of estrogen receptors. Muscle thickness seems to decrease with age. In women over age 60 years, a significantly thinner pelvic floor muscle was found compared to younger women...

  12. Physical, Complementary, and Alternative Medicine in the Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnouk, Alex; De, Elise; Rehfuss, Alexandra; Cappadocia, Carin; Dickson, Samantha; Lian, Fei

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to catalog the most recent available literature regarding the use of conservative measures in treatment of pelvic floor disorders. Pelvic floor disorders encompass abnormalities of urination, defecation, sexual function, pelvic organ prolapse, and chronic pain, and can have significant quality of life implications for patients. Current guidelines recommend behavioral modifications and conservative treatments as first-line therapy for pelvic floor disorders. We have reviewed the literature for articles published on physical, complementary, and alternative treatments for pelvic floor disorders over the past 5 years. Review of pelvic floor muscle physiotherapy (PFMT) and biofeedback (BF) shows a benefit for patients suffering from bladder dysfunction (incontinence, overactive bladder), bowel dysfunction (constipation, fecal incontinence), pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction (pelvic pain). Combination of PFMT and BF has shown improved results compared to PFMT alone, and some studies find that electrical stimulation can augment the benefit of BF and PFMT. Additionally, acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy has shown to be an effective treatment for pelvic floor disorders, particularly with respect to pelvic pain. This update highlights beneficial conservative treatments available for pelvic floor dysfunction, and supplements the current literature on treatment options for patients suffering from these disorders.

  13. Pelvic floor exercises with biofeedback for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Capelini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Prospective study to objectively evaluate the benefits of pelvic floor strengthening exercises associated to biofeedback for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI were selected for this study. All patients underwent a pelvic floor training associated to biofeedback for 12 consecutive weeks. Urodynamic tests, pad test and bladder diary were analyzed at the beginning of the study, at the end and after 3 months. The King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ was applied before and after treatment to assess the impact in the quality of life. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the pad weight (from 14.21 g to 1 g, number of urinary leakage episodes (from 8.14 per day to 2.57 per day and daytime frequency (from 7.93 per day to 5.85 per day. At urodynamics the authors observed a significant increase in Valsalva leak-point pressure (from 103.93 cm H2O to 139.14 cm H2O, cistometric capacity (from 249.29 mL to 336.43 mL, p = 0.0015 and bladder volume at first desire to void (from 145 mL to 215.71 mL. Those differences were kept during the first 3 months of follow up. The KHQ revealed significant differences except in the case of "general health perception", which covers health in general and not exclusively urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION: Treatment of SUI with pelvic floor exercises associated to biofeedback caused significant changes in the parameters analyzed, with maintenance of good results 3 months after treatment.

  14. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles after 6-week biofeedback training in nulliparous continent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Smykla, Agnieszka; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Sobota, Grzegorz; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program on pelvic floor muscle activity in young continent women. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Biofeedback training was continued for 6 weeks, 3 times a week. Muscle strenghtening and endurance exercises were performed alternately. SEMG (surface electromyography) measurements were recorded on four different occasions: before training started, after the third week of training, after the sixth week of training, and one month after training ended. A 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program significantly decreased the resting activity of the pelvic floor muscles in supine lying and standing. The ability to relax the pelvic floor muscles after a sustained 60-second contraction improved significantly after the 6-week training in both positions. SEMG-biofeedback training program did not seem to affect the activity of the pelvic floor muscles or muscle fatigue during voluntary pelvic floor muscle contractions. SEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training might be recommended for physiotherapists to improve the effectiveness of their relaxation techniques.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle thickness measured by perineal ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Juul, N; Grønvall, S

    1991-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle thickness was assessed in nine healthy female physiotherapists by perineal sonography. All measurements were performed as triple-measurements. The aims were to assess the reliability of the measurements and to establish a reference material. The muscle thickness at rest...... and at contraction was 9.4 +/- 0.8 mm and 11.5 +/- 1.1 mm respectively (mean +/- SD). Contraction increased the thickness by 2.2 +/- 0.8 mm or 23 +/- 8%. The intra- and inter observer standard deviation of the estimate was in the range of 4-6%. In conclusion, we find the reliability of the measurements acceptable....

  16. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women’s knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Leopoldino de Andrade

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does an educational program with instructions for performing ‘the Knack’ improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women’s knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles? Design: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessors. Participants: Ninety-nine women from the local community. Intervention: The experimental group (n = 50 received one lecture per week for 4 weeks, and instructions for performing ‘the Knack’. The control group (n = 49 received no intervention. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles measured using manometry. Secondary outcomes were: ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles measured using vaginal palpation; severity of urinary incontinence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results: The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH2O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI –0.5 to 5.9; ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65; or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point greater reduction in the experimental group, 95% CI –3 to 1. Sexual function did not significantly differ between groups, but very few of the women engaged in sexual activity during the study period. The educational program did, however, significantly increase women’s knowledge related to the location, functions and dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles, and treatment options. Conclusion: Education and teaching women to perform ‘the Knack’ had no significant effect on voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles

  17. Recent Advances in Understanding Pelvic-Floor Tissue of Women With and Without Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Considerations for Physical Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kimberly

    2017-04-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a fairly common condition that imposes significant symptoms, diminished quality of life, social burden, financial expense, and surgical risk on women. As evidence supporting the benefit of pelvic-floor muscle training in nonsurgical management of pelvic organ prolapse grows, physical therapists are becoming a provider of choice interacting with women affected by pelvic organ prolapse. This perspective article will review recent research on tissue characteristics of 3 key components of pelvic organ support: skeletal muscle, ligament, and vaginal wall. This information will be summarized as implications for physical therapists. An improved understanding of pelvic-floor tissue in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse will provide a more comprehensive appreciation of the interaction of multiple systems in the disorder. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle strength and sexual function in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinara Sacomori

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Pelvic floor (PF muscles react to sexual stimuli with increased local blood circulation and involuntary contractions during orgasm. The training of the PF musculature helps in the improvement of the female sexual function. Objective : To verify the association between PF muscle strength and sexual function in women, controlling age and parity. Method : Cross-sectional study based on associations. The study included women who attended a reference center in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, for a uterine cancer smear test. The Functional Evaluation of the Pelvic Floor and the Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire were used. Statistical procedures included Mann-Whitney U tests, Spearman correlation and Poisson Regression Analysis, with p < .05. Results : The mean age of the women (n = 177 was 39.05 years (SD = 13.3. Regarding PF function, 53.7% of participants presented weak or not palpable PF muscle function. Women with "good" muscle function (able to maintain contraction under examiner's resistance had significantly better indexes of sexual desire, excitement, lubrication and orgasm than women with weak/poor function. We identified that 52.5% of the women presented sexual dysfunction. Women with "poor" PF function and aged over 50 years had, respectively, 1.36 (CI95% 1.01 - 1.82 and 1.77 (CI95% 1.41 - 2.23 higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction than women with "good" PF function. Conclusions : Adult women with better PF muscle function also presented better sexual function.

  19. MR imaging of pelvic floor in stress urinary incontinence=20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Rae; Park, Heung Jae; Kook, Shin Ho; Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the female pelvic floor and to determine the anatomic differences between normal controls and women with stress urinary incontinence, using MRI. Five healthy, young, nulliparous women and 12 with stress urinary incontinence underwent MR imaging. We obtained FSE T2-weighted axial images, 3mm thick, of the region extending from the urethroversical junction to the perineal membrane. The following parameters were determined : angle, asymmetry and signal intensity of the levator ani muscles, the distance between the urethra and symphysis, and the presence, shape and angulation of urethropelvic ligament. In contrast to normal controls, frequent findings in women with stress incontinence were as follows : increased angle (43%), asymmetry (43%) and higher signal intensity (67%) of the levator ani muscles; increased distance between the urethra and symphysis; loss (43%), discontinuity (60%) and dorsal angulation (43%) of the urethropelvic ligament. In women with stress urinary incontinence, MRI clearly demonstrates the anatomy of the female pelvic floor, changes in the levator ani muscles, the distance between the urethra and symphysis, and the urethropelvic ligament. The modality can therefore be used to evaluate the anatomical changes occurring in cases of stress urinary incontinence. (author)

  20. Dynamic magnetic resonance of pelvic floor: experience in 38 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocantos, Jorge; Fattal Jaef, Virginia; Pietrani, Marcelo; Seclen, Maria F.; Seehaus, Alberto; Sarsotti, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To show the experience in the evaluation of dysfunctions of pelvic floor by dynamic magnetic resonance (DMR) and to describe the structural and dynamic disorders of pelvis organs. Material and Methods: From March 2004 to March 2005 38 patients with pelvic floor disorders have been studied, 33/38 women (86, 84 %) and 5/38 men (15,16 %), ages between 16 and 74 years old. An evacuating rectal enema has been indicated 4 hours before the examination with bladder retention of 3 hours. 180-240 cc of semisolid paste (thin oats and saline solution) has been used to distend rectum until patients refer sensation of rectum full or a maximum of 240 cm 3 . The study has been performed in a Siemens Magnetom Vision (1.5 T) body array and coil CP Body Array Flex. T2 turbo spin eco axial and sagittal (TR 4700, TE1, 32), T1 coronal (TR 580 TE 14) with a 4 mm slice were selected for static sequences and Siemens TRUFI sagittal (TR 4.8 TE 2.3) for dynamic acquisitions during rectal and voiding evacuations. The morphology and symmetry of peri urethral ligaments (PUL), elevator anus muscle (LA), and vagina (V) was evaluated. The organs prolapse was evaluated at rest and maximal pelvis strain in accord with Comiter parameters (Fielding J.R.). Results: At 10/38 (26, 32 %) patients was not detected lesions. In 28/38 P (73,68 %) 75 defects of the pelvic supports (54,6 % of LA, 14,6% of the vagina V, 9,3% of PUL and other 21,3 %). The dynamic sequences show 59 defects, 50, 84 % of posterior compartment and 49,16% of anterior. In 8/38 (28, 57 %) patients the lesions affected both compartment. Conclusion: Dynamic magnetic resonance allows the direct interpretation of the very small pelvic floor structure and its disorders (not available by other methods) and the dynamic study of prolapse, providing a more accurate interpretation of its causes. DRM can be very useful in patients with multi-compartment involvement, complex prolapse or recurrence of symptoms post surgical repair. (author

  1. An education program about pelvic floor muscles improved women's knowledge but not pelvic floor muscle function, urinary incontinence or sexual function: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Roberta Leopoldino; Bø, Kari; Antonio, Flavia Ignácio; Driusso, Patricia; Mateus-Vasconcelos, Elaine Cristine Lemes; Ramos, Salvador; Julio, Monica Pitanguy; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge

    2018-04-01

    Does an educational program with instructions for performing 'the Knack' improve voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, reduce reports of urinary incontinence, improve sexual function, and promote women's knowledge of the pelvic floor muscles? Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessors. Ninety-nine women from the local community. The experimental group (n=50) received one lecture per week for 4 weeks, and instructions for performing 'the Knack'. The control group (n=49) received no intervention. The primary outcome was maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles measured using manometry. Secondary outcomes were: ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles measured using vaginal palpation; severity of urinary incontinence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) scored from 0 to 21; self-reported sexual function; and knowledge related to the pelvic floor. Outcomes were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks. The intervention did not significantly improve: maximum voluntary contraction (MD 2.7 cmH 2 O higher in the experimental group, 95% CI -0.5 to 5.9); ability to contract the pelvic floor muscles (RR 2.18, 95% CI 0.49 to 9.65); or self-reported severity of urinary incontinence (MD 1 point greater reduction in the experimental group, 95% CI -3 to 1). Sexual function did not significantly differ between groups, but very few of the women engaged in sexual activity during the study period. The educational program did, however, significantly increase women's knowledge related to the location, functions and dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles, and treatment options. Education and teaching women to perform 'the Knack' had no significant effect on voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, urinary incontinence or sexual function, but it promoted women's knowledge about the pelvic floor. Brazilian Registry of Clinical

  2. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of minimally invasive pelvic floor reconstruction with polypropylene implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, Katja C.; Reisenauer, Christl; Speck, Sina; Barth, Sonja; Kraemer, Bernhard; Claussen, Claus D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the study was to assess the usefulness of dynamic MRI in patients with pelvic organ prolapse after pelvic floor repair with polypropylene mesh. Materials and methods: Fifteen consecutive patients (mean age 66.5 years) who were scheduled for either anterior (n = 9) or posterior (n = 6) pelvic floor repair were prospectively evaluated by clinical assessment and dynamic MRI 1 day before and 3 months after surgery. MRI diagnoses and MRI measurements of relevant anatomical points at rest and on straining were analysed before and after surgery. Results: At follow-up assessment 93.3% of all patients were clinically cured. Dynamic MRI showed newly developed (n = 6) or increased (n = 6) pelvic organ prolapse in 80% (n = 12) of all patients 3 months after pelvic floor repair. Most of them (n = 11; 91.7%) affected the untreated pelvic floor compartment. On straining anatomical points of reference in the anterior pelvic floor compartment were significantly (p < 0.05) elevated after anterior repair and rectal bulging was significantly (p = 0.036) reduced after posterior pelvic floor repair. Conclusions: In this study dynamic MRI could verify the effective support of anterior and posterior pelvic floor structures by anterior and posterior polypropylene implant respectively. But dynamic MRI demonstrates if one compartment of the pelvic floor is repaired another compartment frequently (73.3%) develops dysfunction. These results did not correspond to clinical symptoms on short-term follow-up (3 months). Studies with long-term follow-up are necessary to prove if dynamic MRI can reliably identify clinically significant pelvic organ prolapse after pelvic floor repair before the onset of symptoms.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on

  4. Can the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence be predicted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Terra (Maaike); M. Deutekom (Marije); A.C. Dobben (Annette); C.G.M.I. Baeten; L.W.M. Janssen (Lucas); G.E. Boeckxstaens (Guy); A.F. Engel (Alexander); R.J.F. Felt-Bersma; J.F.W. Slors; M.F. Gerhards (Michael); A.B. Bijnen (Bart); E. Everhardt; W.R. Schouten (Ruud); B. Berghmans; P.M.M. Bossuyt (Patrick); J. Stoker (Jacob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Pelvic-floor rehabilitation does not provide the same degree of relief in all fecal incontinent patients. We aimed at studying prospectively the ability of tests to predict the outcome of pelvic-floor rehabilitation in patients with fecal incontinence. Materials and methods: Two

  5. Effect of biofeedback training on paradoxical pelvic floor movement in children with dysfunctional voiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Klijn, Aart J.; Vijverberg, Marianne A. W.; de Kort, Laetitia M.; van Empelen, Ron; Schoenmakers, Marja A. G. C.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic perineal ultrasonography to assess the function of the pelvic floor muscles in children with micturition complaints shows that many children with daytime incontinence or recurrent urinary tract infections use their pelvic floor paradoxically. They strain when asked to withhold urine, or they

  6. Synergism between abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in healthy women: a systematic review of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Ferla

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The training of the pelvic floor muscles is widely used for treating pelvic floor dysfunctions, like urinary incontinence. During the training, abdominal contractions are avoided; however several studies support the use of the synergy between these muscle groups. Objective: Carrying out a systematic review of studies that seek to identify the presence of synergy between the muscles of the abdomen and the pelvic floor and its functionality in women without pelvic floor dysfunction. Methodology: To conduct the review, we have followed the recommendations proposed by the Cochrane Collaboration for systematic reviews. The literature search included the databases SCIELO, PEDro, MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE, and manual research, the starting date of the databases until August 2013. We included cross observational studies with healthy women who were assessed to find the presence of synergy between the abdominal muscles and the pelvic floor. Results: We included 10 articles and they all showed the existence of synergy between the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in healthy women in the supine, sitting and standing positions. Conclusion: Thus, we can conclude that there is synergy between the muscles of the abdomen and the pelvic floor in healthy women. Better understanding the behavior of these muscles and synergy may favor the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the female pelvic floor muscles.

  7. A PET study on cortical and subcortical control of pelvic floor musculature in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Bertil F.M.; Sturms, Leontien M.; Holstege, Gert

    1997-01-01

    The pelvic floor musculature plays an important role in behaviors such as defecation, micturition, mating behavior, and vomiting. A recent positron emission tomography (PET) study revealed that structures belonging to the emotional motor system are involved in the control of the pelvic floor during

  8. Is Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Effective for Men With Poststroke Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in men with poststroke lower urinary tract symptoms. Thirty-one poststroke men, median age 68 years, were included in this single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Thirty participants, 15 in each group......, completed the study. The intervention consisted of 3 months (12 weekly sessions) of pelvic floor muscle training in groups and home exercises. The effect was evaluated by the DAN-PSS-1 (Danish Prostate Symptom Score) questionnaire, a voiding diary, and digital anal palpation of the pelvic floor muscle...... that pelvic floor muscle training has an effect for lower urinary tract symptoms, although statistical significance was only seen for pelvic floor muscle....

  9. Production of ascorbic acid releasing biomaterials for pelvic floor repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangır, Naşide; Bullock, Anthony J; Roman, Sabiniano; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    An underlying abnormality in collagen turnover is implied in the occurrence of complications and recurrences after mesh augmented pelvic floor repair surgeries. Ascorbic acid is a potent stimulant of collagen synthesis. The aim of this study is to produce ascorbic acid releasing poly-lactic acid (PLA) scaffolds and evaluate them for their effects on extracellular matrix production and the strength of the materials. Scaffolds which contained either l-ascorbic acid (AA) and Ascorbate-2-Phosphate (A2P) were produced with emulsion electrospinning. The release of both drugs was measured by UV spectrophotometry. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on scaffolds and cultured for 2weeks. Cell attachment, viability and total collagen production were evaluated as well as mechanical properties. No significant differences were observed between AA, A2P, Vehicle and PLA scaffolds in terms of fibre diameter and pore size. The encapsulation efficiency and successful release of both AA and A2P were demonstrated. Both AA and A2P containing scaffolds were significantly more hydrophilic and stronger in both dry and wet states compared to PLA scaffolds. Fibroblasts produced more collagen on scaffolds containing either AA or A2P compared to cells grown on control scaffolds. This study is the first to directly compare the two ascorbic acid derivatives in a tissue engineered scaffold and shows that both AA and A2P releasing electrospun PLA scaffolds increased collagen production of fibroblasts to similar extents but AA scaffolds seemed to be more hydrophilic and stronger compared to A2P scaffolds. Mesh augmented surgical repair of the pelvic floor currently relies on non-degradable materials which results in severe complications in some patients. There is an unmet and urgent need for better pelvic floor repair materials. Our current understanding suggests that the ideal material should be able to better integrate into sites of implantation both biologically and mechanically. The impact of

  10. Reliability of measuring pelvic floor elevation with a diagnostic ultrasonic imaging device

    OpenAIRE

    Ubukata, Hitomi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Huo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of measuring the amount of pelvic floor elevation during pelvic and abdominal muscle contraction with a diagnostic ultrasonic imaging device. [Subjects] The study group comprised 11 healthy women without urinary incontinence or previous birth experience. [Methods] We measured the displacement elevation of the bladder base during contraction of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles was measured using a diagnostic ultrasoni...

  11. [Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength in competition-level athletes and untrained women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludviksdottir, Ingunn; Hardardottir, Hildur; Sigurdardottir, Thorgerdur; Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F

    2018-01-01

    Exercise can stress the pelvic floor muscles. Numerous women experience urinary incontinence while exercising or competing in sports. This study investigated pelvic floor muscle strength, urinary incontinence, and knowledge in contracting pelvic floor muscles among female athletes and untrained women. This was a prospective case-control study measuring pelvic floor muscle strength using vaginal pressure meas-urement. Participants answered questions regarding general health, urinary incontinence, and knowledge on pelvic floor muscles. Partici-pants were healthy nulliparous women aged 18-30 years, athletes and untrained women. The athletes had competed in their sport for at least three years; including handball, soccer, gymnastics, badminton, BootCamp and CrossFit. The women were comparable in age and height. The athletes (n=18) had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.8 kg/m² vs. 25 kg/m² for the untrained (n=16); p<0.05. The athletes trained on average 11.4 hours/week while the untrained women participated in some activity on average for 1.3 hours/week; p< 0.05. Mean pelvic floor strength was 45±2 hPa in the athletes vs. 43±4 hPa in the untrained; p=0.36 for whether the athletes were stronger. Of the athletes, 61.1% experienced urinary incontinence (n=11) compared with 12.5% of the untrained women (n=2); p<0.05. Incontinence usually occurred during high intensity exercise. The athletes were more knowledgeable about the pelvic floor muscles; p<0.05. There was not a significant difference in the strength of pelvic floor muscles of athletes and untrained women. This suggests that pelvic floor muscles are not strengthened during general training but require specific exercises. This holds especially for football, handball and sports with high physical intensity. Coaches need to pay special attention to training and strengthening women's pelvic floor muscles to reduce the occurrence of urinary incontinence.

  12. Feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography of the normal female pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijta, F.M.; Froeling, M.; Paardt, M.P. van der; Bipat, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Stoker, J.; Lakeman, M.M.E.; Montauban van Swijndregt, A.D.; Strijkers, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively determine the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography as a tool for the three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of normal pelvic floor anatomy. Five young female nulliparous subjects (mean age 28 ± 3 years) underwent DTI at 3.0T. Two-dimensional diffusion-weighted axial spin-echo echo-planar (SP-EPI) pulse sequence of the pelvic floor was performed, with additional T2-TSE multiplanar sequences for anatomical reference. Fibre tractography for visualisation of predefined pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles was performed offline by two observers, applying a consensus method. Three eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, λ3), fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated from the fibre trajectories. In all subjects fibre tractography resulted in a satisfactory anatomical representation of the pubovisceral muscle, perineal body, anal - and urethral sphincter complex and internal obturator muscle. Mean FA values ranged from 0.23 ± 0.02 to 0.30 ± 0.04, MD values from 1.30 ± 0.08 to 1.73 ± 0.12 x 10- 3 mm 2 /s. Muscular structures in the superficial layer of the pelvic floor could not be satisfactorily identified. This study demonstrates the feasibility of visualising the complex three-dimensional pelvic floor architecture using 3T-DTI with fibre tractography. DTI of the deep female pelvic floor may provide new insights into pelvic floor disorders. (orig.)

  13. Feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography of the normal female pelvic floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijta, F.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Froeling, M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Biomedical NMR, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Paardt, M.P. van der; Bipat, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lakeman, M.M.E. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Gynaecology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Montauban van Swijndregt, A.D. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Strijkers, G.J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Biomedical NMR, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    To prospectively determine the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography as a tool for the three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of normal pelvic floor anatomy. Five young female nulliparous subjects (mean age 28 {+-} 3 years) underwent DTI at 3.0T. Two-dimensional diffusion-weighted axial spin-echo echo-planar (SP-EPI) pulse sequence of the pelvic floor was performed, with additional T2-TSE multiplanar sequences for anatomical reference. Fibre tractography for visualisation of predefined pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles was performed offline by two observers, applying a consensus method. Three eigenvalues ({lambda}1, {lambda}2, {lambda}3), fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated from the fibre trajectories. In all subjects fibre tractography resulted in a satisfactory anatomical representation of the pubovisceral muscle, perineal body, anal - and urethral sphincter complex and internal obturator muscle. Mean FA values ranged from 0.23 {+-} 0.02 to 0.30 {+-} 0.04, MD values from 1.30 {+-} 0.08 to 1.73 {+-} 0.12 x 10-{sup 3} mm{sup 2}/s. Muscular structures in the superficial layer of the pelvic floor could not be satisfactorily identified. This study demonstrates the feasibility of visualising the complex three-dimensional pelvic floor architecture using 3T-DTI with fibre tractography. DTI of the deep female pelvic floor may provide new insights into pelvic floor disorders. (orig.)

  14. Treating Pelvic Floor Disorders of Defecation: Management or Cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Satish S.C.; Go, Jorge T.

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders that affect defecation consist of structural disorders such as rectocele and functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation. Evaluation includes a good history and physical examination, a careful digital rectal exam, as well as physiological tests such as anorectal manometry, colonic transit study and balloon expulsion test. Defecography and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging may facilitate detection of structural defects. Their management consists of education and counseling regarding bowel function, diet, laxatives and behavioral therapies. Recently, several randomized clinical trials have shown that biofeedback therapy is effective in dyssynergic defecation. Dyssynergia may also co-exist in structural disorders such as solitary rectal ulcer syndrome or rectocele. Hence, before proceeding with surgery, neuromuscular training or biofeedback should be considered. Several surgical approaches including stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) have been advocated, but there is lack of well controlled randomized studies and their efficacy is unproven. PMID:19615303

  15. PELVIC FLOOR DYSFUNCTIONS: CLINICAL AND SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF UROGYNECOLOGIC OUTPATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Fernandes Coelho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the socio-demographic and clinical profile of urogynecologic outpatients of a public tertiary hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará. This is a cross-sectional study whose sample consisted of 85 women with pelvic floor dysfunction. The age ranged from 27 to 86 years old (mean: 53.8±14.2. Most patients were married (54.9%, weren’t working formally (40.0% and didn’t smoke (82.4%. Approximately half was in postmenopausal period (48.2%. Most of them were multiparous (89.4% by vaginal delivery (92.9%. The main complaint reported was urinary incontinence (74.1%, and mixed urinary incontinence (MUI was the most frequent (60.0%. Over half of the patients also had pelvic organ prolapse (75.3%, and the most common defect was from the anterior vaginal wall (55.3%. The majority (57.6% had some form of anorectal dysfunction: constipation (40%, tenesmus (37.6%, fecal incontinence (16.5%. Most of the patients lost urine several times a day (57.3%, with impact on quality of life. The risk factors found are in agreement with literature data, as well as the prevalence of MUI. Given the concomitant disorders, it’s important to address all pathologies, because they are prevalent conditions with medical, social, psychological and economic implications.

  16. Efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training and hypopressive exercises for treating pelvic organ prolapse in women: randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Teixeira Bernardes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have shown that women with pelvic floor dysfunctions present decreased cross-sectional area (CSA of the levator ani muscle. One way to assess the effects of training programs is to measure the CSA of the muscle, using ultrasonography. The aim here was to evaluate the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training and hypopressive exercises for increasing the CSA of the levator ani muscle in women with pelvic organ prolapse. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective randomized controlled trial at the Urogynecology outpatient clinic of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Fifty-eight women with stage II pelvic organ prolapse were divided into three groups for physiotherapy: a pelvic floor muscle training group (GI; a hypopressive exercise group (GII; and a control group (GIII. The patients underwent transperineal ultrasonographic evaluation using a transducer of frequency 4-9 MHz. The (CSA of the levator ani muscle was measured before physiotherapy and after 12 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: The groups were homogeneous regarding age, number of pregnancies, number of vaginal deliveries, body mass index and hormonal status. Statistically significant differences in CSA were found in GI and GII from before to after the treatment (P < 0.001, but not in relation to GIII (P = 0.816. CONCLUSIONS: The CSA of the levator ani muscle increased significantly with physiotherapy among the women with pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic floor muscle training and hypopressive exercises produced similar improvements in the CSA of the levator ani muscle.

  17. A randomized clinical trial comparing pelvic floor muscle training to a Pilates exercise program for improving pelvic muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culligan, Patrick J; Scherer, Janet; Dyer, Keisha; Priestley, Jennifer L; Guingon-White, Geri; Delvecchio, Donna; Vangeli, Margi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Pilates exercise program and a pelvic floor muscle-training (PFMT) program could provide similar improvements in pelvic muscle strength. Sixty-two women with little or no pelvic floor dysfunction were randomized to Pilates or PFMT. Each group had 24 biweekly 1-h sessions with either a physical therapist or Pilates instructor. Strength was measured via perineometry (cmH(2)O). Two questionnaires--pelvic floor distress inventory (PFDI-20) and pelvic floor impact questionnaire (PFIQ-7)--were also collected. At baseline, the Pilates and PFMT groups measured 14.9 +/- 12.5 and 12.5 +/- 10.4 cmH(2)O, respectively (p = 0.41). Both the Pilates and PFMT groups got stronger (6.2 +/- 7.5 cmH(2)O, p = 0.0002 and 6.6 +/- 7.4 cmH(2)O, p = 0.0002, respectively), with no difference between groups p = 0.85. PFIQ and PFDI scores improved from baseline but not between groups. Further study is required to determine if Pilates can actually treat pelvic floor dysfunction.

  18. The 12-month effects of structured lifestyle advice and pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the 12-month effects of adding pelvic floor muscle training to a lifestyle advice program in women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse stage II-III and the number of women who had sought further treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was a 12-month follow up...... of a randomized controlled trial comparing a structured lifestyle advice program alone (lifestyle group) or in combination with pelvic floor muscle training (training and lifestyle group). Both programs consisted of six separate group sessions within 12 weeks. RESULTS: Data were available from 83 (76%) of the 109...... surgery. More severe anterior prolapse and more bladder symptoms at the 3-month follow up were significantly associated with having sought further treatment in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: At 12-month follow up, the effects of adding pelvic floor muscle training to a structured lifestyle advice program were...

  19. The role of local estrogen therapy in the management of pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, T; Yohai, D; Weintraub, A Y

    2016-04-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common and bothersome problems that include a variety of conditions. These conditions greatly affect the performance of daily activities and social function such as work, traveling, physical exercise, sleep and sexual function. Aging is a well-known factor affecting the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract anatomy and function. It is clear that the pelvic organs and their surrounding muscular and connective tissue support are estrogen-responsive. Treatment of pelvic floor disorders requires significant health-care resources and their impact is likely to increase in the near future. This literature review aims to provide an overview of both research and clinical aspects of the pathophysiology of urogenital estrogen deficiency and the role of local estrogen therapy as part of the management strategy of different pelvic floor disorders. The safety and risk concerns regarding the use of local estrogen therapy are addressed as well.

  20. The Integral Theory System Questionnaire: an anatomically directed questionnaire to determine pelvic floor dysfunctions in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, Florian Martin Erich; Fröhlich, Oliver; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Weidner, Wolfgang; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2014-06-01

    Anatomical damage to pelvic floor structures may cause multiple symptoms. The Integral Theory System Questionnaire (ITSQ) is a holistic questionnaire that uses symptoms to help locate damage in specific connective tissue structures as a guide to reconstructive surgery. It is based on the integral theory, which states that pelvic floor symptoms and prolapse are both caused by lax suspensory ligaments. The aim of the present study was to psychometrically validate the ITSQ. Established psychometric properties including validity, reliability, and responsiveness were considered for evaluation. Criterion validity was assessed in a cohort of 110 women with pelvic floor dysfunctions by analyzing the correlation of questionnaire responses with objective clinical data. Test-retest was performed with questionnaires from 47 patients. Cronbach's alpha and "split-half" reliability coefficients were calculated for inner consistency analysis. Psychometric properties of ITSQ were comparable to the ones of previously validated Pelvic Floor Questionnaires. Face validity and content validity were approved by an expert group of the International Collaboration of Pelvic Floor surgeons. Convergent validity assessed using Bayesian method was at least as accurate as the expert assessment of anatomical defects. Objective data measurement in patients demonstrated significant correlations with ITSQ domains fulfilling criterion validity. Internal consistency values ranked from 0.85 to 0.89 in different scenarios. The ITSQ proofed accurate and is able to serve as a holistic Pelvic Floor Questionnaire directing symptoms to site-specific pelvic floor reconstructive surgery.

  1. The effect of pelvic floor physical therapy on sexual function in women complaining dyspareunia

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    Parvin Bastani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dyspareunia is a pain that is occurs in the genital area before, during or after intercourse and is an important factor for sexual dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor physical therapy on sexual function and muscle strength and endurance of pelvic floor (as a non-invasive therapy in women with dyspareunia. Methods: In this clinical trial study, 32 women in the age range of 20-50-year-old and sexually active with complaints of dyspareunia, before the investigation were examined in terms of genital health and strength and endurance of the pelvic floor muscles. After the confidence of mental health, patients underwent pelvic floor rehabilitation for 10 sessions during 3 months. After assessment, myofascial release techniques and progressive pelvic floor muscles exercise was performed for patients based on their primary strength. Finally, patients were compared in terms of the severity of dyspareunia, sexual performance status (by using female sexual function index questionnaire, improvement of symptoms, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance before (first session of physiotherapy and after (after 3 months investigation. Results: In the remaining 32 patients with dyspareunia with a mean age of 38±1.24 years, desire index score 0.95 unit, arousal index score 1.01 unit, lubrication index score 0.67 unit, orgasm index score 0.71 unit, satisfaction index score 1.03 unit, pain index score was increased 1.05 unit, strength index score 2.44 unit, endurance index score 7.06 unit were increased in comparison to before the investigation that showed a significant different with P< 0.0001. Conclusion: According to obtained results, pelvic floor physical therapy had a significant effect in women with dyspareunia. So that the severity of dyspareunia, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance had clinically significant improvement after pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  2. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse : randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M. C. R.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women

  3. Pelvic floor physiotherapy for women with urogenital dysfunction: indications and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, T Y

    2011-03-01

    Pelvic floor physiotherapy (PFPT) is considered to be a salient component of the conservative management of women with urogenital dysfunction including urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). PFPT is an important adjunct to the management of female pelvic and sexual pain disorders which are often associated with bothersome bladder symptoms. Physiotherapists utilize a variety of treatment methods which include behavioral therapy, exercise instruction, manual therapy, biofeedback and electrical stimulation. This review article provides a literature-based update describing and highlighting current indications and methods for pelvic floor physiotherapy intervention.

  4. Impact of vaginal parity and aging on the architectural design of pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Cook, Mark; Tuttle, Lori J; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal delivery and aging are key risk factors for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, which is a critical component of pelvic floor disorders. However, alterations in the pelvic floor muscle intrinsic structure that lead to muscle dysfunction because of childbirth and aging remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of vaginal deliveries and aging on human cadaveric pelvic floor muscle architecture, which is the strongest predictor of active muscle function. Coccygeus, iliococcygeus, and pubovisceralis were obtained from younger donors who were ≤51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 5) and vaginally parous (n = 6) and older donors who were >51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 6) and vaginally parous (n = 6), all of whom had no history of pelvic floor disorders. Architectural parameters, which are predictive of muscle's excursion and force-generating capacity, were determined with the use of validated methods. Intramuscular collagen content was quantified by hydroxyproline assay. Main effects of parity and aging and the interactions were determined with the use of 2-way analysis of variance, with Tukey's post-hoc testing and a significance level of .05. The mean age of younger and older donors differed by approximately 40 years (P = .001) but was similar between nulliparous and parous donors within each age group (P > .9). The median parity was 2 (range, 1-3) in younger and older vaginally parous groups (P = .7). The main impact of parity was increased fiber length in the more proximal coccygeus (P = .03) and iliococcygeus (P = .04). Aging changes manifested as decreased physiologic cross-sectional area across all pelvic floor muscles (P < .05), which substantially exceeded the age-related decline in muscle mass. The physiologic cross-sectional area was lower in younger vaginally parous, compared with younger vaginally nulliparous, pelvic floor muscles; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance

  5. Regular exercisers have stronger pelvic floor muscles than nonregular exercisers at midpregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Ellstrøm Engh, Marie; Hilde, Gunvor

    2018-04-01

    Today all healthy pregnant women are encouraged to be physically active throughout pregnancy, with recommendations to participate in at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity on most days of the week in addition to performing strength training of the major muscle groups 2-3 days per week and also pelvic floor muscle training. There is, however, an ongoing debate whether general physical activity enhances or declines pelvic floor muscle function. The objectives of the study were to compare vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength, and endurance in regular exercisers (exercise ≥30 minutes 3 or more times per week) and nonexercisers at midpregnancy. Furthermore, another objective was to assess whether regular general exercise or pelvic floor muscle strength was associated with urinary incontinence. This was a cross-sectional study at mean gestational week 20.9 (±1.4) including 218 nulliparous pregnant women, with a mean age of 28.6 years (range, 19-40 years) and prepregnancy body mass index of 23.9 kg/m 2 (SD, 4.0). Vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength, and pelvic floor muscle endurance were measured by a high-precision pressure transducer connected to a vaginal balloon. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form was used to assess urinary incontinence. Differences between groups were analyzed using an independent-sample Student t test. Linear regression analysis was conducted to adjust for prepregnancy body mass index, age, smoking during pregnancy, and regular pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. The significance value was set to P ≤ .05. Regular exercisers had statistically significant stronger (mean 6.4 cm H 2 O [95% confidence interval, 1.7-11.2]) and more enduring (mean 39.9 cm H 2 Osec [95% confidence interval, 42.2-75.7]) pelvic floor muscles. Only pelvic floor muscle strength remained statistically significant, when adjusting for possible confounders. Pelvic floor

  6. The influence of various risk factors on the strength of pelvic floor muscle in women

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    Parezanović-Ilić Katarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Damage of any element of pelvic floor leads to its functional damages, reflected in the occurrence of urinary incontinence, prolapse of pelvic organs, fecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Basic aim of our paper was to investigate the influence of various risk factors on pelvic floor muscle strength in women. Methods. The study included 90 female patients and examined how age, job, body weight and height, number of deliveries, sports activities, incontinence occurrence, previous prolapse-caused gynecological surgeries, other gynecological surgeries and other conservatively treated gynecological diseases influence the value of pelvic floor muscle strength. Pelvic floor muscle strength was measured using vaginal dynamometer. Results. Univariate regression analysis showed that parameters such as age, demanding job, body height, number of deliveries, sports activities, prolapse-caused gynecological surgeries, other gynecological surgeries and other gynecological diseases were in positive correlation with the values of pelvic floor muscle strength. In multivariate regression model, incontinence and gynecological operation of prolapse were singled out as independent risk factors. Conclusion. If risk factors that cause damage to pelvic floor muscle are known, it is possible to prevent the damages and improve the quality of women's life.

  7. Myofascial pain and pelvic floor dysfunction in patients with interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaly, Renee; Tidwell, Natalie; Bertolino, Siobhan; Hoyte, Lennox; Downes, Katheryne; Hart, Stuart

    2011-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate myofascial pain in patients with interstitial cystitis (IC) and to correlate myofascial exam findings with validated questionnaires. A retrospective chart review was performed on 186 patients with a diagnosis of IC from April 2007 to December 2008. Demographics, history and physical examination, and validated pelvic floor dysfunction questionnaire scores were extracted. The data was evaluated with SPSS for Windows using Spearman's rho, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis statistical analyses. Myofascial pain was demonstrated in 78.3% of IC patients with at least one myofascial trigger point, and 67.9% of patients had numerous areas of trigger points. Mild correlations were seen with trigger points and scores from the PUF, PFDI-20, and PFIQ-7 questionnaires. Myofascial pain is prevalent among IC patients and positively correlated with pelvic floor dysfunction scores. These findings support evaluation of pelvic floor myofascial pain in IC patients and suggest a possible benefit from pelvic floor therapy.

  8. Strength of pelvic floor in men: reliability intra examiners

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    Patricia Zaidan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The obtaining of urinary continence is due to the strength of the pelvic floor muscles (MAPs at the moment of muscle contraction, when there are sudden increases in intra-abdominal pressure, which increases urethral closure pressure and decreases the possibility of urinary loss. Objective: To verify the reliability, type: stability, intra-examiner, of the measure of the strength of MAPs held with Peritron. Methods: Test and retest study to assess the intra-rater reliability of Peritron to measure the strength of MAPs. The sample consisted of 36 male patients, mean age 65.3 ± 7.2 years, all with urinary incontinence (UI after radical prostatectomy. The physical therapist conducted a training for familiarization with the procedures of MAPs strength assessment with Peritron for two weeks. The strength of MAPs was measured by a perineometer of the Peritron brand (PFX 9300®, Cardio-Design Pty. Ltd, Baulkham Hills, Australia, 2153. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was equal to 0.99; P = 0.0001. The typical measurement error (ETM was equal to 3.1 cmH2O and ETM% of 4. Conclusion: Peritron showed high reliability for measuring the strength of MAPs in men, both for clinical practice and for the production of scientific knowledge. It should be noted that such measures were carried out in stability, so it is suggested that in internal consistency reliability is equivalent.

  9. Comprehensive pelvic floor physical therapy program for men with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, Thomas A.; Masterson, John M.; Azzinaro, Jessica; Manderson, Lattoya; Swain, Sanjaya; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2017-01-01

    Background Male chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms that causes significant impairment and is often challenging to treat. In this prospective study, we evaluated men with CPPS who underwent comprehensive pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) program. We used the previously validated Genitourinary Pain Index (GUPI) to measure outcomes. Methods We included 14 men who underwent physical therapy for idiopathic CPPS from October 2015 to October 2016. Men...

  10. Limited evidence of the effect of prophylactic pelvic floor training on genital prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boie, Sidsel; Jeppesen, Ulla; Bor, Isil Pinar

    Abstract A growing number of women are bothered by genital prolapse. The treatment of genital prolapse includes pelvic floor exercise in variable extent, but only few data are published. Variations in interventions, follow-up time, outcome etc. complicates a comparison. Because of the very limited...... material it is difficult to conclude if pelvic floor exercises have any effect on genital prolapse. There is need for studies concerning the clinical relevance and a cost-benefit analysis....

  11. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor: linking anatomical findings with clinical symtoms

    OpenAIRE

    Steensma, Anneke

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFor evaluation of pelvic floor and lower urinary tract dysfunction the use of transabdominal ultrasound was first documented in the early eighties, with the translabial [1], transrectal [2] and transvaginal [3, 4] techniques developing somewhat later. To obtain a translabial or transperineal image of the pelvic floor, the transducer (ideally a 3.5-6 MHZ curved array abdominal probe) is placed on the perineum, after covering the transducer with an unpowered glove or thin plastic wr...

  12. Dynamic imaging of posterior compartment pelvic floor dysfunction by evacuation proctography: Techniques, indications, results and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglinte, Dean D.T.; Bartram, Clive

    2007-01-01

    The clinical management of patients with anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction is often difficult. Evacuation proctography has evolved from a method to evaluate the anorectum for functional disorders to its current status as a practical method for evaluating anorectal dysfunction and pelvic floor prolapse. It has a high observer accuracy and yield of positive diagnosis. Clinicians find it of major benefit and has altered management from surgical to medical and vice versa in a significant number of cases

  13. Communication barriers among Spanish-speaking women with pelvic floor disorders: lost in translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aqsa A; Sevilla, Claudia; Wieslander, Cecilia K; Moran, Meghan B; Rashid, Rezoana; Mittal, Brita; Maliski, Sally L; Rogers, Rebecca G; Anger, Jennifer T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate barriers in communication and disease understanding among office staff and interpreters when communicating with Spanish-speaking women with pelvic floor disorders. We conducted a qualitative study to evaluate barriers to communication with Spanish-speaking women with pelvic floor disorders among office staff and interpreters. Sixteen office staff and interpreters were interviewed; interview questions focused on experiences with Spanish-speaking patients with pelvic floor disorders in the clinic setting. Interview transcripts were analyzed qualitatively using grounded theory methodology. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed several barriers in communication as identified by office staff and interpreters. Three major classes were predominant: patient, interpreter, and system-related barriers. Patient-related barriers included a lack of understanding of anatomy and medical terminology and inhibited discussions due to embarrassment. Provider-related barriers included poor interpreter knowledge of pelvic floor vocabulary and the use of office staff without interpreting credentials. System-related barriers included poor access to information. From these preliminary themes, an emergent concept was revealed: it is highly likely that Spanish-speaking women with pelvic floor disorders have poor understanding of their condition owing to multiple obstacles in communication. There are many levels of barriers to communications with Latin women treated for pelvic floor disorders, arising from the patient, interpreter, and the system itself. These barriers contribute to a low level of understanding of their diagnosis, treatment options, and administered therapies.

  14. Hip and groin pain in a cyclist resolved after performing a pelvic floor fascial mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navot, Sivan; Kalichman, Leonid

    2016-07-01

    Pelvic floor muscle assessment in situations of hip/groin pain in both male and female patients can be a key element in treatment success. We present herein, a 32 year old male professional cyclist, exhibiting right hip and groin pain during cycling and prolonged sitting. The pain commenced after the patient suffered a right hip severe contusion in 2013 causing a tear in the tensor fascia lata and gluteus medius muscle. The patient did not complain of pelvic floor dysfunctions. After receiving several series of conventional physical therapy for the hip/groin pain, the patient experienced partial pain relief and slight improvement of hip range of motion. His pelvic floor muscles and fascial involvement were subsequently assessed. Two sessions of Pelvic Floor Fascial Mobilization (PFFM) were performed and the patient fully recovered. The authors suggest that PFFM, a novel fascial-oriented manual therapy of the pelvic floor approach, can be used for both hip/groin and pelvic floor pain or dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic study of pelvic floor in patients with constipation: dynamic magnetic resonance vs defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Vasquez, Carlos Mario; Pulgarin, Ricardo Luis German; Melo Arango, Catalina; Delgado de Bedout, Jorge Andres; Llano Serna, Juan Fernando; Restrepo Restrepo, Jose Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: to compare the concordance between defecography and magnetic resonance in patients with constipation. Materials and methods: we did a prospective and descriptive assay to determine the concordance of a diagnostic test with 17 patients. The evaluation of the studies was double blind. Results: the 17 patients were females, age range 31 - 77 year the symptoms were present between 3 to 120 months. Anterior rectocele was the most common diagnosis (11 patients) and magnetic resonance had sensibility 100%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 78, 57% and negative predictive value 100%. 7 patients had pelvic floor descent and magnetic resonance had sensibility 71.4%, specificity 20% positive predictive value 38.46% and negative predictive value 50%. Defecography found patients with enterocele and magnetic resonance had sensibility 0% and specificity 100 anismus was present in 2 patients and magnetic resonance didn't find them. Conclusion defecography is still the gold standard for patients with eonstipation. Magnetic resonance are a promise for those patients but has to improve

  16. Biomechanical paradigm and interpretation of female pelvic floor conditions before a treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucente V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vincent Lucente,1 Heather van Raalte,2 Miles Murphy,1 Vladimir Egorov3 1The Institute for Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Allentown, PA, USA; 2Princeton Urogynecology, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Artann Laboratories, Trenton, NJ, USA Background: Further progress in restoring a woman’s health may be possible if a patient with a damaged pelvic floor could undergo medical imaging and biomechanical diagnostic tests. The results of such tests could contribute to the analysis of multiple treatment options and suggest the optimal one for that patient.Aim: To develop a new approach for the biomechanical characterization of vaginal conditions, muscles, and connective tissues in the female pelvic floor.Methods: Vaginal tactile imaging (VTI allows biomechanical assessment of the soft tissue along the entire length of the anterior, posterior, and lateral vaginal walls at rest, with manually applied deflection pressures and with muscle contraction, muscle relaxation, and Valsalva maneuver. VTI allows a large body of measurements to evaluate individual variations in tissue elasticity, support defects, as well as pelvic muscle function. Presuming that 1 the female pelvic floor organs are suspended by ligaments against which muscles contract to open or close the outlets and 2 damaged ligaments weaken the support and may reduce the force of muscle contraction, we made an attempt to characterize multiple pelvic floor structures from VTI data.Results: All of the 138 women enrolled in the study were successfully examined with the VTI. The study subjects have had normal pelvic support or pelvic organ prolapse (stages I–IV. The average age of this group of subjects was 60±15 years. We transposed a set of 31 VTI parameters into a quantitative characterization of pelvic muscles and ligamentous structures. Interpretation of the acquired VTI data for normal pelvic floor support and prolapse conditions is proposed based on biomechanical assessment of the

  17. Relationship between female pelvic floor dysfunction and sexual dysfunction: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolami, Arianna; Vanti, Carla; Banchelli, Federico; Guccione, Andrew A; Pillastrini, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    The ability to express one's sexuality and engage in sexual activity requires multisystemic coordination involving many psychological functions as well as the integrity of the nervous, hormonal, vascular, immune, and neuromuscular body structures and functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations among pelvic floor function, sexual function, and demographic and clinical characteristics in a population of women initiating physical therapy evaluation and treatment for pelvic floor-related dysfunctions (urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, vulvodynia, vaginismus, and constipation). We consented and collected completed demographic data and data related to symptoms and clinical condition on 85 consecutive patients in an outpatient physical therapy clinic. Clinical and anthropometric characteristics were analyzed descriptively. Analysis of variance and linear regression analyses were used to analyze Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) scale ratings, whereas zero-inflated beta-binomial regression was applied to the pain subscale. Main outcome measure was FSFI score, whereas the secondary outcome measure was the FSFI subscale score related to pain. Women in our sample were 38 years old on average, 33% of whom had given birth and 82% of whom had high tone pelvic floor. Being in the middle-tercile age group and exhibiting low pelvic floor tone (Beta = 6.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.4; 12.0]) were significantly associated with lower levels of sexual dysfunction. Women with low tone pelvic floor also reported lower pain (odds ratio = 4.0; 95% CI = [1.6; 9.6]), whereas younger aged and physically unsatisfied subjects were more likely not to have sexual activity in the month prior to scale measurement. In female patients with pelvic floor muscle dysfunction undergoing physical therapy and rehabilitation, sexual dysfunction appears to be significantly correlated with age and high pelvic floor muscle tone. © 2015

  18. Does motivation predict outcome of pelvic floor muscle retraining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te West, Nevine I D; Parkin, Katrina; Hayes, Wendy; Costa, Daniel S J; Kasparian, Nadine A; Moore, Kate H

    2017-02-01

    Although pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is effective for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), patients need to be motivated to obtain cure. An instrument to assess motivation in such patients was published in 2009: the Incontinence Treatment Motivation Questionnaire (ITMQ). The ITMQ consists of five domains: (i) positive attitudes toward PFMT; (ii) reasons for not doing PFMT; (iii) difficulties living with incontinence; (iv) desire for treatment; and (v) incontinence severity influencing motivation. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between ITMQ scores and treatment success. After referral for PFMT, women with SUI completed the ITMQ. Pre- and post-treatment outcomes were the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) score and a 24-hr pad test. Correlations between ITMQ scores and baseline, as well as post-treatment change in ICIQ scores and pad test results were examined. Additionally, the demographics of non-participants, participants, and patients lost to follow-up were compared. Of 85 recruits, 18 did not complete the ITMQ, 14 were lost to follow-up, thus 53 completed the PFMT programme and undertook either one or both outcomes. Pre-treatment, severity on ICIQ correlated with total ITMQ (ρ = 0.33, P = 0.01). Post-treatment change in pad test was inversely correlated with Domain 2 (ρ = -0.33, P = 0.03). The pre-treatment severity of incontinence was significantly associated with motivation for treatment. Unfortunately, post-treatment change correlated with only one domain of the questionnaire. Further modification of the ITMQ is envisaged. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:316-321, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dynamic translabial ultrasound versus echodefecography combined with the endovaginal approach to assess pelvic floor dysfunctions: How effective are these techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; Karbage, S A; Bezerra, L S; Regadas, F S P; da Silva Vilarinho, A; Borges, L B; Regadas Filho, F S P; Veras, L B

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of dynamic translabial ultrasound (TLUS) in the assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and compare the results with echodefecography (EDF) combined with the endovaginal approach. Consecutive female patients with pelvic floor dysfunction were eligible. Each patient was assessed with EDF combined with the endovaginal approach and TLUS. The diagnostic accuracy of the TLUS was evaluated using the results of EDF as the standard for comparison. A total of 42 women were included. Four sphincter defects were identified with both techniques, and EDF clearly showed if the defect was partial or total and additionally identified the pubovisceral muscle defect. There was substantial concordance regarding normal relaxation and anismus. Perfect concordance was found with rectocele and cystocele. The rectocele depth was measured with TLUS and quantified according to the EDF classification. Fair concordance was found for intussusception. There was no correlation between the displacement of the puborectal muscle at maximum straining on EDF with the displacement of the anorectal junction (ARJ), compared at rest with maximal straining on TLUS to determine perineal descent (PD). The mean ARJ displacement was similar in patients with normal and those with excessive PD on TLUS. Both modalities can be used as a method to assess pelvic floor dysfunction. The EDF using 3D anorectal and endovaginal approaches showed advantages in identification of the anal sphincters and pubodefects (partial or total). There was good correlation between the two techniques, and a TLUS rectocele classification based on size that corresponds to the established classification using EDF was established.

  20. Comprehensive pelvic floor physical therapy program for men with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Thomas A; Masterson, John M; Azzinaro, Jessica; Manderson, Lattoya; Swain, Sanjaya; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2017-10-01

    Male chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms that causes significant impairment and is often challenging to treat. In this prospective study, we evaluated men with CPPS who underwent comprehensive pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) program. We used the previously validated Genitourinary Pain Index (GUPI) to measure outcomes. We included 14 men who underwent physical therapy for idiopathic CPPS from October 2015 to October 2016. Men with clearly identifiable causes of pelvic pain, such as previous surgery, chronic infection, trauma, prostatitis and epididymitis were excluded. Treatment included: (I) manual therapy (internal and external) of pelvic floor and abdominal musculature to facilitate relaxation of muscles; (II) therapeutic exercises to promote range of motion, improve mobility/flexibility and strengthen weak muscles; (III) biofeedback to facilitate strengthening and relaxation of pelvic floor musculature; (IV) neuromodulation for pelvic floor muscle relaxation and pain relief. GUPI questionnaires were collected at initial evaluation and after the 10th visit. Higher scores reflect worse symptoms. Previous validation of the GUPI calculated a reduction of 7 points to robustly predict being a treatment responder (sensitivity 100%, specificity 76%) and a change in 4 points to predict modest response. Data are presented as medians (ranges). A total of 10 patients completed 10 visits, and the remaining four patients completed between 5 and 9 visits. The median National Institute of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score at initial evaluation was 30.8 [16-39] and decreased to 22.2 [7-37] at the tenth visit. Five of the 10 patients (50%) in the study had a reduction of greater than 7 points indicating a robust treatment response, and two (20%) had a change of greater than 4 indicating moderate response. Three patients (30%) did not have any meaningful change in NIH-CPSI and the remaining four are in the

  1. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on sexual problems, in a homogenous group of victims of adolescence rape without a history of childhood sexual, physical, and/or emotional abuse. Sexual functioning and pelvic floor functioning were assessed using self-report questionnaires. In this cross-sectional study, a group of 89 young women aged 18-25 years who were victimized by rape in adolescence was compared with a group of 114 nonvictimized controls. The rape victims were treated for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 3 years prior to participation in the study. Three years posttreatment, rape victims were 2.4 times more likely to have a sexual dysfunction (lubrication problems and pain) and 2.7 times more likely to have pelvic floor dysfunction (symptoms of provoked vulvodynia, general stress, lower urinary tract, and irritable bowel syndrome) than nonvictimized controls. The relationship between rape and sexual problems was partially mediated by the presence of pelvic floor problems. Rape victims and controls did not differ with regard to sexual activities. Rape victims suffer significantly more from sexual dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction when compared with nontraumatized controls, despite the provision of treatment for PTSD. Possibly, physical manifestations of PTSD have been left unaddressed in treatment. Future treatment protocols should consider incorporating (physical or psychological) treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction and/or pelvic floor dysfunction into trauma exposure treatments. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  2. Pelvic floor myofascial trigger points: manual therapy for interstitial cystitis and the urgency-frequency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J M

    2001-12-01

    The effectiveness of manual physical therapy was evaluated in patients with interstitial cystitis and the urethral syndrome, that is urgency-frequency with or without pelvic pain. The rationale was based on the hypothesis that pelvic floor myofascial trigger points are not only a source of pain and voiding symptoms, but also a trigger for neurogenic bladder inflammation via antidromic reflexes. From September 1995 to November 2000, 45 women and 7 men, including 10 with interstitial cystitis and 42 with the urgency-frequency syndrome, underwent manual physical therapy to the pelvic floor for 1 to 2 visits weekly for 8 to 12 weeks. Results were determined by patient completed symptom score sheets indicating the rate of improvement according to outcome parameters, including 25% to 50%-mild, 51% to 75%-moderate, 76% to 99%-marked and 100%-complete resolution. In 10 cases these subjective results were confirmed by measuring resting pelvic floor tension by electromyography before and after the treatment course. Of the 42 patients with the urgency-frequency syndrome with or without pain 35 (83%) had moderate to marked improvement or complete resolution, while 7 of the 10 (70%) with interstitial cystitis had moderate to marked improvement. The mean duration of symptoms before treatment in those with interstitial cystitis and the urgency-frequency syndrome was 14 (median 12) and 6 years (median 2.5), respectively. In patients with no symptoms or brief, low intensity flares mean followup was 1.5 years. In 10 patients who underwent electromyography mean resting pelvic floor tension decreased from 9.73 to 3.61 microV., which was a 65% improvement. Pelvic floor manual therapy for decreasing pelvic floor hypertonus effectively ameliorates the symptoms of the urgency/frequency syndrome and interstitial cystitis.

  3. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  4. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING IN THE TREATMENT OF URINARY INCONTINENCE AFTER RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Demidko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy is 0.8 to 87%. This category of patients has pelvic floor muscle weakness and reduced perineal reflex. The treatment of these patients uses a pelvic floor exercise system that is to enhance muscle tone and to develop strong reflex contraction in response to a sudden rise in intraabdominal pressure. Pelvic floor muscle training belongs to first-line therapy for urinary incontinence occurring within 6 to 12 months after prostatectomy. The ability to control pelvic floor muscle knowingly and to train them allows one not only to increase the closing capability of sphincter mechanisms, but also to suppress involuntary detrusor contractions. We used this method in 9 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. The duration of pelvic floor muscle training under control was up to 25 weeks. During this period, the symptoms of incontinence were relieved. No contraindications or adverse reactions have put this method in first-line therapy for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

  5. Virtual reality: new method of teaching anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Howard D; Pearl, Russell K; Orsay, Charles P; Rasmussen, Mary; Evenhouse, Ray; Ai, Zhuming; Blew, Gregory; Dech, Fred; Edison, Marcia I; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Abcarian, Herand

    2003-03-01

    A clear understanding of the intricate spatial relationships among the structures of the pelvic floor, rectum, and anal canal is essential for the treatment of numerous pathologic conditions. Virtual-reality technology allows improved visualization of three-dimensional structures over conventional media because it supports stereoscopic-vision, viewer-centered perspective, large angles of view, and interactivity. We describe a novel virtual reality-based model designed to teach anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy, pathology, and surgery. A static physical model depicting the pelvic floor and anorectum was created and digitized at 1-mm intervals in a CT scanner. Multiple software programs were used along with endoscopic images to generate a realistic interactive computer model, which was designed to be viewed on a networked, interactive, virtual-reality display (CAVE or ImmersaDesk). A standard examination of ten basic anorectal and pelvic floor anatomy questions was administered to third-year (n = 6) and fourth-year (n = 7) surgical residents. A workshop using the Virtual Pelvic Floor Model was then given, and the standard examination was readministered so that it was possible to evaluate the effectiveness of the Digital Pelvic Floor Model as an educational instrument. Training on the Virtual Pelvic Floor Model produced substantial improvements in the overall average test scores for the two groups, with an overall increase of 41 percent (P = 0.001) and 21 percent (P = 0.0007) for third-year and fourth-year residents, respectively. Resident evaluations after the workshop also confirmed the effectiveness of understanding pelvic anatomy using the Virtual Pelvic Floor Model. This model provides an innovative interactive educational framework that allows educators to overcome some of the barriers to teaching surgical and endoscopic principles based on understanding highly complex three-dimensional anatomy. Using this collaborative, shared virtual-reality environment

  6. Physical Therapy for Fecal Incontinence in Children with Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddasani, Swathi; Moe, Amanda; Semmelrock, Caitlin; Gilbert, Caroyl Luan; Enemuo, Valentine; Chiou, Eric Howard; Chumpitazi, Bruno Pedro

    2017-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of physical therapy (PT) for fecal incontinence in children with pelvic floor dyssynergia (PFD). Retrospective chart review of children with PFD completing >1 PT session for fecal incontinence at a quaternary children's hospital. The frequency of fecal incontinence (primary outcome), constipation-related medication use, number of bowel movements (in those with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function were captured at baseline and at the final PT visit. Outcomes were categorized as excellent (complete continence), good (>50% decrease in fecal incontinence frequency), fair (not worsening but Pelvic floor PT is effective in the majority of children with fecal incontinence related to PFD. Factors associated with PT efficacy include improved PFM functioning, good compliance with PT, and history of tethered cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disorders of the pelvic floor and anal sphincters; a gastroenterologist’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn M.M. Quigley, MD FRCP FACP FACG FRCPI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration and coordination of the musculature of the pelvic floor and the anal sphincters is critical to two important physiological functions: defecation and continence. Consequently, disorders affecting the pelvic floor muscles, the anal sphincters, their innervation or their precise coordination will, depending on their nature, result either in obstructed defecation or fecal incontinence. Both of these disorders are much more common in females and the latter, in particular, is linked with parity. While the symptomatology, presentation and optimal mode of investigation of fecal incontinence are well standardized, considerable debate and controversy continues to surround the contributions of pelvic floor and anal sphincter dysfunction to chronic constipation and the optimal clinical approach to their investigation remains to be defined. In appropriately chosen cases surgical intervention may provide the best outcome for sufferers from incontinence; biofeedback approaches may be of value in both incontinence and obstructed defecation and surgery has little role to play in the latter.

  8. Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Increase Pelvic Floor Muscle Mass in Ovariectomized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Sullivan, Ryan D; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Tillmann, Heather; Getzenberg, Robert H; Narayanan, Ramesh

    2017-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a prevalent condition, is represented by an involuntary leakage of urine that results, at least in part, from weakened or damaged pelvic floor muscles and is triggered by physical stress. Current treatment options are limited with no oral therapies available. The pelvic floor is rich in androgen receptor and molecules with anabolic activity including selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may serve as therapeutic options for individuals with SUI. In this study, two SARMs (GTx-024 and GTx-027) were evaluated in a post-menopausal animal model in order to determine their effect on pelvic floor muscles. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and their pelvic muscles allowed to regress. The animals were then treated with vehicle or doses of GTx-024 or GTx-027. Animal total body weight, lean body mass, and pelvic floor muscle weights were measured along with the expression of genes associated with muscle catabolism. Treatment with the SARMs resulted in a restoration of the pelvic muscles to the sham-operated weight. Coordinately, the induction of genes associated with muscle catabolism was inhibited. Although a trend was observed towards an increase in total lean body mass in the SARM-treated groups, no significant differences were detected. Treatment of an ovariectomized mouse model with SARMs resulted in an increase in pelvic floor muscles, which may translate to an improvement of symptoms associated with SUI and serves as the basis for evaluating their clinical use. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 640-646, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Correlation of Digital Palpation and Transabdominal Ultrasound for Assessment of Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Lorestani, Leila; Azari, Afsaneh

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction has been commonly associated with urinary disorders and lumbo-pelvic pain. Transabdominal (TA) ultrasound is currently used by physical therapists to assess PFM function. Controversy exists regarding the correlation between TA ultrasound measurement and vaginal palpation for assessment of PFM contraction, and this relationship has not yet been examined concurrently during the same contraction. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation of ...

  10. The Treatment of Chronic Coccydynia and Postcoccygectomy Pain With Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kelly M; Fisher, Lauren W; Bernstein, Ira H; Bradley, Michelle H

    2017-04-01

    Coccydynia is a challenging disorder that often is refractory to treatments such as medications and injections. Physical therapy for coccydynia rarely has been studied. To evaluate the efficacy of pelvic floor physical therapy for reducing pain levels in patients with coccydynia. Retrospective chart review. The pelvic floor rehabilitation clinic of a major university hospital. A total of 124 consecutive patients over age 18 with a chief complaint of coccydynia between 2009 and 2012. A subgroup of 17 of the 124 patients had previously undergone coccygectomy with continued pain postoperatively. The primary treatment intervention was pelvic floor physical therapy aimed at pelvic floor muscle relaxation. Secondary treatment interventions included the prescription of baclofen for muscle relaxation (19% of patients), ganglion impar blocks (8%), or coccygeus trigger point injections (17%). Primary outcome measures included final minimum, average, and maximum pain numeric rating scales. A secondary outcome measure was the patient's subjective percent global improvement assessment. Baseline demographics were used to determine which pretreatment characteristics were correlated with treatment outcomes. Of the 124 patients, 93 participated in pelvic floor physical therapy and were included in statistical analysis. For the 79 patients who completed treatment (with a mean of 9 physical therapy sessions), the mean average pain ratings decreased from 5.08 to 1.91 (P physical therapy. Pain duration and history of trauma did not affect treatment outcomes. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a safe and effective method of treating coccydynia. III. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical therapy for chronic scrotal content pain with associated pelvic floor pain on digital rectal exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M Ryan; Dugan, Sheila A; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic scrotal content pain (CSCP) is a common condition that can be challenging to manage definitively. A cohort of patients with CSCP have referred pain from myofascial abnormalities of the pelvic floor and therefore require treatment modalities that specifically address the pelvic floor such as pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT). Retrospective chart review of all men with a pelvic floor component of CSCP presenting to our tertiary care medical center and undergoing PFPT from 2011-2014. Patients with CSCP and pain/tightness on pelvic floor evaluation with 360° digital rectal exam (DRE) were referred to a physiotherapist for PFPT. CSCP was defined as primary unilateral or bilateral pain of the testicle, epididymis and/or spermatic cord that was constant or intermittent, lasted greater than 3 months, and significantly interfered with daily activities. Long term follow up was conducted by office visit and physical therapy chart review. Thirty patients, mean age of 42 years (range 18-75), were followed for a median of 13 months (range 3-48). Median pre-PFPT pain score was 6/10 (range 2-10). After a mean of 12 PFPT sessions (IQR 6-16), pain improved in 50.0% of patients, median decrease in pain was 4.5/10 (range 1-10). Complete resolution of pain occurred in 13.3%, 44.0% had none to minor residual pain. Following PFPT, fewer subjects required pain medication compared with prior to PFPT (44.0% versus 73.3%, p = 0.03). For men with CSCP and a positive pelvic floor exam with DRE, we recommend a trial of PFPT as an effective and non-operative treatment modality.

  12. Do stages of menopause affect the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Özge Çeliker; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Tosun, Gökhan; Ergenoğlu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgur; Malkoç, Mehtap; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine whether there is a difference in pelvic floor muscle strength attributable to pelvic floor muscle training conducted during different stages of menopause. One hundred twenty-two women with stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were included in this prospective controlled study. The participants included in this study were separated into three groups according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop staging system as follows: group 1 (n = 41): stages -3 and -2; group 2 (n = 32): stages +1 and -1; and group 3 (n = 30): stage +2. All three groups were provided an individual home exercise program throughout the 12-week study. Pelvic floor muscle strength before and after the 12-week treatment was measured in all participants (using the PERFECT [power, endurance, number of repetitions, and number of fast (1-s) contractions; every contraction is timed] scheme, perineometry, transabdominal ultrasound, Brink scale, pad test, and stop test). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences in pre-exercise training pelvic floor muscle strength parameters among the three groups. After 12 weeks, there were statistically significant increases in PERFECT scheme, Brink scale, perineometry, and ultrasound values. In contrast, there were significant decreases in stop test and 1-hour pad test values observed in the three groups (P = 0.001, dependent t test). In comparison with the other groups, group 1 demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the following postexercise training parameters: power, repetition, speed, Brink vertical displacement, and stop test. The lowest increase was observed in group 2 (P menopause with pelvic floor muscle training, but the rates of increase vary according to the menopausal stage of the participants. Women in the late menopausal transition and early menopause are least responsive to pelvic floor muscle strength training

  13. Validation of Spanish versions of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI) and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ): a multicenter validation randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotosho, Tola B; Hardart, Anne; Rogers, Rebecca G; Schaffer, Joseph I; Kobak, William H; Romero, Audrey A

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate Spanish versions of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI) and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ). Spanish versions were developed using back translation and validation was performed by randomizing bilingual women to complete the Spanish or English versions of the questionnaires first. Weighted kappa statistics assessed agreement for individual questions; interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) compared primary and subscale scores. Cronbach's alpha assessed internal consistency of Spanish versions. To detect a 2.7 point difference in scores with 80% power and alpha of 0.05, 44 bilingual subjects were required. Individual questions showed good to excellent agreement (kappa > 0.6) for all but eight questions on the PFIQ. ICCs of primary and subscale scores for both questionnaires showed excellent agreement. (All ICC > 0.79). All Cronbach's alpha values were excellent (>0.84) for the primary scales of both questionnaires. Valid and reliable Spanish versions of the PFIQ and PFDI have been developed.

  14. Overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM): improving diagnostic accuracy with clinical examination and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Hau Choong; Ranasinghe, Weranja; Tan, Philip Huang Min; O'Connell, Helen E

    2017-07-01

    To identify the functional correlation of overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM) with cystoscopic and fluoroscopic urodynamic studies (FUDS), including urethral pressure measurements. Patients refractory to conservative therapy including bladder retraining, medications and pelvic muscle exercises for a variety of gamut of storage and voiding disorders were evaluated. Prospective data for 201 patients across both genders who underwent flexible cystoscopy and urodynamics for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) refractory to conservative management between 01 Jan 2014 and 01 Jan 2016 was collected. Factors studied included history of LUTS, voiding patterns, physical examination, cystoscopic findings and functional studies, with maximum urethral closing pressure (MUCP). A total of 201 were patients recruited. The 85 were diagnosed with OPFM based on clinical presentation and presence of pelvic floor tenderness on examination. Significant differences were noted on functional studies with FUDS and urethral pressure measurement. Subjects with pelvic floor tenderness were found to have a higher (MUCP) at 93.1 cm H2O compared to 80.6 cm H2O (P=0.015). There are distinct characteristics of OPFM on clinical examination and functional studies, in particular MUCP. In patients refractory to conservative treatments, specific urodynamics tests are useful in sub-categorising patients. When OPFM is diagnosed, the impact on patient management is significant, and targeted intervention with pelvic floor physiotherapy is central in the multimodal approach of this complex condition.

  15. Dynamic magnetic resonance defecography in the diagnosis of combined pelvic floor disorders in proctology; Dynamische MR-Defaekographie zur Diagnostik kombinierter Beckenbodenfunktionsstoerungen in der Proktologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetzel, C.; Strotzer, M.; Lenhart, M.; Feuerbach, S. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Fuerst, A.; Rentsch, M. [Klinikum der Univ. Regensburg (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2001-05-01

    Evaluation of magnetic resonance defecography in the diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders were examined prospectively. MRI was performed on a 1.5 T scanner. The rectum was opacified with 200 ml of ultrasound transmission gel. A sagittal single section T2-weighted gradient echo sequence with a temporal resolution of 1.1 second was performed. Changes of the anorectal angle and the position of the pelvic organs in relation to the pubococcygeal line were registered at rest, during straining, and during evacuation of the rectum. Results: Patients with obstructed defecation (n = 15) showed prolapse of the rectal mucosa (n = 5), anterior rectocele (n = 8), pelvic floor descent (n = 5), enterocele (n = 2), and anorectal dyscoordination (n = 3). Individuals with stool incontinence (n = 15) had an anterior rectocele (n = 10), pelvic floor descent (n = 11), enterocele (n = 2), prolapse of rectal mucosa (n = 1), and a puborectal insufficiency (n = 1). Urine incontinence was associated with cystocele (n = 10) or normal findings (n = 4). In patients with unspecific symptoms (n = 6), anorectal dyscoordination (n = 4) and prolapse of the rectal mucosa (n = 2) were found. MRI was superior for the detection of enteroceles, cystoceles and pelvic floor descent compared with clinical investigation. Conclusion: Dynamic MR imaging supplies complex information in anorectal disease and thus improves protoscopy. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war die Evaluierung der dynamischen MRT in der proktologischen Diagnostik. Patienten und Methode: in einer prospektiven Studie wurden 36 Patienten (27 Frauen, 9 Maenner) mit Beckenbodenfunktionsstoerungen an einem 1.5-T-Geraet konsekutiv untersucht. Das Rektum wurde mit 200 ml Ultraschallgel kontrastiert. Verwendet wurde eine T{sub 2}-gewichtete Gradientenechoseqenz mit einer zeitlichen Aufloesung von 1,1 Sekunden in Einzelschichttechnik. Aus den Ergebnissen von MRT und proktologischer Untersuchung wurde eine Konsensdiagnose erstellt, die die

  16. Apparatus for treating the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus for reaing carcinoma of the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity is described. An elongated tube has an inner end adapted to be placed in the pelvic cavity and an outer end adapted to extend through to the outside of the body. Radioactive material is placed at the inner end. An inner balloon above the radioactive material is inflated to hold a body of liquid shielding material such as mercury. A lower balloon portion beneath the inner balloon spaces areas to be treated such as the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity from the radioactive material. An upper balloon portion above the inner balloon keeps the intestines out of the pelvic cavity and away from the radioactive material. The apparatus is inserted into the pelvic cavity through an abdominal incision. When treating a woman for carcinoma in the walls and floor of the pelvic cavity the tube is moved through the vaginal passage from the inside outwardly. When treating a woman with a closed vaginal passage, as may result from surgery, or when treating a man, such as for carcinoma of the bladder, the tube will pass out of the body through a lower abdominal incision. Following treatment, all balloons are deflated so that the apparatus can be withdrawn through the vaginal passage or the lower abdominal incision, as the case may be. (auth)

  17. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training versus attention-control massage treatment in patients with faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussing, Anja; Dahn, Inge; Due, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment...... treatment and conservative treatment. The primary outcome is participants' rating of symptom changes after 16 weeks of treatment using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale. Secondary outcomes are the Vaizey Incontinence Score, the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, the Fecal Incontinence...

  18. The effect of pelvic floor physical therapy on sexual function in women complaining dyspareunia

    OpenAIRE

    Parvin Bastani; Sakineh Hajebrahimi; Fariba Ghaderi; Zahra Vakilazad; Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dyspareunia is a pain that is occurs in the genital area before, during or after intercourse and is an important factor for sexual dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor physical therapy on sexual function and muscle strength and endurance of pelvic floor (as a non-invasive therapy) in women with dyspareunia. Methods: In this clinical trial study, 32 women in the age range of 20-50-year-old and sexually active with complaints of dyspareun...

  19. Reconstruction of the pelvic floor and the vagina after total pelvic exenteration using the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, Ilkka S; Vuento, Maarit H; Hyöty, Marja K; Kallio, Jukka; Kuokkanen, Hannu O

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic exenteration (TPE) is a rare operation in which the pelvic contents are removed entirely. Several options for pelvic floor and vaginal reconstruction have been described including transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. The transverse musculocutaneous gracilis (TMG) flap has been introduced for breast reconstruction as a free flap. We adopted the pedicled TMG flap for reconstructions after TPE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this method in the literature. Between November 2011 and February 2014, 12 patients underwent TPE and reconstruction with unilateral (six patients) or bilateral (six patients) pedicled TMG flaps. Five patients underwent vaginal reconstruction with bilateral TMG flaps. We describe the operative procedure and the outcome of the operation in these patients. The total mean operative times for TPE with or without vaginal reconstruction were 467 ± 12 and 386 ± 59 min, respectively. The TMG flaps had enough vascular tissue and mobility for reconstructing the TPE defects. There was distal edge necrosis in one out of 18 flaps, while the rest survived completely. During the follow-up, complete wound healing with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor was observed in all cases. Soft-tissue reconstructions are needed to reduce complications associated with TPE, to secure the pelvic floor and to reconstruct the vagina in select patients. The TMG flap is a logical flap choice that does not lead to functional deficits, complicate the abdominal ostomies or weaken the abdominal wall. It reduces the length of operation compared to that of abdominal flaps. IV, therapeutic. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrical stimulation and pelvic floor muscle training with biofeedback in patients with fecal incontinence: a cohort study of 281 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, M. P.; Dobben, A. C.; Berghmans, B.; Deutekom, M.; Baeten, C. G. M. I.; Janssen, L. W. M.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.; Engel, A. F.; Felt-Bersma, R. J. F.; Slors, J. F. M.; Gerhards, M. F.; Bijnen, A. B.; Everhardt, E.; Schouten, W. R.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Stoker, J.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pelvic floor rehabilitation is an appealing treatment for patients with fecal incontinence but reported results vary. This study was designed to assess the outcome of pelvic floor rehabilitation in a large series of consecutive patients with fecal incontinence caused by different

  1. The impact of acute and chronic strenuous exercise on pelvic floor muscle strength and support in nulliparous healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlekauff, Monique L; Egger, Marlene J; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-09-01

    Strenuous physical activity, which is known to increase intraabdominal pressure and theoretically places stress on the pelvic floor, may affect pelvic support in nulliparous women. The aims of this study were to: (1) examine the differences in maximal vaginal descent (MVD), vaginal resting pressure (VRP), and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) between women who habitually perform strenuous exercise vs women who refrain from performing strenuous exercise; and (2) compare MVD, VRP, and PFMS before and immediately following physical activity in the strenuous and nonstrenuous groups separately. Participants were healthy nulliparous women ages 18-35 years who were habitual strenuous or nonstrenuous exercisers. Women in the strenuous group participated in CrossFit (CrossFit, Inc., Washington, DC) at least 3 days per week for at least 6 months. We assessed anthropometric and body composition values using standardized procedures. Participants completed the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination and pelvic muscle strength assessment before and again within 15 minutes of completing exercise (CrossFit for the strenuous group and self-paced walking for the nonstrenuous). A research nurse masked to study group assignment recorded MVD, defined as the greatest value of anterior, posterior, or apical support, and VRP and PFMS using a perineometer. Maximal PFMS was recorded as the highest pressure measured in 3 vaginal contraction trials. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric tests as appropriate. P < .05 was considered significant. Seventy nulliparous women participated in the study, 35 in each group. The mean age was 24.77 ± 4.3 years. Compared to the nonstrenuous group, strenuous participants were heavier (64.70 ± 7.78 kg vs 60.6 ± 8.99 kg, P = .027), had lower percent body fat (23.36 ± 5.88% vs 27.55 ± 7.07%, P = .003), and had higher handgrip strength (20.78 ± 5.97 kg vs 16.04 ± 11.04 kg, P = .001). Before exercise, there were no

  2. Functional MRI of the pelvic floor: postpartum changes of primiparous women after spontaneous vaginal delivery; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) des Beckenbodens: Postpartale Veraenderungen bei Erstgebaerenden nach vaginaler Spontangeburt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienemann, A.; Fischer, T.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Anthuber, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen/Grosshadern (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    Purpose: Detection of morphological and functional changes of the pelvic floor with functional MRI in primiparous women after spontaneous vaginal delivery. Methods and Materials: The study comprises 26 primiparous women after vaginal delivery and a control group of 41 healthy asymptomatic nulliparous volunteers. MRI was performed on a 1.5 T system in supine position with vagina and rectum opacified with Sonogel. The static images consisted of sagittal and axial T{sub 2}-weighted SE sequences and functional images of true FISP sequences in midsagittal and axial planes acquired with the patient at rest, straining and during defecation. Evaluation of morphometric parameters included pelvimetry, thickness of the puborectal muscle and width of the urogenital hiatus as well as position and movement of the pelvic organs relative to the pubococcygeal reference line. Results: The configuration of the bony pelvis did not differ for both groups. The puborectal muscle was significantly thinner in the study group (0.8 cm vs 0.6 cm). The functional images showed no significant differences between both groups at rest but a significantly increased incidence in the descent of the bladder neck, vaginal fornix and anorectal junction in the study group during straining. In addition, the primiparous women had more prominent rectoceles (0.6 cm vs 1.5 cm). Conclusion: Static imaging alone fails to demonstrate relevant pelvic floor changes and a functional method is necessary to evaluate the interactions of the pelvic organs regarding organ descent. Functional MRI of the pelvic floor is an excellent method to reveal the significant changes of the pelvic floor after vaginal birth without exposing the uterus to radiation. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Darstellung von morphologischen und funktionellen Veraenderungen am Beckenboden bei Erstgebaerenden nach spontanvaginaler Entbindung mittels funktioneller MRT. Methodik: Funktionelle MRT des Beckenbodens von 26 Erstgebaerenden nach vaginaler

  3. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women. Whilst most of the PFMT trials have been done in women with stress urinary incontinence, there is also some trial evidence that PFMT is effective for urgency urinary incontinence and mixed urinary

  4. Urinary incontinence during pregnancy and postpartum. Associated risk factors and influence of pelvic floor exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Martin, Sergio; Pascual-Fernandez, Angela; Alvarez-Colomo, Cristina; Calvo-Gonzalez, Raul; Muñoz-Moreno, Marife; Cortiñas-Gonzalez, Jose Ramon

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) before pregnancy, in the third trimester and postpartum. To analyze its influence on quality of life and associated potential risk factors and the efficacy of pelvic floor exercises. Prospective study in 413 pregnant women. The modified ICIQ-SF incontinence questionnaire was given to the pregnant women at the end of the third quarter. This questionnaire was administered by telephone at 3 and 6 months postpartum. The influence of several risk factors for UI in pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed. Patients with persistent UI at 6 months postpartum were trained to do pelvic floor exercises. Patients with UI before pregnancy were excluded from the study. UI in the third trimester was 31%. Analyzed risk factors did not condition a higher percentage of UI. Prevalence of UI was 11.3% at 3 months postpartum and 6.9% at 6 months. 70% of the incontinent patients already had it during pregnancy and it appeared de novo post-delivery in 30% of the patients. Prevalence of UI after delivery was higher in women with UI in pregnancy and lower in caesarean cases. Most women improved with pelvic floor exercises. Analysed risk factors did not significantly increase UI in pregnancy. Prevalence of UI after delivery is higher in women with UI in pregnancy and lower in caesarean cases. Postpartum pelvic floor exercises for three months in patients with persistent stress UI at 6 months postpartum clearly improved the degree of continence.

  5. Factors influencing long-term adherence to pelvic floor exercises in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Mónica; Carrasco, Bernardita; Casas-Cordero, Romina

    2018-03-01

    To ensure the effectiveness of Physical Therapy for urinary incontinence (UI), it is crucial that patients adhere to treatment in both the long and the short term. Treatment adherence may prevent symptom progression and the need for surgery, which is associated with higher costs and potential complications. Adherence is defined as carrying out a recommended behavioral modification or change. The World Health Organization (WHO) has established that adherence is a multifactorial phenomenon determined by the interaction of five dimensions, which include diverse factors that affect long-term adherence on many levels. To identify the factors that influence long-term adherence to pelvic floor exercises in women with UI. Observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The sample was recruited from the "Centro Integral de Reeducación de Piso Pélvico" (CIREP), and included 61 women treated for UI at the center in 2014 and 2015. Participants completed a self-administered, 28-item questionnaire developed for this study based on the WHO five dimensions. Data analysis was performed using STATA 13.0 software. Having performed pelvic floor home exercises after discharge from Physical Therapy was significantly associated with self-rated treatment adherence (P pelvic floor exercise program (P pelvic floor exercises in women with UI; forgetting to do the exercises and boredom with the exercises were the factors most strongly related to low treatment adherence, while motivation and commitment were associated with high adherence in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the pelvic floor bother questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Thais Villela; Pinto, Rodrigo Ambar; Davila, G Willy; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Haddad, Jorge Milhem

    2018-03-16

    The Pelvic Floor Bother Questionnaire (PFBQ) was designed to identify the presence and degree of bother associated with common pelvic floor symptoms. The PFBQ can be used in clinical practice and for research purposes, but it is not available in Brazilian Portuguese. We aimed to validate a cross-culturally adapted Brazilian Portuguese version of the PFBQ. A pilot-tested version of the PFBQ translated from English was evaluated with Brazilian patients suffering from pelvic floor disorders. Internal reliability, test-retest reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change were assessed. A total of 147 patients (mean age, 60.49 years) were enrolled in the study. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the PFBQ demonstrated good reliability (α = 0.625; ICC = 0.981). There was strong agreement beyond chance for each item (κ = 0.895-1.00). The PFBQ correlated with stage of prolapse (p Portuguese version of the PFBQ is a reliable, valid, and user-friendly instrument that can be used for assessing the presence and severity of pelvic floor symptoms in clinical and research settings in Brazil.

  7. Pelvic floor muscle lesions at endoanal MR imaging in female patients with faecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Vervoorn, Inge; Deutekom, Marije; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency and spectrum of lesions of different pelvic floor muscles at endoanal MRI in women with severe faecal incontinence and to study their relation with incontinence severity and manometric findings. In 105 women MRI examinations were evaluated for internal anal sphincter (IAS),

  8. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation for patients with lifelong premature ejaculation: a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Antonio L; Palleschi, Giovanni; Fuschi, Andrea; Maggioni, Cristina; Rago, Rocco; Zucchi, Alessandro; Costantini, Elisabetta; Carbone, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Premature ejaculation is the most common male sexual disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic role of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation in patients affected by lifelong premature ejaculation. We treated 40 men with lifelong premature ejaculation, reporting, a baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) ≤ 1 min, with 12-week pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation. At the end of the rehabilitation, mean IELTs were calculated to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy. At the end of the treatment, 33 (82.5%) of the 40 patients gained control of their ejaculatory reflex, with a mean IELT of 146.2 s (range: 123.6-152.4 s). A total of 13 out of 33 (39%) patients were evaluated at 6 months follow up, and they maintained a significant IELT (112.6 s) compared with their initial IELT (mean 39.8 s). The results obtained in our subjects treated with pelvic floor rehabilitation are promising. This therapy represents an important cost reduction compared with the standard treatment (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Based on the present data, we propose pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation as a new, viable therapeutic option for the treatment of premature ejaculation.

  9. The influence of age on posterior pelvic floor dysfunction in women with obstructed defecation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; Rodrigues, L V; Furtado, D C; Regadas, F S P; Olivia da S Fernandes, G; Regadas Filho, F S P; Gondim, A C; de Paula Joca da Silva, R

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of risk factors is particularly useful to prevent or manage pelvic floor dysfunction but although a number of such factors have been proposed, results remain inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of aging on the incidence of posterior pelvic floor disorders in women with obstructed defecation syndrome evaluated using echodefecography. A total of 334 patients with obstructed defecation were evaluated using echodefecography in order to quantify posterior pelvic floor dysfunction (rectocele, intussusception, mucosal prolapse, paradoxical contraction or non-relaxation of the puborectalis muscle, and grade III enterocele/sigmoidocele). Patients were grouped according to the age (Group I = patients up to 50 years of age; Group II = patients over 50 years of age) to evaluate the isolated and associated incidence of dysfunctions. To evaluate the relationship between dysfunction and age-related changes, patients were also stratified into decades. Group I included 196 patients and Group II included 138. The incidence of significant rectocele, intussusception, rectocele associated with intussusception, rectocele associated with mucosal prolapse and 3 associated disorders was higher in Group II, whereas anismus was more prevalent in Group I. The incidence of significant rectocele, intussusception, mucosal prolapse and grade III enterocele/sigmoidocele was found to increase with age. Conversely, anismus decreased with age. Aging was shown to influence the incidence of posterior pelvic floor disorders (rectocele, intussusception, mucosa prolapse and enterocele/sigmoidocele), but not the incidence of anismus, in women with obstructed defecation syndrome.

  10. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor: linking anatomical findings with clinical symtoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Steensma (Anneke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractFor evaluation of pelvic floor and lower urinary tract dysfunction the use of transabdominal ultrasound was first documented in the early eighties, with the translabial [1], transrectal [2] and transvaginal [3, 4] techniques developing somewhat later. To obtain a translabial

  11. Dose-effect relationships for individual pelvic floor muscles and anorectal complaints after prostate radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, R.J.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Hopman, W.P.M.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate

  12. Laparoscopic removal of mesh used in pelvic floor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Su-Yen; Lam, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Various meshes are being used widely in clinical practice for pelvic reconstructive surgery despite the lack of evidence of their long-term safety and efficacy. Management of complications such as mesh erosion and dyspareunia can be challenging. Most mesh-related complications can probably be managed successfully via the transvaginal route; however, this may be impossible if surgical access is poor. This case report demonstrates the successful laparoscopic removal of mesh after several failed attempts via the vaginal route.

  13. Pelvic floor physical therapy: impact on quality of life 6 months after vaginal reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Rachel N; Crisp, Catrina C; Novicki, Kathleen; Fellner, Angela N; Kleeman, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) is often used as a treatment of pelvic floor disorders and may improve function after pelvic reconstructive surgery. However, the long-term impact of this modality is not understood. This randomized controlled trial compared PFPT to the standard care in women undergoing vaginal reconstruction. The intervention group received PFPT biweekly until 12 weeks postoperatively, in conjunction with a physician assessment. Control subjects underwent a physician assessment alone at all postoperative intervals. The final follow-up was at 24 weeks. Physical examinations (pelvic organ prolapse quantification assessment), intravaginal electromyography, voiding diaries, and validated questionnaires were completed by all subjects. The primary outcome was change in the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF. Forty-nine women completed the study, 24 in the PFPT group and 25 in the control group. Although electromyography measures showed better muscular function in PFPT subjects after 12 weeks, at 6 months after surgery, this was no longer noted. However, quality of life parameters improved for the entire sample at 24 weeks, with no difference between groups. Positive change from 12 to 24 weeks was also documented in scores on the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (P = 0.04) and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (P = 0.018), corresponding with continued improvement in bladder symptoms. Finally, Prolapse and Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 and Female Sexual Function Index scores improved between 12 and 24 weeks, suggesting better sexual function overall with time elapsed from surgery. Quality of life improves in all subjects after vaginal reconstructive surgery, with ongoing benefit between 3 and 6 months. Nevertheless, standardized PFPT was not associated with differences at 24 weeks in this cohort of women.

  14. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤30 Gy to the IAS; ≤10 Gy to the EAS; ≤50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  15. Pelvic floor muscle training for female urinary incontinence: Does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nilanjana; Rashid, Mumtaz; Bayliss, Lorna; Graham, Penny

    2016-06-01

    Supervised pelvic floor muscle training in patients of stress and mixed urinary incontinence has been recommended. Our aim was to assess the utilisation and effectiveness of our supervised pelvic floor muscle training service and assess the impact of incontinence scores before physiotherapy on the subsequent results of physiotherapy. All 271 patients referred to physiotherapy for symptoms of incontinence filled out the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire-Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms before starting treatment. Depending on pelvic floor muscle assessment, plans for exercises and follow up were made. If the strength of pelvic floor muscles was poor, electrical stimulation was offered. If awareness of the pelvic floor muscle contraction was poor, bio feedback was offered. Group sessions and vaginal cones were also used. Depending on the response to the treatment; patients were either discharged, referred to Urogynaecology clinic or continued physiotherapy. All patients who were discharged or referred for surgery were given a post treatment questionnaire to fill out. 79 (56 %) of 132 women with stress, 49 (51 %) of 98 with mixed and 27 (66 %) of 41 with urge incontinence reported successful control of symptoms (overall success 54 %). However, 65 % of women with incontinence scores of 0-5 before physiotherapy, 64 % with 6-10, 42 % with 11-15 and mere 28 % with 16-20 achieved success with physiotherapy. 27 (10 %) were lost to follow up. 1 in 2 women referred to physiotherapy for incontinence, achieved successful control of symptoms without the need for invasive investigations or surgery. However, poor incontinence scores before the start of physiotherapy is a poor prognostic indicator for success. 90 % women utilised the service.

  16. Dose-effect relationships for individual pelvic floor muscles and anorectal complaints after prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Hopman, Wim P M; van Lin, Emile N J Th; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2012-06-01

    To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: ≤ 30 Gy to the IAS; ≤ 10 Gy to the EAS; ≤ 50 Gy to the PRM; and ≤ 40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are excluded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Classic papers on pelvic floor physiotherapy: the most frequently cited articles in three decades (1983-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alexandre; Carboni, Cristiane

    2018-02-13

    Pelvic floor physiotherapy has been utilized extensively over the past decades for the treatment of pelvic floor dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the most frequently cited articles on pelvic floor physiotherapy published in the last 30 years. A PubMed search of all articles published between 1983 and 2013 was performed. Articles with more than 100 citations were identified as "classic," and were further analyzed based on author names, year of publication, journal of publication, subject, study design, country of research, and number of citations. In 2017, a new search for papers on pelvic floor physiotherapy was conducted using the same methods to compare them with the 2013 data. Of 1,285 articles published between 1983 and 2013, only 20 articles were cited more than 100 times. Among them, we found 12 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and only 4 reviews. The most common topics among the classic articles were behavior therapy, pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), biofeedback-assisted PFMT, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation. In 2017, we found 1,745 papers containing the term "pelvic floor physiotherapy," indicating an increase of around 35% in 4 years. Although there is a fast-growing number of publications, we still have few classic papers on pelvic floor physiotherapy, concentrated in a few research centers. However, the large number of RCTs shows that these papers have a high scientific level, confirming that they can be classified as classic papers.

  18. Modified Thiele massage as therapeutic intervention for female patients with interstitial cystitis and high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Ian A; Rejba, Amy; Lukban, James C; Fletcher, Erica; Kellogg-Spadt, Susan; Holzberg, Adam S; Whitmore, Kristene E

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transvaginal manual therapy of the pelvic floor musculature (Thiele massage) in symptomatic female patients with interstitial cystitis and high-tone dysfunction of the pelvic floor. A total of 21 women with documented interstitial cystitis and high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction underwent transvaginal massage using the Thiele technique twice a week for 5 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated before massage, at protocol conclusion, and at a mean of 4.5 months after therapy completion (long-term follow-up). The response to treatment was evaluated through the O'Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Indexes, Likert Visual Analogue Scales for urgency and pain, and Short-Form 12-item (SF-12) Quality-of-Life Scale, and through changes in the physical examination findings using a 5-point modified Oxford Scale to document pelvic floor tenderness. A statistically significant improvement was seen in the Symptom and Problem Indexes of the O'Leary-Sant Questionnaire (P = 0.015 and P = 0.039, respectively), Likert Visual Analogue Scales for urgency and pain (P = 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively), the Physical and Mental Component Summary from the SF-12 Quality-of-Life Scale (P = 0.049 and P = 0.044, respectively), and the modified Oxford Scale (P pelvic floor (P pelvic floor dysfunction in addition to decreasing pelvic floor muscle tone.

  19. The Effect Of Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy On Sexual Function And Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength And Endurance In Women Complaining Dyspareunia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Bastani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Total pelvic organ prolapse is one of causes of disability in women with slack in the pelvic floor is mainly due to the damage caused by delivery. In colpoclisis mthod, vaginal mucosa in the anterior - posterior side was sutured and actually kind of blocking is done that is preventing the removal of prolapsed organs. The only problem with this method is the lack of vaginal canal and limitations in sexual function. In the present study, in addition to the prolapse treatment, in order to preserve sexual function, the improving the situation was evaluated in elderly patients with medical problems by changes in the mentioned operation method to the modified partial colpoclisis.

  20. Two-year effects and cost-effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in mild pelvic organ prolapse : a randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Chantal M.C.R.; Wiegersma, M; Kollen, B J; Berger, M Y; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Y; Vermeulen, K M; Dekker, J H

    OBJECTIVE: To compare effects and cost-effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and watchful waiting in women with pelvic organ prolapse. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Dutch general practice. POPULATION: Women (≥55 years) with symptomatic mild prolapse, identified by

  1. Help-seeking behaviour for pelvic floor dysfunction in women over 55: drivers and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Amy; Weir, Nicole; Tangyotkajohn, Usanee; Jacques, Angela; Thompson, Judith; Briffa, Kathy

    2018-03-19

    Our aim was to identify drivers of and barriers to help-seeking behaviour of older women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) living independently in Australia . Women aged ≥55 years were recruited to this cross-sectional study during July and August 2016. Bladder, bowel, pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and sexual dysfunction were assessed with the Australian Pelvic Floor Questionnaire (APFQ). Drivers and barriers were based on the Barriers to Incontinence Care Seeking Questionnaire. Univariate analyses were used to assess any significant relationships between PFD, age, education level, self-reported PFD, barriers and drivers. Of the 376 study participants [mean, standard deviation (SD) age 68.6 (10.5) years], 67% reported symptoms of PFD and 98.7% scored >0 on the APFQ. Women were more likely to seek help if they scored higher on the APFQ (p help was the perception that PFD was a normal part of ageing (22.4%). Of those who did seek help (50%), the main factor was increased level of symptom bother (51.4%). There was no difference in age or education level between women who did and did not seek help. Women are more likely to seek help for PFD if scoring higher on the APFQ or symptoms are becoming more bothersome. They are less likely to seek help if they view their symptoms as normal. Future direction should be taken to raise awareness of normal pelvic floor function as well as the availability of help for PFD.

  2. Barium proctography vs magnetic resonance proctography for pelvic floor disorders: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, S A; Nugent, K P; Brenner, J; Harris, S; Clarke, A; Lamparelli, M; Thomas, C; Tarver, D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate and reliable imaging of pelvic floor dynamics is important for tailoring treatment in pelvic floor disorders; however, two imaging modalities are available. Barium proctography (BaP) is widely used, but involves a significant radiation dose. Magnetic resonance (MR) proctography allows visualization of all pelvic midline structures but patients are supine. This project investigates whether there are measurable differences between BaP and MR proctography. Patient preference for the tests was also investigated. Consecutive patients referred for BaP were invited to participate (National Research Ethics Service approved). Participants underwent BaP in Poole and MR proctography in Dorchester. Proctograms were reported by a consultant radiologist with pelvic floor subspecialization. A total of 71 patients were recruited. Both tests were carried out on 42 patients. Complete rectal emptying was observed in 29% (12/42) on BaP and in 2% (1/42) on MR proctography. Anismus was reported in 29% (12/42) on BaP and 43% (18/42) on MR proctography. MR proctography missed 31% (11/35) of rectal intussusception detected on BaP. In 10 of these cases no rectal evacuation was achieved during MR proctography. The measure of agreement between grade of rectal intussusception was fair (κ=0.260) although MR proctography tended to underestimate the grade. Rectoceles were extremely common but clinically relevant differences in size were evident. Patients reported that they found MR proctography less embarrassing but harder to empty their bowel. The results demonstrate that MR proctography under-reports pelvic floor abnormalities especially where there has been poor rectal evacuation. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. [Urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor damages: ethilogy and prevention strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amóstegui Azcúe, J M; Ferri Morales, A; Lillo De La Quintana, C; Serra Llosa, M L

    2004-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, as well as additional pelvic floor damage, such as third and fourth degree muscular lacerations, as well as fecal incontinence, genital prolapse or dyspareunia, result from obstetric trauma, and are generally linked to the first delivery. The purpose of this study is to analyze, from a physiotherapeutic point of view, and therefore from the perspective of muscular physiology and biomechanics, why this damage occurs, while studying the birth process and the way it is currently performed in most hospitals in our country. Analysis of the birth process and, in short, of the different types of positions used for the first and second stage of labor, as well as of the care provided for women in the puerperium, leads us to propose a global prevention strategy to be carried out in three stages: --Ante-natal prevention: specific preparation of the pelvic floor and abdominal musculature during pregnancy, using massage techniques and manual stretching of the perineum. In addition, the pregnant woman learns these positions and methods of pushing, which makes the first and second stage of labour easier. An osteopathic treatment of the pelvis joints is performed in order to facilitate their mobility or to liberate blockades, if they exist. --Prevention during labour: During this stage, physiology is respected and manual, position-based and breathing techniques are implemented in order to enhance the protection of the baby and of the pelvic floor. --Postpartum prevention: The action is focused on the pelvic floor, through diaphragmatic and abdominal exercises or postures and, if necessary, osteopathic treatment in the early puerperium, in order to facilitate the correct involution of all soft tissues and the pelvic joints involved in labor. Early specific physiotherapeutic treatment will be proposed for women with functional pathology six weeks after delivery.

  4. Can pelvic floor muscle training improve sexual function in women with pelvic organ prolapse? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekken, Ingeborg H; Majida, Memona; Ellström Engh, Marie; Bø, Kari

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has level 1 evidence of reducing the size and symptoms associated with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). There is scant knowledge, however, regarding whether PFMT has an effect on sexual function. The aim of the trial was to evaluate the effect of PFMT on sexual function in women with POP. In this randomized controlled trial, 50 women were randomized to an intervention group (6 months of PFMT and lifestyle advice) and 59 women were randomized to a control group (lifestyle advice only). Participants completed a validated POP-specific questionnaire to describe frequency and bother of prolapse, bladder, bowel, and sexual symptoms and answered a semi-structured interview. No significant change in number of women being sexually active was reported. There were no significant differences between groups regarding change in satisfaction with frequency of intercourse. Interview data revealed that 19 (39%) of women in the PFMT group experienced improved sexual function vs. two (5%) in the control group (Ppelvic floor, improved self-confidence, sensation of a "tighter" vagina, improved libido and orgasms, resolution of pain with intercourse, and heightened sexual gratification for partners. Women who described improved sexual function demonstrated the greatest increases in pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength (mean 16 ± 10 cmH2 0) and endurance (mean 150 ± 140 cmH2 0s) (P<0.01). PFMT can improve sexual function in some women. Women reporting improvement in sexual function demonstrated the greatest increase in PFM strength and endurance. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. [Influence of postoperative pelvic floor function on different surgical procedures of hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A L; Hong, L; Zhao, Y Z; Jiang, L

    2017-05-25

    Objective: To compare the influence of postoperative pelvic floor function after different surgical procedures of hysterectomy. Methods: A total of 260 patients who underwent hysterectomy in Renmin hospital of Wuhan University from January 2012 to January 2014 were enrolled in the study, and divided into 5 groups by different surgical procedures, which were total abdominal hysterectomy (A-TH; 46 cases), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (L-TH; 59 cases), total vaginal hysterectomy (V-TH; 42 cases), abdominal intrafascial hysterectomy (A-CISH; 78 cases), laparoscopic intrafascial hysterectomy (L-CISH; 35 cases). Pelvic examination, pelvic organ prolapse quantitation (POP-Q), test of pelvic muscle strength, pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-20) and the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire were measured after 6 months and 12 months. Results: The differences of pelvic organ prolapse incidence after 6 months, A-TH and A-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (2/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (1/35)] were statistically significance (all P CISH was statistically different in degree ( P CISH [59% (27/46) versus 29% (23/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 26% (9/35)] were statistically significant (all P CISH [61% (36/59) versus 29%(23/78)] was statistically different ( P CISH [53% (31/59) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and A-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and L-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 23% (8/35)] were statistically significant (all P CISH [57% (24/42) versus 26%(20/78)] was statistically significant ( P 0.05), PFDI-20 total score was not statistically significant ( P >0.05). FSFI total score after 6 months and 12 months in A-TH and A-CISH, L-TH and A-CISH, A-CISH and L-CISH were statistically significant (all P <0.05). Conclusion: The influences of different surgical procedures to pelvic floor function are no statistical difference; as to the surgical resection of hysterectomy, intrafascia hysterectomy compared with extrafascia

  6. Social networking and Internet use among pelvic floor patients: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloomdoost, Donna; Kanter, Gregory; Chan, Robert C; Deveaneau, Nicolette; Wyman, Allison M; Von Bargen, Emily C; Chaudhry, Zaid; Elshatanoufy, Solafa; Miranne, Jeannine M; Chu, Christine M; Pauls, Rachel N; Arya, Lily A; Antosh, Danielle D

    2016-11-01

    Internet resources are becoming increasingly important for patients seeking medical knowledge. It is imperative to understand patient use and preferences for using the Internet and social networking websites to optimize patient education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate social networking and Internet use among women with pelvic floor complaints to seek information for their conditions as well as describe the likelihood, preferences, and predictors of website usage. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study of women presenting to clinical practices of 10 female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery fellowship programs across the United States, affiliated with the Fellows' Pelvic Research Network. New female patients presenting with pelvic floor complaints, including urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and fecal incontinence were eligible. Participants completed a 24 item questionnaire designed by the authors to assess demographic information, general Internet use, preferences regarding social networking websites, referral patterns, and resources utilized to learn about their pelvic floor complaints. Internet use was quantified as high (≥4 times/wk), moderate (2-3 times/wk), or minimal (≤1 time/wk). Means were used for normally distributed data and medians for data not meeting this assumption. Fisher's exact and χ 2 tests were used to evaluate the associations between variables and Internet use. A total of 282 surveys were analyzed. The majority of participants, 83.3%, were white. The mean age was 55.8 years old. Referrals to urogynecology practices were most frequently from obstetrician/gynecologists (39.9%) and primary care providers (27.8%). Subjects were well distributed geographically, with the largest representation from the South (38.0%). Almost one third (29.9%) were most bothered by prolapse complaints, 22.0% by urgency urinary incontinence, 20.9% by stress urinary incontinence, 14.9% by urgency/frequency symptoms, and 4

  7. Pelvic floor muscle training for secondary prevention of pelvic organ prolapse (PREVPROL): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Suzanne; Glazener, Cathryn; McClurg, Doreen; Macarthur, Christine; Elders, Andrew; Herbison, Peter; Wilson, Don; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Hemming, Christine; Hay-Smith, Jean; Collins, Marissa; Dickson, Sylvia; Logan, Janet

    2017-01-28

    Pelvic floor muscle training can reduce prolapse severity and symptoms in women seeking treatment. We aimed to assess whether this intervention could also be effective in secondary prevention of prolapse and the need for future treatment. We did this multicentre, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial at three centres in New Zealand and the UK. Women from a longitudinal study of pelvic floor function after childbirth were potentially eligible for inclusion. Women of any age who had stage 1-3 prolapse, but had not sought treatment, were randomly assigned (1:1), via remote computer allocation, to receive either one-to-one pelvic floor muscle training (five physiotherapy appointments over 16 weeks, and annual review) plus Pilates-based pelvic floor muscle training classes and a DVD for home use (intervention group), or a prolapse lifestyle advice leaflet (control group). Randomisation was minimised by centre, parity (three or less vs more than three deliveries), prolapse stage (above the hymen vs at or beyond the hymen), and delivery method (any vaginal vs all caesarean sections). Women and intervention physiotherapists could not be masked to group allocation, but allocation was masked from data entry researchers and from the trial statistician until after database lock. The primary outcome was self-reported prolapse symptoms (Pelvic Organ Prolapse Symptom Score [POP-SS]) at 2 years. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01171846. Between Dec 21, 2008, and Feb 24, 2010, in New Zealand, and Oct 27, 2010, and Sept 5, 2011, in the UK, we randomly assigned 414 women to the intervention group (n=207) or the control group (n=207). One participant in each group was excluded after randomisation, leaving 412 women for analysis. At baseline, 399 (97%) women had prolapse above or at the level of the hymen. The mean POP-SS score at 2 years was 3·2 (SD 3·4) in the intervention group versus 4·2 (SD 4·4) in the

  8. Videodefaecography combined with measurement of the anorectal angle and of perineal descent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skomorowska, E.; Henrichsen, S.; Christiansen, J.; Hegedues, V.; Glostrup Sygehus, Copenhagen

    1987-01-01

    Cineradiographic defaecography combined with measurement of the anorectal angle and descent of the pelvic floor is proposed. The method used in 73 women gave valuable information in 48 patients who complained of anal incompetence, rectal tenesmus, and chronic constipation. In these patients, high and low rectal intussusception, rectocele, and pathologic movement of the pelvic floor were detected. Some of these phenomena could only be diagnosed by the radiologic method here described. Quantitations of the anorectal angle and descent of the pelvic floor placed the group with constipation halfway between normal individuals and those with anal incompetence. The value of this finding is discussed. Recent improvements in anorectal surgery often make videodefaecography decisive for the choice of the optimal operative method. Therefore, videodefaecography together with measurement of the anorectal angle and pelvic floor descent is recommended whenever anorectal surgery for correction of functional disturbances is contemplated. (orig.)

  9. Biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise therapy for obstructive defecation: An effective alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ba-bai-ke-re, Ma-Mu-Ti-Jiang A; Wen, Ni-Re; Hu, Yun-Long; Zhao, Liang; Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Husaiyin, Aierhati; Sailai, Yalikun; Abulimiti, Alimujiang; Wang, Yun-Hai; Yang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise therapy (BFT) with the use of oral polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the treatment of obstructive defecation. METHODS: A total of 88 subjects were assigned to treatment with either BFT (n = 44) or oral PEG (n = 44). Constipation symptoms (including difficult evacuation, hard stool, digitation necessity, incomplete emptying sensation, laxative dependence, perianal pain at defecation, and constipation satisfaction), Wexner Scores, and quality of life scores were assessed after 1, 3, and 6 mo. RESULTS: At the 6 mo follow-up, the symptoms of the BFT group patients showed significantly greater improvements compared with the PEG group regarding difficult evacuation, hard stools, digitation necessity, laxative dependence, perianal pain at defecation, constipation satisfaction, Wexner Constipation Score, and quality of life score (P biofeedback-guided pelvic floor exercise training is superior to oral polyethylene glycol therapy for obstructive defecation. PMID:25083090

  10. Characterization of Pelvic Floor Symptoms in Women of Northeastern Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C. Bryce; Munoz, Oxana; Gerten, Kimberly A.; Mann, MerryLynn; Taryor, Rebecca; Norman, Andy M.; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Richter, Holly E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize prevalence and quality of life (QoL) impact of urinary incontinence (UI), fecal incontinence (FI), and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) symptoms in women of Liberia. Methods A questionnaire addressing symptoms and QoL impact of UI, FI and POP was administered to women in a community setting in Ganta, Liberia. Questionnaires were analyzed to determine prevalence rates, QoL impact, and risk factors for these conditions. Results 424 participants were surveyed; 1.7% reported UI, 0.10% reported any form of FI, and 3.3% reported some degree of POP symptoms. QoL responses varied among symptom groups. Previous hysterectomy, cesarean delivery, vaginal deliveries, and body mass index had no significant association with UI, FI, or POP. Participants with UI symptoms were more likely to report FI symptoms (p=0.002). Conclusion Prevalence rates for UI, FI and POP in this population are low; there was a significant association of FI symptoms in subjects with UI. PMID:20206351

  11. Botulinum Toxin A Injections Into Pelvic Floor Muscles Under Electromyographic Guidance for Women With Refractory High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A 6-Month Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Darlene; El-Khawand, Dominique; Ginzburg, Natasha; Wehbe, Salim; O'Hare, Peter; Whitmore, Kristene

    2015-01-01

    High-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder for many women with significant impact on their quality of life (QoL). Our objective was to determine the efficacy of electromyography-guided onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) injections in treating patient's perception of pelvic pain and improving QoL measurement scores. This is a prospective pilot open-label study of women with chronic pelvic pain and HTPFD who have failed conventional therapy between January 2011 and August 2013. Botox injections (up to 300 U) were done using needle electromyography guidance, from a transperineal approach, to localize spastic pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Data were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injections. This included demographics; Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for pain and dyspareunia; validated questionnaires for symptoms, QoL, and sexual function; Global Response Assessment scale for pelvic pain; digital examination of PFM for tone and tenderness; and vaginal manometry. Side effects were also recorded. Out of 28 women who enrolled in the study, 21 completed the 6-month follow-up and qualified for analysis. The mean (SD) age was 35.1 (9.4) years (range, 22-50 years), and the mean (SD) body mass index was 25 (4.4). Comorbidities included interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (42.9%) and vulvodynia (66.7%). Overall, 61.9% of subjects reported improvement on Global Response Assessment at 4 weeks and 80.9% at 8, 12, and 24 weeks post injection, compared with baseline. Of the subjects who were sexually active at baseline, 58.8% (10/17), 68.8% (11/16), 80% (12/15), and 83.3% (15/18) reported less dyspareunia at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Dyspareunia Visual Analog Scale score significantly improved at weeks 12 (5.6, P = 0.011) and 24 (5.4, P = 0.004) compared with baseline (7.8). Two of the 4 patients who avoided sexual activity at baseline secondary to dyspareunia resumed and tolerated

  12. Complications of grafts used in female pelvic floor reconstruction: Mesh erosion and extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M Nazemi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Various grafts have been used in the treatment of urinary incontinence and pelvic prolapse. Autologous materials such as muscle and fascia were first utilized to provide additional anatomic support to the periurethral and pelvic tissues; however, attempts to minimize the invasiveness of the procedures have led to the use of synthetic materials. Complications such as infection and erosion or extrusion associated with these materials may be troublesome to manage. We review the literature and describe a brief overview of grafts used in pelvic floor reconstruction and focus on the management complications specifically related to synthetic materials. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive review of the literature on grafts used in pelvic floor surgery using MEDLINE and resources cited in those peer-reviewed manuscripts. The results are presented. Results: Biologic materials provide adequate cure rates but have associated downfalls including potential complications from harvesting, variable tissue quality and cost. The use of synthetic materials as an alternative graft in pelvic floor repairs has become a popular option. Of all synthetic materials, the type I macroporous polypropylene meshes have demonstrated superiority in terms of efficacy and fewer complication rates due to their structure and composition. Erosion and extrusion of mesh are common and troublesome complications that may be managed conservatively with observation with or without local hormone therapy, with transvaginal debridement or with surgical exploration and total mesh excision, dependent upon the location of the mesh and the mesh type utilized. Conclusions: The ideal graft would provide structural integrity and durability with minimal adverse reaction by the host tissue. Biologic materials in general tend to have fewer associated complications, however, the risks of harvesting, variable integrity of allografts, availability and high cost has led to the

  13. Preventing Urinary Incontinence With Supervised Prenatal Pelvic Floor Exercises: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritel, Xavier; de Tayrac, Renaud; Bader, Georges; Savary, Denis; Gueye, Ameth; Deffieux, Xavier; Fernandez, Hervé; Richet, Claude; Guilhot, Joëlle; Fauconnier, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    To compare, in an unselected population of nulliparous pregnant women, the postnatal effect of prenatal supervised pelvic floor muscle training with written instructions on postpartum urinary incontinence (UI). In a randomized controlled trial in two parallel groups, 282 women were recruited from five university teaching hospitals in France and randomized during the second trimester of pregnancy. The physiotherapy group received prenatal individually supervised exercises. Both groups received written instructions about how to perform exercises at home. Women were blindly assessed at baseline, end of pregnancy, and 2 and 12 months postpartum. The primary outcome measured was UI severity, assessed with an International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form score (range 0-21; 1-5 is slight UI) at 12 months postpartum; other outcomes were UI prevalence and pelvic floor troubles assessed using self-administered questionnaires. To give a 1-point difference in UI severity score, we needed 91 women in each group (standard deviation 2.4, α=0.05, β=0.20, and bilateral analysis). Between February 2008 and June 2010, 140 women were randomized in the physiotherapy group and 142 in the control group. No difference was observed between the two groups in UI severity, prevalence, or pelvic floor troubles at baseline, end of pregnancy, and at 2 and 12 months postpartum. At 12 months postpartum, the primary outcome was available for 190 women (67.4%); mean UI severity was 1.9 in the physiotherapy group compared with 2.1 in the control group (P=.38). Prenatal supervised pelvic floor training was not superior to written instructions in reducing postnatal UI. ClinicalTrials.gov; www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00551551. I.

  14. EFFICACY OF PELVIC FLOOR THERAPY IN TREATING URINARY INCONTINENCE AMONG FEMALE COPD PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohankumar Thekkinkattil

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The major manifestation of COPD includes dyspnea, decreased oxygenation and reduced exercise tolerance. The other manifestations such as urinary incontinence are less noted and treated inadequately. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in Indian COPD population has not been well documented. The treatment of urinary incontinence includes pelvic floor exercises (Kegel’s exercises, biofeedback, and acupuncture etc. Methods: Forty female moderate COPD patients diagnosed according to American Thoracic Criteria with a complaint of urinary incontinence were selected for the study. Pelvic floor therapy exercises were given daily 5 sets per day (1 set =1-3 counts for seven days. Baseline evaluation was done using International Consultation on Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-SF on the day of referral for physiotherapy and the post study measurements were taken on 7th day of hospital stay. Wilcoxon Signed Rank calculator was used to assess the data collected. Results: The z value of ICIQ-SF questionnaire was 5.5109 ( p≤ 0.05 based on Wilcoxon Sign rank test and it was significant when we compared the pre and post test mean difference. The pre test mean score of ICIQ-SF was 14.175 and post test mean score was 4.4.Based on the findings, the results showed significant improvement in patient symptoms and reduced stress incontinence post pelvic floor therapy exercises. Conclusion: The study emphasizes the importance of pelvic floor therapy in treating stress urinary incontinence among COPD patients and it should also be included in a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program.

  15. EFFICACY OF PELVIC FLOOR THERAPY IN TREATING URINARY INCONTINENCE AMONG FEMALE COPD PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohankumar Thekkinkattil; T. S. Muthukumar; R. Monisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The major manifestation of COPD includes dyspnea, decreased oxygenation and reduced exercise tolerance. The other manifestations such as urinary incontinence are less noted and treated inadequately. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in Indian COPD population has not been well documented. The treatment of urinary incontinence includes pelvic floor exercises (Kegel’s exercises)...

  16. Vitamin D Status – A Clinical Review with Implications for the Pelvic Floor

    OpenAIRE

    PARKER-AUTRY, Candace Y.; BURGIO, Kathryn L.; RICHTER, Holly E.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D is a micronutrient vital in calcium homeostasis and musculoskeletal health. Vitamin D insufficiency is a common variant of vitamin D deficiency which has clinical signs of rickets and osteomalacia. The clinical significance of vitamin D insufficiency is being explored in several medical conditions. However, the most robust work suggests a role in musculoskeletal disease. The pelvic floor is a unique part of the body whose function is dependent on interrelationships between muscle, n...

  17. Impact of supervised physiotherapeutic pelvic floor exercises for treating female stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Raquel Diniz Zanetti

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Urinary incontinence is a public health problem that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Stress incontinence is the most prevalent type. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been used for treating it, although there is no consensus regarding their application. The aim of this study was to compare the results from treating female stress urinary incontinence with pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without physiotherapist supervision. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a randomized, prospective, controlled trial in the Urogynecology and Vaginal Surgery Sector, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Forty-four women were randomized to be treated for stress urinary incontinence with pelvic floor exercises for three consecutive months, into two groups: one with and the other without physiotherapist supervision. They were evaluated before and after treatment using a quality-of-life questionnaire, pad test, micturition diary and subjective evaluation. Descriptive analysis was used to evaluate the population. The homogeneity of the two groups was evaluated using the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-squared tests. The success of the two groups after treatment was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS: The supervised group showed statistically greater improvement in the pad test, micturition diary and quality of life than did the control group. In the subjective evaluation, only 23.8% of the control group patients were satised with their treatment. In the supervised group, 66.8% of patients did not want any other treatment. CONCLUSION: Supervised pelvic floor muscle exercises presented better results in objective and subjective evaluations than did unsupervised exercises.

  18. Electrostimulation, response of the pelvic floor muscles, and urinary incontinence in elderly patients post prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidan,Patrícia; Silva,Elirez Bezerra da

    2014-01-01

    Objective to investigate the response of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM), and urinary incontinence (UI), in patients having undergone a prostatectomy, after treatment using electrical stimulation. Materials and methods this observational study was conducted in an outpatient urogynecologic physical therapy clinic of Hospital dos Servidores in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from August to September 2012. Ten patients (aged, 64 ± 7 years) with urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectom...

  19. The development and psychometric evaluation of a self-efficacy scale for practicing pelvic floor exercises

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    Cinara Sacomori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be a predictor of many health-related behaviors, including the practice of pelvic floor exercises with a focus on prevention or cure. OBJECTIVES: To describe the process of construction and the psychometric properties of the scale of self-efficacy for the practice of pelvic floor exercises (EAPEAP. METHOD: A cross-sectional study of validation was carried out with 81 from community and 96 postpartum women, 54.8% of them complained of urinary leakage. An exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency analysis was performed. To check predictive capacity, we analyzed the adherence at 3 months post - intervention and compared the scores of self-efficacy between adherent and non-adherent women. Reliability was analyzed by split half procedure. RESULTS: The instrument showed α=0.923, and revealed three factors: performance expectation considering the action, performance expectation considering the preparation for action and outcome expectations. These factors accounted for 65.32% of the total variance. The instrument was able to differentiate between women who adhere and have not adhered to the exercises (U=352, p=0.013 and there was strong correlation between the two halves of the instrument (rho=0.889, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The scale is a valid and reliable tool to measure self-efficacy to practice pelvic floor exercises.

  20. Attendance at Prescribed Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy in a Diverse, Urban Urogynecology Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Megan Brady; Genereux, Madeleine; Brincat, Cynthia; Adams, William; Brubaker, Linda; Mueller, E R; Fitzgerald, Colleen M

    2017-11-11

    Pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) is a common and effective treatment for several pelvic floor disorders, but there is limited knowledge about adherence to the therapy or what factors influence attendance. To determine rates of PFPT attendance (initiation and completion) as well as correlates of PFPT attendance. Retrospective cohort analysis. Urban outpatient clinics at a tertiary medical center treating women with pelvic floor disorders. Patients prescribed PFPT during the time period January 1, 2014, through January 1, 2015. Number of PFPT visits recommended and attended; diagnoses associated with PFPT referral. Two-thirds of participants (66%; 118/180) initiated PFPT but less than one-third (29%; 52/180) completed the full treatment course. On univariate analysis, age, body mass index, diagnosis requiring PFPT treatment, marital or employment status, insurance type, number of comorbidities, incontinence status on examination, and stage of prolapse did not differ between PFPT initiators and noninitiators. Those who self-identified as Hispanic were less likely to initiate PFPT when compared with non-Hispanic patients, although this only trended toward significance (odds ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.14-1.09; exact P = .078). Two thirds (66%) of patients initiated PFPT but less than one third (29%) completed the treatment course. There appears to be an opportunity to augment PFPT attendance, as well as explore racial disparities in attendance. To be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pelvic floor physical therapy for lifelong vaginismus: a retrospective chart review and interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissing, Elke D; Armstrong, Heather L; Allen, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic floor physical therapy is used in the treatment of sexual pain disorders; however, women with lifelong vaginismus have not yet been included in treatment studies or have not been differentiated from women with acquired vaginismus and/or dyspareunia. This retrospective chart review and interview study was intended to obtain initial information on physical therapy interventions, course, and outcome in women who have never been able to experience vaginal intercourse. The files of 53 women, consecutively treated at one physical therapy clinic, were included in the chart review; 13 of these women volunteered to be interviewed. The chart review revealed significant pelvic floor pathology and an average treatment course of 29 sessions. Internal manual techniques were found to be most effective, followed by patient education, dilatation exercises, and home exercises. Although participants were very satisfied with the physical therapy, some symptoms, such as pain, anxiety/fear, and pelvic floor tension remained and scores on the Female Sexual Distress Scale and Female Sexual Function Index indicated clinical levels of sexual distress and impaired sexual function after treatment. Although there appears to be no linear relation between symptom reduction and healthy sexual function, this initial information suggests that physical therapy may be a promising treatment option for some women with lifelong vaginismus and merits further evaluation.

  2. Treatments for invasive carcinoma of the cervix: what are their impacts on the pelvic floor functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferreira de Noronha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Describe the impact of surgery, radiotherapy and chemoradiation in the pelvic floor functions in cervical cancer patients. Materials and Methods: A prospective study with women submitted to radical hysterectomy (RH (n = 20, exclusive radiotherapy (RT (n = 20 or chemoradiation (CT/RT (n = 20 for invasive cervical cancer. Urinary, intestinal and sexual function, as well as vaginal length and pelvic floor muscle contraction were evaluated. Comparisons between groups were performed by Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests (p < 0.05. Results: The groups were similar in stress urinary incontinence incidence (p = 0.56, urinary urgency (p = 0.44, urge incontinence (p = 0.54, nocturia (p = 0.53, incomplete bowel emptying (p = 0.76, bowel urgency (p = 0.12 and soilage (p = 0.43. The CT/RT group presented a higher urinary frequency (p < 0.001 and diarrhea (p = 0.025. Patients in the RH group were more sexually active (p = 0.01 and experienced less dyspareunia (p = 0.021. Vaginal length was shorter in RT group (5.5 ± 1.9cm and CT/RT(5.3 ± 1.5 cm than in the RH group (7.4 ± 1.1 cm (p < 0.001. Pelvic floor muscle contraction was similar (p = 0.302. Conclusions: RT and CT/RT treatment for cervical carcinoma are more associated to sexual and intestinal dysfunctions.

  3. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Angélica Mércia Pascon; Marini, Gabriela; Piculo, Fernanda; Rudge, Cibele Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2013-01-01

    There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence.

  4. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Mércia Pascon Barbosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. METHODS 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. RESULTS The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence.

  5. Modelling of Soft Connective Tissues to Investigate Female Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions

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    Aroj Bhattarai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available After menopause, decreased levels of estrogen and progesterone remodel the collagen of the soft tissues thereby reducing their stiffness. Stress urinary incontinence is associated with involuntary urine leakage due to pathological movement of the pelvic organs resulting from lax suspension system, fasciae, and ligaments. This study compares the changes in the orientation and position of the female pelvic organs due to weakened fasciae, ligaments, and their combined laxity. A mixture theory weighted by respective volume fraction of elastin-collagen fibre compound (5%, adipose tissue (85%, and smooth muscle (5% is adopted to characterize the mechanical behaviour of the fascia. The load carrying response (other than the functional response to the pelvic organs of each fascia component, pelvic organs, muscles, and ligaments are assumed to be isotropic, hyperelastic, and incompressible. Finite element simulations are conducted during Valsalva manoeuvre with weakened tissues modelled by reduced tissue stiffness. A significant dislocation of the urethrovesical junction is observed due to weakness of the fascia (13.89 mm compared to the ligaments (5.47 mm. The dynamics of the pelvic floor observed in this study during Valsalva manoeuvre is associated with urethral-bladder hypermobility, greater levator plate angulation, and positive Q-tip test which are observed in incontinent females.

  6. Modelling of Soft Connective Tissues to Investigate Female Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Aroj; Staat, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    After menopause, decreased levels of estrogen and progesterone remodel the collagen of the soft tissues thereby reducing their stiffness. Stress urinary incontinence is associated with involuntary urine leakage due to pathological movement of the pelvic organs resulting from lax suspension system, fasciae, and ligaments. This study compares the changes in the orientation and position of the female pelvic organs due to weakened fasciae, ligaments, and their combined laxity. A mixture theory weighted by respective volume fraction of elastin-collagen fibre compound (5%), adipose tissue (85%), and smooth muscle (5%) is adopted to characterize the mechanical behaviour of the fascia. The load carrying response (other than the functional response to the pelvic organs) of each fascia component, pelvic organs, muscles, and ligaments are assumed to be isotropic, hyperelastic, and incompressible. Finite element simulations are conducted during Valsalva manoeuvre with weakened tissues modelled by reduced tissue stiffness. A significant dislocation of the urethrovesical junction is observed due to weakness of the fascia (13.89 mm) compared to the ligaments (5.47 mm). The dynamics of the pelvic floor observed in this study during Valsalva manoeuvre is associated with urethral-bladder hypermobility, greater levator plate angulation, and positive Q-tip test which are observed in incontinent females.

  7. [Cultural adaptation of the female pelvic floor questionnaire (FPFQ) into French].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deparis, J; Bonniaud, V; Desseauve, D; Guilhot, J; Masanovic, M; De Tayrac, R; Fauconnier, A; Fritel, X

    2017-09-01

    The Female Pelvic Floor Questionnaire (FPFQ) is a self-administered tool on pelvic floor function. Our aim was to carry out a cultural adaptation of the FPFQ into French and to assess its psychometric properties. After cross-cultural adaptation into French, acceptability and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed through a sample of 56 women in a test-retest. Discriminative construct validity was evaluated by comparing the results obtained by the FPFQ to those of other validated questionnaires. Longitudinal follow-up of the 282 pregnant women included in the PreNatal Pelvic floor Prevention trial (3PN) was used to analyze responsiveness. The proportion of missing data did not exceed 4 % for questions about bladder function, bowel function and pelvic organ prolapse; 10 % for issues related to sexual function. Question 9 was considered difficult to understand by 14 % of women. After rewriting, this issue was retested in a new sample of 52 women and presented no further problems. The intra-class correlation coefficient was greater than or equal to 0.7 for all domains during the test-retest. The FPFQ was strongly and significantly correlated (Spearman r>0.5) with the other validated questionnaires. The French version of FPFQ recorded changes in urinary and sexual symptoms for the women involved in 3PN trial with a standardized response mean equal to 0.83 and 0.44, respectively. The French version of the FPFQ is self-administered, reliable, valid, and can detect a change in symptoms during follow-up. Level 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome: reduction of medication use after pelvic floor physical therapy with an internal myofascial trigger point wand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rodney U; Harvey, Richard H; Wise, David; Nevin Smith, J; Nathanson, Brian H; Sawyer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    This study documents the voluntary reduction in medication use in patients with refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome utilizing a protocol of pelvic floor myofascial trigger point release with an FDA approved internal trigger point wand and paradoxical relaxation therapy. Self-referred patients were enrolled in a 6-day training clinic from October, 2008 to May, 2011 and followed the protocol for 6 months. Medication usage and symptom scores on a 1-10 scale (10 = most severe) were collected at baseline, and 1 and 6 months. All changes in medication use were at the patient's discretion. Changes in medication use were assessed by McNemar's test in both complete case and modified intention to treat (mITT) analyses. 374 out of 396 patients met inclusion criteria; 79.7 % were male, median age of 43 years and median symptom duration of 5 years. In the complete case analysis, the percent of patients using medications at baseline was 63.6 %. After 6 months of treatment the percentage was 40.1 %, a 36.9 % reduction (p < 0.001). In the mITT analysis, there was a 22.7 % overall reduction from baseline (p < 0.001). Medication cessation at 6 months was significantly associated with a reduction in total symptoms (p = 0.03).

  9. Assessment of degree of trauma and levator ani muscle contraction function after pelvic floor reconstruction and traditional surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse

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    Chun-Hua Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the degree of trauma and levator ani muscle contraction function after pelvic floor reconstruction and traditional surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse. Methods: Patients with III-IV pelvic organ prolapse who received surgical treatment in our hospital between May 2011 and October 2015 were randomly divided into observation group who received vaginal hysterectomy combined with pelvic floor reconstruction and control group who received vaginal hysterectomy combined with colporrhaphy, and then the degree of trauma, urodynamics and levator ani muscle contraction function were compared between two groups of patients. Results: Operating time, intraoperative blood loss as well as serum CRP, IL-1β, TNF-α, Ins, NE and E content were not significantly different between two groups (P>0.05; 2 weeks after operation, maximum bladder volume and QMax of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, PdetQMax, PdetMax and PVR were significantly lower than those of control group (P0.05, LAT under Valsalva maneuver was significantly more than that of control group while LHS under Valsalva maneuver was significantly less than that of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Pelvic floor reconstruction treatment of pelvic organ prolapse has equivalent degree of surgical trauma to traditional surgery, and has better effect on improving the urination function and levator ani muscle contraction function than traditional surgery.

  10. Pelvic floor muscle training for urgency urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Joy A; Smith, Ariana L; Arya, Lily A

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of existing physiotherapy modalities for the treatment of urge urinary incontinence (UUI). A systematic review was performed for primary studies of physiotherapy techniques for UUI published in English between 1996 and August 2010 in major electronic databases. Only randomized clinical trials that reported outcomes separately for women with UUI were included. Outcomes assessed were reduction in UUI, urinary frequency, and nocturia. Data from 13 full-text trials including the modalities of pelvic floor muscles exercises with or without biofeedback, vaginal electrical stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and vaginal cones were analyzed. The methodologic quality of these trials was fair. Significant improvement in UUI was reported for all physiotherapy techniques except vaginal cone therapy. There are insufficient data to determine if pelvic physiotherapy improves urinary frequency or nocturia. Evidence suggests that physiotherapy techniques may be beneficial for the treatment of UUI.

  11. Correlation study regarding the pelvic floor hypotonia in relation to labour, age and number of births

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    Doriana Ioana CIOBANU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. During pregnancy, there is an increased pressure on pelvic floor. During labour and delivery the pelvic floor is stretched and can be damaged, leading to urine leakage, mostly during laughing, sneezing, coughing, running. This condition is called urinary incontinence. Aim. This paperwork aims to emphasize if there is a significant correlation between labor parameters, age, number of deliveries and the presence of pelvic floor hypotonia and urinary incontinence in women, after delivery. Material and method. Study was made on 24 women in the first days after delivery, ages between 21- 42 years old. 66,7% are primiparous, 33,3% are multiparous. As the assessment tools were used: stop urine test, number of perineal muscle contractions, questionnaire regarding the presence of urge urinary incontinence. Results. From the total number of subjects, 33.3% have stress incontinence and 29.2% have urge incontinence. There is a significant correlation between the presence of urinary incontinence and living environment [p = 0,014, (df. = 1], smoking [p = 0,014], the onset of labor [p = 0,014], administration of antispaspasmodic medication in labor [p = 0,010], administration of antialgic medication [p = 0,014] and the duration of delivery period [p = 0,028]. Conclusions. From the 24 subjects, 62,5% of them have urinary incontinence after labor and delivery. From these, 33.3% have stress incontinence, and 29.2% have urge incontinence. After labor and delivery more affected are fast fibers of perineal muscles, responsible withholding the urine during coughing, sneezing, lifting objects, going upstairs, as well as withholding the urine in case of overflow bladder. After labor and delivery, most women have hypotonia of perineal muscles.

  12. Surface electromyography and ultrasound evaluation of pelvic floor muscles in hyperandrogenic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassimon, Flávia Ignácio Antonio; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Martins, Wellington Paula; Ferriani, Rui Alberto; Batista, Roberta Leopoldino de Andrade; Bo, Kari

    2016-04-01

    High levels of androgens increase muscle mass. Due to the characteristics of hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), it is plausible that women with PCOS may have increased pelvic floor muscle (PFM) thickness and neuromuscular activity levels compared with controls. The aim of this study was to assess PFM thickness and neuromuscular activity among hyperandrogenic women with PCOS and controls. This was an observational, cross-sectional, case-control study evaluating PFM by ultrasound (US) and surface electromyography (sEMG) in nonobese women with and without PCOS. Seventy-two women were divided into two groups: PCOS (n = 33) and controls (n = 39). PFM thickness during contraction was assessed by US (Vingmed CFM 800). Pelvic floor muscle activity was assessed by sEMG (MyoTrac Infinit) during contractions at different time lengths: quick, and 8 and 60 s. Descriptive analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Student's t test were used for statistical analyses. There were no significant differences in PFM sEMG activity between PCOS and controls in any of the contractions: quick contraction (73.23 mV/ 71.56 mV; p = 0.62), 8 s (55.77 mV/ 54.17 mV; p = 0.74), and 60 s (49.26 mV/ 47.32 mV; p = 0.68), respectively. There was no difference in PFM thickness during contractions evaluated by US between PCOS and controls (12.78 mm/ 13.43 mm; p =  .48). This study did not find statistically significant differences in pelvic floor muscle thickness or in muscle activity between PCOS women and controls.

  13. Experiences of incontinence and pelvic floor muscle training after gynaecologic cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Anna; Dunberger, G; Enblom, A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe how gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS) experience incontinence in relation to quality of life, their possibilities for physical activity and exercise and their perceptions and experiences of pelvic floor muscle training. This qualitative interview content analysis study included 13 women (48-82 age) with urinary (n = 10) or faecal (n = 3) incontinence after radiation therapy (n = 2), surgery (n = 5) and surgery and radiation therapy (n = 6) for gynaecological cancer, 0.5-21 years ago. Symptoms related to incontinence and restrictions in daily activities reduced physical quality of life. Emotions related to incontinence reduced psychological quality of life and social and existential quality of life, due to restrictions in activity and feelings of exclusion. Practical and mental strategies for maintaining quality of life were described, such as always bringing a change of clothes and accepting the situation. Possibilities for sexual and physical activity as well as exercise were also restricted by incontinence. The women had little or no experience of pelvic floor muscle training but have a positive attitude towards trying it. They also described a lack of information about the risk of incontinence. The women were willing to spend both money and time on an effective treatment for their incontinence. Nine out of 10 were willing to spend at least 7 h a week. GCS experienced that incontinence reduced quality of life and limited possibilities for sexual and physical activity as well as exercise. Coping strategies, both practical and emotional, facilitated living with incontinence. The women had a positive attitude towards pelvic floor muscle training. Lack of information had a negative impact on their way of dealing with the situation.

  14. Influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions

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    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The correlation between vaginal delivery, age and pelvic floor dysfunctions involving obstructed defecation is still a matter of controversy. OBJECTIVES: To determine the influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions in women with obstructed defecation syndrome. METHODS: Four hundred sixty-nine females with obstructed defecation syndrome were retrospectively evaluated using dynamic 3D ultrasonography to quantify posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions (rectocele grade II or III, rectal intussusception, paradoxical contraction/non-relaxation of the puborectalis and entero/ sigmoidocele grade III. In addition, sphincter damage was evaluated. Patients were grouped according to age (50y and stratified by mode of delivery and parity: group I (50y: 251 patients, 60 nulliparous, 148 vaginal delivery and 43 only caesarean section. Additionally, patients were stratified by number of vaginal deliveries: 0 - nulliparous (n = 135, 1 - vaginal (n = 46, >1 - vaginal (n = 166. RESULTS: Rectocele grade II or III, intussusception, rectocele + intussusception and sphincter damage were more prevalent in Group II (P = 0.0432; P = 0.0028; P = 0.0178; P = 0.0001. The stratified groups (nulliparous, vaginal delivery and cesarean did not differ significantly with regard to rectocele, intussusception or anismus in each age group. Entero/sigmoidocele was more prevalent in the vaginal group 50y. No correlation was found between rectocele and the number of vaginal deliveries. CONCLUSION: Higher age (>50 years was shown to influence the prevalence of significant rectocele, intussusception and sphincter damage in women. However, delivery mode and parity were not correlated with the prevalence of rectocele, intussusception and anismus in women with obstructed defecation.

  15. Influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela Maria; Regadas, Francisco Sergio P; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; Furtado, Débora Couto; Gondim, Ana Cecília; Dealcanfreitas, Iris Daiana

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between vaginal delivery, age and pelvic floor dysfunctions involving obstructed defecation is still a matter of controversy. To determine the influence of age, mode of delivery and parity on the prevalence of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions in women with obstructed defecation syndrome. Four hundred sixty-nine females with obstructed defecation syndrome were retrospectively evaluated using dynamic 3D ultrasonography to quantify posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions (rectocele grade II or III, rectal intussusception, paradoxical contraction/non-relaxation of the puborectalis and entero/ sigmoidocele grade III). In addition, sphincter damage was evaluated. Patients were grouped according to age (≤50y x >50y) and stratified by mode of delivery and parity: group I (≤50y): 218 patients, 75 nulliparous, 64 vaginal delivery and 79 only cesarean section and group II (>50y): 251 patients, 60 nulliparous, 148 vaginal delivery and 43 only caesarean section. Additionally, patients were stratified by number of vaginal deliveries: 0 - nulliparous (n = 135), 1 - vaginal (n = 46), >1 - vaginal (n = 166). Rectocele grade II or III, intussusception, rectocele + intussusception and sphincter damage were more prevalent in Group II (P = 0.0432; P = 0.0028; P = 0.0178; P = 0.0001). The stratified groups (nulliparous, vaginal delivery and cesarean) did not differ significantly with regard to rectocele, intussusception or anismus in each age group. Entero/sigmoidocele was more prevalent in the vaginal group 50y. No correlation was found between rectocele and the number of vaginal deliveries. Higher age (>50 years) was shown to influence the prevalence of significant rectocele, intussusception and sphincter damage in women. However, delivery mode and parity were not correlated with the prevalence of rectocele, intussusception and anismus in women with obstructed defecation.

  16. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilaine de Paula Batista Mendes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. Methods: this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. Results: the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2 and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7 in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036 and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010, compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. Conclusion: pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength.

  17. Impact of a Pelvic Floor Training Program Among Women with Multiple Sclerosis: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Paula Silva; Pegorare, Ana Beatriz Gomes de Souza; Salgado, Pedro Rippel; Casafus, Filemón Silva; Christofoletti, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of two programs for strengthening the pelvic floor on the urinary incontinence of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This is a prospective study of the clinical trial type, monitored for 6 mos, in which 24 women in the moderate stage of MS participated in a program of exercises for strengthening the pelvic floor-associated (experimental group) or not (control group) with electrotherapy. The variables analyzed were as follows: quality-of-life, overactivity of the bladder, perineal contraction, and level of anxiety and depression. The statistical procedures involved multivariate analyses of repeated measurements, with a significance of 5%. Initial homogeneity being observed in the anthropometric and clinical variables, both protocols resulted in improvements in quality-of-life (P = 0.001), overactive bladder (P = 0.001), perineal contraction (P = 0.004), and level of anxiety (P = 0.001) and depression (P = 0.001), in relation to the initial comparison. The association of electrotherapy with strengthening exercises increased the improvement of the patients regarding overactive bladder (P = 0.039) and perineal contraction (P = 0.001), in comparison with the control group. The results reinforce the benefit of exercises for strengthening the musculature of the pelvic floor in women with overactive bladder in MS and demonstrate a potential of the action when associated with electrotherapy. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Identify common dysfunctions of the lower urinary tract in women with multiple sclerosis; (2) Discuss the relationship between quality-of-life, level of anxiety and depression, degree of perineal contraction, and overactive bladder; and (3) Recognize the benefits promoted by physical therapy for strengthening the pelvic floor in patients with

  18. [TVT (transvaginal mesh) surgical method for complex resolution of pelvic floor defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamík, Z

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of the effects of a new surgical method for complex resolution of pelvic floor defects. Case study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bata Hospital, Zlín. We evaluated the procedures and results of the new TVM (transvaginal mesh) surgical method which we used in a group of 12 patients. Ten patients had vaginal prolapse following vaginal hysterectomy and in two cases there was uterine prolapse and vaginal prolapse. Only in one case there was a small protrusion in the range of 0.5 cm which we resolved by removal of the penetrated section. The resulting anatomic effect was very good in all the cases.

  19. Sexual health in women with pelvic floor disorders: measuring the sexual activity and function with questionnaires--a summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espuña Pons, Montserrat

    2009-05-01

    The integration of sexual health into the health care services is important. In women attending urogynecological clinics, the urinary function, anorectal function, and anatomical defects are more often evaluated than those related to sexual activity and function. A group of experts in urogynecology, sexuality, and patient reported outcome development, met in a roundtable with the final objective of reviewing what is currently available and what is needed to accurately evaluate sexual function in women with pelvic floor dysfunction. An article was prepared for each of the issued presented during the roundtable and combined into this supplement. This article is a summary of all articles included in this supplement. The pathophysiology of sexual dysfunction as related to pelvic floor disorders has not been well established. Sexuality questionnaires and scales play an integral role in the diagnosis and treatment of female sexual dysfunction. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ) is the only validated female sexual function questionnaire specifically developed to assess sexual function in women with urinary incontinence and/or pelvic organ prolapse; however, the PISQ does not screen for sexual activity. The effects of treatments for pelvic floor problems on sexual function have received little attention. There is a need for a validated sexual function measure that evaluates not only the impact of pelvic floor dysfunction on sexual function but also the impact on sexual activity.

  20. The role of pelvic-floor therapy in the treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunctions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paepe, H; Renson, C; Hoebeke, P; Raes, A; Van Laecke, E; Vande Walle, J

    2002-01-01

    The pelvic-floor is under voluntary control and plays an important role in the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunctions in children, especially of non-neuropathic bladder sphincter dysfunction. The following therapeutic measures can be applied to try to influence the activity of the pelvic-floor during voiding: proprioceptive exercises of the pelvic-floor (manual testing), visualization of the electromyographic registration of relaxation and contraction of the pelvic-floor by a curve on a display (relaxation biofeedback), observation of the flow curve during voiding (uroflow biofeedback), learning of an adequate toilet posture in order to reach an optimal relaxation of the pelvic-floor, an individually adapted voiding and drinking schedule to teach the child to deal consciously with the bladder and its function and a number of simple rules for application at home to increase the involvement and motivation of the child. In children however with persisting idiopathic detrusor instability additional therapeutic measures may be necessary to improve present urologic symptoms (incontinence problems, frequency, urge) and to increase bladder capacity. Intravesical biofeedback has been used to stretch the bladder and seems to be useful in case of sensory urge. Recently a less invasive technique, called transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), has been applied on level of S3 with promising results in children with urodynamicaly proven detrusor instability, in which previous therapies have failed.

  1. Electromyography and vaginal pressure of the pelvic floor muscles in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpeta, Nádia Cristina; Giraldo, Paulo César; Juliato, Cássia Raquel Teatin; Yoshida, Laura Pagotto; do Amaral, Rose Luce Gomes; Eleutério, José

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the electrical potentials and pressure exerted by the pelvic floor muscles in women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) or vulvodynia as compared to control women. A cross-sectional study performed in the Female Outpatient Clinic of Genital Infections in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas analyzed and compared electromyography (EMG) and vaginal pressure of the pelvic floor muscles in 61 women. Of these 61 women, 19 had vulvodynia, 12 had RVVC and 30 women had no disorder (control group). For data collection, the instrument used was the Miotool Uro device and its software Biotrainer (Miotec Ltd., Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil). The EMG evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles showed significantly lower values in the vulvodynia group (tonic contractions) and RVVC group (phasic and tonic contractions) when compared to the control group. No significant differences in basal tone EMG and vaginal pressure values at rest or during pelvic floor muscle contractions were found among groups. The maximum time of sustained contraction in patients with RVVC or vulvodynia was significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than in controls. Women with vulvodynia and RVVC have more frequent pelvic floor muscle dysfunction than controls when observed by EMG evaluation.

  2. Evaluation of the female pelvic floor in pelvic organ prolapse using 3.0-Tesla diffusion tensor imaging and fibre tractography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijta, F.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam and Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam, AZ (Netherlands); Lakeman, M.M.E.; Roovers, J.P. [University of Amsterdam the Netherlands and Biomedical NMR, Amsterdam and Department of Gynaecology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Froeling, M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Paardt, M.P. van der; Borstlap, C.S.V.; Bipat, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Montauban van Swijndregt, A.D. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam and Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Strijkers, G.J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    To prospectively explore the clinical application of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tractography in evaluating the pelvic floor. Ten patients with pelvic organ prolapse, ten with pelvic floor symptoms and ten asymptomatic women were included. A two-dimensional (2D) spin-echo (SE) echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence of the pelvic floor was acquired. Offline fibre tractography and morphological analysis of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Inter-rater agreement for quality assessment of fibre tracking results was evaluated using weighted kappa ({kappa}). From agreed tracking results, eigen values ({lambda}1, {lambda}2, {lambda}3), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated. MD and FA values were compared using ANOVA. Inter-rater reliability of DTI parameters was interpreted using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Substantial inter-rater agreement was found ({kappa} = 0.71 [95% CI 0.63-0.78]). Four anatomical structures were reliably identified. Substantial inter-rater agreement was found for MD and FA (ICC 0.60-0.91). No significant differences between groups were observed for anal sphincter, perineal body and puboperineal muscle. A significant difference in FA was found for internal obturator muscle between the prolapse group and the asymptomatic group (0.27 {+-} 0.05 vs 0.22 {+-} 0.03; P = 0.015). DTI with fibre tractography permits identification of part of the clinically relevant pelvic structures. Overall, no significant differences in DTI parameters were found between groups. circle Diffusion tensor MRI offers new insights into female pelvic floor problems. (orig.)

  3. Architectural design of the pelvic floor is consistent with muscle functional subspecialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lori J; Nguyen, Olivia T; Cook, Mark S; Alperin, Marianna; Shah, Sameer B; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle architecture is the strongest predictor of a muscle's functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to define the architectural properties of the deep muscles of the female pelvic floor (PFMs) to elucidate their structure-function relationships. PFMs coccygeus (C), iliococcygeus (IC), and pubovisceral (PV) were harvested en bloc from ten fixed human cadavers (mean age 85 years, range 55-102). Fundamental architectural parameters of skeletal muscles [physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length, and sarcomere length (L(s))] were determined using validated methods. PCSA predicts muscle-force production, and normalized fiber length is related to muscle excursion. These parameters were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc t tests, as appropriate. Significance was set to α = 0.05. PFMs were thinner than expected based on data reported from imaging studies and in vivo palpation. Significant differences in fiber length were observed across PFMs: C = 5.29 ± 0.32 cm, IC = 7.55 ± 0.46 cm, PV = 10.45 ± 0.67 cm (p design shows individual muscles demonstrating differential architecture, corresponding to specialized function in the pelvic floor.

  4. Professional issues in the use of diagnostic ultrasound biofeedback in physiotherapy of the female pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKiernan, Sharmaine; Chiarelli, Pauline; Warren-Forward, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The usage of diagnostic ultrasound equipment has expanded into physiotherapy. The aim of this paper is to deliver to both the ultrasound and physiotherapy professions an understanding of the use of diagnostic ultrasound for biofeedback in physiotherapy of the female pelvic floor and the issues related to competent and safe practice, including accessing suitable training. This has been evaluated using a qualitative research paradigm with data gathered via focus groups of Australian physiotherapists. The target group were pelvic floor physiotherapists as this is one of the main uses of diagnostic ultrasound within physiotherapy and the main area physiotherapists would like to be trained in. Two focus groups were run with a total of sixteen physiotherapists. Focus group participants reported their training in diagnostic ultrasound to be largely self directed. They also reported they were learning on their patients. Despite very limited training, participants demonstrated some familiarity with images and equipment settings. Participants felt the modality had a role within physiotherapy as an adjunct to their current practices. The main need raised by participants during the focus groups was related to patient expectations and the fact that the physiotherapist may miss evidence of pathology

  5. The effect of outpatient physical therapy intervention on pelvic floor muscles in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorst, Mara R; Resende, Thais L; Santos, Thaís G; Goldim, José R

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effect of a weekly, short-term physical therapy intervention on the pelvic floor muscles and urinary incontinence (UI) among patients of the public health system. Quasi-experimental before-and-after study. Clinical history and function evaluation were performed using perineal bidigital maneuvers and perineometry. The intervention consisted of transvaginal electrical stimulation and pelvic floor kinesiotherapy. Data were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A value of Pphysical therapy sessions were held on average. There was no difference in perineometry measurements following the intervention (40.6±24.1 versus 41.7±25.4, P=0.098). Muscle function significantly increased (P<0.01) in the bidigital maneuver. The patients reported being continent or satisfied with the treatment in 88.9% of cases. The results demonstrated an increase in muscle function and the attainment of urinary continence or treatment satisfaction in most cases.

  6. The effect of outpatient physical therapy intervention on pelvic floor muscles in women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara R. Knorst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a weekly, short-term physical therapy intervention on the pelvic floor muscles and urinary incontinence (UI among patients of the public health system. METHOD: Quasi-experimental before-and-after study. Clinical history and function evaluation were performed using perineal bidigital maneuvers and perineometry. The intervention consisted of transvaginal electrical stimulation and pelvic floor kinesiotherapy. Data were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A value of P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Eight-two women 55.1±10.9 years-old were evaluated. Mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, stress urinary incontinence (SUI and urge urinary incontinence (UUI were observed in 52.4%, 36.6% and 11%, respectively. The length of UI was 6.0 years (3.0-10. Approximately 13.64 physical therapy sessions were held on average. There was no difference in perineometry measurements following the intervention (40.6±24.1 versus 41.7±25.4, P=0.098. Muscle function significantly increased (P<0.01 in the bidigital maneuver. The patients reported being continent or satisfied with the treatment in 88.9% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated an increase in muscle function and the attainment of urinary continence or treatment satisfaction in most cases.

  7. Relationship among vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of female pelvic floor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Pereira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proper evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM is essential for choosing the correct treatment. Currently, there is no gold standard for the assessment of female PFM function. Objective: To determine the correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the female PFM. Method: This cross-sectional study evaluated 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who were nulliparous and had no pelvic floor dysfunction. PFM function was assessed based on digital palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic activity, bilateral diameter of the bulbocavernosus muscles and the amount of bladder neck movement during voluntary PFM contraction using transperineal bi-dimensional ultrasound. The Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05. Results: There was a strong positive correlation between PFM function and PFM contraction pressure (0.90. In addition, there was a moderate positive correlation between these two variables and PFM electromyographic activity (0.59 and 0.63, respectively and movement of the bladder neck in relation to the pubic symphysis (0.51 and 0.60, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that there was a correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the PFM in nulliparous women. The strong correlation between digital palpation and PFM contraction pressure indicated that perineometry could easily be replaced by PFM digital palpation in the absence of equipment.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging identification of muscular and ligamentous structures of the female pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Maria Rita Lima; Soares, Adriano Fleury F.; Faintuch, Salomao; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Ajzen, Sergio A.; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Girao, Manoel

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency and to assess the interobserver agreement of identification of muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures using magnetic resonance imaging. The method: twenty asymptomatic female volunteers (aged 20-80 years old; mean: 50) were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) examinations of the pelvis. Turbo spin-echo sequences were employed to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images on axial and sagittal planes. Two independent observers evaluated the scans in order to identify the levator ani (coccygeal, pubococcygeal, iliococcygeal and puborectalis muscles), obturatorius internus and urethral sphincter muscles, and the pubovesical and pubourethral ligaments. The frequency and the interobserver agreement of the identification of the anatomical structures were assessed (kappa statistic - κ). The results: the frequency of identification of the structures ranged from 50 to 100%, and was slightly lower for identification of the ligaments. Interobserver agreement was as follows: levator ani and obturatorius internus muscle (κ=1), pubococcygeal (κ=0.62), iliococcygeal (κ=0.86), puborectalis (κ= 0.27), coccygeal (κ=0) and urethral sphincter muscles (κ=1), pubovesical (κ=0.50) and pubourethral (κ=0.58) ligaments. The conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis allowed precise identification of the main muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures in most individuals, whereas interobserver agreement was considered good. (author)

  9. Comparison of techniques used for functional evaluation of pelvic floor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Kelen Lucena da Costa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and discuss techniques for evaluation of pelvic floor muscles (PFM focusing on the most used and accessible techniques in health care. Methods: This is a quantitative exploratory and descriptive applied research. Data were collected from March to June 2016 at a higher education institution in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. Initially, 31 healthy young women were submitted to pelvic floor evaluation using the following methods: PERFECT, vaginal cones, and perineometry using Perine and Peritron. The participants then performed exercises to strengthen PFM. The variables measured by the different methods were also recorded 30 and 60 days after the start of the program. ANOVA was used for repeated measures and Spearman's correlation test was used for the evaluation instruments with significance set at 5%. Results: The functional evaluation using all the methods was adequate in the PFM evaluation. In the digital palpation (PERFECT, the endurance response (E was positively correlated to Perina (rho=0.688 and vaginal cones (rho=0.571, and muscle strength (P was positively correlated to the Peritron technique (rho=0.506. Conclusion: There are several ways to evaluate PFM function and all of them provide sensory feedback to the patient. Given the low costs of digital palpation, the introduction of this technique into women's health services is likely to improve women's quality of life.

  10. Pelvic floor muscle training decreases hip adductors isometric peak torque in incontinent women: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiéla Nascimento Correia

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The pelvic floor muscle (PFM training is the most common treatment for urinary incontinence (UI, however many women performed the contraction of PFM with associated contraction of abdominal, gluteus and hip adductors muscles. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of pelvic floor muscle (PFM training on isometric and isokinetic hip adductors peak torque (PT among women suffering from urinary incontinence (UI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: It is a longitudinal and prospective exploratory study. This study included 15 physically active women aged 45 years old and over, who presented complaints of UI. The PFM function (digital evaluation and perineometry, isometric and isokinetic hip adductors PT and one hour pad test were performed before and after treatment. The PFM training was performed in group, one hour once a week for 12 sessions. RESULTS: Significant improvement of PFM function and pressure level (p = 0.003, and significant decrease of hip adductors isometric PT and one-hour pad test, were found post-treatment. Moderate negative correlations between PFM contraction pressure and hip adductors isokinetic PT for dominant side (DS (r = -0.62; p = 0.03 and non-dominant side (NDS (r = -0.64; p = 0.02; and between PFM fast fibers contraction and hip adductors isometric PT for DS (r = -0.60; p = 0.03 and NDS (r = -0.59; p = 0.04 were also found. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM training decreased hip adductors PT and improved PFM functions and UI.

  11. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Stafford

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements.Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression.Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95. The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88. Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks.Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  12. Pelvic floor function following ventral rectopexy versus STARR in the treatment of obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, D F; Picciariello, A; Memeo, R; Fanelli, M; Digennaro, R; Chetta, N; De Fazio, M

    2018-04-01

    Obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS), most commonly found in females, can be treated by a transanal or abdominal approach with good success rate. Nevertheless, patients may experience de novo or persisting pelvic floor dysfunctions after surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcome of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) and ventral rectopexy (VRP) in a series of ODS patients. Forty-nine female patients who had surgery for ODS between 2006 and 2016 were retrospectively evaluated: 28 (median age 60 years, IQR 54-69 years) had VRP and 21 (median age 58 years, IQR 51-66 years) had STARR. ODS was scored with the ODS score while the overall pelvic floor function was assessed with the three axial perineal evaluation (TAPE) score. Quality-of-life was evaluated by the patient assessment of constipation quality-of-life (PAC-Qol) questionnaire administered preoperatively and after 1 year of follow-up. The preoperative median ODS score and TAPE score were comparable in both groups. After a median follow-up of 12 months (range 12-18 months), the median ODS score was 12 (range 10-20) in the STARR group and 9 (range 3-15) in the VRP one (p = 0.02), while the median TAPE score was 70.5 (IQR 60.6-77.3) in the former and 76.8 (IQR 70.2-89.7) in the latter (p = 0.01). Postoperatively the physical domain of the PAC-QoL score had a median value of 2.74 (IQR 1.7-3.75) in the STARR group compared to 1.5 (IQR 1-2.5) in the VRP group (p = 0.03). No major complications were recorded in either group. VRP and STARR can improve defecation in patients with ODS with minimal complications, but the overall pelvic wellness evaluated by the TAPE score improves significantly only after VRP, suggesting a better performance of VRP than STARR when overall pelvic floor function is concerned.

  13. Transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells expressing elastin alleviates pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Minfei; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Yun; Mei, Yan; Liu, Wei; Pan, Chenhao; Hua, Xiaolin

    2016-04-05

    Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is a group of clinical conditions including stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). The abnormality of collagen and elastin metabolism in pelvic connective tissues is implicated in SUI and POP. To reconstitute the connective tissues with normal distribution of collagen and elastin, we transduced elastin to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Elastin-expressing BMSCs were then differentiated to fibroblasts using bFGF, which produced collagen and elastin. To achieve the sustained release of bFGF, we formulated bFGF in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP). In an in vitro cell culture system of 7 days, when no additional bFGF was administrated, the initial PLGA-loaded bFGF NP induced prolonged production of collagen and elastin from elastin-expressing BMSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PLGA-loaded bFGF NP and elastin-expressing BMSCs into the PFD rats significantly improved the outcome of urodynamic tests. Together, these results provided an efficient model of connective tissue engineering using BMSC and injectable PLGA-loaded growth factors. Our results provided the first instance of a multidisciplinary approach, combining both stem cell and nanoparticle technologies, for the treatment of PFD.

  14. The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders and their relationship to gender, age, parity and mode of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, A H; Taylor, A W; Wilson, D H; Wilson, D

    2000-12-01

    To define the prevalence of pelvic floor disorders in a non-institutionalised community and to determine the relationship to gender, age, parity and mode of delivery. A representative population survey using the 1998 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey. Random selection of 4400 households; 3010 interviews were conducted in the respondents' homes by trained female interviewers. This cross sectional survey included men and women aged 15-97 years. The prevalence of all types of self-reported urinary incontinence in men was 4.4% and in women was 35.3% (Pparity and age. The highest prevalence (51.9%) was reported in women aged 70-74 years. The prevalence of flatus and faecal incontinence was 6.8% and 2.3% in men and 10.9% and 3.5% in women, respectively. Pregnancy (> 20 weeks), regardless of the mode of delivery, greatly increased the prevalence of major pelvic floor dysfunction, defined as any type of incontinence, symptoms of prolapse or previous pelvic floor surgery. Multivariate logistic regression showed that, compared with nulliparity, pelvic floor dysfunction was significantly associated with caesarean section (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.3), spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.9) and at least one instrumental delivery (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.8-6.6). The difference between caesarean and instrumental delivery was significant (Pparity and were reported in 19.9% of men and 30.2% of women. Pelvic floor disorders are very common and are strongly associated with female gender, ageing, pregnancy, parity and instrumental delivery. Caesarean delivery is not associated with a significant reduction in long term pelvic floor morbidity compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery.

  15. Update on laparoscopic, robotic, and minimally invasive vaginal surgery for pelvic floor repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J W; Preston, M R

    2009-06-01

    Advanced laparoscopic surgery marked the beginning of minimally invasive pelvic surgery. This technique lead to the development of laparoscopic hysterectomy, colposuspension, paravaginal repair, uterosacral suspension, and sacrocolpopexy without an abdominal incision. With laparoscopy there is a significant decrease in postoperative pain, shorter length of hospital stay, and a faster return to normal activities. These advantages made laparoscopy very appealing to patients. Advanced laparoscopy requires a special set of surgical skills and in the early phase of development training was not readily available. Advanced laparoscopy was developed by practicing physicians, instead of coming down through the more usual academic channels. The need for special training did hinder widespread acceptance. Nonetheless by physician to physician training and society training courses it has continued to grow and now has been incorporated in most medical school curriculums. In the last few years there has been new interest in laparoscopy because of the development of robotic assistance. The 3D vision and 720 degree articulating arms with robotics have made suture intensive procedures much easier. Laparosco-pic robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy is in the reach of most surgeons. This field is so new that there is very little data to evaluate at this time. There are short comings with laparoscopy and even with robotic-assisted procedures it is not the cure all for pelvic floor surgery. Laparoscopic procedures are long and many patients requiring pelvic floor surgery have medical conditions preventing long anesthesia. Minimally invasive vaginal surgery has developed from the concept of tissue replacement by synthetic mesh. Initially sheets of synthetic mesh were tailored by physicians to repair the anterior and posterior vaginal compartment. The use of mesh by general surgeons for hernia repair has served as a model for urogynecology. There have been rapid improvements in biomaterials

  16. Can quality of life be improved by pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Jensen, Rigmor; Lindskov, Grethe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life (QoL) parameters. Three hundred thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised...... to a Treatment Group or a Control Group in a single blinded, randomised study design. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised pelvic floor muscle training. The outcome was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire and The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Twenty...

  17. Comparison of Bladder Directed and Pelvic Floor Therapy in Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    PROJECT NUMBER Kenneth M. Peters 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0307 TITLE: Comparison of Bladder-Directed and Pelvic Floor Therapy in Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain...Pelvic Floor Therapy in Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  18. Observation of the effect of physical rehabilitation therapy combined with the medication on pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Wang, Yongmei; Qi, Shengbo; Li, Tingting; Cao, Jiang; Zheng, Tinghua; Su, Yan

    2018-02-01

    We observed the effects of physical rehabilitation therapy combined with medication on pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). We collected the medical records of 84 maternal patients with PFD who received treatment at the Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University between May 2015 and October 2016. These patients were randomly divided into two groups, the control group (n=42) and observation group (n=42). In the control group, patients received conventional physical rehabilitation therapy while in observation group, patients received the shixiao powder combined with siwu decoction in addition to the physical rehabilitation. The therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. The total effective rate of the observation group was 97.6%, which was significantly higher than 78.6% in the control group (Ppelvic floor function under rest state, such as electromyo-graphy amplitude, contraction force, coordinate strength and urine flow rate, were significantly higher than those in control group (P0.05). In observation group, after treatment, the rehabilitation effects of urinary incontinence and sexual life quality at 3 months post-delivery were significantly better than those in control group (P0.05), however, after treatment, the levels of CRP and IL-10 of patients in observation group were significantly lower than those in control group (Pphysical rehabilitation therapy combined with the shixiao powder and siwu decoction exhibits significant efficacy in the treatment of PFD by effectively improving the pelvic floor functions, increasing perineal muscle strength, and decreasing expression levels of inflammatory factors, which can significantly ameliorate life quality and reduce the incidence rate of complications. Thus, this treatment method shows great application value in clinical practice.

  19. Mesh complications in female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery and their management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemendra N Shah

    2012-01-01

    , its magnitude, severity and potential recurrence of pelvic floor defect.

  20. Mesh complications in female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery and their management: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hemendra N.; Badlani, Gopal H.

    2012-01-01

    , severity and potential recurrence of pelvic floor defect. PMID:22919127

  1. Strengthening validity in studies of pelvic floor disorders through qualitative research: an example from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blystad, Astrid; Rortveit, Guri; Gjerde, Janne Lillelid; Muleta, Mulu; Moland, Karen Marie

    2018-05-01

    This formative qualitative follow-up study addresses validity concerns in the Dabat Incontinence and Prolapse (DABINCOP) study, which aimed to determine the prevalence of pelvic floor disorders in north-west Ethiopia. A pilot study using a questionnaire validated by pelvic exam showed severe underreporting of clinically relevant pelvic organ prolapse (POP). The objective of the follow-up study was to explore the reasons behind the underreporting and to gather information to strengthen the sensitivity and local relevance of the questionnaire to be employed in the main study. A qualitative formative study nested within the DABINCOP study was carried out in rural and semiurban communities using an interpretive approach and in-depth qualitative interviews. Women (5) who had not self-reported POP in the pilot but were diagnosed with severe prolapse after pelvic examination, and health-care workers in the research team (7) were interviewed individually within 1 year of the pilot. Systematic text condensation was used in the analysis. The women explained that shame and fear of social exclusion, lack of trust in the study and data collectors, and lack of hope for cure prevented them from disclosing. The health-care workers reported weaknesses in the questionnaire and the research approach. Time pressure and competition among data collectors may have compromised women's motivation to disclose. The study indicates that qualitative research may fruitfully be employed in the formative phase of an epidemiological study on sensitive reproductive health problems to enhance local relevance of the tool and overall validity of the study.

  2. Pelvic floor muscle training versus watchful waiting or pessary treatment for pelvic organ prolapse (POPPS) : Design and participant baseline characteristics of two parallel pragmatic randomized controlled trials in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M. C. R.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Schram, Aaltje J.; Messelink, Embert J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and pessaries are commonly used in the conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Because there is a lack of evidence regarding the optimal choice between these two interventions, we designed the "Pelvic Organ prolapse in primary care: effects of

  3. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pessary treatment compared with pelvic floor muscle training in older women with pelvic organ prolapse : 2-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Chantal; Wiegersma, Marian; Kollen, Boudewijn; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Vermeulen, Karin; Dekker, Janny H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pessary treatment compared with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in women with pelvic organ prolapse over a 2-year period. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with women (>= 55 y) with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse,

  4. Home exercises for pelvic floor in continent women one year after physical therapy treatment for urinary incontinence: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Ana P; Luz, Soraia C T; Virtuoso, Janeisa F

    2011-01-01

    To describe the results of home exercise targeting the pelvic floor in continent women one year after the end of a physical therapy treatment for the following outcomes: functional assessment of the pelvic floor and urinary incontinence. This is an observational study that evaluated fifteen women one year after physical therapy treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The outcomes for this study were: situations of urinary loss, use of daily protection, practice of home exercises for the pelvic floor, functional assessment of the pelvic floor (FAPF) and patient satisfaction. We also investigated some confounding variables such as hormonal status, number of vaginal deliveries and previous history of episiotomy. One year after completion of physical therapy treatment, we observed that the FAPF median remained stable over time (Median=5, p=0.08). The presence of urinary incontinence was reported by 40% of women in the sample, however, was characterized as mild (i.e. not requiring the use of daily protection). There was also a significant association (p=0.001) between the completion of home exercises (twice or more per week) and the normal clinical status. Confounding variables, which could compromise the clinical status, showed no significant association with the outcomes (p≥0.05). Home exercises contributed to the maintenance of continence following a physical therapy treatment.

  5. Perineal ultrasonography in women with stress-incontinence and controls - the role of the pelvic floor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJMA, J; TINGA, DJ; VISSER, GHA

    1991-01-01

    With a curved array real-time ultrasound scanning machine and the probe placed sagittally onto the vulva, symphysis, bladder, urethra and the pelvic floor can be visualized in one frame. With this technique we studied 10 women with stress incontinence and 10 control women. In both groups active

  6. Pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy with myofeedback for women with stress urinary incontinence : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kruif, Yvette P.; Van Wegen, Erwin E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Involuntary urine loss can be a major social and hygienic problem for women suffering from stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A frequently applied treatment method for these women is pelvic floor muscle exercise therapy (PFE), either with or without EMG-biofeedback (myofeedback). This paper attempts

  7. Pelvic floor muscle training is not effective in women with UI in pregnancy: a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldringh, C.; Wijngaart, M.A.G. van den; Albers-Heitner, P.; Lycklama á Nijeholt, A.A.B.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) during pregnancy in women at risk, i.e. women who were already affected by urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy. The intervention consisted of three sessions of PFMT between week 23

  8. Pelvic floor muscle training in the prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence in women - what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, G.

    2008-01-01

    Many women suffer from urinary incontinence (UI). During and after pregnancy, women are advised to perform pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to prevent the development of UI. In established UI, PFMT is prescribed routinely as first-line treatment. Published studies are small, underpowered...

  9. Pelvic floor muscle training is not effective in women with UI in pregnancy: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldringh, C.; Wijngaart, M.A.G. van den; Albers-Heitner, P.; Lycklama á Nijeholt, A.A.B.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the short- and long-term effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) during pregnancy in women at risk, i.e. women who were already affected by urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy. The intervention consisted of three sessions of PFMT between week 23

  10. The effect of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function in men with lower urinary tract symptoms after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, S; Gard, G; Dehlendorff, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common sequelae in men after stroke. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on measured erectile function as an indicator of sexuality in men with LUTS...

  11. Longitudinal comparison study of pelvic floor function between women with and without stress urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Mikako; Murayama, Ryoko; Haruna, Megumi; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Murashima, Sachiyo; Kozuma, Shiro

    2013-04-01

    To compare the pelvic floor function between women with and without stress urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery. Seventeen women (age 35.5 ± 3.5) were prospectively studied at about 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after vaginal delivery. Urinary incontinence was assessed by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form. Pelvic floor function was assessed by antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus using transperineal ultrasound. Five of 17 women experienced postpartum stress urinary incontinence. The antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus at rest was significantly longer in stress urinary incontinent women than in continent women until 3 months after delivery (p continent women and stress urinary incontinent women. Regardless of urinary incontinence, the antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus at rest shortened at 6 months postpartum, compared to 6 weeks postpartum (p continent women by 6 months postpartum (p = 0.02). The extended pelvic floor may be a cause of stress urinary incontinence in the postpartum period. Therefore, treatment to improve the extended pelvic floor should be developed for the prevention of stress urinary incontinence.

  12. Feasibility and acceptability of couple counselling and pelvic floor muscle training after operation for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Randi V; E Bidstrup, Pernille; Hvarness, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Can intervention, which consists of up to six couple counselling sessions, group instruction in pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), up to three individual PFMT sessions and a DVD home training program. We examined its feasibility on the basis of the recruitment rate, adherence to and acceptability...... of the intervention, the response rate and changes in erectile and sexual functioning measured on the International Index of Erectile Function at baseline and at eight and 12 months. RESULTS: The recruitment rate was 14%. One couple withdrew, six couples attended 1-4 counselling sessions, and all patients attended...... PFMT until continence was achieved. The response rate on outcomes was 85% for patients and 71% for partners. The couples reported that counselling improved their sex life but it did not improve their ability to talk openly about sex. Most patients found that the physiotherapist improved...

  13. Pelvic floor and anal sphincter trauma should be key performance indicators of maternity services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, H P; Pardey, J; Murray, H

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of maternal somatic birth trauma, which affects many more women than previously thought, primarily in the form of anal sphincter and levator ani tears. Given that such trauma occurs in about one-third of all women giving birth vaginally for the first time, and given that it has serious long-term consequences, it should be audited by all maternity services with a view to providing remedial therapy to delay or prevent subsequent morbidity, and to facilitate practice improvement. The increasing availability of modern imaging equipment and the skills of using it for pelvic floor assessment means that it is now becoming possible to provide such services postnatally.

  14. The reliability of surface EMG recorded from the pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchincloss, Cindy C; McLean, Linda

    2009-08-30

    The neuromuscular function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is frequently evaluated using surface electrodes embedded on vaginal probes. The purpose of this study was to determine the between-trial and between-day reliability of EMG data recorded from the PFM using two different vaginal probes while subjects performed PFM maximum voluntary contractions and a coughing task. The Femiscan and the Periform vaginal probes were used to acquire EMG data while the subjects performed the tasks. Peak RMS amplitudes were computed for each instrument, task, and side of the pelvic floor using a sliding window technique. The between-trial reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation (CV). Between-trial reliability was determined using ICCs, Pearson's correlation coefficients, computing the mean absolute difference between days, and calculating the standard error the measurement (SEM) for each instrument and task. EMG amplitude differences were detected between the left and right PFM (pperformed separately for each side. Overall, between-trial reliability was fair to high for the Femiscan (ICC((3,1))=0.58-0.98, CV=8.5-20.7%) and good to high for the Periform (ICC((3,1))=0.80-0.98, CV=9.6-19.5%), however between-day reliability was generally poor for both vaginal probes (ICC((3,1))=0.08-0.84). The results suggest that although it is acceptable to use PFM surface EMG as a biofeedback tool for training purposes, it is not recommended for use to make between-subject comparisons or to use as an outcome measure between-days when evaluating PFM function.

  15. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in the intrinsic structure of rat pelvic floor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Marianna; Lawley, Danielle M; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-08-01

    Maternal birth trauma to the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Modeling and imaging studies suggest that demands placed on PFMs during childbirth exceed their physiologic limits; however many parous women do not sustain PFM injury. Here we determine whether pregnancy induces adaptations in PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of muscle function, and/or intramuscular extracellular matrix (ECM), responsible for load bearing. To establish if parallel changes occur in muscles outside of the PFM, we also examined a hind limb muscle. Coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior of 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley virgin, mid-pregnant, and late-pregnant; 6-month-old virgin; and 4- and 12-week postpartum rats (N = 10/group) were fixed in situ and harvested. Major architectural parameters determining muscle's excursion and force-generating capacity were quantified, namely, normalized fiber length (Lfn), physiologic cross-sectional area, and sarcomere length. Hydroxyproline content was used as a surrogate for intramuscular ECM quantity. Analyses were performed by 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc testing at a significance level of .05. Pregnancy induced a significant increase in Lfn in all PFMs by the end of gestation relative to virgin controls. Fibers were elongated by 37% in coccygeus (P pregnancy. By 12 weeks' postpartum, Lfn of all PFMs returned to the prepregnancy values. Relative to virgin controls, ECM increased by 140% in coccygeus, 52% in iliocaudalis, and 75% in pubocaudalis in late-pregnant group, but remained unchanged across time in the tibialis anterior. Postpartum, ECM collagen content returned to prepregnancy levels in iliocaudalis and pubocaudalis, but continued to be significantly elevated in coccygeus (P pregnancy induces unique adaptations in the structure of the PFMs, which adjust their architectural design by adding sarcomeres in series to increase fiber length as well as mounting

  16. Spanish translation and validation of four short pelvic floor disorders questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treszezamsky, Alejandro D; Karp, Deborah; Dick-Biascoechea, Madeline; Ehsani, Nazanin; Dancz, Christina; Montoya, T Ignacio; Olivera, Cedric K; Smith, Aimee L; Cardenas, Rosa; Fashokun, Tola; Bradley, Catherine S

    2013-04-01

    Globally, Spanish is the primary language for 329 million people; however, most urogynecologic questionnaires are available in English. We set out to develop valid Spanish translations of the Questionnaire for Urinary Incontinence Diagnosis (QUID), the Three Incontinence Questions (3IQ), and the short Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20) and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7). The TRAPD method (translation, review, adjudication, pretesting, and documentation) was used for translation. Eight native Spanish-speaking translators developed Spanish versions collaboratively. These were pretested with cognitive interviews and revised until optimal. For validation, bilingual patients at seven clinics completed Spanish and English questionnaire versions in randomized order. Participants completed a second set of questionnaires later. The Spanish versions' internal consistency and reliability and Spanish-English agreement were measured using Cronbach's alpha, weighted kappa, and intraclass correlation coefficients. A total of 78 subjects were included; 94.9 % self-identified as Hispanic and 73.1 % spoke Spanish as their primary language. The proportion of per-item missing responses was similar in both languages (median 1.3 %). Internal consistency for Spanish PFDI-20 subscales was acceptable to good and for PFIQ-7 and QUID excellent. Test-retest reliability per item was moderate to near perfect for PFDI-20, substantial to near perfect for PFIQ-7 and 3IQ, and substantial for QUID. Spanish-English agreement for individual items was substantial to near perfect for all questionnaires (kappa range 0.64-0.95) and agreement for PFDI-20, PFIQ-7, and QUID subscales scores was high [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) range 0.92-0.99]. We obtained valid Spanish translations of the PFDI-20, PFIQ-7, QUID, and 3IQ. These results support their use as clinical and research assessment tools in Spanish-speaking populations.

  17. Intra and inter-rater reliability study of pelvic floor muscle dynamometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Martinho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra and inter-rater reliability of pelvic floor muscle (PFM dynamometric measurements for maximum and average strengths, as well as endurance. METHOD: A convenience sample of 18 nulliparous women, without any urogynecological complaints, aged between 19 and 31 (mean age of 25.4±3.9 participated in this study. They were evaluated using a pelvic floor dynamometer based on load cell technology. The dynamometric evaluations were repeated in three successive sessions: two on the same day with a rest period of 30 minutes between them, and the third on the following day. All participants were evaluated twice in each session; first by examiner 1 followed by examiner 2. The vaginal dynamometry data were analyzed using three parameters: maximum strength, average strength, and endurance. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was applied to estimate the PFM dynamometric measurement reliability, considering a good level as being above 0.75. RESULTS: The intra and inter-raters' analyses showed good reliability for maximum strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.95, and ICCinter-rater=0.96, average strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.94, and ICCinter-rater=0.97, and endurance (ICCintra-rater1=0.88, ICCintra-rater2=0.86, and ICCinter-rater=0.92 dynamometric measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM dynamometric measurements showed good intra- and inter-rater reliability for maximum strength, average strength and endurance, which demonstrates that this is a reliable device that can be used in clinical practice.

  18. Static and dynamic evaluation of pelvic floor disorders with an open low-field tilting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiaschetti, V.; Pastorelli, D.; Squillaci, E.; Funel, V.; Rascioni, M.; Meschini, A.; Salimbeni, C.; Sileri, P.; Franceschilli, L.; Simonetti, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance defaecography (MRD) in pelvic floor disorders using an open tilting magnet with a 0.25 T static field and to compare the results obtained from the same patient both in supine and orthostatic positions. Materials and methods: From May 2010 to November 2011, 49 symptomatic female subjects (mean age 43.5 years) were enrolled. All the patients underwent MRD in the supine and orthostatic positions using three-dimensional (3D) hybrid contrast-enhanced (HYCE) sequences and dynamic gradient echo (GE) T1-weighted sequences. All the patients underwent conventional defaecography (CD) to correlate both results. Two radiologists evaluated the examinations; inter and intra-observer concordance was measured. The results obtained in the two positions were compared between them and with CD. Results: The comparison between CD and MRD found statistically significant differences in the evaluation of anterior and posterior rectocoele during defaecation in both positions and of rectal prolapse under the pubo-coccygeal line (PCL) during evacuation, only in the supine position (versus MRD orthostatic: rectal prolapse p < 0.0001; anterior rectocoele p < 0.001; posterior rectocoele p = 0.008; versus CD: rectal prolapse p < 0.0001; anterior rectocoele p < 0.001; posterior rectocoele p = 0.01). The value of intra-observer intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) ranged from good to excellent; the interobserver ICC from moderate to excellent. Conclusion: MRD is feasible with an open low-field tilting magnet, and it is more accurate in the orthostatic position than in the supine position to evaluate pelvic floor disorders

  19. A prospective study of pelvic floor physical therapy: pain and psychosexual outcomes in provoked vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; McLean, Linda; Chamberlain, Susan

    2009-07-01

    Research suggests that increased tension in the pelvic floor muscles of women with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD, the most common form of chronic vulvar pain) may play an important role in maintaining and exacerbating their pain. However, no prospective studies of pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) for PVD have been carried out. This study prospectively examined the effectiveness of a PFPT intervention in treating the pain and sexual and psychological components of PVD, and determined predictors of greater treatment success. Thirteen women with PVD completed eight sessions of PFPT. Participants were assessed at pre- and post-treatment via gynecological examinations, vestibular pain threshold testing, structured interviews, and standardized questionnaires. A 3-month follow-up interview assessed any further changes. Outcome measures included: vestibular pain thresholds, gynecological examination and intercourse pain ratings, sexual function and intercourse frequency, mental health, negative pain cognitions, and success rates. Following treatment, participants had significantly higher vestibular pain thresholds and significantly lower pain ratings during the gynecological examination. Participants reported significant reductions in pain intensity during intercourse and were able to engage in significantly more pain-free activities. Although overall sexual function significantly improved, various components of sexual function and frequency of intercourse did not. Participants' mental health did not significantly improve; however, pain catastrophizing and pain-related anxiety significantly decreased. The treatment was considered to be successful for 10 of the 13 participants, and predictors of greater treatment success included greater reductions in helplessness and a longer period of time in treatment. Results provide preliminary support for the effectiveness of PFPT in treating the pain of PVD, as well as some of the sexual and cognitive correlates of PVD. The

  20. Pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder symptoms – A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Fitz

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT involves the contraction of the puborectal, anal sphincter and external urethral muscles, inhibiting the detrusor contraction, what justify its use in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB symptoms. Objective: To verify the effects of isolated PFMT on the symptoms of OAB. Method: Prospective clinical trial with 27 women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, with predominance of OAB symptoms and loss ≥ 2 g in the pad test. It was evaluated: pelvic floor muscles (PFMs function (digital palpation and manometry; urinary symptoms (nocturia, frequency and urinary loss; degree of discomfort of OAB symptoms; and quality of life (Incontinence Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [I-QoL]. The PFMT program consisted of 24 outpatient sessions (2x/week + home PFMT. The Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (with a significance level of 5% were used to analyse the data. Results: There was a significant improvement of the urinary symptoms to the pad test (5.8±9.7, p<0.001, urinary loss (0.7±1.1, p=0.005 and nocturia (0.8±0.9, p=0.011. Reduction in the degree of discomfort of urinary symptoms was observed according to OAB-V8 questionnaire (10.0±7.7, p=0.001. There were also significant results in PFMs function: Oxford (3.6±0.9, p=0.001, endurance (5.2±1.8, p<0.001, fast (8.9±1.5, p<0.001 and manometry (26.6±15.8, p=0.003. In addition, quality of life had a significant improvement in the three domains evaluated by I-QoL. Conclusion: The PFMT without any additional guidelines improves the symptomatology, the function of PFMs and the quality of life of women with OAB symptoms.

  1. Methods of pushing during vaginal delivery and pelvic floor and perineal outcomes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tayrac, Renaud; Letouzey, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, several randomized studies have compared Valsalva and spontaneous pushing techniques during vaginal delivery. This review summarizes current medical knowledge concerning their maternal and fetal consequences, focusing on pelvic and perineal outcomes. We selected nine randomized controlled trials comparing Valsalva and spontaneous pushing, and a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing different methods of perineal protection. Two trials showed that spontaneous pushing reduces the risk of perineal tears, but no firm conclusions can be drawn given the heterogeneity and inconsistent results of these studies. Conflicting results have been reported regarding the duration of the second stage of labor. Pushing technique does not seem to affect episiotomy, instrumental delivery or cesarean rates. Maternal satisfaction seems to be better after spontaneous pushing. Spontaneous pushing appears to have no adverse effects on neonatal well being, and one study showed a significant improvement in prenatal fetal parameters during the expulsive phase. Valsalva and spontaneous pushing techniques currently appear comparable in terms of duration, pelvic floor, perineal, and neonatal outcomes. In the absence of strong evidence in favor of either technique, the decision should be guided by patient preference and the clinical situation. Additional, well-designed randomized controlled trials are required.

  2. High spatial resolution pressure distribution of the vaginal canal in Pompoir practitioners: A biomechanical approach for assessing the pelvic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Licia P; Pássaro, Anice C; Amorim, Amanda C; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2017-08-01

    Pompoir is a technique poorly studied in the literature that claims to improve pelvic floor strength and coordination. This study aims to investigate the pelvic floor muscles' coordination throughout the vaginal canal among Pompoir practitioners and non-practitioners by describing a high resolution map of pressure distribution. This cross-sectional, study included 40 healthy women in two groups: control and Pompoir. While these women performed both sustained and "waveform" pelvic floor muscle contractions, the spatiotemporal pressure distribution in their vaginal canals was evaluated by a non-deformable probe fully instrumented with a 10×10 matrix of capacitive transducers. Pompoir group was able to sustain the pressure levels achieved for a longer period (40% longer, moderate effect, P=0.04). During the "waveform" contraction task, Pompoir group achieved lower, earlier peak pressures (moderate effect, P=0.05) and decreased rates of contraction (small effect, P=0.04) and relaxation (large effect, P=0.01). During both tasks, Pompoir group had smaller relative contributions by the mid-region and the anteroposterior planes and greater contributions by the caudal and cranial regions and the latero-lateral planes. Results suggest that specific coordination training of the pelvic floor muscles alters the pressure distribution profile, promoting a more-symmetric distribution of pressure throughout the vaginal canal. Therefore, this study suggests that pelvic floor muscles can be trained to a degree beyond strengthening by focusing on coordination, which results in changes in symmetry of the spatiotemporal pressure distribution in the vaginal canal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical Therapy in the Management of Pelvic Floor Muscles Hypertonia in a Woman with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Moreira Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pelvic floor (PF hypertonic disorders are a group of conditions that present with muscular hypertonia or spasticity, resulting in a diminished capacity to isolate, contract, and relax the PF. Their presentation includes voiding and sexual dysfunctions, pelvic pain, and constipation. Various factors are associated, such as complicated vaginal birth, muscular injury, scar tissue formation, and neuropathies. Study Design. The case of a single patient will be presented, together with the management strategies employed. Case Description. A woman with hereditary spastic paraparesis and a history of muscle spasticity and urinary and fecal complaints since childhood. She presented to this institution seeking treatment for pelvic pain, pain during intercourse, constipation, and micturition problems. A physical therapy protocol was developed, with the trial of several treatment modalities. Outcome. After some failed attempts, perineal and pelvic floor stretching proved to be very efficacious therapies for this patient’s complaint, leading to improved pain during intercourse, constipation, pelvic pain, and urinary stream. Discussion. PF spasticity can lead to severe disability and interfere with daily basic functions, such as micturition and evacuation. Physical therapy plays an essential role in the management of these patients and can lead to significant improvement in quality of life.

  4. Influence of a protocol of Pilates exercises on the contractility of the pelvic floor muscles of non-institutionalized elderly persons

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Ligia Muniz de; Pegorare, Ana Beatriz Gomes de Souza; Christofoletti, Gustavo; Barbosa, Suzi Rosa Miziara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the influence of a protocol of Pilates exercises on the functionality and contractility of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) of older women living in the city of Campo Grande, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Method: Ten women (median age of 63.4±4.5 years) with little or no pelvic floor dysfunction were subjected to 24 sessions of Pilates exercises lasting one hour each, for 12 weeks. The pressure of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) was assessed using a perineometer (cmH2...

  5. Association of compartment defects in anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction with female outlet obstruction constipation (OOC) by dynamic MR defecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Jiang, T; Peng, P; Yang, X-Q; Wang, W-C

    2015-04-01

    Chronic constipation affects more than 17% of the global population worldwide, and up to 50% of patients were outlet obstruction constipation (OOC). Women and the elderly are most likely to be affected, due to female-specific risk factors, such as menopause, parity and multiparity. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of compartment defects in anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction with female outlet obstruction constipation (OOC) by MR defecography. Fifty-six consecutive women diagnosed with outlet obstruction constipation from October 2009 to July 2011 were included. They were categorized into the following groups: anorectal disorder only group (27 patients) and anorectal disorder plus multi-compartment pelvic disorder group (29 patients). Relevant measurements were taken at rest, during squeezing and straining. Anismus was significantly more common in the anorectal disorder group compared to the multi-compartment pelvic disorder group. Conversely, rectocele, rectal prolapse, and descending perineum were significantly more common in the multi-compartment pelvic disorder group compared to the anorectal disorder group. Of the total 56 OOC patients, 34 (60.7%) exhibited anismus and 38 (67.9%) rectocele. Among the anismus patients, there were 8 patients (23.5%) with combined cystocele, and 6 patients (17.6%) with combined vaginal/cervical prolapse. Among the rectocele patients, there were 23 patients (60.5%) with combined cystocele and 18 patients (47.4%) with combined vaginal/cervical prolapse. With respect to anorectal defects, 13 anismus patients (38.2%) were with signal posterior pelvic defects, 4 rectocele patients (10.5%) presented with signal posterior pelvic defects. Inadequate defecatory propulsion due to outlet obstruction constipation is often associated with multi-compartment pelvic floor disorders, whereas not about dyssynergic defecation.

  6. Dynamic evaluation of pelvic floor reconstructive surgery using radiopaque meshes and three-dimensional helical CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Palma

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This prospective study was performed to achieve visualization of the reestablishment of anatomy after reconstructive surgery in the different pelvic compartments with non-absorbable radiopaque meshes, providing valuable anatomic information for surgeons implanting meshes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 30 female patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI, anterior and posterior vaginal wall prolapse, or both underwent surgical repair using radiopaque meshes after written informed consent. Patients with SUI underwent five different surgeries. Patients with anterior vaginal prolapse underwent a procedure using a combined pre-pubic and transobturator mesh, and those with posterior vaginal prolapse underwent posterior slingplasty. Three-dimensional reconstruction using helical CT was performed four weeks postoperatively. RESULTS: In all cases, the mesh was clearly visualized. Transobturator slings were shown at the midurethra, and the anchoring tails perforated the obturator foramen at the safety region. Mini-slings were in the proper place, and computed angiography revealed that the anchoring system was away from the obturator vessels. In patients undergoing procedure for anterior vaginal prolapse, both pre-pubic armpit and obturator slings were clearly seen and the mesh was in the proper position, supporting the bladder base and occluding the distal part of the urogenital hiatus. Transcoccygeal sacropexy revealed indirectly a well-supported "neo rectovaginal fascia" and the anchoring tails at the level of ischial spines. CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional helical tomography images of the female pelvis using radiopaque meshes have a potential role in improving our understanding of pelvic floor reconstructive surgeries. These radiopaque meshes might be the basis of a new investigative methodology.

  7. The prevalence of symptomatic pelvic floor disorders in women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R M; Bell, R J; Billah, B; Hossain, M B; Davis, S R

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence of, and risk factors for, pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) in women in Bangladesh. A nationally representative sample of 1590 Bangladeshi women, aged 30-59 years, was recruited using a multistage cluster sampling technique, between September 2013 and March 2014. Urinary incontinence (UI), fecal incontinence (FI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) were assessed using validated questionnaires. The weighted prevalence and the factors associated with each PFD were investigated using multivariable weighted logistic regression. The weighted prevalence of UI was 23.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 21.3-26.0%), FI 5.3% (95% CI 4.0-6.6%), POP 16.2% (95% CI 14.2-18.2%), and having at least one PFD 35.3% (95% CI 32.6-37.9%). Women were more likely to have at least one PFD if aged 40-49 years (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.46, 95% CI 1.02-2.08; p = 0.040) or 50-59 years (AOR 2.39, 95% CI 1.59-3.58; p women aged 30-39 years. Having at least one PFD was positively associated with having three or more versus fewer children (AOR 1.61, 95% CI 1.14-2.27; p = 0.007), being in the middle (AOR 3.05, 95% CI 1.72-5.41; p women aged 30-59 years had at least one symptomatic PFD. Risk factors included greater age, higher parity, lower wealth status and self-reported diabetes. The diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of PFDs in Bangladesh need greater attention, as the prevalence of these disabling conditions is likely to increase with the aging of the population.

  8. Electrostimulation, response of the pelvic floor muscles, and urinary incontinence in elderly patients post prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Objective to investigate the response of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM, and urinary incontinence (UI, in patients having undergone a prostatectomy, after treatment using electrical stimulation. Materials and methods this observational study was conducted in an outpatient urogynecologic physical therapy clinic of Hospital dos Servidores in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from August to September 2012. Ten patients (aged, 64 ± 7 years with urinary incontinence resulting from radical prostatectomy, having received surgery within six months of study entry, without urinary infection, and without metallic implants underwent electrical stimulation of the PFM, while in lateral decubitus position with knees and hips flexed. The parameters used were 65 Hz frequency, pulse width of 500 µs, biphasic current, intensity according to the tolerance level reported by the patient, perineal contraction time of four seconds, and rest time of eight seconds for 20 minutes twice a week, totaling 16 sessions of electrical stimulation with active-assisted contraction. Patients were evaluated before and after electrical stimulation through physical therapy evaluation of urinary incontinence, by being asked about the number of disposable guards used daily, using a visual analogue scale (VAS to measure how the UI interfered with activities of daily living, and by electromyographic biofeedback to measure the work of the PFM. Data were analyzed using Student’s paired t-tests and a significance level of 0.05. Results after 16 sessions of electrical stimulation, the electromyographic biofeedback evaluation showed a significant increase in muscle strength of 10.73 ± 8.64 to 17.16 ± 9.00 µV (t = -3.39, P = 0.008, a significant decrease in the number of diapers used before and after treatment (3.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 1.5, respectively; t = 5.16, P = 0.0006, and a significant decrease in the interference of urinary incontinence on daily activities of 9.6 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 3.8 (t = 5

  9. Accuracy of Four Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis of Posterior Pelvic Floor Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gruting, Isabelle M A; Stankiewicz, Aleksandra; Kluivers, Kirsten; De Bin, Riccardo; Blake, Helena; Sultan, Abdul H; Thakar, Ranee

    2017-11-01

    To establish the diagnostic test accuracy of evacuation proctography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), transperineal ultrasonography, and endovaginal ultrasonography for detecting posterior pelvic floor disorders (rectocele, enterocele, intussusception, and anismus) in women with obstructed defecation syndrome and secondarily to identify the most patient-friendly imaging technique. In this prospective cohort study, 131 women with symptoms of obstructed defecation syndrome underwent evacuation proctogram, MRI, and transperineal and endovaginal ultrasonography. Images were analyzed by two blinded observers. In the absence of a reference standard, latent class analysis was used to assess diagnostic test accuracy of multiple tests with area under the curve (AUC) as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were interobserver agreement calculated as Cohen's κ and patient acceptability using a visual analog scale. No significant differences in diagnostic accuracy were found among the imaging techniques for all the target conditions. Estimates of diagnostic test accuracy were highest for rectocele using MRI (AUC 0.79) or transperineal ultrasonography (AUC 0.85), for enterocele using transperineal (AUC 0.73) or endovaginal ultrasonography (AUC 0.87), for intussusception using evacuation proctography (AUC 0.76) or endovaginal ultrasonography (AUC 0.77), and for anismus using endovaginal (AUC 0.95) or transperineal ultrasonography (AUC 0.78). Interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of rectocele (κ 0.53-0.72), enterocele (κ 0.54-0.94) and anismus (κ 0.43-0.81) was moderate to excellent, but poor to fair for intussusception (κ -0.03 to 0.37) with all techniques. Patient acceptability was better for transperineal and endovaginal ultrasonography as compared with MRI and evacuation proctography (P<.001). Evacuation proctography, MRI, and transperineal and endovaginal ultrasonography were shown to have similar diagnostic test accuracy. Evacuation proctography

  10. Can quality of life be improved by pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Jensen, Rigmor; Lindskov, Grethe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in women with urinary incontinence after ischemic stroke measured by quality of life (QoL) parameters. Three hundred thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised...... to a Treatment Group or a Control Group in a single blinded, randomised study design. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised pelvic floor muscle training. The outcome was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire and The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ). Twenty....... Development of specific instruments for QoL in stroke patients with urinary incontinence can be recommended....

  11. Dynamic pelvic floor MR imaging at 3 T in patients with clinical signs of urinary incontinence-preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, Nuschin; Willinek, Winfried A.; Traeber, Frank; Jaeger, Ursula; Schild, Hans H.; Gieseke, Juergen; Bastian, Patrick J.; Schmitz, Bettina; Mueller, Stefan C.

    2008-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate feasibility, image quality and diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MR imaging the pelvic floor at 3.0 T in patients with urinary incontinence and to compare these results with those of MRI performed at 1.5 T. Ten patients with the diagnosis of urinary incontinence (clinical symptoms, clinical examination, pelvic ultrasound) were examined with a dynamic balanced FFE (B-FFE) sequence at 1.5 T and 3.0 T on the same day in a randomized order. Spatial (1.5 x 1.5 x 8 mm) and temporal (0.44 s) resolution at 3.0 T were comparable to the 1.5-T B-FFE sequence. Two radiologists assessed visual signal to noise (three-point scale), artefact level (five-point scale) and final MR diagnoses with regard to pelvic floor weakness (independent analysis). The diagnoses obtained at 1.5-T field strength and the results of the clinical tests served as standard of reference. In addition, ROI-based quantitative measurements were performed to assess different tissue contrasts at both field strengths. Data were analyzed for statistical differences by using the Wilcoxon's matched pairs test and the marginal homogeneity test. Visual signal to noise was rated higher at 3.0 T for all ten studies by both radiologists. With regard to artefact level, there was no statistically significant difference between the studies obtained at 3.0 T as compared to the corresponding 1.5-T studies (marginal homogeneity test: p = 0.18 for reviewer 1 and 0.41 for reviewer 2). Mean artefact level was rated minor to moderate by both reviewers for both field strengths (excellent interobserver agreement with Kendall-W value of 0.973). Except for a higher tissue contrast between fat and urethra at 1.5 T, there were no statistically significant differences between tissue contrast at 1.5 T as compared to 3.0 T (Wilcoxon's test). Final MR diagnoses regarding pelvic floor weakness did not differ between 3.0-T and 1.5-T field strength and correlated well with the results of the clinical tests. Dynamic

  12. Dynamic pelvic floor MR imaging at 3 T in patients with clinical signs of urinary incontinence-preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, Nuschin; Willinek, Winfried A.; Traeber, Frank; Jaeger, Ursula; Schild, Hans H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, Juergen [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Bastian, Patrick J. [University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Schmitz, Bettina; Mueller, Stefan C. [University of Bonn, Department of Urology, Bonn (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    To prospectively evaluate feasibility, image quality and diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MR imaging the pelvic floor at 3.0 T in patients with urinary incontinence and to compare these results with those of MRI performed at 1.5 T. Ten patients with the diagnosis of urinary incontinence (clinical symptoms, clinical examination, pelvic ultrasound) were examined with a dynamic balanced FFE (B-FFE) sequence at 1.5 T and 3.0 T on the same day in a randomized order. Spatial (1.5 x 1.5 x 8 mm) and temporal (0.44 s) resolution at 3.0 T were comparable to the 1.5-T B-FFE sequence. Two radiologists assessed visual signal to noise (three-point scale), artefact level (five-point scale) and final MR diagnoses with regard to pelvic floor weakness (independent analysis). The diagnoses obtained at 1.5-T field strength and the results of the clinical tests served as standard of reference. In addition, ROI-based quantitative measurements were performed to assess different tissue contrasts at both field strengths. Data were analyzed for statistical differences by using the Wilcoxon's matched pairs test and the marginal homogeneity test. Visual signal to noise was rated higher at 3.0 T for all ten studies by both radiologists. With regard to artefact level, there was no statistically significant difference between the studies obtained at 3.0 T as compared to the corresponding 1.5-T studies (marginal homogeneity test: p = 0.18 for reviewer 1 and 0.41 for reviewer 2). Mean artefact level was rated minor to moderate by both reviewers for both field strengths (excellent interobserver agreement with Kendall-W value of 0.973). Except for a higher tissue contrast between fat and urethra at 1.5 T, there were no statistically significant differences between tissue contrast at 1.5 T as compared to 3.0 T (Wilcoxon's test). Final MR diagnoses regarding pelvic floor weakness did not differ between 3.0-T and 1.5-T field strength and correlated well with the results of the clinical tests

  13. Severe Pelvic Floor Symptoms After Cervical Cancer Treatment Are Predominantly Associated With Mental and Physical Well-Being and Body Image A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, Menke H.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Velden, Jacobus van der; Burger, Matthé P. M.; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between demographic, disease-related, and psychological variables and severe distress from pelvic floor symptoms (PFSs) after cervical cancer treatment. Methods: This study was cross-sectional and questionnaire based. We included patients with cervical cancer

  14. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on symptoms and uroflowmetry parameters in female patients with overactive bladder

    OpenAIRE

    KULAKSIZOĞLU, HALUK; AKAND, MURAT; ÇAKMAKÇI, EVRİM; GÜL, MURAT; SEÇKİN, BEDREDDİN

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: To evaluate the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) as well as uroflowmetry parameters and functional bladder capacity. Materials and methods: Fifty-nine female patients with OAB symptoms were included. Patients were assessed by SEAPI-QMM, uroflowmetry, and abdominal ultrasound. A specially designed PFMT program using a Pilates ball was generated for patients. The training period was 1-h sessions twice a week for 6 weeks and ...

  15. Pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without electric stimulation and post-prostectomy urinary incontinence: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidan,Patrícia; Silva,Elirez Bezerra da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI) after prostatectomy is difficult to treat and causes profound adverse impacts on the individual's quality of life. The main clinical treatments available for post-prostatectomy UI consist of behavioral techniques and physical therapy techniques, such as exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback for pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation for reduc...

  16. Determining the optimal pelvic floor muscle training regimen for women with stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Chantale; Glazener, Cathryn; Jenkinson, David

    2011-06-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training has received Level-A evidence rating in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, based on meta-analysis of numerous randomized control trials (RCTs) and is recommended in many published guidelines. However, the actual regimen of PFM training used varies widely in these RCTs. Hence, to date, the optimal PFM training regimen for achieving continence remains unknown and the following questions persist: how often should women attend PFM training sessions and how many contractions should they perform for maximal effect? Is a regimen of strengthening exercises better than a motor control strategy or functional retraining? Is it better to administer a PFM training regimen to an individual or are group sessions equally effective, or better? Which is better, PFM training by itself or in combination with biofeedback, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, and/or vaginal cones? Should we use improvement or cure as the ultimate outcome to determine which regimen is the best? The questions are endless. As a starting point in our endeavour to identify optimal PFM training regimens, the aim of this study is (a) to review the present evidence in terms of the effectiveness of different PFM training regimens in women with SUI and (b) to discuss the current literature on PFM dysfunction in SUI women, including the up-to-date evidence on skeletal muscle training theory and other factors known to impact on women's participation in and adherence to PFM training. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Patient-selected goals: the fourth dimension in assessment of pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstein, Lior; FitzGerald, Mary P; Kenton, Kimberly; Dooley, Yashika; Templehof, Mike; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Brubaker, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between self-expressed urogynecologic goals, symptoms, and treatment choice. Charts of women presenting for urogynecology consultation were reviewed. Demographics, diagnoses and responses to the pelvic floor distress inventory and medical, social, and epidemiologic aspects of aging questionnaires were recorded. Patients listed urogynecology goals before consultation. We categorized goals into five categories and then compared these categories by symptom type, severity, and treatment. Three hundred five women reported 635 goals (median 2, range 1-6). The number of goals listed per patient did not differ by age, race, comorbidities, or clinical diagnosis (p > 0.05). The most frequent goal category was symptoms (67%), followed by information seeking (12%), lifestyle (11%), emotional (4%), and "other" (6%). Women selecting non-surgical treatment were more likely to list information seeking as primary goal than those who chose surgery (p = 0.009). One third of participants expressed a primary non-symptom goal and were more likely to seek non-surgical therapy.

  18. Effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise on faecal incontinence in rectal cancer patients after stoma closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-H; Yang, H-Y; Hung, S-L; Chen, H-P; Liu, K-W; Chen, T-B; Chi, S-C

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) on the faecal incontinence (FI) of rectal cancer patients following stoma closure. Participants were randomly distributed into an exercise group (n = 27) and non-exercise group (n = 26). An experimental design and longitudinal approach were implemented for data collection. Baseline data were collected at 1 day before discharge, and then PFME was taught before the patients were discharged from the hospital. We collected data and followed up with the patients at their pre-discharge visit and at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months after discharge. The Cleveland Clinic Faecal Incontinence (CCI) score was used to measure patient outcome. PFME proved to effectively decrease the degree of FI in stoma closure recipients. The FI score of the exercise group significantly decreased from 8.37 to 2.27 after PFME compared with that of the non-exercise group (from 8.54 to 2.58). The generalised estimation equation tests showed that both group and time were significantly different. The tests also indicated that although PFME appeared to hasten the decline of incontinence, this effect was no longer detectable at 9 months; thus, it may be an effective intervention for FI when implemented up to half a year after discharge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Intra-abdominal pressure during Pilates: unlikely to cause pelvic floor harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tanner J; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Holder, Dannielle N; Egger, Marlene J; Hitchcock, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to describe the intra-abdominal pressures (IAP) generated during Pilates Mat and Reformer activities, and determine whether these activities generate IAP above a sit-to-stand threshold. Twenty healthy women with no symptomatic vaginal bulge, median age 43 (range 22-59 years), completed Pilates Mat and Reformer exercise routines each consisting of 11 exercises. IAP was collected by an intra-vaginal pressure transducer, transmitted wirelessly to a base station, and analyzed for maximal and area under the curve (AUC) IAP. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean maximal IAP between sit-to-stand and any of the Mat or Reformer exercises in the study population. Six to twenty-five percent of participants exceeded their individual mean maximal IAP sit-to-stand thresholds for 10 of the 22 exercises. When measuring AUC from 0 cm H2O, half the exercises exceeded the mean AUC of sit-to-stand, but only Pilates Reformer and Mat roll-ups exceeded the mean AUC of sit-to-stand when calculated from a threshold of 40 cm H2O (consistent with, for example, walking). Our results support recommending this series of introductory Pilates exercises, including five Mat exercises and six Reformer exercises to women desiring a low IAP exercise routine. More research is needed to determine the long-term effects of Pilates exercise on post-surgical exercise rehabilitation and pelvic floor health.

  20. A manometry classification to assess pelvic floor muscle function in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscylla Helouyse Angelo

    Full Text Available To develop a classification scale for manometry of pelvic floor muscles (PFM in Brazilian women, according to the modified Oxford scale.A cross sectional study, with 288 women enrolled in the Maternity, Natal, Brazil. Manometry and PFM strength data were collected and classified according to the modified Oxford scale. A simple linear regression was performed to determine the classification scale of manometry using the modified Oxford scale as the explanatory variable and the arithmetic mean of the manometry measurements as the response variable.The average age was 52.80 (±8.78; CI: 51.67-53.93 years. Manometry showed an average of 35.1 (±22.7; CI: 32.1-38.0 cmH2O and most women (29.7% scored grade 3 on the modified Oxford scale. According to the proposed scale, values between 7.5 to 14.5 cmH2O correspond to very weak pressure; 14.6 to 26.5 cmH2O represent weak pressure; 26.6 to 41.5 cmH2O represent moderate pressure; 41.6 to 60.5 cmH2O represent good pressure, and values above 60.6 cmH2O correspond to strong pressure.Manometry values were rated on a five-point scale. It is possible to rank the pressure levels performed by voluntary contraction of PFM with this new scale.

  1. Intra-abdominal Pressure during Pilates: Unlikely to Cause Pelvic Floor Harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tanner J.; Holder, Dannielle N.; Egger, Marlene J.; Hitchcock, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Aims To describe intra-abdominal pressures (IAP) generated during Pilates Mat and Reformer activities, and determine whether these activities generate IAP above a sit-to-stand threshold. Methods Twenty healthy women with no symptomatic vaginal bulge, median age 43 (range 22 – 59 years), completed Pilates Mat and Reformer exercise routines each consisting of 11 exercises. IAP was collected by an intra-vaginal pressure transducer, transmitted wirelessly to a base station, and analyzed for maximal and area under the curve (AUC) IAP. Results There were no statistically significant differences in mean max IAP between sit-to-stand and any of the Mat or Reformer exercises in the study population. Six to twenty-five percent of participants exceeded their individual mean max IAP sit-to-stand thresholds for 10 of the 22 exercises. When measuring AUC from 0 cm H2O, half the exercises exceeded the mean AUC of sit-to-stand but only Pilates Reformer and Mat roll-ups exceeded the mean AUC of sit-to-stand when calculated from a threshold of 40 cm H2O (consistent with, for example, walking). Conclusion Our results support recommending this series of introductory Pilates exercises including five Mat exercises and six Reformer exercises to women desiring a low IAP exercise routine. More research is needed to determine the long term effects of Pilates exercise on post-surgical exercise rehabilitation and pelvic floor health. PMID:25672647

  2. Efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training in women with overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Silvia; Riccetto, Cassio; Araújo, Angélica; Galo, Laryssa; Brito, Nathália; Botelho, Simone

    2018-04-11

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in reducing overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women. Searches were performed at MEDLINE, PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Scielo, and Central Cochrane Library PubMed until January 2017. Controlled trials were researched by two independent reviewers. Eligible studies were restricted to random and controlled clinical trials that investigated the effectiveness of PFMT in decreasing OAB symptoms. Qualitative methodology was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Data was analyzed and interpreted qualitatively. The final search retrieved eight studies (n = 1161 women with urgency symptoms), which were published between 2002 and 2016. The methodological scores varied between 4 and 7 in the PEDro scale. PFMT, with the objective of controlling urgent micturition, demonstrated improvements in quality of life in women with OAB. Most data in this revision came from small- to moderate-sized trials, with different and inconsistent outcome measures, which could have impacted the end results. The literature regarding the effectiveness of PFMT in OAB remains heterogeneous and inconclusive.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle lesions at endoanal MR imaging in female patients with faecal incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Vervoorn, Inge; Dobben, Annette C.; Stoker, Jaap; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Deutekom, Marije; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.; Wasser, Martin N.J.M.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Baeten, Cor G.M.I.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency and spectrum of lesions of different pelvic floor muscles at endoanal MRI in women with severe faecal incontinence and to study their relation with incontinence severity and manometric findings. In 105 women MRI examinations were evaluated for internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS), puborectal muscle (PM) and levator ani (LA) lesions. The relative contribution of lesions to differences in incontinence severity and manometric findings was studied. IAS (n=59) and EAS (n=61) defects were more common than PM (n=23) and LA (n=26) defects. PM and LA defects presented mainly with IAS and/or EAS defects (isolated n=2 and n=3). EAS atrophy (n=73) was more common than IAS (n=19), PM (n=16) and LA (n=9) atrophy and presented mainly isolated. PM and LA atrophy presented primarily with EAS atrophy (isolated n=3 and n=1). Patients with IAS and EAS lesions had a lower resting and squeeze pressure, respectively; no other associations were found. PM and LA lesions are relatively common in patients with severe faecal incontinence, but the majority of lesions are found in women who also have IAS and/or EAS lesions. Only an association between anal sphincter lesions and manometry was observed. (orig.)

  4. Are we missing an opportunity to teach future physicians about female pelvic floor disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Elizabeth R; Kenton, Kimberly; Rogers, Rebecca G; Fenner, Dee E

    2009-12-01

    Many physicians in primary care and medical/surgical specialties will care for female patients with pelvic floor disorders (PFD). A survey was mailed to 266 United States and Canadian clerkship directors that queried how medical students were being educated in PFD. Forty-four percent of clerkship directors responded. The mean clerkship size was 105 medical students. Over 97% of third year medical students received lectures on hypertension in pregnancy, normal labor, and abnormal uterine bleeding and at least 90% received lectures on obstetric hemorrhage, placenta previa, and menstruation. Forty percent to 85% of medical students received lectures in PFD depending on the topic. Eighty percent of medical students had no exposure to PFD during their first 2 years of medical school. During their third year, 95% of the students were exposed to PFD topics but only 60% had an opportunity to spend at least a day in an urogynecology practice. Clerkship directors indicate that PFD are relevant to medical student training, however, they have limited time in the clerkship to cover all of the required topics. We are missing an important opportunity to educate future clinicians about PFD, which dramatically impact women's quality of life.

  5. Study of the pelvic floor muscles in vaginismus: a concept of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Ahmed; El-Sibai, Olfat

    2002-10-10

    Neither the cause of vaginismus nor the muscles involved are precisely identified. To define the involved muscles and their role in the pathogenesis of vaginismus. The EMG activity of the levator ani (LA), puborectalis (PR) and bulbocavernosus (BC) muscles was studied in seven female patients (age (years): 25.6(mean)+/-1.2(S.D.)) and seven healthy volunteers who matched the patients in age. Recordings were performed at rest and during induction of vaginismus by a vaginal dilator. Upon approximating the vaginal dilator to the vaginal introitus or introducing it into the vagina of the healthy volunteers, the EMG activity of the LA, PR and BC muscles showed no significant difference from the basal activity. In the patients, the basal EMG activity of the examined muscles was significantly higher than that of the healthy volunteers (Pvaginismus induction, the muscles showed a significant increase of the EMG activity (P0.05) in the LA, PR and BC muscles, respectively. The muscle response was momentary lasting a mean of 31.2+/-5.7s. It was reproducible provided an off-time of a mean of 13.2+/-2.3s was observed. The pelvic floor muscles of vaginismus patients exhibited increased EMG activity at rest and on vaginismus induction; the cause is unknown. The concept of a disordered sacral reflex arc is put forward but needs further studies to be verified.

  6. Chronic prostatitis presenting with dysfunctional voiding and effects of pelvic floor biofeedback treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Chen, Minfeng; Zu, Xiongbing; Li, Yuan; Ning, Keping; Qi, Lin

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the features of chronic prostatitis presenting with dysfunctional voiding (DV) and the effects of pelvic floor biofeedback (PFB). The study included 21 patients, diagnosed by having symptoms for > or =3 months, including urinary frequency and urgency, voiding difficulty, upper abdominal or perineal discomfort, and with a score of > or =1 on the first and second part of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). Patients with bacterial prostatitis, urethritis, interstitial cystitis, urethral stricture and neurogenic bladder were excluded. All patients had a urodynamic examination, to assess the uroflow curve, maximum urinary flow rate (Q(max)), maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase (P(det.max)), maximum urethral pressure (MUP) and the maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) were recorded. PFB was carried out in patients with non-neurogenic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, and the effects evaluated after 10 weeks. Before and after PFB treatment the mean (sd) Q(max), P(det.max), MUP, MUCP were 8.2 (4.1) vs 15.1 (7.3) mL/s, 125.1 (75.3) vs 86.3 (54.2) cmH(2)O, 124.3 (23.3) vs 65.4 (23.0) cmH(2)O and 101.5 (43.6) vs 43.5 (16.7) cmH(2)O, all significantly different (P PFB had satisfactory short-term effects on these patients.

  7. Effects of multidimensional pelvic floor muscle training in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasz, Helena; Kalchschmid, Elisabeth; Kofler, Markus; Lechleitner, Monika

    2012-03-01

    Cross-sectional and interventional study to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in healthy young nulliparous women and to determine the effects of a 3-month PFM training program with emphasis on co-contraction of PFM and anterolateral abdominal muscles and on correctly performed coughing patterns. PFM function was assessed by digital vaginal palpation in 40 volunteers and graded according to the 6-point Oxford grading scale. The PFM training program was comprised theoretical instruction, as well as verbal feedback during hands-on instruction and repeated training sessions focussing on strengthening PFM and anterolateral abdominal muscle co-contraction during forced expiration and coughing. At baseline, 30 women (75%) were able to perform normal PFM contractions at rest (Oxford scale score ≥ 3); only 4 of them (10%) presented additional involuntary PFM contractions before and during coughing. The remaining 10 women (25%) were unable to perform voluntary or involuntary PFM contractions. Mean Oxford scale score in the whole group was 3.3 ± 1.7. After completing the PFM training program, 29 women (72.5%) performed cough-related PFM contractions and group mean Oxford scale score increased significantly to 4.2 ± 1.0. The study shows that PFM dysfunction may be detected even in healthy young women. Multidimensional training, however, may significantly improve PFM function.

  8. The effect of pelvic floor muscle training in urinary incontinent elderly women: a sistematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Henriques Jácomo

    Full Text Available Introduction The International Continence Society (ICS determines that the pelvic floor muscles training (PFMT is the first-choice treatment of urinary symptoms in women. Objective The aim of this study was to systematize randomized controlled clinical trials that address the effects of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in older women using objective outcome measures. Method Systematic review search was performed eletronic the following databases: Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs, PEDro and manual research conducted in the references of the studies. Were considered eligible women aged over 60 years who performed PFMT in isolation, without the involvement of another technique. The PFMT performed in clinic or at home, with or without the supervision of a therapist and with or without the use of biofeedback as an adjunct. Considered as outcome measures urodynamic studies, voiding diary that assesses daytime urinary frequency, nocturnal urinary frequency, urinary incontinence and exchange absorbent, and, finally, the absorbent test that quantifies loss urinary grams. The assessment of methodological quality of the studies was conducted by PEDro scale. Results Three studies were reviewed in full. Only one trial was rated high methodological quality. There was significant improvement in urinary symptoms after treatment proposed in the three selected studies. Conclusion Considering the studies available so far are weak the evidence for the use of PFMT in the treatment of urinary symptoms in elderly women.

  9. Pelvic Floor Morphometric Differences in Elderly Women with or without Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradet, Sarah; Morin, Mélanie; Kruger, Jennifer; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Urinary incontinence (UI) affects as many as 50% of women aged 60 years and older, but UI pathophysiology, specifically in elderly women, remains unclear. A better understanding of morphometric differences between continent and urinary incontinent elderly women is needed to improve the effectiveness of conservative treatment approaches. We hypothesized that morphometric differences in the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) among elderly women with and without UI could be observed using three- and four-dimensional (3D/4D) transperineal ultrasound (TPU) imaging. Method: A total of 40 elderly women (20 women with and 20 women without UI), with a mean age of 67.10 (SD 4.94) years, participated in the study. This was a case-control study in which TPU images were taken under three conditions: rest, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and Valsalva. Independent t -tests were conducted to compare measurements between the groups. Results: The study revealed statistically significant differences between the groups. At rest, the levator hiatal area and transverse diameter were bigger, and the PFM position was lower in the incontinent group. During MVC, all axial plane parameters were bigger in the incontinent group. In the sagittal plane, PFM position was again lower in the incontinent group. During Valsalva, the anorectal angle was wider in the women with incontinence. Conclusion: PFM morphometric differences were present and were observed using 3D/4D TPU imaging in elderly women with and without UI.

  10. Biologic mesh reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extralevator abdominoperineal excision; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasra N Alam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evidence for the use of biologic mesh in the reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extralevator abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (ELAPE.MethodsA systematic search of PubMed was conducted using the search terms ‘ELAPE’, ‘extralevator abdominoperineal excision of rectum’ or ‘extralevator abdominoperineal resection’. The search yielded 17 studies.ResultsBiologic mesh was used in perineal reconstruction in 463 cases. There were 41 perineal hernias reported but rates were not consistently reported in all studies. The most common complications were perineal wound infection (n = 93, perineal sinus and fistulae (n = 26 and perineal haematoma or seroma (n = 11. There were very few comparative studies, with only one RCT identified that compared patients undergoing ELAPE with perineal reconstruction using a biological mesh, with patients undergoing a conventional abdominoperineal excision of the rectum with no mesh. There was no significant difference in perineal hernia rates or perineal wound infections between the groups. Other comparative studies comparing the use of biologic mesh with techniques such as the use of myocutaneous flaps were of low quality.ConclusionsBiologic mesh-assisted perineal reconstruction is a promising technique to improve wound healing and has comparable complications rates to other techniques. However, there is not enough evidence to support its use in all patients who have undergone ELAPE. Results from high-quality prospective RCTs and national/international collaborative audits are required.

  11. Training through gametherapy promotes coactivation of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in young women, nulliparous and continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Regina Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Several studies have been investigated co-activation can enhance the effectveness of PFM training protocols allowing preventive and therapeutic goals in pelvic floor dysfunctions. The objective of the present study was to investigate if an abdominal-pelvic protocol of training (APT using gametherapy would allow co-activation of PFM and transversus abdominis/oblique internal (TrA/OI muscles. Patients and methods: Twenty-five nulliparous, continent, young females, with median age 24.76 (±3.76 years were evaluated using digital palpation (DP of PFM and surface electromyography of PFM and TrA/OI simultaneously, during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, alternating PFM and TrA/OI contraction requests. All women participated on a supervised program of APT using gametherapy, that included exercises of pelvic mobilization associated to contraction of TrA/OI muscles oriented by virtual games, for 30 minutes, three times a week, in a total of 10 sessions. Electromyographic data were processed and analyzed by ANOVA - analysis of variance. Results: When MVC of TrA/OI was solicited, it was observed simultaneous increase of electromyographic activity of PFM (p=0.001 following ATP. However, EMG activity did not change significantly during MVC of PFM. Conclusion: Training using gametherapy allowed better co-activation of pelvic floor muscles in response to contraction of TrA, in young nulliparous and continent women.

  12. Influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Torres, Vanessa Braga; Angelo, Priscylla Helouyse Melo; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Matias de Barros, Alef Cavalcanti; Viana, Elizabel de Souza Ramalho; Micussi, Maria Thereza de Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women. [Subjects and Methods] This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study with a sample of 100 postmenopausal women, aged between 45 and 65 years, divided into three groups according to menopausal stage: hysterectomized and early and late postmenopause. Patients were assessed for sociodemographic and gyneco-obstetric factors and subjected to a muscle strength test and perineometry. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and multiple regression were applied. [Results] The results showed homogeneity in sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics. There was no difference in pelvic floor muscle function among the three groups. Type of delivery, parity and physical activity level showed no influence on muscle function. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level had no influence on pelvic floor muscle pressure in postmenopausal women. One hypothesis to explain these results is the fact that the decline in muscle function in postmenopausal women is related to the female aging process.

  13. Quantification of pelvic floor muscle strength in female urinary incontinence: A systematic review and comparison of contemporary methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Emily G; Stothers, Lynn; Kavanagh, Alex; Macnab, Andrew J

    2018-01-01

    There remains no gold standard for quantification of voluntary pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength, despite international guidelines that recommend PFM assessment in females with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods currently reported for quantification of skeletal muscle strength across disciplines are systematically reviewed and their relevance for clinical and academic use related to the pelvic floor are described. A systematic review via Medline, PubMed, CINHAL, and the Cochrane database using key terms for pelvic floor anatomy and function were cross referenced with skeletal muscle strength quantification from 1946 to 2016. Full text peer-reviewed articles in English having female subjects with incontinence were identified. Each study was analyzed for use of controls, type of methodology as direct or indirect measures, benefits, and limitations of the technique. A total of 1586 articles were identified of which 50 met the inclusion criteria. Nine methodologies of determining PFM strength were described including: digital palpation, perineometer, dynamometry, EMG, vaginal cones, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, urine stream interruption test, and the Colpexin pull test. Thirty-two percent lacked a control group. Technical refinements in both direct and indirect instrumentation for PFM strength measurement are allowing for sensitivity. However, the most common methods of quantification remain digital palpation and perineometry; techniques that pose limitations and yield subjective or indirect measures of muscular strength. Dynamometry has potential as an accurate and sensitive tool, but is limited by inability to assess PFM strength during dynamic movements. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A pilot randomized trial of levator injections versus physical therapy for treatment of pelvic floor myalgia and sexual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoorob, Dani; South, Mary; Karram, Mickey; Sroga, Julie; Maxwell, Rose; Shah, Aparna; Whiteside, James

    2015-06-01

    Our aim was to determine the effects of pelvic floor physical therapy (PT) and levator-directed trigger-point injections (LTPI) on sexual function and levator-related pelvic pain. A randomized trial among women with pelvic floor myalgia (PFM) was performed wherein participants received either PT or LTPI. Pain was assessed and 1 month posttreatment completion. Levator-based pain was assessed using a numeric rating scale (NRS) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) scale. Sexual function was assessed using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Twenty-nine women completed the study (17 had PT, 12 had LTPI). Both groups reported reduction in vaginal pain: mean NRS change from baseline of 4.47 [standard deviation (SD) 2.12) for PT and 4.67 (SD 1.72) for LTPI (p = 0.8)]. A >50 % improvement in NRS was documented among 59 % of women receiving PT and 58 % receiving LTPI (p = 1.0). Consistent with NRS scores, mean PGI-I score was 2.50 (SD 1.17) for PT and 2.17 (SD 1.01) for LTPI (p = 0.5). Mean change in FSFI favored PT [PT +8.87 (SD 5.60), LTPI +4.00 (SD 5.24), p = 0.04], reflecting improvement in the sexual pain domain favoring PT (p = 0.02). However, the time in weeks to effect improvement favored LTPI if controlling for the degree of change in NRS (p = 0.01) and FSFI (p = 0.01). Vaginal myalgia and sex-related pain improved with pelvic floor PT and LTPI. Time-to-effect improvement and significance of therapy are dependent on treatment type.

  15. Pelvic floor muscle exercises with or without electric stimulation and post-prostectomy urinary incontinence: a systematic review

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    Patrícia Zaidan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Urinary incontinence (UI after prostatectomy is difficult to treat and causes profound adverse impacts on the individual's quality of life. The main clinical treatments available for post-prostatectomy UI consist of behavioral techniques and physical therapy techniques, such as exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback for pelvic floor muscles (PFMs. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation for reducing post-prostatectomy UI. Methods: We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs which used PFM exercises with or without electrical stimulation. The search was conducted in August of 2013 in the databases of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (MEDLINE, Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro and Virtual Health Library (VHL. We searched for RCTs published between 1999 and 2013. As keywords for our search, we used the following descriptors from the Health Sciences Descriptors (DeCS: urinary incontinence, pelvic diaphragm, prostatectomy, pelvic floor exercises, electrostimulation and electrical stimulation. We also used the following descriptors from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH: electrical stimulation, pelvic floor, urinary incontinence, prostatectomy, physiotherapy and exercise therapy. Results: Of the 59 RCTs found, 26 were excluded as duplicates, and 28 were excluded for not displaying a minimum score of 5.0 on the PEDro Scale, which left us with five RCTs. Conclusion: PFM exercises can be effective for treating UI after radical prostatectomy, especially if begun soon after surgery. Associating electrical stimulation with PFM exercises did not show additional benefit for treating urinary incontinence. However, the selected studies presented some methodological weaknesses that may have compromised their internal validity.

  16. Pengaruh Pelvic Floor Muscle Training terhadap Pengembalian Fungsi Miksi dan Defekasi pada Ibu Postpartum Spontan

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    Mustika Dewi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPersalinan membawa dampak terhadap fungsi miksi dan defekasi pada ibu postpartum. Stimulasi dini yang dapat dilakukan guna memulihkan fungsi miksi dan defekasi, antara lain dengan Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT atau latihan yang dilakukan khusus untuk otot dasar panggul. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh PFMT terhadap pengembalian fungsi miksi dan defekasi pada ibu postpartum spontan (tanpa bantuan alat penolong persalinan. Penelitian ini merupakan studi kuasi eksperimen dengan post test only control group design. PFMT dilakukan setelah 2 jam persalinan sebanyak 3 sesi selama 3 hari postpartum. Selanjutnya mewawancarai kelompok yang melakukan PFMT maupun kelompok yang tidak melakukan PFMT untuk mengetahui miksi dan defekasi pertama kali dimasa postpartum. Data dianalisis secara statistik menggunakan uji chi-square dan nilai p < 0.05 dianggap bermakna secara statistik. Hasil penelitian didapatkan persentase miksi spontan lebih tinggi pada ibu yang melakukan PFMT dari pada ibu yang tidak melakukan PFMT (83.3% : 58.3%, Secara statistik perbedaan tersebut tidak signifikan (p > 0.05, maka dapat dinyatakan tidak terdapat pengaruh PFMT terhadap miksi pada ibu postpatum spontan. Persentase defekasi normal lebih tinggi pada ibu yang melakukan PFMT dari pada ibu yang tidak melakukan PFMT (87.5% : 16.7%. Secara statistik perbedaan tersebut signifikan (p < 0.05, maka dapat dinyatakan ada pengaruh PFMT terhadap defekasi pada ibu postpartum spontan. Dari hasil penelitian disimpulkan tidak terdapat pengaruh PFMT terhadap miksi pada ibu postpartum spontan dan terdapat pengaruh PFMT terhadap defekasi pada ibu postpartum.Kata Kunci: PFMT, miksi, defekasi, postpartum spontanAbstractLabour have an impact on the function of micturition and defecation in postpartum. Early stimulation that can be done to restore the function of micturition and defecation, among others, with Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT. The purpose of this study

  17. Effects of Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise on Urinary Incontinence in Elderly Women With Cognitive Impairment

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    Bo Ae Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME is a therapeutic option for urinary incontinence (UI. However, studies of the efficacy of PFME on UI in patients with cognitive impairment (CI are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of PFME on UI in elderly women with mild CI. Methods A total of 150 women with mild CI or Alzheimer disease and UI were screened using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF. Cognitive function and behavioral symptoms were evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination and Barthel’s Activities of Daily Living. The patients were randomly divided into a control group (n=46 and a PFME group (n=52, 6 sessions of PFME for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the change in UI episodes measured with a frequency volume chart (FVC. The secondary outcomes were other FVC parameters and the ICIQ-SF scores. Results A total of 82 women (control group: 40 and PFME group: 42 completed the study. After 12 weeks of PFME, the mean number of UI episodes per 24 hours decreased by 1.6 (from 3.3 to 1.7 in the PFME group and by 0.5 (from 3.4 to 2.9 in the control group (P<0.001 between groups. The mean number of micturition episodes and total ICIQ-SF scores improved in the PFME group to a significantly greater extent than in the control group (P<0.001. Conclusions Supervised PFME can be a good therapeutic option for improving UI in elderly women with CI.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle training protocol for stress urinary incontinence in women: A systematic review

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    Marlene Oliveira

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Strengthening exercises for pelvic floor muscles (SEPFM are considered the first approach in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Nevertheless, there is no evidence about training parameters. Objective: To identify the protocol and/or most effective training parameters in the treatment of female SUI. Method: A literature research was conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Web of Science and Lilacs databases, with publishing dates ranging from January 1992 to March 2014. The articles included consisted of English-speaking experimental studies in which SEPFM were compared with placebo treatment (usual or untreated. The sample had a diagnosis of SUI and their age ranged between 18 and 65 years. The assessment of methodological quality was performed based on the PEDro scale. Results: Seven high methodological quality articles were included in this review. The sample consisted of 331 women, mean age 44.4±5.51 years, average duration of urinary loss of 64±5.66 months and severity of SUI ranging from mild to severe. SEPFM programs included different training parameters concerning the PFM. Some studies have applied abdominal training and adjuvant techniques. Urine leakage cure rates varied from 28.6 to 80%, while the strength increase of PFM varied from 15.6 to 161.7%. Conclusion: The most effective training protocol consists of SEPFM by digital palpation combined with biofeedback monitoring and vaginal cones, including 12 week training parameters, and ten repetitions per series in different positions compared with SEPFM alone or a lack of treatment.

  19. Is there any difference in pelvic floor muscles performance between continent and incontinent women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burti, Juliana Schulze; Hacad, Claudia R; Zambon, João Paulo; Polessi, Emily Assis; Almeida, Fernando G

    2015-08-01

    To compare pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) performance in women with and without stress urinary incontinence (SUI) during endurance test. It is a prospective case-control clinical trial. After determining PFM maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by electromyography (EMG), women underwent endurance test, which consisted of consecutively PFM 1-sec fast contractions reaching MVC amplitude followed by 1-sec rest. Training time guided by Borg perceived exertion scale was noted. Heart rate (HR) behavior and EMG variables were assessed before and after training making a physiological analysis in both groups. A total of 56 women, mean age 52.19 years old, were evaluated (26 continent and 30 incontinent women). The time that SUI and continent women took to reach fatigue (Borg 10) was 9.1 ± 4.7 and 14.19 ± 8.32 min, respectively (P = 0.006). Confirming that all women performed similar effort during the test, analysis of variance with repeated measures showed that during the endurance test both groups presented similar increase in HR, showing detectable and significant increase from resting time to Borg 10 (P continent and SUI women, with a decrease from the baseline resting amplitude (P = 0.003 for SUI women and P = 0.006 for continent women). Women with SUI showed worse performance during an endurance test than continent women. It suggests that women have different capacity to perform PFM training. An initial evaluation based on PFM performance would help to define the best individualized PFM training. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study.

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    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos de; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; Silva, Renata Luana da

    2016-08-15

    to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. comparar a força muscular do assoalho pélvico em primíparas no pós-parto normal e cesariana, relacionando-a às características sociodemográficas, estado nutricional, incontinência urinária, dispareunia, exercício perineal na gestação, condição perineal e peso do recém-nascido. estudo transversal realizado entre 50 e 70 dias de pós-parto, com 24 primíparas submetidas à cesariana e 72 ao parto normal. Utilizou-se PeritronTM 9301 para análise da força muscular. Comparou-se as médias da força muscular entre os

  1. Is there any change in pelvic floor electromyography during the first 6 months after radical retropubic prostatectomy?

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    Hacad, Claudia R; Glazer, Howard I; Zambon, João Paulo C; Burti, Juliana S; Almeida, Fernando G

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine electromyographic pelvic floor muscles activity during the first 6 months post RRP and its relationship to urinary continence. Thirty-eight men (mean age of 63.1 ± 5.7 year) with prostate cancer scheduled for open radical retropubic prostatectomy were evaluated. pelvic radiotherapy, systemic or neurologic diseases, pre-operative International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) >7 and OABq ≥8. Surface electromyography (sEMG) evaluation, IPSS, Urinary Distress Inventory, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire, and Overactive Bladder Questionnaire-short form were applied before and at 1, 3, and 6 months after RRP. Six months after surgery, 18 men (47.4 %) presented urinary leakage. The sEMG evaluations within the first 6 months presented changes in fast contraction amplitude (p = 0.006), rest amplitude after fast contraction (p = 0.04), 10 s sustained contraction mean amplitude (p = 0.024) and final rest amplitude (p = 0.011). We observed that continent and incontinent patients as a group presented electromyographic changes during the first 6 months after radical prostatectomy that could be justified by the denervation/reinnervation of the external urethral sphincter. This finding is consistent with the adaptation of the pelvic floor musculature to the new urethral sphincter condition following surgery.

  2. Prevention of postpartum stress incontinence in primigravidae with increased bladder neck mobility: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal pelvic floor exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, E T C; Freeman, R M; Waterfield, M R; Waterfield, A E; Steggles, P; Pedlar, F

    2014-12-01

    To test whether supervised pelvic floor exercises antenatally will reduce the incidence of postpartum stress incontinence in at-risk primigravidae with bladder neck mobility, ultrasonically proven. Single blind, randomised controlled trial. Antenatal clinic in a UK NHS Trust Hospital. Two hundred and sixty-eight primigravidae attending an antenatal clinic at approximately 20 weeks of gestation with bladder neck mobility, on standardised valsalva, of 5 mm or more linear movement. The median age was 28, ranging from 16 to 47 years. Patients randomised to supervised pelvic floor exercises (n = 139) attended a physiotherapist at monthly intervals from 20 weeks until delivery. The exercises comprised three repetitions of eight contractions each held for six seconds, with two minutes rest between repetitions. These were repeated twice daily. At 34 weeks of gestation the number of contractions per repetition was increased to 12. Both the untreated control group and the study group received verbal advice on pelvic floor exercises from their midwives antenatally. Subjective reporting of stress incontinence at three months postpartum. Pelvic floor strength, using perineometry, and bladder neck mobility measured by perineal ultrasound. Of the 268 women enrolled, information on the main outcome variable was available for 110 in the control group and 120 in the study group. Fewer women in the supervised pelvic floor exercise group reported postpartum stress incontinence, 19.2% compared with 32.7% in the control group (RR 0.59 [0.37-0.92]). There was no change in bladder neck mobility and no difference in pelvic floor strength between groups after exercise, although all those developing postpartum stress incontinence had significantly poorer perineometry scores than those who were continent. The findings suggest that antenatal supervised pelvic floor exercises are effective in reducing the risk of postpartum stress incontinence in primigravidae with bladder neck mobility.

  3. Comparative effect of 2 packages of pelvic floor muscle training on the clinical course of stage I-III pelvic organ prolapse.

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    Kashyap, Rashmi; Jain, Vanita; Singh, Amarjeet

    2013-04-01

    To compare the effect of 2 packages of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on the clinical course of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) among women attending a gynecology outpatient department in Chandigarh, India. A randomized controlled trial was conducted between August 8, 2010, and October 31, 2011. Overall, 140 women with stage I-III POP were allocated to a 24-week behavioral therapy intervention. Group A (n=70) received 1-to-1 PFMT and a self-instruction manual (SIM), whereas Group B (n=70) received SIM alone. Symptoms were assessed using the POP symptom scale (POP-ss), visual analog scale (VAS), and pelvic floor impact questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7) scores. Marked improvements in mean POP-ss, VAS, PFIQ-7 scores were observed in both groups from baseline to week 24. However, significant between-group changes in mean POP-ss scores were observed from baseline to 6 weeks (P<0.001), 18 weeks (P=0.001), and 24 weeks (P=0.002). Significant between-group changes in mean VAS scores were observed at 18 and 24 weeks (P=0.009 and P=0.005). Significant between-group changes in mean PFIQ-7 scores were observed at 6 (P=0.001), 18 (P<0.001), and 24 weeks (P<0.001). Provision of both 1-to-1 PFMT and SIM led to greater improvements in POP symptoms than provision of SIM alone. ctri.nic.in: CTRI/2010/091/001190. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles of continent and incontinent women using an inverse finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M E T; Brandão, S; Parente, M P L; Mascarenhas, T; Natal Jorge, R M

    2017-06-01

    Pelvic disorders can be associated with changes in the biomechanical properties in the muscle, ligaments and/or connective tissue form fascia and ligaments. In this sense, the study of their mechanical behavior is important to understand the structure and function of these biological soft tissues. The aim of this study was to establish the biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles of continent and incontinent women, using an inverse finite element analysis (FEA). The numerical models, including the pubovisceral muscle and pelvic bones were built from magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired at rest. The numerical simulation of Valsalva maneuver was based on the finite element method and the material constants were determined for different constitutive models (Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Yeoh) using an iterative process. The material constants (MPa) for Neo-Hookean (c 1 ) were 0.039 ± 0.022 and 0.024 ± 0.004 for continent vs. incontinent women. For Mooney-Rivlin (c 1 ) the values obtained were 0.026 ± 0.010 vs. 0.016 ± 0.003, and for Yeoh (c 1 ) the values obtained were 0.031 ± 0.023 vs. 0.016 ± 0.002, (p continent women. The results were also similar between MRI and numerical simulations (40.27% vs. 42.17% for Neo-Hookean, 39.87% for Mooney-Rivlin and 41.61% for Yeoh). Using an inverse FEA coupled with MR images allowed to obtain the in vivo biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles, leading to a relationship between them for the continent and incontinent women in a non-invasive manner.

  5. Differences in pelvic floor morphology between continent, stress urinary incontinent, and mixed urinary incontinent elderly women: An MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontbriand-Drolet, Stéphanie; Tang, An; Madill, Stephanie J; Tannenbaum, Cara; Lemieux, Marie-Claude; Corcos, Jacques; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2016-04-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvic floor musculature (PFM), bladder neck and urethral sphincter morphology under three conditions (rest, PFM maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and straining) in older women with symptoms of stress (SUI) or mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) or without incontinence. This 2008-2012 exploratory observational cohort study was conducted with community-dwelling women aged 60 and over. Sixty six women (22 per group), mean age of 67.7 ± 5.2 years, participated in the study. A 3 T MRI examination was conducted under three conditions: rest, PFM MVC, and straining. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests (data not normally distributed) were conducted, with Bonferroni correction, to compare anatomical measurements between groups. Women with MUI symptoms had a lower PFM resting position (M-Line P = 0.010 and PC/H-line angle P = 0.026) and lower pelvic organ support (urethrovesical junction height P = 0.013) than both continent and SUI women. Women with SUI symptoms were more likely to exhibit bladder neck funneling and a larger posterior urethrovesical angle at rest than both continent and MUI women (P = 0.026 and P = 0.008, respectively). There were no significant differences between groups on PFM MVC or straining. Women with SUI and MUI symptoms present different morphological defects at rest. These observations emphasize the need to tailor UI interventions to specific pelvic floor defects and UI type in older women. Older women with UI demonstrate different problems with their pelvic organ support structures depending on the type of UI. These new findings should be taken into consideration for future research into developing new treatment strategies for UI in older women. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:515-521, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ethics, economics and the regulation and adoption of new medical devices: case studies in pelvic floor surgery

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    Ross Sue

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concern has been growing in the academic literature and popular media about the licensing, introduction and adoption of surgical devices before full effectiveness and safety evidence is available to inform clinical practice. Our research will seek empirical survey evidence about the roles, responsibilities, and information and policy needs of the key stakeholders in the introduction into clinical practice of new surgical devices for pelvic floor surgery, in terms of the underlying ethical principals involved in the economic decision-making process, using the example of pelvic floor procedures. Methods/Design Our study involves three linked case studies using, as examples, selected pelvic floor surgery devices representing Health Canada device safety risk classes: low, medium and high risk. Data collection will focus on stakeholder roles and responsibilities, information and policy needs, and perceptions of those of other key stakeholders, in seeking and using evidence about new surgical devices when licensing and adopting them into practice. For each class of device, interviews will be used to seek the opinions of stakeholders. The following stakeholders and ethical and economic principles provide the theoretical framework for the study: Stakeholders - federal regulatory body, device manufacturers, clinicians, patients, health care institutions, provincial health departments, and professional societies. Clinical settings in two centres (in different provinces will be included. Ethics - beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, justice. Economics - scarcity of resources, choices, opportunity costs. For each class of device, responses will be analysed to compare and contrast between stakeholders. Applied ethics and economic theory, analysis and critical interpretation will be used to further illuminate the case study material. Discussion The significance of our research in this new area of ethics will lie in providing

  7. Ethics, economics and the regulation and adoption of new medical devices: case studies in pelvic floor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Concern has been growing in the academic literature and popular media about the licensing, introduction and adoption of surgical devices before full effectiveness and safety evidence is available to inform clinical practice. Our research will seek empirical survey evidence about the roles, responsibilities, and information and policy needs of the key stakeholders in the introduction into clinical practice of new surgical devices for pelvic floor surgery, in terms of the underlying ethical principals involved in the economic decision-making process, using the example of pelvic floor procedures. Methods/Design Our study involves three linked case studies using, as examples, selected pelvic floor surgery devices representing Health Canada device safety risk classes: low, medium and high risk. Data collection will focus on stakeholder roles and responsibilities, information and policy needs, and perceptions of those of other key stakeholders, in seeking and using evidence about new surgical devices when licensing and adopting them into practice. For each class of device, interviews will be used to seek the opinions of stakeholders. The following stakeholders and ethical and economic principles provide the theoretical framework for the study: Stakeholders - federal regulatory body, device manufacturers, clinicians, patients, health care institutions, provincial health departments, and professional societies. Clinical settings in two centres (in different provinces) will be included. Ethics - beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, justice. Economics - scarcity of resources, choices, opportunity costs. For each class of device, responses will be analysed to compare and contrast between stakeholders. Applied ethics and economic theory, analysis and critical interpretation will be used to further illuminate the case study material. Discussion The significance of our research in this new area of ethics will lie in providing recommendations for regulatory bodies

  8. What is to blame for postnatal pelvic floor dysfunction in primiparous women-Pre-pregnancy or intrapartum risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnea, Constantin M; Khashan, Ali S; Kenny, Louise C; Durnea, Uliana A; Dornan, James C; O'Sullivan, Suzanne M; O'Reilly, Barry A

    2017-07-01

    The aetiology of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is still poorly understood. However childbearing is recognized as a major risk factor. To elucidate the natural history of PFD by investigating the impact of the mode of delivery on postnatal pelvic floor dysfunction in primiparas, when PFD existing before the first pregnancy is taken into consideration. 4P-study (Prevalence and Predictors of Pelvic floor dysfunction in Primips) is a prospective cohort study, nested within the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study set in a tertiary referral teaching hospital with 9000 deliveries annually. Established and proposed risk factors for urinary, fecal, prolapse and sexual dysfunction and the severity of symptoms for each of these outcomes were assessed using the Australian Pelvic Floor Questionnaire in 1482 nulliparous women, who each completed the questionnaire in early pregnancy. Of these, 1060 (72%) repeated the questionnaire 12 months postpartum.Outcomes were analyzed using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Significant (ppregnancy presence of similar symptoms Odds Ratio (OR) (5.0-30.0), smoking (OR 2.2-4.6), recurrent UTI (OR 2.2-17.3), high hip circumference (OR1.4-1.6), vigorous exercising (OR 3.1-17.9), induction of labor (OR 1.5-2.3), forceps delivery (OR 1.8-8.8), and 3rd degree perineal tear (OR 2.4-2.7). Cesarean section was associated with a lower risk of stress urinary incontinence (OR 0.3-0.5). Other common pre-pregnancy significant (ppregnancy were: diagnosed depression - (OR 1.6-2.1), high BMI (OR 3.1), strenuous exercising (OR 1.3-2.2), recurrent UTI (OR 1.5-2.5) and lower educational achievement (OR 1.5-1.6). Pre-pregnancy PFD was mainly associated with modifiable risk factors such as smoking and exercising. The main risk factor for postpartum PFD was the presence of similar symptoms prior to pregnancy, followed by anthropometric and intrapartum factors. Hip circumference seems to be a better predictor of PFD compared to BMI. When pre

  9. Sectional depiction of the pelvic floor by CT, MR imaging and sheet plastination: computer-aided correlation and 3D model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany); Schiemann, T. [Inst. for Mathematics and Computer Science in Medicine, University of Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany); Nicolas, V. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    The structures of the pelvic floor are clinically important but difficult to assess. To facilitate the understanding of the complicated pelvic floor anatomy on sectional images obtained by CT and MR imaging, and to make the representation more vivid, a computer-aided 3D model was created from a male and a female torso to develop a teaching tool. A male and a female cadaver torso were investigated by means of CT, MR imaging, and serial-section sheet plastination. A 3D reconstruction of the pelvic floor and adjacent structures was performed by fusion of CT and MR imaging data sets with sheet plastination sections. Corresponding sections from all three methods could be compared and visualized in their 3D context. Sheet plastination allows distinction of connective tissue, muscles, and pelvic organs down to a microscopic level. In combination with CT, MR imaging, and sheet plastination a 3D model of the pelvic floor offers a better understanding of the complex pelvic anatomy. This knowledge may be applied in the diagnostic imaging of urinary incontinence or prolapse and prior to prostate surgery. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of the relationship between the pelvic floor muscles and insulin resistance

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    Micussi MT

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Thereza Micussi,1 Rodrigo Pegado Freitas,1 Priscylla Helouyse Angelo,2 Elvira Maria Soares,3 Telma Maria Lemos,4 Técia Maria Maranhão51Physical Therapy Department, 2Postgraduate Program in Physical Therapy, 3Januário Cicco Maternity School, 4Clinical Analysis Department, 5Tocogynecology Department, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, BrazilPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs in women with insulin resistance (IR using surface electromyography and to associate the results with insulin levels.Patients and methods: Through an analytical, cross-sectional study, 86 women were evaluated and divided into two groups: a control group (n=35 and an IR group (n=51. Data were collected through detailed history-taking, physical examination, and biochemical analysis. Fasting insulin levels were used for diagnosing IR. Electromyography of the PFMs was used for analyzing the tone and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC. The measures of central tendency and linear regression models were used.Results: The average age was 25.3±4.5 years in the IR group and 27.2±4.4 years in the control group. The mean weight was 75.6±17.6 kg and 51.8±4.9 kg in the IR and control groups, respectively. Fasting insulin levels were 19.7±6.6 µIU/mL in the IR group and 5.4±1.8 µIU/mL in the control group (P<0.010. There were significant differences between the groups with regard to PFM tone (IR: 13.4±3.4 µV; control: 25.1±3.3 µV; P<0.001 and MVC (IR: 47.6±4.5 µV; control: 64.3±5.0 µV; P<0.001. Multiple linear regression analysis using the insulin levels as dependent variable showed a significant association for MVC (P=0.047, weight (P=0.017, and waist circumference (P=0.000.Conclusion: Compared with the control group, the IR group showed lower electromyographic activity of the PFMs, and there was an association between insulin levels and electromyographic activity.Keywords: tone

  11. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in the management of stress urinary incontinence

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    Rodrigo A. Castro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31, ES (n=30, vaginal cones (n=27, or no treatment (untreated control (n=30. Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL, urodynamic test, voiding diary, and subjective response. RESULTS: In the objective evaluation, we observed a statistically significant reduction in the pad test (p=0.003, in the number of stress urinary episodes (p<0.001, and a significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.001 in subjects who used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones compared to the control group. No significant difference was found between groups in the urodynamic parameters. In the subjective evaluation, 58%, 55%, and 54% of women who had used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones, respectively, reported being satisfied after treatment. In the control group, only 21% patients were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence.

  12. A Comparative Study of Whole Body Vibration Training and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training on Women's Stress Urinary Incontinence: Three- Month Follow- Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizeh Farzinmehr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether Whole Body Vibration Training (WBVT is effective at improving pelvic floor muscles strength in women with Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI.Materials and methods: The study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. 43 women with SUI were randomly assigned in two groups; WBVT and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT and received interventions for four weeks. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM strength, quality of life and incontinence intensity were evaluated. All measurements were conducted pre and post intervention and also after 3 months in all participants. The ANOVA and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between the groups.Results: This study showed the WBVT protocol in this study was effective in pelvic floor muscles strength similar to PFMT, and also in reducing the severity of incontinence and increasing I-QOL questionnaire score. We found significant differences in each group pre and post intervention (p = 0.0001; but no significant difference in comparison of two groups' outcomes. Also after three-month follow up, there was no significant difference between groups.Conclusion: The findings of this study showed the beneficial effects of WBVT in improving pelvic floor muscles strength and quality of life in patients with urinary incontinence in four-week treatment period and after three months follow up.

  13. Modelling of Soft Connective Tissues to Investigate Female Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattarai, Aroj; Staat, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    After menopause, decreased levels of estrogen and progesterone remodel the collagen of the soft tissues thereby reducing their stiffness. Stress urinary incontinence is associated with involuntary urine leakage due to pathological movement of the pelvic organs resulting from lax suspension system, fasciae, and ligaments. This study compares the changes in the orientation and position of the female pelvic organs due to weakened fasciae, ligaments, and their combined laxity. A mixture theory we...

  14. Radiological diagnosis in constipation and anal incontinence due to changes in the pelvic floor and sphincter apparatus of the anus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistolfi, F.; Grillo Ruggeri, F.; Siragusa, A.

    1987-01-01

    Rectal constipation, anal incontinence and constipation combined with incontinence, are often caused by organic or simply functional changes in the pelvic floor and sphincterial apparatus. Therefore morphological as well as manometric and electromyographic studies of these anatomical parts are required. This is possible by combining two techniques: Intestinal Transit Time (ITT) and Defecatory Proctogram with Balloon (DPB). Personal experience of 38 patients with constipation with or without incontinence is reported. The results lead to the following conclusion: 1) ITT is a simple and non-invasive radiological technique that provides us with objective evidence of an impairment, i.e. constipation, whose symptoms are often only subjective; especially is allows us to identify rectal constipation, that can be caused by impairment of the anal sphincteral apparatus. 2) Using an uroprophylactic with a collar that adapts to the size of the anal duct, DPB always permits visualization of the duct with good representation of the recto-anal angle, whose changes may be the expression of organic or only functional impairments of the anal sphincterial apparatus. Increasing use of the two radiological techniques is therefore recommended in the diagnosis of alterations of the pelvic floor or anal sphincter

  15. A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Teresa L; Rogers, Rebecca; Lee, Sang-Joon; Muller, Carolyn Y

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported high rates of urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple intervention for treatment of urinary incontinence in this population. We recruited 40 gynecologic cancer survivors who reported urinary incontinence on a validated questionnaire. Women were randomized to either pelvic floor muscle training/behavioral therapy (treatment group) or usual care (control group). The primary outcome measure, assessed at 12 weeks post intervention, was a 40% difference in the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Fisher's exact test was used to identify differences between groups for frequency data; two-sample t-test was conducted for continuous measurements. Mean age of this cohort was 57 (range: 37-79). The majority of the survivors had uterine cancer (60%), 18% had received radiation therapy, 95% had received surgical therapy, and 35% had received chemotherapy. At three months, 80% of the treatment and 40% of the control group reported that their urinary incontinence was "much better" or "very much better" as evaluated by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (p=0.02). Brink's scores were significantly improved in the treatment group as compared to those of the controls (pgynecologic cancer survivors, it is often under-assessed and undertreated. We found a simple intervention that included pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy, which significantly improved cancer survivor's urinary incontinence. © 2013.

  16. Effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction to a Pilates exercise program: an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Luiza; de Jarmy Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin; Rodrigues, Claudinei Alves; Stüpp, Liliana; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) to a Pilates exercise program in sedentary nulliparous women. Fifty-seven healthy nulliparous and physically inactive women were randomized to a Pilates exercise program (PEP) with or without PFMC. Forty-eight women concluded this study (24 participants for each group). Each woman was evaluated before and after the PEP, by a physiotherapist and an urogynecologist (UG). Neither of the professionals was revealed to them. This physiotherapist measured their pelvic floor muscle strength by using both a perineometer (Peritron) and vaginal palpation (Oxford Scale). The UG, who performed 3D perineal ultrasound examinations, collected their data and evaluated the results for pubovisceral muscle thickness and the levator hiatus area (LA). Both professionals were blinded to the group allocation. The protocol for both groups consisted of 24 bi-weekly 1-h individual sessions of Pilates exercises, developed by another physiotherapist who specializes in PFM rehabilitation and the Pilates technique. The PEP+ PFMC group showed significantly greater strength improvements than the PEP group when comparing the Oxford scale, vaginal pressure and pubovisceral muscle thickness during contraction measurements at baseline and post-treatment. Our findings suggest that adding a voluntary PFMC to a Pilates exercise program is more effective than Pilates alone in improving PFM strength in sedentary nulliparous women.

  17. Development and Validation of a Questionnaire for the Assessment of Pelvic Floor Disorders and Their Risk Factors During Pregnancy and Post Partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Melanie; Junginger, Bärbel; Henrich, Wolfgang; Baeßler, Kaven

    2017-04-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire for the assessment of pelvic floor disorders, their symptoms and risk factors in pregnancy and after birth including symptom course, severity and impact on quality of life. Methods The validated German pelvic floor questionnaire was modified and a new risk factor domain developed. The questionnaire was initially completed by 233 nulliparous women in the third trimester of pregnancy and at six weeks (n = 148) and one year (n = 120) post partum. Full pyschometric testing was performed. The clinical course of symptoms and the influence of risk factors were analysed. Results Study participants had a median age of 31 (19-46) years. 63 % had spontaneous vaginal deliveries, 15 % operative vaginal deliveries and 22 % were delivered by caesarean section. Content validity: Missing answers never exceeded 4 %. Construct validity: The questionnaire distinguished significantly between women who reported bothersome symptoms and those who did not. Reliability: Cronbach's alpha values exceeded 0.7 for bladder, bowel and support function, and 0.65 for sexual function. The test-retest analysis showed moderate to almost complete concordance. The intraclass coefficients for domain scores (between 0.732 and 0.818) were in acceptable to optimal range. Reactivity: The questionnaire was able to track changes significantly with good effect size for each domain. Risk factors for pelvic floor symptoms included familial predisposition, maternal age over 35 years, BMI above 25, nicotine abuse, subjective inability to voluntarily contract the pelvic floor musculature and postpartum wound pain. Conclusion This pelvic floor questionnaire proved to be valid, reliable and reactive for the assessment of pelvic floor disorders, their risk factors, incidence and impact on quality of life during pregnancy and post partum. The questionnaire can be utilised to assess the course of symptoms and treatment effects

  18. A nurse-led long-term pelvic floor muscle training program in the management of female patients with overactive bladder – A study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu-Zhen Xu

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: A nurse-led long-term (6 months pelvic floor muscle training program may alleviate OAB symptoms effectively and improve the quality of life more than a short term (3 months pelvic floor muscle training program combined with solifenacin succinate tablets.

  19. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halski T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Halski,1 Kuba Ptaszkowski,2 Lucyna Słupska,1 Robert Dymarek,3 Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz2 1Department of Physiotherapy, Opole Medical School, Opole, 2Department of Clinical Biomechanics and Physiotherapy in Motor System Disorders, 3Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Objectives: In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C in the supine position.Materials and methods: This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance.Results: In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102. The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3

  20. Structural and functional ultrasound imaging of the pelvic floor during pregnancy and postpartum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grob, ATM

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focussed on the composition and functionality of the puborectalis muscle based on calculating echogenicity and strain from transperineal ultrasound recordings. It is its specific orientation that allows the levator ani muscle to lift (vertically in the standing posture) the pelvic organs

  1. Fasciocutaneous Lotus Petal Flap for Perineal Wound Reconstruction after Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision : Application for Reconstruction of the Pelvic Floor and Creation of a Neovagina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellinga, Joke; Khoe, Patrick C. K. H.; van Etten, Boudewijn; Hemmer, Patrick H. J.; Havenga, Klaas; Stenekes, Martin W.; Eltahir, Yassir

    2016-01-01

    The extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE) procedure creates an extensive soft tissue defect of the pelvic floor. It has been suggested that primary reconstruction reduces the risk of wound infection and delayed wound healing in this high-risk area. Use of myocutaneous flaps or omentoplasty

  2. Response to Jensen et al. : pelvic floor reconstruction with a biological mesh after extralevator abdominoperineal excision leads tolow wound complications and perineal hernia rates with minor movement limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musters, G. D.; Bemelman, W. A.; Tanis, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Jensen et al describe their experience with reconstruction of the pelvic floor using a biological mesh after extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE)[1]. The title states that a biological mesh leads to low perineal wound complications and perineal hernia rates. Surprisingly the authors

  3. Can pelvic floor muscle training improve quality of life in men with mild to moderate post‑stroke and lower urinary tract symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have a significant impact on quality of life (QoL) in post‑stroke patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on QoL parameters in men with post‑stroke LUTS. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled...

  4. The impact of pelvic floor muscle training on the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radzimińska A

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Agnieszka Radzimińska, Agnieszka Strączyńska, Magdalena Weber-Rajek, Hanna Styczyńska, Katarzyna Strojek, Zuzanna Piekorz Department of Physiotherapy, Nicolaus Copernicus University Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Bydgoszcz, Poland Purpose: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT in the treatment of urinary incontinence (UI in women, with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients’ quality of life (QoL. Methods: The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (articles only in English, 1990–2017. Search terms were as follows: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, pelvic floor exercises, quality of life. Systematic review methods were based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Results: The assessment of the impact of PFMT on the QoL of women with UI was conducted among 2,394 women in 24 selected studies. After the end of treatment, the majority of patients in the experimental groups noted a statistically significant improvement in QoL. Conclusion: The results of this literature review demonstrate that PFMT is an effective treatment for UI in women. PFMT significantly improves the QoL of women with UI, which is an important determinant of their physical, mental, and social functioning. Keywords: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, quality of life

  5. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Moebius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjalmas, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjoerg; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    Objective Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center

  6. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Möbius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjälmås, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjörg; Hoebeke, Piet; Walle, Johan Vande; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    2014-01-01

    Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center controlled

  7. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women: shortened version of a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. C. Jean; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2013-01-01

    Feedback and biofeedback (BF) are common adjuncts to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for women with stress, urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence (UI). An up to date systematic review of adjunctive feedback or BF was needed to guide practice and further research. To determine whether feedback

  8. The efficacy of electroacupuncture for the treatment of simple female stress urinary incontinence - comparison with pelvic floor muscle training: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tongsheng; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhishun; Chen, Yuelai; Zhang, Wei; Chu, Haoran; Luo, Qiong; Lu, Jin; An, Junming; Liu, Baoyan

    2015-02-08

    Previous research has shown that electroacupuncture therapy has a potential therapeutic effect for simple female stress urinary incontinence. In this study, pelvic floor muscle training, the first-line treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women based on meta-analysis of numerous randomized control trials and recommended by international clinical practice, is used as a control group to demonstrate whether electroacupuncture therapy is a better method for female stress urinary incontinence. A randomized controlled trial has been designed to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of electroacupuncture for female stress urinary incontinence compared with pelvic floor muscle training. The safety of electroacupuncture and patient compliance will also be evaluated. Untoward reaction to the electroacupuncture, including a broken needle, fainting on acupuncture, or pain during acupuncture, will be recorded and the therapy will be stopped if an untoward reaction occurs. After we have received full ethical approval and patient consent, participants will be randomized to receive a series of 24 electroacupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training interventions. The frequency and amount of leakage will be measured as the primary outcome parameters. Secondary outcome parameters include the 1-hour pad test, the short-form of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire, patient subjective effectiveness evaluation, weekly usage of pad, and usage of specialty therapy for female stress urinary incontinence. This trial will help to determine whether electroacupuncture is a more effective treatment than pelvic floor muscle training for patients with female stress urinary incontinence. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01940432 (12 September 2013).

  9. Effects of pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy Efeitos da cinesioterapia no assoalho pélvico durante a gravidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OJETIVE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in 46 nulliparous pregnant women. METHODS: The women were divided into 2 groups: an exercise group and a control group. Functional evaluation of the pelvic floor muscle was performed by digital vaginal palpation using the strength scale described by Ortiz and by a perineometer (with and without biofeedback. RESULTS: The functional evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles showed a significant increase in pelvic floor muscle strength during pregnancy in both groups (P INTRODUÇÃO: A gravidez traz importantes modificações hormonais e anatômicas que têm efeito sobre a musculatura do assoalho pélvico. A cinesioterapia aplicada à musculatura do assoalho pélvico na gestação pode ser grande aliada no controle das alterações músculo-esqueléticas. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar efeitos da cinesioterapia no assoalho pélvico durante a gravidez, por meio da perineometria com e sem "biofeedback" e da avaliação funcional do assoalho pélvico, e correlacionar os valores da avaliação funcional com as perineometrias. MÉTODOS: Estudamos 46 gestantes nulíparas em seguimento pré-natal no Departamento de Obstetrícia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo, entre novembro de 2003 e dezembro de 2004, com até 20 semanas de gestação, atendidas no Setor de Baixo-Risco, divididas em dois grupos: Grupo exercício (23 casos: pacientes submetidas à cinesioterapia para a musculatura do assoalho pélvico; e grupo controle (23 casos: sem a prática da cinesioterapia. Por 12 semanas, até a 36ª semana, seguiu-se um protocolo, com treinamento de 60 minutos semanais, executando-se quatro séries de 10 contrações destes músculos com seis segundos de manutenção e 12 segundos de relaxamento, em decúbitos distintos. Realizaram-se 2 avaliações: 1ª (até 20 semanas e 2ª (36 semanas gestacionais, por meio da avaliação funcional do assoalho p

  10. The automatic pelvic floor muscle response to the active straight leg raise in cases with pelvic girdle pain and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuge, Britt; Sætre, Kaja; Ingeborg Hoff, Brækken

    2013-08-01

    The active straight leg raise (ASLR) test has been proposed as a clinical test for the assessment of pelvic girdle pain (PGP). Little is known about the activation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) during ASLR. The main aim of this study was to examine the automatic PFM contraction during ASLR. Specific aims were to compare automatic contraction to rest and to voluntary contraction, to compare PFM contraction during ASLR with and without compression and to examine whether there were any differences in PFM contraction between women with and without clinically diagnosed PGP during ASLR. Forty-nine pairs of women participated in a cross-sectional study with individual, one-to-one matched cases and controls. PFM was assessed by reliable and valid 3D ultrasound at rest, during voluntary and automatic contraction. Test-retest data for the levator hiatus during ASLR showed good repeatability. Significantly automatic PFM contractions occurred when ASLR tests were performed. There was a strong positive correlation between voluntary and automatic PFM contractions. Manual compression reduced the automatic PFM contraction during ASLR by 62-66%. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in reduction of levator hiatus or muscle length from rest to automatic contractions during ASLR. Interestingly, a significantly smaller levator hiatus was found in women with PGP than in controls, at rest, during an automatic contraction with ASLR and during voluntary contraction. In conclusion, a significant automatic PFM contraction occurred during ASLR, both in cases and in controls. Women with PGP had a significantly smaller levator hiatus than controls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pelvic floor muscle assessment outcomes in women with and without provoked vestibulodynia and the impact of a physical therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; McLean, Linda; Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Chamberlain, Susan

    2010-02-01

    Physical therapy (PT) may reduce the pain associated with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) based on previous findings that pelvic floor muscle dysfunction (PFMD) is associated with PVD symptoms. The goals of this study were: (i) to determine whether women with and without PVD differ on measures of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) behavior; and (ii) to assess the impact of PT treatment for women with PVD on these measures. Eleven women with PVD and 11 control women completed an assessment evaluating PFM behavior using surface electromyography (SEMG) recordings and a digital intravaginal assessment. Women with PVD repeated the assessment after they had undergone eight PT treatment sessions of manual therapy, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, dilator insertions, and home exercises. Superficial and deep PFM SEMG tonic activity and phasic activity in response to a painful pressure stimulus, PFM digital assessment variables (tone, flexibility, relaxation capacity, and strength). At pretreatment, women with PVD had higher tonic SEMG activity in their superficial PFMs compared with the control group, whereas no differences were found in the deep PFMs. Both groups demonstrated contractile responses to the painful pressure stimulus that were significantly higher in the superficial as compared with the deep PFMs, with the responses in the PVD group being higher than those in control women. Women with PVD had higher PFM tone, decreased PFM flexibility and lower PFM relaxation capacity compared with control women. Posttreatment improvements included less PFM responsiveness to pain, less PFM tone, improved vaginal flexibility, and improved PFM relaxation capacity, such that women with PVD no longer differed from controls on these measures. Women with PVD demonstrated altered PFM behavior when compared with controls, providing empirical evidence of PFMD, especially at the superficial layer. A PT rehabilitation program specifically targeting PFMD normalized PFM behavior in women with PVD.

  12. Predictors of improvement in sexual function of women with urinary incontinence after treatment with pelvic floor exercises: a secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacomori, Cinara; Cardoso, Fernando Luiz

    2015-03-01

    Women with urinary incontinence (UI) frequently present with complaints of sexual problems. To evaluate the predictors of sexual function improvement after participating in three physical therapy sessions and performing home-based pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) for the treatment of female UI. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial with a 3-month follow-up in which the sexual function of 54 women with UI was evaluated. These women joined three supervised physiotherapy sessions that included PFME and health education during 1 month, with a 15-day interval between each session, and kept practicing home-based PFME for a further 2 months. Sexual function was assessed using the Female Sexual Quotient, the pelvic floor muscle strength was measured using the modified Oxford scale, and UI was assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. The mean of sexual quotient score improved after treatment (P = 0.001). With respect to specific domains of sexual function, improvement was observed only in the questions about sexual desire, arousal/excitement, and orgasm. Before treatment, 18 women (33.3%) were classified as having sexual dysfunction, and after treatment, eight remained with sexual dysfunction and two other joined this category (total of 18.5%). Those women who had sexual dysfunction at baseline experienced a higher level of improvement of the sexual quotient compared with those without sexual dysfunction (P = 0.001, 95% CI = 9.1-31.9). A multivariate linear regression with backward elimination revealed the following predictors of improvement of the sexual quotient: higher parity, higher adherence to PFME, improvement in the strength of PFM, and a decrease in the frequency of urine leakage (R(2)  = 0.497). PFME was more beneficial with regard to sexual function in those women who presented with sexual dysfunction at baseline. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Use of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography to assess posterior pelvic floor dysfunction related to obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas Filho, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Regadas, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; de J R Pereira, Jacyara; da S Fernandes, Graziela Olivia; Dealcanfreitas, Iris Daiana; Mendonca Filho, Jose Jader

    2014-02-01

    New ultrasound techniques may complement current diagnostic tools, and combined techniques may help to overcome the limitations of individual techniques for the diagnosis of anorectal dysfunction. A high degree of agreement has been demonstrated between echodefecography (dynamic 3-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography) and conventional defecography. Our aim was to evaluate the ability of a combined approach consisting of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography by using a 3-dimensional biplane endoprobe to assess posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions related to obstructed defecation syndrome in comparison with echodefecography. This was a prospective, observational cohort study conducted at a tertiary-care hospital. Consecutive female patients with symptoms of obstructed defecation were eligible. Each patient underwent assessment of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions with a combination of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography by using a biplane transducer and with echodefecography. Kappa (κ) was calculated as an index of agreement between the techniques. Diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of the combined technique in detection of posterior dysfunctions was assessed with echodefecography as the standard for comparison. A total of 33 women were evaluated. Substantial agreement was observed regarding normal relaxation and anismus. In detecting the absence or presence of rectocele, the 2 methods agreed in all cases. Near-perfect agreement was found for rectocele grade I, grade II, and grade III. Perfect agreement was found for entero/sigmoidocele, with near-perfect agreement for rectal intussusception. Using echodefecography as the standard for comparison, we found high diagnostic accuracy of transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography in the detection of posterior dysfunctions. This combined technique should be compared with other dynamic techniques and

  14. Technique and complications of reconstruction of the pelvic floor with polyglactin mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sener, S.F.; Imperato, J.P.; Blum, M.D.; Ignatoff, J.M.; Soper, T.G.; Winchester, D.P.; Meiselman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A polyglactin mesh sling was used to reconstruct the pelvis in eight patients after colorectal or urologic resections in preparation for postoperative radiation therapy. There were three perioperative complications--a pelvic abscess requiring percutaneous drainage, a wound dehiscence and a herniation of the small intestine between the pelvic sidewall and mesh requiring small intestinal resection. There were two delayed complications, both partial small intestinal obstructions. One occurred just after the conclusion of radiation treatment and the other occurred five months after the conclusion of radiation therapy. Both obstructions responded to conservative management. None of the common acute radiation effects occurred during radiotherapy. One patient with delayed partial small intestinal obstruction had possible late radiation effects. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 12.5 months. Despite the complications described in this report, the use of a polyglactin mesh sling as an adjunct to resection of carcinoma of the pelvis has merit and should be studied further

  15. Supervised pelvic floor muscle training versus attention-control massage treatment in patients with faecal incontinence: Statistical analysis plan for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussing, Anja; Dahn, Inge; Due, Ulla; Sørensen, Michael; Petersen, Janne; Bandholm, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Faecal incontinence affects approximately 8-9% of the adult population. The condition is surrounded by taboo; it can have a devastating impact on quality of life and lead to major limitations in daily life. Pelvic floor muscle training in combination with information and fibre supplements is recommended as first-line treatment for faecal incontinence. Despite this, the effect of pelvic floor muscle training for faecal incontinence is unclear. No previous trials have investigated the efficacy of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment and compared this to an attention-control massage treatment including conservative treatment. The aim of this trial is to investigate if 16 weeks of supervised pelvic floor muscle training in combination with conservative treatment is superior to attention-control massage treatment and conservative treatment in patients with faecal incontinence. Randomised, controlled, superiority trial with two parallel arms. 100 participants with faecal incontinence will be randomised to either (1) individually supervised pelvic floor muscle training and conservative treatment or (2) attention-control massage treatment and conservative treatment. The primary outcome is participants' rating of symptom changes after 16 weeks of treatment using the Patient Global Impression of Improvement Scale. Secondary outcomes are the Vaizey Incontinence Score, the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index, the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale, a 14-day bowel diary, anorectal manometry and rectal capacity measurements. Follow-up assessment at 36 months will be conducted. This paper describes and discusses the rationale, the methods and in particular the statistical analysis plan of this trial.

  16. Transvaginal six-arm mesh OPUR in women with apical pelvic organ prolapse - analysis of short-term results, pelvic floor ultrasound evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluz, Tomasz; Wlaźlak, Edyta; Surkont, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of feasibility, efficacy and short-term results after six-arm transvaginal mesh OPUR implantation in women with apical prolapse. The same surgeon operated all of 39 women using mesh OPUR. Preoperatively patients had a standardized interview and clinical examination. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were analyzed. Postoperative evaluation included standardized interview, clinical examination and standardized pelvic floor ultrasound performed with 2D transvaginal probe and 4D abdominal probe. There was no complication that needed operative intervention. Hematomas in 3 patients resolved spontaneously. Transient voiding difficulties which lasted less than 7 days were observed in 5 patients. No erosion was observed. Comparison of pre- and postoperative results in 34 women revealed that in all 3 compartments improvement in POP-Q scale was statistically significant (p mesh needed re-operation. During PFS-TV in 94.1% of patients urethra was normobile or hypermobile. In all of the patients urethral end of the mesh was positioned far enough from the middle part of the urethra (ultrasound) to implant suburethral sling without risk of collision. Sexually active women did not inform of any important discomfort or pain during intercourse. It seems that six-arm OPUR mesh, if implanted under strict surgical rules, gives low risk of complications and high chance to successfully reduce POP symptoms in short term after the operation. It seems that OPUR mesh should not have negative influence on the results after anti-incontinence suburethral sling.

  17. Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points of Pelvic Floor with Physiotherapeutic Package: A Case Report

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    Esmaeil Shokri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are various factors that may cause pain and dysfunction in the pelvic region. Myofascial trigger points can likewise contribute in pelvic pain. Common treatments for myofascial trigger points include electrotherapy, laser therapy, massage, ischemic compression, dry-needling, stretch, icing, heating, and biofeedback. Case Report: A 26 year old man with an exertion-related pain that lasted 5 months was referred for physiotherapy consultation. He had no pain at rest but reported a referral pain from perineal region to the anus and muscular stiffness following a bout of physical activity. On palpation there was a trigger point in the perineal region with referral pain to anus. At the beginning of the treatment, the patient was asked to stop his physical activities. The patient received a treatment package which was useful in the management of trigger points. After 7 sessions of treatment the pain was diminished and there was no exercise induced stiffness. The patient was followed for 10 months later and no pain and stiffness was reported. Conclusion: The application of heat, friction massage, stretching, combined with endurance exercise could be an effective treatment for reliving the pain and muscular stiffness caused by trigger points.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Rhianon; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Cody, June D; Mørkved, Siv

    2012-10-17

    About a third of women have urinary incontinence and up to a 10th have faecal incontinence after childbirth. Pelvic floor muscle training is commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth both for prevention and the treatment of incontinence. To determine the effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared to usual antenatal and postnatal care on incontinence. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which includes searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in Process and handsearching (searched 7 February 2012) and the references of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials in pregnant or postnatal women. One arm of the trial needed to include pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Another arm was either no PFMT or usual antenatal or postnatal care. Trials were independently assessed for eligibility and methodological quality. Data were extracted then cross checked. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. Data were processed as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Three different populations of women were considered separately, women dry at randomisation (prevention); women wet at randomisation (treatment); and a mixed population of women who might be one or the other (prevention or treatment). Trials were further divided into those which started during pregnancy (antenatal); and those started after delivery (postnatal). Twenty-two trials involving 8485 women (4231 PFMT, 4254 controls) met the inclusion criteria and contributed to the analysis.Pregnant women without prior urinary incontinence (prevention) who were randomised to intensive antenatal PFMT were less likely than women randomised to no PFMT or usual antenatal care to report urinary incontinence up to six months after delivery (about 30% less; risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.95, combined result of 5 trials).Postnatal women with persistent urinary incontinence (treatment) three months after delivery and who received

  19. The effects of Pilates method on pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cíntia S; Pedriali, Fabiana R; Urbano, Mariana R; Moreira, Eliane H; Averbeck, Marcio A; Almeida, Silvio Henrique M

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire. PFMS was measured using a manometric perineometry device at baseline and 4 months after radical prostatectomy (RP). The level of significance was P  0.05). G1 and G2 achieved a higher number of fully continent patients than G3 (P Pilates method promoted similar outcomes in the proportion of fully continent patients when compared to conventional PFMT 4 months after RP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Outcomes of different protocols of pelvic floor physical therapy and anti-cholinergics in women with wet over-active bladder: A 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuri, Joseph; Kafri, Rachel; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Stav, Kobi

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the 4-year outcomes of three protocols of pelvic floor physical therapy and anticholinergic drug in women with wet over-active bladder (OAB). One hundred and sixty-four women were randomly allocated to one of four interventions: drug therapy (DT), bladder training (BT), pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), or combined pelvic floor rehabilitation (CPFR) that includes BT, PFMT, and behavioral advice. The active treatment in each group lasted 3 months. Of the 132 women who completed a 1-year follow-up, 120 women (90%) responded to our questionnaires and therefore were included in this study. Outcome measures were the number of voids per day, number of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes per week, completely dry rate and Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire (I-QOL) at 4 years. After 4 years of follow-up, the outcome measures improved significantly and equally in all four groups. The median number of UUI episodes/week dropped by 3, 1, 2, and 2 in the DT, BT, PFMT, and CPFR groups, respectively (P = ns). The dry rates were 25%, 31%, 44%, 34% in the DT, BT, PFMT, and CPFR groups, respectively (P = ns). I-QOL scores improved significantly in all four groups. Women who suffer from wet-OAB may experience the same degree of long-term improvement following various pelvic floor physical therapy protocols as they would from drug therapy. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:755-758, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Instruction to Control Urinary Incontinence and its Resulting Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

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    Rafii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary disorders are common problems in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Urinary incontinence largely affects the physical, social and emotional characteristics and activities of such patients. Objectives The current study aimed to identify the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. Methods The present clinical trial with a pre-post design was conducted on 50 patients with MS referring to the MS clinic of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran, Iran, selected by convenience sampling method. Participants received instructions on pelvic floor muscle exercises and then practiced for three consecutive months. The international consultation on incontinence questionnaire-urinary incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI-SF was used to measure participants' urinary incontinence, and the 21-item depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21 to measure their depression, anxiety and stress, both before the intervention and at the end of the third month of exercising. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS16 using descriptive statistics and the dependent t test. Results About 45 (90% participants practiced pelvic floor muscle exercises until the end of the third month. The frequency and amount of urine leakage and the effect of urinary incontinence on the quality of life differed significantly in the patients after the instructions compared to the status before the intervention (P < 0.001. The mean score of stress (P < 0.001, anxiety (P = 0.04 and depression (P = 0.003 decreased significantly after the intervention. Conclusions According to the findings, instructing pelvic floor muscle exercises was effective in reducing urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. These exercises were recommended as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive and cost-effective method to control urinary incontinence in patients with MS.

  2. 198: THE EFFECT OF INSTRUCTING PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING FOR CONTROLLING URINARY INCONTINENCE AND ITS RESULTING STRESS, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareinia, Habib; Rafii, Forough; Sarraf, Payam; Seyedalshohahadaee, Mahnaz

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Urinary disorders are common problems in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Urinary incontinence largely affects the physical, social, and emotional characteristics and activities of these patients. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of pelvic floor muscle Training on urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in MS patients. Methods The present clinical trial with a pre-post design was conducted on 50 MS patients presenting to the MS clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran (Iran) who had been selected by convenience sampling method. Participants received instructions on pelvic floor muscle exercises and then practiced them for three consecutive months. The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire – Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF) was used to measure participants' urinary incontinence and the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) then used to measure their depression, anxiety and stress, both before the intervention and at the end of the third month of exercising. The data obtained were analyzed in SPSS16 using descriptive statistics and the dependent t test. Results About 45 (90%) participants practiced pelvic floor muscle exercises up until the end of the third month. The frequency and amount of urine leakage and the effect of urinary incontinence on the quality of life differed significantly in the patients after the instructions compared to before (P<0.001). The mean score of stress (P<0.001), anxiety (P=0.04) and depression (P=0.003) decreased significantly after the intervention. Conclusion According to the findings, instructing pelvic floor muscle exercises is effective in reducing urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in MS patients. These exercises are therefore recommended as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive and cost-effective method for controlling urinary incontinence in MS patients.

  3. Women’s pelvic floor muscle strength and urinary and anal incontinence after childbirth: a cross-sectional study

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    Priscila Tavares Zizzi

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyse pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS and urinary and anal incontinence (UI and AI in the postpartum period. METHOD Cross-sectional study carried out with women in their first seven months after child birth. Data were collected through interviews, perineometry (Peritron™, and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF. RESULTS 128 women participated in the study. The PFMS mean was 33.1 (SD=16.0 cmH2O and the prevalence of UI and AI was 7.8% and 5.5%, respectively. In the multiple analyses, the variables associated with PFMS were type of birth and cohabitation with a partner. Newborn’s weight, previous pregnancy, UI during pregnancy, and sexual activity showed an association with UI after child birth. Only AI prior to pregnancy was associated with AI after childbirth. CONCLUSION Vaginal birth predisposes to the reduction of PFMS, and caesarean section had a protective effect to its reduction. The occurrence of UI during pregnancy is a predictor of UI after childbirth, and women with previous pregnancies and newborns with higher weights are more likely to have UI after childbirth.AI prior to pregnancy is the only risk factor for its occurrence after childbirth. Associations between PFMS and cohabitation with a partner, and between UI and sexual activity do not make possible to conclude that these variables are directly associated.

  4. General or Spinal Anaesthetic for Vaginal Surgery in Pelvic Floor Disorders (GOSSIP): a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, B; Ismail, K M; Turner, N; Farrell, A; Verzune, M; Annappa, M; Smith, I; El-Gizawy, Zeiad; Cooper, J C

    2015-08-01

    Spinal anaesthesia (SA) and general anaesthesia (GA) are widely used techniques for vaginal surgery for pelvic floor disorders with inconclusive evidence of the superiority of either. We conducted a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to assess the feasibility of a full scale RCT aiming to examine the effect of anaesthetic mode for vaginal surgery on operative, patient reported and length of hospital stay (LOHS) outcomes. Patients undergoing vaginal surgery, recruited through a urogynaecology service in a University teaching hospital, were randomised to receive either GA or SA. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks postoperatively. Pain was measured on a visual analogue scale; nausea was assessed with a four-point verbal rating scale. Patient's subjective perception of treatment outcome, quality of life (QoL) and functional outcomes were assessed using the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) on vaginal symptoms and the SF-36 questionnaire. Sixty women were randomised, 29 to GA and 31 to SA. The groups were similar in terms of age and type of vaginal surgery performed. No statistically significant differences were noted between the groups with regard to pain, nausea, quality of life (QoL), functional outcomes as well as length of stay in the postoperative recovery room, use of analgesia postoperatively and LOHS. This study has demonstrated that a full RCT is feasible and should focus on the length of hospital stay in a subgroup of patients undergoing vaginal surgery where SA may help to facilitate enhanced recovery or day surgery.

  5. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on symptoms and uroflowmetry parameters in female patients with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaksizoğlu, Haluk; Akand, Murat; Çakmakçi, Evrim; Gül, Murat; Seçkin, Bedreddin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) as well as uroflowmetry parameters and functional bladder capacity. Fifty-nine female patients with OAB symptoms were included. Patients were assessed by SEAPI-QMM, uroflowmetry, and abdominal ultrasound. A specially designed PFMT program using a Pilates ball was generated for patients. The training period was 1-h sessions twice a week for 6 weeks and aerobic home exercises to be performed at home 4 or 5 times every other day. Following training, subjects were reevaluated for body mass index, SEAPI questionnaire, and uroflowmetry. Initial mean SEAPI score, mean maximum and average flow rates, and mean voided volume were 9.8 ± 7.2, 29.8 ± 16.4 mL/s, 16.3 ± 8.7 mL/s, and 211.6 ± 173.5 mL, respectively. After completion of the training program, SEAPI scores improved significantly to 3.4 ± 6.4 (P < 0.05). Maximum and average flow rate results did not show significant changes, whereas voided volume seemed to have improved in conjunction with patients' symptom scores (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.86). According to. our results, we think that proper PFMT results in increase of functional bladder capacity as well as improvement in OAB symptoms and can be recommended as first-line therapy or in conjunction with medical therapy in severe cases.

  6. Pelvic floor electrostimulation in women with urinary incontinence and/or overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez-Roig, J; Souza, D L B; Espelt, A; Costa-Marín, M; Belda-Molina, A M

    2013-01-01

    Electrostimulation (ES) is one of the techniques employed in conservative treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, there is controversy in the scientific literature regarding its effectiveness as monotherapy. To evaluate the scientific evidence on ES of the pelvic floor in women with UI and with/without OAB. A systematic review of clinical trials was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane, PEDro, Elsevier (Doyma) and EnFisPo (1980-2011). Quality of study registries was evaluated and information was obtained from those that presented the inclusion criteria established in the review. The 27 clinical trials were included in the review: 13 randomized controlled trials, 11 randomized non-controlled trials and 3 non-randomized trials. Most of the clinical trials conclude that ES is effective in the treatment of UI and OAB in women. However, better methodological quality studies are needed to obtain a higher level of scientific evidence and to know the optimal current modality, type and parameters for each type of UI and OAB. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing prevalence of urinary incontinence in Scottish fitness instructors and experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Kate; van Woerden, Hugo; MacRury, Sandra

    2018-06-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence in fitness instructors, experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), and attitudes to incorporating such exercises into classes. An online survey was undertaken of fitness instructors working in Scotland based on the Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI). The survey was at least partially completed by 106, of whom 73.6% (53/72) were female and 52.8% (38/72) were in the 35-54 years age group. Prevalence of UI was 28.2% (24/85), and severity based on ICIQ-UI scores was 'slight' 65.2% (15/23), or 'moderate' in 26.1% (6/23). Leakage of urine was associated with physical activity in 36% (9/25), of whom 31.8% (7/22) had not taken actions to reduce the impact, and 86.4% (19/22) had not sought professional advice or treatment. There was widespread willingness to incorporate PFME into classes if given appropriate training 86.1% (62/72), and 67.1% (49/73) would be happy to recommend a PFME app. A significant proportion of fitness instructors are in need of PFME and those who perform PFME do so at a level below that which is recommended. However, many have had some training on PFME or are willing to provide this.

  8. The impact of pelvic floor muscle training on the quality of life of women with urinary incontinence: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzimińska, Agnieszka; Strączyńska, Agnieszka; Weber-Rajek, Magdalena; Styczyńska, Hanna; Strojek, Katarzyna; Piekorz, Zuzanna

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the treatment of urinary incontinence (UI) in women, with a particular focus on the impact of this form of therapy on the patients’ quality of life (QoL). Methods The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (articles only in English, 1990–2017). Search terms were as follows: urinary incontinence, pelvic floor muscle training, pelvic floor exercises, quality of life. Systematic review methods were based on the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Results The assessment of the impact of PFMT on the QoL of women with UI was conducted among 2,394 women in 24 selected studies. After the end of treatment, the majority of patients in the experimental groups noted a statistically significant improvement in QoL. Conclusion The results of this literature review demonstrate that PFMT is an effective treatment for UI in women. PFMT significantly improves the QoL of women with UI, which is an important determinant of their physical, mental, and social functioning.

  9. Assessment of pelvic floor by three-dimensional-ultrasound in primiparous women according to delivery mode: initial experience from a single reference service in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo Júnior, Edward; de Freitas, Rogério Caixeta Moraes; Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin de Jármy; Alexandre, Sandra Maria; Nakamura, Mary Uchiyama; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate changes to the pelvic floor of primiparous women with different delivery modes, using three-dimensional ultrasound. A prospective cross-sectional study on 35 primiparae divided into groups according to the delivery mode: elective cesarean delivery (n=10), vaginal delivery (n=16), and forceps delivery (n=9). Three-dimensional ultrasound on the pelvic floor was performed on the second postpartum day with the patient in a resting position. A convex volumetric transducer (RAB4-8L) was used, in contact with the large labia, with the patient in the gynecological position. Biometric measurements of the urogenital hiatus were taken in the axial plane on images in the rendering mode, in order to assess the area, anteroposterior and transverse diameters, average thickness, and avulsion of the levator ani muscle. Differences between groups were evaluated by determining the mean differences and their respective 95% confidence intervals. The proportions of levator ani muscle avulsion were compared between elective cesarean section and vaginal birth using Fisher's exact test. The mean areas of the urogenital hiatus in the cases of vaginal and forceps deliveries were 17.0 and 20.1 cm(2), respectively, versus 12.4 cm(2) in the Control Group (elective cesarean). Avulsion of the levator ani muscle was observed in women who underwent vaginal delivery (3/25), however there was no statistically significant difference between cesarean section and vaginal delivery groups (p=0.5). Transperineal three-dimensional ultrasound was useful for assessing the pelvic floor of primiparous women, by allowing pelvic morphological changes to be differentiated according to the delivery mode.

  10. Final descent for CMS

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    The 15th and last section of the CMS detector was lowered on Tuesday 22 January. The YE-1 endcap (1430 tonnes) began its 100-metre descent at 7 am and arrived gently on the floor of the experiment hall at 5.30 pm.

  11. Radiotherapy, cancer and some anatomical structures related with the pelvic floor: an evaluation of the scientific literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. Biomedico. Dept. de Fisiologia Humana; Paoli, Severo de [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Missailids, Sotiris [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry and Analytical Sciences

    2008-12-15

    Radiotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy X-rays or other types of ionizing radiation to try to kill the cancer cells in various organs/tissues. PubMed is a database used as a tool in various publications. The aim of this work was to evaluate, in the PubMed, the number of publications (NP) in radiotherapy and cancer in various organs related to the pelvic floor as well as brachytherapy. The searches were performed (August 2008) in the PubMed (http://www.pubmed.com) using the words: radiotherapy (RT) or cancer (CA), RT and CA, RT and CA and prostate, RT and CA and testis, RT and CA and breast, RT and CA and kidneys, RT and CA and vulva, RT and CA and vagina, RT and CA and penis, RT and CA and uterus, RT and CA and ovary, RT and CA and bladder, and RT and CA and urethra. A search using brachytherapy was also performed. The NP in each subject was determined and was 2178635 to CA and about 9% of them are related with RT. The NP in RT and CA and breast or prostate is bigger than for the other organs, whereas brachytherapy is mainly cited in the studies about CA of prostate, bladder and breast. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the importance of radiation therapy studies in the cancer of several organs. This information is crucial in understanding the field and demonstrates areas of significant progress or existing gaps of research in radiotherapy treatment of various cancers of the pelvis. Furthermore, it could significantly aid the interprofessional team in the determination of actions related to the treatment of patients that are undertaking radiotherapy, due to the possible complications of this modality of treatment. (author)

  12. A Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle contraction: Is it effective for pregnant women? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Naiara T; Ferreira, Letícia R; Fernandes, Mariana G; Resende, Ana Paula M; Pereira-Baldon, Vanessa S

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction compared to a conventional intervention in pregnant women. Fifty primiparous women, without gestational alterations, were randomized to the Pilates group (n = 25) and control group (n = 25). Interventions for both groups consisted of twice-weekly sessions of 1 h each during the period between the 14-16th and 32-34th gestational weeks. The Pilates group performed a Pilates exercises program with the addition of voluntary PFM contraction. Mat-based Pilates exercises were performed involving movement of the upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk in all sessions. The Control group walked for 10 min and performed strengthening exercises of the lower limbs, upper limbs, and trunk with resistance from an elastic band and body weight. Each woman was evaluated by an unblinded physiotherapist before and after intervention for primary (PFM strength using a manometer) and secondary (PFM strength using Oxford Scale, endurance and repeatability) outcomes. Covariance analysis (ANCOVA) was used to compare the groups using the baseline values as a covariate. Thirty-six women were included in the analysis. There were no differences between the groups for manometry. An increase in the PFM strength, endurance, and repeatability was only observed in the Pilates group. In addition, the Pilates group showed greater adherence to the intervention. Pilates exercise program with PFM contraction is not able to change the PFM strength assessed by manometer in pregnant women, but it improved adherence to the intervention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Test-retest reliability of the different dynamometric variables used to evaluate pelvic floor musculature during the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis Nagano, Reny C; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela A; da Costa, Gilmar L; Amorim, Karina M; Fumagalli, Marco A; Amorim, César F; Politti, Fabiano

    2018-04-17

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of different dynamometric variables of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) in healthy women during different periods of menstrual cycle. Vaginal dynamometric equipment was developed by the authors and its reproducibility was tested. The PFM contractions of 20 healthy women were collected by two independent examiners over three consecutive weeks, always on the same day, with a seven-day interval between readings, starting from the first day after the end of the menstrual period. For the measurements, the branch of the dynamometer was positioned first on the sagittal plane and then on the frontal plane. Baseline, peak time, maximum PFM strength, impulse contraction, and average contraction force were calculated. Reproducibility was tested using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to compare the data from different days. For intra-day and inter-day reliability between examiners, all the parameters collected on the sagittal plane presented good and excellent reproducibility (ICC 2,1  = 0.60 to 0.98), whereas reproducibility on the frontal plane was respectively poor and excellent (ICC 2,1  = 0.23 to 0.97). The ANOVA revealed significant differences between sessions only for the impulse of contraction for the sagittal (P = 0.005) and frontal (P = 0.03) planes. Time and contraction force parameters of the PFM are not influenced by hormonal alterations that occur during the menstrual cycle. The impulse of contraction was the only variable to demonstrate a significant difference between the first and second week of the data collection protocol. The baseline, maximum strength value, impulse of contraction, and average contraction force variables presented good to excellent reproducibility and can be safely used as a method of PFM evaluation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle strength evaluation in different body positions in nulliparous healthy women and its correlation with sexual activity

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    Monica Orsi Gameiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM strength in different body positions in nulliparous healthy women and its correlation with sexual activity. Materials and Methods Fifty healthy nulliparous women with mean age of 23 years were prospectively studied. Subjective evaluation of PFM was assessed by transvaginal digital palpation (TDP of anterior and posterior areas regarding the vaginal introitus. A perineometer with inflatable vaginal probe was used to assess the PFM strength in four different positions: supine with extended lower limbs (P1; bent-knee supine (P2; sitting (P3; standing (P4. Results Physical activity, 3 times per week, was reported by 58% of volunteers. Sexual activity was observed in 80% of women and 82% of them presented orgasm. The average body mass index (BMI was 21.76 kg/m2, considered as normal according World Health Organization (WHO. We observed that 68% of volunteers were conscious about the PFM contraction. TDP showed concordance of 76% when anterior and posterior areas were compared (p = 0.00014. There was not correlation between PFM strength and orgasm in subjective evaluation. The PFM strength was significantly higher in standing position when compared with the other positions (p < 0.000. No statistical difference was observed between orgasm and PFM strength when objective evaluations were performed. Conclusions There was concordance between anterior and posterior areas in 76% of cases when subjective PFM strength was assessed. In objective evaluation, higher PFM strength was observed when volunteers were standing. No statistical correlation was observed between PFM strength and orgasm in nulliparous healthy women.

  15. Radiotherapy, cancer and some anatomical structures related with the pelvic floor: an evaluation of the scientific literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio; Paoli, Severo de; Missailids, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy X-rays or other types of ionizing radiation to try to kill the cancer cells in various organs/tissues. PubMed is a database used as a tool in various publications. The aim of this work was to evaluate, in the PubMed, the number of publications (NP) in radiotherapy and cancer in various organs related to the pelvic floor as well as brachytherapy. The searches were performed (August 2008) in the PubMed (http://www.pubmed.com) using the words: radiotherapy (RT) or cancer (CA), RT and CA, RT and CA and prostate, RT and CA and testis, RT and CA and breast, RT and CA and kidneys, RT and CA and vulva, RT and CA and vagina, RT and CA and penis, RT and CA and uterus, RT and CA and ovary, RT and CA and bladder, and RT and CA and urethra. A search using brachytherapy was also performed. The NP in each subject was determined and was 2178635 to CA and about 9% of them are related with RT. The NP in RT and CA and breast or prostate is bigger than for the other organs, whereas brachytherapy is mainly cited in the studies about CA of prostate, bladder and breast. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the importance of radiation therapy studies in the cancer of several organs. This information is crucial in understanding the field and demonstrates areas of significant progress or existing gaps of research in radiotherapy treatment of various cancers of the pelvis. Furthermore, it could significantly aid the interprofessional team in the determination of actions related to the treatment of patients that are undertaking radiotherapy, due to the possible complications of this modality of treatment. (author)

  16. Are Obese Patients at an Increased Risk of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction Compared to Non-obese Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Isaac José Felippe Corrêa; Pinto, Rodrigo Ambar; Jorge, José Marcio Neves; Santo, Marco Aurélio; Bustamante-Lopez, Leonardo Alfonso; Cecconello, Ivan; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Factors associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure such as chronic cough, morbid obesity, and constipation may be related to pelvic floor dysfunction. In this study, we compared anorectal manometry values and clinical data of class II and III morbidly obese patients referred to bariatric surgery with that of non-obese patients. We performed a case-matched study between obese patients referred to bariatric surgery and non-obese patients without anorectal complaints. The groups were matched by age and gender. Men and nulliparous women with no history of abdominal or anorectal surgery were included in the study. Anorectal manometry was performed by the stationary technique, and clinical evaluation was based on validated questionnaires. Mean age was 44.8 ± 12.5 years (mean ± SD) in the obese group and 44.1 ± 11.8 years in the non-obese group (p = 0.829). In the obese group, 65.4% of patients had some degree of fecal incontinence. Mean squeeze pressure was significantly lower in obese than in non-obese patients (155.6 ± 64.1 vs. 210.1 ± 75.9 mmHg, p = 0.004), and there was no significant difference regarding mean rest pressure in obese patients compared to non-obese ones (63.7 ± 23.1 vs. 74.1 ± 21.8 mmHg, p = 0.051). There were no significant differences in anorectal manometry values between continent and incontinent obese patients. The prevalence of fecal incontinence among obese patients was high regardless of age, gender, and body mass index. Anal squeeze pressure was significantly lower in obese patients compared to non-obese controls.

  17. Correlation Between Echodefecography and 3-Dimensional Vaginal Ultrasonography in the Detection of Perineal Descent in Women With Constipation Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Pinheiro Regadas, Francisco Sergio; Rodrigues, Lusmar V; da Silva Vilarinho, Adjra; Buchen, Guilherme; Borges, Livia Olinda; Veras, Lara B; da Cruz, Mariana Murad

    2016-12-01

    Defecography is an established method of evaluating dynamic anorectal dysfunction, but conventional defecography does not allow for visualization of anatomic structures. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of dynamic 3-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography for evaluating perineal descent in comparison with echodefecography (3-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography) and to study the relationship between perineal descent and symptoms and anatomic/functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor. This was a prospective study. The study was conducted at a large university tertiary care hospital. Consecutive female patients were eligible if they had pelvic floor dysfunction, obstructed defecation symptoms, and a score >6 on the Cleveland Clinic Florida Constipation Scale. Each patient underwent both echodefecography and dynamic 3-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography to evaluate posterior pelvic floor dysfunction. Normal perineal descent was defined on echodefecography as puborectalis muscle displacement ≤2.5 cm; excessive perineal descent was defined as displacement >2.5 cm. Of 61 women, 29 (48%) had normal perineal descent; 32 (52%) had excessive perineal descent. Endovaginal ultrasonography identified 27 of the 29 patients in the normal group as having anorectal junction displacement ≤1 cm (mean = 0.6 cm; range, 0.1-1.0 cm) and a mean anorectal junction position of 0.6 cm (range, 0-2.3 cm) above the symphysis pubis during the Valsalva maneuver and correctly identified 30 of the 32 patients in the excessive perineal descent group. The κ statistic showed almost perfect agreement (κ = 0.86) between the 2 methods for categorization into the normal and excessive perineal descent groups. Perineal descent was not related to fecal or urinary incontinence or anatomic and functional factors (sphincter defects, pubovisceral muscle defects, levator hiatus area, grade II or III rectocele, intussusception, or anismus). The study did not include a

  18. Electrospun biodegradable microfibers induce new collagen formation in a rat abdominal wall defect model - a possible treatment for pelvic floor repair?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpø, Cecilie Lærke Glindtvad; Chen, Menglin; Nygaard, Jens Vinge

    2017-01-01

    Half of the female population over age 50 years will experience pelvic organ prolapse. We suggest a new approach based on tissue engineering principles to functionally reconstruct the anatomical structures of the pelvic floor. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical performance......, and tested for mechanical properties and the composition of connective tissue. The study showed an increase in mRNA expression for collagen-I (p = 0.0060) and collagen-III (p = 0.0086) in the 4 weeks group with bFGF. The difference was equalized at 8 and 24 weeks. No difference was found at any time...... for protein amount for collagen-I, collagen-III, and fibronectin. The amount of collagen decreased from 4 to 24 weeks but the fraction of collagen increased. The maximal load of the newly formed tissue showed no effect of bFGF at any time. Exclusively, histology showed a limited ingrowth of collagen fibers...

  19. Fabrication of electrospun thermoplastic polyurethane blended poly (l-lactide-co-e-caprolactone) microyarn scaffolds for engineering of female pelvic-floor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Min; Wu, Qingkai; Dai, Miao; Xu, Peirong; Jia, Xiang; Feng, Jie; Gu, Chaochen; Mo, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Potential scaffolds for repair of the female pelvic floor require new materials and fabrication by novel methods to improve cellular infiltration. An ‘ideal’ engineered scaffold for pelvic-floor tissue should mimic the three-dimensional (3D) network of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which possesses intricate macro- and nano-architecture. In this study, a series of blended poly(l-lactide-co-ecaprolactone) P(LLA-CL)/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) microyarn/microfibrous scaffolds were produced with different weight ratios via dynamic liquid electrospinning and electrospinning. Both biopolymers were dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP). Our data showed the mean diameter of microyarn scaffolds to be significantly larger than that of microfibers. Microyarn scaffolds possessed large pore sizes and high porosity. There was no significant difference between the mechanical properties of microyarn and microfibrous scaffolds. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that intermolecular bonds were not present between the molecules of TPU and P(LLA-CL). Morphologic observations using scanning electron microscopy and inverted fluorescence microscopy showed that adipose-derived stem cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein could grow well along or within blend microyarns and migrate within the novel 3D scaffolds. Hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that cell infiltration on microyarn scaffolds was significantly enhanced. The CCK-8 assay showed that microyarns could significantly facilitate cell proliferation compared with microfibrous scaffolds. These results suggested that blend microyarns of P(LLA-CL)/TPU designed to mimic the ECM for female pelvic-floor tissue may be excellent macroporous scaffolds for tissue repair. (paper)

  20. Types of pelvic floor dysfunctions in nulliparous, vaginal delivery, and cesarean section female patients with obstructed defecation syndrome identified by echodefecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas, Francisco Sérgio P; Rodrigues, Lusmar V; Oliveira, Leticia; Barreto, Rosilma G L; de Souza, Marcellus H L P; Silva, Flavio Roberto S

    2009-10-01

    This study aims to show pelvic floor dysfunctions in women with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS), comparing nulliparous to those with vaginal delivery or cesarean section using the echodefecography (ECD). Three hundred seventy female patients with ODS were reviewed retrospectively and were divided in Group I-105 nulliparous, Group II-165 had at least one vaginal delivery, and Group III-comprised of 100 patients delivered only by cesarean section. All patients had been submitted to ECD to identify pelvic floor dysfunctions. No statistical significance was found between the groups with regard to anorectocele grade. Intussusception was identified in 40% from G I, 55.0% from G II, and 30.0% from G III, with statistical significance between Groups I and II. Intussusception was associated with significant anorectocele in 24.8%, 36.3%, and 18% patients from G I, II, and III, respectively. Anismus was identified in 39.0% from G I, 28.5% from G II, and 60% from G III, with statistical significance between Groups I and III. Anismus was associated with significant anorectocele in 22.8%, 15.7%, and 24% patients from G I, II, and III, respectively. Sigmoidocele/enterocele was identified in 7.6% from G I, 10.9% G II, and was associated with significant rectocele in 3.8% and 7.3% patients from G I and II, respectively. The distribution of pelvic floor dysfunctions showed no specific pattern across the groups, suggesting the absence of a correlation between these dysfunctions and vaginal delivery.

  1. A comparative study of pelvic floor muscle training in women with multiple sclerosis: its impact on lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélia Correia Lúcio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare pelvic floor muscle training and a sham procedure for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life in women with multiple sclerosis. METHODS: Thirty-five female patients with multiple sclerosis were randomized into two groups: a treatment group (n = 18 and a sham group (n = 17. The evaluation included use of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and Qualiveen questionnaire. The intervention was performed twice per week for 12 weeks in both groups. The treatment group underwent pelvic floor muscle training with assistance from a vaginal perineometer and instructions to practice the exercises daily at home. The sham group received a treatment consisting of introducing a perineometer inside the vagina with no exercises required. Pre- and post-intervention data were recorded. RESULTS: The evaluation results of the two groups were similar at baseline. At the end of the treatment, the treatment group reported fewer storage and voiding symptoms than the sham group. Furthermore, the differences found between the groups were significant improvements in the following scores in the treatment group: Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and the General Quality of Life, and Specific Impact of Urinary Problems domains of the Qualiveen questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: The improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms had a positive effect on the quality of life of women with multiple sclerosis who underwent pelvic floor muscle training, as the disease-specific of quality of life questionnaires demonstrated. This study reinforces the importance of assessing quality of life to judge the effectiveness of a treatment intervention.

  2. Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Stephanie J; Boyle, Rhianon; Cody, June D; Mørkved, Siv; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-12-22

    About one-third of women have urinary incontinence and up to one-tenth have faecal incontinence after childbirth. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth for both prevention and treatment of incontinence.This is an update of a review previously published in 2012. To determine the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in the prevention or treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in pregnant or postnatal women. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Specialised Register (16 February 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials in pregnant or postnatal women. One arm of the trial included PFMT. Another arm was no PFMT, usual antenatal or postnatal care, another control condition, or an alternative PFMT intervention. Review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias. We extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Populations included: women who were continent (PFMT for prevention), women who were incontinent (PFMT for treatment) at randomisation and a mixed population of women who were one or the other (PFMT for prevention or treatment). We assessed quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. The review included 38 trials (17 of which were new for this update) involving 9892 women from 20 countries. Overall, trials were small to moderate sized, and the PFMT programmes and control conditions varied considerably and were often poorly described. Many trials were at moderate to high risk of bias. Other than two reports of pelvic floor pain, trials reported no harmful effects of PFMT.Prevention of urinary incontinence: compared with usual care, continent pregnant women performing antenatal PFMT may have had a lower risk of reporting urinary incontinence in late pregnancy (62% less; risk ratio (RR) for incontinence 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 0.72; 6 trials, 624 women; low-quality evidence). Similarly, antenatal PFMT

  3. Pelvic floor muscle training and adjunctive therapies for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann Patricia B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is a prevalent and costly condition which may be treated surgically or by physical therapy. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT performed alone and together with adjunctive therapies (eg biofeedback, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones for the treatment of female SUI. Methods All major electronic sources of relevant information were systematically searched to identify peer-reviewed English language abstracts or papers published between 1995 and 2005. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs and other study designs eg non-randomised trials, cohort studies, case series, were considered for this review in order to source all the available evidence relevant to clinical practice. Studies of adult women with a urodynamic or clinical diagnosis of SUI were eligible for inclusion. Excluded were studies of women who were pregnant, immediately post-partum or with a diagnosis of mixed or urge incontinence. Studies with a PFMT protocol alone and in combination with adjunctive physical therapies were considered. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study, its level of evidence and the methodological quality. Due to the heterogeneity of study designs, the results are presented in narrative format. Results Twenty four studies, including 17 RCTs and seven non-RCTs, met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the studies varied but lower quality scores did not necessarily indicate studies from lower levels of evidence. This review found consistent evidence from a number of high quality RCTs that PFMT alone and in combination with adjunctive therapies is effective treatment for women with SUI with rates of 'cure' and 'cure/improvement' up to 73% and 97% respectively. The contribution of adjunctive therapies is unclear and there is limited

  4. Pelvic Floor Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called urinary incontinence , can occur in women or men when the bladder falls from its proper place. Other symptoms include a sudden, strong urge to urinate. Bowel control problems. The leaking ...

  5. Pelvic Floor Dyssynergia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more effectively. Digestive Tract Disorders of the Esophagus Achalasia GERD Disorders of the Stomach Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome ... Legislative & Regulatory Research Leadership Contact us News Industry Treatment News Medical News Legislative & Regulatory News Press Releases ...

  6. Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library Quality Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Healthcare Economics Committee Resources Past Presidents Search form Search Online ... patterns, including diarrhea, constipation, or both, is also essential. Other key parts of the history include prior ...

  7. Impact of episiotomy on pelvic floor disorders and their influence on women's wellness after the sixth month postpartum: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calcagno Angelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of episiotomy as a protective factor against pelvic floor disorders postpartum has been debated for many years, but its routine use has been hitherto discouraged in the literature. Comparisons between restrictive and routine use of episiotomy in existent literature, however, fail to include any consideration relating to quality of life. The aim of this study, therefore, is to state the role of episiotomy in preserving the perineum from damage, in order to prevent the influence of pelvic floor disorders on women's psycho-physical wellness after the sixth month postpartum. Methods A follow-up telephone interview was performed among 377 primiparous and secondiparous Caucasian women who had a child by spontaneous or operative vaginal delivery in 2006 using a self-created questionnaire and King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ. Results The mean age at delivery was 35.26 (±4.68 years and episiotomy was performed in 59.2% of women. Multivariate linear regression shows episiotomy associated to higher quality of life after the sixth month postpartum by correlating with inferior values of King's Health Questionnaire (p Conclusions Episiotomy appears to be a protective factor for women's wellness. Women who had episiotomy and who experienced perineal symptoms have a better psycho-physical health status in the 12.79 months (±3.3 follow-up.

  8. There is not yet strong evidence that exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training can reduce stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bø, Kari; Herbert, Robert D

    2013-09-01

    What evidence is there for alternative exercises to specific pelvic floor muscle training for treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women? A systematic review was conducted with searches of PubMed and PEDro to January 2013. The quality of randomised trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Each type of exercise was classified as being in a Development Phase, Testing Phase, or Refinement and Dissemination Phase. Women with stress or mixed urinary incontinence with predominantly stress urinary incontinence. Exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training. The primary outcome was urinary leakage. Seven randomised controlled trials were found: three on abdominal training, two on the Paula method, and two on Pilates exercise. The methodological quality score ranged between 4 and 8 with a mean of 5.7. There was no convincing evidence for the effect of these exercise regimens so they remain in the Testing Phase. Because no randomised trials were found for posture correction, breathing exercise, yoga, Tai Chi, and general fitness training, these were classified as being in the Development Phase. There is not yet strong evidence that alternative exercise regimens can reduce urinary leakage in women with stress urinary incontinence. Alternative exercise regimens should not yet be recommended for use in clinical practice for women with stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2013 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  9. Searching for pelvic floor muscle exercises on YouTube: what individuals may find and where this might fit with health service programmes to promote continence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Kate; Cumming, Grant P

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the investigation, categorization/characterization and viewing of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) on YouTube from the perspective of the 'wisdom of the crowd'. The aim of the research was to increase awareness of the type of clips that individuals are likely to come across when searching YouTube and to describe trends and popularity. This awareness will be useful for the design of continence promotion services, especially for hard-to-reach individuals. Web-based videos relating to PFE were identified by searching YouTube using the snowball technique. Main outcome measures Number of views; the approach taken (health, fitness, sexual and pregnancy); product promotion; and the use of music, visual cues and elements designed to encourage exercise. The number of views of each video was recorded at three points over a seven-month period. Twenty-two videos were identified. Overall these videos had been viewed over 430,000 times during the study period. One video was viewed over 100,000 times and overall the median increase in views was 59.4%. YouTube is increasingly used to access information about pelvic floor exercises. Different approaches are used to communicate PFME information but there are no formal structures for quality control. Further research is required to identify which elements of the video clips are effective in communicating information and in motivating exercise and to establish appropriate protocols. Kitemarking is recommended in order that women obtain correct advice.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging identification of muscular and ligamentous structures of the female pelvic floor; Identificacao das estruturas musculo-ligamentares do assoalho pelvico feminino na ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Maria Rita Lima; Soares, Adriano Fleury F.; Faintuch, Salomao; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Ajzen, Sergio A.; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: mrcfc@ig.com.br; Girao, Manoel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ginecologia

    2001-12-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency and to assess the interobserver agreement of identification of muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures using magnetic resonance imaging. The method: twenty asymptomatic female volunteers (aged 20-80 years old; mean: 50) were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) examinations of the pelvis. Turbo spin-echo sequences were employed to obtain T1 and T2 weighted images on axial and sagittal planes. Two independent observers evaluated the scans in order to identify the levator ani (coccygeal, pubococcygeal, iliococcygeal and puborectalis muscles), obturatorius internus and urethral sphincter muscles, and the pubovesical and pubourethral ligaments. The frequency and the interobserver agreement of the identification of the anatomical structures were assessed (kappa statistic - {kappa}). The results: the frequency of identification of the structures ranged from 50 to 100%, and was slightly lower for identification of the ligaments. Interobserver agreement was as follows: levator ani and obturatorius internus muscle ({kappa}=1), pubococcygeal ({kappa}=0.62), iliococcygeal ({kappa}=0.86), puborectalis ({kappa}= 0.27), coccygeal ({kappa}=0) and urethral sphincter muscles ({kappa}=1), pubovesical ({kappa}=0.50) and pubourethral ({kappa}=0.58) ligaments. The conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis allowed precise identification of the main muscular and ligamentous pelvic floor structures in most individuals, whereas interobserver agreement was considered good. (author)

  11. Computer interviewing in urogynaecology: concept, development and psychometric testing of an electronic pelvic floor assessment questionnaire in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, S C; Jones, G L; Tanguy, E A; Stevens, V G; Nelson, C; Mathers, N J

    2006-02-01

    To develop and evaluate a Web-based, electronic pelvic floor symptoms assessment questionnaire (e-PAQ)1 for women. A cross-sectional study in primary and secondary care. Two general practices, two community health clinics and a secondary care urogynaecology clinic. A total of 432 women (204 in primary care and 228 in secondary care) were recruited between June 2003 and January 2004. The e-PAQ was located on a workstation (computer, touchscreen and printer). Women completed the e-PAQ prior to their appointment. Untreated women in primary care were asked to return seven days later to complete the e-PAQ a second time (test-retest). Factor analysis, reliability, validity, patient satisfaction, completion times and system costs. In secondary care, factor analysis identified 14 domains within the four dimensions (urinary, bowel, vaginal and sexual symptoms) with internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha)>or=0.7 in 11 of these. In primary care, alpha values were all>or=0.7 and test-retest analysis found acceptable intraclass correlations of 0.50-0.95 (PPAQ offers a user-friendly clinical tool, which provides valid and reliable data. The system offers comprehensive symptoms and quality of life evaluation and may enhance the clinical episode as well as the quality of care for women with pelvic floor disorders.

  12. The effects of training by virtual reality or gym ball on pelvic floor muscle strength in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Martinho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of abdominopelvic training by virtual reality compared to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT using a gym ball (a previously tested and efficient protocol on postmenopausal women’s pelvic floor muscle (PFM strength. Method A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 postmenopausal women, randomly allocated into two groups: Abdominopelvic training by virtual reality – APT_VR (n=30 and PFMT using a gym ball – PFMT_GB (n=30. Both types of training were supervised by the same physical therapist, during 10 sessions each, for 30 minutes. The participants’ PFM strength was evaluated by digital palpation and vaginal dynamometry, considering three different parameters: maximum strength, average strength andendurance. An intention-to-treat approach was used to analyze the participants according to original groups. Results No significant between-group differences were observed in most analyzed parameters. The outcome endurance was higher in the APT_VR group (p=0.003; effect size=0.89; mean difference=1.37; 95% CI=0.46 to 2.28. Conclusion Both protocols have improved the overall PFM strength, suggesting that both are equally beneficial and can be used in clinical practice. Muscle endurance was higher in patients who trained using virtual reality.

  13. [Comparison of the efficacy and safety between TVT-O and TVT-O with biofeedback pelvic floor electrical stimulation on female stress urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ling; Zhao, Xia

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety between tension-free vaginal tape obturator technique (TVT-O) and TVT-O with biofeedback pelvic floor electrical stimulation on the therapy of female stress urinary incontinence. In this prospective study, 120 female patients of female stress urinary incontinence were enrolled from January 2012 to December 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups, 60 in group A received TVT-O alone, while 60 in group B not only received TVT-O but also received biofeedback pelvic floor electrical stimulation. All the patients were followed up for 12 months to assess the efficacy and safety of the two procedures. Subjective indices [total volume of urine (TV), the total frequency of urination (TOV), the total leakage of urine events (TL), urinary incontinence related quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL), International Advisory Committee on urinary incontinence urinary incontinence questionnaire short form scale (ICI-Q-SF)] and objective indices [Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP), maximum flow rate (MFR), residual urine volume (RUV),pad test] were analyzed. Overall, the cure rate was 75% at 1 year follow-up for group A and 88.33% for group B (PTVT-O on the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence.

  14. Vaginismus, a component of a general defensive reaction. an investigation of pelvic floor muscle activity during exposure to emotion-inducing film excerpts in women with and without vaginismus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, J.; Laan, E.; Everaerd, W.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanism underlying vaginismus, which may be part of a general defense mechanism. Exposure to a threatening situation will evoke an increase in muscle activity. This muscle reaction will not be restricted to the pelvic floor but will also occur in postural muscles, such

  15. Protocol for Physiotherapy Or TVT Randomised Efficacy Trial (PORTRET) : a multicentre randomised controlled trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of the tension free vaginal tape versus pelvic floor muscle training in women with symptomatic moderate to se

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrie, J.; van der Graaf, Y.; Buskens, E.; Tiersma, S.E.; van der Vaart, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress urinary incontinence is a common condition affecting approximately 20% of adult women causing substantial individual (quality of life) and economic (119 million Euro/year spent on incontinence pads in the Netherlands) burden. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is regarded as

  16. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Vecchioli Scaldazza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. Materials and Methods 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. Results A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups. Quality of life improved in both groups, whereas patient perception of urgency improved only in women treated with PTNS. Global impression of improvement revealed a greater satisfaction in patients treated with PTNS. Conclusion This study demonstrates the effectiveness of PTNS and ES with PFMT in women with OAB, but greater improvements were found with PTNS.

  17. Operative vaginal delivery in case of persistent occiput posterior position after manual rotation failure: a 6-month follow-up on pelvic floor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerby, Paul; Parant, Olivier; Chantalat, Elodie; Vayssiere, Christophe; Vidal, Fabien

    2018-05-21

    To compare the short- and long-term perineal consequences (at 6 months postpartum) and short-term neonatal consequences of instrumental rotation (IR) to those induced by assisted delivery (AD) in the occiput posterior (OP) position, in case of manual rotation failure. A prospective observational cohort study; tertiary referral hospital including all women presenting with persistent OP position who delivered vaginally after manual rotation failure with attempted IR or AD in OP position from September 2015 to October 2016. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of all attempted IR deliveries were compared with OP operative vaginal deliveries. Main outcomes measured were pelvic floor function at 6 months postpartum including Wexner score for anal incontinence and ICIQ-FLUTS for urinary symptoms. Perineal morbidity comprised severe perineal tears, corresponding to third and fourth degree lacerations. Fetal morbidity parameters comprised low neonatal Apgar scores, acidaemia, major and minor fetal injuries and neonatal intensive care unit admissions. Among 5265 women, 495 presented with persistent OP positions (9.4%) and 111 delivered after manual rotation failure followed by AD delivery: 58 in the IR group and 53 in the AD in OP group. The incidence of anal sphincter injuries was significantly reduced after IR attempt (1.7% vs. 24.5%; p < 0.001) without increasing neonatal morbidity. At 6 months postpartum, AD in OP position was associated with higher rate of anal incontinence (30% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.001) and with more urinary symptoms, dyspareunia and perineal pain. OP operative deliveries are associated with significant perineal morbidity and pelvic floor dysfunction at 6 months postpartum.

  18. Prevalence and degree of bother of pelvic floor disorder symptoms among women from primary care and specialty clinics in Lebanon: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Lilian; Minassian, Vatche; Al-Badr, Ahmed; Abou Ghaida, Rami; Geagea, Sandra; Bazi, Tony

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of pelvic floor disorders (PFD) and their impact on quality of life of women vary among different populations. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of symptoms of PFD, and their degree of bother in a convenience sample of Lebanese women, and to evaluate health-care seeking (HCS) behavior related to PFD. Women visiting clinics in a University Medical Center in Beirut, Lebanon, completed the self-filled validated Arabic version of the Global Pelvic Floor Bother Questionnaire (PFBQ). Data covering demographics, comorbidities, and HCS behavior related to PFD were collected. Total individual PFBQ scores, individual PFD symptom scores and HCS behavior were correlated to demographic data and comorbidities. The study participants included 900 women. PFBQ scores were significantly higher in women of older age, women with a lower level of education, women with higher vaginal parity, and women who engaged in heavy lifting/physical activity. BMI >25 kg/m 2 was the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of PFD symptoms. The overall prevalence of urinary incontinence was 42 %. Anal incontinence was the most bothersome PFD. Almost two thirds of the women reported HCS due to any aspect of PFD. Among symptomatic women who believed that their PFD warranted HCS, financial concern was the most common obstacle irrespective of age and educational level. In this convenience sample of Lebanese women, PFD symptoms were common and were significantly correlated with demographic characteristics and self-reported comorbidities. The key reason for not seeking health care related to PFD was financial concern.

  19. Randomized multicenter clinical trial of myofascial physical therapy in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and pelvic floor tenderness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, M P; Payne, C K; Lukacz, E S; Yang, C C; Peters, K M; Chai, T C; Nickel, J C; Hanno, P M; Kreder, K J; Burks, D A; Mayer, R; Kotarinos, R; Fortman, C; Allen, T M; Fraser, L; Mason-Cover, M; Furey, C; Odabachian, L; Sanfield, A; Chu, J; Huestis, K; Tata, G E; Dugan, N; Sheth, H; Bewyer, K; Anaeme, A; Newton, K; Featherstone, W; Halle-Podell, R; Cen, L; Landis, J R; Propert, K J; Foster, H E; Kusek, J W; Nyberg, L M

    2012-06-01

    We determined the efficacy and safety of pelvic floor myofascial physical therapy compared to global therapeutic massage in women with newly symptomatic interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. A randomized controlled trial of 10 scheduled treatments of myofascial physical therapy vs global therapeutic massage was performed at 11 clinical centers in North America. We recruited women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome with demonstrable pelvic floor tenderness on physical examination and a limitation of no more than 3 years' symptom duration. The primary outcome was the proportion of responders defined as moderately improved or markedly improved in overall symptoms compared to baseline on a 7-point global response assessment scale. Secondary outcomes included ratings for pain, urgency and frequency, the O'Leary-Sant IC Symptom and Problem Index, and reports of adverse events. We compared response rates between treatment arms using the exact conditional version of the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for clustering by clinical center. For secondary efficacy outcomes cross-sectional descriptive statistics and changes from baseline were calculated. A total of 81 women randomized to the 2 treatment groups had similar symptoms at baseline. The global response assessment response rate was 26% in the global therapeutic massage group and 59% in the myofascial physical therapy group (p=0.0012). Pain, urgency and frequency ratings, and O'Leary-Sant IC Symptom and Problem Index decreased in both groups during followup, and were not significantly different between the groups. Pain was the most common adverse event, occurring at similar rates in both groups. No serious adverse events were reported. A significantly higher proportion of women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome responded to treatment with myofascial physical therapy than to global therapeutic massage. Myofascial physical therapy may be a beneficial therapy in women with this

  20. Pelvic floor muscle training in women with stress urinary incontinence causes hypertrophy of the urethral sphincters and reduces bladder neck mobility during coughing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MicroRNA-29 facilitates transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to alleviate pelvic floor dysfunction by repressing elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Minfei; Wu, Yuelin; Wang, Jun; Ye, Weiping; Wang, Lei; Yin, Peipei; Liu, Wei; Pan, Chenhao; Hua, Xiaolin

    2016-11-17

    Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is a condition affecting many women worldwide, with symptoms including stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). We have previously demonstrated stable elastin-expressing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) attenuated PFD in rats, and aim to further study the effect of microRNA-29a-3p regulation on elastin expression and efficacy of BMSC transplantation therapy. We inhibited endogenous microRNA-29a-3p in BMSCs and investigated its effect on elastin expression by RT-PCR and Western blot. MicroRNA-29-inhibited BMSCs were then transplanted into PFD rats, accompanied by sustained release of bFGF using formulated bFGF in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP), followed by evaluation of urodynamic tests. MicroRNA-29a-3p inhibition resulted in upregulated expression and secretion of elastin in in vitro culture of BMSCs. After co-injection with PLGA-loaded bFGF NP into the PFD rats in vivo, microRNA-29a-3p-inhibited BMSCs significantly improved the urodynamic test results. Our multidisciplinary study, combining microRNA biology, genetically engineered BMSCs, and nanoparticle technology, provides an excellent stem cell-based therapy for repairing connective tissues and treating PFD.

  2. The usability of a WeChat-based electronic questionnaire for collecting participant-reported data in female pelvic floor disorders: a comparison with the traditional paper-administered format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Jing; Zhu, Lan; Liang, Maolian; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jing-He

    2016-08-01

    WeChat is a promising tool for capturing electronic data; however, no research has examined its use. This study evaluates the reliability and feasibility of WeChat for administering the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire Short Form 7 questionnaire to women with pelvic floor disorders. Sixty-eight pelvic floor rehabilitation women were recruited between June and December 2015 and crossover randomized to two groups. All participants completed two questionnaire formats. One group completed the paper version followed by the WeChat version; the other group completed the questionnaires in reverse order. Two weeks later, each group completed the two versions in reverse order. The WeChat version's reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients and test-retest reliability. Forty-two women (61.8%) preferred the WeChat to the paper format, eight (11.8%) preferred the paper format, and 18 (26.5%) had no preference. The younger women preferred WeChat. Completion time was 116.5 (61.3) seconds for the WeChat version and 133.4 (107.0) seconds for the paper version, with no significant difference (P = 0.145). Age and education did not impact completion time (P > 0.05). Consistency between the WeChat and paper versions was excellent. The intraclass correlation coefficients of the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire Short Form 7 and the three subscales ranged from 0.915 to 0.980. The Bland-Altman analysis and linear regression results also showed high consistency. The test-retest study had a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.908, demonstrating a strong correlation. WeChat-based questionnaires were well accepted by women with pelvic floor disorders and had good data quality and reliability.

  3. Evaluation of Bioelectrical Activity of Pelvic Floor Muscles and Synergistic Muscles Depending on Orientation of Pelvis in Menopausal Women with Symptoms of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Preliminary Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Halski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Evaluation of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM and the synergistic muscles, depending on the orientation of the pelvis, in anterior (P1 and posterior (P2 pelvic tilt. Design. Preliminary, prospective observational study. Setting. Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Participants. Thirty-two menopausal and postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence were recruited. Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, sixteen women aged 55 to 70 years were enrolled in the study. Primary Outcome Measures. Evaluation of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles by electromyography (sEMG and vaginal probe. Secondary Outcome Measures. Evaluation of activity of the synergistic muscles by sEMG and surface electrodes. Results. No significant differences between orientations P1 and P2 were found in functional and resting sEMG activity of the PFM. During resting and functional PFM activity, higher electrical activity in P2 than in P1 has been recorded in some of the synergistic muscles. Conclusions. This preliminary study does not provide initial evidence that pelvic tilt influences PFM activation. Although different activity of synergistic muscles occurs in various orientations of the pelvic tilt, it does not have to affect the sEMG activity of the PFM.

  4. MRI role in morphological and functional assessment of the levator ani muscle: Use in patients affected by stress urinary incontinence (SUI) before and after pelvic floor rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Vecchia, Nicoletta Della; Giurazza, Francesco; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Pelvic floor dysfunctions affect a very high proportion of female population. Magnetic resonance imaging is the only technique able to provide a multiplanar overview of pelvic organs and muscles without the use of ionizing radiation. The aim of our prospective study is to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of perineal re-education applying MR technique. Materials and methods: 22 patients affected by stress urinary incontinence were enrolled in our prospective study. They underwent urogynaecological, urodynamic examinations, and a questionnaire about symptoms (ICIQ-UI) to investigate the degree of their interference with daily activities. Then they underwent a morphological and dynamic MR exam. Results: The pre-perineal rehabilitation MR examinations showed an asymmetry of the levator ani muscle in 87% of patients; the remaining 13% showed a muscular bilateral volume reduction. In the group with unilateral defect, the muscle total volume had values between 15 and 21 cm 3 . Its overall volume was 34.2% smaller on the defective side (9.28 ± 0.26 cm 3 ) compared to the normal side (12.64 ± 12.31 cm 3 , P < 0.001). In patients with a bilateral impairment, the muscle was replaced by fibro-fatty tissue, without a significant asymmetry between the two sides. The post-perineal rehabilitation MR tests showed three different degrees of response to therapy, with a “complete response” found in 67% of patients and no response in 13%. Conclusions: MR is an useful tool in the management of patients affected by stress urinary incontinence with indication for perineal rehabilitation. Its objective data allow to distinguish different types of response to therapy and, consequently, different outcomes in terms of additional treatments

  5. MRI role in morphological and functional assessment of the levator ani muscle: Use in patients affected by stress urinary incontinence (SUI) before and after pelvic floor rehabilitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Vescovo, Riccardo, E-mail: r.delvescovo@unicampus.it; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia, E-mail: c.piccolo@unicampus.it; Vecchia, Nicoletta Della, E-mail: nico.dvecchia@libero.it; Giurazza, Francesco, E-mail: f.giurazza@unicampus.it; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: r.cazzato@unicampus.it; Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte, E-mail: b.zobel@unicampus.it

    2014-03-15

    Objective: Pelvic floor dysfunctions affect a very high proportion of female population. Magnetic resonance imaging is the only technique able to provide a multiplanar overview of pelvic organs and muscles without the use of ionizing radiation. The aim of our prospective study is to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of perineal re-education applying MR technique. Materials and methods: 22 patients affected by stress urinary incontinence were enrolled in our prospective study. They underwent urogynaecological, urodynamic examinations, and a questionnaire about symptoms (ICIQ-UI) to investigate the degree of their interference with daily activities. Then they underwent a morphological and dynamic MR exam. Results: The pre-perineal rehabilitation MR examinations showed an asymmetry of the levator ani muscle in 87% of patients; the remaining 13% showed a muscular bilateral volume reduction. In the group with unilateral defect, the muscle total volume had values between 15 and 21 cm{sup 3}. Its overall volume was 34.2% smaller on the defective side (9.28 ± 0.26 cm{sup 3}) compared to the normal side (12.64 ± 12.31 cm{sup 3}, P < 0.001). In patients with a bilateral impairment, the muscle was replaced by fibro-fatty tissue, without a significant asymmetry between the two sides. The post-perineal rehabilitation MR tests showed three different degrees of response to therapy, with a “complete response” found in 67% of patients and no response in 13%. Conclusions: MR is an useful tool in the management of patients affected by stress urinary incontinence with indication for perineal rehabilitation. Its objective data allow to distinguish different types of response to therapy and, consequently, different outcomes in terms of additional treatments.

  6. Smartphone-based reminder system to promote pelvic floor muscle training for the management of postnatal urinary incontinence: historical control study with propensity score-matched analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Kinouchi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a smartphone-based reminder system in promoting pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT to help postpartum women manage urinary incontinence (UI. Methods Forty-nine and 212 postpartum women in the intervention and control groups, respectively, received PFMT guidance using a leaflet and verbal instruction as the standard care at an obstetrics clinic in Japan. Women in the intervention group also received PFMT support using the smartphone-based reminder system between January and August 2014. For analysis, they were compared with historical controls between February 2011 and January 2012, who did not receive such support and were chosen by propensity score matching. The outcomes examined were PFMT adherence and UI prevalence. The former consisted of implementation rate (i.e., the percentage of women who reported performing PFMT during the intervention period, training intensity (i.e., the number of pelvic floor muscle contractions (PFMCs per day, and training frequency (i.e., the number of days PFMT was performed per week; the latter consisted of self-reported UI prevalence at baseline and at the end of the eight-week intervention period. Result Propensity score matching resulted in 58 postpartum women (n = 29 per group. The intervention group exhibited better PFMT adherence than the control group, in terms of PFMT implementation rate (69 vs. 31%, p = 0.008, median training intensity (15 vs. 1 PFMC reps/day, p = 0.006, and training frequency (7 vs. 3 days/week, p < 0.001. UI prevalence was not different between the groups at baseline, but was significantly reduced in the intervention group at eight weeks (0 vs. 24%, p = 0.004. Conclusion Our smartphone-based reminder system appears promising in enhancing PFMT adherence and managing postpartum UI in postpartum women. By enhancing PFMT adherence and improving women’s ability to manage the condition, the reminder system could

  7. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptaszkowski K

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kuba Ptaszkowski,1 Małgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz,2 Lucyna Słupska,2 Janusz Bartnicki,1,3 Robert Dymarek,4 Joanna Rosińczuk,4 Jerzy Heimrath,5 Janusz Dembowski,6 Romuald Zdrojowy6 1Department of Obstetrics, 2Department of Clinical Biomechanics and Physiotherapy in Motor System Disorders, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Health Center Bitterfeld/Wolfen gGmbH, Bitterfeld-Wolfen, Germany; 4Department of Nervous System Diseases, 5Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Health Science, 6Department and Clinic of Urology, Faculty of Postgraduate Medical Training, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Objective: Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM, gluteus maximus (GM, rectus abdominis (RA, and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI, and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman’s ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI.Materials and methods: This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16 and continent women (n=14. The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM was

  8. Results of preoperative electrical stimulation of pelvic floor muscles in the continence status following radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Elaine Laurienzo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate preoperative rectal electrical stimulation in the recovery of urinary continence in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods Patients were divided into 3 randomized groups: control, pelvic exercises, and electrical stimulation. A 1 hour pad-test, the ICIQ-SF, and the SF-36 were performed 1, 3, and 6 months after the surgical procedure. Results Of the 58 patients who were initially included in the study, 9 were excluded due to radiotherapy after surgical intervention, an indwelling urethral catheter for more than 30 days, high surgical risk, loss of follow-up, or incomplete participation in the study routines and spontaneous interruption. Forty-nine patients concluded the study (15 in the control group, 17 in the exercise group, and 17 in the electrical stimulation group. We did not observe any significant difference in the pad test (p > 0.05, the 8 domains of the SF-36, or ICIQ-SF score compared with control groups (control, exercise, and electrical stimulation. Conclusion Preoperative rectal electrical stimulation has no impact on continence status in patients who undergo radical retropubic prostatectomy. There is no difference in the three above mentioned groups with regard to urinary leakage and quality of life.

  9. Enabling or Cultivating? The Role of Prostate Cancer Patients' Received Partner Support and Self-Efficacy in the Maintenance of Pelvic Floor Exercise Following Tumor Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Diana Hilda; Knoll, Nina; Wiedemann, Amelie; Keller, Jan; Scholz, Urte; Schrader, Mark; Burkert, Silke

    2016-04-01

    To manage incontinence following tumor surgery, prostate cancer patients are advised to perform pelvic floor exercise (PFE). Patients' self-efficacy and support from partners were shown to facilitate PFE. Whereas support may enhance self-efficacy (enabling function), self-efficacy may also cultivate support (cultivation function). Cross-lagged inter-relationships among self-efficacy, support, and PFE were investigated. Post-surgery patient-reported received support, self-efficacy, PFE, and partner-reported provided support were assessed from 175 couples at four times. Autoregressive models tested interrelations among variables, using either patients' or partners' reports of support. Models using patients' data revealed positive associations between self-efficacy and changes in received support, which predicted increased PFE. Using partners' accounts of support provided, these associations were partially cross-validated. Furthermore, partner-provided support was related with increases in patients' self-efficacy. Patients' self-efficacy may cultivate partners' support provision for patients' PFE, whereas evidence of an enabling function of support as a predictor of self-efficacy was inconsistent.

  10. Comparison of the functionality of pelvic floor muscles in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferla, Lia; Paiva, Luciana Laureano; Darki, Caroline; Vieira, Adriane

    2016-01-01

    The Pilates method is a form of physical exercise that improves the control of the core muscles, improving the conditioning of all the muscle groups that comprise the core, including the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). Thus, this study had the goal of verifying the existence of differences in the functioning of the PFM in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women. This was an observational, cross-sectional pilot study. A sample size calculation was performed using preliminary data and it determined that the sample should have at least 24 individuals in each group. The participants were 60 women aged 20 to 40 years; 30 women practiced the Pilates method (PMG) and 30 were sedentary (SG). An anamnesis file was used to collect personal data and assess the knowledge and perception of the PFM. The Perina perineometer and vaginal palpation were used to determine the functionality of the PFM. There was no significant difference between the PMG and the SG in any of the variables analyzed. We concluded that the functionality of the PFM in younger women who practice the Pilates method is not different from that of sedentary women.

  11. [Pelvic floor muscles training, electrical stimulation, bladder training and lifestyle interventions to manage lower urinary tract dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, L; Tombal, B; Castille, Y; Opsomer, R-J; Detrembleur, C

    2014-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of conservative therapeutic approaches in a multiple sclerosis population. Review was performed in PubMed, PEDro, Scopus and Cochrane Library using combinations of the following keywords: multiple sclerosis; bladder dysfunction; overactive bladder; detrusor hyperreflexia; urge incontinence; urgency; stress incontinence; pelvic floor muscle; biofeedback; PTNS; tibial nerve; bladder training; physical therapy; physiotherapy; conservative treatment and behavioral therapy. Six randomized articles including 289 patients were selected. Four papers exhibited strong scores for the methodological quality assessment. The parameters always significantly improved concerned: number of incontinence episodes (decreased from 64% to 86% after treatment versus before treatment), quality of life (P≤0.001), severity of irritative symptoms (decreased by more than 50% after treatment versus before treatment), and nocturia (P=0.035 to Ptreatment of urinary disorders in multiple sclerosis populations with mild disability. However, the analyses are based on six studies within only four showed good methodological quality. No strong conclusions regarding treatment approaches can be drawn from this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effects of Combining Videogame Dancing and Pelvic Floor Training to Improve Dual-Task Gait and Cognition in Women with Mixed-Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Sarah A; Elliott, Valerie; de Bruin, Eling D; Bherer, Louis; Dumoulin, Chantal

    2014-06-01

    Many women over 65 years of age suffer from mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) and executive function (EF) deficits. Both incontinence and EF declines increase fall risk. The current study assessed EF and dual-task gait after a multicomponent intervention that combined pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training and videogame dancing (VGD). Baseline (Pre1), pretraining (Pre2), and post-training (Post) neuropsychological and dual-task gait assessments were completed by 23 women (mean age, 70.4 years) with MUI. During the dual-task, participants walked and performed an auditory n-back task. From Pre2 to Post, all women completed 12 weeks of combined PFM and VGD training. After training (Pre2 to Post), the number of errors in the Inhibition/Switch Stroop condition decreased significantly, the Trail Making Test difference score improved marginally, and the number of n-back errors during dual-task gait significantly decreased. A subgroup analysis based on continence improvements (pad test) revealed that only those subjects who improved in the pad test had significantly reduced numbers of n-back errors during dual-task gait. The results of this study suggest that a multicomponent intervention can improve EFs and the dual-task gait of older women with MUI. Future research is needed to determine if the training-induced improvements in these factors reduce fall risk.

  13. The IUGA/ICS classification of synthetic mesh complications in female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklos, John R; Chinthakanan, Orawee; Moore, Robert D; Mitchell, Gretchen K; Favors, Sheena; Karp, Deborah R; Northington, Gina M; Nogueiras, Gladys M; Davila, G Willy

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to report patterns of sling and transvaginal mesh-related complications using the IUGA/ICS classification of prosthesis-related complications. This was a retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent surgical removal of sling, transvaginal mesh, and sacrocolpopexy for mesh-related complications from 2011 to 2013 at three tertiary referral centers. The International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)/International Continence Society (ICS) classification system was utilized. We identified 445 patients with mesh complications, 506 pieces of synthetic mesh were removed, and 587 prostheses-related complications were classified. 3.7 % of patients had viscus organ penetration or vaginal exposure as their presenting chief complaint and 59.7 % were classified as not having any vaginal epithelial separation or category 1. The most common category was spontaneous pain (1Be: 32.5 %) followed by dyspareunia (1Bc: 14.7 %). The sling group was 20 % more likely to have pain compared with the pelvic organ prolapse (POP) mesh group (OR 1.2, 95 % CI 0.8-1.6). The most commonly affected site (S2) was away from the suture line (49 %). Compared with the sling group, the POP group had a higher rate of mesh exposure, which mostly occurred at the suture line area. The majority of patients presented with mesh-related complications more than 1 year post-insertion (T4; average 3.68 ± 2.47 years). Surgeons should be aware that patients with vaginal mesh complications routinely exhibit complications more than 1 year after the implantation with pain as the most common presenting symptom.

  14. Value of MRI in the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence in the absence of organ descent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Taupitz, M.; Fischer, T.; Hamm, B.; Tunn, R.; Rieprich, M.

    2001-01-01

    To detect pathomorphological changes of the pelvic floor, the vagina, and the urethra by MR imaging in patients with stress urinary incontinence in the absence of organ descent compared with findings in 10 healthy controls. Materials and Methods: The study included 10 healthy controls and 38 patients with stage II urinary incontinence showing no urge symptoms but a pathological stress profile on urodynamic testing. The subjects underwent MR imaging with a phased-array coil at 1.5 T in addition to urodynamic testing and gynecological examination. The following sequences were used: axial and coronal PD-weighted TSE sequences with a FOV of 20 cm and a section thickness of 4 mm; axial STIR sequence. Sagittal T 2 -weighted HASTE sequences were acquired during pelvic floor contraction, relaxation, and straining maneuvers. Results: In 22/38 cases pathomorphological changes were found by MR imaging. The pathomorphological changes were classified as lateral defects (n = 14) if the musculofascial connection between the levator muscle and the lateral vaginal wall or the butterfly shape of the vagina was absent and as central (n = 16) if changes were detected in the urethral wall. Defects of the pelvic floor muscles were detected in 8 cases. No underlying changes were identified in 16/38 cases. Conclusion: In cases of female urinary incontinence, MR imaging of the pelvic floor can detect pathomorphological changes, which are difficult to identify by clinical examination. MR imaging currently does not allow the detection of morphological changes in all forms of female urinary stress incontinence. (orig.) [de

  15. Early development of the human pelvic diaphragm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Wijnandus Franciscus Robertus Maria

    2006-01-01

    The last decade an increasing interest in the pelvic floor can be observed in medical sciences. The lack of data on the development of the human pelvic floor is striking. The early development of the human pelvic diaphragm was studied. Materials and methodsUse was made of 38 human embryos and

  16. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training on labour and newborn outcomes: a randomized controlled trial Efeitos do treinamento da musculatura do assoalho pélvico sobre o parto e recém-nascido: estudo controlado randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia A. R. Dias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of the pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence treatment is well established but little is known about its effects in labor and newborn outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of antenatal pelvic floor muscle training and strength in labor and newborn outcomes in low-income pregnant women. METHODS: This is a randomized controlled trial that recruited forty-two nulliparous healthy pregnant women aged between 18-36 years old and able to contract the pelvic floor muscles. The participants were included in the study with 20 weeks of gestational age and had their pelvic floor muscles measured by vaginal squeeze pressure. They were randomly allocated into two groups: training group and a non-intervention control group. Then, all participants had their labor and newborn outcomes evaluated through consultation of medical records by a blinded researcher. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding gestational age at birth, type of labor, duration of the second stage of labor, total time of labor, prevalence of laceration, weight and size of the baby, and Apgar score. No correlation was observed between pelvic floor muscle strength and the second stage or the total length of labor. CONCLUSIONS: This randomized controlled trial did not find any effect of pelvic floor muscle training or pelvic floor muscle strength on labor and newborn outcomes.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O treinamento da musculatura do assoalho pélvico para tratamento da incontinência urinária é bem estabelecida, mas pouco se sabe sobre seus efeitos sobre o parto e o recém-nascido. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar se os desfechos do parto e os resultados dos recém-nascidos são influenciados pelo treinamento e força da musculatura do assoalho pélvico realizados por gestantes de baixa renda. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um ensaio clínico randomizado que incluiu 42 gestantes nulíparas de baixo risco, com idade entre 18 e 36

  17. Is pilates as effective as conventional pelvic floor muscle exercises in the conservative treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedriali, Fabiana Rotondo; Gomes, Cíntia Spagnolo; Soares, Larissa; Urbano, Mariana Ragassi; Moreira, Eliane Cristina Hilberath; Averbeck, Márcio Augusto; de Almeida, Silvio Henrique Maiade

    2016-06-01

    To verify the efficacy of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) protocol in the conservative treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI). Baseline assessment was performed four weeks postoperatively and included 24 hr pad test, bladder diary, and the ICIQ-SF. Patients were randomised into three groups: Pilates (G1), PFME combined with anal electrical stimulation (G2), and a control group (G3). Both treatment groups had to perform 10 weekly treatment sessions. Primary outcomes were mean reduction of daily pads and mean reduction of ICIQ-SF score four months after surgery. The significance level was set at P  0.05). The control group differed from G1 in daily pad usage (P = 0.01) and ICIQ-SF score (P = 0.0073). Intergroup comparisons revealed that 57.7% of the volunteers in G1 and 50% of the individuals from G2 no longer used pads by the end of the treatment period (P = 0.57). In the control group, 22.6% were not using pads four months after surgery, with statistical difference compared to G1 (P Pilates exercise program proved to be as effective as conventional PFME to speed up continence recovery in PPUI. It also achieved a higher rate of fully continent patients when compared to the control group in the short-term. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:615-621, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women: a short version Cochrane systematic review with meta-analysis.

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    Dumoulin, Chantale; Hay-Smith, Jean; Habée-Séguin, Gabrielle Mac; Mercier, Joanie

    2015-04-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a commonly used physical therapy for women with urinary incontinence (UI). To determine the effects of PFMT for women with UI in comparison to no treatment, placebo or other inactive control treatments. Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialized Register, (searched 15 April 2013). Randomized or quasi-randomized trials in women with stress, urgency or mixed UI (based on symptoms, signs, or urodynamics). At least two independent review authors carried out trial screening, selection, risk of bias assessment and data abstraction. Trials were subgrouped by UI diagnosis. The quality of evidence was assessed by adopting the (GRADE) approach. Twenty-one trials (1281 women) were included; 18 trials (1051 women) contributed data to the meta-analysis. In women with stress UI, there was high quality evidence that PFMT is associated with cure (RR 8.38; 95% CI 3.68 to 19.07) and moderate quality evidence of cure or improvement (RR 17.33; 95% CI 4.31 to 69.64). In women with any type of UI, there was also moderate quality evidence that PFMT is associated with cure (RR 5.5; 95% CI 2.87-10.52), or cure and improvement (RR 2.39; 95% CI 1.64-3.47). The addition of seven new trials did not change the essential findings of the earlier version of this review. In this iteration, using the GRADE quality criteria strengthened the recommendations for PFMT and a wider range of secondary outcomes (also generally in favor of PFMT) were reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Active and Passive Components of Pelvic Floor Muscle Tone in Women with Provoked Vestibulodynia: A Perspective Based on a Review of the Literature.

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    Thibault-Gagnon, Stéphanie; Morin, Mélanie

    2015-11-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions, especially elevated tone or tension, are suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). However, the involvement of the PFMs remains misunderstood as the assessment of muscle tone is complex and requires a thorough understanding of muscle physiology in relation to the characteristics and limitations of current PFM assessment tools. The aim of this review was to describe the structures and mechanisms involved in muscle tone in normally innervated muscle, and to discuss and relate these concepts to the PFM findings in women with PVD. A narrative overview of the literature retrieved from searches of electronic databases and hand searches. Muscle tone in a normally innervated muscle comprises both active (contractile) and passive (viscoelastic) components. Current methods for evaluating PFM tone such as digital palpation, ultrasound imaging, pressure perineometry, dynamometry, and electromyography may evaluate different components. Research findings suggestive of PFM hypertonicity in women with PVD include elevated general PFM tone, changes in viscoelastic properties, and at least in some women, abnormal increases in electrogenic activity. There is a growing body of evidence to support the involvement of PFM hypertonicity in the pathophysiology of PVD. Limitations of the instruments as well as their properties should be considered when evaluating PFM tone in order to obtain better insight into which component of PFM tone is assessed. Future research is required for further investigating the underlying mechanisms of PFM hypertonicity, and studying the specific effects of physiotherapeutic interventions on PFM tone in women with PVD. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  20. Impact of Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy on Quality of Life and Function After Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Oakley, Susan H; Ghodsi, Vivian C; Crisp, Catrina C; Estanol, Maria Victoria; Westermann, Lauren B; Novicki, Kathleen M; Kleeman, Steven D; Pauls, Rachel N

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard of care for women sustaining an obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS). We sought to determine whether pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT) would improve the quality of life and function in women 12 weeks after OASIS. This institutional review board-approved randomized trial enrolled primiparous women 2 weeks after delivery complicated by OASIS. After informed consent, all subjects underwent vaginal electromyography and anorectal manometry and completed validated questionnaires; measures were repeated for all subjects at 12 weeks after delivery. The intervention arm completed 4 PFPT sessions. The primary outcome was a change in the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life. Three hundred four women were screened; 250 were excluded, and 54 were randomized. After four were lost to follow-up, analysis included 27 in the intervention arm and 23 in the control arm. Overall, mean age was 29.8 ± 4.7 years, and there were no demographic differences between groups.Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life domain scores showed improvement for both groups from baseline to 12 weeks for coping (P = 0.006) and depression (P = 0.009); however, there was no difference in domain scores between groups. For the secondary outcome of anorectal manometry, squeezing pressure improved for all subjects (P = 0.035) from baseline to 12 weeks. Vaginal EMG strength (microvolts) increased for all subjects in measures of rest average (P < 0.000), rapid peak (P = 0.006), and work average (P < 0.000), with no difference based on therapeutic arm. All women showed improvements in quality of life and function at 12 weeks after delivery, regardless of treatment allocation. Further study is needed to determine whether PFPT provides a significant benefit to women having OASIS.

  1. Biological findings from the PheWAS catalog: focus on connective tissue-related disorders (pelvic floor dysfunction, abdominal hernia, varicose veins and hemorrhoids).

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    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Khadzhieva, Maryam B; Kolobkov, Dmitry S

    2016-07-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction, specifically genital prolapse (GP) and stress urinary inconsistency (SUI) presumably co-occur with other connective tissue disorders such as hernia, hemorrhoids, and varicose veins. Observations on non-random coexistence of these disorders have never been summarized in a meta-analysis. The performed meta-analysis demonstrated that varicose veins and hernia are associated with GP. Disease connections on the molecular level may be partially based on shared genetic susceptibility. A unique opportunity to estimate shared genetic susceptibility to disorders is provided by a PheWAS (phenome-wide association study) designed to utilize GWAS data concurrently to many phenotypes. We searched the PheWAS Catalog, which includes the results of the PheWAS study with P value hemorrhoids. We found pronounced signals for the associations of the SLC2A9 gene with SUI (P = 6.0e-05) and the MYH9 gene with varicose veins of lower extremity (P = 0.0001) and hemorrhoids (P = 0.0007). The comparison of the PheWAS Catalog and the NHGRI Catalog data revealed enrichment of genes associated with bone mineral density in GP and with activated partial thromboplastin time in varicose veins of lower extremity. In cross-phenotype associations, genes responsible for peripheral nerve functions seem to predominate. This study not only established novel biologically plausible associations that may warrant further studies but also exemplified an effective use of the PheWAS Catalog data.

  2. Effect of combined actions of hip adduction/abduction on the force generation and maintenance of pelvic floor muscles in healthy women.

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    Amanda C Amorim

    Full Text Available Pelvic floor muscle (PFM force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation. Twenty healthy, nulliparous women were evaluated using two strain-gauge dynamometers (one cylinder-like inside the vaginal cavity, and the other measuring hip adduction/abduction forces around both thighs while performing three different tasks: (a isolated PFM contraction; (b PFM contraction combined with hip adduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force; and (c PFM contraction combined with hip abduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force. Data were sampled at 100Hz and subtracted from the offset if existent. We calculated a gradient between the isolated PFM contraction and each hip condition (Δ Adduction and Δ Abduction for all variables: Maximum force (N, instant of maximum-force occurrence (s, mean force in an 8-second window (N, and PFM force loss (N.s. We compared both conditions gradients in 30% and 50% by paired t-tests. All variables did not differ between hip conditions both in 30% and 50% of maximum hip force (p>.05. PFM contraction combined with isometric hip abduction did not increase vaginal force in healthy and nulliparous women compared to PFM contraction combined with isometric hip adduction. Therefore, so far, the use of hip adduction or abduction in PFM training and treatments are not justified for improving PFM strength and endurance.

  3. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of synergistic muscles during pelvic floor muscles activation in postmenopausal women with and without stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study.

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    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Słupska, Lucyna; Bartnicki, Janusz; Dymarek, Robert; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Heimrath, Jerzy; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Muscles such as adductor magnus (AM), gluteus maximus (GM), rectus abdominis (RA), and abdominal external and internal oblique muscles are considered to play an important role in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and the relationship between contraction of these muscles and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been established in previous studies. Synergistic muscle activation intensifies a woman's ability to contract the PFM. In some cases, even for continent women, it is not possible to fully contract their PFM without involving the synergistic muscles. The primary aim of this study was to assess the surface electromyographic activity of synergistic muscles to PFM (SPFM) during resting and functional PFM activation in postmenopausal women with and without SUI. This study was a preliminary, prospective, cross-sectional observational study and included volunteers and patients who visited the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Forty-two patients participated in the study and were screened for eligibility criteria. Thirty participants satisfied the criteria and were categorized into two groups: women with SUI (n=16) and continent women (n=14). The bioelectrical activity of PFM and SPFM (AM, RA, GM) was recorded with a surface electromyographic instrument in a standing position during resting and functional PFM activity. Bioelectrical activity of RA was significantly higher in the incontinent group than in the continent group. These results concern the RA activity during resting and functional PFM activity. The results for other muscles showed no significant difference in bioelectrical activity between groups. In women with SUI, during the isolated activation of PFM, an increased synergistic activity of RA muscle was observed; however, this activity was not observed in asymptomatic women. This may indicate the important accessory contribution of these muscles in the mechanism of continence.

  4. Is Pelvic-Floor Muscle Training a Physical Therapy or a Behavioral Therapy? A Call to Name and Report the Physical, Cognitive, and Behavioral Elements.

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    Frawley, Helena C; Dean, Sarah G; Slade, Susan C; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-04-01

    This perspective article explores whether pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) for the management of female urinary incontinence and prolapse is a physical therapy or a behavioral therapy. The primary aim is to demonstrate that it is both. A secondary aim is to show that the plethora of terms used for PFMT is potentially confusing and that current terminology inadequately represents the full intent, content, and delivery of this complex intervention. While physical therapists may be familiar with exercise terms, the details are often incompletely reported; furthermore, physical therapists are less familiar with the terminology used in accurately representing cognitive and behavioral therapy interventions, which results in these elements being even less well reported. Thus, an additional aim is to provide greater clarity in the terminology used in the reporting of PFMT interventions, specifically, descriptions of the exercise and behavioral elements. First, PFMT is described as a physical therapy and as an exercise therapy informed predominantly by the discipline of physical therapy. However, effective implementation requires use of the cognitive and behavioral perspectives of the discipline of psychology. Second, the theoretical underpinning of the psychology-informed elements of PFMT is summarized. Third, to address some identified limitations and confusion in current terminology and reporting, recommendations for ways in which physical therapists can incorporate the psychology-informed elements of PFMT alongside the more familiar exercise therapy-informed elements are made. Fourth, an example of how both elements can be described and reported in a PFMT intervention is provided. In summary, this perspective explores the underlying concepts of PFMT to demonstrate that it is both a physical intervention and a behavioral intervention and that it can and should be described as such, and an example of the integration of these elements into clinical practice is provided

  5. [Evaluation of the electromyography activity of pelvic floor muscle during postural exercises using the Wii Fit Plus©. Analysis and perspectives in rehabilitation].

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    Steenstrup, B; Giralte, F; Bakker, E; Grise, P

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of postural awareness by using the Wii Fit Plus© on the quality of the baseline (automatic) activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) measured by intravaginal surface electromyography (sEMG). Four healthy continent female subjects, all able to perform a voluntary contraction, undertook 2 sets of 3 various exercises offered by the software Wii Fit Plus© using the Wii balance board© (WBB): one set without any visual control and the second set with postural control and sEMG visual feedback. Simultaneously, we recorded the sEMG activity of the PFM. Mean baseline activity of PFM in standing position at start was 2.87 mV, at submaximal voluntary contraction the sEMG activity raised at a mean of 14.43 mV (7.87-21.89). In the first set of exercises on the WBB without any visual feedback, the automatic activity of the PFM increased from 2.87 mV to 8.75 mV (7.96-9.59). In the second set, with visual postural and sEMG control, mean baseline sEMG activity even raised at 11.39 mV (10.17-11.58). Among women able of a voluntary contraction of PFM, visualisation of posture with the help of the WBB and of sEMG activity of the PFM during static and dynamic Wii Fit Plus© activities, may improve the automatic activation of the PFMs. 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Randomised controlled trial comparing early home biofeedback physiotherapy with pelvic floor exercises for the treatment of third-degree tears (EBAPT Trial).

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    Peirce, C; Murphy, C; Fitzpatrick, M; Cassidy, M; Daly, L; O'Connell, P R; O'Herlihy, C

    2013-09-01

    To compare early home biofeedback physiotherapy with pelvic floor exercises (PFEs) for the initial management of women sustaining a primary third-degree tear. Single centre, randomised trial. National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. A total of 120 women sustaining a primary third-degree tear. Women were randomised in a one to three ratio: 30 to early postpartum home biofeedback physiotherapy and 90 to PFEs. Differences in anorectal manometry results, Cleveland Clinic continence scores and Rockwood faecal incontinence quality of life scale scores after 3 months of postpartum treatment. The mean anal resting pressure was 39 ± 13 mmHg in the early biofeedback physiotherapy group and 43 ± 17 mmHg in the PFE group. The mean anal squeeze pressure was 64 ± 17 mmHg in the biofeedback group and 62 ± 23 mmHg in the PFE group. There was no significant difference in anal resting and squeeze pressure values between the groups (P = 0.123 and P = 0.68, respectively). There were no differences in symptom score and quality of life measurements between the groups. This study demonstrates no added value in using early home biofeedback physiotherapy in the management of women sustaining third-degree tears. Poor compliance may have contributed because women found it difficult to designate time to using biofeedback. © 2013 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2013 RCOG.

  7. The Effect of Commonly Performed Exercises on the Levator Hiatus Area and the Length and Strength of Pelvic Floor Muscles in Postpartum Women.

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    Siff, Lauren N; Hill, Audra J; Walters, Samantha J; Walters, Ginny; Walters, Mark D

    2018-05-02

    The aim oft his study was to compare the effects of 10 common exercises to traditional pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions (Kegel) on levator hiatus (LH) area and PFM length and strength. This is a cross-sectional study of 15 healthy postpartum women. Ten exercises were studied. These were common variations of leg, core, and back exercises used in yoga, Pilates, strength training, and physical therapy. Each participant performed all 10 exercises at a single visit in 2 examination settings: transperineal ultrasound and perineometry. Ultrasound measured the LH area and PFM length, and perineometry measured the muscle strength (peak squeeze pressure). Kegel generates an increase in squeeze pressure (24.3 cm H2O), shortens the muscles (-0.46 cm) and narrows the LH (-0.13 cm). The bird-dog and plank exercises were not different from Kegel in any measurement. While the leg-lift ultrasound dimensions are similar to Kegel, leg lifts generated peak squeeze pressures stronger than any other exercise (including Kegel). Whereas ultrasound dimensions were similar to Kegel, tucked and untucked squats and thigh adductions generated weaker contractions than Kegel. While crunch generated a squeeze pressure similar to Kegel, the ultrasound dimensions showed a significantly wider LH and longer muscle than Kegel. Bridge, clam, and plié exercises affected the PFMs differently than Kegel in all measures. Bird-dog, plank, and leg-lift exercises should be evaluated as alternative exercises to Kegel as they affect PFM strength and length and LH area similarly to Kegel, and leg lifts generate a stronger contraction than Kegel.

  8. Treinamento dos músculos do assoalho pélvico nas disfunções sexuais femininas Pelvic floor muscle training in female sexual dysfunctions

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    Virginia Pianessole Piassarolli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o efeito do treinamento dos músculos do assoalho pélvico (TMAP sobre as disfunções sexuais femininas. MÉTODOS: para esse ensaio clínico com abordagem antes e depois, foram incluídas 26 mulheres que apresentavam diagnóstico de disfunção sexual (transtorno de desejo sexual, de excitação, orgástico e/ou dispareunia. As participantes foram avaliadas antes, na metade (após cinco sessões e ao final do tratamento (após dez sessões, por meio da palpação vaginal bidigital (avaliação da força dos músculos do assoalho pélvico-MAP, eletromiografia (EMG intravaginal (captação das amplitudes de contração dos MAP e Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, questionário de avaliação da função sexual. As mulheres foram submetidas ao TMAP em diferentes posições, por dez sessões (uma ou duas vezes na semana. Para análise estatística, utilizou-se frequências absolutas e relativas para características clínicas e força dos MAP. Empregou-se teste de Friedman para comparação dos escores dos domínios do FSFI e valores da EMG, t de Student para associação entre esses valores e características das mulheres e Wilcoxon para modificação percentual da EMG. O teste Mann-Whitney permitiu comparar esses valores com características clínicas. Para correlacionar os valores da EMG com escore total médio, utilizou-se teste de correlação de Spearman. Adotou-se nível de significância de pPURPOSE: to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT on female sexual dysfunctions. METHODS: twenty-six women with a diagnosis of sexual dysfunction (sexual desire, arousal, orgasmic disorders and/or dyspareunia were included in a clinical trial with a before/after approach . The assessment was carried out before, during (after five sessions and at the end of the treatment (after ten sessions by two-digit palpation (assessment of pelvic floor muscle, PFM, strength, intravaginal electromyography (EMG (capture of PFM

  9. Can primary care nurse administered pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT be implemented for the prevention and treatment of urinary incontinence? A study protocol [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/wo

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    Sue Child

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aim to evaluate if Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT delivered in primary care results in fewer referrals to secondary care for urinary incontinence (UI, thereby reducing the number and associated costs of surgical procedures for UI. Methods / design: The study will consist of two populations – a prevention group and a treatment group who will both be offered PFMT in primary care. The prevention group will consist of parous women aged 25-64 attending for a routine cervical smear. Their pelvic floor will be assessed using the Modified Oxford Scale (MOS and a baseline data form will be completed that asks about the frequency and associated bother of urine leakage. From the answers given, the group will be subdivided into two groups. The first (prevention group will be subdivided into a primary prevention arm (no symptoms of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor strength ≤2 on MOS and a secondary prevention arm (women reporting symptoms of urine leakage irrespective of MOS. The second (treatment group will be women of any age who may or may not have had a vaginal birth presenting to their GP with UI. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews will be conducted with a subset of patients and staff with the aim of identifying barriers and facilitators in delivering PFMT in primary care. Discussion: A recently completed community study showed good outcomes with practice nurse delivery of PFMT. We suggest if this were to be implemented more widely it would reduce the need for referral to secondary care. We believe that this study will show whether implementing a package of PFMT delivered in primary care can treat as well as prevent UI and will also be helpful in exploring the benefits / drawbacks of such implementation, thus providing lessons for implementation in other Primary Care Trusts (PCTs.

  10. Impact of pelvic floor muscle training on sexual function of women with urinary incontinence and a comparison of electrical stimulation versus standard treatment (IPSU trial): a randomised controlled trial.

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    Jha, Swati; Walters, Stephen J; Bortolami, Oscar; Dixon, Simon; Alshreef, Abualbishr

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of electric stimulation plus standard pelvic floor muscle training compared to standard pelvic floor muscle training alone in women with urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Single centre two arm parallel group randomised controlled trial conducted in a Teaching hospital in England. Participants were women presenting with urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. The interventions compared were electric stimulation versus standard pelvic floor muscle training. included Prolapse and Incontinence Sexual function Questionnaire (PISQ) physical function dimension at post-treatment (primary); other dimensions of PISQ, SF-36; EQ-5D, EPAQ, resource use, adverse events and cost-effectiveness (secondary outcomes). 114 women were randomised (Intervention n=57; Control group n=57). 64/114 (56%). had valid primary outcome data at follow-up (Intervention 30; Control 34). The mean PISQ-PF dimension scores at follow-up were 33.1 (SD 5.5) and 32.3 (SD 5.2) for the Intervention and Control groups respectively; with the Control group having a higher (better) score. After adjusting for baseline score, BMI, menopausal status, time from randomisation and baseline oxford scale score the mean difference was -1.0 (95% CI: -4.0 to 1.9; P=0.474). There was no differences between the groups in any of the secondary outcomes at follow-up. Within this study, the use of electrical stimulation was cost-effective with very small incremental costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). In women presenting with urinary incontinence in conjunction with sexual dysfunction, physiotherapy is beneficial to improve overall sexual function. However no specific form of physiotherapy is beneficial over another. Trial registration ISRCTN09586238. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Eletromiografia de superfície para avaliação dos músculos do assoalho pélvico feminino: revisão de literatura Evaluation of female pelvic floor muscles using surface electromyography: literature review

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    Ana Paula Magalhães Resende

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A eletromiografia de superfície tem grande importância clínica e de pesquisa para o fisioterapeuta. Apesar de captar a atividade elétrica promovida pelo recrutamento das unidades motoras, há boa correlação entre o número de unidades ativadas e a força muscular. É um dos métodos de maior especificidade na avaliação do assoalho pélvico, embora não haja consenso em relação à sua aplicação. Essa revisão de literatura foi desenvolvida com o objetivo de agrupar as informações sobre o uso da eletromiografia de superfície na avaliação do assoalho pélvico. Foram pesquisados artigos nas bases de dados Medline, PubMed, Lilacs, SciELO e Biblioteca Cochrane, e selecionados os que avaliassem o assoalho pélvico feminino por meio de eletromiografia de superfície. Apesar de sua metodologia ainda carecer de padronização, é um instrumento que deve ser considerado nas pesquisas científicas em nosso meio, pois parece apresentar boa reprodutibilidade e confiabilidade. Pacientes com disfunções do assoalho pélvico possuem alterações no tempo de ativação dos músculos do assoalho pélvico (MAP e músculos abdominais. Quanto à gestação e puerpério, ainda faltam evidências sobre possíveis alterações da ativação elétrica dos MAP nesses períodos.Surface electromyography has clinical and research importance for the physiotherapist. Although capturing electrical activity promoted by recruitment of motor units, there is a good correlation between the number of activated units and muscle strength. This is one of the methods of higher specificity in pelvic floor evaluation, although the lack of consensus regarding its application. The aim of this literature review was to cluster information regarding to the use of surface electromyography in the evaluation of pelvic floor. Papers were searched in Medline, Pubmed Lilacs, SciELO and Cochrane Library. Were selected papers which methods used surface electromyography to evaluate the

  12. Muscle strength of the pelvic floor among young and climateric continent women Força muscular do assoalho pélvico entre mulheres continentes jovens e climatéricas

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    Paula Bueno de Arruda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The menopause represents a stage in life when modifications in the urogynecological tract occur as a decrease in the muscle strength of the pelvic floor and urethral turgidity. It is suggested that healthy muscles are thick and this enables them to support the vagina walls as well as provide a sphincteral action, favoring the closing and urethral continence. It is possible that the blood supply associated to strong muscles will promote the health of the epithelium in the area, stimulating the adequate vaginal lubrication and the delay of atrophic changes due to the age. The purpose of this study was to verify the muscle strength of the pelvic floor among healthy young and climateric women, in order to identify the existing alterations in this musculature. The study consisted of 49 women divided in two groups: Group 1 consisting of women (N=24 with an average age of 29.33 years old and Group 2, consisting of women (N=25 with an average age of 51.8 years old, submitted to the evaluation of the muscle strength of the pelvic floor by means of bidigital palpation and perineometry. Significant differences were not identified concerning the pelvic floor muscle strength by means of the perineometry in the studied groups. As for the bidigital palpation evaluation, a larger capacity of voluntary contraction and sustained maintenance of this contraction in 25 to 35-years old women was observed. O climatério representa a fase em que ocorrem modificações no trato uroginecológico, como a diminuição da força muscular do assoalho pélvico e turgidez uretral. É sugerido que músculos sadios são volumosos e isso os capacita a suportar as paredes da vagina tão bem como prover uma ação esfincteriana, favorecendo o fechamento e a continência uretral. É plausível que o suprimento de sangue associado a músculos fortes promoverá a saúde do epitélio na área, estimulando a lubrificação vaginal adequada e o retardo das mudanças atróficas da idade

  13. Aspectos morfológicos da uretra de ratas após eletroestimulação do assoalho pélvico Morphological aspects of the urethra in female rats after electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor

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    Adriana Luciana Moreno Camargo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da eletroestimulação (ES do assoalho pélvico na uretra de ratas. MÉTODOS: Quarenta ratas adultas foram distribuídas, randomicamente, em quatro grupos com dez animais cada: Ctrl - sem intervenção; Sham - não foi submetido a ES, recebeu um eletrodo dentro da vagina; Exp6 - submetido a seis sessões de ES do assoalho pélvico; e Exp12 - submetido a 12 sessões de ES do assoalho pélvico. Ao final do experimento, todos os animais foram anestesiados, e o terço médio da uretra foi retirado, fixado em líquido de Bouin e processado para estudo histomorfométrico. Alguns cortes foram corados pela hematoxilina e eosina, para descrição morfológica e morfométrica, e outros, pelo picrosirius red, para avaliação do colágeno total. As espessuras da camada muscular e do epitélio foram obtidas, nos 4 quadrantes da uretra, pela realização de 20 medições em cada animal. O número de vasos sanguíneos presentes na lâmina própria foi obtido nos quatro quadrantes, em uma área de 10³ mm² por quadrante, sendo as imagens obtidas pelo programa de análise de imagens AxioVision® REL 4.3 (Carl Zeiss. A proporção de colágeno e de fibras musculares foi obtida de duas imagens por quadrante, de cada lâmina da uretra corada pelo picrosirius red, com auxílio do programa Imagelab®. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância (ANOVA e ao teste de comparações múltiplas de Tukey-Kramer (pExp6==Ctrl==Sham; *pPURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES of the pelvic floor on the urethra of female rats. METHODS: Forty adult rats were divided at random into four groups of ten animals each: Ctrl - without intervention; Sham - not submitted to ES, but with an electrode inserted into the vagina; Exp6 - submitted to six sessions of ES of the pelvic floor, and Exp12 - submitted to 12 sessions of ES of the pelvic floor. At the end of the experiment, all animals were anesthetized and the middle third

  14. Anatomical and functional characteristics of the pelvic floor in nulliparous women submitted to three-dimensional endovaginal ultrasonography: case control study and evaluation of interobserver agreement Características anatômicas e funcionais do assoalho pélvico em nulíparas avaliadas por ultrassonografia tridimensional endovaginal: estudo caso-controle e avaliação da confiabilidade interobservador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine anatomical and functional pelvic floor measurements performed with three-dimensional (3-D endovaginal ultrasonography in asymptomatic nulliparous women without dysfunctions detected in previous dynamic 3-D anorectal ultrasonography (echo defecography and to demonstrate the interobserver reliability of these measurements. METHODS: Asymptomatic nulliparous volunteers were submitted to echo defecography to identify dynamic dysfunctions, including anatomical (rectocele, intussusceptions, entero/sigmoidocele and perineal descent and functional changes (non-relaxation or paradoxical contraction of the puborectalis muscle in the posterior compartment and assessed with regard to the biometric index of levator hiatus, pubovisceral muscle thickness, urethral length, anorectal angle, anorectal junction position and bladder neck position with the 3-D endovaginal ultrasonography. All measurements were compared at rest and during the Valsalva maneuver, and perineal and bladder neck descent was determined. The level of interobserver agreement was evaluated for all measurements. RESULTS: A total of 34 volunteers were assessed by echo defecography and by 3-D endovaginal ultrasonography. Out of these, 20 subjects met the inclusion criteria. The 14 excluded subjects were found to have posterior dynamic dysfunctions. During the Valsalva maneuver, the hiatal area was significantly larger, the urethra was significantly shorter and the anorectal angle was greater. Measurements at rest and during the Valsalva maneuver differed significantly with regard to anorectal junction and bladder neck position. The mean values for normal perineal descent and bladder neck descent were 0.6 cm and 0.5 cm above the symphysis pubis, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.62-0.93. CONCLUSIONS: Functional biometric indexes, normal perineal descent and bladder neck descent values were determined for young asymptomatic nulliparous women

  15. Short-term complications associated with the use of transvaginal mesh in pelvic floor reconstructive surgery: Results from a multi-institutional prospectively maintained dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caveney, Maxx; Haddad, Devin; Matthews, Catherine; Badlani, Gopal; Mirzazadeh, Majid

    2017-11-01

    Vaginal reconstructive surgery can be performed with or without mesh. We sought to determine comparative rates of perioperative complications of native tissue versus vaginal mesh repairs for pelvic organ prolapse. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database, we concatenated surgical data from vaginal procedures for prolapse repair, including anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, paravaginal defect repair, enterocele repair, and vaginal colpopexy using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding. We stratified this data by the modifier associated with mesh usage at the time of the procedure. We then compared 30-day perioperative outcomes, postoperative complications (bleeding, infection, etc), and readmission rates between women with and without mesh-based repairs. We identified 10 657 vaginal reconstructive procedures without mesh and 959 mesh-based repairs from 2009 through 2013. Patients undergoing mesh repair were more likely to experience at least one complication than native tissue repair (9.28% vs 6.15%, P mesh group (11.37% vs 9.39%, P = 0.03). Procedures with mesh had a higher rate of perioperative bleeding requiring transfusion than native tissue repair (2.3% vs 0.49%, P surgical site infection (SSI) (0.52% vs 0.17%, P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in rates of readmission, superficial, or deep SSIs, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, or renal failure. The use of vaginal mesh for pelvic organ prolapse repair appears to result in a higher rate of perioperative complications than native tissue repair. Patients undergoing these procedures should be counselled preoperatively concerning these risks. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Estudo comparativo da função do assoalho pélvico em mulheres continentes e incontinentes na pós menopausa Comparative study of pelvic floor function in continent and incontinent postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia E. C. Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A incontinência urinária (IU é de causa multifatorial, sendo atribuída, em parte, à fraqueza da musculatura do assoalho pélvico. Apesar de ser subestimada por muitas mulheres, a avaliação funcional do assoalho pélvico (AFA pode contribuir para um correto diagnóstico e terapêutica adequada. OBJETIVOS: Comparar a função muscular do assoalho pélvico em mulheres continentes e incontinentes na pós menopausa como fator diagnóstico no tratamento da IU. MÉTODOS: A partir da investigação dos sintomas urinários, 153 mulheres (idade X=66,7±5,4 foram separadas em dois grupos (G1 incontinentes e G2 assintomáticas. Após análise dos critérios de inclusão, as mulheres foram submetidas à AFA por meio da palpação bidigital (classificação de Contreras Ortis, 1994 e à quantificação da pressão de contração perineal por meio do perineômetro (PERINA 996-2® QUARK. RESULTADOS: Observou-se prevalência de IU (54,9% na amostra estudada, sendo a incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE (41,7% o tipo mais presente. Em relação aos sintomas urinários, como a frequência miccional diurna (p=0,004 e noturna (p=0,02, o grupo G1 apresentou um valor significativamente mais alto. A AFA mostrou resultados similares durante a palpação e o perineômetro, com diferenças significativas (pBACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI is multifactorial and attributed, in part, to weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. Despite being underestimated by many women, a functional pelvic floor assessment (FPA may contribute to a correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVES: To compare the function of pelvic floor muscles in continent and incontinent postmenopausal women as a diagnostic factor in UI treatment. METHODS: Based on the investigation of urinary symptoms, 153 women (age X=66.7±5.4 were divided into two groups (G1-incontinent and G2-continent. After analysis of the inclusion criteria, the women were submitted to FPA by

  17. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  18. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-10-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 3 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first 2 conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacological, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should be avoided, and surgical treatment has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MR imaging in female pelvic organs prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiel, Carlos A. h; Bouzas, Carlos A.

    2003-01-01

    Pelvic floor weakness and consequent organ prolapse may result in a variety of symptoms, including pain, urinary or fecal incontinence and constipation. Diagnosis is made primary on the basis of findings at physical pelvic examination. Imaging is useful in patients in whom findings at physical examination are equivocal. Different imaging techniques (fluoroscopy, ultrasonography), can be useful in evaluating pelvic organs prolapse. MR imaging is a new noninvasive technique that provides a multiplanar global evaluation of the pelvic contents and demonstrates pelvic organs prolapse. Reference points are the pubococcygeal line and puborectalis muscle sling. This pictorial assay illustrates different grades of cystourethrocele, recto-sigmoidocele and hysteroptosis (uterine prolapse) on MR imaging. (author)

  20. Indications and Complications Associated with the Removal of 506 Pieces of Vaginal Mesh Used in Pelvic Floor Reconstruction: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklos, John R; Chinthakanan, Orawee; Moore, Robert D; Karp, Deborah R; Nogueiras, Gladys M; Davila, G Willy

    2016-10-26

    Synthetic mesh utilized to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) can often result in postoperative complications. The objectives of this study were to determine: 1) the most common indications for mesh removal; 2) the incidences of the removal of specific mesh procedures (such as suburethral sling [SUS], transvaginal mesh [TVM], or sacrocolpopexy); and 3) the idences and types of surgical complications associated with mesh removal. This was a retrospective study. Design Classification: Canadian Task Force II-3. Three tertiary referral centers in the United States. We examined data from all patients at the three centers who underwent surgical removal of synthetic materials from previous SUS, TVM, and sacrocolpopexy procedures for mesh-related complications from 2011 to 2013. Patients underwent vaginal, intra-abdominal, and inguinal mesh revisions by cutting, partial removal, or total removal of the mesh for mesh-related complications. Overall, 445 patients with complications underwent mesh removal laparoscopically, via groin dissection and/or transvaginally. There were a total of 506 mesh products removed. Of these, 56.5% were slings and 43.5% were for pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Synthetic mesh removed from patients included: transvaginal mesh (TVM) anterior for anterior vaginal prolapse, TVM posterior for posterior vaginal prolapse, sacrocolpopexy mesh, and suburethral slings (SUS) for stress urinary incontinence. Synthetic SUS removed included: retropubic (RPS), transobturator (TOT), and single-incision slings (SIS). TOT was the most common type of sling removed. Patients with a sling who only complained of vaginal pain with or without intercourse underwent a vaginal approach for surgical revision/removal of the sling (86.6%). Patients with an RPS with lower abdominal/suprapubic pain and vaginal pain underwent a vaginal and laparoscopic approach for sling removal (18.4%). Patients with a TOT sling who complained of vaginal and

  1. Força dos músculos do assoalho pélvico e função sexual em gestantes Strength of pelvic floor muscles and sexual function during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseli Franceschet

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O bem-estar sexual depende de músculos do assoalho pélvico (MAP fortes o suficiente para manter a sua função. Durante a gestação, tanto a função sexual como a força dos MAP podem modificar-se. OBJETIVOS: Comparar o grau de força dos MAP e a função sexual em gestantes do segundo e terceiro trimestres. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa descritiva causal comparativa realizada com 37 gestantes de Florianópolis (18 do segundo e 19 do terceiro trimestre, com média de idade de 25,22 anos (±5,7 anos. Os instrumentos utilizados foram o Questionário Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI e o Teste Manual da Musculatura do Assoalho Pélvico, utilizando a escala de Oxford modificada para graduação da força. Os dados foram analisados por meio de estatística descritiva e inferencial (teste t independente, teste U de Mann Whitney, correlação de Spearman, nível de significância de 0,05. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significativa entre a média dos valores dos postos do grau de contração dos MAP de gestantes do segundo e do terceiro trimestre (U=150,5; p=0,512. Todavia, a função sexual das gestantes do segundo trimestre de gestação foi melhor que as do terceiro (U=104; p=0,042, e o grau de contração dos MAP apresentou correlações estatisticamente significativas com a idade (ρ=0,320, p=0,041 e com o escore do FSFI (ρ=0,540, pBACKGROUND: Sexual well-being depends on pelvic floor muscles (PFMs that are strong enough to maintain their function. During pregnancy, both the sexual function and the strength of the PFMs may be altered. OBJECTIVES: to compare the degree of PFM strength and the sexual function of pregnant women in the second and the third trimesters. METHODS: a descriptive, causal-comparative study was carried out with 37 pregnant women in Florianópolis (18 in the second trimester and 19 in the third trimester with a mean age of 25.22 years (±5.7 years. The instruments used were the Female Sexual Function Index

  2. Biofeedback and the electromyographic activity of pelvic floor muscles in pregnant women Biofeedback na atividade eletromiográfica dos músculos do assoalho pélvico em gestantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta L. A. Batista

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maintaining continence is among the functions of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM and their dysfunction can cause urinary incontinence (UI, which is a common occurrence during pregnancy and the puerperal period. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT, therefore, is important during pregnancy, although most women perform the muscle contractions unsatisfactorily. OBJECTIVES: This study is an exploratory analysis of the results of three electromyographic (EMG activity biofeedback sessions in pregnant women. METHODS: The study sample included 19 nulliparous women with low risk pregnancies. The participants performed three sessions of EMG biofeedback consisting of slow and fast contractions. The average value of the normalized amplitudes of surface electromyography was used to evaluate the results. The linear regression model with mixed effects was used for statistical analysis, with the EMG data normalized by maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. RESULTS: A steady increase in EMG amplitude was observed during each contraction and by the end of the biofeedback sessions, although this difference was only significant when comparing the first tonic contraction of each session (p=0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that three sessions of training with biofeedback improved PFM EMG activity during the second trimester in women with low-risk pregnancies. The effectiveness of this protocol should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Dentre as funções dos músculos do assoalho pélvico (MAPs, pode-se citar a manutenção da continência, sendo que sua disfunção pode causar a incontinência urinária (IU, muito frequente no período gestacional e no puerpério. Diante disso, se faz importante o treinamento dos músculos do assoalho pélvico (TMAP durante o período gestacional, entretanto grande parte das mulheres realiza a contração dessa musculatura de maneira insatisfatória. OBJETIVOS: Realizar uma an

  3. Determination of a cutoff value for pelvic floor distensibility using the Epi-no balloon to predict perineal integrity in vaginal delivery: ROC curve analysis. Prospective observational single cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Raquel Diniz Zanetti

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Several risk factors are involved in perineal lacerations during vaginal delivery. However, little is known about the influence of perineal distensibility as a protective factor. The aim here was to determine a cutoff value for pelvic floor distensibility measured using the Epi-no balloon, which could be used as a predictive factor for perineal integrity in vaginal delivery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective observational single cohort study conducted in a maternity hospital. METHODS: A convenience sample of 227 consecutive at-term parturients was used. All women had a single fetus in the vertex presentation, with up to 9.0 cm of dilation. The maximum dilation of the Epi-no balloon was measured using a tape measure after it had been inflated inside the vagina up to the parturients' maximum tolerance. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to obtain the Epi-no circumference measurement with best sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: Among the 161 patients who were included in the study, 50.9% underwent episiotomy, 21.8% presented lacerations and 27.3% retained an intact perineum. Age > 25.9 years; number of pregnancies > 3.4; number of deliveries > 2.2 and circumference measured by Epi-no > 21.4 cm were all directly correlated with an intact perineum. Circumference measurements using the Epi-no balloon that were greater than 20.8 cm showed sensitivity and specificity of 70.5% and 66.7% (area under curve = 0.713, respectively, as a predictive factor for an intact perineum in vaginal delivery. CONCLUSION: Circumferences greater than 20.8 cm achieved using the Epi-no balloon are a predictive factor for perineal integrity in parturients.

  4. Efeito do treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico associado ou não à eletroestimulação na incontinência urinária após prostatectomia radical Effect of functional training for the pelvic floor muscles with or without electrical stimulation in cases of urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CT Kakihara

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A literatura sobre fisioterapia do assoalho pélvico no tratamento da incontinência urinária após prostatectomia radical é escassa e relata técnicas diferentes de tratamento fisioterapêutico. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito do tratamento fisioterapêutico na recuperação da continência urinária de pacientes submetidos a prostatectomia radical utilizando treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico acompanhado ou não da eletroestimulação. MÉTODO: Foram selecionados 20 pacientes com incontinência urinária pós-prostatectomia radical. Os pacientes foram distribuídos ao acaso em grupos controle e de investigação. O grupo de investigação, composto por 10 pacientes, recebeu como tratamento fisioterapêutico o treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico e a eletroestimulação. O grupo controle, composto por 10 pacientes, recebeu como tratamento fisioterapêutico o treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico. Todos os pacientes foram reavaliados 3 meses, 6 meses e 12 meses após o início do tratamento por meio de "pad test", Escala Visual Análoga (EVA da incontinência, Escala Visual Análoga (EVA do problema e número de fraldas utilizadas. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição estatisticamente significante entre a avaliação inicial e o 12º mês do "pad test", da EVA incontinência, da EVA problema e do número de fraldas no grupo controle e no grupo de investigação. Entretanto, não foi encontrada diferença estatisticamente significante quando comparadas as mesmas variáveis entre os dois grupos. DISCUSSÃO E CONCLUSÃO: Não houve melhora adicional no tratamento com treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico associado à eletroestimulação quando comparado com o tratamento apenas com treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico. Entretanto, nos dois grupos, houve melhora significante da incontinência urinária.INTRODUCTION: Literature on physical therapy for the pelvic floor muscles to treat urinary incontinence following

  5. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in primiparae two years after cesarean section: cross-sectional study Prevalência de incontinência urinária e disfunção muscular do assoalho pélvico em primíparas dois anos após parto cesárea: estudo transversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Mércia Pascon Barbosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE There is uncertainty in the literature regarding the theory that obstetric events and pelvic floor injuries give rise to lower risk of subsequent urinary incontinence among women delivering via cesarean section than among women delivering vaginally. The objective of this study was to assess the two-year postpartum prevalence of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and the factors responsible for them. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional study, conducted in a public university. METHODS 220 women who had undergone elective cesarean section or vaginal childbirth two years earlier were selected. Their urinary incontinence symptoms were investigated, and their pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was assessed using digital palpation and a perineometer. RESULTS The two-year urinary incontinence prevalences following vaginal childbirth and cesarean section were 17% and 18.9%, respectively. The only risk factor for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction was weight gain during pregnancy. Body mass index less than 25 kg/m 2 and normal pelvic floor muscle function protected against urinary incontinence. Gestational urinary incontinence increased the risk of two-year postpartum urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Gestational urinary incontinence was a crucial precursor of postpartum urinary incontinence. Weight gain during pregnancy increased the subsequent risk of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, and elective cesarean section did not prevent urinary incontinence. CONTEXTO E OBJETIVO É ainda controversa na literatura a teoria de que eventos obstétricos e traumas no assoalho pélvico representariam menor risco para mulheres submetidas ao parto cesárea do que para aquelas submetidas a parto vaginal, no tocante a subsequente incontinência urinária. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a prevalência de incontinência urinária e disfunção muscular do assoalho pélvico dois anos após o parto e os fatores responsáveis por elas

  6. LA GRANDE DESCENTE

    CERN Multimedia

    The first endcap disc of CMS being lowered slowly and carefully 100 m underground into the experimental cavern. The disc is one of 15 large pieces to make the grand descent.  The uniquely shaped slice, 16 m high, about 50 cm thick weighs 400 tonnes. The two HF that were lowered earlier in November can also be seen in the foreground and background.  

  7. Dictionary descent in optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Temlyakov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The problem of convex optimization is studied. Usually in convex optimization the minimization is over a d-dimensional domain. Very often the convergence rate of an optimization algorithm depends on the dimension d. The algorithms studied in this paper utilize dictionaries instead of a canonical basis used in the coordinate descent algorithms. We show how this approach allows us to reduce dimensionality of the problem. Also, we investigate which properties of a dictionary are beneficial for t...

  8. THE GREAT DESCENT CONTINUES

    CERN Document Server

        With precise coordination YE+1 was lowered into the cavern (9-Jan), soon joined by the ?rst barrel wheel YB+2 (19-Jan), then YB+1(4-Feb) and HB+ (13-Feb). The 1920 ton central barrel wheel YB0 rests brie?y on the pit-head cover in anticipation of a monumental descent (28-Feb) that will also trigger an intense campaign of installation of services and detectors underground.  

  9. Efeito da via de parto sobre a força muscular do assoalho pélvico The influence of the delivery route on pelvic floor muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Mércia Pascon Barbosa

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a influência da via de parto sobre a força muscular do assoalho pélvico (FM-AP. MÉTODOS: estudo clínico de corte transversal, para avaliar a FM-AP pelo teste da avaliação da força do assoalho pélvico (AFA e uso do perineômetro em primíparas, entre 20-30 anos de idade, 4-6 meses pós-parto. A contração, medida pelos dois testes, foi classificada em: zero - ausência, um - leve, dois - moderada e três - normal, sustentada por 6 segundos. Avaliaram-se 94 mulheres, entre 20 e 30 anos, divididas em três grupos: pós-parto vaginal (n=32; pós-cesárea (n=32 e nulíparas (n=30. A variável independente foi a via de parto e a dependente, a FM-AP. A comparação entre os graus de contração foi realizada pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis e o teste de Dunn para comparações múltiplas; a influência da via de parto pelo teste chi2, o risco relativo (RR para alteração da FM-AP e o coeficiente kappa para avaliar equivalência entre os testes. RESULTADOS: a mediana e 1º e 3º quartil da FM-AP foram menores (p=0,01 pós-parto vaginal (2,0;1-2 e intermediários pós-cesárea (2,0; 2-3 em relação às nulíparas (3,0;2-3, tanto analisadas pelo AFA como pelo perineômetro. Aumentou o RR de exame alterado pós-parto vaginal (RR=2,5; IC 95%: 1,3-5,0; p=0,002; (RR=2,3; IC 95%: 1,2-4,3; p=0,005 e pós-cesárea (RR=1,5; IC 95%: 0,94-2,57; p=0,12; (RR=1,3; IC 95%: 0,85-2,23; p=0,29 pelo PFSE e perineômetro, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: o parto vaginal diminuiu a força muscular do AP de primíparas quando comparado com os casos submetidos à cesárea e com as nulíparas.PURPOSE: to evaluate the influence of the delivery route on pelvic floor (PF muscle strength. METHODS: a cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate PF muscle strength by the pelvic floor strength evaluation (PFSE test and perineometer in primiparous patients aged 20 to 30 years 4 to 6 months after delivery. The categorization was: zero lack of muscle

  10. A novel three-dimensional dynamic anorectal ultrasonography technique for the assessment of perineal descent, compared with defaecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; dos Santos, D; Soares, G; Regadas, F S P; Rodrigues, L V; Buchen, G; Kenmoti, V T; Surimã, W S; Fernandes, G O da S

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe a novel three-dimensional dynamic anorectal ultrasonography technique (dynamic 3-DAUS) for assessment of perineal descent (PD) and establishment of normal range values, comparing it with defaecography. Secondarily, the study compares the ability of the two techniques to identify various pelvic floor dysfunctions. A prospective study was undertaken in 29 women (mean age 43 years) with obstructed defecation disorder. All patients underwent defaecography and dynamic 3-DAUS and the results were compared. Lee kappa coefficients (K) were used. On defaecography, PD > 3 cm was detected in 12 patients. On dynamic 3-DAUS, 10 of these patients had PD > 2.5 cm. Seventeen had normal PD on defaecography and PD ≤ 2.5 cm on dynamic 3-DAUS (K 0.85). Normal relaxation was observed in 10 patients and anismus in 14 with both techniques (K 0.65). Both techniques identified five patients without rectocele, two with grade I rectocele (K 0.89 and 1.00, respectively) and 10 with grade II and nine with grade III (K 0.72 and 0.77, respectively). Rectal intussusception was identified in six patients on defaecography. These were confirmed on dynamic 3-DAUS in addition to the identification of another seven cases indicating moderate agreement (K 0.46). Enterocele/sigmoidocele grade III was identified in one patient with both techniques, indicating substantial agreement (K 0.65). Dynamic 3-DAUS was shown to be a reliable technique for the assessment of PD and pelvic floor dysfunctions, identifying all disorders and confirming findings from defaecography. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OLPP) Office of Science Policy, Reporting, and Program Analysis (OSPRA) Division of Extramural Research (DER) Extramural Scientific ... treat my pain? Can pelvic pain affect my emotional well-being? How can I cope with long- ...

  12. Pelvic Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each step so that nothing comes as a surprise to you. After the pelvic exam After the ... Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Advertising and sponsorship policy ...

  13. Pelvic Floor 3D Ultrasound of Women with a TVT, TVT-O, or TVT-S for Stress Urinary Incontinence at the Three-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Claudinei A; Bianchi-Ferraro, Ana Maria H M; Zucchi, Eliana Viana Monteiro; Sartori, Marair G F; Girão, Manoel J B C; Jarmy-Di Bella, Zsuzsanna I K

    2017-09-01

    Objective  Using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), we aimed to compare the tape position and the angle formed by the sling arms in different techniques of mid-urethral sling insertion for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence, three years after surgery. In addition, we examined the correlations between the US findings and the clinical late postoperative results. Methods  A prospective cross-sectional cohort study of 170 patients who underwent a sling procedure between May 2009 and December 2011 was performed. The final sample, with US images of sufficient quality, included 26 retropubic slings (tension-free vaginal tape, TVT), 42 transobturator slings (tension-free vaginal tape-obturator, TVT-O), and 37 single-incision slings (tension-free vaginal tape-Secur, TVT-S). The images (at rest, during the Valsalva maneuver, and during pelvic floor contraction) were analyzed offline by 2 different observers blinded against the surgical and urinary continence status. Group comparisons were performed using the Student t -test, the chi-squared and the Kruskal-Wallis tests, and analyses of variance with Tukey multiple comparisons. Results  Differences among the groups were found in the mean angle of the tape arms (TVT = 119.94°, TVT-O = 141.93°, TVT-S = 121.06°; p  TVT = 1.65 cm, TVT-O = 1.93 cm, TVT-S = 1.95 cm; p  = 0.010). The global objective cure rate was of 87.8% (TVT = 88.5%, TVT-O = 90.5%, TVT-S = 83.8%; p  = 0.701). The overall subjective cure rate was of 83.8% (TVT = 88.5%, TVT-O = 88.5% and TVT-S = 78.4%; p  = 0.514). The slings were located in the mid-urethra in 85.7% of the patients (TVT = 100%, TVT-O = 73.8%, TVT-S = 89.2%; p  = 0.001), with a more distal location associated with obesity (distal: 66.7% obese; mid-urethra: 34% obese; p  = 0.003). Urgency-related symptoms were observed in 23.8% of the patients (TVT = 30.8%, TVT-O = 21.4%, TVT

  14. The effect of biofeedback physical therapy in men with Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Erik B; van Haarst, Ernst P; Schaarsberg, Ria W M Browning-Groote; Geels, Jenet

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the symptoms of chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CP) or Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) may be due to or associated with pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Therapies aimed to improve relaxation and proper use of the pelvic floor muscles such as biofeedback physical therapy and pelvic floor re-education are expected to give symptom improvement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofeedback physical therapy on the symptoms of men with CPPS. Between March 2000 to March 2004, 33 consecutive men were diagnosed with CP/CPPS based on history including the NIH-CPSI questionnaire and physical examination including pelvic floor muscle tonus, urinalysis, uroflowmetry with residual urine measurement and transrectal ultrasonography of the prostate. All patients participated in a pelvic floor biofeedback re-educating program. A rectal EMG probe was used to measure resting tone of the pelvic floor muscles and was helpful for instruction pelvic floor muscles contraction and relaxation. Two of the 33 men dropped out. In the remaining 31 men, mean age 43.9 years (range 23-70), the mean total Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) changed from 23.6 (range 11-34) at baseline to 11.4 (range 1-25) after treatment (ppelvic floor muscle tonus was 4.9 at diagnosis (range 2.0-10.0) and decreased to 1.7 (range 0.5-2.8) after treatment (pphysical therapy and pelvic floor re-education for CP/CPPS patients, leading to a significant improvement of the symptom score. The correlation between the pelvic muscle tonus results with NIH-CPSI score is highly suggestive that the pelvic floor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS.

  15. Pelvic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra García-García

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Actinomycosis is a chronic bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces, Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Its symptomatology imitates some malignant pelvic tumours, tuberculosis, or nocardiosis, causing abscesses and fistulas. Actinomycoses are opportunistic infections and require normal mucous barriers to be altered. No epidemiological studies have been conducted to determine prevalence or incidence of such infections. Objective. To analyse the clinical cases of pelvic actinomycosis reported worldwide, to update the information about the disease. Methods. A systematic review of worldwide pelvic actinomycosis cases between 1980 and 2014 was performed, utilising the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. The following information was analysed: year, country, type of study, number of cases, use of intrauterine device (IUD, final and initial diagnosis, and method of diagnosis. Results. 63 articles met the search criteria, of which 55 reported clinical cases and 8 reported cross-sectional studies. Conclusions. Pelvic actinomycosis is confusing to diagnose and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic chronic inflammatory lesions. It is commonly diagnosed through a histological report, obtained after a surgery subsequent to an erroneous initial diagnosis. A bacterial culture in anaerobic medium could be useful for the diagnosis but requires a controlled technique and should be performed using specialised equipment.

  16. The grand descent has begun for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, the CMS experimental cavern looked relatively empty; its detector was assembled entirely at ground level, to be lowered underground in 15 sections. On 2 November, the first hadronic forward calorimeter led the way with a grand descent. The first section of the CMS detector (centre of photo) arriving from the vertical shaft, viewed from the cavern floor. There is something unusual about the construction of the CMS detector. Instead of being built in the experimental cavern, like all the other detectors in the LHC experiments, it was constructed at ground level. This was to allow for easy access during the assembly of the detector and to minimise the size of the excavated cavern. The slightly nerve-wracking task of lowering it safely into the cavern in separate sections came after the complete detector was successfully tested with a magnetic field at ground level. In the early morning of 2 November, the first section of the CMS detector began its eagerly awaited descent into the underground ca...

  17. Home exercises for pelvic floor in continent women one year after physical therapy treatment for urinary incontinence: an observational study Exercício domicilar para o assoalho pélvico em mulheres continentes após tratamento fisioterapêutico para incontinência urinária: um estudo observacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. Krüger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe the results of home exercise targeting the pelvic floor in continent women one year after the end of a physical therapy treatment for the following outcomes: functional assessment of the pelvic floor and urinary incontinence. METHODS: This is an observational study that evaluated fifteen women one year after physical therapy treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI. The outcomes for this study were: situations of urinary loss, use of daily protection, practice of home exercises for the pelvic floor, functional assessment of the pelvic floor (FAPF and patient satisfaction. We also investigated some confounding variables such as hormonal status, number of vaginal deliveries and previous history of episiotomy. RESULTS: One year after completion of physical therapy treatment, we observed that the FAPF median remained stable over time (Median=5, p=0.08. The presence of urinary incontinence was reported by 40% of women in the sample, however, was characterized as mild (i.e. not requiring the use of daily protection. There was also a significant association (p=0.001 between the completion of home exercises (twice or more per week and the normal clinical status. Confounding variables, which could compromise the clinical status, showed no significant association with the outcomes (p≥0.05. CONCLUSION: Home exercises contributed to the maintenance of continence following a physical therapy treatment.OBJETIVOS: Descrever os resultados da prática de exercícios domicilares para o assoalho pélvico em mulheres continentes nos quesitos avaliação funcional do assoalho pélvico (AFA e presença de incontinência urinária após um ano de tratamento fisioterapêutico. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional com 15 mulheres um ano após o tratamento fisioterapêutico para incontinência urinária de esforço (IUE. As variáveis analisadas neste estudo foram: situações de perda urinária, utilização de proteção diária, manuten

  18. Luteinizing hormone in testicular descent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppari, Jorma; Kaleva, Marko M; Virtanen, Helena E

    2007-01-01

    alone is not sufficient for normal testicular descent. The regulation of androgen production is influenced both by placental human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). There is evidence that the longer pregnancy continues, the more important role pituitary LH may have....... Insulin-like hormone-3 (INSL3) is suggested to be the main regulator of gubernacular development and therefore an apparent regulator of testicular descent. INSL3 production is also related to LH, and reduced INSL3 action is a possible cause for cryptorchidism. Cryptorchid boys have normal testosterone...

  19. Floors: Selection and Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley, Bernard

    Flooring for institutional, commercial, and industrial use is described with regard to its selection, care, and maintenance. The following flooring and subflooring material categories are discussed--(1) resilient floor coverings, (2) carpeting, (3) masonry floors, (4) wood floors, and (5) "formed-in-place floors". The properties, problems,…

  20. Conjugate descent formulation of backpropagation error in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nique of backpropagation was popularized in a paper by Rumelhart, et al. ... the training of a multilayer neural network using a gradient descent approach applied to a .... superior convergence of the conjugate descent method over a standard ...

  1. Pelvic Chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Rojas, Alfredo Ernesto; Restrepo Escobar, Ligia Ines; Melo Uribe, Mario Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the case of a 24-year old woman with a pelvic chondroblastoma localized at the top of the right iliac crest, with six months of evolution and progressive growth. X-rays revealed an osteolytic lesion with heterogeneous density, extending toward soft tissue; the histopathologic study provided evidence of chondroblastoma. Chondroblastomas are benign bone tumors producers of cartilage which appears in the long bone epiphysis of young people. Nearly 75% of such tumors affect the long bones, principally the femur, the tibia, and the humerus; exceptions include those in the flat craniofacial bones and the pelvis bones. Chondroblastomas have distinct radiological and histopathologic characteristics, and despite their benign biological behavior, can cause elevated morbidity among patients due to their localization and being treated exclusively with surgery.

  2. Theseus' arid Peirithoos' descent into the underworld

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, Jan N.

    2015-01-01

    In my contribution I will first briefly discuss the earliest known literary descent, that by Enkidu, which almost certainly influenced the poet of the Odyssey in his depiction of Odysseus' descent. Then I will take a brief look at some descents in the Archaic Age, in particular the earliest

  3. Descent construction for GSpin groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hundley, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the authors provide an extension of the theory of descent of Ginzburg-Rallis-Soudry to the context of essentially self-dual representations, that is, representations which are isomorphic to the twist of their own contragredient by some Hecke character. The authors' theory supplements the recent work of Asgari-Shahidi on the functorial lift from (split and quasisplit forms of) GSpin_{2n} to GL_{2n}.

  4. Mobilidade do Colo Vesical e Avaliação Funcional do Assoalho Pélvico em Mulheres Continentes e com Incontinência Urinária de Esforço, Consoante o Estado Hormonal Bladder Neck Mobility and Functional Pelvic Floor Evaluation in Women with and without Stress Urinary Incontinence, According to Hormonal Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fátima da Silva Moreira

    2002-07-01

    ultra-sonografia, é maior nas mulheres incontinentes, independente do estado menopausal. A avaliação do assoalho pélvico pela palpação digital e pelos cones vaginais mostrou que a função muscular é menos eficiente nas mulheres incontinentes.Purpose: to study the relationship between pelvic floor function and bladder neck mobility in women with and without stress urinary incontinence (SUI, in menacme and postmenopausal. Methods: sixty-one SUI patients were evaluated; 31 of them were in menacme and of these 17 had SUI and 14 did not have any complaint; 30 were postmenopausal and of these, 15 with SUI and 15 without SUI. Simple cystometry and empty supine stress test were performed in those who had urinary incontinence complaint. Bladder neck mobility was studied by ultrasound and by the Q-tip test. To study pelvic floor function, vaginal cones and digital palpation were used. Results: the bladder neck position in the incontinent women (Groups A and C, determined by ultrasound or the Q tip-test, was --11.8 cm in Group A and --12.5 cm in Group C, lower than the continent women, in whom the bladder neck was at +4.4 cm in Group B and +2.3 cm in Group D. There were no differences in bladder neck mobility among the continent menacme (9.1 cm and postmenopausal (9.5 cm groups. Also there were no differences among the incontinent groups (17.1 cm for Group A and 16.6 cm for Group C. The bladder neck mobility was greater in the incontinent women (A and C. Continent women had better results on evaluation of pelvic floor muscles than the incontinent ones, even using vaginal cones or digital palpation, and these results were not dependent on the hormonal status. Conclusion: a positive correlation was found between the Q-tip tests and ultrasound, and between test with vaginal cones and digital palpation. No significant correlation was found between pelvic floor function and bladder neck mobility.

  5. [Sciatic hernia as a cause of chronic pelvic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De los Ríos, José F; Calle, Gustavo; Castañeda, Juan D; Serna, Eduardo A; Vásquez, Ricardo A; Arango, Adriana M; López, Claudia C

    2013-04-01

    Sciatic hernia constitutes the scarcest group of hernias of pelvic floor; however, they should be considered in the origin of chronic pelvic pain. The proper diagnosis of sciatic hernias has allowed to surgeons treating successfully patients with acute or chronic pelvic pain, with intestinal or ureteral obstruction and with urinary or gluteus sepsis. It has to be considered as differential diagnosis before the finding of a congenital or acquired gluteus mass. Laparoscopist gynecologist should know the existence of this defect, to be familiar with its aspect in laparoscopic view and to know the laparoscopic treatment of this disease.

  6. Descent in buildings (AM-190)

    CERN Document Server

    Mühlherr, Bernhard; Weiss, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Descent in Buildings begins with the resolution of a major open question about the local structure of Bruhat-Tits buildings. The authors then put their algebraic solution into a geometric context by developing a general fixed point theory for groups acting on buildings of arbitrary type, giving necessary and sufficient conditions for the residues fixed by a group to form a kind of subbuilding or "form" of the original building. At the center of this theory is the notion of a Tits index, a combinatorial version of the notion of an index in the relative theory of algebraic groups. These results

  7. Chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Sharon L

    2013-12-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is pain lasting longer than 6 months and is estimated to occur in 15% of women. Causes of pelvic pain include disorders of gynecologic, urologic, gastroenterologic, and musculoskeletal systems. The multidisciplinary nature of chronic pelvic pain may complicate diagnosis and treatment. Treatments vary by cause but may include medicinal, neuroablative, and surgical treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Análise dos recursos para reabilitação da musculatura do assoalho pélvico em mulheres com prolapso e incontinência urinária Análisis de los recursos para rehabilitación de la musculatura del suelo pélvico en mujeres con prolapso e incontinencia urinaria Analysis of the resources for rehabilitation of pelvic floor muscles in women with prolapse and urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnaldo Lopes Silva Filho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisão teve como objetivo analisar os recursos e sua eficácia na reabilitação do assoalho pélvico no tratamento dos prolapsos genitais e incontinência urinária. As buscas foram realizadas nas bases de dados MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS/SciELO e Biblioteca Cochrane. Foram encontrados 886 artigos, dos quais foram utilizados 34 estudos clínicos relevantes que respondiam às perguntas construídas pelos autores. Os estudos analisados mostraram que o treinamento do assoalho pélvico pode ser usado no tratamento dos prolapsos, porém são necessários mais estudos randomizados para sustentar essa evidência. Para a incontinência urinária a reabilitação do assoalho pélvico é eficiente e deve ser o tratamento de primeira escolha.Esta revisión tiene como objetivo analizar los recursos y su eficacia en la rehabilitación del suelo pélvico en el tratamiento de los prolapsos genitales y la incontinencia urinaria. Las búsquedas fueron realizadas en las bases de datos Medline/Pubmed, LILACS/SciELO y Cochrane. Fueron encontrados 886 artículos, de los cuales fueron utilizados 34 estudios clínicos relevantes y que respondían las preguntas construidas por los autores. Los estudios analizados mostraron que el entrenamiento del suelo pélvico puede ser usado en el tratamiento de los prolapsos, sin embargo, son necesarios más estudios randomizados para sustentar esta evidencia. Para la incontinencia urinaria la rehabilitación del suelo pélvico es eficiente y debe ser el tratamiento de primera opción.This review aimed to assess the capabilities and effectiveness of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of genital prolapse and urinary incontinence. The research was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS/SciELO and Cochrane Library. There were found 886 articles, of which were used 34 relevant clinical trials that answered the questions constructed by the authors. The studies analyzed showed that pelvic floor training can be used in prolapse

  9. A study to evaluate the effect of manual therapy and exercise on the levator plate in women with pelvic organ prolapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Maeve

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) symptoms, severity and pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength have been shown to improve significantly with pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). In this study, a new approach to conservative treatment of POP was investigated by the addition of manual physiotherapy to conventional PFMT. Aim & Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of internal manual therapy and PFMT on the levator plate angle (LPA) in women with stage I or I...

  10. Primary perineal posterior hernia: an abdominoperineal approach for mesh repair of the pelvic floor Hérnia perineal posterior primária: um acesso abdômino-perineal para o reforço do assoalho pélvico com tela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara R. Salum

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous development of perineal hernias is a very rare condition and many techniques have been described for repairing the floor defect. The authors describe the use of a combined approach in the surgical treatment of primary perineal hernias, by reconstructing the muscle pelvic floor and restoring the rectum to its sacral position with mesh repair. The case of one patient with a huge primary perineal hernia is reported, with clinical manifestations of progressive bulging in the buttock area, obstipation and fecal incontinence. Long-term follow-up has shown no recurrence of the condition and normal bowel function. It is concluded that primary perineal hernia can be repaired by a combined surgical approach, by using prosthetic material.O desenvolvimento espontâneo de hérnia perineal representa uma condição patológica muito rara.Várias técnicas têm sido descritas para a correção da falha no assoalho muscular pélvico. Os autores descrevem um acesso cirúrgico combinado para o tratamento das hérnias perineais primárias, pela reconstrução do assoalho pélvico muscular e reposicionamento do reto com reforço utilizando-se tela. O caso de uma paciente com uma volumosa hérnia na região perineal, caracterizada como primária, é relatado, evidenciando-se manifestações clínicas de aumento progressivo do saco herniário, dificuldades para evacuar e incontinência fecal. O seguimento clínico a longo prazo, após a correção cirúrgica, demonstrou que não houve recidiva da hérnia, normalizando-se a função intestinal. Conclui-se que as hérnias perineais primárias podem ser tratadas por este acesso combinado, utilizando-se próteses.

  11. Determinants and Management Outcomes of Pelvic Organ Prolapse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    determine, however, the life time risk of requiring at least one operation to ... are appropriately treated with pelvic floor exercises and/or physical ... improve their quality of life. In Nnewi .... [1,17,19-21] Pregnancy itself, without vaginal birth has.

  12. Continuous Descent Operations using Energy Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    During today’s aircraft descents, Air Traf?c Control (ATC) commands aircraft to descend to specific altitudes and directions to maintain separation and spacing from other aircraft. When the aircraft is instructed to maintain an intermediate descent altitude, it requires engine thrust to maintain

  13. Does fibromyalgia influence symptom bother from pelvic organ prolapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kerrie; Osmundsen, Blake; Gregory, W Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Determine if women with fibromyalgia report increased bother from pelvic organ prolapse compared with women without fibromyalgia. We performed a cross-sectional study of women with symptomatic prolapse on consultation with a private urogynecology practice within a 46-month period. After matching for age, women with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia were compared with a reference group of women without fibromyalgia. Demographic, POPQ examination, medical history, and pelvic floor symptom data (PFDI, PFIQ, and PISQ-12) were collected. Our primary outcome was to compare the mean Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI) scores of women with and without fibromyalgia. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in women evaluated for initial urogynecology consultation during the study period was 114 out of 1,113 (7%). Women with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher symptom bother scores related to pelvic organ prolapse, defecatory dysfunction, urinary symptoms, and sexual function: PFDI (p = 0.005), PFIQ (p=0.010), and PISQ (p=0.018). Women with fibromyalgia were found to have a higher BMI (p=0.008) and were more likely to report a history of sexual abuse, OR 3.1 (95 % CI 1.3, 7.9), and have levator myalgia on examination, OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.5, 9.1). In a linear regression analysis, levator myalgia was found to be the significant factor associated with pelvic floor symptom bother. In women with symptomatic prolapse, fibromyalgia is associated with an increased risk of levator myalgia and 50% more symptom bother from pelvic floor disorders.

  14. Pelvic and acetabular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mears, D.C.; Rubash, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This treatise focuses primarily on the clinical aspects of diagnosis and treatments of pelvic and acetabular fractures. However, considerable attention is also paid to the radiographic diagnosis of trauma and postoperative effects. The book begins with a succinct review of pelvic and acetabular anatomy and pelvic biomechanics. It continues with a radiographic classification of pelvic injury, which will represent the major source of the book's interest for radiologists. The remainder of the book is concerned with clinical management of pelvic and acetabular trauma, including preoperative planning, surgical approaches, techniques of reduction, internal fixation, eternal fixation, post-operative care, and late problems. Even throughout this later portion of the book there are extensive illustrations, including plain radiographs, computed tomographic (CT) scans, reconstructed three-dimensional CT