WorldWideScience

Sample records for pegmatite-related metasomatic emerald

  1. The emerald deposits of ultramafic rocks of Capoeirana and Belmont, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Machado, G.; Schorscher, H.

    1998-01-01

    The emerald deposits of Capoeirana and Belmont, State of Minas Gerais (MG), Brazil, occur vithin an area comprising a deeply weathered Archean Metavulcano-Sedimentary Sequence (SVS) in tectonic contact with the Borrachudos Metagranitoids (GB) and Fluorite bearing Foliated Metagranitoids (MGF). The SVS is formed by intercalation s of ultramafic schists and amphibolites, basic to intermediate amphibolites, vulcanoclastic, metapelitic and calcsilicate schists and gneisses, banded iron formation and metacherts. The metaultramafic rocks include minor chromitite cumulates and occur at the base of the SVS. When metasomatized in the shear zones adjoining GB and MGF they host emerald mineralizations. (author)

  2. Growth of emerald single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukin, G.V.; Godovikov, A.A.; Klyakin, V.A.; Sobolev, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to its use for jewelry, emerald can also be used in low-noise microwave amplifiers. The authors discuss flux crystallization of emerald and note that when emerald is grown by this method, it is desirable to use solvents which dissolve emerald with minimum deviations from congruence but at the same time with sufficient high efficiency. Emerald synthesis and crystal growth from slowly cooled solutions is discussed as another possibility. The techniques are examined. Vapor synthesis and growht of beryl crystals re reviewed and the authors experimentally study the seeded CVD crystallization of beryl from BeO, Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 oxides, by using complex compounds as carrier agents. The color of crystals of emerald and other varieties of beryl is detemined by slelective light absorption in teh visible part of the spectrum and depends on the density and structural positions of chromphore ions: chromium, iron, vanadium, nickel, manganese and cobalt

  3. Radiogeochemical features of hydrothermal metasomatic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plyushchev, E.V.; Ryabova, L.A.; Shatov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the most general peculiarities of uranium and thorium distributions in hydrothermal-metasomatic formations of three levels of substance formation: 1) in hydrothermal minerals; 2) in natural associations of these minerals (in the altered rocks, metasomatites, ores, etc.); 3) ordened series of zonally and in stage conjugated hydrothermal-metasomatic formations. Statistically stable recurrence of natural combinations of hydrothermal-metasomatic formations points out conjugation of their formation in the directed evolution in the general hydrothermal process. Series of metasomatic formations, the initial members of which are potassium metasomatites, mostly result in accumulation up to industrial concentrations of radioactive elements in final members of these formations. Development of midlow-temperature propylitic alterations in highly radiative rocks causes the same accumulation

  4. Medical radiation physics training EMERALD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabakov, S.; Roberts, C.; Lamm, I.L.; Milano, F.; Lewis, C.; Smith, D.; Litchev, A.; Jonsson, B.A.; Ljungberg, M.; Strand, S.E.; Jonsson, L.; Riccardi, L.; Benini, A.; Silva, G. da; Teixeira, N.; Pascoal, A.; Noel, A.; Smith, P.; Musilek, L.; Sheahan, N.

    2001-01-01

    Training of young medical physicists is an essential part of the framework of measures for Radiological Protection of Patients. The paper describes the Medical Radiation Physics Training Scheme EMERALD, developed by an European Project Consortium. EMERALD Training covers the Physics of X-ray Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy. Each of these 3 modules covers 4 months training period. The EMERALD training materials are 3 Workbooks with tasks and a Teachers' Guide (total volume approx 700 pages) and 3 CD-ROMs with image database. (author)

  5. Emerald Express '95: Analysis Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newett, Sandra

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of Emerald Express was to bring together senior representatives from military, relief, political, and diplomatic communities to address issues that arise during Humanitarian Assistance and Peace Operations (HA/POs...

  6. Emerald ash borer flight potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin A. Taylor; Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Robert A. Haack

    2005-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) that is rapidly spreading from the probable introduction site in Detroit, Michigan. The rapid spread to areas outside Michigan is undoubtedly due to phoretic transport on nursery stock, logs, and...

  7. Emerald ash borer life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Toby R. Petrice; Houping Liu

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was discovered in southeastern Michigan and nearby Ontario in June of 2002. EAB was identified as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in approximately 2,500 mi2, and...

  8. Emerald ash borer biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah Bauer; Juli Gould; Jian Duan; Mike. Ulyshen

    2011-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive buprestid from northeast Asia, was identified in 2002 as the cause of ash (Fraxinus) tree mortality in southeast Michigan and adjacent areas of Ontario, Canada. This destructive beetle apparently arrived in North America via infested solid wood packaging materials from...

  9. Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive beetle from Asia that has caused large scale ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in North America. This book chapter reviews the taxonomy, biology, life history of this invasive pest and its associated natural enemies in both its native ...

  10. K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of emerald mineralizations from Brazil. Evidence of Transamazonian (2 Ga) and Brazilian (650 - 500 Ma) ages. Influence of phlogopite crystallo-chemistry on argon retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro-Althoff, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The emerald deposits of Brazil are always found within basic and ultra-basic formations which have been metasomatized by hydrothermal fluids, and transformed into phlogopitites. Two types of deposits may be distinguished: one associated with pegmatites, the other with shear zones. In both cases the precipitation of emerald is contemporaneous with that of phlogopite. The age of these has been determined by dating of the latter, using K-Ar and 40 Ar/ 39 Ar methods. Deposits associated with pegmatite have ages between 2.0 et 1.9 Ga (Carnaiba, Socoto), and between 650 et 500 Ma (Pombos, Juca, Pirenoplis, Capoeirana, Coqui). The Santa Terezinha deposit, associated with a shear zone where pegmatites are absent, gives an age of formation of 520 Ma. These results show that brazilian emeralds were formed during two distinct orogenic periods: the Transamazonian (2.0 Ga), in the Sao Francisco craton, and the Brasilian (650 - 500 Ma)

  11. Action Learning Drives the Emerald Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalborczyk, Sarah; Sandelands, Luke

    2012-01-01

    This account examines the action learning process adopted by Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., embedded in the organization through the in-company Emerald Academy. In case study format, the paper emphasizes that in order to align learning with organizational objectives joined up thinking and practice is needed beyond the learning and development…

  12. Metasomatic zoning at some stratiform rare metal deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altyntsev, Yu.V.; Bazhenov, M.I.; Bepeshov, G.V.; Komarnitskij, G.M.; Petrov, I.Ya.; Serykh, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Metasomatic zoning of stratiform deposits of rare metals (Mo, Pb, As, V, Se, U, etc.) in intermontane depresions, deposited at the postorogenic stage of Paleozoic geosyncline region development, is considered. Geochemical and geophysical characteristics of metasomatic zoning in the case of sloping and steep rock deposition are given. It is established, that in rare metal deposits in variegated deposits of molassoid formation of Middle-Upper Paleozoic the external and internal zones of metasomatic alterations are distinctly separated. The external zone is presented by mineral association: quartz + -albile + -calcite + -epidote; the internal one - by hydromica + -chlorite + -analcite, laumontite + -hematite + -ankerite + -kaolinite. Geochemical zoning is manifested quite regularly at all the deposits and it is subjected to metasomatic zoning. Changes in physical properties of rocks reflect the metasomatic zoning. The character of metasomatic alterations of rocks, geochemical zoning of metasomatites at rare metal deposits in molassoid deposits and spatially contiguous deposits in volcanogenic complexes have common features. A supposition is made on polygenic ore formation in sedimentary rocks of the depressions

  13. GPU Computing Gems Emerald Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Wen-mei W

    2011-01-01

    ".the perfect companion to Programming Massively Parallel Processors by Hwu & Kirk." -Nicolas Pinto, Research Scientist at Harvard & MIT, NVIDIA Fellow 2009-2010 Graphics processing units (GPUs) can do much more than render graphics. Scientists and researchers increasingly look to GPUs to improve the efficiency and performance of computationally-intensive experiments across a range of disciplines. GPU Computing Gems: Emerald Edition brings their techniques to you, showcasing GPU-based solutions including: Black hole simulations with CUDA GPU-accelerated computation and interactive display of

  14. Distributed Space System Technology Demonstrations with the Emerald Nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiggs, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of Distributed Space System Technologies utilizing the Emerald Nanosatellite is shown. The topics include: 1) Structure Assembly; 2) Emerald Mission; 3) Payload and Mission Operations; 4) System and Subsystem Description; and 5) Safety Integration and Testing.

  15. Dating Metasomatism: Monazite and Zircon Growth during Amphibolite Facies Albitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cailey B. Condit

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present coupled textural observations and trace element and geochronological data from metasomatic monazite and zircon, to constrain the timing of high-grade Na-metasomatism (albitization of an Archean orthogneiss in southwest Montana, USA. Field, mineral textures, and geochemical evidence indicate albitization occurred as a rind along the margin of a ~3.2 Ga granodioritic orthogneiss (Pl + Hbl + Kfs + Qz + Bt + Zrn exposed in the Northern Madison range. The metasomatic product is a weakly deformed albitite (Ab + Bt + OAm + Zrn + Mnz + Ap + Rt. Orthoamphibole and biotite grew synkinematically with the regional foliation fabric, which developed during metamorphism that locally peaked at upper amphibolite-facies during the 1800–1710 Ma Big Sky orogeny. Metasomatism resulted in an increase in Na, a decrease in Ca, K, Ba, Fe, and Sr, a complete transformation of plagioclase and K-feldspar into albite, and loss of quartz. In situ geochronology on zoned monazite and zircon indicate growth by dissolution–precipitation in both phases at ~1750–1735 Ma. Trace element geochemistry of rim domains in these phases are best explained by dissolution–reprecipitation in equilibrium with Na-rich fluid. Together, these data temporally and mechanistically link metasomatism with high-grade tectonism and prograde metamorphism during the Big Sky orogeny.

  16. Wide color gamut display with white and emerald backlighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lvyin; Lei, Zhichun

    2018-02-20

    This paper proposes a wide color gamut approach that uses white and emerald lighting units as the backlight of the liquid crystal display. The white and emerald backlights are controlled by the image to be displayed. The mixing ratio of the white and the emerald lighting is analyzed so that the maximal color gamut coverage ratio can be achieved. Experimental results prove the effectiveness of the wide color gamut approach using white and emerald backlights.

  17. Gemmology, geology and origin of the Sandawana emerald deposits, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most valuable gemstones, emeralds are known to occur in several countries of the world, such as Colombia, Zambia, Brazil, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Russia, Madagascar and Zimbabwe. The emerald deposits at Sandawana, Zimbabwe, are described, the emeralds from this deposit characterised and

  18. Magma genesis at Gale Crater: Evidence for Pervasive Mantle Metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiberto, J.

    2017-12-01

    Basaltic rocks have been analyzed at Gale Crater with a larger range in bulk chemistry than at any other landing site [1]. Therefore, the rocks may have experienced significantly different formation conditions than those experienced by magmas at Gusev Crater or Meridiani Planum. Specifically, the rocks at Gale Crater have higher potassium than other Martian rocks, with a potential analog of the Nakhlite parental magma, and are consistent with forming from a metasomatized mantle source [2-4]. Mantle metasomatism would not only affect the bulk chemistry but mantle melting conditions, as metasomatism fluxes fluids into the source region. Here I will combine differences in bulk chemistry between Martian basalts to calculate formation conditions in the interior and investigate if the rocks at Gale Crater experienced magma genesis conditions consistent with metasomatism - lower temperatures and pressures of formation. To calculate average formation conditions, I rely on experimental results, where available, and silica-activity and Mg-exchange thermometry calculations for all other compositions following [5, 6]. The results show that there is a direct correlation between the calculated mantle potential temperature and the K/Ti ratio of Gale Crater rocks. This is consistent with fluid fluxed metasomatism introducing fluids to the system, which depressed the melting temperature and fluxed K but not Ti to the system. Therefore, all basalts at Gale Crater are consistent with forming from a metasomatized mantle source, which affected not only the chemistry of the basalts but also the formation conditions. References: [1] Cousin A. et al. (2017) Icarus. 288: 265-283. [2] Treiman A.H. et al. (2016) Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets. 121: 75-106. [3] Treiman A.H. and Medard E. (2016) Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 48: doi: 10.1130/abs/2016AM-285851. [4] Schmidt M.E. et al. (2016) Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. 48: doi: 10

  19. Flight potential of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Robin A.J. Taylor; Robert A. Haack

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Native to several Asian countries, EAB was discovered in six southeastern Michigan counties and southwestern Ontario in 2002. EAB presumably emerged from infested solid wood...

  20. Biology of emerald ash borer parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Jonathan P. Lelito; Houping Liu; Juli R. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle introduced from China (Bray et al., 2011), was identified as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002; Federal Register, 2003; Cappaert et al., 2005)....

  1. Laboratory rearing of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Houping Liu; Toby Petrice

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was identified in 2002 as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality throughout southeastern Michigan and southwestern Ontario. More isolated infestations continue to be found throughout Lower Michigan, northern...

  2. Emerald ash borer genetics: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicia M. Bray; Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Therese Poland; James J. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, samples were collected from introduced sites in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and Ontario, Canada, as well as native sites in China, Japan, and South Korea with the help of a network of collaborators. The beetles were analyzed using DNA sequences from mitochondrial cytochrome...

  3. Emerald ash borer survival in firewood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2005-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is native to Asia and was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. As of October 2004, EAB was only found to breed in ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. EAB is spreading naturally through adult flight as well as artificially through...

  4. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  5. Emerald ash borer biology and invasion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Yuri Baranchikov; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is native to eastern Asia and is primarily a pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees (Fig. 1). Established populations of EAB were first detected in the United States and Canada in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002), and based on a dendrochronology study by Siegert...

  6. Crystal growth of emerald by flux method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Mikio; Narita, Eiichi; Okabe, Taijiro; Morishita, Toshihiko.

    1979-01-01

    Emerald crystals have been formed in two binary fluxes of Li 2 O-MoO 2 and Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 using the slow cooling method and the temperature gradient method under various conditions. In the flux of Li 2 O-MoO 3 carried out in the range of 2 -- 5 of molar ratios (MoO 3 /Li 2 O), emerald was crystallized in the temperature range from 750 to 950 0 C, and the suitable crystallization conditions were found to be the molar ratio of 3 -- 4 and the temperature about 900 0 C. In the flux of Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 carried out in the range of 1.7 -- 5 of molar ratios (V 2 O 5 /Li 2 O), emerald was crystallized in the temperature range from 900 to 1150 0 . The suitable crystals were obtained at the molar ratio of 3 and the temperature range of 1000 -- 1100 0 C. The crystallization temperature rised with an increase in the molar ratio of the both fluxes. The emeralds grown in two binary fluxes were transparent green, having the density of 2.68, the refractive index of 1.56, and the two distinct bands in the visible spectrum at 430 and 600nm. The emerald grown in Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 flux was more bluish green than that grown in Li 2 O-MoO 3 flux. The size of the spontaneously nucleated emerald grown in the former flux was larger than the latter, when crystallized by the slow cooling method. As for the solubility of beryl in the two fluxes, Li 2 O-V 2 O 5 flux was superior to Li 2 O-MoO 3 flux whose small solubility of SiO 2 caused an experimental problem to the temperature gradient method. The suitability of the two fluxes for the crystal growth of emerald by the flux method was discussed from the view point of various properties of above-mentioned two fluxes. (author)

  7. Trace element fingerprinting of emeralds by PIXE/PIGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei; MacArthur, J.D.; Roeder, P.L.; Mariano, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Gemologists consider the mineral beryl, beryllium aluminium silicate, to be the gem, emerald, when it contains sufficient chromium, >0.1%, to colour it a strong green. Emeralds usually contain other trace elements. To investigate the feasibility of distinguishing an emerald's country of origin through its trace content, the trace elements in emeralds and a few beryls from sixteen locations have been determined with a single nondestructive measurement using PIXE and PIGE. From the database established with this limited number of samples, distinguishing trace element patterns were found. (orig.)

  8. Mechanisms of metasomatism in the calcite-pitchblende system: 2. Replacement of pitchblende by calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymkov, Yu.M.

    1996-01-01

    The principal mechanisms of the nasturan replacement by calcite -intrametasomatism, frontal metasomatism, dispersive metasomatism, and transformative metasomatism - are discussed in terms of G.L. Pospelov's (1973) concept. The main chemical condition required by the process is an oxidized environment, in which the tetravalent uranium of pitchblende or transitional reduced phases (coffinite) oxidizes to yield readily soluble uranyl compounds. The latter are replaced by calcite

  9. μ-SRXRF characterization of Brazilian emeralds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, J. F.; Radtke, M.; Buzanich, G.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H.; Guttler, R. A. S.; Rizzutto, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to characterize emeralds from different mines of Brazil by using Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence Microanalysis (μ-SRXRF). The advantage of this technique is that we can analyze a homogeneous, inclusion free area of the stone with the microbeam to distinguish the elemental fingerprint according to the provenance of the emerald. A total of 47 samples belonging to 5 different Brazilian mines were studied in this work and 28 elements were identified. By means of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) it is possible to build different groups according to the provenance of the stones, which allows to assign samples of unknown origin to the according mine.

  10. μ-SRXRF characterization of Brazilian emeralds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curado, J F; Radtke, M; Buzamcn, G; Reinnolz, U; Riesemeier, H; Guttler, R A S; Kizzutto, M A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to characterize emeralds from different mines of Brazil by using Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence Microanalysis (μ-SRXRF). The advantage of this technique is that we can analyze a homogeneous, inclusion free area of the stone with the microbeam to distinguish the elemental fingerprint according to the provenance of the emerald. A total of 47 samples belonging to 5 different Brazilian mines were studied in this work and 28 elements were identified. By means of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) it is possible to build different groups according to the provenance of the stones, which allows to assign samples of unknown origin to the according mine.

  11. Protecting black ash from the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Les Benedict

    2010-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) is an important resource for Tribes in the Northeast and Great Lakes regions of the North American continent. Ash in North America is being threatened with widespread destruction as a result of the introduction of emerald ash borer beetle (Agrilus planipennis) in 2002. Measures are being taken to slow the spread of emerald ash borer beetle....

  12. Characterization of emerald from Gujar Kili, Swat, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.A.; Akram, M.; Khattak, N.U.; Khan, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    The green gem variety of beryl family having Cr as colouring agent is known as emerald. Thirteen emerald occurrences are known from northern Pakistan. These occurrences are in Mohamand Agency, Bajuar Agency, Swat District, Indus Kohistan and Gilgit which are located exclusively in the metamorphosed ophiolitic melange of the Indus Suture Zone. The ophiolitic rocks of this suture are the source of Cr which colours the beryl to make it emerald. Studies have been carried out for the characterisation of emerald from one locality, Gujar Kili in Swat district, using petrographic, XRD, XRF and fission track techniques. The Gujar Kili emerald is of green to deep green colour good quality gemstone and contains inclusions in some cases. In general, the Gujar Kili emerald has high Mg, Fe, Cr, V and Al values as compared to average composition of natural emeralds of Swat District. Two mineralogical phases, namely beryl and chrysoberyl have been identified in the four Gujar Kili samples analysed by us. The XRD data for the beryl and chrysoberyl is also presented. The Cr which colours the beryl to make it emerald, does not substitute any element in the beryl structure, rather it is present as an impurity in the crystal matrix. A new etchant to reveal fission tracks in a very short time is also being reported in this paper. (author)

  13. The origin of emeralds embedded in archaeological artefacts in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Kržič

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Roman gold jewellery, which was excavated in Ptuj (Poetovio and consists of a necklace, earrings and a braceletwith embedded emeralds, is part of the Slovenian archaeological artefacts collections. Crystallographic characteristics,inclusions, luminous phenomena and geological characteristics were determined in order to establish theorigin of the emeralds. Chemical composition of the emeralds was determined non-destructively using the methodsof proton-induced X-rays and gamma rays (PIXE/PIGE. The results were compared with reference emeraldsfrom Habachtal in Austria and with green beryls from the Ural Mts. Literature data for emeralds from Egypt andmodern-day Afghanistan area were used to interpret the results. Specifically, these sites were known for emeraldsbeing mined for jewellery in Roman times. It was assumed that emeralds from archaeological artefacts originatedfrom Habachtal in Austria, given that this site was the nearest to the place where found. But the emeralds fromthe necklace and earrings in fact came from Egyptian deposits. The origin of emeralds from the bracelet could nothave been determined absolutely reliably due to the lack of comparative materials; they may originate from a site inmodern-day Afghanistan or from Egypt, but certainly not from the same site as the previously mentioned emeraldsin the necklace and earrings.

  14. Upper mantle fluids evolution, diamond formation, and mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    During mantle metasomatism, fluid-rock interactions in the mantle modify wall-rock compositions. Previous studies usually either investigated mineral compositions in xenoliths and xenocrysts brought up by magmas, or examined fluid compositions preserved in fluid inclusions in diamonds. However, a key study of Panda diamonds analysed both mineral and fluid inclusions in the diamonds [1] which we used to develop a quantitative characterization of mantle metasomatic processes. In the present study, we used an extended Deep Earth Water model [2] to simulate fluid-rock interactions at upper mantle conditions, and examine the fluids and mineral assemblages together simultaneously. Three types of end-member fluids in the Panda diamond fluid inclusions include saline, rich in Na+K+Cl; silicic, rich in Si+Al; and carbonatitic, rich in Ca+Mg+Fe [1, 3]. We used the carbonatitic end-member to represent fluid from a subducting slab reacting with an excess of peridotite + some saline fluid in the host environment. During simultaneous fluid mixing and reaction with the host rock, the logfO2 increased by about 1.6 units, and the pH increased by 0.7 units. The final minerals were olivine, garnet and diamond. The Mg# of olivine decreased from 0.92 to 0.85. Garnet precipitated at an early stage, and its Mg# also decreased with reaction progress, in agreement with the solid inclusions in the Panda diamonds. Phlogopite precipitated as an intermediate mineral and then disappeared. The aqueous Ca, Mg, Fe, Si and Al concentrations all increased, while Na, K, and Cl concentrations decreased during the reaction, consistent with trends in the fluid inclusion compositions. Our study demonstrates that fluids coming from subducting slabs could trigger mantle metasomatism, influence the compositions of sub-lithospherc cratonic mantle, precipitate diamonds, and change the oxygen fugacity and pH of the upper mantle fluids. [1] Tomlinson et al. EPSL (2006); [2] Sverjensky, DA et al., GCA (2014

  15. Trace element finger printing of emeralds by PIXE and PIGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei; Palmer, G.R.; MacArthur, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of 18 major- and minor-elements in 12 Emeralds from different mines and two synthetic ones are measured with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and γ-ray emission (PIGE). The concentration and distribution of 18 elements are used to establish the characteristic finger print pattern of each Emerald. With the help of cluster analysis of SYSTAT statistical package for IBMPC, these finger prints are analysed, from which a quantitative description of the dissimilarities between Emeralds can be given

  16. EMERALD - Vocational training in medical radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.A.; Tabakov, S.D.; Roberts, V.C.

    2000-01-01

    EMERALD (European MEdiation RAdiation Learning Development) is a project funded by the European Union under the Leonardo da Vinci programme. It involves a collaboration between Universities and Hospitals from the UK, Sweden, Italy and Portugal. The aim of the EMERALD project is to develop and deliver three common transnational vocational training modules in Medical Radiation Physics in the specific areas of Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy. These modules are intended to be used in the training programme for young professionals involved in medical radiation physics. Each module is developed from a series of competencies. The competencies are acquired by undertaking practical tasks described in a workbook given to each trainee. Once the task has been completed the trainee discusses the results and observations with his supervisor to ensure that the appropriate competency has been achieved. In addition to the workbook, each trainee receives a CD-ROM containing a series of images to help describe each task. The workbooks for each subject area have been completed and students from Sweden have undertaken Diagnostic Radiology training in the United Kingdom using this approach. The project is now entering the next phase; to develop a multimedia version of the workbook. (author)

  17. Emerald ash borer dispersal in Maryland: go forth young pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Sargent; Dick Bean; Michael Raupp; Alan J. Sawyer

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive pest from Asia, was introduced into Maryland in April 2003 via infested nursery stock shipped from Michigan to a nursery in southern...

  18. Emerald ash borer infestation rates in Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric L. Smith; Andrew J. Storer; Bryan K. Roosien

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain an estimate of the infestation rate of ash trees with emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis, Fairmaire; Coleoptera; Buprestidae), across its primary infestation zone of...

  19. Boron Isotopic Composition of Metasomatized Mantle Xenoliths from the Western Rift, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, T.; Nelson, W. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Western Branch of the East African Rift System is known to have a thick lithosphere and sparse, alkaline volcanism associated with a metasomatized mantle source. Recent work investigating the relationship between Western Branch metasomatized mantle xenoliths and associated lavas has suggested that these metasomes are a significant factor in the evolution of the rift. Hydrous/carbonated fluids or silicate melts are potent metasomatic agents, however gaining insight into the source of a metasomatic agent proves challenging. Here we investigate the potential metasomatic fluid sources using B isotope analysis of mineral separates from Western Branch xenoliths. Preliminary SIMS analyses of phlogopite from Katwe Kikorongo and Bufumbira have and average B isotopic composition of -28.2‰ ± 5.1 and -16.4‰ ± 3.6, respectively. These values are are dissimilar to MORB (-7.5‰ ± 0.7; Marschall and Monteleone, 2015), primitive mantle (-10‰ ± 2; Chaussidon and Marty, 1995), and bulk continental crust (-9.1‰ ± 2.4; Marschall et al., 2017) and display significant heterogeneity across a relatively short ( 150km) portion of the Western Branch. Though displaying large variability, these B isotopic compositions are indicative of a metasomatic agent with a more negative B isotopic composition than MORB, PM, or BCC. These results are consistent with fluids that released from a subducting slab and may be related to 700 Ma Pan-African subduction.

  20. 77 FR 57063 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety... NC 58 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 226, at Emerald Isle, North...

  1. 77 FR 64906 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety... NC 58 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 226, at Emerald Isle, North...

  2. 77 FR 44463 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety zone is... Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 226, at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety...

  3. 77 FR 35903 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... zone on the waters of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. The safety... Intracoastal Waterway, mile 226, at Emerald Isle, North Carolina. [[Page 35904

  4. Thermodynamic modeling of phase relations and metasomatism in shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, P.; Oliot, E.; Marquer, D.

    2009-04-01

    Ductile shear zones have been recognized for a long time as privileged sites of intense fluid-rock interactions in the crust. In most cases they induce focused changes in mineralogy and bulk chemical composition (metasomatism) which in turn may control the deformation and fluid-migration processes. Therefore understanding these processes requires in a first step to be able to model phase relations in such open system. In this contribution, emphasizes in placed on metasomatic aspects of the problem. Indeed , in many ductile shear zones reported in metagranites, deformation and fluid-rock interactions are associated with gain in MgO and losses of CaO and Na2O (K2O is also a mobile component but it can be either gained or lost). Although the mineralogical consequences of this so-called Mg-metasomatism are well-documented (replacement of K-feldspar into phengite, breakdown of plagioclase into ab + ep, crystallization of chlorite), the origin of this coupled mass-transfer is still unknown. We have performed a forward modeling of phase relationships using petrogenetic grids and pseudosections that consider variations in chemical potential (μ) of the mobile elements (MgO, CaO, Na2O). Chemical potential gradients being the driving force of mass transfer, μ-μ diagrams are the most appropriate diagrams to model open systems where fluid-rock interactions are prominent. Chemical potential diagrams are equivalent to activity diagrams but our approach differs from previous work because (1) solid solutions are taken into account (2) phase relations are modeled in a more realistic chemical system (Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O) and (3) the use of pseudosections allows to predict changes of the mineralogy (modes, composition) for the specific bulk composition studied. A particular attention is paid to the relationships between component concentrations and chemical potentials, which is not obvious in multi-component system. The studied shear zone is located in the Grimsel

  5. Metasomatism and the Weakening of Cratons: A Mechanism to Rift Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Stefanie; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The preservation of cratons is a demonstration of their strength and resistance to deformation. However, several cratons are rifting now (e.g. Tanzania and North China Craton) or have rifted in the past (e.g. North Atlantic Craton). To explain this paradox, we suggest that widespread metasomatism of the originally cold depleted dehydrated craton mantle lithosphere root can act as a potential weakening mechanism. This process, particularly melt metasomatism, increases root density through a melt-peridotite reaction, and reduces root viscosity by increasing the temperature and rehydrating the cratonic mantle lithosphere. Using 2D numerical models, we model silicate-melt metasomatism and rehydration of cold cratonic mantle lithosphere that is positioned beside standard Phanerozoic lithosphere. The models are designed to investigate when a craton is sufficiently weakened to undergo rifting and is no longer protected by the initially weaker adjacent standard Phanerozoic lithosphere. Melt is added to specified layers in the cratonic mantle lithosphere at a uniform volumetric rate determined by the duration of metasomatism (3 Myr, 10 Myr or 30 Myr), until a total of ~30% by volume of melt has been added. During melt addition heat and mass are properly conserved and the density and volume increase by the respective amounts required by the reaction with the peridotite. No extensional boundary conditions are applied to the models during the metasomatism process. As expected, significant refertilization leads to removal and thinning of progressively more gravitationally unstable cratonic mantle lithosphere. We show that the duration of metasomatism dictates the final temperature in the cratonic upper mantle lithosphere. Consequently, when extensional boundary conditions are applied in our rifting tests in most cases the Phanerozoic lithosphere rifts. The craton rifts only in the models with the hottest cratonic upper mantle lithosphere. Our results indicate rifting of cratons

  6. Depletion, cryptic metasomatism, and modal metasomatism (refertilization) of Variscan lithospheric mantle: Evidence from major elements, trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Os isotopes in a Saxothuringian garnet peridotite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medaris Jr., L. G.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, E.; Michels, Z. D.; Erban, V.; Kotková, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 226, SI (2015), s. 81-97 ISSN 0024-4937 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : garnet peridotite * Variscan * Bohemian Massif * Sr-Nd-Os isotopes * depletion cryptic metasomatism and refertilization * P-T conditions Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.723, year: 2015

  7. Depleted and metasomatized oceanic lithosphere beneath La Palma, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janisch, Astrid; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2017-04-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of Earth's interior, xenoliths became the best possibility to study the chemical composition of the earth mantle as well as its various processes. Three samples out of the sample suite of mantle peridotites from San Antonio Volcano on La Palma, Canary Islands, have been chosen to illustrate three examples of diverse mantle metasomatic events. The first sample, a pyroxene-hornblende-peridotite, was influenced by an alkali-rich, silicic-hydrous undersaturated melt and/or fluid forming a conspicuous cross-cutting amphibole-apatite-dyke with several veins percolating through the rock. Forsterite content in olivine varies between 82.5 - 85.5 and 86.0 - 89.0, suggesting at least two different occurrences of metasomatic overprint. Clinopyroxenes are mostly found in association with amphibole and in textural equilibrium hinting that both minerals may have grown together, while orthopyroxene have only been found as remnant inclusions in olivine. These clinopyroxenes are Cr-Diopsides with En43.40-50.97-Wo43.99-48.64-Fs4.30-8.22 and Mg# between 85.54 and 92.36. Secondary clinopyroxenes are Ti-Augites with En39.86-46.81-Wo46.65-51.98-Fs5.86-8.72 and Mg# of 82.44 - 89.09. The second sample, a sp-dunite, is characterized by haüyne-bearing melt veins which clearly indicate host-basalt infiltration. The haüyne is always in contact with amphibole, spinel and clinopyroxene denoting that they have been formed at the same time because there is no evidence for reaction among these phases. The melt infiltration apparently took place prior to xenolith entrainment in the host basalt. Primary olivine has Fo content of 89.57 - 89.67 with NiO ranging from 0.32 - 0.334, in contrast Fo content in secondary olivine varies from 89.05 - 90.86 and NiO fluctuates between 0.24 - 0.31. Cr-Diopside compositions are in range of En41.63-47.05-Wo47.83-51-90-Fs4.93-6.64 and Mg# between 86.48 - 90.50. The third sample is also a sp-dunite and marked by a network of phlogopite

  8. Geochemical behaviour of rare earth elements on metasomatic alteration of volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanov, J.A.; Kunov, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations are carried out on metasomatically altered Paleogene latites in order to follow up the rare earth elements (REE) geochemical behavour. Representative samples of the initial rocks (latites), from propylitized latites and quartz-sericite rocks, as well as from dickite, alumite, diaspore and monoquartzites, are analysed. The results show that REE have a behaviour of moderately mobile elements. They undergo redistribution both in quantity and in the composition of the group. The different concentrations and changes in the ΣREE compared to the initial rocks are observed and direct relationships to the degree of endogenic leaching are made. The REE mobility and redistribution during the metasomatic alterations in the region investigated are controlled by the physical-chemical conditions which play a significant role both in determining the composition of the mineral paragenese and in the fixing of REE. The distribution patterns indicate that REE redistribution in the case of metasomatic alterations is almost isochemical without any supply from hydrothermal solutions

  9. The geochemical characteristics of alkali metasomatic ore and its ore-forming significance at Zoujiashan deposit, Xiangshan uranium field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun; Hu Baoqun; Sun Zhanxue; Li Xueli; Guo Guolin; Rao Minghui

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline metasomatites are widely distributed in Zoujiashan uranium deposit and have close relation with uranium mineralization. Based on the study of field geological survey, petrographic methods, element chemical analysis and EPMA, etc, the alteration in alkaline metasomatic ore was found in the order of sodium metasomatism, potassium metasomatism and silica metasomatism. The alkaline hydrothermal fluid of mineralization is rich in Na at first and then rich in K, and quite similar in other chemical composition, but the K rich one is more favourite for the metallization. Compared with the normal porphyroclastic lava, the alkaline metasomatic ores in lower in SiO 2 , but higher in K 2 O or Na 2 O, Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , MgO, P 2 O 5 , CaO and U, Th, Zr, Hf, Sm, Ti, REE. Compared with potassium metasomatic ore, the sodium metasomatic ore is with high ΣLREE/ΣHREE ratio and lower Rb and REE. Because alkaline metasomatism is beneficial to release uranium from accessory mineral and bring out uranium from rocks, therefore it is very important to the migration and precipitation of uranium. (authors)

  10. Contemporary Irish identity on the Emerald Isle of the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura; Ryzewski, Krysta; Cherry, John F

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the island of Montserrat has been noticeably repositioning itself within the Caribbean as a place with a unique Irish heritage. Using the tag-line ‘the Emerald Isle of the Caribbean’, there has been an explicit attempt to evoke images of a verdant, green island with a long Irish...

  11. Progress on biological control of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Juli Gould

    2008-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, a buprestid native to northeastern Asia, was determined as the cause of ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in areas of southern Michigan and Ontario, Canada, in 2002. Infestations have been found since in Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Virginia, Illinois, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia....

  12. Invasion genetics of emerald ash borer in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicia M. Bray; Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Therese Poland; James J. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) was first detected in Michigan and Canada in 2002. Efforts to eradicate this destructive pest by federal and state regulatory agencies continue. Knowledge of EAB genetics will be useful in understanding the invasion dynamics of the beetle and to help identify geographic localities of potential biocontrol agents.

  13. Optical spectroscopy and high pressure on emeralds: synthetic and natural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Alejo, M. A.; Hernández-Alcántara, J. M.; Flores Jiménez, C.; Calderón, T.; Murrieta S., H.; Camarillo García, E.

    2011-09-01

    Emerald, natural and synthetic, are the subject of study by means of optical spectroscopy techniques. Particularly, natural emeralds have been considered as a gemstone in jewelry not being so the synthetic ones. But, in general, the properties of these are very good for applications, for instance as a laser system, due to the impurities control. In this work a comparison between natural and synthetic emeralds is done. Chromium ions are the main responsible of the characteristic fascinating green color of these gemstones, entering in the crystals in octahedral sites. Absorption at room temperature show up two broad bands in the visible region and two narrow bands called the R-lines. That spectrum corresponds to trivalent chromium ions in an octahedral site, as it happens in ruby and alexandrite. On other hand, photoemission arises in the range 640-850 nm. at room temperature . It is shown that the luminescence spectra changes as the temperature is lowered. The effect on the main peak of luminescence when high pressure is applied on small samples of emerald shows as a linear function.

  14. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer.

  15. The Emerald Necklace: Boston's Green Connection. Teaching with Historic Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Lisa; Snow, Pamela

    In 1870, Boston, Massachusetts, was an overcrowded, noisy, and dirty city. Concerned with the health and happiness of Bostonians restricted to these unhealthy surroundings, the city hired Frederick Law Olmsted to design a park system. The series of parks he designed over the next several years is known as the Emerald Necklace. From lovely…

  16. Features of phenacite mineralization from the Ural emerald mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Popov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the problems of development of phenacite mineralization at the Ural Emerald Mines, which is rather well developed and described in the Mariinsky (Malyshevsky and Sretensky (Sverdlovsk emerald-beryllium deposits. Phenacite is widespread in many beryllium deposits, but crystals of jewelry quality, with such large sizes as at the Emerald Mines, form rarely. Despite the prescription of the discovery (1833, and because of the rare occurrence of jewelry quality of crystals, and the presence of more expensive and valuable stones – emeralds and alexandrites – in deposits of the Emerald mines, phenacite remains almost unknown in the precious stones market, and especially abroad. Phenacite mineralization mostly occurs in the micaceous veins represented by gray and greenish-gray phlogopite. Distribution of phenacite in the micaceous veins is extremely uneven. Mineralization is typically nesting. High content of phenacite appears in the micaceous veins, mineral composition of which is mostly phlogopite, veins and concretions of beryllium-containing margarite (B-margarite and chlorite. Content of phenacite is low in the micaceous veins that include phlogopite, plagioclase, beryl, fluorite, smoky quartz. At the Sretensky deposit is located a vein that refers to a new type of ore bodies of the chrysoberyl-phenacite composition lying in ultrabasic rocks. Unlike emerald-bearing micaceous veins that have a northwestern spread, the chrysoberyl-phenacite ore bodies are oriented in the near-latitudinal direction and have a northern incidence at an angle of 75°–80°. The most common form of phenacite crystals on the Emerald Mines is rhombohedral and short columned. Crystals have a large number of faces. The usual shapes are a hexagonal prism and rhombohedrons. Twin crystals are common, druses, columnar aggregates, and spherulites are characteristic. Phenacite can be colorless or slightly colored in wine yellow, sometimes pinkish, light

  17. Ancient melt depletion overprinted by young carbonatitic metasomatism in the New Zealand lithospheric mantle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, James M.; Hodgkinson, A.; Palin, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    radiogenic than, the HIMU mantle reservoir. Metasomatism appears to pre-date ubiquitous pyroxene core to rim Al diffusion zoning, which may have resulted from cooling of the lithospheric mantle following cessation of Late Cretaceous-Eocene rifting of Zealandia from Gondwana. Nd isotope data, however, suggest...

  18. Experimental constraints on metasomatism of mantle wedge peridotites by hybridized adakitic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corgne, Alexandre; Schilling, Manuel E.; Grégoire, Michel; Langlade, Jessica

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a series of high-pressure (1.5 GPa) and high-temperature (1000-1300 °C) experiments were performed to investigate the petrological imprints of adakitic metasomatism on mantle wedge peridotites. Reaction couples were prepared using a powdered adakite from Cerro Pampa, Argentina (Mg# 0.7) placed in contact with a cored sample of medium-grained protogranular depleted spinel lherzolite from Pali Aike (Chile). Textural and chemical analyses of the run products allow us to identify key features of modal metasomatism by hybridized adakitic melts. The main changes in phase relations are associated with the following metasomatic reactions: incongruent dissolution of olivine and associated precipitation of secondary orthopyroxene, dissolution of primary spinel and subsequent replacement by secondary high-Cr spinel. In experiments with high water contents (9-12 wt%), precipitation of pargasitic amphibole also occurred, possibly at the expense of primary clinopyroxene. Neither phlogopite nor Ti-oxides were precipitated in any of these experiments. As expected, primary pyroxenes do not show evidence of being significantly altered following the interaction with the produced siliceous melts. Within the adakitic portion of the experimental charge, it was also observed the crystallization of secondary Ti-rich, Cr- and Na-poor diopsidic clinopyroxene, andesine plagioclase and, at low temperature, Fe-enriched secondary orthopyroxene. Considering textural criteria, we interpreted the formation of these minerals as crystallization products of the adakite component and not as true products of metasomatic reactions. The experimental results are used to discuss some of the petrological evidences presented to support modal metasomatism by slab-derived melts of mantle xenoliths extracted from several suprasubduction settings located around the Pacific Ring of Fire.

  19. EMERALD: Coping with the Explosion of Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. D.; Fouch, M. J.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2009-12-01

    The geosciences are currently generating an unparalleled quantity of new public broadband seismic data with the establishment of large-scale seismic arrays such as the EarthScope USArray, which are enabling new and transformative scientific discoveries of the structure and dynamics of the Earth’s interior. Much of this explosion of data is a direct result of the formation of the IRIS consortium, which has enabled an unparalleled level of open exchange of seismic instrumentation, data, and methods. The production of these massive volumes of data has generated new and serious data management challenges for the seismological community. A significant challenge is the maintenance and updating of seismic metadata, which includes information such as station location, sensor orientation, instrument response, and clock timing data. This key information changes at unknown intervals, and the changes are not generally communicated to data users who have already downloaded and processed data. Another basic challenge is the ability to handle massive seismic datasets when waveform file volumes exceed the fundamental limitations of a computer’s operating system. A third, long-standing challenge is the difficulty of exchanging seismic processing codes between researchers; each scientist typically develops his or her own unique directory structure and file naming convention, requiring that codes developed by another researcher be rewritten before they can be used. To address these challenges, we are developing EMERALD (Explore, Manage, Edit, Reduce, & Analyze Large Datasets). The overarching goal of the EMERALD project is to enable more efficient and effective use of seismic datasets ranging from just a few hundred to millions of waveforms with a complete database-driven system, leading to higher quality seismic datasets for scientific analysis and enabling faster, more efficient scientific research. We will present a preliminary (beta) version of EMERALD, an integrated

  20. Mantle metasomatism in the Kaapvaal Craton lithosphere: constraints on the composition of the metasomatic agent from fluid inclusions in MARID-type xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzett, J.; Krenn, K.; Hauzenberger, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The emplacement of both group I and group II kimberlites in the Kaapvaal Craton of the Kimberley region in South Africa is associated with an intense metasomatic alteration of the country rocks as evidenced by a diverse suite of xenoliths sampled by the kimberlites mainly comprising metasomatized peridotites and minor MARID-type xenoliths. These are characterized by hydrous potassic silicates and LILE-HFSE-rich titanates. Because the metasomatic agent is not preserved in these rocks its composition has to be inferred from that of the metasomatic assemblages. Here we present for the first time data on fluid inclusions from two MARID-xenoliths sampled by group-I kimberlites of the Kimberley cluster. They provide direct evidence for the nature of the metasomatic fluids involved in kimberlite-related metsomatism. The xenoliths contain phlogopite+K-richterite+diopside+ilmenite±rutile±apatite±zircon. Fluid inclusions with 4-10 µm in size were found in diopside, K-richterite and zircon and contain L+V+one-to-several daughter phases. Investigations with the freezing and heating stage indicate two different chemical systems for the fluids: (1) H2O-NaCl dominant fluids found as L+V+S inclusions in zircon together with abundant needle-like apatite, rutile and phlogopite solid inclusions. The fluid inclusions in part occur along zircon host-rutile/apatite inclusion grain boundaries which indicates that the fluids were trapped during zircon growth. They contain 30-32 mass% NaCl and show a density of 0.87-0.94 g/cm3. Halos of tiny fluid inclusions, however, indicate that most if not all zircon inclusions are decrepitated during ascent from depth and/or superheating during entrainment of the xenoliths into the kimberlite. Using EMPA, enstatite and a SiO2 polymorph were identified in opened fluid inclusions exposed at the surface of polished thin sections. Because these phases were exclusively found in the fluid inclusions, they are considered daughter crystals. The enstatite

  1. 77 FR 15600 - Special Local Regulation; Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix; Saint Andrew Bay; Panama City, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix; Saint Andrew Bay; Panama City, FL... navigable waters during the Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix high speed boat races. Entry into... needed to safeguard persons and vessels from safety hazards associated with the Emerald Coast Super Boat...

  2. 78 FR 54619 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Emerald...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ...] Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Emerald Ash... for the importation of emerald ash borer host material from Canada to prevent the introduction and spread of emerald ash borer in the United States. DATES: We will consider all comments that we receive on...

  3. EMERALD: A Flexible Framework for Managing Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. D.; Fouch, M. J.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2010-12-01

    The seismological community is challenged by the vast quantity of new broadband seismic data provided by large-scale seismic arrays such as EarthScope’s USArray. While this bonanza of new data enables transformative scientific studies of the Earth’s interior, it also illuminates limitations in the methods used to prepare and preprocess those data. At a recent seismic data processing focus group workshop, many participants expressed the need for better systems to minimize the time and tedium spent on data preparation in order to increase the efficiency of scientific research. Another challenge related to data from all large-scale transportable seismic experiments is that there currently exists no system for discovering and tracking changes in station metadata. This critical information, such as station location, sensor orientation, instrument response, and clock timing data, may change over the life of an experiment and/or be subject to post-experiment correction. Yet nearly all researchers utilize metadata acquired with the downloaded data, even though subsequent metadata updates might alter or invalidate results produced with older metadata. A third long-standing issue for the seismic community is the lack of easily exchangeable seismic processing codes. This problem stems directly from the storage of seismic data as individual time series files, and the history of each researcher developing his or her preferred data file naming convention and directory organization. Because most processing codes rely on the underlying data organization structure, such codes are not easily exchanged between investigators. To address these issues, we are developing EMERALD (Explore, Manage, Edit, Reduce, & Analyze Large Datasets). The goal of the EMERALD project is to provide seismic researchers with a unified, user-friendly, extensible system for managing seismic event data, thereby increasing the efficiency of scientific enquiry. EMERALD stores seismic data and metadata in a

  4. From Boston to the Balkans: Olmsted’s Emerald Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Luke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the legacy of landscape architect Fredrick Law Olmsted on modern cultural tourism policies. The author explains the involvement of Olmsted in the founding of Yosemite National Park, and describes the influence of this experience on his later work on the Emerald Necklace parks project in Boston. This became a model for natural and cultural corridors worldwide, including those in the Balkans and Turkey.

  5. Guía de uso de la base de datos Emerald

    OpenAIRE

    Biblioteca de la Universidad de Málaga

    2014-01-01

    Guía de uso de la base de datos Emerald. Recoge publicaciones de diferentes áreas temáticas: Economía, Ciencias Sociales, Ingeniería, Biblioteconomía, etc. Guía de uso de la base de datos Emerald en PDF.

  6. Field host range testing of Spathius agrili, a parasitoid of emerald ash borer: evaluating nontarget impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Strazanac; Juli R. Gould; Robert A. Haack; Ivich Fraser

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilis planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), into the Midwest from Asia has had a devastating affect on ash (Fraxinus spp.). As the emerald ash borer's ability to spread became better understood and its distribution in the Midwest increased, biocontrol became an increasingly...

  7. Early Reading Programs in High-Poverty Schools: Emerald Elementary Beats the Odds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Charles; Adler, Martha A.

    This report describes the early reading program in Emerald Elementary School, located in a Midwest urban fringe district. From 1996 through 1998, Emerald's students performed well above the district average or near the state average on reading achievement. During this period, the school had at least half of its students eligible for free or…

  8. Structural and genetic characteristics of uranium phosphates metasomatic deposits in limestones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, K G; Pigul' skij, V I; Prozorov, V G

    1985-01-01

    Voluminous literature on structural and genetic peculiarities of phosphorus-uranium deposits in Ordovician volcanogenic-sedimentary masses, is analyzed to clarify the reasons for their formation. On the basis of geologo-structural and mineralogo-geochemical research, it has been established that phosphorus-uranium mineralization is of metasomatic, postgeosyncline, intraorogenetic character. Mineralization is related to filtration of uprising fluids along rupture untrafolding violations. Formation of metasomatic ore bodies took place under hypabyssal conditions in closed structures by means of endogenous replacement of both carbonate and alumosilicate rocks, including intrusive volcanic and sedimentary complexes. The scale of phosphorus-uranium deposits depends on tectonic peculiarities of ore-containing medium much more than on lithological ones.

  9. Rb/Sr establishes an age of 61 to 67 Ma for Colombian emeralds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, F Romero; Kawashita, Koji; Schultz-Guttler, R

    2001-01-01

    The age of emeralds is related to the environment within which they form and can be dated by geochronological methods of which the rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) method (Faure, 1986) is the best to date the emeralds and its host rocks (Vidal et al., 1992). Isotopic studies done by Vidal et al. (1992) established two different geochronological environments for dating emeralds depending on their ages: emeralds from Precambrian rocks in Brazil, Madagascar and Zambia with high radiogenic strontium enrichment due to the older ages and high Rb contents and emeralds hosted by younger rocks in Colombia, Paquistan and Afganistan generally, with low 87 Rb/ 86 Sr range and low radiogenic Sr enrichment, and low content of Rb (au)

  10. Chemical and boron isotopic composition of tourmaline from the Mariinsky emerald deposit, Central Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksheev, Ivan A.; Trumbull, Robert B.; Popov, Mikhail P.; Erokhin, Yuri V.; Kudryavtseva, Olesya E.; Yapaskurt, Vasily O.; Khiller, Vera V.; Vovna, Galina M.; Kiselev, Vladimir I.

    2018-04-01

    Tourmaline is abundant at the Mariinsky schist-hosted emerald deposit in the Central Urals, Russia, both in emerald-bearing phlogopite veins (type 1) and later, emerald-free pockets, lenses, and veinlets cutting the phlogopite veins (type 2). The Ca content in tourmaline is influenced by the host rocks (ultramafic and mafic rocks), associated minerals, and minerals crystallized before tourmaline (amphibole, fluorite, margarite). The Na concentration in tourmaline depends on the presence or absence of paragonite, and the association with micas also strongly influences the contents of Li, Zn, Ni, and Co in tourmaline. Type 1 tourmalines associated with phlogopite are relatively depleted in these elements, whereas type 2 tourmalines associated with margarite or paragonite are enriched. Some differences in isomorphic substitutions along with the trace element composition (Zn, V, Sr, Co, REE) may have value in exploration of emerald-bearing and emerald-free veins in schist-hosted emerald deposits. The δ11B values in tourmaline of all types fall in a narrow total range from -11.3 to -8.4‰. These values, combined with a mineralization temperature of 420-360 °C, yield an estimated δ11B fluid composition of -7.4 to -6.8‰ suggesting a mixed source of boron, likely dominated from the granitic rocks surrounding the emerald belt. The narrow range of B-isotope compositions in tourmaline from throughout the Mariinsky deposit suggests a well-mixed hydrothermal system.

  11. Emerald oil field on production in North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Midland and Scottish Energy Ltd. (MSE) has placed Emerald oil field on stream in the U.K. North Sea with a floating production unit. Initial production, from two satellite wells, will be used to commission facilities. Three water injection wells have been unplugged and are ready for start-up. MSE will place a central cluster of wells-five producers and one water injector-on stream during the next few weeks. Production will build to an expected 25,000 b/d from 35 million bbl of reserves. Field development has undergone an unusually large number of setbacks and changes

  12. Inclusions in diamonds constrain thermo-chemical conditions during Mesozoic metasomatism of the Kaapvaal cratonic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yaakov; Navon, Oded; Goldstein, Steven L.; Harris, Jeff W.

    2018-06-01

    Fluid/melt inclusions in diamonds, which were encapsulated during a metasomatic event and over a short period of time, are isolated from their surrounding mantle, offering the opportunity to constrain changes in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that occurred during individual thermo-chemical events, as well as the composition of the fluids involved and their sources. We have analyzed a suite of 8 microinclusion-bearing diamonds from the Group I De Beers Pool kimberlites, South Africa, using FTIR, EPMA and LA-ICP-MS. Seven of the diamonds trapped incompatible-element-enriched saline high density fluids (HDFs), carry peridotitic mineral microinclusions, and substitutional nitrogen almost exclusively in A-centers. This low-aggregation state of nitrogen indicates a short mantle residence times and/or low mantle ambient temperature for these diamonds. A short residence time is favored because, elevated thermal conditions prevailed in the South African lithosphere during and following the Karoo flood basalt volcanism at ∼180 Ma, thus the saline metasomatism must have occurred close to the time of kimberlite eruptions at ∼85 Ma. Another diamond encapsulated incompatible-element-enriched silicic HDFs and has 25% of its nitrogen content residing in B-centers, implying formation during an earlier and different metasomatic event that likely relates to the Karoo magmatism at ca. 180 Ma. Thermometry of mineral microinclusions in the diamonds carrying saline HDFs, based on Mg-Fe exchange between garnet-orthopyroxene (Opx)/clinopyroxene (Cpx)/olivine and the Opx-Cpx thermometer, yield temperatures between 875-1080 °C at 5 GPa. These temperatures overlap with conditions recorded by touching inclusion pairs in diamonds from the De Beers Pool kimberlites, which represent the mantle ambient conditions just before eruption, and are altogether lower by 150-250 °C compared to P-T gradients recorded by peridotite xenoliths from the same locality. Oxygen fugacity (fO2

  13. Si-Metasomatism During Serpentinization of Jurassic Ultramafic Sea-floor: a Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Boschi, C.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Bracco-Levanto ophiolitic complex (northwestern Italy) represents one of the largest and better-exposed ophiolitic successions in the Northern Apennines. It is considered to be a fragment of heterogeneous Jurassic lithosphere that records tectono-magmatic and alteration histories similar to those documented along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), such as at the 15°20'N area and the Atlantis Massif at 30°N. Structural and petrological studies on these rocks provide constraints on metamorphic/deformation processes during formation and hydrothermal alteration of the Jurassic oceanic lithosphere. We present a petrological and geochemical study of serpentinization processes and fluid-rock interaction in the Bracco-Levanto ophiolitic complex and compare these to published data from modern oceanic hydrothermal systems, such as the Lost City hydrothermal field hosted in serpentinites on the Atlantis Massif. Major element and mineral compositional data allow us to distinguish a multiphase history of alteration characterized by: (1) widespread Si-metasomatism during progressive serpentinization, and (2) multiple phases of veining and carbonate precipitation associated with circulation of seawater in the shallow ultramafic-dominated portions of the Jurassic seafloor, resulting in the formation of ophicalcites. In detail, regional variations in Si, Mg and Al content are observed in zones of ophicalcite formation, indicating metasomatic reactions and Si-Al transport during long-lived fluid-rock interaction and channelling of hydrothermal fluids. Rare earth element and isotopic analysis indicate that the Si-rich fluids are derived from alteration of pyroxenes to talc and tremolite in ultramafic rocks at depth. Comparison with serpentinites from the Atlantis Massif and 15°20'N indicates a similar degree of Si-enrichment in the modern seafloor and suggests that Si-metasomatism may be a fundamental process associated with serpentinization at slow-spreading ridge environments

  14. Preliminary studies on fluid inclusions in metasomatic albite grains from Lagoa Real, Caetite, Ba, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzikawa, K.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary fluid inclusion studies in metasomatic albite grains from the Lagoa Real uranium deposit pointed out to mixing of strong brines (23 wt% NaCl equivalent) with low salinity fluids (2.3 wt% NaCl equivalent). Microthermometry and crushing tests indicated elevated pressures and the presence of hidrocarbons in larger amount than CO 2 . The remobilization of uranium as uranyl carbonate complexes and its precipitation, reducing U 6 + to U 4 + by CH 4 , is considered as a possibility. (Author) [pt

  15. Factors that influence emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) adult longevity and oviposition under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody A. Keena; Juli Gould; Leah S. Bauer

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is a nonnative insect from Asia that threatens ash trees in the urban and natural forests of North America. Research on this invasive insect and rearing parasitoids for...

  16. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  17. Effects of Cr 3+ impurity concentration on the crystallography of synthetic emerald crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Huang, Eugene; Lee, Jan-Shing; Yu, Shu-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    Flux method has been adopted for the synthesis of emerald crystals using PbO-V 2O 5 as a flux in order to study the crystallography of the synthetic crystals. In general, the hue of green color of emerald deepens with the addition of Cr 3+. The molar volume of the synthesized crystals was found to increase with the incorporation of Cr 2O 3 dopant. The substitution of Cr 3+ for Al 3+ in the octahedral sites of beryl results in the expansion of a-axis, while c-axis remains nearly unchanged. The maximum Cr 2O 3-content allowed in the crystal lattice of emerald has been found to be about 3.5 wt%. When the doping Cr 2O 3-content exceeds 3.5 wt%, a significant anomaly in lattice parameters starts to take place, accompanying the precipitation of an unknown phase in the emerald matrix.

  18. Optimization of visual trapping methodology for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Francese; Damon J. Crook; Ivich Fraser; David R. Lance; Alan J. Sawyer; Victor C. Mastro

    2009-01-01

    As the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), spreads throughout the range of North American ash species, better tools are needed for the detection and delimitation of new infestations...

  19. Parasitoids attacking emerald ash borers in western Pennsylvania and their potential use in biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Duan; R.W. Fuester; J. Wildonger; P.B. Taylor; S. Barth; S-E. Spichiger

    2009-01-01

    Current biological control programs against the emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) have primarily focused on the introduction and releases of exotic parasitoids from China, home of the pest origin....

  20. Slowing ash mortality: a potential strategy to slam emerald ash borer in outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert; John Bedford

    2009-01-01

    Several isolated outlier populations of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) were discovered in 2008 and additional outliers will likely be found as detection surveys and public outreach activities...

  1. Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis SDS-502 on adult emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Diana K. Londo& #241; o

    2011-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, an intermittent pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in northeastern Asia, was discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. In North America, infestations of EAB are now known in 13 states and 2 provinces.

  2. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N.L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D.M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R.P.; Garg, K.B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising

  3. PIXE/PIGE characterisation of emeralds using an external micro-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.; Poirot, J.-P.; Querre, G.; Salomon, J.; Zwaan, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    A large collection of emeralds of various occurrences has been analysed by PIXE/PIGE in view to establish a compositional database. Major elements (Be, Si, Al) and trace elements (Li, F, Na, Mg, Ca, Rb, Cs and transition metals) are determined using an external 3 MeV proton micro-beam. Elemental micro-mapping permits to select the useful provenance tracers. This database was applied to infer the origin of several ancient emeralds set on historical jewels

  4. Temperature Range for Metasomatism at the Bakalskoe Siderite Deposits with Use of Geochemical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Krupenin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data obtained with the quantitative microprobe ankerite–siderite composition analysis of seven samples from the different parts of Bakalskoe field showed that the wallrock ankerites in the western and central parts of the ore field differ in average concentrations of FeCO 3 (respectively 14.21 and 20.84 wt.%. However, there is no significant difference in composition of siderites. The calculation of the Mg-Fe metasomatism temperatures based on ankerite-siderite and ankerite-breinerite geothermometers showed the close agreement of the values of both methods at temperatures of 250 °C and above. The average temperatures of siderite metasomatism in the central part of the Bakalskoe ore field are in range 250-270 ° C, and, in the peripheral part, the determined temperature does not exceed 190-220 ° C. These values do not depend on the position of the siderite deposits in stratigraphic level of the Bakalskaya Suite.

  5. Biotic and abiotic factors affect green ash volatile production and emerald ash borer adult feeding preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-12-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic woodborer first detected in 2002 in Michigan and Ontario and is threatening the ash resource in North America. We examined the effects of light exposure and girdling on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) volatile production, and effects of light exposure, girdling, and leaf age on emerald ash borer adult feeding preferences and phototaxis. Green ash seedlings grown under higher light exposure had lower amounts of three individual volatile compounds, (Z)-3-hexenol, (E)-beta-ocimene, and (Z,E)-alpha-farnesene, as well as the total amount of six detected volatile compounds. Girdling did not affect the levels of these volatiles. Emerald ash borer females preferred mature leaves, leaves from girdled trees, and leaves grown in the sun over young leaves, leaves from nongirdled trees, and leaves grown in the shade, respectively. These emerald ash borer preferences were most likely because of physical, nutritional, or biochemical changes in leaves in response to the different treatments. Emerald ash borer females and males showed positive phototaxis in laboratory arenas, a response consistent with emerald ash borer preference for host trees growing in sunlight.

  6. Alkaline and carbonatite metasomatism of lithospheric mantle beneath SW Poland- Pilchowice case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwiek, Mateusz; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2014-05-01

    The Cenozoic basanites from Pilchowice (SW Poland) form volcanic plug located exactly at Intra- Sudetic Fault. These basanites belong to the Polish part of the Central European Volcanic Province and contain numerous, usually small (pfu and mg# from 0.915- 0.920 . One xenolith contains clinopyroxene with abundant spongy rims. Primary clinopyroxene is very rare and Al-enriched (mg# 0.92, 0.17 atoms of Al pfu). The spinel is Cr enriched (cr# 0.46-0.68) and is usually associated with clinopyroxene. Orthopyroxene is depleted in REE compared to primitive mantle. Orthopyroxene from majority of xenoliths are strongly LREE depleted ((La/Lu)N = 0.03-0.21). All studied peridotites contain clinopyroxene which is enriched (2 to 70 times) in REE compared to primitive mantle. Clinopyroxene patterns show relative low HREE concentration ((La/Lu)N = 4.75- 19.99), moreover patterns from three samples are convex- upward shaped with inflection point on Nd ((La/Nd)N = 0.36-0.96). Clinopyroxene- poor lithology, high cr# in spinel and LREE- depleted nature of orthopyroxene suggest that upper mantle sampled by Pilchowice basanite is a restite after partial melting. The LREE enriched composition of clinopyroxene suggest that peridotites were metasomatised. Clinopyroxene convex- upward shaped REE plots with inflection point on Nd is typical for metasomatism related with alkaline melt. On the other hand very low ratios of Ti/ Eu (24.8- 738.9) and high (La/ Yb)N (3.5- 17) ratio (Coltorti, 1999) suggest that the metasomatic agent was either a mixture of alkaline silicate melt with carbonatite or peridotite reaction with two independent agents is recorded. This study is a part of MSc thesis of the first author and was possible thanks to the project NCN 2011/03/B/ST10/06248 of Polish National Centre for Science. Coltorti, M., Bonadiman, C., Hinton, R. W., Siena, F. & Upton, B. G. J. (1999). Carbonatite metasomatism of the oceanic upper mantle: Evidence from clinopyroxenes and glasses in

  7. Apatite formation behaviour during metasomatism in the Bathtub Intrusion (Babbitt deposit, Duluth Complex, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raič, Sara; Mogessie, Aberra; Krenn, Kurt; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Tropper, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The mineralized troctolitic Bathtub intrusion (Duluth Complex, NE-Minnesota) is known for its famous Cu-Ni-Sulfide±PGM Babbitt deposit, where platinum group minerals (PGMs) are either hosted by primary magmatic sulfides (base metal sulfides) or associated with hydrothermally altered portions. This secondary generation of PGMs is present in alteration patches and suggests the involvement of hydrothermal fluids in the mobilization of platinum-group elements (PGEs). Accessory fluorapatite in these samples reveals besides H2O- and CO2-rich primary fluid inclusions, textural and compositional variations that also record magmatic and metasomatic events. Based on detailed back-scattered electron imaging (BSE) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), a primary magmatic origin is reflected by homogeneous or zoned grains, where zoning patterns are either concentric or oscillatory, with respect to LREE. Late magmatic to hydrothermal processes are indicated by grains with bright LREE-enriched rims or conversion textures with REE-enriched patches in the interior of the apatite. A metasomatic formation of monazite from apatite is documented by the presence of monazite inclusions in apatite and newly grown monazite at altered apatite rims. They formed by the release of REEs from the apatite during a fluid-induced alteration, based on the coupled substitution Ca2+ + P5+ = REE3+ + Si4+ (Rønsbo 1989; Rønsbo 2008). Samples with monazite inclusions in apatite further display occurrences of PGMs associated with hydrothermal alteration patches (chlorite + amphibole). The presence of H2O- and CO2-rich fluid inclusions in apatite, the metasomatically induced monazite growth, as well as the occurrence of PGMs in hydrothermally alteration zones, also suggest the involvement of aqueous chloride complexes in a H2O dominated fluid in the transportation of LREE and redistribution of the second generation of PGEs. Rønsbo, J.G. (1989): Coupled substitutions

  8. Occurrence of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and biotic factors affecting its immature stages in the Russian Far East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Yurchenko, Galina; Fuester, Roger

    2012-04-01

    Field surveys were conducted from 2008 to 2011 in the Khabarovsk and Vladivostok regions of Russia to investigate the occurrence of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, and mortality factors affecting its immature stages. We found emerald ash borer infesting both introduced North American green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and native oriental ashes (F. mandshurica Rupr. and F. rhynchophylla Hance) in both regions. Emerald ash borer densities (larvae/m(2) of phloem area) were markedly higher on green ash (11.3-76.7 in the Khabarovsk area and 77-245 in the Vladivostok area) than on artificially stressed Manchurian ash (2.2) or Oriental ash (10-59). Mortality of emerald ash borer larvae caused by different biotic factors (woodpecker predation, host plant resistance and/or undetermined diseases, and parasitism) varied with date, site, and ash species. In general, predation of emerald ash borer larvae by woodpeckers was low. While low rates (3-27%) of emerald ash borer larval mortality were caused by undetermined biotic factors on green ash between 2009 and 2011, higher rates (26-95%) of emerald ash borer larval mortality were caused by putative plant resistance in Oriental ash species in both regions. Little (emerald ash borer larvae was observed in Khabarovsk; however, three hymenopteran parasitoids (Spathius sp., Atanycolus nigriventris Vojnovskaja-Krieger, and Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang) were observed attacking third - fourth instars of emerald ash borer in the Vladivostok area, parasitizing 0-8.3% of emerald ash borer larvae infesting Oriental ash trees and 7.3-62.7% of those on green ash trees (primarily by Spathius sp.) in two of the three study sites. Relevance of these findings to the classical biological control of emerald ash borer in newly invaded regions is discussed.

  9. The role of metasomatism in the balance of halogens in ore-forming process at porphyry Cu-Mo deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzina, A. N.

    2009-04-01

    Volatile components play an important role in the evolution of ore-magmatic systems and their ore potential. Of special interest are fluorine and chlorine compounds that principally control the transportation of ore elements by the fluid in a magmatic process and under high-temperature hydrothermal conditions. Study of the evolution of fluorine-chlorine activity in the ore-forming process and their source is usually based on analysis of their magmatic history, whereas the additional source of fluorine and chlorine released during metasomatic alteration of rocks hosting mineralization is poorly discussed in the existing literature. Based on microprobe data on Cl and F abundances in halogen-containing minerals (biotite, amphibole, apatite, titanite) in intrusive rocks and their hydrothermally altered varieties, the role of metasomatic processes in the balance of volatiles in the ore-forming system is discussed by the example of porphyry Cu-Mo deposits of Siberia (Russia) and Mongolia. Two groups of the deposits are considered: copper-molybdenum (Erdenetiin Ovoo, Mongolia and Aksug, Russia) with prevailing propylitic and phyllic alteration and molybdenum-copper (Sora, Russia), with predominant potassic alteration. All types of hydrothermal alterations have led to drastic decrease in Cl contents in metasomatic minerals as compared with halogen-containing magmatic minerals. All studied deposits (particularly those where propylitic and phyllic alteration were developed) show a nearly complete chlorine removal from altered halogen-containing rock-forming minerals (biotite and amphibole). The Cl content in amphibole decreases several times at the stage of replacement with actinolite in the process of propylitization. In the later chlorites (ripidolite and brunsvigite) that replace amphibole, actinolite, and biotite, chlorine is not detected by microprobe (detection limit 0.01-0.02% Cl). Chlorine was also not detected in white micas (muscovite-phengite series) in quartz

  10. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to the identification of emeralds from different synthetic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrosì, G. [Department of Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Tempesta, G., E-mail: gioacchino.tempesta@uniba.it [Department of Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Scandale, E. [Department of Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V. [Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds, CNR, Pisa (Italy); Mangone, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Lezzerini, M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy can provide a useful contribution in mineralogical field in which the quantitative chemical analyses (including the evaluation of light elements) can play a key role in the studies on the origin of the emeralds. In particular, the chemical analyses permit to determine those trace elements, known as fingerprints, that can be useful to study their provenance. This technique, not requiring sample preparation results particularly suitable for gemstones, that obviously must be studied in a non-destructive way. In this paper, the LIBS technique was applied to distinguish synthetic emeralds grown by Biron hydrothermal method from those grown by Chatham flux method. The analyses performed by collinear double-pulse LIBS give a signal enhancement useful for the quantitative chemical analyses while guaranteeing a minimal sample damage. In this way it was obtained a considerable improvement on the detection limit of the trace elements, whose determination is essential for determining the origin of emerald gemstone. The trace elements V, Cr, and Fe and their relative amounts allowed the correct attribution of the manufacturer. Two different methods for quantitative analyses were used for this study: the standard Calibration-Free LIBS (CF-LIBS) method and its recent evolution, the One Point Calibration LIBS (OPC-LIBS). This is the first approach to the evaluation of the emerald origin by means of the LIBS technique. - Highlights: • A LIBS method for discrimination between synthetic emeralds is presented. • Only one standard of known composition is needed for the analysis. • A set of two kind of synthetic emeralds has been analyzed. • The cromophoric elements Cr, V and Fe amounts have been used to determine the origin of emerald gemstone.

  11. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to the identification of emeralds from different synthetic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrosì, G.; Tempesta, G.; Scandale, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.; Mangone, A.; Lezzerini, M.

    2014-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy can provide a useful contribution in mineralogical field in which the quantitative chemical analyses (including the evaluation of light elements) can play a key role in the studies on the origin of the emeralds. In particular, the chemical analyses permit to determine those trace elements, known as fingerprints, that can be useful to study their provenance. This technique, not requiring sample preparation results particularly suitable for gemstones, that obviously must be studied in a non-destructive way. In this paper, the LIBS technique was applied to distinguish synthetic emeralds grown by Biron hydrothermal method from those grown by Chatham flux method. The analyses performed by collinear double-pulse LIBS give a signal enhancement useful for the quantitative chemical analyses while guaranteeing a minimal sample damage. In this way it was obtained a considerable improvement on the detection limit of the trace elements, whose determination is essential for determining the origin of emerald gemstone. The trace elements V, Cr, and Fe and their relative amounts allowed the correct attribution of the manufacturer. Two different methods for quantitative analyses were used for this study: the standard Calibration-Free LIBS (CF-LIBS) method and its recent evolution, the One Point Calibration LIBS (OPC-LIBS). This is the first approach to the evaluation of the emerald origin by means of the LIBS technique. - Highlights: • A LIBS method for discrimination between synthetic emeralds is presented. • Only one standard of known composition is needed for the analysis. • A set of two kind of synthetic emeralds has been analyzed. • The cromophoric elements Cr, V and Fe amounts have been used to determine the origin of emerald gemstone

  12. Metasomatic alkali-feldspar syenites (episyenites) of the Proterozoic Suomenniemi rapakivi granite complex, southeastern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkanen, E.; Rämö, O. T.

    2017-12-01

    Peralkaline to marginally metaluminous alkali-feldspar syenites and quartz alkali-feldspar syenites are hosted by subalkaline, ferroan rapakivi granites in the 1644 Ma Suomenniemi complex of southeastern Finland. These alkali syenites form NW-oriented dikes and small (fingerprints are, within error, identical to those of the subalkaline granites of the complex. We propose that the Suomenniemi alkali-feldspar syenites are episyenites, formed as the result of pervasive local metasomatism of the subalkaline granites caused by high-temperature oxidizing peralkaline fluids. The process led to major geochemical changes, e.g., addition of Na, Al and Fe3 +, depletion of Si and Fe2 +, and partial to complete recrystallization of the granites along fluid pathways.

  13. Strategic removal of host trees in isolated, satellite infestations of emerald ash borer can reduce population growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel J. Fahrner; Mark Abrahamson; Robert C. Venette; Brian H. Aukema

    2017-01-01

    Emerald ash borer is an invasive beetle causing significant mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America and western Russia. The invasive range has expanded to more than half of the states in the United States since the initial detection in Michigan, USA in 2002. Emerald ash borer is typically managed with a combination of techniques...

  14. Monitoring the establishment and abundance of introduced parasitoids of emerald ash borer larvae in Maryland, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical biological control can be an important tool for managing invasive species such as emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Emerald ash borer is now widespread throughout the United States, and was first detected in Maryland in 2003. The biological control program to manage emera...

  15. Pressure–Temperature–Fluid Constraints for the Poona Emerald Deposits, Western Australia: Fluid Inclusion and Stable Isotope Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Marshall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerald from the deposits at Poona shows micrometre-scale chemical, optical, and cathodoluminescence zonation. This zonation, combined with fluid inclusion and isotope studies, indicates early emerald precipitation from a single-phase saline fluid of approximately 12 weight percent NaCl equivalent, over the temperature range of 335–525 °C and pressures ranging from 70 to 400 MPa. The large range in pressure and temperature likely reflects some post entrapment changes and re-equilibration of oxygen isotopes. Secondary emerald-hosted fluid inclusions indicate subsequent emerald precipitation from higher salinity fluids. Likewise, the δ18O-δD of channel fluids extracted from Poona emerald is consistent with multiple origins yielding both igneous and metamorphic signatures. The combined multiple generations of emerald precipitation, different fluid compositions, and the presence of both metamorphic and igneous fluids trapped in emerald, likely indicate a protracted history of emerald precipitation at Poona conforming to both an igneous and a metamorphic origin at various times during regional lower amphibolite to greenschist facies metamorphism over the period ~2710–2660 Ma.

  16. White Fringetree as a Novel Larval Host for Emerald Ash Borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Don

    2015-02-01

    Emerald ash borer is an invasive Asian pest of ash species in North America. All North American species of ash tested so far are susceptible to it, but there are no published reports of this insect developing fully in non-ash hosts in the field in North America. I report here evidence that emerald ash borer can attack and complete development in white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus L., a species native to the southeastern United States that is also planted ornamentally. Four of 20 mature ornamental white fringetrees examined in the Dayton, Ohio area showed external symptoms of emerald ash borer attack, including the presence of adult exit holes, canopy dieback, and bark splitting and other deformities. Removal of bark from one of these trees yielded evidence of at least three generations of usage by emerald ash borer larvae, several actively feeding live larvae, and a dead adult confirmed as emerald ash borer. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Use of the extraction residue of emeralds in a formulation mass of ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, R. F.; Nascimento, R.M.; Paskocimas, C.A.; Dutra, R.P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Companies involved in mining and beneficiation of emerald represent an important area of industrial development in Brazil, with a significant contribution to world production of this ore. As a result, large volumes of waste generated and emerald are constantly abandoned in the environment, contributing negatively to their preservation. On the other hand the interest in the use of mining waste as an additive in production of ceramic materials has grown among researchers in recent years. The ceramic industry is constantly seeking to expand the market for the sector and trying to improve product quality and increase the variety of applications. The technology of obtaining ceramic coating that uses waste from mining is still a largely unexplored market. Thus, the purpose of this study was to characterize the waste generated from mining emerald as well as to evaluate its potential use as raw material for production melting of ceramic tiles. Ceramic mixtures were prepared from raw materials characterized by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Five compositions were prepared using the waste codes of emeralds from 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Samples were prepared by pressing, sintered at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C and characterized to establish their mineralogical composition, water absorption, linear shrinkage and modulus of rupture. The results showed that the residue of emeralds studied can be embedded in the mass of ceramic tiles up to 20% in replacement of feldspar without compromising the end product properties. (author)

  18. Pressure-temperature-fluid constraints for the Emmaville-Torrington emerald deposit, New South Wales, Australia: Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughrey, Lara; Marshall, Dan; Jones, Peter; Millsteed, Paul; Main, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Emmaville-Torrington emeralds were first discovered in 1890 in quartz veins hosted within a Permian metasedimentary sequence, consisting of meta-siltstones, slates and quartzites intruded by pegmatite and aplite veins from the Moule Granite. The emerald deposit genesis is consistent with a typical granite-related emerald vein system. Emeralds from these veins display colour zonation alternating between emerald and clear beryl. Two fluid inclusion types are identified: three-phase (brine+vapour+halite) and two-phase (vapour+liquid) fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the emeralds were precipitated from saline fluids ranging from approximately 33 mass percent NaCl equivalent. Formational pressures and temperatures of 350 to 400 °C and approximately 150 to 250 bars were derived from fluid inclusion and petrographic studies that also indicate emerald and beryl precipitation respectively from the liquid and vapour portions of a two-phase (boiling) system. The distinct colour zonations observed in the emerald from these deposits is the first recorded emerald locality which shows evidence of colour variation as a function of boiling. The primary three-phase and primary two-phase FITs are consistent with alternating chromium-rich `striped' colour banding. Alternating emerald zones with colourless beryl are due to chromium and vanadium partitioning in the liquid portion of the boiling system. The chemical variations observed at Emmaville-Torrington are similar to other colour zoned emeralds from other localities worldwide likely precipitated from a boiling system as well.

  19. U-Th-He dating of diamond-forming C-O-H fluids and mantle metasomatic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Y.; Class, C.; Goldstein, S. L.; Winckler, G.; Kiro, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon- and water-rich (C-O-H) fluids play important roles in the global material circulation, deep Earth processes, and have major impacts on the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). Yet the origin and composition of C-O-H fluids, and the timing of fluid-rock interaction, are poorly constrained. `Fibrous' diamonds encapsulate C-O-H mantle fluids as μm-scale high-density fluid (HDF) inclusions. They can be directly sampled, and offer unique opportunities to investigate metasomatic events involving C-O-H fluids and the SCLM through Earth history. Until now no technique has provided reliable age constraints on HDFs. We applied a new in-vacuum crushing technique to determine the He abundances and 3He/4He ratios of HDFs in diamonds from the Kaapvaal lithosphere, South Africa. Three diamonds with saline HDFs have 3He/4He=3-4Ra. In 4He/3He vs 238U/3He space they define an `isochron' age of 96±45Ma, representing the first radiometric age reported for HDFs, and thus for C-O-H mantle fluids. In addition, a diamond with silicic HDFs and two that carry carbonatitic HDFs have low 3He/4He=0.07-0.6Ra. Using the measured U, Th, 4He and 3He contents of these diamonds, and the equation for 4He production from U-Th decay, we calculate 3He/4He as a function of time. Metasomatic fluids are derived from MORB, SCLM or subducted components with R/Ra=3-10, and this is assumed as the HDFs initial composition. The silicic and carbonatitic HDFs signify two older metasomatic events at 350 and 850 Ma, respectively. Thus, our new data reveal 3 metasomatic episodes in the Kaapvaal SCLM during the last 1 Ga, each by a different metasomatic agent. These 3 episodes correspond to late-Mesozoic kimberlite eruptions at 85 Ma, and the regional Namaqua-Natal and Damara Orogenies at 1 Ga and 500 Ma. We propose that the radioactive U-Th-He system in HDF-bearing diamonds can be used as a tool to provide meaningful radiometric ages of deep C-O-H fluids, and the timing of SCLM metasomatic events.

  20. The overwintering physiology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis fairmaire (coleoptera: buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, Jill C; Sobek, Stephanie; Lyons, D Barry; Bernards, Mark A; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-01-01

    Ability to survive cold is an important factor in determining northern range limits of insects. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive beetle introduced from Asia that is causing extensive damage to ash trees in North America, but little is known about its cold tolerance. Herein, the cold tolerance strategy and mechanisms involved in the cold tolerance of the emerald ash borer were investigated, and seasonal changes in these mechanisms monitored. The majority of emerald ash borers survive winter as freeze-intolerant prepupae. In winter, A. planipennis prepupae have low supercooling points (approximately -30°C), which they achieve by accumulating high concentrations of glycerol (approximately 4M) in their body fluids and by the synthesis of antifreeze agents. Cuticular waxes reduce inoculation from external ice. This is the first comprehensive study of seasonal changes in cold tolerance in a buprestid beetle. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of heat treatment schedules for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott W; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-12-01

    The thermotolerance of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was evaluated by subjecting larvae and prepupae to a number of time-temperature regimes. Three independent experiments were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by heating emerald ash borer infested firewood in laboratory ovens. Heat treatments were established based on the internal wood temperature. Treatments ranged from 45 to 65 degrees C for 30 and 60 min, and the ability of larvae to pupate and emerge as adults was used to evaluate the success of each treatment. A fourth experiment was conducted to examine heat treatments on exposed prepupae removed from logs and subjected to ambient temperatures of 50, 55, and 60 degrees C for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. Results from the firewood experiments were consistent in the first experiment. Emergence data showed emerald ash borer larvae were capable of surviving a temperatures-time combination up to 60 degrees C for 30 min in wood. The 65 degrees C for 30 min treatment was, however, effective in preventing emerald ash borer emergence on both dates. Conversely, in the second experiment using saturated steam heat, complete mortality was achieved at 50 and 55 degrees C for both 30 and 60 min. Results from the prepupae experiment showed emerald ash borer survivorship in temperature-time combinations up to 55 degrees C for 30 min, and at 50 degrees C for 60 min; 60 degrees C for 15 min and longer was effective in preventing pupation in exposed prepupae. Overall results suggest that emerald ash borer survival is variable depending on heating conditions, and an internal wood temperature of 60 degrees C for 60 min should be considered the minimum for safe treatment for firewood.

  2. Effectiveness of differing trap types for the detection of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jordan M; Storer, Andrew J; Fraser, Ivich; Beachy, Jessica A; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-08-01

    The early detection of populations of a forest pest is important to begin initial control efforts, minimizing the risk of further spread and impact. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an introduced pestiferous insect of ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) in North America. The effectiveness of trapping techniques, including girdled trap trees with sticky bands and purple prism traps, was tested in areas with low- and high-density populations of emerald ash borer. At both densities, large girdled trap trees (>30 cm diameter at breast height [dbh], 1.37 m in height) captured a higher rate of adult beetles per day than smaller trees. However, the odds of detecting emerald ash borer increased as the dbh of the tree increased by 1 cm for trap trees 15-25 cm dbh. Ash species used for the traps differed in the number of larvae per cubic centimeter of phloem. Emerald ash borer larvae were more likely to be detected below, compared with above, the crown base of the trap tree. While larval densities within a trap tree were related to the species of ash, adult capture rates were not. These results provide support for focusing state and regional detection programs on the detection of emerald ash borer adults. If bark peeling for larvae is incorporated into these programs, peeling efforts focused below the crown base may increase likelihood of identifying new infestations while reducing labor costs. Associating traps with larger trees ( approximately 25 cm dbh) may increase the odds of detecting low-density populations of emerald ash borer, possibly reducing the time between infestation establishment and implementing management strategies.

  3. The Finero phlogopite-peridotite massif: an example of subduction-related metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Alberto; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Rivalenti, Giorgio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    The Finero peridotite massif is a harzburgite that suffered a dramatic metasomatic enrichment resulting in the pervasive presence of amphibole and phlogopite and in the sporadic occurrence of apatite and carbonate (dolomite)-bearing domains. Pyroxenite (websterite) dykes also contain phlogopite and amphibole, but are rare. Peridotite bulk-rock composition retained highly depleted major element characteristics, but was enriched in K, Rb, Ba, Sr, LREE (light rare earth elements) (LaN/YbN=8-17) and depleted in Nb. It has high radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr(270)=0.7055-0.7093), low radiogenic Nd (ɛNd(270)=-1 to -3) and EMII-like Pb isotopes. Two pyroxenite - peridotite sections examined in detail show the virtual absence of major and trace element gradients in the mineral phases. In both rock types, pyroxenes and olivines have the most unfertile major element composition observed in Ivrea peridotites, spinels are the richest in Cr, and amphibole is pargasite. Clinopyroxenes exhibit LREE-enriched patterns (LaN/YbN 16), negative Ti and Zr and generally positive Sr anomaly. Amphibole has similar characteristics, except a weak negative Sr anomaly, but incompatible element concentration 1.9 (Sr) to 7.9 (Ti) times higher than that of coexisting clinopyroxene. Marked geochemical gradients occur toward apatite and carbonate-bearing domains which are randomly distributed in both the sections examined. In these regions, pyroxenes and amphibole (edenite) arelower in mg## and higher in Na2O, and spinels and phlogopite are richer in Cr2O3. Both the mineral assemblage and the incompatible trace element characteristics of the mineral phases recall the typical signatures of ``carbonatite'' metasomatism (HFSE depletion, Sr, LILE and LREE enrichment). Clinopyroxene has higher REE and Sr concentrations than amphibole (amph/cpxDREE,Sr=0.7-0.9) and lower Ti and Zr concentrations. It is proposed that the petrographic and geochemical features observed at Finero are consistent with a subduction

  4. Mineralogy of metasomatic rocks and geochronology of the Olhovka porphyry-copper deposit, Chukotka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogacheva, Lyuba; Baksheev, Ivan

    2010-05-01

    The Olkhovka porphyry-copper deposit located on the border of foreland of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt (OCVB) and a ledge composed of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Uda-Murgal arc (J3-K1) rocks is hosted by monzonite stock attributed to the Upper Cretaceous Kavralyan complex - K2) We estimated age of the Olkhovka monzonite by Rb-Sr and U-Pb methods. Rb-Sr age was determine om the basis of isotopic analysis of 8 monomineralic samples (potassium feldspar, plagioclase, amphibole, and dark mica). Isochron constructed on the basis of Rb-Sr data corresponds to the age of 78 + 2.6 Ma (MSWD=0.23). The Rb-Sr age is supported by U-Pb data derived from zircon of the same rock. One hundred and three single crystals of zircon were analyzed. Uranium content ranges from 52.66 ppm to 579.64 ppm; U/Th isotopic ratio varies from 0.567 to 1.746; age is 78.02+0.65 Ma (MSWD = 2.8). Monzonite is propylitized in variable degree. Propylite is composed of actinolite, chlorite, albite, quartz, and calcite. Propylite are cut by quartz-tourmaline veins. In addition, quartz-tourmaline metasomatic rock was identified in rhyolite ignimbrite out of the stock. Microscopically, tourmaline crystals of both types are oscilatory zoned that is caused by variable Fe content. Tourmalines of both assemblages can be classified as intermediate member of the schorl ("oxy-schorl")-dravite ("oxy-dravite") series. The Fetot/ (Fetot+Mg) varies from 0.31 to 0.95 in propylitic tourmaline and from 0.11 to 0.49, in quartz-tourmaline altered rocks from ignimbrite. Despite similar composition of both tourmalines, the major isomorphic substitutions in them are different. In propylite tourmaline, it is Fe → Al, whereas in the second case, it is Fe → Mg with certain effect of the Fe → Al type. Fe → Al isomorphic substitution is typical of porphyry style deposits (Baksheev et al., 2009 [1]). Therefore, we can conclude that quartz-tourmaline alteration in ignimbrite does not related to the formation of

  5. Chemical and oxygen isotope zonings in garnet from subducted continental crust record mineral replacement and metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vho, Alice; Rubatto, Daniela; Regis, Daniele; Baumgartner, Lukas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Garnet is a key mineral in metamorphic petrology for constraining pressure, temperature and time paths. Garnet can preserve multiple growth stages due to its wide P-T stability field and the relatively slow diffusivity for major and trace elements at sub-solidus temperatures. Pressure-temperature-time-fluid paths of the host rock may be reconstructed by combining metamorphic petrology with microscale trace element and oxygen isotope measurements in garnet. Subduction zones represent relevant geological settings for geochemical investigation of element exchanges during aqueous fluid-rock interactions. The Sesia Zone consists of a complex continental sequence containing a variety of mono-metamorphic and poly-metamorphic lithologies such as metagranitoids, sediments and mafic boudins. The precursor Varisican-Permian amphibolite-facies basement (6-9 kbar 650-850°C; Lardeaux and Spalla, 1991; Robyr et al., 2013) experienced high pressure metamorphism (15-22 kbar 500-550°C; Regis, et al. 2014; Robyr et al., 2013) during Alpine subduction. In different lithologies of the Internal Complex (Eclogitic Micaschist Complex), including metabasites from the Ivozio Complex, Ti-rich metasediments from Val Malone and pre-Alpine Mn-quartzites associated to metagabbros from Cima Bonze, garnet is abundant and shows a variety of complex textures that cannot be reconciled with typical growth zoning, but indicate resorption and replacement processes and possible metasomatism. In-situ, microscale oxygen isotopes analysis of garnet zones was performed by ion microprobe with the SwissSIMS Cameca IMS 1280-HR at University of Lausanne and SHRIMP-SI at the Australian National University. Each sample has a distinct δ18O composition, and the δ18O values show different degrees of variation between domains. Homogeneously low values of < 5‰ are measured in the garnets from the Ivozio Complex metagabbro. Intragrain variations of up to 3.5‰ in the porphyroblasts from Val Malone metasediments

  6. Xenoliths in Eocene lavas from Central Tibet record carbonated metasomatism of the lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussin, Fanny; Cordier, Carole; Boulvais, Philippe; Guillot, Stéphane; Roperch, Pierrick; Replumaz, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Cenozoic post-collisional volcanism of the Tibetan Plateau, emplaced on an accreted continental margin under compression, could bring important information regarding the edification of the Plateau. In this study, we combined petrography, whole rock geochemistry, stable isotopes and in situ mineral analysis to decipher the genesis of Eocene-Oligocene magmatic rocks from the Nangqian basin (35-38 Ma, [Spurlin et al., 2005; Xu et al., 2016]), located at the hinge between Central Tibet and the Eastern Indo-Asia Collision Zone. Our dataset includes potassic trachyandesites; amphibole-bearing potassic trachytes; and rare ultrapotassic (K2O/Na2O ≥ 4) mafic syenites. All samples have high REE abundances (La = 100 - 500 x primitive mantle). Fractionation of heavy REE (Gd/YbN > 3) indicates melting in the garnet stability field, and relative depletion in high-field strength elements (Nb, Ta) indicates a selective enrichment of the source by metasomatic fluids. This metasomatism event is also evidenced by the occurrence of re-equilibrated mantle xenocrysts of phlogopite (Mg# = 88 - 90 and Cr2O3 content = 0.9 - 1.82 wt%) in mafic syenites. Potassic trachyandesites have specific composition, with negative Zr-Hf anomaly and low Hf/Sm (0.2 - 0.4). Indeed, they include xenocrystic aggregates, composed of magmatic clinopyroxene, apatite and subordinate biotite and feldspar, with interstitial calcite and dolomite. δ18OV -SMOW (9.2 - 11.0 ) and δ13CV -PDB (-6.1 - -4.0 ) of these rocks indicate the presence of primary, mantle-derived carbonates. In situ analysis of the major and trace element compositions of the carbonates, clinopyroxenes and apatites further suggest that these aggregates represent cumulates of a carbonate-bearing magma. These xenoliths thus show that the lithospheric mantle was also metasomatized by CO2-rich fluids. Cenozoic carbonatites in China have been identified in Maoniuping in Western Sichuan (31.7 Ma), Lixian in the Western Qinlin (22-23 Ma), and

  7. Measuring the impact of biotic factors on populations of immature emerald ash borers (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Ulyshen, Michael D; Bauer, Leah S; Gould, Juli; Van Driesche, Roy

    2010-10-01

    Cohorts of emerald ash borer larvae, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, were experimentally established in July of 2008 on healthy green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) trees in two wooded plots at each of three sites near Lansing, MI, by caging gravid emerald ash borer females or placing laboratory-reared eggs on trunks (0.5-2 m above the ground) of selected trees. One plot at each site was randomly chosen for release of two introduced larval parasitoids, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), whereas the other served as the control. Stage-specific mortality factors and rates were measured for all experimentally established cohorts and for associated wild (i.e., naturally occurring) emerald ash borer immature stages via destructive sampling of 2.5 m (above the ground) trunk sections of cohort-bearing trees in the spring and fall of 2009. Host tree defense was the most important mortality factor, causing 32.0 to 41.1% mortality in the experimental cohorts and 17.5 to 21.5% in wild emerald ash borer stages by spring 2009, and 16.1 to 29% for the remaining experimental cohorts, and 9.9 to 11.8% for wild immature emerald ash borer stages by fall 2009. Woodpecker predation was the second most important factor, inflicting no mortality in the experimental cohorts but causing 5.0 to 5.6% mortality to associated wild emerald ash borer stages by spring 2009 and 9.2 to 12.8% and 3.2 to 17.7%, respectively, for experimental cohorts and wild emerald ash borer stages by fall 2009. Mortality from disease in both the experimental and wild cohorts was low (emerald ash borer stages were parasitized by T. planipennisi. While there were no significant differences in mortality rates because of parasitism between parasitoid-release and control plots, T. planipennisi was detected in each of the three release sites by the end of the study but was not detected in the experimental cohorts or associated wild larvae in any of the

  8. Evolved Rocks in Ocean Islands Formed by Melting of Metasomatized Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Torsvik, T. H.; Horvath, P.; Harris, C.; Webb, S. J.; Werner, S. C.; Corfu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Evolved rocks like trachyte occur as minor components of many plume-related basaltic ocean islands (e.g. Hawaii, Gran Canaria, Azores, Réunion), and are typically interpreted as products of extreme fractional crystallization from broadly basaltic magmas. Trachytes from Mauritius (Indian Ocean) suggest otherwise. Here, 6.8 Ma nepheline-bearing trachytes (SiO2 ~63%, Na2O + K2O ~12%) are enriched in all incompatible elements except Ba, Sr and Eu, which show prominent negative anomalies. Initial eNd values cluster at 4.03 ± 0.15 (n = 13), near the lower end of the range for Mauritian basalts (eNd = 3.70 - 5.75), but initial Sr is highly variable (ISr = 0.70408 - 0.71034) suggesting secondary deuteric alteration. Fractional crystallization models starting with a basaltic parent fail, because when plagioclase joins olivine in the crystallizing assemblage, residual liquids become depleted in Al2O3, produce no nepheline, and do not approach trachytic compositions. Mauritian basalts and trachytes do not fall near the ends of known miscibility gaps, eliminating liquid immiscibility processes. Partial melting of extant gabbroic bodies, either from the oceanic crust or from Réunion plume-related magmas should yield quartz-saturated melts different from the critically undersaturated Mauritian trachytes. A remaining possibility is that the trachytes represent direct, small-degree partial melts of fertile, perhaps metasomatized mantle. This is supported by the presence of trachytic glasses in many mantle xenoliths, and experimental results show that low-degree trachytic melts can be produced from mantle peridotites even under anhydrous conditions. If some feldspar is left behind as a residual phase, this would account for the negative Ba, Sr and Eu anomalies observed in Mauritian trachytes. Two trachyte samples that are less depleted in these elements contain xenocrysts of anorthoclase, Al-rich cpx and Cl-rich kaersutite that are out of equilibrium with host trachyte magmas

  9. Life History of the Emerald Jewel Wasp Ampulex compressa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Arvidson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Emerald Jewel Wasp Ampulex compressa (Fabricius is an endoparasitoid of the American cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus. Its host subjugation strategy is unusual in that envenomation is directed into the host central nervous system, eliciting a long-term behavior modification termed hypokinesia, turning stung cockroaches into a lethargic and compliant, but not paralyzed, living food supply for wasp offspring. A. compressa manipulates hypokinesic cockroaches into a burrow, where it oviposits a single egg onto a mesothoracic leg, hatching three days later. Herein we describe the life history and developmental timing of A. compressa. Using head capsule measurements and observations of mandibular morphology, we found that the larvae develop through three instars, the first two ectoparasitoid, and the third exclusively endoparasitoid. The first two instars have mandibles sufficient for piercing and cutting the cuticle respectively, while the third instar has a larger and blunter mandibular structure. During ecdysis to the third instar, the larva enters the body cavity of the cockroach, consuming internal tissues selectively, including fat body and skeletal muscle, but sparing the gut and Malpighian tubules. The developmental timing to pupation is similar between males and females, but cocoon volume and mass, and pupation duration are sexually dimorphic. Further, we show that the difference in cocoon mass and volume can be used to predict sex before eclosion, which is valuable for studies in venom pharmacology, as only females produce venom.

  10. Temporal geochemical trends in northern Luzon arc lavas (Philippines): implications on metasomatic processes in the island arc mantle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, R.C.; Bellon, H.; Jacques, D.; Defant, J.; Joron, J.L.; Mcdermott, F.; Vidal, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    Neogene and Quaternary lavas from Batan, Babuyan de Claro, Camiguin and Calayan islands (northern Luzon arc) display temporal increases in incompatible elements including Cs, Rb, Ba, K, La, Ce, Th, U, Ta, Hf and Zr from volcanoes older than 3 Ma to younger ones. These enrichments occur either within a single island (Batan) or within an island group (from Calayan to Camiguin and Babuyan). We show that these enrichments result from incompatible element input into the mantle wedge rather than from partial melting or fractionation effects. The fact that highly incompatible elements display temporal enrichment patterns in Batan lavas whatever their chemical properties indicates that hydrous fluids are not the only metasomatic agents operating in the mantle wedge and that slab-derived melts (adakitic magmas) may also be involved. The coupled temporal variation patterns of large ion lithophile elements and Sr-Nd isotopes suggest that the metasomatic budgets beneath the southern group of islands are mainly controlled by hydrous fluids inputs. In contrast, young Batan lavas likely derive from a mantle source mostly metasomatized by adakitic magmas. (authors)

  11. Failure to phytosanitize ash firewood infested with emerald ash borer in a small dry kiln using ISPM-15 standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, P Charles; Bumgardner, Matthew S; Herms, Daniel A; Sabula, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    Although current USDA-APHIS standards suggest that a core temperature of 71.1 degrees C (160 degrees F) for 75 min is needed to adequately sanitize emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire-infested firewood, it is unclear whether more moderate (and economical) treatment regimes will adequately eradicate emerald ash borer larvae and prepupae from ash firewood. We constructed a small dry kiln in an effort to emulate the type of technology a small- to medium-sized firewood producer might use to examine whether treatments with lower temperature and time regimes successfully eliminate emerald ash borer from both spilt and roundwood firewood. Using white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) firewood collected from a stand with a heavy infestation of emerald ash borer in Delaware, OH, we treated the firewood using the following temperature and time regime: 46 degrees C (114.8 degrees F) for 30 min, 46 degrees C (114.8 degrees F) for 60 min, 56 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) for 30 min, and 56 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) for 60 min. Temperatures were recorded for the outer 2.54-cm (1-in.) of firewood. After treatment, all firewood was placed under mesh netting and emerald ash borer were allowed to develop and emerge under natural conditions. No treatments seemed to be successful at eliminating emerald ash borer larvae and perpupae as all treatments (including two nontreated controls) experienced some emerald ash borer emergence. However, the 56 degrees C (132.8 degrees F) treatments did result in considerably less emerald ash borer emergence than the 46 degrees C (114.8 degrees F) treatments. Further investigation is needed to determine whether longer exposure to the higher temperature (56 degrees C) will successfully sanitize emerald ash borer-infested firewood.

  12. Metasomatic tourmalinite formation along basement-cover decollements, Orobic Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, J.F.; Passchier, C.W.; Zhang, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Cryptocrystalline tourmalinites that occur discontinuously for ???30 km along basement-cover de??collements of the Orohic Alps (Italy) formed by the metasomatism of aluminous cataclasites derived from Permian conglomerates and/or feldspathic sandstones. Using Al as an immobile element monitor, calculations show that the majority of tourmalinites in the region formed through the addition of moderate to significant amounts of B, Mg, Na, Sr, and Be, and the loss of moderate to significant Mn, Ca, K, P, Rb, Ba, and Cr; minor Si, Ti, V, light REE, and Eu also were lost. Data tor relatively immobile Al, Zr, Th, Sc, Nb, and heavy REE indicate that, on average, these tourmalinites formed through ???12% net mass loss assuming an original conglomerate protolith, or through ???7% net mass loss assuming a sandstone protolith. The B and other introduced constituents in the tourmalinites were deposited by hydrothermal fluids focused along and near basement-cover de??collements. These fluids, believed to be associated with late Hercynian felsic magmatism, probably are related to fluids that formed the tourmaline-rich U-Mo-Zn deposits at the nearby Novazza mine and the U-Zn deposits at the nearby Val Vedello mine.

  13. Pilot implementation of training modules of the EMERALD program in Brazil; Implementacao piloto de modulos de treinamento do programa EMERALD no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo R.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Okuno, Emico; Nersissian, Denise Y. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Intituto de Fisica. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Tabakov, Slavik [Dept. Medical Engineering and Physics, King' s College, London (United Kingdom); Terini, Ricardo A., E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUCSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2014-04-15

    A research cooperation program was established between the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo and the King's College of London to conduct the translation to Portuguese language, adaptation and update of the X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology training module of the Emerald Program (www.emerald2.eu/cd/Emerald2/). The Emerald Program teaching material in X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology is divided in ten topics covering the basics of Diagnostic Radiology, Quality Control and Radiation Protection. The referred work, besides the translation of the texts into Portuguese, comprised the review of the previously produced material. During the review process, it was decided to update some of the training tasks and add more information related to current topics, such as digital X-ray imaging modalities, multislice computed tomography and tomosynthesis. These new additions will also be available in English. The translated or written texts have been submitted to a cross-reviewing process by the co-authors in order to standardize the language. Moreover, national radiological protection recommendations were included to assist the users of the teaching material with the Brazilian rules of radiation safety and quality control in X-ray medical applications. Part of the material was submitted to a validation and also to a practical assessment process by means of a critical analysis by experts in Medical Physics education during a workshop held in Sao Paulo in March 2014. Finally, a pilot implementation has been organized in order to do the last adjustments before making the material available to other users in Portuguese language. Further assessment and feedback procedures were planned in both London and Sao Paulo, aiming to evaluate and disseminate the final product. (author)

  14. Lethal trap trees: a potential option for emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Phillip A. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Economic and ecological impacts of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality resulting from emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) invasion are severe in forested, residential and urban areas. Management options include girdling ash trees to attract ovipositing adult beetles and then destroying infested trees...

  15. Dendrochronological reconstruction of the epicenter and early spread of emerald ash borer in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold; Frank W. Telewski

    2014-01-01

    Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis was identified in 2002 as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality in Detroit, Michigan, and has since killed millions of ash trees in the US and Canada. When discovered, it was not clear how long it had been present or at what location the invading colony started....

  16. Reconstructing the temporal and spatial dynamics of emerald ash borer adults through dendrochronological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold; Frank W. Telewski

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae) was identified in June 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern lower Michigan and Windsor, Ontario. Localized outlier populations have since been discovered across much of lower Michigan and in areas of Indiana, Ohio and...

  17. Recent development and advances in survey and detection tools for emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. ​Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Taylor Scarr; Joseph Francese; Damon Crook; Michael Domingue; Harold Thistle; Brian Strom; Laura Blackburn; Daniel A. Herms; Krista Ryall; Patrick. Tobin

    2016-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees since it was discovered near Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario in 2002 (www.emeraldashborer. info 2016) and continues to spread in North America. Canadian and U.S. federal, provincial, and state regulatory agencies have used artificial traps...

  18. Three-year progression of emerald ash borer-induced decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal J.K. Gandhi; Annemarie Smith; Robert P. Long; Robin A.J. Taylor; Daniel A. Herms

    2008-01-01

    We monitored the progression of ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality due to emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, in 38 forest stands in the upper Huron River watershed region of southeastern Michigan from 2004-2007. Black ash (F. nigra), green ash (F. pennsylvanica), and white ash...

  19. Modeling potential movements of the emerald ash borer: the model framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha Prasad; Jonathan Bossenbroek; Davis Sydnor; Mark W. Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is threatening to decimate native ashes (Fraxinus spp.) across North America and, so far, has devastated ash populations across sections of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario. We are attempting to develop a computer model that will predict EAB future movement by adapting...

  20. Population biology of emerald ash borer and its natural enemies in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Tonghai Zhao; Ruitong Gao

    2008-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), also known as emerald ash borer (EAB), was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario, Canada, in 2002 following investigations of declining and dying ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Agrilus planipennis has also spread to Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Virginia,...

  1. Genetic transformation of Fraxinus spp. for resistance to the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula M. Pijut; Rochelle R. Beasley; Kaitlin J. Palla

    2010-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera; Buprestidae) is a wood-boring beetle that poses substantial risk to the ash resource in North America. Ash species native to the United States and known to be susceptible to EAB are Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), F. americana (white ash...

  2. Emerald Ash Borer Microbial Control with the Entomopathogen Beauveria bassiana GHA formulated as Botanigard®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Lui; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a sporadic wood-boring pest native to northeastern Asia, was found attacking ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in southeastern Michigan in 2002. Despite regulatory efforts to quarantine and eradicate EAB, this invasive beetle has continued to spread...

  3. Heat treatment of Firewood for Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire): Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Richard D. Bergman; Brian K. Brashaw; Scott W. Myers

    2014-01-01

    The movement of firewood within emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (EAB)-infested states and into adjoining areas has been a contributor to its spread throughout the United States and Canada. In an effort to prevent further human-aided spread of EAB and to facilitate interstate commerce, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and cooperating...

  4. Imidacloprid concentration effects on adult emerald ash borer: a greenhouse study

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Cappaert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Phil Lewis; John Molongoski

    2008-01-01

    Imidacloprid is the active ingredient of many widely used products applied to control the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, in valuable urban trees. Systemic treatment with imidacloprid is typically made in the spring to reduce the number of larvae that would otherwise be generated by oviposition during the summer. Substantial...

  5. Prospects for long-term ash survival in the core emerald ash borer mortality zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan M. Marshall; Andrew J. Storer; Roger Mech; Steven A. Katovich

    2011-01-01

    Attacking all North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.), emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has caused significant mortality within its introduced range. For other forest pests, host bark plays an important role in infestation density and oviposition behavior. The objectives of this study were to (1) locate...

  6. Detection of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, at low population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa J. Porter; Michael D. Hyslop; Andrew J. Storer

    2011-01-01

    The exotic emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was first discovered in North America in Detroit, MI, in 2002. This beetle has killed millions of ash trees in several states in the United States and in Canada, and populations of this insect continue to be detected. EAB is difficult to detect when it invades new...

  7. Biological control of emerald ash borer in North America: current progress and potential for success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Juli R. Gould; Jonathan P. Lelito

    2012-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis), a buprestid native to north-east Asia, was first discovered in North America near Detroit in 2002. EAB has since spread to at least 15 U.S. States and two Canadian provinces, threatening the existence of native ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). A classical biocontrol program was initiated...

  8. Attraction of the emerald ash borer to ash trees stressed by girdling, herbicide treatment, or wounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah McCullough; Therese Poland; David. Cappaert

    2009-01-01

    New infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive pest native to Asia, are difficult to detect until densities build and symptoms appear on affected ash (Fraxinus spp). We compared the attraction of A. planipennis to ash trees stressed by girdling (bark and phloem removed...

  9. Monitoring ash (Fraxinus spp.) decline and emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) symptoms in infested areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; Britton P. Flash; Rachel H. Kappler; Joel A. Throckmorton; Bernadette Grafton; Charles E. Flower

    2014-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (A. planipennis) (EAB) has had a devastating effect on ash (Fraxinus) species since its introduction to North America and has resulted in altered ecological processes across the area of infestation. Monitoring is an important tool for understanding and managing the impact of this threat, and the use of common...

  10. Using Dutch elm disease-tolerant elm to restore floodplains impacted by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; James M. Slavicek; Rachel Kappler; Elizabeth Pisarczyk; Bernadette Wiggin; Karen. Menard

    2012-01-01

    American elm (Ulmus Americana L.) was a dominant species in floodplains and swamps of the Midwest before Dutch elm disease (DED) (Ophiostoma ulmi and O.novo-ulmi) reduced its populations. In many areas, ash (Fraxinus spp.) became dominant in these ecosystems. Emerald ash borer (EAB) (...

  11. Patterns among the ashes: Exploring the relationship between landscape pattern and the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Greg C. Liknes

    2010-01-01

    Landscape metrics, including host abundance and population density, were calculated using forest inventory and land cover data to assess the relationship between landscape pattern and the presence or absence of the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire). The Random Forests classification algorithm in the R statistical environment was...

  12. An assessment of the relationship between emerald ash borer presence and landscape pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2009-01-01

    Six years after its 2002 detection near Detroit, MI, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has spread hundreds of miles across the Upper Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. Human-assisted transportation of infested ash materials is the primary mechanism of EAB dispersal over long distances. Natural spread...

  13. Cost of potential emerald ash borer damage in U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Robert G. Haight; Andrew M. Liebhold; Deborah G. McCullough; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Nathan W. Siegert

    2010-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), a phloem-feeding beetle native to Asia, was discovered near Detroit, MI, and Windsor, ON, in 2002. As of March 2009, isolated populations of EAB have been detected in nine additional states and Quebec. EAB is a highly invasive forest pest that has the potential to spread and kill native ash...

  14. Evaluation of firewood bagging and vacuum treatment for regulatory control of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Kuhn; Chen Zhangjing; Andrea Diss-Torrance; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in Detroit, Michigan, in 2002, the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has caused extensive mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) as it has spread across southeast Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada (Haack et al. 2002, Poland and McCullough 2006). In addition to this core...

  15. On some molybdenum occurrences associated with emerald deposits in the Gravelotte area, Eastern Transvaal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, J.E.J.

    1980-04-01

    Sporadic molybdenite is found associated with emerald mineralization at the contact of intrusive granite and Archaean basic rocks. The most important occurrence is at Cobra quarry. However, a general investigation and several analyses show that it has probably no economic significance

  16. Evaluation of recovery and monitoring methods for parasitoids released against Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) is an invasive insect pest, and the target of an extensive biological control campaign designed to mitigate EAB driven ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality. Since 2007, environmental releases of three species of hymenopteran parasitoids of EA...

  17. Haruchlora maesi, a new emerald moth genus and species from Mesoamerica (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Geometrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viidalepp, Jaan; Lindt, Aare

    2014-09-30

    A new genus and species of Neotropical emerald geometrid moths, Haruchlora Viidalepp & Lindt, gen. nov., and Haruchlora maesi Viidalepp & Lindt, sp. nov. are described. The new genus differs from all other New World Geometrinae genera in having a bifid uncus, in characters of the pregenital segments of the male abdomen, and in the male genitalia. 

  18. Dispersal of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, in newly-colonized sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo J. Mercader; Andrew M. Siegert; Andrew M. Liebhold; Deborah G. McCullough

    2009-01-01

    Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive forest insect pest threatening more than 8 billion ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America. Development of effective survey methods and strategies to slow the spread of A. planipennis requires an understanding of dispersal...

  19. The Role of Biocontrol of Emerald Ash Borer in Protecting Ash Regeneration after Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive Asian beetle that is destroying ash in forests over much of eastern North America because of the high susceptibility of our native ash and a lack of effective natural enemies. To increase mortality of EAB larvae and eggs, the USDA (FS, ARS and APHIS) is carryin...

  20. Exploring the molecular and biochemical basis of ash resistance to emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin G.A. Whitehill; Daniel A. Herms; Pierluigi. Bonello

    2010-01-01

    Larvae of the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) feed on phloem of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. It is hypothesized that the resistance of Asian species of ash (e.g., Manchurian ash, F. mandshurica) to EAB is due to endogenous defenses present in phloem tissues in the form of defensive proteins and/or...

  1. Temporal dynamics of woodpecker predation on the invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodpeckers (Picidae) are among the most prevalent natural enemies attacking the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, in North America, but there can be considerable variation in the levels of EAB predation on ash trees (Oleaceae: Fraxinus) within and between sites as wel...

  2. The relationship between trees and human health: evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Geoffrey H; Butry, David T; Michael, Yvonne L; Prestemon, Jeffrey P; Liebhold, Andrew M; Gatziolis, Demetrios; Mao, Megan Y

    2013-02-01

    Several recent studies have identified a relationship between the natural environment and improved health outcomes. However, for practical reasons, most have been observational, cross-sectional studies. A natural experiment, which provides stronger evidence of causality, was used to test whether a major change to the natural environment-the loss of 100 million trees to the emerald ash borer, an invasive forest pest-has influenced mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory diseases. Two fixed-effects regression models were used to estimate the relationship between emerald ash borer presence and county-level mortality from 1990 to 2007 in 15 U.S. states, while controlling for a wide range of demographic covariates. Data were collected from 1990 to 2007, and the analyses were conducted in 2011 and 2012. There was an increase in mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illness in counties infested with the emerald ash borer. The magnitude of this effect was greater as infestation progressed and in counties with above-average median household income. Across the 15 states in the study area, the borer was associated with an additional 6113 deaths related to illness of the lower respiratory system, and 15,080 cardiovascular-related deaths. Results suggest that loss of trees to the emerald ash borer increased mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illness. This finding adds to the growing evidence that the natural environment provides major public health benefits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Factors affecting the survival of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees infested by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; John P. Brown; Robert P. Long

    2013-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (EAB), an Asian woodboring beetle accidentally introduced in North America, has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees and is spreading rapidly. This study examined the effects of tree- and site-level factors on the mortality of ash trees in stands infested by EAB in OH, USA. Our data...

  4. 76 FR 1338 - Emerald Ash Borer; Quarantined Areas; Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Pennsylvania...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 [Docket No. APHIS-2008-0072] Emerald Ash Borer; Quarantined Areas; Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri..., Japan, Mongolia, the Russian Far East, Taiwan, and Canada, eventually kills healthy ash trees after it...

  5. Emerald ash borer in North America: a research and regulatory challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Cappaert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Nathan W. Siegert

    2005-01-01

    The saga of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmare (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in North America began on 25 June 2002, when five entomologists representing Michigan State University (MSU), the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS)...

  6. Use of unwounded ash trees for the detection of emerald ash borer adults: EAB landing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan M. Marshall; Melissa J. Porter; Andrew J. Storer

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of multiple trapping techniques and sites within a survey program is essential to adequately identify the range of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestation. Within natural forests, EAB lands on stick band traps wrapped around girdled ash trees at a rate similar to that on unwounded ash trees. The objective of...

  7. Emerald ash borer impacts on visual preferences for urban forest recreation settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arne Arnberger; Ingrid E. Schneider; Martin Ebenberger; Renate Eder; Robert C. Venette; Stephanie A. Snyder; Paul H. Gobster; Ami Choi; Stuart Cottrell

    2017-01-01

    Extensive outbreaks of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis; EAB), an invasive forest insect, are having serious impacts on the cultural ecosystem services of urban forests in the United States and other countries. Limited experience with how such outbreaks might affect recreational opportunities prompted this investigation of visitors to a...

  8. Breeding strategies for the development of emerald ash borer - resistant North American ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Kathleen S. Knight; Therese Poland; Daniel A. Herms; Mary E. Mason

    2012-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus plannipennis; EAB) is a phloem-feeding beetle that is endemic to Asia. It was discovered in North America in 2002, found almost simultaneously near Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Adult beetles feed on ash (Fraxinus spp.) foliage, but larval feeding on phloem, cambium, and...

  9. Survey for tolerance to emerald ash borer within North American ash species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Koch; Mary E. Mason; David W. Carey; Kathleen Knight; Therese Poland; Daniel A. Herms

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of the emerald ash borer (EAB) near Detroit, MI, in 2002, more than 40 million ash trees have been killed and another 7.5 billion are at risk in the United States. When the EAB outbreak was initially discovered, our native ash species appeared to have no resistance to the pest.

  10. Intraspecific variation in Fraxinus pennsylvanica responses to emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Koch; D.W. Carey; M.E. Mason; T.M. Poland; K.S. Knight

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is a bark and wood boring beetle native to east Asia that was first discovered in North America in 2002. Since then, entire stands of highly susceptible green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) have been killed within a few years of infestation. We have identified a...

  11. 75 FR 51107 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules for Public Lands in Routt County, CO: Emerald Mountain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... destination recreation-tourism market strategy. The strategy targets Steamboat Springs area visitors... concerns regarding traditional or religious cultural properties in the Emerald Mountain Special Recreation Management Area. These supplementary rules would not affect Indian land, resources, or religious rights...

  12. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessments by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard W. Mankin; Yigen Chen; Jian J. Duan; Therese M. Poland; Leah S. Bauer

    2011-01-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  13. Reproductive and developmental biology of the emerald ash borer parasitoid Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) as affected by temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive pest of serious concern in North America. To complement ongoing biological control efforts, Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a recently-described specialist parasitoid of ...

  14. Geochemical models of metasomatism in ultramafic systems: Serpentinization, rodingitization, and sea floor carbonate chimney precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palandri, J.L.; Reed, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of water-rock reaction simulations, we assess the processes of serpentinization of harzburgite and related calcium metasomatism resulting in rodingite-type alteration, and seafloor carbonate chimney precipitation. At temperatures from 25 to 300??C (P = 10 to 100 bar), using either fresh water or seawater, serpentinization simulations produce an assemblage commonly observed in natural systems, dominated by serpentine, magnetite, and brucite. The reacted waters in the simulations show similar trends in composition with decreasing water-rock ratios, becoming hyper-alkaline and strongly reducing, with increased dissolved calcium. At 25??C and w/r less than ???32, conditions are sufficiently reducing to yield H2 gas, nickel-iron alloy and native copper. Hyperalkalinity results from OH- production by olivine and pyroxene dissolution in the absence of counterbalancing OH- consumption by alteration mineral precipitation except at very high pH; at moderate pH there are no stable calcium minerals and only a small amount of chlorite forms, limited by aluminum, thus allowing Mg2+ and Ca2+ to accumulate in the aqueous phase in exchange for H+. The reducing conditions result from oxidation of ferrous iron in olivine and pyroxene to ferric iron in magnetite. Trace metals are computed to be nearly insoluble below 300??C, except for mercury, for which high pH stabilizes aqueous and gaseous Hg??. In serpentinization by seawater at 300??C, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt may approach ore-forming concentrations in sulfide complexes. Simulated mixing of the fluid derived from serpentinization with cold seawater produces a mineral assemblage dominated by calcite, similar to recently discovered submarine, ultramafic rock-hosted, carbonate mineral deposits precipitating at hydrothermal vents. Simulated reaction of gabbroic or basaltic rocks with the hyperalkaline calcium- and aluminum-rich fluid produced during serpentinization at 300??C yields rodingite-type mineral assemblages, including

  15. Metasomatism, Fluid Overpressure and Brecciation at the Slab-Mantle Interface: Insights from the Livingstone Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, M.; Smith, S. A. F.; Scott, J.

    2017-12-01

    Juxtaposition of mantle peridotite and serpentinite against quartzofeldspathic and mafic schists occurs along the shallow slab-mantle interface in some subduction zones. This part of the subduction interface has been invoked as a possible source region of episodic tremor and slow slip, yet geological observations of fault zone structures and chemical reactions pertinent to this region are quite rare. The >1000 km long Livingstone Fault in New Zealand is a superbly exposed fault zone that provides a suitable analogue (both in terms of scale and the rock types involved) for the shallow slab-mantle interface. The fault is characterized by a foliated and highly sheared serpentinite mélange tens to several hundreds of meters wide that separates (partially serpentinised) peridotites from quartzofeldspathic schists. Talc- and tremolite-forming metasomatic reactions occurred along the margins of the mélange and around entrained pods due to mixing of serpentinite with silica- and calcium-rich fluids derived from the adjacent quartzofeldspathic schist. The metasomatic reactions generated significant volumes of water at the melange-schist contact that became trapped between the two relatively impermeable fault zone lithologies. On the schist side of the contact, brittle faulting was promoted by the formation of a laterally-continuous silicified zone up to tens of metres wide. On the melange side, a zone up to tens of metres wide of `crackle-breccias' containing veined stockworks of tremolite indicates periodic increases of pore pressure sufficient to cause hydraulic fracture of serpentinite. The crackle-breccias are multi-generational indicating that this process was episodic. Sr and Nd isotope data and permeability calculations suggest that the episodic brecciation process was critical to the transfer of fluids across the melange. Our observations suggest that fluid-producing metasomatic reactions along the shallow slab-mantle interface may contribute to the tremor signal

  16. Metasomatized granulites of the Mozambique belt: consequences for lithospheric U, Th, REE fertilisation and metallogenesis in the ancient Gondwanaland supercontinent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoli, M.A.G.; Hart, R.J.

    1988-02-01

    The 1,0 Ga old Lurio belt extends for ca. 1 000 km from Nsanje (S Malawi) through NE Mozambique to the Indian ocean. Lower crustal levels are locally exposed along its southern tectonic front. In this article mineralogical and geochemical data for an andesinite-mafic-ultramafic suite from Nsanje were reported.The results indicate that this complex terrane equilibrated first at P ∼ 13 kbr and T ∼ 900 0 C and subsequently cooled under an eclogite-garnet granulite georem. During a later event (P ∼ 7-10 kbar, T ∼ 650 - 800 0 C) distinctive metasomatic mica, amphibole, scapolite, apatite, diopsidic pyroxene (MASAD)-bearing assemblages and pegmatoids were formed by CO 2 , Cl, H 2 O, S and F rich fluids with higher REE, U, Th and Zr concentrations than the high-grade precursors. MASAD and older high-pressure granulite parageneses underwent subsequent dehydratation and reequilibration under medium-pressure granulite facies conditions perhaps during the Lurio orogenic event. MASAD-like assemblages are relatively common within the late Proterozoic medium- and high-pressure granulite terranes of Central Gondwana, especially in the newly defined Lurio-Zambezi Eclogite Province. The data provide indicate that the metasomatizing, MASAD-forming fluids had crypto-carbonatitic affinities and were introduced into the crust from the upper mantle during protorifting episodes between ca. 1,1 and 0,5 Ga ago. The MASAD assemblages may therefore represent the crustal equivalent of the metasomatic and MARID suites discovered in mantle xenoliths

  17. Metasomatized and hybrid rocks associated with a Palaeoarchaean layered ultramafic intrusion on the Johannesburg Dome, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhaeusser, Carl R.

    2015-02-01

    The Johannesburg Dome occurs as an inlier of Palaeoarchaean-Mesoarchaean granitic rocks, gneisses and greenstones in the central part of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa. In the west-central part of the dome a large greenstone remnant is surrounded and intruded by ca. 3114 Ma porphyritic granodiorites. Referred to locally as the Zandspruit greenstone remnant, it consists of a shallow-dipping ultramafic complex comprised of a number of alternating layers of harzburgite and pyroxenite. The ultramafic rocks are metamorphosed to greenschist grade and have largely been altered to serpentinite and amphibolite (tremolite-actinolite). In the granite-greenstone contact areas the porphyritic granodiorite has partially assimilated the greenstones producing a variety of hybrid rocks of dioritic composition. The hybrid rocks contain enclaves or xenoliths of greenstone and, in places, orbicular granite structures. Particularly noteworthy is an unusual zone of potash-metasomatized rock, occurring adjacent to the porphyritic granodiorite, consisting dominantly of biotite and lesser amounts of carbonate, quartz and sericite. Large potash-feldspar megacrysts and blotchy aggregated feldspar clusters give the rocks a unique texture. An interpretation placed on these rocks is that they represent metasomatized metapyroxenites of the layered ultramafic complex. Field relationships and geochemical data suggest that the rocks were influenced by hydrothermal fluids emanating from the intrusive porphyritic granodiorite. The adjacent greenstones were most likely transformed largely by the process of infiltration metasomatism, rather than simple diffusion, as CO2, H2O as well as dissolved components were added to the greenstones. Element mobility appears to have been complex as those generally regarded as being immobile, such as Ti, Y, Zr, Hf, Ta, Nb, Th, Sc, Ni, Cr, V, and Co, have undergone addition or depletion from the greenstones. Relative to all the rocks analyzed from the greenstones

  18. Metasomatic processes in the orthogneiss-hosted Archaean peridotites of the Fiskefjord region, SW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilas, K.; Cruz, M. F.; Grove, M.; Morishita, T.; Pearson, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    Field observations and preliminary geochemical data are presented for large (>500x1000m) peridotite enclaves from the Fiskefjord region of SW Greenland. These ultramafic complexes are dominated by dunite, amphibole-harzburgite, lesser amounts of norite and horizons of stratiform chromitite and are therefore interpreted as cumulate rocks[1]. The ultramafic enclaves are hosted by intrusive tonalitic orthogneiss, which provide U-Pb zircon minimum age constraints of ca. 2980 Ma, whereas preliminary Re-Os isotope data on the dunite and chromitite yield TRD ages of ca. 3300 Ma[2]. Dunite has highly forsteritic olivine compositions with Mg# mostly around 92 to 93, which is uncorrelated with the bulk-rock mg# or modal chromite contents. This indicates that the primary olivine records equilibration with a highly magnesian parental magma, which may have been responsible for the strong depletion of the SCLM in this region. Amphibole and phlogopite is mostly associated with granitoid sheets or infiltrating veins in the dunite and appear to replace chromite. Argon dating (40Ar/39Ar) of the phlogopite yields ages ranging from ca. 3400 Ma to ca. 1750 Ma, with most ages clustering around 3000 Ma. This is consistent with formation of the phlogopite and amphibole by metasomatic processes involving reaction between granitoid-derived siliceous fluids and the ultramafic rocks. The older 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus most plausibly represent excess Ar, potentially inherited from the nearby Itsaq Gneiss Complex (3900 to 3600 Ga) based on its proximity. The youngest 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus on the other hand may potentially signify the closure-age for this system, which could have important implications for determining the exhumation history of the North Atlantic craton. References [1] Szilas, K., Kelemen, P. B., & Bernstein, S. (2015). Peridotite enclaves hosted by Mesoarchaean TTG-suite orthogneisses in the Fiskefjord region of southern West Greenland. GeoResJ, 7, 22-34. [2] Szilas, K., van

  19. Garnet - two pyroxene rock from the Gridino complex, Russia: a record of the early metasomatic stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunova, Alena A.; Perchuk, Alexei L.

    2010-05-01

    mineralogy was developed after some metasomatic rock. Fragments of this rock that have been trapped by the minerals during HP metamorphic event are likely experienced dehydration melting and subsequent crystallization under close system conditions. Such interpretation elegantly explains location of the REE phase, expansion and contraction of the inclusions resulted in the exotic phenomenon - two systems of cracks. Financial support by RFBR grants N 09-05-01217 and 09-05-00991.

  20. Sr-Nd evidence of paleoproterozoic mantle metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle beneath northeastern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollanda, M.H.B.M.; Pimentel, M.M.; Jardim de Sa, E.F

    2001-01-01

    discuss about mantle metasomatism against crustal contamination. The difficulty in commenting about this question taking into consideration Proterozoic mantle-derived plutonic rocks is related to non-uniqueness in interpreting the common enriched signatures, since that are similar to geochemical signature of crustal rocks. In this study, the data were carefully treated for filtering out the effects of crustal contamination to recognise the nature of their mantle source and obtain a picture of the lithospheric mantle chemical at Proterozoic time (au)

  1. Lithium, boron and chlorine as tracers for metasomatism in high-pressure metamorphic rocks: a case study from Syros (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Horst R.; Altherr, Rainer; Gméling, Katalin; Kasztovszky, Zsolt

    2009-03-01

    High-pressure metamorphic (HPM) rocks (derived from igneous protoliths) and their metasomatised rinds from the island of Syros (Greece) were analysed for their B and Cl whole-rock abundances and their H2O content by prompt-gamma neutron-activation analysis (PGNAA) and for their Li and Be whole-rock abundances by ICP-OES. In the HPM rocks, B /Be and Cl /Be ratios correlate with H2O contents and appear to be controlled by extraction of B and Cl during dehydration and prograde metamorphism. In contrast, samples of the metasomatised rinds show no such correlation. B /Be ratios in the rinds are solely governed by the presence or absence of tourmaline, and Cl /Be ratios vary significantly, possibly related to fluid inclusions. Li/Be ratios do not correlate with H2O contents in the HPM rocks, which may in part be explained by a conservative behaviour of Li during dehydration. However, Li abundances exceed the vast majority of published values for Li abundances in fresh, altered, or differentiated oceanic igneous rocks and presumably result from metasomatic enrichment of Li. High Li concentrations and highly elevated Li/Be ratios in most metasomatised samples demonstrate an enrichment of Li in the Syros HP mélange during fluid infiltration. This study suggests that B and Cl abundances of HPM meta-igneous rocks can be used to trace prograde dehydration, while Li concentrations seem to be more sensitive for retrograde metasomatic processes in such lithologies.

  2. Study of the use waste resulting from the mining of emerald for the production refractory ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, P.J.C.; Coelho, R.E.; Cruz, R.M.S.; Cavalcanti, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The great impact caused by excess mineral waste in ambient of the emerald exploration, in determined locals of Brazil, where are deposited, it has caused inconvenience to their various people residents. The jungles, rivers and lakes are directly harmed by the aggressions imposed by neglect in the destination of such waste. Considering the importance of the issue outlined to the goal of this work, this paper can back report a study for utilizing emerald waste, focused the possibility manufacture for obtained refractory ceramic. The results show that the specimens prepared by the ball milling, cold pressing and sintering method had better high temperature properties, due to a higher mica volume percent and finer crystallite size. Specimens it was characterized by X-ray diffractometer and fluorescence. Test was realized in the materials, submitted in high temperature was observed good thermal stability, the processed ceramics could be recommended for the adequate applications. (author)

  3. Feeding and Development of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on Cultivated Olive, Olea europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Don; Rigsby, Chad M; Peterson, Donnie L

    2017-08-01

    We examined the suitability of cultivated olive, Olea europaea L., as a host for emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. In a bioassay using cut stems from a field-grown olive tree (cv. 'Manzanilla') we found that 45% of larvae that had emerged from eggs used to inoculate stems, were recovered alive, many as larvae or prepupae, during periodic debarking of a subset of stems. Three intact stems that 19 larvae successfully entered were exposed to a simulated overwintering treatment. Four live adults emerged afterwards, and an additional pupa and several prepupae were discovered after debarking these stems. Cultivated olive joins white fringetree as one of the two species outside of the genus Fraxinus capable of supporting the development of emerald ash borer from neonate to adult. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Improving detection tools for the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of prism and multifunnel traps at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Crook, Damon J; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2013-12-01

    The current emerald ash borer survey trap used in the United States is a prism trap constructed from a stock purple corrugated plastic. In recent years, several colors (particularly shades of green and purple) have been shown to be more attractive to the emerald ash borer than this stock color. Our goal was to determine if plastics produced with these colors and incorporated into prism traps can improve and serve as a new alternative to plastics already in use for the emerald ash borer survey. The plastics were tested in moderate to heavily infested areas in Michigan in two initial studies to test their effectiveness at catching the emerald ash borer. Because results from studies performed in heavily infested sites may not always correspond with what is found along the edges of the infestation, we compared trap catch and detection rates (recording at least one catch on a trap over the course of the entire trapping season) of several trap types and colors at sites outside the core of the currently known emerald ash borer infestation in a nine-state detection tool comparison study. Two of the new plastics, a (Sabic) purple and a medium-dark (Sabic) green were incorporated into prism traps and tested alongside a standard purple prism trap and a green multifunnel trap. In areas with lower emerald ash borer density, the new purple (Sabic) corrugated plastic caught more beetles than the current purple prism trap, as well as more than the medium-dark green (Sabic) prism and green multifunnel traps. Sabic purple traps in the detection tools comparison study recorded a detection rate of 86% compared with 73, 66, and 58% for the standard purple, Sabic green, and green multifunnel traps, respectively. These detection rates were reduced to 80, 63, 55, and 46%, respectively, at low emerald ash borer density sites.

  5. Outlook for ash in your forest: results of emerald ash borer research and implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight

    2014-01-01

    Since its accidental introduction near Detroit, Michigan, in the mid-1990s, emerald ash borer (EAB) has rapidly spread through much of the U.S. and adjacent Canada, leaving millions of dead ash trees in Midwestern states (4,11). Unfortunately, EAB attacks trees as small as an inch in stem diameter and it attacks all five ash species native to the region - white, green...

  6. Progress and future directions in research on the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland

    2014-01-01

    When the emerald ash borer (EAB) was discovered near Detroit, Michigan in July 2002, very little was known about it other than the fact that it was killing large numbers of ash trees throughout a widespread area in southeast Michigan (Poland and McCullough 2006). Ash mortality in the area had been noted for a few years, but was attributed to ash decline until damage...

  7. Pilot implementation of training modules of the EMERALD program in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paulo R.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Okuno, Emico; Nersissian, Denise Y.; Terini, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    A research cooperation program was established between the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo and the King's College of London to conduct the translation to Portuguese language, adaptation and update of the X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology training module of the Emerald Program (www.emerald2.eu/cd/Emerald2/). The Emerald Program teaching material in X-Ray Diagnostic Radiology is divided in ten topics covering the basics of Diagnostic Radiology, Quality Control and Radiation Protection. The referred work, besides the translation of the texts into Portuguese, comprised the review of the previously produced material. During the review process, it was decided to update some of the training tasks and add more information related to current topics, such as digital X-ray imaging modalities, multislice computed tomography and tomosynthesis. These new additions will also be available in English. The translated or written texts have been submitted to a cross-reviewing process by the co-authors in order to standardize the language. Moreover, national radiological protection recommendations were included to assist the users of the teaching material with the Brazilian rules of radiation safety and quality control in X-ray medical applications. Part of the material was submitted to a validation and also to a practical assessment process by means of a critical analysis by experts in Medical Physics education during a workshop held in Sao Paulo in March 2014. Finally, a pilot implementation has been organized in order to do the last adjustments before making the material available to other users in Portuguese language. Further assessment and feedback procedures were planned in both London and Sao Paulo, aiming to evaluate and disseminate the final product. (author)

  8. Strengthening mental health systems in low- and middle-income countries: the Emerald programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrau, Maya; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Alem, Atalay; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Chisholm, Dan; Gureje, Oye; Hanlon, Charlotte; Jordans, Mark; Kigozi, Fred; Lempp, Heidi; Lund, Crick; Petersen, Inge; Shidhaye, Rahul; Thornicroft, Graham

    2015-04-10

    There is a large treatment gap for mental health care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), with the majority of people with mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders receiving no or inadequate care. Health system factors are known to play a crucial role in determining the coverage and effectiveness of health service interventions, but the study of mental health systems in LMICs has been neglected. The 'Emerging mental health systems in LMICs' (Emerald) programme aims to improve outcomes of people with MNS disorders in six LMICs (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda) by generating evidence and capacity to enhance health system performance in delivering mental health care. A mixed-methods approach is being applied to generate evidence on: adequate, fair, and sustainable resourcing for mental health (health system inputs); integrated provision of mental health services (health system processes); and improved coverage and goal attainment in mental health (health system outputs). Emerald has a strong focus on capacity-building of researchers, policymakers, and planners, and on increasing service user and caregiver involvement to support mental health systems strengthening. Emerald also addresses stigma and discrimination as one of the key barriers for access to and successful delivery of mental health services.

  9. Holocene glacier fluctuations inferred from lacustrine sediment, Emerald Lake, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, Taylor S.; Kaufman, Darrell S.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and biological characteristics of lacustrine sediment from Emerald Lake were used to reconstruct the Holocene glacier history of Grewingk Glacier, southern Alaska. Emerald Lake is an ice-marginal threshold lake, receiving glaciofluvial sediment when Grewingk Glacier overtops the topographic divide that separates it from the lake. Sub-bottom acoustical profiles were used to locate core sites to maximize both the length and resolution of the sedimentary sequence recovered in the 4-m-long cores. The age model for the composite sequence is based on 13 14C ages and a 210Pb profile. A sharp transition from the basal inorganic mud to organic-rich mud at 11.4 ± 0.2 ka marks the initial retreat of Grewingk Glacier below the divide of Emerald Lake. The overlaying organic-rich mud is interrupted by stony mud that records a re-advance between 10.7 ± 0.2 and 9.8 ± 0.2 ka. The glacier did not spill meltwater into the lake again until the Little Ice Age, consistent with previously documented Little Ice Ages advances on the Kenai Peninsula. The retreat of Grewingk Glacier at 11.4 ka took place as temperature increased following the Younger Dryas, and the subsequent re-advance corresponds with a climate reversal beginning around 11 ka across southern Alaska.

  10. The relationship between the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) and ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree decline: Using visual canopy condition assessments and leaf isotope measurements to assess pest damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Kathleen S. Knight; Joanne Rebbeck; Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler

    2013-01-01

    Ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America are being severely impacted by the invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) which was inadvertently introduced to the US in the 1990s from Asia. The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a phloem boring beetle which relies exclusively on ash trees to complete its life cycle. Larvae...

  11. Assessment of magmatic vs. metasomatic processes in rare-metal granites: A case study of the Cínovec/Zinnwald Sn–W–Li deposit, Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel; Ďurišová, Jana; Hrstka, Tomáš; Korbelová, Zuzana; Hložková Vaňková, M.; Vašinová Galiová, M.; Kanický, V.; Rambousek, P.; Knésl, I.; Dobeš, P.; Dosbaba, M.

    292/293, November (2017), s. 198-217 ISSN 0024-4937 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13600S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : rare-metal granite * Cínovec/Zinnwald deposit * rock textures * metasomatic processes * magmatic processes Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 3.677, year: 2016

  12. Rational calculation of migrated component amount for metasomatically altered rocks--taking albitized trachyte at uranium deposit No.470 as an sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dezheng

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of overall confirming the reasonableness of available method for calculating migrated component amount, the author has further improved the true constant component fixed calculation method proposed by the author in 2000, i.e, the calculation of actual true migrated mass and atomic number of metasomatically atered rocks, by using two method of measuring rock density. (authors)

  13. The urano-thorianite-bearing pyroxenites from S-E Madagascar: the conditions of their metasomatic crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moine, B.; Rakotondratsima, C.; Cuney, M.

    1985-01-01

    In the proterozoic of granulite facies in S-E Madagascar the urano-thorianite bearing rocks are part of a clinopyroxene-rich calc-magnesian complex. The rocks are produced by the metamorphic/metasomatic alteration of limestones and marls. By metasomatism K, Na, Fe and in some cases Ca are lost by the rocks; Mg and Si are gained. The parageneses exhibited by the surrounding gneissses, leptynites and marbles as well as the Fe-Mg distribution in the pairs cordierite-garnet and cordierite-spinel constrain as follows the conditions for the main phase of regional metamorphism: T=700-750 0 C; Psub(F) approximately= 5 kbar; CO 2 concentrations often high in the fluid phase. Similar temperatures are deduced from the scapolite-plagioclase equilibrium in the pyroxenites. Evidences of an older metamorphic phase of higher temperature (T>=780 0 C) are locally observed. The clinopyroxenes compositions are near the diopside-Ca-tschermak (CaTs) join and show very high Al-content. The CaTs-content of the clinopyroxene is clearly dependent on the silica activity in the fluid phase. It is shown that this one may have been as low as below 0.10 the silica activity for quartz-saturation in the same P-T-Xsub(CO2) conditions. The results are coherent with the required conditions for the stability of a Th-rich (Th/U>1) urano-thorianite as they are shown by recent experimental work in the system UO 2 -ThO 2 -SiO 2 [fr

  14. Studies of petrography, metasomatic alteration, and genesis of Kamtal iron-copper skarn, northeast of Kharvana, East-Azarbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Ferdowsi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kamtal skarn is located 15 km northeast of Kharvana, East-Azarbaijan. A quartz-monzonitic stock of Oligocene age intruded the upper Cretaceous sedimentary sequence (claystone, limestone, marl, and siltstone developing noticeable metamorphic (marble, hornfels and metasomatic (skarn alteration zones along the contact. Kamtal skarn is of calcic type and consists of both endoskarn and exoskarn zones. Exoskarn includes two zones of garnet skarn and epidote skarn. Skarnification processes are divided mainly in two major stages (1 prograde and (2 retrograde. During prograde stage, the emplacement of intrusive body caused isochemical metamorphism of the wall rocks and developed marble and hornfels units in enclosing rocks. Crystallization of intrusive body led to evolvement of hydrothermal fluid phase which infiltrated into enclosing rocks. Reaction of these fluids with the early-formed metamorphosed wall rocks brought about extensive progressive metasomatic alteration characterized by the formation of anhydrous calc-silicate minerals such as garnets and pyroxenes at a temperature range of 420-550°C and ¦O2=10-22-10-25. Retrograde stage was accompanied by some physicochemical changes (decrease in temperature to <420°C and increase in ¦S2 which caused the alteration of pre-existing anhydrous calc-silicates to hydrous calc-silicates (epidote, and tremolite-actinolite, silicates (quartz, chlorites, and other clay minerals, oxides (magnetite and hematite, sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, and tetrahedrite, and carbonate (calcite. Comparison of Kamtal skarn with some other ones of corresponding type from Iran and other countries shows that Kamtal skarn well resembles to Anjerd and Pahnavar skarns in East-Azarbaijan.

  15. Optimizing Use of Girdled Ash Trees for Management of Low-Density Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Nathan W; McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Heyd, Robert L

    2017-06-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of ash mortality. We evaluated options for using girdled ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees for emerald ash borer detection and management in a low-density infestation in a forested area with abundant green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Across replicated 4-ha plots, we compared detection efficiency of 4 versus 16 evenly distributed girdled ash trees and between clusters of 3 versus 12 girdled trees. We also examined within-tree larval distribution in 208 girdled and nongirdled trees and assessed adult emerald ash borer emergence from detection trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site. Overall, current-year larvae were present in 85-97% of girdled trees and 57-72% of nongirdled trees, and larval density was 2-5 times greater on girdled than nongirdled trees. Low-density emerald ash borer infestations were readily detected with four girdled trees per 4-ha, and 3-tree clusters were as effective as 12-tree clusters. Larval densities were greatest 0.5 ± 0.4 m below the base of the canopy in girdled trees and 1.3 ± 0.7 m above the canopy base in nongirdled trees. Relatively few adult emerald ash borer emerged from trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site through the following summer, suggesting removal or destruction of girdled ash trees may be unnecessary. This could potentially reduce survey costs, particularly in forested areas with poor accessibility. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Interspecific proteomic comparisons reveal ash phloem genes potentially involved in constitutive resistance to the emerald ash borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Justin G A; Popova-Butler, Alexandra; Green-Church, Kari B; Koch, Jennifer L; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica), which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra) and Manchurian ash in the same clade and section, yet black ash is highly susceptible to the emerald ash borer. This contrast provides an opportunity to compare the genetic traits of the two species and identify those with a potential role in defense/resistance. We used Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) to compare the phloem proteomes of resistant Manchurian to susceptible black, green, and white ash. Differentially expressed proteins associated with the resistant Manchurian ash when compared to the susceptible ash species were identified using nano-LC-MS/MS and putative identities assigned. Proteomic differences were strongly associated with the phylogenetic relationships among the four species. Proteins identified in Manchurian ash potentially associated with its resistance to emerald ash borer include a PR-10 protein, an aspartic protease, a phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and a thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase. Discovery of resistance-related proteins in Asian species will inform approaches in which resistance genes can be introgressed into North American ash species. The generation of resistant North American ash genotypes can be used in forest ecosystem restoration and urban plantings following the wake of the emerald ash borer invasion.

  17. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessment by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D; Mankin, Richard W; Chen, Yigen; Duan, Jian J; Poland, Therese M; Bauer, Leah S

    2011-02-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. T. planipennisi is known to prefer late-instar emerald ash borer, but the cues used to assess host size by this species and most other parasitoids of concealed hosts remain unknown. We sought to test whether vibrations produced by feeding emerald ash borer vary with larval size and whether there are any correlations between these cues and T. planipennisi progeny number (i.e., brood size) and sex ratio. The amplitudes and rates of 3-30-ms vibrational impulses produced by emerald ash borer larvae of various sizes were measured in the laboratory before presenting the larvae to T. planipennisi. Impulse-rate did not vary with emerald ash borer size, but vibration amplitude was significantly higher for large larvae than for small larvae. T. planipennisi produced a significantly higher proportion of female offspring from large hosts than small hosts and was shown in previous work to produce more offspring overall from large hosts. There were no significant correlations, however, between the T. planipennisi progeny data and the emerald ash borer sound data. Because vibration amplitude varied significantly with host size, however, we are unable to entirely reject the hypothesis that T. planipennisi and possibly other parasitoids of concealed hosts use vibrational cues to assess host quality, particularly given the low explanatory potential of other external cues. Internal chemical cues also may be important.

  18. Metasomatic Reaction Zones as Monitors of Trace Element Transfer at the Slab-Mantle Interface: the Case of the Hochwart Peridotite (Ulten Zone, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchi, M.; Hermann, J.; Bargossi, G. M.; Mair, V.; Morten, L.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic blocks belonging to the Hochwart peridotite outcrop (Ulten Zone, Italian Alps) preserve a series of metasomatic mineral zones generated by infiltration of Si-rich hydrous fluids which occurred at the gneiss- peridotite interface. The age of the high pressure metamorphism for the Hochwart complex has been constrained at 330 Ma (Tumiati et al., 2003, EPSL, 210, 509-526). The country rocks are stromatic gneisses consisting mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, garnet, kyanite, biotite and muscovite. The ultramafic body consists of strongly serpentinized metaperidotites which are exposed as a hectometre-size lens along a steep gully, associated to monomineralic zones that developed at the contact between the peridotite body and the garnet gneiss country rocks. The composition of the metasomatic zones has been investigated in detail and records an order of metasomatic zoning formed by phlogopite-rich to tremolite-anthophyllite-rich rocks going from the host gneiss towards the peridotite. In some cases, the ultramafics fade into the gneisses developing serpentine and talc which has replaced, presumably at lower temperatures, the serpentine matrix and occurs in association with chlorite. Phlogopite aggregates (phlogopitite) with accessory minerals (quartz + zircon + apatite) and metabasic pods (phlogopite and hornblende) also occur. Black tourmaline (schorl-dravite solid solution) has been found for the first time in the contact near the phlogopite zone, suggesting an external addition of elements (boron and fluorine) to the system at high temperature. The formation of the metasomatic zones composed exclusively of hydrous phases must have involved extensive H2O-metasomatism as already documented for the Ulten peridotites. The source for these fluids can be a system of trondhjemitic-pegmatitic dikes cutting the peridotite that would have channelled aqueous fluids into the ultramafic rocks. Whole-rock geochemistry and trace element (LA ICP-MS) composition of hydrous

  19. EMERALD, Radiation Release and Dose after PWR Accident for Design Analysis and Operation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunot, W.K.; Fray, R.R.; Gillespie, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The EMERALD program is designed for the calculation of radiation releases and exposures resulting from abnormal operation of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR). The approach used in EMERALD is similar to an analog simulation of a real system. Each component or volume in the plant which contains a radioactive material is represented by a subroutine which keeps track of the production, transfer, decay and absorption of radioactivity in that volume. During the course of the analysis of an accident, activity is transferred from subroutine to subroutine in the program as it would be transferred from place to place in the plant. For example, in the calculation of the doses resulting from a loss-of-coolant accident the program first calculates the activity built up in the fuel before the accident, then releases some of this activity to the containment volume. Some of this activity is then released to the atmosphere. The rates of transfer, leakage, production, cleanup, decay, and release are read in as input to the program. Subroutines are also included which calculate the on-site and off-site radiation exposures at various distances for individual isotopes and sums of isotopes. The program contains a library of physical data for the twenty-five isotopes of most interest in licensing calculations, and other isotopes can be added or substituted. Because of the flexible nature of the simulation approach, the EMERALD program can be used for most calculations involving the production and release of radioactive materials during abnormal operation of a PWR. These include design, operational, and licensing studies. 2 - Method of solution - Explicit solutions of first-order linear differential equations are included. In addition, a subroutine is provided which solves a set of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 25 isotopes, 7 time periods, 15 volumes or components, 10

  20. Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Khrimian, Ashot; Cossé, Allard; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2012-04-01

    Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 2009, six bark oil distillate lure treatments were tested against manuka oil lures (used in 2008 by USDA APHIS PPQ emerald ash borer cooperative program). Purple traps baited with 80/20 (manuka/phoebe oil) significantly increased beetle catch compared with traps baited with manuka oil alone. In 2010 we monitored emerald ash borer attraction to dark green traps baited with six lure combinations of 80/20 (manuka/phoebe), manuka oil, and (3Z)-hexenol. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol caught significantly more male and total count insects than traps baited with manuka oil alone. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol did not catch more beetles when compared with traps baited with (3Z)-hexenol alone. When compared with unbaited green traps our results show that (3Z)-hexenol improved male catch significantly in only one of three field experiments using dark green traps. Dark green traps caught a high number of A. planipennis when unbaited while (3Z)-hexenol was seen to have a minimal (nonsignificant) trap catch effect at several different release rates. We hypothesize that the previously reported kairomonal attractancy of (3Z)-hexenol (for males) on light green traps is not as obvious here because of improved male attractancy to the darker green trap.

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of the Toxicity of Systemic Insecticides to Emerald Ash Borer Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Therese M; Ciaramitaro, Tina M; McCullough, Deborah G

    2016-04-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding insect native to Asia, threatens at least 16 North American ash (Fraxinus) species and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in landscapes and forests. We conducted laboratory bioassays to assess the relative efficacy of systemic insecticides to control emerald ash borer larvae in winter 2009 and 2010. Second- and third-instar larvae were reared on artificial diet treated with varying doses of emamectin benzoate (TREE-äge, Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA), imidacloprid (Imicide, J. J Mauget Co., Arcadia, CA), dinotefuran (Safari, Valent Professional Products, Walnut Creek, CA), and azadirachtin (TreeAzin, BioForest Technologies, Inc., Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, and Azasol, Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA). All of the insecticides were toxic to emerald ash borer larvae, but lethal concentrations needed to kill 50% of the larvae (LC50), standardized by larval weight, varied with insecticide and time. On the earliest date with a significant fit of the probit model, LC50 values were 0.024 ppm/g at day 29 for TREE-äge, 0.015 ppm/g at day 63 for Imicide, 0.030 ppm/g at day 46 for Safari, 0.025 ppm/g at day 24 for TreeAzin, and 0.027 ppm/g at day 27 for Azasol. The median lethal time to kill 50% (LT50) of the tested larvae also varied with insecticide product and dose, and was longer for Imicide and Safari than for TREE-äge or the azadirachtin products. Insecticide efficacy in the field will depend on adult and larval mortality as well as leaf and phloem insecticide residues.

  2. Multi-element analysis of emeralds and associated rocks by k0 neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.N.; Mondal, R.K.; Burte, P.P.; Nair, A.G.C.; Reddy, N.B.Y.; Reddy, L.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Manohar, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    Multi-element analysis was carried out in natural emeralds, their associated rocks and one sample of beryl obtained from Rajasthan, India. The concentrations of 21 elements were assayed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using the k 0 method (k 0 INAA method) and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The data reveal the segregation of some elements from associated (trapped and host) rocks to the mineral beryl forming the gemstones. A reference rock standard of the US Geological Survey (USGS BCR-1) was also analysed as a control of the method

  3. Carbonatite and silicate melt metasomatism of the mantle surrounding the Hawaiian plume: Evidence from volatiles, trace elements, and radiogenic isotopes in rejuvenated-stage lavas from Niihau, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jacqueline; Clague, David A.; Cousens, Brian; Monsalve, Maria Luisa; Uhl, Jessika

    2008-09-01

    We present new volatile, trace element, and radiogenic isotopic compositions for rejuvenated-stage lavas erupted on Niihau and its submarine northwest flank. Niihau rejuvenated-stage Kiekie Basalt lavas are mildly alkalic and are isotopically similar to, though shifted to higher 87Sr/86Sr and lower 206Pb/204Pb than, rejuvenated-stage lavas erupted on other islands and marginal seafloor settings. Kiekie lavas display trace element heterogeneity greater than that of other rejuvenated-stage lavas, with enrichments in Ba, Sr, and light-rare earth elements resulting in high and highly variable Ba/Th and Sr/Ce. The high Ba/Th lavas are among the least silica-undersaturated of the rejuvenated-stage suite, implying that the greatest enrichments are associated with the largest extents of melting. Kiekie lavas also have high and variable H2O/Ce and Cl/La, up to 620 and 39, respectively. We model the trace element concentrations of most rejuvenated-stage lavas by small degrees (˜1% to 9%) of melting of depleted peridotite recently metasomatized by a few percent of an enriched incipient melt (0.5% melting) of the Hawaiian plume. Kiekie lavas are best explained by 4% to 13% partial melting of a peridotite source metasomatized by up to 0.2% carbonatite, similar in composition to oceanic carbonatites from the Canary and Cape Verde Islands, with lower proportion of incipient melt than that for other rejuvenated-stage lavas. Primary H2O and Cl of the carbonatite component must be high, but variability in the volatile data may be caused by heterogeneity in the carbonatite composition and/or interaction with seawater. Our model is consistent with predictions based on carbonated eclogite and peridotite melting experiments in which (1) carbonated eclogite and peridotite within the Hawaiian plume are the first to melt during plume ascent; (2) carbonatite melt metasomatizes plume and surrounding depleted peridotite; (3) as the plume rises, silica-undersaturated silicate melts are also

  4. Petrography, metasomatism and mineralization of uranium and other radioactive minerals in the Narigan Area (Central Iran) Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazeli, A.; Azizaliabad, M.; Iranmanesh, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Narigan Zone is a portion of Yazd Province based on geopolitical division. In the Narigan Valley, rocks of zone have experienced a lot of fracturing and faulting events that are caused by different compressional and tensional tectonic processes. Tensional forces by producing fractures and faults have created an appropriate place for migration of magmatic hydrothermal solutions. The assemblage rock of these study area includes of various mineralogical types such as: acidic rocks, basic rocks, sedimentary rocks, rhyolite and rhyodacite, andesite, limestone layers, quartz-porphyry, metasomatic granites and diabasic dikes. On the basis of petrographical and mineralogical studies, various alterations were observed in the Narigan area, such as: gumbeite or potassic alteration, bresite or phyllic alteration, argillic or clay alteration, propylitic alteration, hornfelsic alteration and hydromica, chlorite, carbonate, magnetite and pyritic alteration. Elevated radiometric counts usually occur in phlogopite-magnetite alteration zone that in this complex usually consists of minerals like biotite, phlogopite, hydromica, magnetite, carbonate, pyrite, chlorite and less commonly apatite. The greatest increase in U content is accompanied by phlogopite-magnetite alteration, sometimes this increase is also observed in the propylitic zone. Respectively, the greatest increases in Th contents were observed by phlogopitic-magnetitic, gumbeitey, bresitic-propylitic intermediate zone and the bresitic and propylitic alteration zones. Increasing amounts of Cu is accompanied by phlogopitic-magnetitic, phyllic, phyllic-propylitic intermediate zone, hornfelsic and propylitic alteration zones. The greatest increase in Mo contents is respectively accompanied by phlogopitic-magnetitic, hornfelsic, bresiticpropylitic intermediate zone, bresitic, propylitic and gumbeitic alteration zones. Respectively, the most increase in amount of Co is associated with phlogopite-magnetite, hornfelsic

  5. Modeling emerald ash borer dispersal using percolation theory: estimating the rate of range expansion in a fragmented landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin A. J. Taylor; Daniel A. Herms; Louis R. Iverson

    2008-01-01

    The dispersal of organisms is rarely random, although diffusion processes can be useful models for movement in approximately homogeneous environments. However, the environments through which all organisms disperse are far from uniform at all scales. The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is obligate on ash (Fraxinus spp...

  6. Developing rearing methods for Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip Taylor; Jian J. Duan; Roger. Fuester

    2011-01-01

    Classical biological control efforts against emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in North America primarily have focused on introduction and releases of exotic parasitoid species collected from northern parts of China. Recently, field surveys in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Ontario also indicate that some existing parasitoids...

  7. Water table response to harvesting and simulated emerald ash borer mortality in black ash wetlands in Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Slesak; Christian F. Lenhart; Kenneth N. Brooks; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik

    2014-01-01

    Black ash wetlands are seriously threatened because of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB). Wetland hydrology is likely to be modified following ash mortality, but the magnitude of hydrological impact following loss via EAB and alternative mitigation harvests is not clear. Our objective was to assess the water table response to simulated EAB and harvesting to...

  8. Evaluating the use of plastic bags to prevent escape of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from firewood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Ciaramitaro; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Andrea Diss-Torrance

    2008-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a highly destructive exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus) in North America. Human movement of infested logs, primarily pieces of firewood, is a major pathway for long distance spread of the beetle. Firewood may be confiscated at campgrounds, rest-areas, and...

  9. Microsatellite population genetics of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire): comparisons between Asian and North American populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson C. Keever; Christal Nieman; Larissa Ramsay; Carol E. Ritland; Leah S. Bauer; D. Barry Lyons; Jenny S. Cory

    2013-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera; Buprestidae), is an invasive wood-boring beetle native to northeast Asia. This species was first detected in Michigan USA in 2002, and is a significant threat to native and ornamental ash tree species (Fraxinus spp.) throughout North America. We...

  10. Microbial control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: Greenhouse and field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    In 2003-2004, the lethal and sublethal effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults and larvae were evaluated using topical spray and fungal band treatments in the greenhouse and field. B. bassiana strain GHA was moderately effective against...

  11. 76 FR 62827 - Notice of Final Supplementary Rules for Public Lands in Routt County, CO: Emerald Mountain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... Management Zones. Zone 1 is managed under a destination recreation-tourism market strategy. The strategy... religious cultural properties in the Emerald Mountain SRMA. These supplementary rules would not affect Indian land, resources, or religious rights. Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations That...

  12. Review of ecosystem level impacts of emerald ash borer on black ash wetlands: What does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall K. Kolka; Anthony W. D' Amato; Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Robert A. Slesak; Thomas G. Pypker; Melissa B. Youngquist; Alexis R. Grinde; Brian J. Palik

    2018-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) is rapidly spreading throughout eastern North America and devastating ecosystems where ash is a component tree. This rapid and sustained loss of ash trees has already resulted in ecological impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and is projected to be even more severe as EAB invades black ash-dominated wetlands of the western...

  13. Effects of trap type, placement and ash distribution on emerald ash borer captures in a low density site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert; Therese M. Poland; Steven J. Pierce; Su Zie. Ahn

    2011-01-01

    Effective methods for early detection of newly established, low density emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestations are critically needed in North America. We assessed adult A. planipennis captures on four types of traps in a 16-ha site in central Michigan. The site was divided into 16 blocks, each comprised of...

  14. Evaluating the economic costs and benefits of slowing the spread of emerald ash borer in Ohio and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Bossenbroek; Audra Croskey; David Finnoff; Louis Iverson; Shana M. McDermott; Anantha Prasad; Charles Sims; Davis. Sydnor

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis; EAB) is poised to wipe out native ashes (Fraxinus spp.) in North America with expected catastrophic losses to ash tree forestry (MacFarlane and Meyer 2005). EAB was first discovered in Detroit in 2002. Most scientists hypothesize that it entered the United States through solid wood...

  15. Methods to Improve Survival and Growth of Planted Alternative Species Seedlings in Black Ash Ecosystems Threatened by Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas Bolton; Joseph Shannon; Joshua Davis; Matthew Grinsven; Nam Noh; Shon Schooler; Randall Kolka; Thomas Pypker; Joseph Wagenbrenner

    2018-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) continues to spread across North America, infesting native ash trees and changing the forested landscape. Black ash wetland forests are severely affected by EAB. As black ash wetland forests provide integral ecosystem services, alternative approaches to maintain forest cover on the landscape are needed. We implemented simulated EAB infestations...

  16. Effects of the emerald ash borer invasion on the community composition of arthropods associated with ash tree boles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is an invasive non-native wood-boring beetle that has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America, and threatens to extirpate the ecological services provided by the genus. Identifying the arthropod community assoc...

  17. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: the potential for early stage recovery of North American ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many parts of North America, ash stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees and young basal sprouts, saplings, and seedlings. Without a seed bank, ash tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these younger cohorts...

  18. Developing rearing methods for Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Mike Ulyshen; Leah Bauer; Ivich. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yong, a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid, is one of three hymenopteran parasitoids being released in the U.S. for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmair, EAB), an invasive beetle from Asia causing mortality of the ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North...

  19. A new species of genus Oobius (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from the Russian Far East that parasitizes eggs of Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is described from the Vladivostok, Russia, Oobius primorskyensis Yao & Duan n. sp. Both morphological characters and analysis of DNA sequence divergence suggest that this species is different from t...

  20. Use of feces to attract insects by a Glittering-bellied Emerald, Chlorostilbon lucidus (Shaw, 1812 (Apodiformes: Trochilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio André Facco Jacomassa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the occurrence of a female Glittering-bellied Emerald, Chlorostilbon lucidus, using feces to attract insects to the nesting site for predation. This is the first report of a hummingbird using feces to attract insects.

  1. Can ash communities and their dependent species be partially protected through biological control of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002 and has been detected in 32 U.S. states and two Canadian pro...

  2. Exploratory survey for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and its natural enemies in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Ruitong Gao; Tonghai Zhao; Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2003-01-01

    An exploratory survey for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, and its natural enemies was conducted in China during October and November 2003. We examined 29 field plots in six provinces. We visually inspected living Fraxinus chinensis, F. mandshurica, F. pennsylvanica, F. rhynchophylla, and F. velutina...

  3. Development of a web-based tool for projecting costs of managing emerald ash borer in municipal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford S. Sadof

    2009-01-01

    City managers faced with the invasion of emerald ash borer into their urban forests need to plan for the invasion in order to obtain the resources they need to protect the public from harm caused by dying ash trees. Currently, city...

  4. Progress and challenges of protecting North American ash trees from the emerald ash borer using biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian Duan; Leah Bauer; Roy van Driesche; Juli. Gould

    2018-01-01

    After emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, was discovered in the United States, a classical biological control program was initiated against this destructive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). This biocontrol program began in 2007 after federal regulatory agencies and the state of Michigan approved release of...

  5. Planning for and implementing an emerald ash borer-induced forest restoration program in municipal woodlands in Oakville, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter A. Williams; Candace. Karandiuk

    2017-01-01

    Oakville is an urban municipality with 846 ha of woodland. Management priorities are to maintain forest health, environmental health, and safety; wood production is a minor objective. The town developed a comprehensive strategy to plan for emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis) induced ash mortality and forest restoration. Oakville has begun...

  6. Can Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), emerge from logs two summers after infested trees are cut?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Much of EAB's range expansion has been attributed to human-assisted movement of infested items such as ash logs and firewood. It is unclear the amount of time that logs cut...

  7. Effects of rearing conditions on reproduction of Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Juli R; Ayer, Tracy; Fraser, Ivich

    2011-04-01

    Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) can be successfully reared on emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), larvae feeding in chambers drilled in small ash twigs that are wrapped with floral tape. Females maintained in groups with males for one week can receive enough sperm for production of female progeny throughout their lives. Volatiles released by emerald ash borer adults feeding on ash foliage increased parasitoid fecundity over ash foliage alone or no stimulus. The temperature at which the parasitoids were reared ranged from 20 to 25 degrees C in a daily cycle; however, raising the daily maximum temperature to 28 degrees C did not affect parasitoid longevity or fecundity. Adult females lived between 12 and 127 d, with an average of 60.8 +/- 4.5 d. Males lived slightly longer, with an average of 66 +/- 4.5 d. The first clutch of eggs was laid when the female was between 2 and 42 d old, with the average preoviposition period lasting 11.4 +/- 1.4 or 19.5 +/- 2.0 d in 2007 and 2009 trials, respectively. A higher proportion of the emerald ash borer larvae were feeding and thus attractive to parasitoids in the 2009 trial, and female S. agrili laid an average of 9.5 +/- 1.0 clutches containing 5.4 +/- 0.2 eggs, for an average of 51.2 eggs per female. Approximately three quarters of the progeny were female. The number of eggs per clutch was significantly greater when deposited on larger emerald ash borer larvae, further highlighting the need for quality larvae in rearing. Chilling S. agrili pupae at 10 degrees C to stockpile them for summer release was not successful; chilling resulted in lower survival and lower fecundity of emerging progeny. Female S. agrili proved capable of attacking emerald ash borer larvae through even the thickest bark of an ash tree that was 30-cm diameter at breast height. Even emerald ash borer larvae that were creating overwintering chambers in the outer sapwood of the tree were successfully

  8. Metasomatized mantle as the source of Mid-Miocene-Quaternary volcanism in NW-Iranian Azerbaijan: Geochronological and geochemical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechmann, Anna; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Ulmer, Peter; Guillong, Marcel; Faridi, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    Middle Miocene to Quaternary volcanic rocks cover large areas of the Azerbaijan Province in NW Iran. This study reports two separate age clusters out of 23 new LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages: (1) Middle Miocene (16.2-10.6 Ma) and (2) Latest Miocene-Late Pleistocene (5.5-0.4 Ma). Major and trace element bulk rock geochemistry and initial Sr, Nd, Pb radiogenic isotope data on the dated rocks provide new constraints on the Mid-Miocene to Quaternary volcanism in this region. The analyses are distributed over a large compositional range from low-K to high-K calc-alkaline andesites and dacites/rhyolites to more alkaline trachybasalts and dacites with shoshonitic affinities. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are steep with significant enrichment in LREE and low abundances of HREE indicating a garnet control. Plots of primitive mantle-normalized trace elements show negative Ti and Nb-Ta anomalies indicative of an arc signature. The wide compositional range and the ubiquitous presence of an arc signature reveal that the source mantle is heterogeneous and metasomatically altered. Sr, Nd and Pb radiogenic isotope data further point towards an enriched mantle source and/or crustal contamination. Crustal contamination is best recognized by inherited zircon cores, which yield Late Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian ages typical for the Iranian basement. The occurrence of adakite-like compositions with elevated magnesium numbers, Cr and Ni concentrations argue against a fractionation-driven process but point to a subcrustal origin. Overall, the analyzed lavas show no spatial and temporal relation to a potential subduction zone, confirming the dated volcanics to be post-collisional and not related to singular processes such as slab retreat or delamination of a continuous lower crustal sliver. We propose three hypotheses to explain the reported disparity in distribution, age and composition and favour small-scale sublithospheric convection or incorporation of crustal material into the

  9. Sources and mobility of carbonate melts beneath cratons, with implications for deep carbon cycling, metasomatism and rift initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Romer, Rolf L.; Stracke, Andreas; Steenfelt, Agnete; Smart, Katie A.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2017-05-01

    differentiated 'cratonic carbonatites' have only little in common with those of metasomatic agents that act on the deeper lithosphere. Consequently, carbonatite trace element systematics should only be used with caution when constraining carbon mobility and metasomatism at mantle depths. Regardless of the exact nature of carbonate-bearing melts within the mantle lithosphere, they play an important role in enrichment processes, thereby decreasing the stability of buoyant cratons and promoting rift initiation - as exemplified by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic breakup of the North Atlantic craton.

  10. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures aragonite veins in metabasalt and siltstone clasts within the serpentinite flows have ??18O = 16.7-24.5???, consistent with the serpentinizing fluids at temperatures <250 ??C. ??13C values of 0.1-2.5??? suggest a source in subducting carbonate sediments. The ??34S values of sulfide in serpentinites on Conical Seamount (-6.7??? to 9.8???) result from metasomatism through variable reduction of aqueous sulfate (??34S = 14???) derived from slab sediments. Despite sulfur metasomatism, serpentinites have low sulfur contents (generally < 164 ppm) that reflect the highly depleted nature of the mantle wedge. The serpentinites are mostly enriched in 34S (median ??34Ssulfide = 4.5???), consistent with a 34S

  11. Characterization of yellow and colorless decorative glasses from the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klysubun, Wantana; Ravel, Bruce; Klysubun, Prapong; Sombunchoo, Panidtha; Deenan, Weeraya

    2013-06-01

    Yellow and colorless ancient glasses, which were once used to decorate the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, Bangkok, Thailand, around 150 years ago, are studied to unravel the long-lost glass-making recipes and manufacturing techniques. Analyses of chemical compositions, using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SRXRF), indicate that the Thai ancient glasses are soda lime silica glasses (60 % SiO2; 10 % Na2O; 10 % CaO) bearing lead oxide between 2-16 %. Iron (1.5-9.4 % Fe2O3) and manganese (1.7 % MnO) are present in larger abundance than the other 3 d transition metals detected (0.04-0.2 %). K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) provide conclusive evidence on the oxidation states of Fe being 3+ and Mn being 2+ and on short-length tetrahedral structures around the cations. This suggests that iron is used as a yellow colorant with manganese as a decolorant. L 3-edge XANES results reveal the oxidation states of lead as 2+. The results from this work provide information crucial for replicating these decorative glasses for the future restoration of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha.

  12. The Biology and Ecology of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis, in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Zhong-Qi; Gould, Juli R.; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Liu, Gui-Jun; Liu, EnShan

    2010-01-01

    The biology, ecology, and life cycle of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), were studied using regular inspection in the forest and observations in the laboratory. Results indicated that A. planipennis are mostly univoltine in Tianjin, China. They overwintered individually as mature larvae in shallow chambers excavated in the outer sapwood. In late July, some full-grown larvae began to build overwintering chambers, and all larvae entered the sapwood for dormancy by early November. A. planipennis pupated in the overwintering chamber from early April to mid May the following year, and the average pupal duration was about 20 days. In late April, some newly eclosed adults could be found in the pupal cells, but they had not yet emerged from the tree. Adults began to emerge in early May, with peak flight occurring in mid May. The average longevity of adults was about 21 days and the adult stage lasted through early July. The adults fed on ash foliage as a source of nutrition. Mating was usually conducted and completed on the leaf or trunk surfaces of ash trees. Oviposition began in mid May and eggs hatched on average in 15.7 days. The first instar larvae appeared in early June. The larval stage lasted about 300 days to complete an entire generation. The emerald ash borer had four larval instars on velvet ash, Fraxinus velutina (Scrophulariales: Oleaceae). The major natural control factors of A. planipennis were also investigated, and preliminary suggestions for its integrated management are proposed. PMID:20879922

  13. Alkaline and Carbonate-rich Melt Metasomatism and Melting of Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle: Evidence from Mantle Xenoliths, NE Bavaria, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Špaček, Petr; Magna, T.; Ulrych, Jaromír; Svojtka, Martin; Hegner, E.; Balogh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 12 (2013), s. 2597-2633 ISSN 0022-3530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1170 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : peridotite * metasomatism * subcontinental lithosphere * Sr-Nd-Li isotopes * microstructure Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 4.485, year: 2013

  14. Accessory minerals and subduction zone metasomatism: a geochemical comparison of two mélanges (Washington and California, U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of a subducted slab or subducted sediment to contribute many incompatible trace elements to arc source regions may depend on the stabilities of accessory minerals within these rocks, which can only be studied indirectly. In contrast, the role of accessory minerals in lower-T and -P metasomatic processes within paleo-subduction zones can be studied directly in subduction-zone metamorphic terranes.

  15. Monitoring the establishment and flight phenology of parasitoids of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan by using sentinel eggs and larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristopher J. Abell; Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Jian J. Duan; Roy G. Van Driesche

    2016-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an important invasive pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. Two larval parasitoid species, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera:...

  16. Comparison of emerald ash borer preference for ash of different species, sun exposure, age, and stress treatments in relation to foliar volatiles and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Yigen Chen

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on six different species of ash including Manchurian ash (F...

  17. Oceanic provenance of lithospheric mantle beneath Lower Silesia (SW Poland) and the two kinds of its "Fe-metasomatism"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puziewicz, Jacek; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Kukuła, Anna; Ćwiek, Mateusz

    2016-04-01

    Lusatia is surrounded to the West and South West by Al-richer domains (the first Al-rich orthopyroxene occurrences in mantle xenoliths are located in the Rhön Mts. to the West and in Upper Palatinate to the South-West. The low Al content in orthopyroxene, corresponding to that typical for the Lower Silesian European mantle domain, is characteristic for (1) oceanic mantle formed in the mid ocean ridges (MOR) and (2) mantle wedge affected by extreme melting in the supra-subduction zones (SSZ). The SSZ harzburgites contain usually orthopyroxene which is more Al-poor (< 2.0 wt. % Al2O3) than that of the MOR ones (2.0 - 6. 0 wt. % Al2O3; Bonatti & Michael 1989, EPSL 91, 297-311). Thus, we infer that the Lower Silesian SCLM originated rather in the MOR setting. The Lower Silesian B harzburgites were formed by reactive basaltic melt percolation, which lowered the forsterite content in olivine and Mg# in orthopyroxene ("Fe metasomatism"). The B1 harzburgites contain orthopyroxene which is Al poor (see above) irrespectively of forsterite content of coexisting olivine. Thus, the medium which led to the "Fe-metasomatism" must have been also Al-poor. This criterion is met by tholeiitic basaltic melts which originate by multiple polybaric mantle melting in MOR environment. Their percolation in oceanic mantle leads to production of low-Al orthopyroxene (e. g in the peridotites from East Pacific Rise, Dick & Natland 1996 Proc ODP Sci Res, 147, 103-234). Therefore, we suggest that the B1 harzburgites originated by "Fe-metasomatism" also in the MOR setting. The coexistence of A and B1 harzburgites suggests that they represent lithospheric mantle generated in the magma-rich, thus rather fast-spreading, MOR. Textural relationships show that the Al-enriched B2 harzburgites were also affected by "Fe metasomatism", but by alkaline basaltic melt percolating in SCLM during Cenozoic rifting. The crust overlying western part of the Lower Silesian domain of European SCLM belongs to the easternmost

  18. Alkali feldspar syenites with shoshonitic affinities from Chhotaudepur area: Implication for mantle metasomatism in the Deccan large igneous province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Hari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two petrologically distinct alkali feldspar syenite bodies (AFS-1 and AFS-2 from Chhotaudepur area, Deccan Large Igneous Province are reported in the present work. AFS-1 is characterized by hypidiomorphic texture and consists of feldspar (Or55Ab43 to Or25Ab71, ferro-pargasite/ferro-pargasite hornblende, hastingsite, pyroxene (Wo47, En5, Fs46, magnetite and biotite. AFS-2 exhibits panidiomorphic texture with euhedral pyroxene (Wo47-50, En22-39, Fs12–31 set in a groundmass matrix of alkali feldspar (Or99Ab0.77 to Or1.33Ab98, titanite and magnetite. In comparison to AFS-1, higher elemental concentrations of Ba, Sr and ∑REE are observed in AFS-2. The average peralkaline index of the alkali feldspar syenites is ∼1 indicating their alkaline nature. Variation discrimination diagrams involving major and trace elements and their ratios demonstrate that these alkali feldspar syenites have a shoshonite affinity but emplaced in a within-plate and rifting environment. No evidence of crustal contamination is perceptible in the multi-element primitive mantle normalized diagram as well as in terms of trace elemental ratios. The enrichment of incompatible elements in the alkali feldspar syenites suggests the involvement of mantle metasomatism in their genesis.

  19. Presumed Multiple Metasomatism underneath the Colorado Plateau; Decoding from Chemistry and Inclusion/Lamella Mineralogy of Diverse Garnets from the Garnet Ridge, Northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Ogasawara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Various garnets containing the information on mantle petrology and related metasomatism occur at the Garnet Ridge, Colorado Plateau. The origins of garnets range from deep mantle to shallow continental crust. These garnets were delivered by kimberlitic diatreme of 30 Ma (Smith et al. 2004). We have classified the garnets into 10 groups (A to J, see figure) by naked eye observation, major chemistry, minor Na-Ti-P, inclusion/lamella mineralogy. Among them, groups A to D are of mantle origin, E to G of subducted oceanic crust origin, and H to J of continental crust origin. We summarized results as in the followings. A: Cr and pyrope-rich garnet has Cr2O3(0.8-6.3 wt.%) and inclusions of Ol, Cpx, Opx, Ti-Chu/Chn and carbonates, indicating carbonated garnet lherzolites as host. Cr contents negatively correlates with Na-Ti-P contents and occurrence of exsolved Rt, Ilm and crichtonite. This indicates Cr-rich end-member is the most "primitive" mantle garnet before metasomatism. B: Pyrope-rich reddish brown garnet of peridotitic origins was subdivided into 4 subgroups (B1 to B4, see figure). Compositional range in Ca-Mg-Fe triangle expands to Fe-rich side from group A. Exsolved Na-bearing amphibole and inclusions of Ap, carbonates and fluid were identified. These indicate metasomatism of group A. C: Garnet megacryst is coarse-grained garnet (2-10 cm across) with crystal faces. This garnet has wide chemical variation plotted in the center area of Ca-Mg-Fe triangle. D: Garnet aggregate has similar chemistry of group C and is composed of several grains. Grain boundaries of garnet were recognized by Rt, Ilm and other minerals and oscillatory zonings of Ca, Mg, Fe and Na-Ti-P. Fluid inclusions of groups C and D suggest these garnets might crystalized from fluid. E: Garnet in eclogite and F: Garnet in metasomatized eclogite are xenolith samples (the Fallaron Plate origin?). Aggregate of Zo+Ab contained in group E indicates decomposed precursor lawsonite inclusion. G: Quartz

  20. ABOUT LOVE, MURDER AND EMERALDS. IOAN PETRU CULIANU'S ”SERIOUSLY” GAME WITH FICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Iulian TOROCZKAI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study looks into how Ioan Petru Culianu illustrated some of his ideas, as a historian of religions and as a philosopher of culture, in one of his literary works, The Emeralds Game. This novel is more than mere detective fiction, it is also a magic and esoteric novel, and to understand it we need to refer to magic, astrologic or geomantic practices. This means the considerations the author expressed in his other essential scientific works are “logically” extended, continued in this literary writing. The contemporaneity of the work is suggested by the significant fictional world it proposes, a world where the political blends with the religious, where reality blends with the psychological, science with adventure; all these aspects bring this novel to the same level with other similar novels, like Umberto Eco’s Name of the Rose or Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code.

  1. Temperature dependence of the chromium(III) R1 linewidth in emerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller-Pastor, Ivana; Hutchison, Wayne D.; Riesen, Hans

    2013-03-01

    The temperature dependent contribution to the R1 (2E ← 4A2) linewidth in emerald, Be3Al2Si6O18:Cr3, has been measured by employing spectral hole-burning, fluorescence line narrowing and conventional luminescence experiments. The contribution varies from 0.6 MHz at 6.5 K to ˜420 GHz at 240 K and the line red-shifts by ˜570 GHz. Above 60 K, the dependence is well described by a non-perturbative formalism for two-phonon Raman scattering. Below this temperature the direct one-phonon process between the levels of the split 2E excited state dominates. However, it appears that a localized low-energy phonon leads to a deviation from the standard pattern at lowest temperatures.

  2. Emerald ash borer invasion of North America: history, biology, ecology, impacts, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herms, Daniel A; McCullough, Deborah G

    2014-01-01

    Since its accidental introduction from Asia, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has killed millions of ash trees in North America. As it continues to spread, it could functionally extirpate ash with devastating economic and ecological impacts. Little was known about EAB when it was first discovered in North America in 2002, but substantial advances in understanding of EAB biology, ecology, and management have occurred since. Ash species indigenous to China are generally resistant to EAB and may eventually provide resistance genes for introgression into North American species. EAB is characterized by stratified dispersal resulting from natural and human-assisted spread, and substantial effort has been devoted to the development of survey methods. Early eradication efforts were abandoned largely because of the difficulty of detecting and delineating infestations. Current management is focused on biological control, insecticide protection of high-value trees, and integrated efforts to slow ash mortality.

  3. The Lagoa Real subalkaline granitic complex (south Bahia, Brazil): a source for uranium mineralizations associated with Na-Ca metasomatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruejol, P.; Cuney, M.; Poty, B.; Neto, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    In the central zone of the Sao Francisco Craton (South Bahia), the lower Proterozoic Lagoa Real granites and orthogneisses overthrust to the West the younger Urandi and Espinhaco metamorphic series, probably a late Brazilian event. This thrust is related to the regional metamorphism (amphibolite facies) of the Lagoa Real granites and induces a reverse HP metamorphism in the over thrusted series. Undeformed granites (sao Timoeto type) present two feldspars, perthitic orthoclase largely predominant over plagioclase (oligoclase ≥ albite), blue quartz, Fe-rich amphibole and biotite ± clinopyroxene assemblages, ilmenite ≥ magnetite, zircon, apatite, allanite and Nb ± Ti-REE oxides and silicates. The crystallization of the granites begins at high temperature and under low fO 2 and P H2O conditions. Fractional crystallization of pyroxene and plagioclase leads to silica enrichment during magmatic differentiation. Increasing fO 2 and P H2O are observed during this evolution. Orthogneisses show strongly recrystallized paragenesis: equal abundance of non-perthitic microcline and plagioclase (oligoclase ≤ albite), quartz, more Al-rich amphibole and biotite, magnetite, sphene, zircon, allanite, Nb ± Ti-REE oxides and silicates, and ± apatite. HT Na and Ca metasomatism occurs 330 Ma later than granite emplacement and is synchronous with important uranium mineralizations. Major elements and trace-elements geochemistry of the granites and orthogneisses indicate subalkaline to alkaline typology. Incompatible behaviour of Th, REE, Y, Zr, Nb, and F points out a convergence with alkaline magmatism. CI, F, Th, Y, REE, NB enrichments and Ba, Sr depletions are also related to a late magmatic stage. U-Th-rich and metamict accessory minerals of the granites represent a favorabl source for the Lagoa Real uranium ore-deposits [pt

  4. EMERALD-NORMAL, Routine Radiation Release and Dose for PWR Design Analysis and Operation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, S.G.; Brunot, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: EMERALD-NORMAL is designed for the calculation of radiation releases and exposures resulting from normal operation of a large pressurized water reactor. The approach used is similar to an analog simulation of a real system. Each component or volume in the plant which contains a radioactive material is represented by a subroutine which keeps track of the production, transfer, decay, and absorption of radioactivity in that volume. During the course of the analysis, activity is transferred from subroutine to subroutine in the program as it would be transferred from place to place in the plant. Some of this activity is then released to the atmosphere and to the discharge canal. The rates of transfer, leakage, production, cleanup, decay, and release are read as input to the program. Subroutines are also included which calculate the off-site radiation exposures at various distances for individual isotopes and sums of isotopes. The program contains a library of physical data for the forty isotopes of most interest in licensing calculations, and other isotopes can be added or substituted. Because of the flexible nature of the simulation approach, the EMERALD-NORMAL program can be used for most calculations involving the production and release of radioactive material. These include design, operation, and licensing studies. 2 - Method of solution: Explicit solutions of first-order linear differential equations are included. In addition, a subroutine is provided which solves a set of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Many parameters and systems included in the program, particularly the radiation waste-treatment system, are unique to the PG and E Diablo Canyon PWR plant. Maxima of: 50 isotopes, 9 distances, 16 angular sectors, 1 operating period, 1 reactor power level

  5. Evaluation of modified atmosphere bag and sulphur dioxide concentrations applied on highbush blueberries fruit (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cv. Emerald

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Mario; Wyss, Anddy; Hormazábal, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to evaluate techniques for modified atmosphere and application of sulphur anhydride upon parameters of quality of postharvest on blueberry fruit (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cv. Emerald, an experiment of six treatments was conducted, given by the combination of two factors, modified atmosphere (with and without) and different concentrations of sulphur dioxide (generated by 0, 1 and 2 g of sodium metabisulphite) during 7, 14, 21 and 28 days at 0 °C. The dose of 2 g of modified atmosphere s...

  6. The Role of Multichannel Marketing in Customer Retention and Loyalty: Study in Emerald Bank Customer in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ambarwati Ambarwati; Djumilah Zain Hadiwidjojo; Achmad Sudiro; Fatchur Rohman

    2015-01-01

    Attention on the relationship between customer retention, customer loyalty, and customer satisfaction that serves as "seed" of customer loyalty highlight the important factors for multichannel management. With the growing trends of people in investing their money in bank for securities need to be responded by the marketing department to create better marketing strategies. The purpose of this study is to examine and explain the effect of a multichannel bank on emerald customers retention   in ...

  7. Interactive influence of leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on green ash foliar chemistry and emerald ash borer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-07-01

    Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adults reared on green ash foliage subjected to these factors was assayed. Mature leaves generally were more nutritious with greater amino acids and a greater ratio of protein to non-structural carbohydrate (P:C) than young leaves, in particular when trees were grown in shade. On the other hand, mature leaves had lower amounts of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors, and total phenolics compared to young leaves. Lower defense of mature leaves alone, or along with higher nutritional quality may lead to increased survival and longevity of emerald ash borer feeding on mature leaves. Sunlight reduced amino acids and P:C ratio, irrespective of leaf age and girdling, and elevated total protein of young foliage, but not protein of mature leaves. Sunlight also dramatically increased all investigated defensive compounds of young, but not mature leaves. Girdling reduced green ash foliar nutrition, especially, of young leaves grown in shade and of mature leaves grown in sun. However emerald ash borer performance did not differ when fed leaves from trees grown in sun or shade, or from girdled or control trees. One explanation is that emerald ash borer reared on lower nutritional quality food may compensate for nutrient deficiency by increasing its consumption rate. The strong interactions among leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on nutrition and defense highlight the need for caution when interpreting data without considering possible interactions.

  8. Influence of Mortality Factors and Host Resistance on the Population Dynamics of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Urban Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquarrie, Chris J K; Scharbach, Roger

    2015-02-01

    The success of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in North America is hypothesized to be due to both the lack of significant natural enemies permitting easy establishment and a population of trees that lack the ability to defend themselves, which allows populations to grow unchecked. Since its discovery in 2002, a number of studies have examined mortality factors of the insect in forests, but none have examined the role of natural enemies and other mortality agents in the urban forest. This is significant because it is in the urban forest where the emerald ash borer has had the most significant economic impacts. We studied populations in urban forests in three municipalities in Ontario, Canada, between 2010 and 2012 using life tables and stage-specific survivorship to analyze data from a split-rearing manipulative experiment. We found that there was little overall mortality caused by natural enemies; most mortality we did observe was caused by disease. Stage-specific survivorship was lowest in small and large larvae, supporting previous observations of high mortality in these two stages. We also used our data to test the hypothesis that mortality and density in emerald ash borer are linked. Our results support the prediction of a negative relationship between mortality and density. However, the relationship varies between insects developing in the crown and those in the trunk of the tree. This relationship was significant because when incorporated with previous findings, it suggests a mechanism and hypothesis to explain the outbreak dynamics of the emerald ash borer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Development of novel ash hybrids to introgress resistance to emerald ash borer into north American ash species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Koch; David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there is no evidence that any of the native North American ash species have any resistance to the emerald ash borer (EAB). This means that the entire ash resource of the eastern United States and Canada is at risk of loss due to EAB. In contrast, outbreaks of EAB in Asian ash species are rare and appear to be isolated responses to stress (Bauer et al. 2005,...

  10. Titanates of the lindsleyite-mathiasite (LIMA) group reveal isotope disequilibrium associated with metasomatism in the mantle beneath Kimberley (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Andrea; Woodhead, Jon D.; Phillips, David; Maas, Roland; Davies, Gareth R.; Griffin, William L.

    2018-01-01

    Radiogenic isotope variations unrelated to radiogenic ingrowth are common between minerals found in metasomatised mantle xenoliths entrained in kimberlite, basalts and related magmas. As the metasomatic minerals are assumed to have been in isotopic equilibrium originally, such variations are typically attributed to contamination by the magma host and/or interaction with mantle fluids during or before xenolith transport to surface. However, the increasing evidence of metasomatism by multiple, compositionally distinct fluids permeating the lithospheric mantle, coeval with specific magmatic events, suggests that isotopic disequilibrium might be a consequence of discrete, though complex, metasomatic events. Here we provide clear evidence of elemental and Sr isotope heterogeneity between coeval Ti-rich LIMA (lindsleyite-mathiasite) minerals at the time of their formation in the mantle. LIMA minerals occur in close textural association with clinopyroxene and phlogopite in low-temperature (∼800-900 °C), strongly metasomatised mantle xenoliths from the ∼84 Ma Bultfontein kimberlite (South Africa). Previous U/Pb dating of the LIMA phases was used to argue that each xenolith recorded a single event of LIMA crystallisation at ∼180-190 Ma, coeval with the emplacement of Karoo magmas. SEM imaging reveals that up to four types of LIMA phases coexist in each xenolith, and occasionally in a single LIMA grain. Major element and in situ Sr isotope analyses of the different LIMA types show that each phase has a distinct elemental composition and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio (e.g., 0.7068-0.7086 and 0.7115-0.7129 for two LIMA types in a single xenolith; 0.7053-0.7131 across the entire sample suite). These combined age and isotopic constraints require that multiple fluids metasomatised these rocks at broadly the same time (i.e. within a few thousands to millions of years), and produced similar mineralogical features. Elemental and isotopic variations between different LIMA types

  11. Depleted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and its tholeiitic melt metasomatism beneath NE termination of the Eger Rift (Europe): the case study of the Steinberg (Upper Lusatia, SE Germany) xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Büchner, Jörg; Tietz, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    The ca. 30 Ma Steinberg basanite occurs at the NE termination of the Eger (Ohře) Rift in the NW Bohemian Massif, Central Europe, and belongs to the Cenozoic alkaline Central European Volcanic Province. The basanite hosts a suite of mantle xenoliths, most of which are harzburgites containing relatively magnesian olivine (Fo 90.5-91.6) and Al-poor (0.04-0.13 a pfu) orthopyroxene (mg# 0.90-0.92). Some of these harzburgites also contain volumetrically minor clinopyroxene (mg# 0.92-0.95, Al 0.03-0.13 a pfu) and have U-shaped LREE-enriched REE patterns. The Steinberg harzburgites are typical for the Lower Silesian - Upper Lusatian domain of the European subcontinental lithospheric mantle. They represent residual mantle that has undergone extensive partial melting and was subsequently affected by mantle metasomatism by mixed carbonatite-silicate melts. The Steinberg xenolith suite comprises also dunitic xenoliths affected by metasomatism by melt similar to the host basanite, which lowered the Fo content in olivine to 87.6 %. This metasomatism happened shortly before xenolith entrainment in the erupting lava. One of the xenoliths is a wehrlite (olivine Fo 73 %, clinopyroxene mg# 0.83-0.85, subordinate orthopyroxene mg# 0.76-0.77). Its clinopyroxene REE pattern is flat and slightly LREE-depleted. This wehrlite is considered to be a tholeiitic cumulate. One of the studied harzburgites contains clinopyroxene with similar trace element contents to those in wehrlite. This type of clinopyroxene records percolation of tholeiitic melt through harzburgite. The tholeiitic melt might be similar to Cenozoic continental tholeiites occurring in the Central European Volcanic Province (e.g., Vogelsberg, Germany).

  12. Trace element distribution in peridotite xenoliths from Tok, SE Siberian craton: A record of pervasive, multi-stage metasomatism in shallow refractory mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Chazot, Gilles; Chauvel, Catherine; Merlet, Claude; Bodinier, Jean-Louis

    2006-03-01

    Spinel peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts at Tok, SE Siberian craton range from fertile lherzolites to harzburgites and wehrlites; olivine-rich (70-84%) rocks are dominant. REE patterns in the lherzolites range from nearly flat for fertile rocks (14-17% cpx) to LREE-enriched; the enrichments are positively correlated with modal olivine, consistent with high-permeability of olivine-rich rocks during melt percolation. Clinopyroxene in olivine-rich Tok peridotites typically has convex-upward trace element patterns (La/Nd PM 1); the LREE-enrichments are positively correlated with phosphorus abundances and are mainly hosted by accessory phosphates and P-rich cryptocrystalline materials. In addition to apatite, some Tok xenoliths contain whitlockite (an anhydrous, halogen-poor and Na-Mg-rich phosphate), which is common in meteorites and lunar rocks, but has not been reported from any terrestrial mantle samples. Some olivine-rich peridotites have generations of clinopyroxene with distinct abundances of Na, LREE, Sr and Zr. The mineralogical and trace element data indicate that the lithospheric mantle section represented by the xenoliths experienced a large-scale metasomatic event produced by upward migration of mafic silicate melts followed by percolation of low- T, alkali-rich melts and fluids. Chromatographic fractionation and fractional crystallisation of the melts close to the percolation front produced strong LREE-enrichments, which are most common in the uppermost mantle and are related to carbonate- and P 2O 5-rich derivatives of the initial melt. Reversal and gradual retreat of the percolation front during thermal relaxation to ambient geotherm ("retrograde" metasomatism) caused local migration and entrapment of small-volume residual fluids and precipitation of volatile-rich accessory minerals. A distinct metasomatic episode, which mainly produced "anhydrous" late-stage interstitial materials was concomitant with the alkali basaltic magmatism, which brought

  13. Characterization of the emerald of Santa Terezinha de Goias by spectroscopy, fluorescence and X-ray difraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lariucci, C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the emerald of Santa Terezinha de Goias-GO, according to their physical properties (refractive index and specific gravity); spectrographic (infrared, ultraviolet and visible absorption); electron paramagnetic resonance; chemical analysis; crystal structure and specially by the recognition of their mineral inclusions. The results of the refractive index measure for the emerald of Santa Terezinha de Goias-GO are n e (1.575-1.585) and n o (1.590-1.9600) and the birrefringence = 0.012; the specific gravity is between the highest of the world (2.745 (4) Mg. m -3 ). The near infrared and infrared absorption, show the presence, in the structural channels of the emerald, of gas carbonic and free water interacting with an ion (Fe and/or Na) in these channels. The ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra accused the presence of Cr 3+ replacing Al 3+ and Fe 3+ in the channels of the structure. The study of electron paramagnetic resonance confirmed these last results [pt

  14. Efficacy of multifunnel traps for capturing emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): effect of color, glue, and other trap coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2011-06-01

    Tens of thousands of adhesive-coated purple prism traps are deployed annually in the United States to survey for the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A reusable, more user-friendly trap is desired by program managers, surveyors, and researchers. Field assays were conducted in southeastern Michigan to ascertain the feasibility of using nonsticky traps as survey and detection tools for emerald ash borer. Three nonsticky trap designs, including multifunnel (Lindgren), modified intercept panel, and drainpipe (all painted purple) were compared with the standard purple prism trap; no statistical differences in capture of emerald ash borer adults were detected between the multifunnel design and the prism. In subsequent color comparison assays, both green- and purple-painted multifunnel traps (and later, plastic versions of these colors) performed as well or better than the prism traps. Multifunnel traps coated with spray-on adhesive caught more beetles than untreated traps. The increased catch, however, occurred in the traps' collection cups and not on the trap surface. In a separate assay, there was no significant difference detected between glue-coated traps and Rain-X (normally a glass treatment)-coated traps, but both caught significantly more A. planipennis adults than untreated traps.

  15. Age of the emerald mineralization from the Itabira-Nova Era District, Minas Gerais, Brazil, based on LA-ICP-MS geochronology of cogenetic titanite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Jordt-Evangelista

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In the Itabira-Nova Era Emerald District, southeast Brazil, gemological emerald is extracted from underground mines found in schist-type deposits at the contact zone of the Archean Metavolcanosedimentary Sequence of the Guanhães Complex and Paleoproterozoic anorogenic granites of the Borrachudos Suite. Schist-type deposits are commonly generated by reactions enhanced by deformation and heat during regional metamorphism. The age of the mineralization in the region has been a matter of debate for decades: Ages ranging from the Archean to the Neoproterozoic are mentioned in the literature. In the mineralized zone from the Piteiras mine fluorine-aluminum-bearing titanite is found in metamafic rocks. The fluorine content was probably derived from the Borrachudos granites and pegmatites like the beryllium for emerald, thus both minerals could have been generated during the same event. U-Pb titanite geochronology via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS was performed on a thin section of a phlogopite-plagioclase-hornblende schist from the Piteiras mine. The determined age of 576 ± 7 Ma is also the probable age for emerald generation during the Brasiliano cycle, which was the only tectonometamorphic event postdating the intrusion of the granites. This event provided heat and fluids necessary for reactions between the Be- and the Cr-bearing rocks, thus enabling the formation of emeralds.

  16. Chromite symplectites in Mg-suite troctolite 76535 as evidence for infiltration metasomatism of a lunar layered intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Shearer, Charles K.

    2012-06-01

    Despite the very low chromium concentrations in its cumulus olivine (˜140 ppm), lunar troctolite 76535 contains large amounts of Cr sporadically, but highly concentrated, in symplectite assemblages consisting of Mg-Al-chromite and two pyroxenes. Previously proposed symplectite formation mechanisms include crystallization of trapped interstitial melt, diffusion of Cr from cumulus olivine, and/or remobilization of cumulus chromite grains. These mechanisms would imply that the highly Cr-depleted nature of Mg-suite parental magmas and their source materials inferred from cumulus olivine may be illusory. We have conducted a detailed petrologic and textural study of symplectites, as well as chromite veins, intercumulus assemblages, olivine-hosted melt inclusions and clinopyroxene-troilite veins in 76535 with the goals of constraining the origin of the symplectites, and the degree of Cr-depletion in Mg-suite magmas relative to other lunar basalts. Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene in melt inclusions are depleted in Cr relative to their symplectite counterparts, averaging 900 and 1200 ppm vs. 7400 and 8100 ppm Cr2O3, respectively. Olivine in contact with symplectite assemblages may exhibit a diffusion profile of Cr going into olivine, whereas olivine boundaries away from symplectites show no diffusion profile. There is also a distinct lack of primary chromite as inclusions in cumulus phases and melt inclusions. Multiple textural observations, melt inclusion chemistry, and modeling of chromite-olivine equilibrium rule out previously proposed symplectite formation mechanisms, and strongly suggest that chromite was not a primary crystallization product of the 76535 parental magma. Accordingly, the post-cumulus addition of Cr and Fe is required to produce the symplectites. After considering multiple models, the addition of Cr and Fe to 76535 via infiltration metasomatism by an exogenous chromite-saturated melt is the model most consistent with multiple textural and geochemical

  17. The peculiar case of Marosticano xenoliths: a cratonic mantle fragment affected by carbonatite metasomatism in the Veneto Volcanic Province (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, Valentina; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo; Florencia Fahnestock, M.; Bryce, Julia G.; Marzoli, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Tertiary Magmatic Province of Veneto, known as Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the Northern Italy, represents one of the most important volcanic provinces of the Adria Plate. It is composed by five volcanic districts: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Mts. Lessini, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas, from nephelinites to tholeiites in composition. Commonly VVP nephelinites and basanites carry mantle xenoliths. This study presents a petrological characterization of the new xenolith occurrence of Marosticano and comparison with previously studied VVP xenolith populations (i.e. from the Lessinean and Val d'Adige areas), which represent off-craton lithospheric mantle fragment affected by Na-alkaline silicate metasomatism (Siena & Coltorti 1989; Beccaluva et al., 2001; Gasperini et al., 2006). Marosticano (MA) peridotites are anhydrous spinel-bearing lherzolites and harzburgites, which are geochemically well distinguishible from the other VVP mantle xenoliths. Primary minerals record the "most restitic" composition of the VVP sampled mantle, even calling the geochemical features of a sub-cratonic mantle. Olivines in both lherzolites and harzburgites show high Ni contents compared with the Fo values (Ni→ lherzolite: 2600-3620 ppm; harzburgite: 2600-3540 ppm; Fo → lh: 91-92; hz: 90-93) that follow the trend of olivine from a cratonic area (Kelemen, 1998). Orthopyroxenes have mg# values with 1:1 ratio with coexisting olivines and Al2O3 contents always 0.5 wt%) contents are also the chemical characteristics of the clinopyroxenes. On the whole both MA pyroxenes show major element contents that recall the characteristics of those from cratonic (sp-bearing) peridotites (e.g. from Greenland, South Africa and Tanzania; Downes et al., 2004). In addition, the relationship between the high Fo content of olivine and the high chromium contents (cr#=(Cr/(Cr+Al)X100); lh: 30-53; hz: 38-67) in coexisting spinel, out of

  18. Hydration of an active shear zone: Interactions between deformation, metasomatism and magmatism - the spinel-lherzolites from the Montferrier (southern France) Oligocene basalts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanes, N.; Briqueu, L.

    1987-01-01

    Geochemical and textural investigations have been simultaneously performed on spinel-lherzolite xenoliths from the Oligo-Miocene alkali basalts of Montferrier (southern France). All the investigated samples have undergone a deformation very particular by intense shearing under high stresses (up to 1.75 kbar), low temperatures (≤900 0 C) and strain rates of about 10 -18 to 10 -15 s -1 . Mineral chemistry reveals that the Montferrier lherzolites are fragments of an undepleted relatively shallow upper mantle level located at a depth of 50 km (15 kbar). Moreover, Na and Ti enrichment in diopside would reflect a metasomatic event, also emphasized by the common occurrence of pargasite in 50-70% of the investigated samples. Crystallization of this amphibole is attributed to a hydrous infiltration which is related in time and space to the deformation. Indeed, amphibole is preferentially concentrated in strongly deformed zones and in kink-band boundaries of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts. Moreover, the grain boundaries were used by the pervasive agent to percolate into the lherzolite: significant chemical variations (increase in MgO: 15% and decrease in Al 2 O 3 : 55%) are observed within the range of 7-5 μm adjacent to the grain boundary. Finally, Sr isotopic data ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) demonstrate that the amphibole, i.e. the metasomatic agent, is genetically related to the host lava of the xenoliths. Thus, the hydrous silicate liquid from which the amphibole has crystallized may be an early percolation of the ascending alkali magma. (orig.)

  19. Os-Hf-Sr-Nd isotope and PGE systematics of spinel peridotite xenoliths from Tok, SE Siberian craton: Effects of pervasive metasomatism in shallow refractory mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Shirey, Steven B.; Weis, Dominique; Brügmann, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Os-Hf-Sr-Nd isotopes and PGE were determined in peridotite xenoliths carried to the surface by Quaternary alkali basaltic magmas in the Tokinsky Stanovik Range on the Aldan shield. These data constrain the timing and nature of partial melting and metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle beneath SE Siberian craton. The xenoliths range from the rare fertile spinel lherzolites to the more abundant, strongly metasomatised olivine-rich (70-84%) rocks. Hf-Sr-Nd isotope compositions of the xenoliths are mainly within the fields of oceanic basalts. Most metasomatised xenoliths have lower 143Nd / 144Nd and 176Hf / 177Hf and higher 87Sr / 86Sr than the host basalts indicating that the metasomatism is older and has distinct sources. A few xenoliths have elevated 176Hf / 177Hf (up to 0.2838) and plot above the Hf-Nd mantle array defined by oceanic basalts. 187Os / 188Os in the poorly metasomatised, fertile to moderately refractory (Al2O3 ≥ 1.6%) Tok peridotites range from 0.1156 to 0.1282, with oldest rhenium depletion ages being about 2 Ga. The 187Os / 188Os in these rocks show good correlations with partial melting indices (e.g. Al2O3, modal cpx); the intercept of the Al-187Os / 188Os correlation with lowest Al2O3 estimates for melting residues (∼0.3-0.5%) has a 187Os / 188Os of ∼0.109 suggesting that these peridotites may have experienced melt extraction as early as 2.8 Gy ago. 187Os / 188Os in the strongly metasomatised, olivine-rich xenoliths (0.6-1.3% Al2O3) ranges from 0.1164 to 0.1275 and shows no apparent links to modal or chemical compositions. Convex-upward REE patterns and high abundances of heavy to middle REE in these refractory rocks indicate equilibration with evolved silicate melts at high melt / rock ratios, which may have also variably elevated their 187Os / 188Os. This inference is supported by enrichments in Pd and Pt on chondrite-normalised PGE abundance patterns in some of the rocks. The melt extraction ages for the Tok suite of 2.0 to 2.8 Ga are

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer and persistent spectral hole-burning in natural emerald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Hans

    2011-06-02

    Wavelength-selective excited-state lifetime measurements and absorption, luminescence, and hole-burning spectra of a natural African emerald crystal are reported. The (2)E excited-state lifetime displays an extreme wavelength dependence, varying from 190 to 37 μs within 1.8 nm of the R(1)-line. Overall, the excited state is strongly quenched, in comparison to laboratory-created emerald (τ=1.3 ms), with an average quenching rate of ∼6 × 10(3) s(-1) at 2.5 K. This quenching is attributed to photoinduced electron transfer caused by a relatively high concentration of Fe(2+) ions. The forward electron-transfer rate, k(f), from the nearest possible Fe(2+) sites at around 5 Å is estimated to be ∼20 × 10(3) s(-1) at 2.5 K. The photoreductive quenching of the excited Cr(3+) ions by Fe(2+) is followed by rapid electron back-transfer in the ground state upon deactivation. The exchange interaction based quenching can be modeled by assuming a random quencher distribution within the possible Fe(2+) sites with the forward electron-transfer rate, k(f), given as a function of acceptor-donor separation R by exp[(R(f)-R)/a(f)]; R(f) and a(f) values of 13.5 and 2.7 Å are obtained at 2.5 K. The electron transfer/back-transfer reorganizes the local crystal lattice, occasionally leading to a minor variation of the short-range structure around the Cr(3+) ions. This provides a mechanism for spectral hole-burning for which a moderately high quantum efficiency of about ∼0.005% is observed. Spectral holes are subject to spontaneous hole-filling and spectral diffusion, and both effects can be quantified within the standard two-level systems for non-photochemical hole-burning. Importantly, the absorbance increases on both sides of broad spectral holes, and isosbestic points are observed, in accord with the expected distribution of the "photoproduct" in a non-photochemical hole-burning process. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Novel marine actinobacteria from emerald Andaman & Nicobar Islands: a prospective source for industrial and pharmaceutical byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Rajan, Lawrance Anbu; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2013-06-22

    Andaman and Nicobar Islands situated in the eastern part of Bay of Bengal are one of the distinguished biodiversity hotspot. Even though number of studies carried out on the marine flora and fauna, the studies on actinobacteria from Andaman and Nicobar Islands are meager. The aim of the present study was to screen the actinobacteria for their characterization and identify the potential sources for industrial and pharmaceutical byproducts. A total of 26 actinobacterial strains were isolated from the marine sediments collected from various sites of Port Blair Bay where no collection has been characterized previously. Isolates were categorized under the genera: Saccharopolyspora, Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Streptoverticillium, Microtetraspora, Actinopolyspora, Actinokineospora and Dactylosporangium. Majority of the isolates were found to produce industrially important enzymes such as amylase, protease, gelatinase, lipase, DNase, cellulase, urease and phosphatase, and also exhibited substantial antibacterial activity against human pathogens. 77% of isolates exhibited significant hemolytic activity. Among 26 isolates, three strains (NIOT-VKKMA02, NIOT-VKKMA22 and NIOT-VKKMA26) were found to generate appreciable extent of surfactant, amylase, cellulase and protease enzyme. NIOT-VKKMA02 produced surfactant using kerosene as carbon source and emulsified upto E(24)-63.6%. Moreover, NIOT-VKKMA02, NIOT-VKKMA22 and NIOT-VKKMA26 synthesized 13.27 U/ml, 9.85 U/ml and 8.03 U/ml amylase; 7.75 U/ml, 5.01 U/ml and 2.08 U/ml of cellulase and 11.34 U/ml, 6.89 U/ml and 3.51 U/ml of protease enzyme, respectively. High diversity of marine actinobacteria was isolated and characterized in this work including undescribed species and species not previously reported from emerald Andaman and Nicobar Islands, including Streptomyces griseus, Streptomyces venezuelae and Saccharopolyspora salina. The enhanced salt, pH and temperature tolerance of the actinobacterial isolates along with their

  2. Chemical classification and geotermometry of chlorites from the cretaceous Santa Rosa and Lutitas de Macanal formations, eastern emerald belt, eastern cordillera, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Arias, Alejandro; Mantilla Figueroa, Luis Carlos; Terraza Melo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The study of the chemical composition of chlorites from the Santa Rosa and Lutitas de Macanal formations in the eastern emerald belt (eastern cordillera), are used to estimate the formation temperature of these minerals and the associated hydrothermal fluids. The chlorites were analyzed using the classification proposed by hey (1954), foster (1962), and Bailey (1980); and the formation temperature is calculated from empirical geothermometers from kranidiotis and Maclean (1987), Cathelineau (1988), Jowett (1991) and Xie et al. (1997). Chlorites in hydrothermally altered rocks associated with emerald mineralization of the Santa Rosa formation is classified as clinochlore and formed at temperatures of 354 Celsius degrade; this temperature is consistent with the fluid inclusions in emeralds of the same formation. Chlorites in veins from Lutitas de Macanal Formation are classified as chamosites and formed at lower temperatures between 210 to 225 Celsius degrade

  3. Influence of host age on critical fitness parameters of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a new parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Timothy J; Duan, Jian J

    2014-08-01

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a recently discovered gregarious idiobiont larval ectoparasitoid currently being evaluated for biological control against the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the United States. To aid in the development of laboratory rearing protocols, we assessed the influence of various emerald ash borer stages on critical fitness parameters of S. galinae. We exposed gravid S. galinae females to emerald ash borer host larvae of various ages (3.5, 5, 7, and 10 wk post egg oviposition) that were reared naturally in tropical (evergreen) ash (Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh) logs, or to field-collected, late-stage emerald ash borers (nonfeeding J-shaped larvae termed "J-larvae," prepupae, and pupae) that were artificially inserted into green ash logs. When exposed to larvae in tropical ash logs, S. galinae attacked 5 and 7 wk hosts more frequently (68-76%) than 3.5 wk (23%) and 10 wk (12%) hosts. Subsample dissections of the these logs revealed that 3.5, 5, 7 and 10 wk host logs contained mostly second, third, fourth, and J-larvae, respectively, that had already bored into the sapwood for diapause. No J-larvae were attacked by S. galinae when naturally reared in tropical ash logs. When parasitized by S. galinae, 7 and 10 wk hosts produced the largest broods (approximately 6.7 offspring per parasitized host), and the progenies that emerged from these logs had larger anatomical measurements and more female-biased sex ratios. When exposed to emerald ash borer J-larvae, prepupae, or pupae artificially inserted into green ash logs, S. galinae attacked 53% ofJ-larvae, but did not attack any prepupae or pupae. We conclude that large (fourth instar) emerald ash borer larvae should be used to rear S. galinae.

  4. Effects of ambient temperature on egg and larval development of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): implications for laboratory rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Watt, Tim; Taylor, Phil; Larson, Kristi; Lelito, Jonathan P

    2013-10-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive beetle from Asia causing large scale ash (Fraxinus) mortality in North America, has been extremely difficult to rear in the laboratory because of its long life cycle and cryptic nature of immature stages. This lack of effective laboratory-rearing methods has not only hindered research into its biology and ecology, but also mass production of natural enemies for biological control of this invasive pest. Using sticks from the alternate host plant, Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh, we characterized the stage-specific development time and growth rate of both emerald ash borer eggs and larvae at different constant temperatures (12-35 degrees C) for the purpose of developing effective laboratory-rearing methods. Results from our study showed that the median time for egg hatching decreased from 20 d at 20 degrees C to 7 d at 35 degrees C, while no emerald ash borer eggs hatched at 12 degrees C. The developmental time for 50% of emerald ash borer larvae advancing to third, fourth, and J-larval stages at 20 degrees C were 8.3, 9.1, and 12.3 wk, respectively, approximately two times longer than at 30 degrees C for the corresponding instars or stages. In contrast to 30 degrees C, however, the development times of emerald ash borer larvae advancing to later instars (from oviposition) were significantly increased at 35 degrees C, indicating adverse effects of this high temperature. The optimal range of ambient temperature to rear emerald ash borer larvae should be between 25-30 degrees C; however, faster rate of egg and larval development should be expected as temperature increases within this range.

  5. Combined iron and magnesium isotope geochemistry of pyroxenite xenoliths from Hannuoba, North China Craton: implications for mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin Miao; Cao, Hui Hui; Mi, Xue; Evans, Noreen J.; Qi, Yu Han; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Hong Fu

    2017-06-01

    We present high-precision iron and magnesium isotopic data for diverse mantle pyroxenite xenoliths collected from Hannuoba, North China Craton and provide the first combined iron and magnesium isotopic study of such rocks. Compositionally, these xenoliths range from Cr-diopside pyroxenites and Al-augite pyroxenites to garnet-bearing pyroxenites and are taken as physical evidence for different episodes of melt injection. Our results show that both Cr-diopside pyroxenites and Al-augite pyroxenites of cumulate origin display narrow ranges in iron and magnesium isotopic compositions (δ57Fe = -0.01 to 0.09 with an average of 0.03 ± 0.08 (2SD, n = 6); δ26Mg = - 0.28 to -0.25 with an average of -0.26 ± 0.03 (2SD, n = 3), respectively). These values are identical to those in the normal upper mantle and show equilibrium inter-mineral iron and magnesium isotope fractionation between coexisting mantle minerals. In contrast, the garnet-bearing pyroxenites, which are products of reactions between peridotites and silicate melts from an ancient subducted oceanic slab, exhibit larger iron isotopic variations, with δ57Fe ranging from 0.12 to 0.30. The δ57Fe values of minerals in these garnet-bearing pyroxenites also vary widely (-0.25 to 0.08 in olivines, -0.04 to 0.25 in orthopyroxenes, -0.07 to 0.31 in clinopyroxenes, 0.07 to 0.48 in spinels and 0.31-0.42 in garnets). In addition, the garnet-bearing pyroxenite shows light δ26Mg (-0.43) relative to the mantle. The δ26Mg of minerals in the garnet-bearing pyroxenite range from -0.35 for olivine and orthopyroxene, to -0.34 for clinopyroxene, 0.04 for spinel and -0.68 for garnet. These measured values stand in marked contrast to calculated equilibrium iron and magnesium isotope fractionation between coexisting mantle minerals at mantle temperatures derived from theory, indicating disequilibrium isotope fractionation. Notably, one phlogopite clinopyroxenite with an apparent later metasomatic overprint has the heaviest δ57Fe

  6. THE EARLY DETECTION OF THE EMERALD ASH BORER (EAB USING MULTI-SOURCE REMOTELY SENSED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to exploit the synergy of hyperspectral imagery, Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR and high spatial resolution data and their synergy in the early detection of the EAB (Emerald Ash Borer presence in trees within urban areas and to develop a framework to combine information extracted from multiple data sources. To achieve these, an object-oriented framework was developed to combine information derived from available data sets to characterize ash trees. Within this framework, an advanced individual tree delineation method was developed to delineate individual trees using the combined high-spatial resolution worldview-3 imagery was used together with LiDAR data. Individual trees were then classified to ash and non-ash trees using spectral and spatial information. In order to characterize the health state of individual ash trees, leaves from ash trees with various health states were sampled and measured using a field spectrometer. Based on the field measurements, the best indices that sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content were selected. The developed framework and methods were tested using worldview-3, airborne LiDAR data over the Keele campus of York University Toronto Canada. Satisfactory results in terms of individual tree crown delineation, ash tree identification and characterization of the health state of individual ash trees. Quantitative evaluations is being carried out.

  7. The Early Detection of the Emerald Ash Borer (eab) Using Multi-Source Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B.; Naveed, F.; Tasneem, F.; Xing, C.

    2018-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to exploit the synergy of hyperspectral imagery, Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and high spatial resolution data and their synergy in the early detection of the EAB (Emerald Ash Borer) presence in trees within urban areas and to develop a framework to combine information extracted from multiple data sources. To achieve these, an object-oriented framework was developed to combine information derived from available data sets to characterize ash trees. Within this framework, an advanced individual tree delineation method was developed to delineate individual trees using the combined high-spatial resolution worldview-3 imagery was used together with LiDAR data. Individual trees were then classified to ash and non-ash trees using spectral and spatial information. In order to characterize the health state of individual ash trees, leaves from ash trees with various health states were sampled and measured using a field spectrometer. Based on the field measurements, the best indices that sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content were selected. The developed framework and methods were tested using worldview-3, airborne LiDAR data over the Keele campus of York University Toronto Canada. Satisfactory results in terms of individual tree crown delineation, ash tree identification and characterization of the health state of individual ash trees. Quantitative evaluations is being carried out.

  8. Quintinite-1 M from the Mariinsky Deposit, Ural Emerald Mines, Central Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitova, E. S.; Popov, M. P.; Krivovichev, S. V.; Zaitsev, A. N.; Vlasenko, N. S.

    2017-12-01

    The paper describes the first finding of quintinite [Mg4Al2(OH)12][(CO3)(H2O)3] at the Mariinsky deposit in the Central Urals, Russia. The mineral occurs as white tabular crystals in cavities within altered gabbro in association with prehnite, calcite, and a chlorite-group mineral. Quintinite is the probable result of late hydrothermal alteration of primary mafic and ultramafic rocks hosting emerald-bearing glimmerite. According to electron microprobe data, the Mg: Al ratio is 2: 1. IR spectroscopy has revealed hydroxyl and carbonate groups and H2O molecules in the mineral. According to single crystal XRD data, quintinite is monoclinic, space group C2/ m, a =5.233(1), b = 9.051(2), c = 7.711(2) Å, β = 103.09(3)°, V = 355.7(2) Å3. Based on structure refinement, the polytype of quintinite should be denoted as 1M. This is the third approved occurrence of quintinite-1M in the world after the Kovdor complex and Bazhenovsky chrysotile-asbestos deposit.

  9. A contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Peter J; Ryall, Krista; Barry Lyons, D; Sweeney, Jon; Wu, Junping

    2009-05-01

    Analyses of the elytral hydrocarbons from male and female emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, that were freshly emerged vs. sexually mature (>10 days old) revealed a female-specific compound, 9-methyl-pentacosane (9-Me-C(25)), only present in sexually mature females. This material was synthesized by the Wittig reaction of 2-decanone with (n-hexadecyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide followed by catalytic reduction to yield racemic 9-Me C(25), which matched the natural compound by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (retention time and EI mass spectrum). In field bioassays with freeze-killed sexually mature A. planipennis females, feral males spent significantly more time in contact and attempting copulation with unwashed females than with females that had been washed in n-hexane to remove the cuticular lipids. Hexane-washed females to which 9-Me-C(25) had been reapplied elicited similar contact time and percentage of time attempting copulation as unwashed females, indicating that 9-methyl-pentacosane is a contact sex pheromone component of A. planipennis. This is the first contact sex pheromone identified in the Buprestidae.

  10. Building Double-decker Traps for Early Detection of Emerald Ash Borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M

    2017-10-04

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), the most destructive forest insect to have invaded North America, has killed hundreds of millions of forest and landscape ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Several artificial trap designs to attract and capture EAB beetles have been developed to detect, delineate, and monitor infestations. Double-decker (DD) traps consist of two corrugated plastic prisms, one green and one purple, attached to a 3 m tall polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe supported by a t-post. The green prism at the top of the PVC pipe is baited with cis-3-hexenol, a compound produced by ash foliage. Surfaces of both prisms are coated with sticky insect glue to capture adult EAB beetles. Double-decker traps should be placed near ash trees but in open areas, exposed to sun. Double-decker trap construction and placement are presented here, along with a summary of field experiments demonstrating the efficacy of DD traps in capturing EAB beetles. In a recent study in sites with relatively low EAB densities, double-decker traps captured significantly more EAB than green or purple prism traps or green funnel traps, all of which are designed to be suspended from a branch in the canopy of ash trees. A greater percentage of double decker traps were positive, i.e., captured at least one EAB, than the prism traps or funnel traps that were hung in ash tree canopies.

  11. Development of RNAi method for screening candidate genes to control emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thais B; Rieske, Lynne K; J Duan, Jian; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba R

    2017-08-07

    The ingestion of double-strand RNAs (dsRNA) targeting essential genes in an insect could cause mortality. Based on this principle, a new generation of insect control methods using RNA interference (RNAi) are being developed. In this work, we developed a bioassay for oral delivery of dsRNA to an invasive forest and urban tree pest, the emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis). EAB feeds and develops beneath the bark, killing trees rapidly. This behavior, coupled with the lack of a reliable artificial diet for rearing larvae and adults, make them difficult to study. We found that dsRNA is transported and processed to siRNAs by EAB larvae within 72 h after ingestion. Also, feeding neonate larvae with IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) or COP (COPI coatomer, β subunit) dsRNA silenced their target genes and caused mortality. Both an increase in the concentration of dsRNA fed and sequential feeding of two different dsRNAs increased mortality. Here we provide evidence for successful RNAi in EAB, and demonstrate the development of a rapid and effective bioassay for oral delivery of dsRNA to screen additional genes.

  12. Directional reflectance and milli-scale feather morphology of the African Emerald Cuckoo, Chrysococcyx cupreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S; Marschner, Steve

    2013-09-06

    Diverse plumages have evolved among birds through complex morphological modifications. We investigate how the interplay of light with surface and subsurface feather morphology determines the direction of light propagation, an understudied aspect of avian visual signalling. We hypothesize that milli-scale modifications of feathers produce anisotropic reflectance, the direction of which may be predicted by the orientation of the milli-scale structure. The subject of this study is the African Emerald Cuckoo, Chrysococcyx cupreus, noted for its shimmering green iridescent appearance. Using a spherical gantry, we measured the change in the directional reflectance across the feather surface and over a hemisphere of incident lighting directions. Using a microCT scanner, we also studied the morphology of the structural branches of the barb. We tracked the changes in the directional reflectance to the orientation of the structural branches as observed in the CT data. We conclude that (i) the far-field signal of the feather consists of multiple specular components, each associated with a different structural branch and (ii) the direction of each specular component is correlated to the orientation of the corresponding structure.

  13. Spectral analysis of white ash response to emerald ash borer infestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Laura

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive insect that has killed over 50 million ash trees in the US. The goal of this research was to establish a method to identify ash trees infested with EAB using remote sensing techniques at the leaf-level and tree crown level. First, a field-based study at the leaf-level used the range of spectral bands from the WorldView-2 sensor to determine if there was a significant difference between EAB-infested white ash (Fraxinus americana) and healthy leaves. Binary logistic regression models were developed using individual and combinations of wavelengths; the most successful model included 545 and 950 nm bands. The second half of this research employed imagery to identify healthy and EAB-infested trees, comparing pixel- and object-based methods by applying an unsupervised classification approach and a tree crown delineation algorithm, respectively. The pixel-based models attained the highest overall accuracies.

  14. Thermal constraints on the emerald ash borer invasion of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, R.; Moser, W. K.; Gormanson, D. D.; Bartlett, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; EAB), a non-native invasive beetle, has caused substantial damage to green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.), white (Fraxinus americana L.), and black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh.), the major ash species of North America. In the absence of effective methods for controlling or eradicating the beetle, EAB continues to spread unimpeded across North America. Evidence indicates the mortality rate for EAB-infested trees near the epicenter of the infestation in southeast Michigan exceeds 99 percent for the major ash species. One possible climatic limitation on the spread of the infestation is suggested by recent work indicating that beetles cannot survive exposure to temperatures below -35.3 degrees Celsius. We considered whether this thermal constraint will limit the spread and distribution of EAB in North America. Historical climatic data for the United States and Canada were employed along with thermal models of the conditions beneath likely winter snowpack and beneath tree bark to predict the potential geographic distribution of the invasion. Results suggested the thermal mortality constraint will not lead to the protection of ash stands across most of North America. However, recent work indicates the majority of beetles cannot survive exposure to temperatures below -30 degrees Celsius. Along with our results, this suggests thermal constraints near the northern and western edges of the ranges of ash might limit EAB survival to some extent, thereby reducing the EAB population, the likelihood of EAB infestation, and subsequent ash mortality.

  15. Core RNAi machinery and gene knockdown in the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Alvarez Gonzales, Miguel A; Poland, Therese M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technology has been widely used in insect functional genomics research and provides an alternative approach for insect pest management. To understand whether the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive and destructive coleopteran insect pest of ash tree (Fraxinus spp.), possesses a strong RNAi machinery that is capable of degrading target mRNA as a response to exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induction, we identified three RNAi pathway core component genes, Dicer-2, Argonaute-2 and R2D2, from the A. planipennis genome sequence. Characterization of these core components revealed that they contain conserved domains essential for the proteins to function in the RNAi pathway. Phylogenetic analyses showed that they are closely related to homologs derived from other coleopteran species. We also delivered the dsRNA fragment of AplaScrB-2, a β-fructofuranosidase-encoding gene horizontally acquired by A. planipennis as we reported previously, into A. planipennis adults through microinjection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis on the dsRNA-treated beetles demonstrated a significantly decreased gene expression level of AplaScrB-2 appearing on day 2 and lasting until at least day 6. This study is the first record of RNAi applied in A. planipennis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lethal trap trees: a potential option for emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Lewis, Phillip A

    2016-05-01

    Economic and ecological impacts of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality resulting from emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) invasion are severe in forested, residential and urban areas. Management options include girdling ash trees to attract ovipositing adult beetles and then destroying infested trees before larvae develop or protecting ash with a highly effective, systemic emamectin benzoate insecticide. Injecting this insecticide and then girdling injected trees a few weeks later could effectively create lethal trap trees, similar to a bait-and-kill tactic, if girdling does not interfere with insecticide translocation. We compared EAB larval densities on girdled trees, trees injected with the emamectin benzoate insecticide, trees injected with the insecticide and then girdled 18-21 days later and untreated controls at multiple sites. Pretreatment larval densities did not differ among treatments. Current-year larval densities were higher on girdled and control trees than on any trees treated with insecticide at all sites. Foliar residue analysis and adult EAB bioassays showed that girdling trees after insecticide injections did not reduce insecticide translocation. Girdling ash trees to attract adult EAB did not reduce efficacy of emamectin benzoate trunk injections applied ≥ 18 days earlier and could potentially be used in integrated management programs to slow EAB population growth. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. A Late Mesozoic short-lived shift from fluid-dominated to sediment-dominated mantle metasomatism in the northeast South China Block and its tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fa-Bin; Jin, Chong; Jia, Bao-Jian; Liu, Rong; He, Xiaobo; Gao, Zhong; Tao, Lu; Zhou, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Li-Qi

    2018-06-01

    Early Cretaceous northwest (NW)-trending dolerite and amphibole lamprophyre dykes exposed in NW Zhejiang Province provide a number of new insights into the nature of the subcontinental mantle on the northeast (NE) South China Block (SCB). These dykes have a high Al2O3 (14.04-17.89 wt%) and K2O (0.66-2.69 wt%) contents but relatively low Na2O (2.48-4.61 wt%) and TiO2 (1.33-2.79 wt%) makeup alongside moderate K2O/Na2O ratios between 0.26 and 1.04. These amphibole lamprophyre dykes also have higher MgO, Cr, and Ni contents than those of comparable dolerites that have SiO2 content ranging from 46.32 to 49.87 wt%. The most striking feature of these intrusions is that they contain higher contents of Rb, Th, U, Nb, Ta, and LREE compared to their dolerite counterparts, although both amphibole lamprophyres and dolerites do exhibit similar geochemical patterns that are indicative of subduction-related origins. These features imply that an ambient peridotitic mantle that acted as the source for the amphibole lamprophyre magma source may have reacted with silicate-rich melts leading to olivine consumption while maintaining orthopyroxene. The geochemical composition of these dolerites are likely influenced to a variable extent by the fractionation of olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides, and apatite, while their amphibole lamprophyre counterparts have been modified to a minor degree by amphibole fractionation. Measured Sr-Nd isotopic compositions suggest relatively constant Nd isotopic compositions (-0.36 to +1.52) with more variable Sr isotopic compositions (0.7071 to 0.7306). We hence propose that both the dolerite and amphibole lamprophyre dykes in this region are the products of mantle source metasomatism by the subducted Paleo-Pacific slab. The dolerite dykes are mainly associated with slab-derived fluids, while the lamprophyre dykes are related to both slab-derived fluids and sediment melts. Evidence in support of metasomatism comprising distinct two

  18. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close.

  19. Multi-element analysis of emeralds and associated rocks by k{sub 0} neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, R.N.; Mondal, R.K.; Burte, P.P.; Nair, A.G.C.; Reddy, N.B.Y.; Reddy, L.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Manohar, S.B

    2000-12-15

    Multi-element analysis was carried out in natural emeralds, their associated rocks and one sample of beryl obtained from Rajasthan, India. The concentrations of 21 elements were assayed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using the k{sub 0} method (k{sub 0} INAA method) and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The data reveal the segregation of some elements from associated (trapped and host) rocks to the mineral beryl forming the gemstones. A reference rock standard of the US Geological Survey (USGS BCR-1) was also analysed as a control of the method.

  20. Subvolcanic contact metasomatism at El Laco Volcanic Complex, Central Andes Metasomatismo de contacto subvolcánico en el Complejo Volcánico El Laco, Andes centrales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Naranjo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of drill cores from the Pasos Blancos area at El Laco in the central Andes, northern Chile, give evidence of an intense and extensive subvolcanic contact-metasomatic process. This process resulted from shallow-level emplacement of very volatile-rich iron-oxide magma, with discharge of volatiles that resulted in extensive fracturing of overlying volcanic rocks. The brecciated rocks were altered (mainly extensive scapolitization and formation of pyroxene by hot magmatic fluids emitted from the cooling intrusion , and accompanied by magnetite deposition. With time and decreasing temperature, the metasomatic fluids evolved to fluids of hydrothermal character, and a final recent geothermal event took place that deposited superficial gypsum over a large part of the El Laco Volcanic Complex.Estudios realizados en testigos de sondajes en el area de Pasos Blancos en El Laco, en los Andes Centrales del norte de Chile, dan evidencias de un intenso y extenso proceso subvolcánico de metasomatismo de contacto. Este proceso es el resultado de un emplazamiento a poca profundidad de un magma de óxido de fierro muy rico en volátiles y cuya descarga de gases produjo un intenso fracturamiento de las rocas sobrepuestas. Las rocas brechizadas fueron alteradas (principalmente una extensa escapolitización y formación de piroxeno, junto con la depositación de magnetita, por los fluidos magmáticos calientes emitidos por la intrusión durante su enfriamiento. Los fluidos metasomáticos evolucionaron en el tiempo y con la disminución de temperatura, a fluidos de carácter hidrotermal y finalmente tuvo lugar un evento geotérmico reciente, el cual depositó yeso superficial en gran parte del Complejo Volcánico El Laco.

  1. Evidence of Metasomatism in the Lowest Petrographic Types Inferred from A Na(-), K, Rich Rim Around A LEW 86018 (L3.1) Chondrule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Marhas, Kuljeet Kaur; Simon, Justin I.; Ross, Daniel Kent

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary chondrites (OCs) represent the most abundant extraterrestrial materials and also record the widest range of alteration of primary, pristine minerals of early Solar system material available for study. Relatively few investigations, however, address: (1) the role of fluid alteration, and (2) the relationship between thermal metamorphism and metasomatism in OCs, issues that have been extensively studied in many other meteorite groups e.g., CV, CO, CR, and enstatite chondrites. Detailed elemental abundances profiles across individual chondrules, and mineralogical studies of Lewis Hills (LEW) 86018 (L3.1), an unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (UOC) of low petrographic type of 3.1 returned from Antarctica, provide evidence of extensive alteration of primary minerals. Some chondrules have Na(-), K(-), rich rims surrounded by nepheline, albite, and sodalite-like Na(-), Cl(-), Al-rich secondary minerals in the near vicinity within the matrices. Although, limited evidences of low temperature (approximately 250 C) fluid-assisted alteration of primary minerals to phyllosilicates, ferroanolivine, magnetite, and scapolite have been reported in the lowest grades (less than 3.2) Semarkona (LL3.00) and Bishunpur (LL3.10), alkali-rich secondary mineralization has previously only been seen in higher grade greater than 3.4 UOCs. This preliminary result suggests highly localized metamorphism in UOCs and widens the range of alteration in UOCs and complicates classification of petrographic type and extent of thermal metamorphism or metasomatism. The work in progress will document the micro-textures, geochemistry (Ba, Ca, REE), and isotopic composition (oxygen, Al(-)- 26 Mg-26) of mineral phases in chondrules and adjoining objects to help us understand the formation scenario and delineate possible modes of metamorphism in UOCs.

  2. Canopy treatment influences growth of replacement tree species in Fraxinus nigra forests threatened by the emerald ash borer in Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher E. Looney; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2017-01-01

    Fraxinus nigra Marsh. (black ash), a dominant tree species of wetland forests in northern Minnesota, USA, is imperiled by the invasive insect emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888). Regeneration of associated tree species is generally low in F. nigra forests and could be impacted...

  3. SLAM: A multi-agency pilot project to SL.ow A.sh M.ortality caused by emerald ash borer in outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in southeast Michigan in 2002, the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has continued to spread and kill ash (Fraxinus) trees at an alarming rate. As of February 2010, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees in Michigan, at least 12 additional U.S. states, and the...

  4. Tree Stress and Mortality from Emerald Ash Borer Does Not Systematically Alter Short-Term Soil Carbon Flux in a Mixed Northeastern U.S. Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Hatala Matthes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive insect pests are a common disturbance in temperate forests, but their effects on belowground processes in these ecosystems are poorly understood. This study examined how aboveground disturbance might impact short-term soil carbon flux in a forest impacted by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire in central New Hampshire, USA. We anticipated changes to soil moisture and temperature resulting from tree mortality caused by emerald ash borer, with subsequent effects on rates of soil respiration and methane oxidation. We measured carbon dioxide emissions and methane uptake beneath trees before, during, and after infestation by emerald ash borer. In our study, emerald ash borer damage to nearby trees did not alter soil microclimate nor soil carbon fluxes. While surprising, the lack of change in soil microclimate conditions may have been a result of the sandy, well-drained soil in our study area and the diffuse spatial distribution of canopy ash trees and subsequent canopy light gaps after tree mortality. Overall, our results indicate that short-term changes in soil carbon flux following insect disturbances may be minimal, particularly in forests with well-drained soils and a mixed-species canopy.

  5. Overstory treatment and planting season affect survival of replacement tree species in emerald ash borer threatened Fraxinus nigra forests in Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher E. Looney; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2015-01-01

    Fraxinus nigra Marsh. (black ash) wetland forests in northern Minnesota, USA, are threatened by the invasive insect, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB)). A potential management option is promoting regeneration of tree species that are not EAB hosts to maintain ecosystem functions. Using an operational-scale...

  6. Sap flow of black ash in wetland forests of northern Minnesota, USA: Hydrologic implications of tree mortality due to emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew C. Telander; Robert A. Slesak; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Kenneth N. Brooks; Christian F. Lenhart

    2015-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra) mortality caused by the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) is of concern to land managers in the upper Great Lakes region, given the large areas of ash-dominated forest and potential alteration of wetland hydrology following loss of this foundation tree species. The importance of changes in evapotranspiration (ET) following...

  7. Biotic and Abiotic Drivers of Sap Flux in Mature Green Ash Trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) Experiencing Varying Levels of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) Infestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Douglas J. Lynch; Kathleen S. Knight; Miquel A.  Gonzalez-Meler

    2018-01-01

    While the relationship between abiotic drivers of sap flux are well established, the role of biotic disturbances on sap flux remain understudied. The invasion of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) into North America in the 1990s represents a significant threat to ash trees (Fraxinus spp.), which are a...

  8. Distribution of trunk-injected 14C-imidacloprid in ash trees and effects on emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Mota-Sánchez; Bert M. Cregg; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert M. Hollingworth

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is a destructive exotic pest of North American ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees. Trunk injection of imidacloprid is commonly used to protect landscape ash trees from A. planipennis damage. Efficacy can vary and little is known about the...

  9. The influence of satellite populations of emerald ash borer on projected economic damage in U.S. communities, 2010-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Robert G. Haight; Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold

    2011-01-01

    The invasion spread of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is characterized by the formation of satellite populations that expand and coalesce with the continuously invading population front. As of January 2010, satellite infestations have been detected in 13 states and two Canadian provinces. Understanding...

  10. Performance evaluation of the Abbott CELL-DYN Emerald for use as a bench-top analyzer in a research setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, T-L; Xiros, N; Guan, F; Orellana, D; Holst, J; Joshua, D E; Rasko, J E J

    2013-08-01

    The CELL-DYN Emerald is a compact bench-top hematology analyzer that can be used for a three-part white cell differential analysis. To determine its utility for analysis of human and mouse samples, we evaluated this machine against the larger CELL-DYN Sapphire and Sysmex XT2000iV hematology analyzers. 120 human (normal and abnormal) and 30 mouse (normal and abnormal) samples were analyzed on both the CELL-DYN Emerald and CELL-DYN Sapphire or Sysmex XT2000iV analyzers. For mouse samples, the CELL-DYN Emerald analyzer required manual recalibration based on the histogram populations. Analysis of the CELL-DYN Emerald showed excellent precision, within accepted ranges (white cell count CV% = 2.09%; hemoglobin CV% = 1.68%; platelets CV% = 4.13%). Linearity was excellent (R² ≥ 0.99), carryover was minimal (laboratories or as a backup system in larger laboratories. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Biology and life history of Atanycolus cappaerti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a north american larval parasitoid attacking the invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanycolus cappaerti Marsh and Strazanac is a native North American parasitoid that has been found to parasitize the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, a serious invasive pests of North American ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). To facilitate the development of potential augmentative biocon...

  12. Evaluating a new method for monitoring the field establishment and parasitism of Oobius agrili, an egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oobius agrili is a solitary egg parasitoid of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, and can be responsible for 50-60% of EAB egg mortality in its native range. O. agrili has been released for biological control of EAB in the US since 2007; however, current methods to monitor its establishme...

  13. Natural enemies and their impacts on emerald ash borer populations in its native range, with new records of parasitism by two species of beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the natural enemies of the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and their role in regulating the pest population dynamics, we conducted field surveys at multiple forest sites with variable host densities in the pest’s native range (north an...

  14. Monitoring the establishment and flight phenology of egg and larval parasitoids of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan, USA using sentinel eggs and larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an important invasive pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. Two larval parasitoids, Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang and Spathius agrili Yang, and one egg parasitoid, Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang, were introduced into the United Sta...

  15. A new species of oobius trjapitzin (hymenoptera:encyrtidae) from the russian far east that parasitizes eggs of emerald ash borer (coleoptera:buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from the Russian Far East, Oobius primorskyensis Yao et Duan is described. Both morphological characters and analysis of DNA sequence divergence suggest that this species is different from the previ...

  16. Biology, life history, and laboratory rearing of Atanycolus cappaerti (Hymenoptera:Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanycolus cappaerti Marsh and Strazanac is a native North American parasitoid that has been found to parasitize the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, which has killed millions of ash trees since it was first detected in Michigan. A native parasitoid like A. cappaerti...

  17. Natural enemies implicated in the regulation of an invasive pest: a life table analysis of the population dynamics of the emerald ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is a serious invasive forest pest that has killed tens of millions of ash (Fraxinus) trees in the United States and Canada. By caging EAB adults on trunks of healthy ash trees, we established three generations of experimental cohorts from ...

  18. To treat or not to treat: Diminishing effectiveness of emamectin benzoate tree injections in ash trees heavily infested by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Jennifer E. Dalton; Kathleen S. Knight; Marie Brikha; Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler

    2015-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), a non-native invasive tree-boring beetle, is the primary agent behind thewidespread mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in both natural forests and urban areas of North Amer-ica. While a variety of insecticide options have been adopted for protection against EAB attacks, little hasbeen reported on the success of...

  19. Comparison of male and female emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) responses to phoebe oil and (Z)-3-hexanol lures in light green prism traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary G. Grant; Therese M. Poland; Tina Ciaramitaro; D. Barry Lyons; Gene C. Jones

    2011-01-01

    We conducted trapping experiments for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan, USA, and Ontario, Canada, to compare unbaited light green sticky prism traps with traps baited with phoebe oil, (Z)-3-hexenol (Z3-6:OH), or blends of other green leaf volatiles (GLVs) with Z3-6:OH. Traps were placed in the...

  20. Effects of cutting time, stump height, and herbicide application on ash (Fraxinus spp.) stump sprouting and colonization by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to eradicate or slow the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire [Coleoptera: Buprestidae]) include cutting infested and nearby uninfested ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. However, ash trees readily sprout after they have been cut, providing potential host material for EAB. In 2004-2005, we conducted...

  1. Quantifying the impact of woodpecker predation on population dynamics of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Jennings

    Full Text Available The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive beetle that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp. since it was accidentally introduced to North America in the 1990s. Understanding how predators such as woodpeckers (Picidae affect the population dynamics of EAB should enable us to more effectively manage the spread of this beetle, and toward this end we combined two experimental approaches to elucidate the relative importance of woodpecker predation on EAB populations. First, we examined wild populations of EAB in ash trees in New York, with each tree having a section screened to exclude woodpeckers. Second, we established experimental cohorts of EAB in ash trees in Maryland, and the cohorts on half of these trees were caged to exclude woodpeckers. The following spring these trees were debarked and the fates of the EAB larvae were determined. We found that trees from which woodpeckers were excluded consistently had significantly lower levels of predation, and that woodpecker predation comprised a greater source of mortality at sites with a more established wild infestation of EAB. Additionally, there was a considerable difference between New York and Maryland in the effect that woodpecker predation had on EAB population growth, suggesting that predation alone may not be a substantial factor in controlling EAB. In our experimental cohorts we also observed that trees from which woodpeckers were excluded had a significantly higher level of parasitism. The lower level of parasitism on EAB larvae found when exposed to woodpeckers has implications for EAB biological control, suggesting that it might be prudent to exclude woodpeckers from trees when attempting to establish parasitoid populations. Future studies may include utilizing EAB larval cohorts with a range of densities to explore the functional response of woodpeckers.

  2. Weight of Production of Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires, and Tanzanite from 1995 Through 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Thomas R.; Menzie, W. David; Olson, Donald W.

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) historically has not attempted to report comprehensive world production of gemstones on a country basis. This was because estimation of gemstone production is inherently difficult due to the fragmentary nature of the industry, the lack of governmental oversight or reporting in many countries where colored gemstones are mined, and the wide variation in quality between individual gemstones. Unlike diamonds, which, with the exception of the alluvial stones of West Africa, are mainly produced by large international mining companies and evaluated, cut, and marketed through a highly developed pricing structure and complex commercial arrangements, colored gemstones are mainly mined by individuals or small companies and have less developed evaluation and marketing arrangements. The trading centers for colored gems are smaller and less well known than the diamond centers. Colored gemstones, like alluvial diamonds, have the potential to be used to fund civil conflicts and other illegal activities, and because trade in colored gemstones is less organized than that of diamonds, they offer less opportunity for effective regulation of their trade. And, like diamond, until the recent advent of the Kimberley Process no generally accepted estimates of colored gemstone production globally or by producing country have existed. The present paper is a first attempt to develop production statistics for the three precious gems -emeralds, rubies, and sapphires - and tanzanite tanzanite, a semi-precious gem. The data consist of the weight of production of each of the gemstones from 1995 through 2005. Preliminary data on the weights of gemstone production were presented as a poster session at the Gemological Institute of America's Gemological Research Conference in San Diego, CA, in 2006, and as a published abstract (Yager, 2006) in an attempt to gather response to the estimates. The USGS continues to welcome information and suggestions that would improve the

  3. Tissue-Specific Transcriptomics of the Exotic Invasive Insect Pest Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittapalli, Omprakash; Bai, Xiaodong; Bonello, Pierluigi; Herms, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The insect midgut and fat body represent major tissue interfaces that deal with several important physiological functions including digestion, detoxification and immune response. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), is an exotic invasive insect pest that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) primarily in the Midwestern United States and Ontario, Canada. However, despite its high impact status little knowledge exists for A. planipennis at the molecular level. Methodology and Principal Findings Newer-generation Roche-454 pyrosequencing was used to obtain 126,185 reads for the midgut and 240,848 reads for the fat body, which were assembled into 25,173 and 37,661 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for the midgut and the fat body of A. planipennis larvae, respectively. Among these ESTs, 36% of the midgut and 38% of the fat body sequences showed similarity to proteins in the GenBank nr database. A high number of the midgut sequences contained chitin-binding peritrophin (248)and trypsin (98) domains; while the fat body sequences showed high occurrence of cytochrome P450s (85) and protein kinase (123) domains. Further, the midgut transcriptome of A. planipennis revealed putative microbial transcripts encoding for cell-wall degrading enzymes such as polygalacturonases and endoglucanases. A significant number of SNPs (137 in midgut and 347 in fat body) and microsatellite loci (317 in midgut and 571 in fat body) were predicted in the A. planipennis transcripts. An initial assessment of cytochrome P450s belonging to various CYP clades revealed distinct expression patterns at the tissue level. Conclusions and Significance To our knowledge this study is one of the first to illuminate tissue-specific gene expression in an invasive insect of high ecological and economic consequence. These findings will lay the foundation for future gene expression and functional studies in A. planipennis. PMID:21060843

  4. Quantifying the impact of woodpecker predation on population dynamics of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, David E; Gould, Juli R; Vandenberg, John D; Duan, Jian J; Shrewsbury, Paula M

    2013-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive beetle that has killed millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) since it was accidentally introduced to North America in the 1990s. Understanding how predators such as woodpeckers (Picidae) affect the population dynamics of EAB should enable us to more effectively manage the spread of this beetle, and toward this end we combined two experimental approaches to elucidate the relative importance of woodpecker predation on EAB populations. First, we examined wild populations of EAB in ash trees in New York, with each tree having a section screened to exclude woodpeckers. Second, we established experimental cohorts of EAB in ash trees in Maryland, and the cohorts on half of these trees were caged to exclude woodpeckers. The following spring these trees were debarked and the fates of the EAB larvae were determined. We found that trees from which woodpeckers were excluded consistently had significantly lower levels of predation, and that woodpecker predation comprised a greater source of mortality at sites with a more established wild infestation of EAB. Additionally, there was a considerable difference between New York and Maryland in the effect that woodpecker predation had on EAB population growth, suggesting that predation alone may not be a substantial factor in controlling EAB. In our experimental cohorts we also observed that trees from which woodpeckers were excluded had a significantly higher level of parasitism. The lower level of parasitism on EAB larvae found when exposed to woodpeckers has implications for EAB biological control, suggesting that it might be prudent to exclude woodpeckers from trees when attempting to establish parasitoid populations. Future studies may include utilizing EAB larval cohorts with a range of densities to explore the functional response of woodpeckers.

  5. Comparison of trap types and colors for capturing emerald ash borer adults at different population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Therese M; Mccullough, Deborah G

    2014-02-01

    Results of numerous trials to evaluate artificial trap designs and lures for detection of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the emerald ash borer, have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of different A. planipennis population densities in the field sites. In 2010 and 2011, we compared 1) green canopy traps, 2) purple canopy traps, 3) green double-decker traps, and 4) purple double-decker traps in sites representing a range of A. planipennis infestation levels. Traps were baited with cis-3-hexenol in both years, plus an 80:20 mixture of Manuka and Phoebe oil (2010) or Manuka oil alone (2011). Condition of trees bearing canopy traps, A. planipennis infestation level of trees in the vicinity of traps, and number of A. planipennis captured per trap differed among sites in both years. Overall in both years, more females, males, and beetles of both sexes were captured on double-decker traps than canopy traps, and more beetles of both sexes (2010) or females (2011) were captured on purple traps than green traps. In 2010, detection rates were higher for purple (100%) and green double-decker traps (100%) than for purple (82%) or green canopy traps (64%) at sites with very low to low A. planipennis infestation levels. Captures of A. planipennis on canopy traps consistently increased with the infestation level of the canopy trap-bearing trees. Differences among trap types were most pronounced at sites with low A. planipennis densities, where more beetles were captured on purple double-decker traps than on green canopy traps in both years.

  6. A Biologically Active Analog of the Sex Pheromone of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, P J; Ryall, K; Mayo, P; MaGee, D I; Leclair, G; Fidgen, J; Lavallee, R; Price, J; McConaghy, J

    2015-03-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) (EAB), is an invasive species causing unprecedented levels of mortality to ash trees in its introduced range. The female-produced sex pheromone of EAB has been shown to contain the macrocyclic lactone (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide. This compound and its geometrical isomer, (3E)-dodecen-12-olide, have been demonstrated previously to be EAG active and, in combination with a host-derived green leaf volatile, (3Z)-hexenol, to be attractive to male EAB in green prism traps deployed in the ash tree canopy. In the current study, we show that the saturated analog, dodecan-12-olide, is similarly active, eliciting an antennal response and significant attraction of EAB in both olfactometer and trapping bioassays in green traps with (3Z)-hexenol. Conformational modeling of the three lactones reveals that their energies and shapes are very similar, suggesting they might share a common receptor in EAB antennae. These findings provide new insight into the pheromone ecology of this species, highlighting the apparent plasticity in response of adults to the pheromone and its analog. Both of the unsaturated isomers are costly to synthesize, involving multistep, low-yielding processes. The saturated analog can be made cheaply, in high yield, and on large scale via Mitsunobu esterification of a saturated ω-hydroxy acid or more simply by Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of commercially available cyclododecanone. The analog can thus provide an inexpensive option as a lure for detection surveys as well as for possible mitigation purposes, such as mating disruption.

  7. Fine-scale features on bioreplicated decoys of the emerald ash borer provide necessary visual verisimilitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Michael J.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Narkhede, Mahesh S.; Engel, Leland G.; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Kumar, Jayant; Baker, Thomas C.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-03-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive tree-killing pest in North America. Like other buprestid beetles, it has an iridescent coloring, produced by a periodically layered cuticle whose reflectance peaks at 540 nm wavelength. The males perform a visually mediated ritualistic mating flight directly onto females poised on sunlit leaves. We attempted to evoke this behavior using artificial visual decoys of three types. To fabricate decoys of the first type, a polymer sheet coated with a Bragg-stack reflector was loosely stamped by a bioreplicating die. For decoys of the second type, a polymer sheet coated with a Bragg-stack reflector was heavily stamped by the same die and then painted green. Every decoy of these two types had an underlying black absorber layer. Decoys of the third type were produced by a rapid prototyping machine and painted green. Fine-scale features were absent on the third type. Experiments were performed in an American ash forest infested with EAB, and a European oak forest home to a similar pest, the two-spotted oak borer (TSOB), Agrilus biguttatus. When pinned to leaves, dead EAB females, dead TSOB females, and bioreplicated decoys of both types often evoked the complete ritualized flight behavior. Males also initiated approaches to the rapidly prototyped decoy, but would divert elsewhere without making contact. The attraction of the bioreplicated decoys was also demonstrated by providing a high dc voltage across the decoys that stunned and killed approaching beetles. Thus, true bioreplication with fine-scale features is necessary to fully evoke ritualized visual responses in insects, and provides an opportunity for developing insecttrapping technologies.

  8. Identification of odor-processing genes in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Praveen; Wijeratne, Asela J; Wijeratne, Saranga; Poland, Therese; Qazi, Sohail S; Doucet, Daniel; Cusson, Michel; Beliveau, Catherine; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-01-01

    Insects rely on olfaction to locate food, mates, and suitable oviposition sites for successful completion of their life cycle. Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer) is a serious invasive insect pest that has killed tens of millions of North American ash (Fraxinus spp) trees and threatens the very existence of the genus Fraxinus. Adult A. planipennis are attracted to host volatiles and conspecifics; however, to date no molecular knowledge exists on olfaction in A. planipennis. Hence, we undertook an antennae-specific transcriptomic study to identify the repertoire of odor processing genes involved in A. planipennis olfaction. We acquired 139,085 Roche/454 GS FLX transcriptomic reads that were assembled into 30,615 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including 3,249 isotigs and 27,366 non-isotigs (contigs and singletons). Intriguingly, the majority of the A. planipennis antennal transcripts (59.72%) did not show similarity with sequences deposited in the non-redundant database of GenBank, potentially representing novel genes. Functional annotation and KEGG analysis revealed pathways associated with signaling and detoxification. Several odor processing genes (9 odorant binding proteins, 2 odorant receptors, 1 sensory neuron membrane protein and 134 odorant/xenobiotic degradation enzymes, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases; esterases, etc.) putatively involved in olfaction processes were identified. Quantitative PCR of candidate genes in male and female A. planipennis in different developmental stages revealed developmental- and sex-biased expression patterns. The antennal ESTs derived from A. planipennis constitute a rich molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of A. planipennis. These findings should help in understanding the processing of antennally-active compounds (e.g. 7-epi-sesquithujene) previously identified in this serious invasive pest.

  9. Glutathione-S-transferase profiles in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-05-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is a recently discovered invasive insect pest of ash, Fraxinus spp. in North America. Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are a multifunctional superfamily of enzymes which function in conjugating toxic compounds to less toxic and excretable forms. In this study, we report the molecular characterization and expression patterns of different classes of GST genes in different tissues and developmental stages plus their specific activity. Multiple sequence alignment of all six A. planipennis GSTs (ApGST-E1, ApGST-E2, ApGST-E3, ApGST-O1, ApGST-S1 and ApGST-μ1) revealed conserved features of insect GSTs and a phylogenetic analysis grouped the GSTs within the epsilon, sigma, omega and microsomal classes of GSTs. Real time quantitative PCR was used to study field collected samples. In larval tissues high mRNA levels for ApGST-E1, ApGST-E3 and ApGST-O1 were obtained in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. On the other hand, ApGST-E2 and ApGST-S1 showed high mRNA levels in fat body and ApGST-μ1 showed constitutive levels in all the tissues assayed. During development, mRNA levels for ApGST-E2 were observed to be the highest in feeding instars, ApGST-S1 in prepupal instars; while the others showed constitutive patterns in all the developmental stages examined. At the enzyme level, total GST activity was similar in all the tissues and developmental stages assayed. Results obtained suggest that A. planipennis is potentially primed with GST-driven detoxification to metabolize ash allelochemicals. To our knowledge this study represents the first report of GSTs in A. planipennis and also in the family of wood boring beetles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from a world-wide distribution from the EMERALD INDAH and other platforms from 28 November 2000 to 29 May 2001 (NODC Accession 0000465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XBT and other data were collected from a world-wide distribution from the EMERALD INDAH and other platforms from 28 November 2000 to 29 May 2001. Data were submitted...

  11. Emerald Ash Borer Threat Reveals Ecohydrologic Feedbacks in Northern U.S. Black Ash Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, J.; Mclaughlin, D. L.; Slesak, R.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrology is a primary driver of wetland structure and process that can be modified by abiotic and biotic feedbacks, leading to self-organization of wetland systems. Large-scale disturbance to these feedbacks, such as loss of vegetation, can thus be expected to impact wetland hydrology. The Emerald Ash Borer is an invasive beetle that is expected to cause widespread-loss of ash trees throughout the northern U.S. and Canada. To predict ecosystem response to this threat of vegetation loss, we ask if and how Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra), a ubiquitous facultative-wetland ash species, actively controls wetland hydrology to determine if Black Ash creates favorable hydrologic regimes for growth (i.e., evidence for ecohydrologic feedbacks). We do this by taking advantage of plot-level tree removal experiments in Black Ash-dominated (75-100% basal area) wetlands in the Chippewa National Forest, Minnesota. The monospecies dominance in these systems minimizes variation associated with species-specific effects, allowing for clearer interpretation of results regarding ecohydrologic feedbacks. Here, we present an analysis of six years of water table and soil moisture time series in experimental plots with the following treatments: 1) clear cut, 2) girdling, 3) group-selection thinning, and 4) control. We also present evapotranspiration (ET) time series estimates for each experimental plot using analysis of diel water level variation. Results show elevated water tables in treatment plots relative to control plots for all treatments for several years after treatments were applied, with differences as great as 50 cm. Some recovery of water table to pre-treatment levels was observed over time, but only the group-selection thinning treatment showed near-complete recovery to pre-treatment levels, and clear-cut treatments indicate sustained elevated water tables over five years. Differences among treatments are directly attributed to variably reduced ET relative to controls. Results also

  12. Evaluation of double-decker traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Therese M; McCullough, Deborah G; Anulewicz, Andrea C

    2011-04-01

    Improved detection tools are needed for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive forest insect from Asia that has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since its discovery in Michigan in 2002. We evaluated attraction of adult A. planipennis to artificial traps incorporating visual (e.g., height, color, silhouette) and olfactory cues (e.g., host volatiles) at field sites in Michigan. We developed a double-decker trap consisting of a 3-m-tall polyvinyl pipe with two purple prisms attached near the top. In 2006, we compared A. planipennis attraction to double-decker traps baited with various combinations of manuka oil (containing sesquiterpenes present in ash bark), a blend of four ash leaf volatiles (leaf blend), and a rough texture to simulate bark. Significantly more A. planipennis were captured per trap when traps without the rough texture were baited with the leaf blend and manuka oil lures than on traps with texture and manuka oil but no leaf blend. In 2007, we also tested single prism traps set 1.5 m above ground and tower traps, similar to double-decker traps but 6 m tall. Double-decker traps baited with the leaf blend and manuka oil, with or without the addition of ash leaf and bark extracts, captured significantly more A. planipennis than similarly baited single prism traps, tower traps, or unbaited double-decker traps. A baited double-decker trap captured A. planipennis at a field site that was not previously known to be infested, representing the first detection event using artificial traps and lures. In 2008, we compared purple or green double-decker traps, single prisms suspended 3-5 m above ground in the ash canopy (canopy traps), and large flat purple traps (billboard traps). Significantly more A. planipennis were captured in purple versus green traps, baited traps versus unbaited traps, and double-decker versus canopy traps, whereas billboard traps were intermediate. At sites

  13. De novo assembly and characterization of tissue specific transcriptomes in the emerald notothen, Trematomus bernacchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Troy J; Place, Sean P

    2013-11-20

    The notothenioids comprise a diverse group of fishes that rapidly radiated after isolation by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current approximately 14-25 million years ago. Given that evolutionary adaptation has led to finely tuned traits with narrow physiological limits in these organisms, this system provides a unique opportunity to examine physiological trade-offs and limits of adaptive responses to environmental perturbation. As such, notothenioids have a rich history with respect to studies attempting to understand the vulnerability of polar ecosystems to the negative impacts associated with global climate change. Unfortunately, despite being a model system for understanding physiological adaptations to extreme environments, we still lack fundamental molecular tools for much of the Nototheniidae family. Specimens of the emerald notothen, Trematomus bernacchii, were acclimated for 28 days in flow-through seawater tanks maintained near ambient seawater temperatures (-1.5°C) or at +4°C. Following acclimation, tissue specific cDNA libraries for liver, gill and brain were created by pooling RNA from n = 5 individuals per temperature treatment. The tissue specific libraries were bar-coded and used for 454 pyrosequencing, which yielded over 700 thousand sequencing reads. A de novo assembly and annotation of these reads produced a functional transcriptome library of T. bernacchii containing 30,107 unigenes, 13,003 of which possessed significant homology to a known protein product. Digital gene expression analysis of these extremely cold adapted fish reinforced the loss of an inducible heat shock response and allowed the preliminary exploration into other elements of the cellular stress response. Preliminary exploration of the transcriptome of T. bernacchii under elevated temperatures enabled a semi-quantitative comparison to prior studies aimed at characterizing the thermal response of this endemic fish whose size, abundance and distribution has established it as a

  14. Inclusions of crichtonite-group minerals in Cr-pyropes from the Internatsionalnaya kimberlite pipe, Siberian Craton: Crystal chemistry, parageneses and relationships to mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvukhin, Dmitriy I.; Malkovets, Vladimir G.; Sharygin, Igor S.; Tretiakova, Irina G.; Griffin, William L.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2018-05-01

    Cr-pyrope xenocrysts and associated inclusions of crichtonite-group minerals from the Internatsionalnaya kimberlite pipe were studied to provide new insights into processes in the lithospheric mantle beneath the Mirny kimberlite field, Siberian craton. Pyropes are predominantly of lherzolitic paragenesis (Cr2O3 2-6 wt%) and have trace-element spectra typical for garnets from fertile mantle (gradual increase in chondrite-normalized values from LREE to MREE-HREE). Crichtonite-group minerals commonly occur as monomineralic elongated inclusions, mostly in association with rutile, Mg-ilmenite and Cr-spinel within individual grains of pyrope. Sample INT-266 hosts intergrowth of crichtonite-group mineral and Cl-apatite, while sample INT-324 contains polymineralic apatite- and dolomite-bearing assemblages. Crichtonite-group minerals are Al-rich (1.1-4.5 wt% Al2O3), moderately Zr-enriched (1.3-4.3 wt% ZrO2), and are Ca-, Sr-, and occasionally Ba-dominant in terms of A-site occupancy; they also contain significant amounts of Na and LREE. T-estimates and chemical composition of Cr-pyropes imply that samples represent relatively low-T peridotite assemblages with ambient T ranging from 720 to 820°С. Projected onto the 35 mW/m2 cratonic paleogeotherm for the Mirny kimberlite field (Griffin et al., 1999b. Tectonophysics 310, 1-35), temperature estimates yield a P range of 34-42 kbar ( 110-130 km), which corresponds to a mantle domain in the uppermost part of the diamond stability field. The presence of crichtonite-group minerals in Cr-pyropes has petrological and geochemical implications as evidence for metasomatic enrichment of some incompatible elements in the lithospheric mantle beneath the Mirny kimberlite field. The genesis of Cr-pyropes with inclusions of crichtonite-group minerals is attributed to the percolation of Ca-Sr-Na-LREE-Zr-bearing carbonate-silicate metasomatic agents through Mg- and Cr-rich depleted peridotite protoliths. The findings of several potentially

  15. Seven-Year Evaluation of Insecticide Tools for Emerald Ash Borer in Fraxinus pennsylvanica (Lamiales: Oleaceae) Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Emily N; Forbes, Nora J; Haugen, Christopher; Jones, Grant; Bernick, Shawn; Miller, Fredric

    2018-04-02

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is decimating ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Combatting EAB includes the use of insecticides; however, reported insecticide efficacy varies among published studies. This study assessed the effects of season of application, insecticide active ingredient, and insecticide application rate on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) (Lamiales: Oleaceae) canopy decline caused by EAB over a 5- to 7-yr interval. Data suggested that spring treatments were generally more effective in reducing canopy decline than fall treatments, but this difference was not statistically significant. Lowest rates of decline (<5% over 5 yr) were observed in trees treated with imidacloprid injected annually in the soil during spring (at the higher of two tested application rates; 1.12 g/cm diameter at 1.3 m height) and emamectin benzoate injected biennially into the stem. All tested insecticides (dinotefuran, emamectin benzoate, and imidacloprid) under all tested conditions significantly reduced the rate of increase of dieback.

  16. Progade PT path, prograde fluid flow, metasomatism and hydrous melting in the Osor high-grade HT-LP complex (Catalan Coastal Ranges-CCR, NE Iberia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reche, Joan; Martínez, Francisco; Leoz, Gisela

    2015-04-01

    Fast thermal pulses related to HT-LP metamorphism may imply dehydration reaction overstepping, higher than normal fluid production rates, quick local increases in Pfluid and common situations of Pfluid >> Plitostatic and surpassing locally the tensile stresses. This ambient would be favorable to transient hydrofracturing and fluid flow even if the ongoing HT-LP event develops on dominantly ductile crustal levels. In inner zones where temperatures are high enough, hydrous melting and melt migration would be favored as well. Such movement of fluids and melts would tend to be sustained if non-hydrostatic stresses are active during heating, and would be favored in high strain domains such high-T shear zones or along foliation planes. In such scenario, local metasomatic processes and mass-transfer phenomena are expected to occur along these high strain zones and so distributed along tectonic anisotropies. A variety of features found in high T Garnet - biotite-sillimanite±cordierite±plagioclase±K-feldspar±quartz metapelitic gneisses from the Osor Complex (Guilleries massif, CCR), testify from this kind of processes operating in the lower crustal section, at the amphibolite to granulite transition zone during a prograde Variscan HT-LP thermal pulse. Such features include: syn-D2 quartz veining, leucogranitoid (leucotonalite, trondhjemitic) lenses sub parallel to S2 dominant foliation, fibrolite-rich foliation planes and prograde sub-idiomorphic garnet developing preferentially near fluid migration channels (quartz veins) or near melt lenses.

  17. Changes in physiological responses of an Antarctic fish, the emerald rock cod (Trematomus bernacchii), following exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ruma; Lokman, P Mark; Lamare, Miles D; Metcalf, Victoria J; Burritt, David J; Davison, William; Hageman, Kimberly J

    2013-03-15

    Although polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have the ability to undergo long-range atmospheric transport to remote ecosystems like Antarctica, a recent study found evidence for a local source within the Antarctic. PBDEs from sewage treatment outfalls of McMurdo Station and Scott Base on Ross Island have been attributed to the high concentrations measured in emerald rock cod (Trematomus bernacchii). The potential impact of PBDEs on Antarctic fish physiology is unknown and therefore, the aim of this study was to obtain a greater understanding of physiological responses of emerald rock cod for assessing changes in ecosystem quality. A PBDE mixture (ΣPBDE 8 congeners) was administered fortnightly over 42 days and physiological changes were observed throughout this period and for a further 14 days thereafter. Changes in liver composition, molecular level changes and enzyme activities of selected detoxification-mediated and antioxidant defence markers were measured. Changes in total lipid, lipid peroxide and protein carbonyl concentrations in emerald rock cod liver were consistent with increases in nucleus surface area in the PBDE-treated groups, suggesting alterations in cellular function. Changes in the activities of selected antioxidant enzymes indirectly indicated oxidative stress, possibly resulting in the changes in liver composition. Additionally, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity reached its peak faster than that of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), suggesting that during the early response to PBDE exposures there could be a greater involvement of GST-mediated detoxification. Thus, for at least the species examined here, protein carbonyl and lipid peroxides were useful and informative biomarkers for cellular level responses following PBDE-related exposure. Furthermore, our findings suggest that emerald rock cod exposed to PBDEs develop oxidative stress - a condition with potential consequences for fish growth, health and reproduction. Copyright

  18. Analytical imaging studies of the migration of degraded orpiment, realgar, and emerald green pigments in historic paintings and related conservation issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, K.; Mass, J.; Mehta, A.; Church, J.; Meirer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Yellow orpiment (As2S3) and red–orange realgar (As4S4) photo-degrade and the nineteenth-century pigment emerald green (Cu(C2H3O2)2·3Cu(AsO2)2) degrades into arsenic oxides. Because of their solubility in water, arsenic oxides readily migrate and are found throughout the multi-layered paint system.

  19. Short-Term Responses of Ground Beetles to Forest Changes Caused by Early Stages of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)-Induced Ash Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kayla I; Herms, Daniel A

    2016-04-22

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an invasive wood-boring beetle native to Asia, has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction into North America, resulting in widespread formation of canopy gaps and accumulations of coarse woody debris (CWD) in forests. The objective was to quantify effects of canopy gaps and CWD caused by early stages of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality, and their interaction on ground beetle assemblages. The impact of canopy gaps and CWD varied, as gaps affected beetle assemblages in 2011, while effects of CWD were only observed in 2012. Gaps decreased beetle activity-abundance, and marginally decreased richness, driving changes in species composition, but evenness and diversity were unaffected. Effects of the CWD treatment alone were minimal, but CWD interacted with the canopy treatment, resulting in an increase in activity-abundance of ground beetles in canopy gaps without CWD, and a marginal increase in species richness in canopy gaps with CWD. Although there were some initial changes in species composition, these were ephemeral, suggesting that ground beetle assemblages may be resilient to disturbance caused by emerald ash borer. This study contributes to our understanding of the cascading ecological impacts of biological invasions on forest ecosystems. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Use of the extraction residue of emeralds in a formulation mass of ceramic tiles; Utilizacao do residuo da extracao de esmeraldas em uma formulacao de massa de revestimento ceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, R. F., E-mail: ronaldofcavalcante@gmail.com [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica - PPgEM - UFRN, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova, RN (Brazil); Nascimento, R.M.; Paskocimas, C.A., E-mail: rmaribondo@ufrnet.br, E-mail: paskocimas_ca@hotmail.com [Departamento de Engenharia Materiais - DEMAT - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Lagoa Nova, RN (Brazil); Dutra, R.P.S., E-mail: ricardodutra@ct.ufpb.br [Departamento de Engenharia Materiais - DEMAT - UFPB - Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Companies involved in mining and beneficiation of emerald represent an important area of industrial development in Brazil, with a significant contribution to world production of this ore. As a result, large volumes of waste generated and emerald are constantly abandoned in the environment, contributing negatively to their preservation. On the other hand the interest in the use of mining waste as an additive in production of ceramic materials has grown among researchers in recent years. The ceramic industry is constantly seeking to expand the market for the sector and trying to improve product quality and increase the variety of applications. The technology of obtaining ceramic coating that uses waste from mining is still a largely unexplored market. Thus, the purpose of this study was to characterize the waste generated from mining emerald as well as to evaluate its potential use as raw material for production melting of ceramic tiles. Ceramic mixtures were prepared from raw materials characterized by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Five compositions were prepared using the waste codes of emeralds from 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Samples were prepared by pressing, sintered at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C and characterized to establish their mineralogical composition, water absorption, linear shrinkage and modulus of rupture. The results showed that the residue of emeralds studied can be embedded in the mass of ceramic tiles up to 20% in replacement of feldspar without compromising the end product properties. (author)

  1. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    trace element characteristics are similar to those of ocean island basalts (OIB), including enrichment in alkalis and incompatible trace elements. These characteristics are interpreted to indicate that their mantle source experienced an ancient melt-removal event that is reflected in depleted radiogenic isotopic compositions and was then re-enriched by metasomatism that elevated incompatible trace element contents, but was too young to produce a time-integrated change in radiogenic isotopic ratios. Evidence suggests that the Pribilof Island basalts did not form in either a plume or a back-arc basin tectonic setting. Rather, they were produced by melting of metasomatically hydrated upper mantle peridotite at relatively low temperatures and were able to erupt at the surface through extensional or transtensional faults that served as conduits for the magmas. ?? The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Chlorine isotopic compositions of apatite in Apollo 14 rocks: Evidence for widespread vapor-phase metasomatism on the lunar nearside ∼4 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Nicola J.; Barnes, Jessica J.; Tartèse, Romain; Franchi, Ian A.; Anand, Mahesh

    2018-06-01

    Compared to most other planetary materials in the Solar System, some lunar rocks display high δ37Cl signatures. Loss of Cl in a H ≪ Cl environment has been invoked to explain the heavy signatures observed in lunar samples, either during volcanic eruptions onto the lunar surface or during large scale degassing of the lunar magma ocean. To explore the conditions under which Cl isotope fractionation occurred in lunar basaltic melts, five Apollo 14 crystalline samples were selected (14053,19, 14072,13, 14073,9, 14310,171 along with basaltic clast 14321,1482) for in situ analysis of Cl isotopes using secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cl isotopes were measured within the mineral apatite, with δ37Cl values ranging from +14.6 ± 1.6‰ to +40.0 ± 2.9‰. These values expand the range previously reported for apatite in lunar rocks, and include some of the heaviest Cl isotope compositions measured in lunar samples to date. The data here do not display a trend between increasing rare earth elements contents and δ37Cl values, reported in previous studies. Other processes that can explain the wide inter- and intra-sample variability of δ37Cl values are explored. Magmatic degassing is suggested to have potentially played a role in fractionating Cl isotope in these samples. Degassing alone, however, could not create the wide variability in isotopic signatures. Our favored hypothesis, to explain small scale heterogeneity, is late-stage interaction with a volatile-rich gas phase, originating from devolatilization of lunar surface regolith rocks ∼4 billion years ago. This period coincides with vapor-induced metasomastism recorded in other lunar samples collected at the Apollo 16 and 17 landing sites, pointing to the possibility of widespread volatile-induced metasomatism on the lunar nearside at that time, potentially attributed to the Imbrium formation event.

  3. Host-rock controlled epigenetic, hydrothermal metasomatic origin of the Bayan Obo REEFe-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, P.R.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Yinchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Bayan Obo, a complex rare earth element (REE)FeNb ore deposit, located in Inner Mongolia, P.R.C. is the world's largest known REE deposit. The deposit is chiefly in a marble unit (H8), but extends into an overlying unit of black shale, slate and schist unit (H9), both of which are in the upper part of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. Based on sedimentary structures, the presence of detrital quartz and algal fossil remains, and the 16-km long geographic extent, the H8 marble is a sedimentary deposit, and not a carbonatite of magmatic origin, as proposed by some previous investigators. The unit was weakly regionally metamorphosed (most probably the lower part of the green schist facies) into marble and quartzite prior to mineralization. Tectonically, the deposit is located on the northern flank of the Sino-Korean craton. Many hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Bayan Obo deposit; the studies reported here support an epigenetic, hydrothermal, metasomatic origin. Such an origin is supported by field and laboratory textural evidence; 232Th/208Pb internal isochron mineral ages of selected monazite and bastnaesite samples; 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating minimum mineral ages of selected alkali amphiboles; chemical compositions of different generations of both REE ore minerals and alkali amphiboles; and evidence of host-rock influence on the various types of Bayan Obo ores. The internal isochron ages of the REE minerals indicate Caledonian ages for various episodes of REE and Fe mineralization. No evidence was found to indicate a genetic relation between the extensive biotite granitic rocks of Hercynian age in the mine region and the Bayan Obo are deposit, as suggested by previous workers. ?? 1992.

  4. Peace with Hunger: Colombia’s Checkered Experience with Post-Conflict Sustainable Community Development in Emerald-Mining Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel B. Franco

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between conflict and local development has puzzled scholars and practitioners alike. This article explores why the advent of peace in Colombia’s emerald-mining regions for the past few years, as well as a broader national peace process, has not delivered the expected development dividends among mining communities. We contrast differences in stakeholders’ perceptions between levels of governance (local, regional and national. Based on the research, we conclude that while stakeholder collaboration is successful at the regional and national levels of governance, it fails at the local level. While peace has allowed an increase in mainstream business investment in mining, this has concentrated production in a few hands leading to a deterioration in many aspects of community livelihoods and wealth distribution. There has been a shift in the concentration of wealth and production from traditional elites to large companies. Communities noted a loss of collective assets and lack of community and institutional capacity to overcome pressing issues in a post-conflict market economy that favors those who control capital and technology. Based on an evaluation of community perceptions through a focus group methodology, this study recommends ways to prepare and better coordinate stakeholders to engage with complex relationships, and protect community assets in a collaborative governance scenario. This research suggests that political reconciliation processes amid complex resource geographies require greater devolution and community engagement on post-conflict economic development during the peace process itself.

  5. Progress and Challenges of Protecting North American Ash Trees from the Emerald Ash Borer Using Biological Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian J. Duan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available After emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, was discovered in the United States, a classical biological control program was initiated against this destructive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.. This biocontrol program began in 2007 after federal regulatory agencies and the state of Michigan approved release of three EAB parasitoid species from China: Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Eulophidae, Spathius agrili Yang (Braconidae, and Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Encyrtidae. A fourth EAB parasitoid, Spathius galinae Belokobylskij (Braconidae from Russia, was approved for release in 2015. We review the rationale and ecological premises of the EAB biocontrol program, and then report on progress in North American ash recovery in southern Michigan, where the parasitoids were first released. We also identify challenges to conserving native Fraxinus using biocontrol in the aftermath of the EAB invasion, and provide suggestions for program improvements as EAB spreads throughout North America. We conclude that more work is needed to: (1 evaluate the establishment and impact of biocontrol agents in different climate zones; (2 determine the combined effect of EAB biocontrol and host plant resistance or tolerance on the regeneration of North American ash species; and (3 expand foreign exploration for EAB natural enemies throughout Asia.

  6. Methods to Improve Survival and Growth of Planted Alternative Species Seedlings in Black Ash Ecosystems Threatened by Emerald Ash Borer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Bolton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerald ash borer (EAB continues to spread across North America, infesting native ash trees and changing the forested landscape. Black ash wetland forests are severely affected by EAB. As black ash wetland forests provide integral ecosystem services, alternative approaches to maintain forest cover on the landscape are needed. We implemented simulated EAB infestations in depressional black ash wetlands in the Ottawa National Forest in Michigan to mimic the short-term and long-term effects of EAB. These wetlands were planted with 10 alternative tree species in 2013. Based on initial results in the Michigan sites, a riparian corridor in the Superior Municipal Forest in Wisconsin was planted with three alternative tree species in 2015. Results across both locations indicate that silver maple (Acer saccharinum L., red maple (Acer rubrum L., American elm (Ulmus americana L., and northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis L. are viable alternative species to plant in black ash-dominated wetlands. Additionally, selectively planting on natural or created hummocks resulted in two times greater survival than in adjacent lowland sites, and this suggests that planting should be implemented with microsite selection or creation as a primary control. Regional landowners and forest managers can use these results to help mitigate the canopy and structure losses from EAB and maintain forest cover and hydrologic function in black ash-dominated wetlands after infestation.

  7. The Role of Multichannel Marketing in Customer Retention and Loyalty: Study in Emerald Bank Customer in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarwati Ambarwati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention on the relationship between customer retention, customer loyalty, and customer satisfaction that serves as "seed" of customer loyalty highlight the important factors for multichannel management. With the growing trends of people in investing their money in bank for securities need to be responded by the marketing department to create better marketing strategies. The purpose of this study is to examine and explain the effect of a multichannel bank on emerald customers retention   in one of the largest SOE bank in Indonesia, in the city of Surabaya, BNI (Bank Negara Indonesia toward customer  satisfaction, loyalty and customer  retention. This study develops the theory  of  mix marketing by using multichannel  as one of the elements that can increase customer retention   using satisfaction mediation and customer loyalty. Mechanical determination of sample units in this study is a  purposive sampling, of 89 respondents. Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA was applied to test the hypotheses. The results of this study indicate that direct multichannel not  significantly effect the customer retention. Customer satisfaction can not be a perfect mediation  and the customer loyalty can be a perfect mediation in the relationship between multichannel and customer retention. This study contributes to the banking industry in applying the concept of the mix marketing.

  8. Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) from the emerald rock cod, Trematomus bernacchii (Teleostei: Perciformes) in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mario; Cipriani, Paolo; Pankov, Plamen; Lawton, Scott P

    2015-10-01

    Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. is described from the gill blood vessels of the emerald rock cod Trematomus bernacchii in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. It is distinguished from all other species of Aporocotyle by its body tegument showing single conical spines, spinous buccal capsule, and genital atrium positioned medially; all congeners described to date are characterized by clusters of tegumental spines, unspined buccal capsule and genital atrium located in the lateral part of the body. Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. clearly differs from A. notothenia (the only other species of Aporocotyle found in a perciform fish) in its shape and arrangement of tegumental spines, buccal capsule features, location of genital atrium, body size, ratio of esophagus/body length, anterior caeca/posterior caeca ratio, number of testes, cirrus sac and ovary size and shape, and host. The new species is easily distinguished from A. argentinensis (the species that most closely resembles A. michaudi) by the shape and arrangement of tegumental spines, buccal capsule features, genital atrium location, left anterior caecum longer than right, esophagus/body length ratio, number of testes, cirrus sac size and shape, host and molecular analyses. Phylogenetic analyses of partial 28S rDNA genetic data showed that sequences representing the new species form a distinct clade with all other sequences for species of Aporocotyle and appear basal within the genus. Aporocotyle michaudi n. sp. represents the only species of genus described in Antarctica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of Soil-Applied Neonicotinoid Insecticides for Long-term Protection Against Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitley, David R; Herms, Daniel A; Davis, Terrance W

    2015-10-01

    Protection of green ash trees (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) from the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, by soil applications of neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, clothianidin, and dinotefuran) was tested at five locations between 2005 and 2013. Application rate and spring versus fall application dates were evaluated in tests with neighborhood street trees and in one plantation of 65 ash trees. Insecticide treatments of ash trees at all five sites were initiated as the leading edge of the EAB invasion began to kill the first ash trees at each location. Trees were treated and evaluated at each site for 4 to 7 yr. Spring applications of imidacloprid were more efficacious than fall applications. Application rates of 0.8 g a.i./cm dbh or greater per year gave a higher level of protection and were more consistent than rates of 0.56 g a.i./cm dbh per year or less. The number of years between the first observation of canopy loss due to EAB and death of most of the control trees varied from three to seven years among test sites, depending on how many non-treated ash trees were nearby. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Biotic mortality factors affecting emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) are highly dependent on life stage and host tree crown condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D E; Duan, J J; Shrewsbury, P M

    2015-10-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is a serious invasive forest pest in North America responsible for killing tens to hundreds of millions of ash trees since it was accidentally introduced in the 1990 s. Although host-plant resistance and natural enemies are known to be important sources of mortality for EAB in Asia, less is known about the importance of different sources of mortality at recently colonized sites in the invaded range of EAB, and how these relate to host tree crown condition. To further our understanding of EAB population dynamics, we used a large-scale field experiment and life-table analyses to quantify the fates of EAB larvae and the relative importance of different biotic mortality factors at 12 recently colonized sites in Maryland. We found that the fates of larvae were highly dependent on EAB life stage and host tree crown condition. In relatively healthy trees (i.e., with a low EAB infestation) and for early instars, host tree resistance was the most important mortality factor. Conversely, in more unhealthy trees (i.e., with a moderate to high EAB infestation) and for later instars, parasitism and predation were the major sources of mortality. Life-table analyses also indicated how the lack of sufficient levels of host tree resistance and natural enemies contribute to rapid population growth of EAB at recently colonized sites. Our findings provide further evidence of the mechanisms by which EAB has been able to successfully establish and spread in North America.

  11. Identification of highly effective target genes for RNAi-mediated control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thais B; Duan, Jian J; Palli, Subba R; Rieske, Lynne K

    2018-03-22

    Recent study has shown that RNA interference (RNAi) is efficient in emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, and that ingestion of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting specific genes causes gene silencing and mortality in neonates. Here, we report on the identification of highly effective target genes for RNAi-mediated control of EAB. We screened 13 candidate genes in neonate larvae and selected the most effective target genes for further investigation, including their effect on EAB adults and on a non-target organism, Tribolium castaneum. The two most efficient target genes selected, hsp (heat shock 70-kDa protein cognate 3) and shi (shibire), caused up to 90% mortality of larvae and adults. In EAB eggs, larvae, and adults, the hsp is expressed at higher levels when compared to that of shi. Ingestion of dsHSP and dsSHI caused mortality in both neonate larvae and adults. Administration of a mixture of both dsRNAs worked better than either dsRNA by itself. In contrast, injection of EAB.dsHSP and EAB.dsSHI did not cause mortality in T. castaneum. Thus, the two genes identified cause high mortality in the EAB with no apparent phenotype effects in a non-target organism, the red flour beetle, and could be used in RNAi-mediated control of this invasive pest.

  12. Early detection of emerald ash borer infestation using multisourced data: a case study in the town of Oakville, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kongwen; Hu, Baoxin; Robinson, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) poses a significant economic and environmental threat to ash trees in southern Ontario, Canada, and the northern states of the USA. It is critical that effective technologies are urgently developed to detect, monitor, and control the spread of EAB. This paper presents a methodology using multisourced data to predict potential infestations of EAB in the town of Oakville, Ontario, Canada. The information combined in this study includes remotely sensed data, such as high spatial resolution aerial imagery, commercial ground and airborne hyperspectral data, and Google Earth imagery, in addition to nonremotely sensed data, such as archived paper maps and documents. This wide range of data provides extensive information that can be used for early detection of EAB, yet their effective employment and use remain a significant challenge. A prediction function was developed to estimate the EAB infestation states of individual ash trees using three major attributes: leaf chlorophyll content, tree crown spatial pattern, and prior knowledge. Comparison between these predicted values and a ground-based survey demonstrated an overall accuracy of 62.5%, with 22.5% omission and 18.5% commission errors.

  13. Effects of water availability on emerald ash borer larval performance and phloem phenolics of Manchurian and black ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Whitehill, Justin G A; Hill, Amy L; Opiyo, Stephen O; Cipollini, Don; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-04-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle is a significant threat to the survival of North American ash. In previous work, we identified putative biochemical and molecular markers of constitutive EAB resistance in Manchurian ash, an Asian species co-evolved with EAB. Here, we employed high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-MS) to characterize the induced response of soluble phloem phenolics to EAB attack in resistant Manchurian and susceptible black ash under conditions of either normal or low water availability, and the effects of water availability on larval performance. Total larval mass per tree was lower in Manchurian than in black ash. Low water increased larval numbers and mean larval mass overall, but more so in Manchurian ash. Low water did not affect levels of phenolics in either host species, but six phenolics decreased in response to EAB. In both ashes, pinoresinol A was induced by EAB, especially in Manchurian ash. Pinoresinol A and pinoresinol B were negatively correlated with each other in both species. The higher accumulation of pinoresinol A in Manchurian ash after attack may help explain the resistance of this species to EAB, but none of the responses measured here could explain increased larval performance in trees subjected to low water availability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The potential for host switching via ecological fitting in the emerald ash borer-host plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Don; Peterson, Donnie L

    2018-02-27

    The traits used by phytophagous insects to find and utilize their ancestral hosts can lead to host range expansions, generally to closely related hosts that share visual and chemical features with ancestral hosts. Host range expansions often result from ecological fitting, which is the process whereby organisms colonize and persist in novel environments, use novel resources, or form novel associations with other species because of the suites of traits that they carry at the time they encounter the novel environment. Our objective in this review is to discuss the potential and constraints on host switching via ecological fitting in emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, an ecologically and economically important invasive wood boring beetle. Once thought of as an ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree specialist, recent studies have revealed a broader potential host range than was expected for this insect. We discuss the demonstrated host-use capabilities of this beetle, as well as the potential for and barriers to the adoption of additional hosts by this beetle. We place our observations in the context of biochemical mechanisms that mediate the interaction of these beetles with their host plants and discuss whether evolutionary host shifts are a possible outcome of the interaction of this insect with novel hosts.

  15. Review of Ecosystem Level Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer on Black Ash Wetlands: What Does the Future Hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall K. Kolka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The emerald ash borer (EAB is rapidly spreading throughout eastern North America and devastating ecosystems where ash is a component tree. This rapid and sustained loss of ash trees has already resulted in ecological impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and is projected to be even more severe as EAB invades black ash-dominated wetlands of the western Great Lakes region. Using two companion studies that are simulating short- and long-term EAB infestations and what is known from the literature, we synthesize our current limited understanding and predict anticipated future impacts of EAB on black ash wetlands. A key response to the die-back of mature black ash will be higher water tables and the potential for flooding and resulting changes to both the vegetation and animal communities. Although seedling planting studies have shown some possible replacement species, little is known about how the removal of black ash from the canopy will affect non-ash species growth and regeneration. Because black ash litter is relatively high in nitrogen, it is expected that there will be important changes in nutrient and carbon cycling and subsequent rates of productivity and decomposition. Changes in hydrology and nutrient and carbon cycling will have cascading effects on the biological community which have been scarcely studied. Research to address these important gaps is currently underway and should lead to alternatives to mitigate the effects of EAB on black ash wetland forests and develop management options pre- and post-EAB invasion.

  16. Si-metasomatism in serpentinized peridotite: The effects of talc-alteration on strontium and boron isotopes in abyssal serpentinites from Hole 1268a, ODP Leg 209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jason; Savov, Ivan P.; Agostini, Samuele; Cliff, Robert A.; Walshaw, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Ultramafic rocks recovered from Hole 1268a, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 209, to the south of the 15°20‧N Fracture Zone on the Mid-Atlantic ridge have experienced a complex history of melt depletion and subsequent interaction with a series of fluids under varying temperature and pH conditions. After intense melt depletion, varying degrees of serpentinization at 100-200 °C took place, initially under seawater-like pH conditions. Subsequently, interaction with a higher temperature (300-350 °C) fluid with low (4-5) pH and low MgO/SiO2 resulted in the heterogeneous alteration of these serpentinites to talc-bearing ultramafic lithologies. The proximity of the currently active, high temperature Logatchev hydrothermal field, located on the opposite flank of the Mid-Atlantic ridge, suggests that unlike more distal localities sampled during ODP Leg 209, Hole 1268a has experienced Si-metasomatism (i.e. talc-alteration) by a Logatchev-like hydrothermal fluid. Serpentinite strontium isotope ratios were not materially shifted by interaction with the subsequent high-T fluid, despite the likelihood that this fluid had locally interacted with mid-ocean ridge gabbro. 87Sr/86Sr in the ultramafic lithologies of Hole 1268a are close to that of seawater (c.0.709) and even acid leached serpentinites retain 87Sr/86Sr in excess of 0.707, indistinguishable from Logatchev hydrothermal fluid. On the other hand, boron isotope ratios appear to have been shifted from seawater-like values in the serpentinites (δ11B = c.+40‰) to much lighter values in talc-altered serpentinites (δ11B = +9 to +20‰). This is likely a consequence of the effects of changing ambient pH and temperature during the mineralogical transition from serpentine to talc. Heterogeneous boron isotope systematics have consequences for the composition of ultramafic portions of the lithosphere returned to the convecting mantle by subduction. Inhomogeneities in δ11B, [B] and mineralogy introduce significant uncertainties in

  17. Melt Origin Across a Rifted Continental Margin: A Case for Subduction-related Metasomatic Agents in the Lithospheric Source of Alkaline Basalt, Northwest Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, K. S.; Castillo, P.; Krans, S. R.; Deering, C. D.; McIntosh, W. C.; Valley, J. W.; Kitajima, K.; Kyle, P. R.; Hart, S. R.; Blusztajn, J.

    2017-12-01

    subduction-related residue to the asthenosphere. Metasomatism was triggered by major episodes of extension beginning in the Late Cretaceous but did not produce alkaline magmatism directly. Significant delay of 30 to 20 Ma between extension and magmatism was likely controlled by conductive heating and the rate of thermal migration at the base of the lithosphere.

  18. Constitutive mass balance relations between chemical composition, volume, density, porosity, and strain in metasomatic hydrochemical systems: Results on weathering and pedogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, George H.; Dietrich, William E.

    1987-03-01

    Relations characterizing the chemical, physical, and mechanical changes resulting from metasomatic hydrochemical processes are developed using mass balance models which formally link chemical composition to bulk density, mineral density, volumetric properties, porosity, and amount of deformation (strain). Rigorous analysis of aqueous solute transport effects is then made possible in a variety of porous media flow environments including chemical weathering, pedogenesis (soil formation), diagenesis, ore deposition and enrichment, and metamorphism. Application of these linear constitutive relations to chemical weathering profiles shows that immobile and locally mobile chemical elements, with masses conserved on the scale of soil profiles, can be accurately identified from analysis of appropriate data arrays and then used as natural geochemical tracers to infer the nature and extent of hydrochemical weathering processes and volume changes during pedogenesis. Assumptions commonly made in the past about the supposed immobility of certain elements, e.g., Ti and Zr, become unnecessary. Quantitative differentiation between the effects of residual and supergene fractionation is then easily made. These methods are applied to Ni-rich laterites developed by weathering of ultramafic rocks, showing that during ordinary residual enrichment, Ni is concentrated by as much as 4× protolith peridotite concentrations. This occurs simply by silicate mineral dissolution and removal of chemical elements other than Ni ( e.g., Mg) with a corresponding reduction in saprolite density and increase in bulk porosity without significant deformation. In contrast, laterites with mineable concentrations of Ni which are similarly undeformed (such as the Nickel Mountain Mine in Riddle, Oregon) have experienced, in addition to residual enrichment, strong supergene enrichment by fractionation of ore elements between a leached zone from which Ni is extracted and a complementary enriched zone positioned

  19. Establishment and abundance of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Michigan: potential for success in classical biocontrol of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Bauer, Leah S; Abell, Kristopher J; Lelito, Jonathan P; Van Driesche, Roy

    2013-06-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid native to China and has been introduced to the United States since 2007 for classical biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an exotic beetle responsible for widespread ash mortality. Between 2007-2010, T. planipennisi adults (3,311-4,597 females and approximately 1,500 males per site) were released into each of six forest sites in three counties (Ingham, Gratiot, and Shiawassee) of southern Michigan. By the fall of 2012, the proportion of sampled trees with one or more broods of T. planipennisi increased to 92 and 83% in the parasitoid-release and control plots, respectively, from 33 and 4% in the first year after parasitoid releases (2009 fall for Ingham county sites and 2010 for other sites). Similarly, the mean number of T. planipennisi broods observed from sampled trees increased from less than one brood per tree in the first year after parasitoid releases to 2.46 (at control plots) to 3.08 (at release plots) broods by the fall of 2012. The rates of emerald ash borer larval parasitism by T. planipennisi also increased from 1.2% in the first year after parasitoid releases to 21.2% in the parasitoid-release plots, and from 0.2 to 12.8% for the control plots by the fall of 2012. These results demonstrate that T. planipennisi is established in southern Michigan and that its populations are increasing and expanding. This suggests that T. planipennisi will likely play a critical role in suppressing emerald ash borer populations in Michigan.

  20. Executive summary - Assessing the response of Emerald Lake, an alpine watershed in Sequoia National Park, California, to acidification during snowmelt using a simple hydrochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, R.P.; West, C.T.; Peters, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple process-oriented model, called the Alpine Lake Forecaster (ALF), was constructed using data collected from the Integrated Watershed Study of Emerald Lake, Sequoia National Park, California. ALF is able to capture the basic solute patterns during snowmelt in this alpine catchment where groundwater is a minor contributor to streamflow. It includes an empirical representation of primary mineral weathering as the only alkalinity generating mechanism. During a heavy snow year, such as the one used for calibrating the model, the model accurately simulated the surface water chemical change in response to the initial ionic pulse from the snowpack and to the dilution that occurs at peak snowmelt. Because the model does not consider cation exchange, it over-predicts the acidification during the initial period of snowmelt, and therefore is a conservative predictor. However, the minimum alkalinity observed in the main inflows to Emerald Lake and in the lake outflow is accurately simulated by the model. The representation of the lake as simply a missing volume with no additional chemical reactions is supported by the observation. The model predicts a change of 2 to 5 microequiv/L in the minimum alkalinity of the lake outflow during snowmelt if the deposition would have to increase between two and 18 times the current load-alkalinity of the lake; the precise increase depends on hydrologic conditions and on the pattern of solute release from the snowpack. An acidic rainstorm that exhausted the alkalinity of the lake was observed during summer 1984 after the lake had stratified, and is the likely cause of the acidification of Emerald Lake

  1. Studies of the g factors of the ground 4A2 and the first excited 2E state of Cr 3+ ions in emerald

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qun; Guo, Li-Xin; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Wei, Bing

    2011-09-01

    By using complete diagonalization method, the zero-field splitting and g factors of the ground 4A2 and the first excited 2E states of Cr 3+ ions in emerald are calculated. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The dependencies of the g factors on the crystal field parameters, including Dq, v, and v', have been studied. It is shown that, the g factors of the ground state varied with the crystal field parameters approximately in a linear way, but the g factors of the first excited state varied nonlinearly with these parameters.

  2. Towards the development of an autocontamination trap system to manage populations of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with the native entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D Barry; Iavallée, Robert; Kyei-Poku, George; Van Frankenhuyzen, Kees; Johny, Shajahan; Guertin, Claude; Francese, Joseph A; Jones, Gene C; Blais, Martine

    2012-12-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive species from Asia that was discovered in North America Canada, in 2002. Herein, we describe studies to develop an autocontamination trapping system to disseminate Beauveria bassiana to control beetle populations. The standard trap for emerald ash borer in Canada is a light green prism trap covered in an insect adhesive and baited with (Z)-3-hexenol. We compared of green multifunnel traps, green intercept panel traps (both with and without fluon coating) and green prism traps for capturing emerald ash borer in a green ash plantation. The coated green multifunnel traps captured significantly more males and more females than any other trap design. We examined the efficacy of two native B. bassiana isolates, INRS-CFL and L49-1AA. In a field experiment the INRS-CFL isolate attached to multifunnel traps in autocontamination chambers retained its pathogenicity to emerald ash borer adults for up to 43 d of outdoor exposure. Conidia germination of the INRS-CFL isolate was >69% after outdoor exposure in the traps for up to 57 d. The L49-1AA isolate was not pathogenic in simulated trap exposures and the germination rate was extremely low (<5.3%). Mean (+/- SEM) conidia loads on ash borer adults after being autocontaminated in the laboratory using pouches that had been exposed in traps out of doors for 29 d were 579,200 (+/- 86,181) and 2,400 (+/- 681) for the INRS-CFL and the LA9-1AA isolates, respectively. We also examined the fungal dissemination process under field conditions using the L49-1AA isolate in a green ash plantation. Beetles were lured to baited green multifunnel traps with attached autocontamination chambers. Beetles acquired fungal conidia from cultures growing on pouches in the chambers and were recaptured on Pestick-coated traps. In total, 2,532 beetles were captured of which 165 (6.5%) had fungal growth that resembled B. bassiana. Of these 25 beetles were positive for

  3. VIDENTE: a graphical user interface and decision support system for stochastic modelling of water table fluctuations at a single location; includes documentation of the programs KALMAX, KALTFN, SSD and EMERALD and introductions to stochastic modellin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierkens, M.F.P.; Bron, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    The VIDENTE program contains a decision support system (DSS) to choose between different models for stochastic modelling of water-table depths, and a graphical user interface to facilitate operating and running four implemented models: KALMAX, KALTFN,SSDS and EMERALD. In self-contained parts each of

  4. Differences in the reproductive biology and diapause of two congeneric species of egg parasitoids (Hymenoptera:Encyrtidae) from northeast Asia: implications for biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oobius primorskyensis Yao and Duan and Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) constitute a cryptic species complex of egg parasitoids attacking the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis (Coleotpera: Buprestidae) in their native range of northeast Asia. While O. primorskyensis is c...

  5. Long-term monitoring of the introduced emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) egg parasitoid, oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyridae), in Michigan, USA and evaluation of a newly developed monitoring technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. The egg parasitoid Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) was introduced as a biological control agent of this pest in Michiga...

  6. Effects of Adult Feeding and Overwintering Conditions on Energy Reserves and Flight Performance of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussey, Dylan A; Aukema, Brian H; Charvoz, Anthony M; Venette, Robert C

    2018-04-02

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle from Asia, spreads through human-mediated movement and active flight. The effects of adult feeding and overwintering conditions on A. planipennis energy reserves (e.g., lipid, glycogen, and sugars) and flight are poorly understood. We conjectured that the potential energetic demands associated with the production of cryoprotectants might affect dispersal capacity and partially explain slower spread of A. planipennis in Minnesota than in the other states. Two studies sought to measure the effects of adult feeding on lipid content and flight capacity. Adult A. planipennis were fed shamel ash, Fraxinus uhdei Wenzig, leaves for 0-20 d after emergence, and half were flown on a custom flight mill for 24 h, before being frozen for comparative lipid analysis with a control group. The second study compared the effects of adult feeding on energy reserves and flight capacity of A. planipennis that were originally from St. Paul, Minnesota but overwintered in infested logs placed in Grand Rapids, Minnesota (low winter temperature, -34°C) or St. Paul, Minnesota (-26.3°C). Live adults consumed foliage at a constant rate, but lipid content (percentage of fresh mass) did not change with increases in feeding or flight. Adult glycogen content declined with flight and increased only slightly with feeding. Overwintering location affected survival rates but not energy reserves or flight capacity. These results suggest that the flight capacity of A. planipennis is largely determined before emergence, with no differences in energy reserves after cryoprotectant investment.

  7. Environmental safety to decomposer invertebrates of azadirachtin (neem) as a systemic insecticide in trees to control emerald ash borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzweiser, David; Thompson, Dean; Grimalt, Susana; Chartrand, Derek; Good, Kevin; Scarr, Taylor

    2011-09-01

    The non-target effects of an azadirachtin-based systemic insecticide used for control of wood-boring insect pests in trees were assessed on litter-dwelling earthworms, leaf-shredding aquatic insects, and microbial communities in terrestrial and aquatic microcosms. The insecticide was injected into the trunks of ash trees at a rate of 0.2 gazadirachtin cm(-1) tree diameter in early summer. At the time of senescence, foliar concentrations in most (65%) leaves where at or below detection (azadirachtin) and the average concentration among leaves overall at senescence was 0.19 mg kg(-1). Leaves from the azadirachtin-treated trees at senescence were added to microcosms and responses by test organisms were compared to those in microcosms containing leaves from non-treated ash trees (controls). No significant reductions were detected among earthworm survival, leaf consumption rates, growth rates, or cocoon production, aquatic insect survival and leaf consumption rates, and among terrestrial and aquatic microbial decomposition of leaf material in comparison to controls. In a further set of microcosm tests containing leaves from intentional high-dose trees, the only significant, adverse effect detected was a reduction in microbial decomposition of leaf material, and only at the highest test concentration (∼6 mg kg(-1)). Results indicated no significant adverse effects on litter-dwelling earthworms or leaf-shredding aquatic insects at concentrations up to at least 30 × the expected field concentrations at operational rates, and at 6 × expected field concentrations for adverse effects on microbial decomposition. We conclude that when azadirachtin is used as a systemic insecticide in trees for control of insect pests such as the invasive wood-boring beetle, emerald ash borer, resultant foliar concentrations in senescent leaf material are likely to pose little risk of harm to decomposer invertebrates. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of host plant and larval density on intraspecific competition in larvae of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Larson, Kristi; Watt, Tim; Gould, Juli; Lelito, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    Competition for food, mates, and space among different individuals of the same insect species can affect density-dependent regulation of insect abundance or population dynamics. The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees, with its larvae feeding in serpentine galleries between the interface of sapwood and phloem tissues of ash trees. Using artificial infestation of freshly cut logs of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical ash (Fraxinus uhdei [Wenzig] Lingelsh) with a series of egg densities, we evaluated the mechanism and outcome of intraspecific competition in larvae of A. planipennis in relation to larval density and host plant species. Results from our study showed that as the egg densities on each log (1.5-6.5 cm in diameter and 22-25 cm in length) increased from 200 to 1,600 eggs per square meter of surface area, larval survivorship declined from ≍68 to 10% for the green ash logs, and 86 to 55% for tropical ash logs. Accordingly, larval mortality resulting from cannibalism, starvation, or both, significantly increased as egg density increased, and the biomass of surviving larvae significantly decreased on both ash species. When larval density was adjusted to the same level, however, larval mortality from intraspecific competition was significantly higher and mean biomasses of surviving larvae was significantly lower in green ash than in tropical ash. The role of intraspecific competition of A. planipennis larvae in density-dependent regulation of its natural population dynamics is discussed.

  9. Optimization of multifunnel traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): influence of size, trap coating, and color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Mastro, Victor C

    2013-12-01

    Field assays were conducted in southeastern and south-central Michigan in 2011 and 2012 to optimize green and purple multifunnel (Lindgren funnel) traps for use as a survey tool for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larger sized (12- and 16-unit) multifunnel traps caught more beetles than their smaller-sized (4- and 8-unit) counterparts. Green traps coated with untinted (white) fluon caught almost four times as many adult A. planipennis as Rain-X and tinted (green) fluon-coated traps and almost 33 times more beetles than untreated control traps. Purple multifunnel traps generally caught much lower numbers of A. planipennis adults than green traps, and trap catch on them was not affected by differences in the type of coating applied. However, trap coating was necessary as untreated control purple traps caught significantly less beetles than traps treated with Rain-X and untinted or tinted (purple) fluon. Proportions of male beetles captured were generally much higher on green traps than on purple traps, but sex ratios were not affected by trap coating. In 2012, a new shade of purple plastic, based on a better color match to an attractive purple paint than the previously used purple, was used for trapping assays. When multifunnel traps were treated with fluon, green traps caught more A. planipennis adults than both shades of purple and a prism trap that was manufactured based on the same color match. Trap catch was not affected by diluting the fluon concentration applied to traps to 50% (1:1 mixture in water). At 10%, trap catch was significantly lowered.

  10. Density of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Adults and Larvae at Three Stages of the Invasion Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Stephen J; McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M

    2018-02-08

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding buprestid, has killed hundreds of millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in the United States and two Canadian provinces. We evaluated EAB persistence in post-invasion sites and compared EAB adult captures and larval densities in 24 forested sites across an east-west gradient in southern Michigan representing the Core (post-invasion), Crest (high EAB populations), and Cusp (recently infested areas) of the EAB invasion wave. Condition of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) trees were recorded in fixed radius plots and linear transects in each site. Ash mortality was highest in Core sites in the southeast, moderate in Crest sites in central southern Michigan, and low in Cusp sites in the southwest. Traps and trap trees in Crest sites accounted for 75 and 60% of all EAB beetles captured in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Populations of EAB were present in all Core sites and traps in these sites captured 13% of all beetles each year. Beetle captures and larval densities at Cusp sites roughly doubled between 2010 and 2011, reflecting the increasing EAB populations. Sticky bands on girdled trees captured the highest density of EAB beetles per m2 of area, while baited double-decker traps had the highest detection rates and captured the most beetles. Larval densities were higher on girdled ash than on similar ungirdled trees and small planted trees. Woodpecker predation and a native larval parasitoid were present in all three invasion regions but had minor effects on ash survival and EAB densities. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Biology and Behavior of Spathius agrili, a Parasitoid of the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis, in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Gould, Juli R.; Reardon, Richard C.; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Liu, Gui-Jun; Liu, En-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a gregarious larval ectoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and is a recently described species. Both pest and parasitoid are native to China. In Tianjin City, China, S. agrili typically exhibited 3–4 generations per year, overwintering as a prepupa in a cocoon inside the host gallery. The multiple generations of S. agrili overlapped with its host, as did the emergence dates of the overwintering generation. From a single host, 1–18 S. agrili successfully developed to the adult stage (average 8.4), but in all cases the host was killed. The sex ratio (female: male) of the parasitoid adults emerging from field-collected cocoons was 2:1, whereas the sex ratio of parasitoids reared from field collected eggs and larvae was greater than 3:1. On average, adult females lived 29.1 d, and males lived 23.6 d when fed with 20% honey solution, significantly longer than without a nutritional supplement. Sexual reproduction is the normal mode of reproduction, but in the laboratory females did reproduce parthenogenetically, producing only males. The average fecundity was 23.3 eggs per female in the laboratory. S. agrili developed through five larval instars, and the larvae fed gregariously on the host hemolymph. The generation time from egg to adult wasp was 27–28 d at 22–26°C. Natural parasitism rates were as high as 60%, and in October they reached over 90% in some stands. This study showed that S. agrili is a promising agent for biocontrol of A. planipennis. PMID:20569125

  12. Variation in the Volatile Profiles of Black and Manchurian Ash in Relation to Emerald Ash Borer Oviposition Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, Chad M; McCartney, Nathaniel B; Herms, Daniel A; Tumlinson, James H; Cipollini, Don

    2017-08-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis) is a devastating pest of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in its invaded range in North America. Its coevolved Asian hosts are more resistant and less preferred for oviposition than susceptible North American species. We compared EAB oviposition preferences and bark and canopy volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of resistant Manchurian ash and susceptible black ash, and examined relationships between VOC profiles and oviposition. In the field, black ash was highly preferred for oviposition while no eggs were laid on Manchurian ash, and we found clear differences in the VOC profiles of Manchurian and black ash. We detected 78 compounds emitted from these species, including 16 compounds that elicited EAB antennal activity in prior studies. Four compounds were unique to black and 11 to Manchurian ash. Emission rates of 14 canopy and 19 bark volatiles varied among the two species, including four previously reported as antennally active. Specifically, 7-epi-sesquithujene (bark) emissions were greater from black ash, while β-caryophyllene (canopy), linalool (bark), and α-cubebene (bark) were emitted at higher rates by Manchurian ash. No relationships were found between the emission rate of any single compound or group of compounds (e.g. monoterpenes) suggesting that preference may be based on complex profile combinations. This is the first study to directly compare VOCs of black and Manchurian ash as well as the first to examine bark- and canopy-specific VOCs. The unique bark and canopy VOC profiles of these two species implicates potentially important variation in VOCs between a closely related resistant and susceptible species that provides a foundation for future studies of host preferences of EAB.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis: De Novo Assembly, Functional Annotation and Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jun; Ladd, Tim; Doucet, Daniel; Cusson, Michel; vanFrankenhuyzen, Kees; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Krell, Peter J; Quan, Guoxing

    2015-01-01

    The Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive phloem-feeding insect pest of ash trees. Since its initial discovery near the Detroit, US- Windsor, Canada area in 2002, the spread of EAB has had strong negative economic, social and environmental impacts in both countries. Several transcriptomes from specific tissues including midgut, fat body and antenna have recently been generated. However, the relatively low sequence depth, gene coverage and completeness limited the usefulness of these EAB databases. High-throughput deep RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to obtain 473.9 million pairs of 100 bp length paired-end reads from various life stages and tissues. These reads were assembled into 88,907 contigs using the Trinity strategy and integrated into 38,160 unigenes after redundant sequences were removed. We annotated 11,229 unigenes by searching against the public nr, Swiss-Prot and COG. The EAB transcriptome assembly was compared with 13 other sequenced insect species, resulting in the prediction of 536 unigenes that are Coleoptera-specific. Differential gene expression revealed that 290 unigenes are expressed during larval molting and 3,911 unigenes during metamorphosis from larvae to pupae, respectively (FDR2). In addition, 1,167 differentially expressed unigenes were identified from larval and adult midguts, 435 unigenes were up-regulated in larval midgut and 732 unigenes were up-regulated in adult midgut. Most of the genes involved in RNA interference (RNAi) pathways were identified, which implies the existence of a system RNAi in EAB. This study provides one of the most fundamental and comprehensive transcriptome resources available for EAB to date. Identification of the tissue- stage- or species- specific unigenes will benefit the further study of gene functions during growth and metamorphosis processes in EAB and other pest insects.

  14. Biology and Life History of Balcha indica, an Ectoparasitoid Attacking the Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis, in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J.; Taylor, Philip B.; Fuester, Roger W.

    2011-01-01

    Balcha indica Mani and Kaul (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) is a solitary ectoparasitoid attacking larvae, prepupae, and pupae of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae). Its fecundity, oviposition rate, longevity, and development time were determined in the laboratory under standard rearing conditions (25 ± 2° C, 65 ± 10% relative humidity, and 14:10 L:D). Adults lived a mean of 59 days with a maximum of 117 days. Lifetime adult fecundity averaged 36 eggs with a maximum 94 eggs per female. The egg stage lasted for a maximum of four days with ∼ 50% eggs hatched within two days. The development time of the first instars lasted for a maximum of nine days; 50% of the first instars completed their development (i.e., molted to the next instar) within five days. Instars of the intermediate and final stage larvae (after molting of the first instars occurred) could not be distinguished until they reached the pupal stage, and 50% of those larvae pupated ∼ 62 days after adult oviposition. Under the standard rearing conditions, 50% of B. indica took ∼ 83 days to complete the life cycle (from egg to adult emergence) ranging from 47 to 129 days. These results suggest that B. indica may not have more than two generations in the mid-Atlantic and Midwest regions of United States, where normal growing seasons—with average temperature above 25° C—are normally less than six months (May–October). Because of the long life span and oviposition period of adults, however, B. indica is likely to have overlapping generations. PMID:22233385

  15. Evaluation of the e-Learning material developed by EMERALD and EMIT for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Victoria; Tabakov, Slavik

    2005-09-01

    Two Leonardo projects, EMERALD and EMIT, have developed in a partnershipof university and hospital departments (the consortia) e-Learning materials in X-ray diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for medical physics graduates and other healthcare professionals. These e-Learning materials are described in a separate paper in this issue. To assess the effectiveness and relevance of the e-Learning material, a series of evaluations by student users groups plus experts in medical physics education and training were undertaken. The students, with backgrounds in physics and clinical ultrasound, reviewed the e-Learning material using an evaluation form developed by the consortia. The student feedback was favourable with students commenting that their level of knowledge had increased having completed the tasks. Areas identified for development were a reduction in text volume and an increase in the time allowed for completion of some tasks. The feedback from the experts was positive with an overall appreciation of the value of the learning material as a resource for students in medical physics field across Europe and identified other disciplines in which the access to the learning material could be useful contribution to their learning. Suggestions made for improvements ranged from grading the tasks into basic and advanced topics to increasing the interactive nature of the material. These early evaluation of the e-Learning material look promising and provide a framework for further developments in the field. Insight into users and providers views is important if developers are to provide relevant and worthwhile educational learning opportunities.

  16. Re-Os ages for Archean molybdenite and pyrite, Kuittila-Kivisuo, Finland and Proterozoic molybdenite, Kabeliai, Lithuania: Testing the chronometer in a metamorphic and metasomatic setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, H.J.; Sundblad, K.; Markey, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Motuza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Seven 187Re-187Os ages were determined for molybdenite and pyrite samples from two well-dated Precambrian intrusions in Fennoscandia to examine the sustainability of the Re-Os chronometer in a metamorphic and metasomatic setting. Using a new 187Re decay constant (1.666 x 10-11y-1) with a much improved uncertainty (±0.31%), we determined replicate Re-Os ages for molybdenite and pyrite from the Kuittila and Kivisuo prospects in easternmost Finland and for molybdenite from the Kabeliai prospect in southernmost Lithuania. These two localities contain some of the oldest and youngest plutonic activity in Fennoscandia and are associated with newly discovered economic Au mineralization (Ilomantsi, Finland) and a Cu-Mo prospect (Kabeliai, Lithuania). Two Re-Os ages for veinhosted Kabeliai molybdenite average 1486 ± 5 Ma, in excellent agreement with a 1505 ± 11 Ma U-Pb zircon age for the hosting Kabeliai granite pluton. The slightly younger age suggests the introduction of Cu-Mo mineralization by a later phase of the Kabeliai magmatic system. Mean Re-Os ages of 2778 ± 8 Ma and 2781 ± 8 Ma for Kuittila and Kivisuo molybdenites, respectively, are in reasonable agreement with a 2753 ± 5 Ma weighted mean U-Pb zircon age for hosting Kuittila tonalite. These Re-Os ages agree well with less precise ages of 2789 ± 290 Ma for a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron and 2771 ± 75 Ma for the average of six Sm-Nd T(DM) model ages for Kuittila tonalite. Three Re-Os analyses of a single pyrite mineral separate, from the same sample of Kuittila pluton that yielded a molybdenite separate, provide individual model ages of 2710 ± 27, 2777 ± 28, and 2830 ± 28 Ma (Re = 17.4, 12.1, and 8.4 ppb, respectively), with a mean value of 2770 ± 120 Ma in agreement with the Kuittila molybdenite age. The Re and 187Os abundances in these three pyrite splits are highly correlated (r = 0.9994), and provide a 187Re-187Os isochron age of 2607 ± 47 Ma with an intercept of 21 ppt 187Os (MSWD = 1.1). It appears

  17. Time-scales of assembly and thermal history of a composite felsic pluton: constraints from the Emerald Lake area, northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Villeneuve, Mike E.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Duncan, Robert A.; Russell, James K.; Mortensen, James K.

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge of the time-scales of emplacement and thermal history during assembly of composite felsic plutons in the shallow crust are critical to deciphering the processes of crustal growth and magma chamber development. Detailed petrological and chemical study of the mid-Cretaceous, composite Emerald Lake pluton, from the northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon Territory, coupled with U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology, indicates that this pluton was intruded as a series of magmatic pulses. Intrusion of these pulses produced a strong petrological zonation from augite syenite, hornblende quartz syenite and monzonite, to biotite granite. Our data further indicate that multiple phases were emplaced and cooled to below the mineral closure temperatures over a time-scale on the order of the resolution of the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique (˜1 Myr), and that emplacement occurred at 94.3 Ma. Simple thermal modelling and heat conduction calculations were used to further constrain the temporal relationships within the intrusion. These calculations are consistent with the geochronology and show that emplacement and cooling were complete in less than 100 kyr and probably 70±5 kyr. These results demonstrate that production, transport and emplacement of the different phases of the Emerald Lake pluton occurred essentially simultaneously, and that these processes must also have been closely related in time and space. By analogy, these results provide insights into the assembly and petrogenesis of other complex intrusions and ultimately lead to an understanding of the processes involved in crustal development.

  18. Byrudite, (Be,□)(V3+,Ti)3O6, a new mineral from the Byrud emerald mine, South Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raade, Gunnar; Balic Zunic, Tonci; Stanley, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Byrudite (IMA 2013-045, Raade et al., 2013), with simplified formula (Be,◊)V3+,Ti)3O6, occurs in emerald-bearing syenitic pegmatites of Permian age at Byrud farm, Eidsvoll, Akershus, South Norway. It has a norbergite-type structure, Pnma, with a = 9.982(1), b = 8.502(1), c = 4.5480(6) Å, V = 385...... of the crystal used for structure determination gave the empirical formula (Be0.84◊0.16)(V3+1.32Ti1.25Cr0.29Fe0.09Al0.07)Σ3.02O6. There is a strong inverse correlation between V and Cr. The ideal endmember formula is BeV3+2TiO6. The mineral is black and opaque with a metallic lustre. Reflectance data in air...

  19. Assessing the response of Emerald Lake, an alpine watershed in Sequoia National Park, California, to acidification during snowmelt by using a simple hydrochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, R.P.; West, C.T.; Peters, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    A sparsely parameterized hydrochemical model has been developed by using data from Emerald Lake watershed, which is a 120-ha alpine catchment in Sequoia National Park, California. Greater than 90% of the precipitation to this watershed is snow; hence, snowmelt is the dominant hydrologic event. A model which uses a single alkalinity-generating mechanism, primary mineral weathering, was able to capture the pattern of solute concentrations in surface waters during snowmelt. An empirical representation of the weathering reaction, which is based on rock weathering stoichiometry and which uses discharge as a measure of residence time, was included in the model. Results of the model indicate that current deposition levels would have to be increased between three-fold and eight-fold to exhaust the alkalinity of the lake during snowmelt if their is a mild acidic pulse in the stream at the beginning of snowmelt as was observed during the study period. The acidic pulse in the inflow stream at the onset of snowmelt was less pronounced than acidic pulses observed in the meltwater draining the snowpack at a point using snow lysimeters or in the laboratory. Sulfate concentrations in the stream water were the most constant; chloride and nitrate concentrations increased slightly at the beginning of snowmelt. Additional field work is required to resolve whether an acidic meltwater pulse occurs over a large area as well as at a point or whether, due to physical and chemical processes within the snowpack, the acidic meltwater pulse is attenuated at the catchment scale. The modest data requirements of the model permit its applications to other alpine watersheds that are much less intensively studied than Emerald Lake watershed

  20. A molecular tool for detection and tracking of a potential indigenous Beauveria bassiana strain for managing emerald ash borer populations in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Shajahan; Kyei-Poku, George

    2014-10-01

    Emerald ash borer is an invasive species from Asia. Beauveria bassiana strain L49-1AA is being tested for the control of emerald ash borer in Canada, using an autocontamination trapping system. We have developed a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to screen B. bassiana strain, L49-1AA from other Beauveria species by targeting the inter-strain genetic differences in 5' end of EF1-α gene of the genus Beauveria. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site, T→C was identified only in L49-1AA and was used to develop a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on a modified allelic inhibition of displacement activity (AIDA) approach for distinguishing B. bassiana L49-1AA from all background Beauveria isolates. The SNP site was employed to design inner primers but with a deliberate mismatch introduced at the 3' antepenultimate from the mutation site in order to maximize specificity and detection efficiency. Amplification was specific to L49-1AA without cross-reaction with DNA from other Beauveria strains. In addition, the designed primers were also tested against environmental samples in L49-1AA released plots and observed to be highly efficient in detecting and discriminating the target strain, L49-1AA from both pure and crude DNA samples. This new method can potentially allow for more discriminatory tracking and monitoring of released L49-1AA in our autocontamination and dissemination projects for managing EAB populations. Additionally, the modified-AIDA format has potential as a tool for simultaneously identifying and differentiating closely related Beauveria species, strains/isolates as well as general classification of other pathogens or organisms. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 16 CFR 23.23 - Misuse of the words “ruby,” “sapphire,” “emerald,” “topaz,” “stone,” “birthstone,” “gemstone,” etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misuse of the words âruby,â âsapphire,â... PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.23 Misuse of the words “ruby,” “sapphire,” “emerald,” “topaz,” “stone,” “birthstone,” “gemstone,” etc. (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the unqualified words “ruby,” “sapphire...

  2. Seletividade de herbicidas aplicados nas gramas Santo Agostinho e Esmeralda Selectivity of herbicides applied on St. Augustinegrass and Emerald turfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar a seletividade de herbicidas aplicados nas gramas Santo Agostinho (Stenotaphrum secundatum e Esmeralda (Zoysia japonica em condições de campo. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. As gramas foram cortadas a 3 cm de altura e, em seguida, foram feitas as aplicações dos herbicidas. Os tratamentos utilizados foram: testemunha sem aplicação, fluazifop-p-butil (125 g ha-1, sethoxydim+óleo mineral (276 g ha-1 + 0,5% v v-1 de Assist, bispyribac-sodium (25 g ha-1, chlorimuron-ethyl (15 g ha-1, ethoxysulfuron (150 g ha-1, halosulfuron (112,5 g ha-1, iodosulfuron-methyl (10 g ha-1, metsulfuron-methyl (2,4 g ha-1, nicosulfuron (125 g ha-1, pyrithiobac-sodium (140 g ha-1, trifloxysulfuron-sodium (22,5 g ha-1, 2,4-D (720 g ha-1, quinclorac (375 g ha-1, atrazina (1.250 g ha-1, bentazon (600 g ha-1, linuron (1.350 g ha-1, fomesafen (187,5 g ha-1, lactofen (120 g ha-1, oxadiazon (600 g ha-1 e oxyfluorfen (720 g ha-1. Os herbicidas que apresentaram potencial de seletividade para o gramado de S. secundatum foram: os inibidores da ALS chlorimuron-ethyl, ethoxysulfuron, halosulfuron, iodosulfuron-methyl e metsulfuron-methyl, o mimetizador de auxina 2,4-D, os inibidores do fotossistema II atrazina e bentazon, bem como os inibidores da Protox fomesafen, lactofen e o oxadiazon. Para o gramado de Z. japonica, os herbicidas que apresentaram potencial de seletividade foram: os inibidores da ALS chlorimuron-ethyl, ethoxysulfuron, halosulfuron, metsulfuron-methyl e nicosulfuron, os mimetizadores de auxina 2,4-D e quinclorac, os inibidores do fotossistema II atrazina e bentazon, além dos inibidores da Protox fomesafen, lactofen e o oxadiazon.The objective of this study was to evaluate the selectivity of herbicides applied on turfgrasses St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum and Emerald (Zoysia japonica under field conditions. The experimental design was randomized blocks

  3. Geochemical criteria for distinguishing magmatic and metasomatic albite-enrichment in granitoids — examples from the Ta-Li granite Yichun (China) and the Sn-W deposit Tikus (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. O.

    1992-03-01

    Two examples of albite-rich granitoids of different genesis are discussed: the Ta-Li granite at Yichun (China) exhibits dominantly igneous textures, and the sodium-enrichment zone in biotite granite of the Sn-W deposit at Tikus is characterized by metasomatic textures. The Yichun stock shows a magmatic evolution from biotite-muscovite granite to lepidolite granite with an increase of Na2O and F concentrations and a decrease of CaO and Sr concentrations. The composition of the different granite phases is close to pseudoternary minima in the haplogranite-H2O(-Li-F) system. The composition of the F-rich albitization zone at Tikus deviates strongly from the pseudoternary minima and shows a tendency to become monomineralic (nearly pure albitite). CaO and Sr concentrations are increased or remain unchanged with respect to the unaltered biotite granite at Tikus. Albitization produced by fluid-rock interaction in F-rich systems is characterized by that CaO or Sr released by the breakdown of plagioclase in the granite protolith, are fixed in newly formed fluorite or albite, respectively.

  4. Progress and gaps in understanding mechanisms of ash tree resistance to emerald ash borer, a model for wood-boring insects that kill angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villari, Caterina; Herms, Daniel A; Whitehill, Justin G A; Cipollini, Don; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    We review the literature on host resistance of ash to emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis), an invasive species that causes widespread mortality of ash. Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandshurica), which coevolved with EAB, is more resistant than evolutionarily naïve North American and European congeners. Manchurian ash was less preferred for adult feeding and oviposition than susceptible hosts, more resistant to larval feeding, had higher constitutive concentrations of bark lignans, coumarins, proline, tyramine and defensive proteins, and was characterized by faster oxidation of phenolics. Consistent with EAB being a secondary colonizer of coevolved hosts, drought stress decreased the resistance of Manchurian ash, but had no effect on constitutive bark phenolics, suggesting that they do not contribute to increased susceptibility in response to drought stress. The induced resistance of North American species to EAB in response to the exogenous application of methyl jasmonate was associated with increased bark concentrations of verbascoside, lignin and/or trypsin inhibitors, which decreased larval survival and/or growth in bioassays. This finding suggests that these inherently susceptible species possess latent defenses that are not induced naturally by larval colonization, perhaps because they fail to recognize larval cues or respond quickly enough. Finally, we propose future research directions that would address some critical knowledge gaps. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Improving detection tools for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of multifunnel traps, prism traps, and lure types at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Lance, David R; Hull-Sanders, Helen M; Mastro, Victor C; Silk, Peter J; Ryall, Krista L

    2014-08-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) that has caused devastating mortality since it was first identified in North America in 2002. In 2012, we conducted field trapping assays that tested the efficacy of purple prism and fluon-coated green multifunnel (Lindgren funnel) traps. Traps were baited with combinations of several lures that were previously shown to be attractive to A. planipennis: manuka oil--a sesquiterpene-rich oil, (3Z)-hexenol--a green leaf volatile, or (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide [= (3Z)-lactone], a sex pheromone. Eighty-nine blocks (trap lines) were tested throughout nine states along the outer edges of the currently known A. planipennis infestation in North America. Trap catch was highest on fluon-coated green multifunnel traps, and trap detections at sites with low A. planipennis population density ranged from 72 to 76% for all trap and lure types tested. (3Z)-hexenol and (3Z)-lactone baited traps functioned as well as (3Z)-hexenol and manuka oil-baited traps. Independent of the lure used, detection rates on green fluon-coated multifunnel traps were comparable with glued purple prism traps in areas with low A. planipennis population densities.

  6. Did the Kiruna iron ores form as a result of a metasomatic or igneous process? New U-Pb and Nd data for the iron oxide apatite ores and their host rocks in the Norrbotten region of northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhues, A.; Hanchar, J. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Fisher, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    A number of iron deposits near Kiruna in the Norrbotten region of northern Sweden are of the iron oxide apatite (IOA) type of deposits; also referred to as Kiruna-type deposits. They are commonly considered a subgroup or end-member of iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) deposits, containing no economic grades of copper or gold. Both IOCG and IOA deposits are characterized by abundant low-Ti Fe oxides, an enrichment in REE, and intense sodium and potassium wall-rock alteration adjacent to the ores. Deposits of these types are of a great economic importance, not only for iron, but also for other elements such as rare earth elements (REE) or uranium. Kiruna, the type locality of the IOA type of mineral deposits, is the focus of this study. Despite a century-long mining history and 2500 Mt of iron ore produced in the region to date (with grades of 30 to 70 wt.% Fe), the genesis of these deposits is poorly understood: theories of a magmatic vs. a hydrothermal or metasomatic origin have been debated, and the timing of mineralization of the ores in the Norbotten region has never been directly dated. The results anticipated from this study will provide a better understanding of the nature of the IOA type of mineral deposits and their relation to IOCG deposits such as Olympic Dam in Australia. An array of geochemical methods is used in order to gain insights on the emplacement history of the host rocks, their subsequent alteration, and the ore genesis of these deposits. This includes in situ U/Pb geochronology of zircon, monazite, and titanite to constrain the timing between host rock emplacement, alteration and mineralization. Isotopic data from whole rocks and in situ at mineral scale will provide constraints on the involvement of hydrothermal fluids and their possible sources, as well as on the sources of Fe, U, and the REE. Newly obtained Sm-Nd isotopic data points to distinct source differences between host rocks, ore and alteration related samples. Preliminary in situ U

  7. VIDENTE 1.1: a graphical user interface and decision support system for stochastic modelling of water table fluctuations at a single location; includes documentation of the programs KALMAX, KALTFN, SSD and EMERALD and introductions to stochastic modelling; 2nd rev. ed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierkens, M.F.P.; Bron, W.A.; Knotters, M.

    2002-01-01

    A description is given of the program VIDENTE. VIDENTE contains a decision support system to choose between different models for stochastic modelling of water-table depths and a graphical user interface to facilitate operating and running four implemented models: KALMAX, KALTFN, SSD and EMERALD. In

  8. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  9. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan sp. n. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi sp. n. from both L. smaragdina we collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colorless, bilayered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but 1–4 polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules. PMID:24048748

  10. Impact of gender on infarct size, ST-segment resolution, myocardial blush and clinical outcomes after primary stenting for acute myocardial infarction: Substudy from the EMERALD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Vivian G; Mori, Ken; Costa, Ricardo A; Kish, Mitra; Mehran, Roxana; Urata, Hidenori; Saku, Keijiro; Stone, Gregg W; Lansky, Alexandra J

    2016-03-15

    Women with AMI may have worse outcomes than men. However, it is unclear if this is related to differences in treatment, treatment effect or gender specific factors. We sought to determine whether primary percutaneous intervention (PCI) has a differential impact on infarct size, myocardial perfusion and ST segment resolution in men and women with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A total of 501 AMI patients were prospectively enrolled in the EMERALD study and underwent PCI with or without distal protection. Post hoc gender subset analysis was performed. 501 patients (108 women, 393 men) with ST-segment elevation AMI presenting within 6h underwent primary (or rescue) PCI with stenting and a distal protection device. Women were older, had more hypertension, less prior AMI, smaller BSA, and smaller vessel size, but had similar rates of diabetes (30% versus 20.2%, p=0.87), LAD infarct, and time-to-reperfusion compared to men. Women more frequently had complete ST-resolution (>70%) at 30days (72.8% versus 59.8%, p=0.02), and smaller infarct size compared to males (12.2±19.6% versus 18.4±18.5%, p=0.006). At 6months, TLR (6.9% versus 5.2%) and MACE (11.4% versus 10.3%) were similar for women and men. Despite worse comorbidities, women with AMI treated with primary PCI with stenting showed similar early and midterm outcomes compared to men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiological responses of emerald ash borer larvae to feeding on different ash species reveal putative resistance mechanisms and insect counter-adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, C M; Showalter, D N; Herms, D A; Koch, J L; Bonello, P; Cipollini, D

    2015-07-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an Asian wood-boring beetle, has devastated ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North American forests and landscapes since its discovery there in 2002. In this study, we collected living larvae from EAB-resistant Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandschurica), and susceptible white (Fraxinus americana) and green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) ash hosts, and quantified the activity and production of selected detoxification, digestive, and antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that differences in larval physiology could be used to infer resistance mechanisms of ash. We found no differences in cytochrome P450, glutathione-S-transferase, carboxylesterase, sulfotransferase, and tryptic BApNAase activities between larvae feeding on different hosts. Despite this, Manchurian ash-fed larvae produced a single isozyme of low electrophoretic mobility that was not produced in white or green ash-fed larvae. Additionally, larvae feeding on white and green ash produced two serine protease isozymes of high electrophoretic mobility that were not observed in Manchurian ash-fed larvae. We also found lower activity of β-glucosidase and higher activities of monoamine oxidase, ortho-quinone reductase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase in Manchurian ash-fed larvae compared to larvae that had fed on susceptible ash. A single isozyme was detected for both catalase and superoxide dismutase in all larval groups. The activities of the quinone-protective and antioxidant enzymes are consistent with the resistance phenotype of the host species, with the highest activities measured in larvae feeding on resistant Manchurian ash. We conclude that larvae feeding on Manchurian ash could be under quinone and oxidative stress, suggesting these may be potential mechanisms of resistance of Manchurian ash to EAB larvae, and that quinone-protective and antioxidant enzymes are important counter-adaptations of larvae for dealing with these resistance

  12. Effects of Temperature and Photoperiod on the Reproductive Biology and Diapause of Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an Egg Parasitoid of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, J; Duan, J J; Hough-Goldstein, J

    2016-04-25

    Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) is a solitary egg parasitoid of the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), and has been introduced to the United States for classical biological control. We characterized the weekly survivorship, fecundity, and diapause patterns of both diapaused and nondiapaused populations of O. agrili under four different temperature-photophase combinations: 30°C (warm) and 20°C (cold) temperatures with both long-day (16 h) and short-day (8 h) photophase. Results of this study showed that regardless of the length of photophase, parental parasitoids of both diapaused and nondiapaused O. agrili survived significantly longer at 20°C than at 30°C. Both populations also laid their eggs faster at 30°C compared with those at 20°C. Higher proportions of the progeny produced by both populations of O. agrili were induced into diapause by short-day (8 h) photophase, regardless of rearing temperature. In addition, the diapaused parasitoids in the short-day photophase treatment at both warm and cold temperatures produced increasing proportions of diapaused progeny over time, whereas no significant differences were observed in the proportions of diapaused progeny by the nondiapaused parasitoids over different sampling times. These findings suggest that O. agrili should be continuously reared under warm temperature and long-day photoperiod (to avoid diapause for increased reproduction). In addition, we recommend that diapaused adults be used for field releases in early summer when temperatures are still relatively low (∼20°C) and host eggs are available so that they can produce multiple generations prior to overwintering. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  13. Incidence of Infestation and Larval Success of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) on White Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus), Chinese Fringetree (Chionanthus retusus), and Devilwood (Osmanthus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Don; Rigsby, Chad M

    2015-10-01

    We compared the incidence of infestation by emerald ash borer (EAB) and lilac borer on white fringetree to that of its Asian congener, Chinese fringetree, Chionanthus retusus, and a North American relative, devilwood, Osmanthus americanus. We also conducted laboratory bioassays to determine the suitability of these hosts for EAB larvae. At Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum in Cincinnati, Ohio, 9 of 28 white fringetrees examined were infested by EAB. Most of the white fringetrees had lilac borer infestation, and most of the trees infested by EAB also had lilac borer infestation. None of the 11 Chinese fringetrees examined were infested by either EAB or lilac borer. Each of the five devilwood individuals examined was infested by lilac borer, but not EAB. At The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois, 7 of 16 white fringetrees examined were infested by EAB, while none of the seven Chinese fringetrees examined were infested by either insect. A 40-d bioassay confirmed that white fringetree was an acceptable host, producing fourth-instar larvae that were smaller than those produced on a highly susceptible cultivar of green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica. No larvae survived on Chinese fringetree, and neonates were largely incapable of feeding on it. Two larvae survived on devilwood, reaching the second instar and excavating extensive galleries. Future work should be aimed at biotic and abiotic factors influencing the susceptibility of white fringetree, as well as further examination of close relatives for their vulnerability to EAB. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Duszynski, Donald W; Bush, Sarah E; Fisher, Robert N; Austin, Christopher C

    2013-10-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  15. Biology, life history, and laboratory rearing of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Watt, Timothy J; Larson, Kristi

    2014-06-01

    Spathius galinae Belokobylskij & Strazanac is a recently described parasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, in the Russian Far East, and is currently being considered for biocontrol introduction in the United States. Using A. planipennis larvae reared with freshly cut ash (Fraxinus spp.) sticks, we investigated the biology, life cycle, and rearing of S. galinae in the laboratory under normal rearing conditions (25 +/- 1 degrees C, 65 +/- 10% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 [L:D] h). Our study showed that S. galinae took approximately 1 mo (29 d) to complete a single generation (from egg to adult) under the laboratory rearing conditions. After eclosion from eggs, larvae of S. galinae molted four times to reach the fifth instar, which then spun cocoons for pupation and development to adults. Adult female wasps had a median survival time of 7 wk with fecundity peaking 3 wk after emergence when reared in groups (of five females and five males) and 2 wk in single pairs. Throughout the life span, a single female S. galinae produced a mean (+/- SE) of 31 (+/- 3.0) progeny when reared in groups, and a mean (+/- SE) of 47 (+/- 5.3) progeny when reared in single pairs. Results from our study also showed that S. galinae could be effectively reared with A. planipennis larvae reared in both green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical [Fraxinus uhdei (Wenzig) Lingelsh] ash sticks. However, the abortion (unemergence) rate of S. galinae progeny was much higher (20%) when reared with host larvae in green ash sticks than that (2.1%) in tropical ash sticks.

  16. Interaction of peridotite with Ca-rich carbonatite melt at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa: Implication for merwinite formation in upper mantle, and for the metasomatic origin of sublithospheric diamonds with Ca-rich suite of inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharygin, Igor S.; Shatskiy, Anton; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ohtani, Eiji; Pokhilenko, Nikolay P.

    2018-03-01

    We performed an experimental study, designed to reproduce the formation of an unusual merwinite + olivine-bearing mantle assemblage recently described as a part of a Ca-rich suite of inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds, through the interaction of peridotite with an alkali-rich Ca-carbonatite melt, derived from deeply subducted oceanic crust. In the first set of experiments, we studied the reaction between powdered Mg-silicates, olivine and orthopyroxene, and a model Ca-carbonate melt (molar Na:K:Ca = 1:1:2), in a homogeneous mixture, at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa. In these equilibration experiments, we observed the formation of a merwinite + olivine-bearing assemblage at 3.1 GPa and 1200 °C and at 6.5 GPa and 1300-1400 °C. The melts coexisting with this assemblage have a low Si and high Ca content (Ca# = molar 100 × Ca/(Ca + Mg) > 0.57). In the second set of experiments, we investigated reaction rims produced by interaction of the same Ca-carbonate melt (molar Na:K:Ca = 1:1:2) with Mg-silicate, olivine and orthopyroxene, single crystals at 3.1 GPa and 1300 °C and at 6.5 GPa and 1400 °C. The interaction of the Ca-carbonate melt with olivine leads to merwinite formation through the expected reaction: 2Mg2SiO4 (olivine) + 6CaCO3 (liquid) = Ca3MgSi2O8 (merwinite) + 3CaMg(CO3)2 (liquid). Thus, our experiments confirm the idea that merwinite in the upper mantle may originate via interaction of peridotite with Ca-rich carbonatite melt, and that diamonds hosting merwinite may have a metasomatic origin. It is remarkable that the interaction of the Ca-carbonate melt with orthopyroxene crystals does not produce merwinite both at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa. This indicates that olivine grain boundaries are preferable for merwinite formation in the upper mantle.

  17. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stream Water, Carbon and Total Nitrogen Load Responses to a Simulated Emerald Ash Borer Infestation in Black Ash Dominated Headwater Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grinsven, M. J.; Shannon, J.; Noh, N. J.; Kane, E. S.; Bolton, N. W.; Davis, J.; Wagenbrenner, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Kolka, R.; Pypker, T. G.

    2017-12-01

    The rapid and extensive expansion of emerald ash borer (EAB) is considered an important ecological and economic disturbance, and will likely affect critical ecosystem services associated with black ash wetlands. It is unknown how EAB-induced disturbance in wetlands dominated with black ash will impact stream water, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) export dynamics. We hypothesized that loads of water, DOC and TDN exported from black ash wetlands would be elevated following an EAB-induced disturbance. Stream water, DOC and TDN loads exiting two black ash wetlands in headwater watersheds in Michigan were quantified over a four-year period, and were combined with wetland soil temperature and soil decomposition rate monitoring to better understand the biogeochemical implications of an EAB-induced disturbance. After a two-year baseline monitoring period, an EAB disturbance was simulated by felling (ash-cut) all black ash trees with diameters greater than 2.5-cm in one wetland. When compared to the unaltered control, stream water DOC and TDN concentrations exiting the ash-cut wetland were significantly larger by 39% and 38%, respectively during the post-treatment study period. The significantly elevated DOC and TDN concentrations were likely associated with the higher soil temperatures and increased rates of soil decomposition detected in the ash-cut site during the post-treatment period. No significant mean daily stream discharge differences were detected between treatments during the pre-treatment period, however the 0.46 mm d-1 mean daily stream discharge exiting the ash-cut wetland was significantly smaller than the 1.07 mm d-1 exiting the unaltered control during the post-treatment study period. The significantly smaller daily stream discharge in the ash-cut site likely contributed to the fact no significant differences between treatments for either mean daily DOC loads or TDN loads were detected during the post-treatment period

  19. Simulated Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer on Throughfall and Stemflow Inputs of Water and Nitrogen in Black Ash Wetlands in Northern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pypker, T. G.; Davis, J.; Van Grinsven, M. J.; Bolton, N. W.; Shannon, J.; Kolka, R. K.; Nelson, J.; Wagenbrenner, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB)) is an invasive insect that effectively kills ash trees (genus: Fraxinus) greater than 2.5 cm in diameter, resulting in near-complete stand mortality within 3-4 years. Black ash wetlands occupy approximately 270,000 ha in Michigan, and have 40 to 90% of the basal area occupied by black ash (F. nigra Marshall); hence the loss of black ash may result in dramatic changes in the canopy hydrology and nutrient deposition. We assessed the impact of a simulated EAB invasion on throughfall and stemflow quantity and nitrogen (N) content in 9 uninfected black ash wetlands located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Within the 9 stands, 3 stands were left untreated ('Control'), 3 stands had all the black ash trees manually girdled ('Girdled') and 3 had all the black ash trees felled by chainsaw ('Clearcut'). We measured the quantity and inorganic-N content of throughfall using an array of randomly placed collectors (n = 16 per site). Stemflow was monitored at 2 sites (n = 12 trees) on the 3 most common tree species (black ash, yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britt.) and red maple (Acer rubra L.)). Preliminary results indicate that relative to the Control, average monthly throughfall was 25% and 1% greater in the Clearcut and Girdled sites, respectively. While the loss of the ash trees resulted in greater throughfall inputs in the Clearcut sites, water table heights did not significantly change as a result of the treatments. Stemflow from live black ash trees was lower than from the yellow birch and red maple trees. As a result, we predict stemflow will increase over time as species with smoother bark and less upright branching begin replacing the black ash. Hence, the change in tree species may result in a greater concentration of inorganic-N inputs to the base of the trees, thereby altering the distribution of inorganic-N inputs into the wetland. Our preliminary results show no significant change in the total

  20. Evaluación de bolsa atmósfera modificada y concentraciones de anhídrido sulfuroso aplicadas sobre frutos de arándano alto (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cv. Emerald

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Rodríguez Beraud; Anddy Wyss Valdés; Nelson Hormazábal Vásquez

    2015-01-01

    Con el objetivo de evaluar las técnicas de atmósfera modificada y aplicación de anhídrido sulfuroso sobre parámetros de calidad de postcosecha en frutos de arándanos (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cv. Emerald, se realizó un experimento de seis tratamientos, dados por la combinación de dos factores, atmósfera modificada (con y sin), y diferentes concentraciones de anhídrido sulfuroso (generadas por 0, 1 y 2 g de metabisulfito de sodio) durante 7, 14, 21 y 28 días a 0 °C. Con la dosis de 2 g de meta...

  1. Drought in the Emerald City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, S.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses a drought preparedness study being conducted for the Cedar River and Green River basins in western Washington state. The study is one of four regional case studies being managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as part of the National Study of Water Management During Drought. The overriding objective of the drought preparedness study is to leave the region better prepared for drought, through demonstration and test of drought preparedness tools and strategies. The study has served as a vehicle to promote a greater regional focus on drought related water supply problem solving. The 1992 drought in the Seattle/Tacoma metropolitan area provided a unique opportunity for the study team to demonstrate approaches to drought management being researched and tested as part of the study

  2. Пошаговая инструкция по доступу к электронным ресурсам Emerald

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Руководство по использованию электронных журналов и книг издательства Emerald на платформе Emeraldinsight на русском языке.

  3. Evaluación de bolsa atmósfera modificada y concentraciones de anhídrido sulfuroso aplicadas sobre frutos de arándano alto (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Emerald

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rodríguez Beraud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar las técnicas de atmósfera modificada y aplicación de anhídrido sulfuroso sobre parámetros de calidad de postcosecha en frutos de arándanos (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Emerald, se realizó un experimento de seis tratamientos, dados por la combinación de dos factores, atmósfera modificada (con y sin, y diferentes concentraciones de anhídrido sulfuroso (generadas por 0, 1 y 2 g de metabisulfito de sodio durante 7, 14, 21 y 28 días a 0 °C. Con la dosis de 2 g de metabisulfito de sodio en atmósfera modificada no se presentaron pudriciones, a diferencia del tratamiento testigo que presentó un 4,86% luego de 28 días de almacenaje. Los resultados indican que la incidencia de pudrición gris disminuyó significativamente (p ≤ 0,05 con anhídrido sulfuroso en bolsa atmósfera modificada, existiendo un efecto de interacción entre ambos factores, no obstante, el gas causó daños de blanqueamiento de frutos, el que correspondió a un 11,66% con una dosis de 2 g de metabisulfito de sodio, luego de 28 días de almacenaje. El uso de bolsa de atmósfera modificada redujo significativamente (p ≤ 0,05 la pérdida de peso por deshidratación (en promedio un 4% respecto a los tratamientos donde esta tecnología no fue utilizada. La concentración de sólidos solubles no fue influenciada por los tratamientos, manteniéndose entre 13 y 14%.

  4. New host record and molecular characterization of Dicauda atherinoidi Hoffman & Walker (Bivalvulida: Myxobolidae): a parasite of the emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque, 1818 and mimic shiner Notropis vollucellus Cope, 1865.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, T P; Rosser, T G; Baumgartner, W A; Boontai, T; Faisal, M; Griffin, M J

    2017-10-01

    Updated morphological and histopathological descriptions for Dicauda atherinoidi (Bivalvulida:Myxobolidae) and an expanded host range are supplemented with the first molecular data and phylogenetic analyses of the genus. Plasmodia were located on the head, ventrum/body and fins of infected emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque, 1818 and mimic shiner Notropis vollucellus Cope, 1865, a new host species. Myxospores were spherical, ranging 9.3-11.4 μm (10.5 ± 0.4) in length, 9.0-11.0 μm (9.7 ± 0.4) in width and 6.6-7.0 μm (6.8 ± 0.2) thick in sutural view, and possessed 2-3 caudal processes (5.3-68.3 μm, 31.1 ± 13.6) connected to the spore body at the sutural groove, all of which are consistent with the genus Dicauda. In the absence of available Dicauda sequence data, the 18S rDNA sequences from Michigan isolates were most similar to Myxobolus spp. Phylogenetic analyses clustered these isolates with myxobolid species from cyprinid fish, suggesting these parasites may represent an underpopulated group of cyprinid-infecting myxozoans. Histopathology revealed thin-walled plasmodial pseudocysts in the dermis and associated connective tissue, where granulomatous inflammation and focal scale atrophy were also present. Further sampling/sequencing of myxobolids from Notropis spp. should expand these underrepresented myxozoans and offer further insight into Myxobolidae host family tropisms. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Achieving ADA/ISPAD clinical guideline goals is associated with higher insulin sensitivity and cardiopulmonary fitness in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Results from RESistance to InSulin in Type 1 ANd Type 2 diabetes (RESISTANT) and Effects of MEtformin on CardiovasculaR Function in AdoLescents with Type 1 Diabetes (EMERALD) Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, Petter; Cree-Green, Melanie; Baumgartner, Amy; Coe, Gregory; Reyes, Yesenia Garcia; Schäfer, Michal; Pyle, Laura; Regensteiner, Judith G; Reusch, Jane Eb; Nadeau, Kristen J

    2018-05-01

    Most youth with type 1 diabetes do not meet the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) targets for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), lipids, and body mass index (BMI). We hypothesized that ISPAD/ADA goal achievement would be associated with better insulin sensitivity (IS) and cardiopulmonary fitness. IS was quantified as glucose infusion rate (GIR) from a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in youth with type 1 diabetes from the RESistance to InSulin in Type 1 ANd Type 2 diabetes (RESISTANT) (n = 86) and Effects of MEtformin on CardiovasculaR Function in AdoLescents with Type 1 Diabetes (EMERALD) (n = 41) cohorts (n = 127; age 15.7 ± 2.2 years, 52% girls). Cardiopulmonary fitness was measured as peak oxygen consumption (VO 2 peak/kg) during upright (RESISTANT) or supine (EMERALD) cycle ergometry and were stratified by cycle type. Goal achievement was defined as HbA1c 35 mg/dL, triglycerides ADA/ISPAD goal achievement was associated with greater IS and cardiopulmonary fitness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Utilização do resíduo da extração de esmeraldas em uma formulação de massa de revestimento cerâmico Use of the extraction residue of emeralds in a formulation mass of ceramic tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Empresas envolvidas na mineração de esmeralda e beneficiamento representam uma importante área de desenvolvimento industrial no Brasil, com significativa contribuição para a produção mundial desse minério. Como resultado, grandes volumes de resíduos de esmeralda são constantemente gerados e abandonados no ambiente, contribuindo negativamente para a sua preservação. Por outro lado o interesse no uso do resíduo de mineração como aditivo na produção de material cerâmico tem crescido entre os pesquisadores nos últimos anos. A indústria cerâmica está constantemente buscando a ampliação do mercado para o setor e tentando aperfeiçoar a qualidade dos produtos e aumentar a variedade de aplicações. A tecnologia de obtenção de cerâmica de revestimento que usa resíduos de mineração é um mercado ainda pouco explorado. Neste cenário, o objetivo do presente estudo foi caracterizar o resíduo gerado a partir de mineração de esmeralda, bem como para avaliar seu potencial uso como matéria-prima fundente para a produção de revestimentos cerâmicos. Misturas cerâmicas foram preparadas a partir de matérias-primas caracterizadas por fluorescência de raios X e difração de raios X. Cinco composições foram preparadas utilizando índices de resíduos de esmeraldas de 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% e 40%. As amostras foram preparadas por prensagem, sinterizadas em 1000, 1100 e 1200 ºC e caracterizadas visando estabelecer sua composição mineralógica, absorção de água, retração linear e módulo de ruptura à flexão. Os resultados mostraram que o resíduo de esmeraldas estudado pode ser incorporado na massa de revestimento cerâmico até 20% em substituição ao feldspato sem comprometimento das propriedades do produto final.Companies involved in mining and beneficiation of emerald represent an important area of industrial development in Brazil, with a significant contribution to world production of this ore. As a result, large

  7. Silicate melt metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle beneath SW Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puziewicz, Jacek; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Grégoire, Michel; Kukuła, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The xenoliths of peridotites representing the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath SW Poland and adjacent parts of Germany occur in the Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks. Our study is based on detailed characterization of xenoliths occurring in 7 locations (Steinberg in Upper Lusatia, Księginki, Pilchowice, Krzeniów, Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra and Lutynia in Lower Silesia). One of the two major lithologies occurring in the xenoliths, which we call the "B" lithology, comprises peridotites (typically harzburgites) with olivine containing from 90.5 to 84.0 mole % of forsterite. The harzburgites contain no clinopyroxene or are poor in that mineral (eg. in Krzeniów the group "B" harzburgites contain pfu in ortho-, and pfu in clinopyroxene). The exception are xenoliths from Księginki, which contain pyroxenes characterised by negative correlation between mg# and Al. The REE patterns of both ortho- and clinopyroxene in the group "B" peridotites suggest equilibration with silicate melt. The rocks of "B" lithology were formed due to alkaline silicate melt percolation in the depleted peridotitic protolith. The basaltic melts formed at high pressure are usually undersaturated in both ortho- and clinopyroxene at lower pressures (Kelemen et al. 1992). Because of cooling and dissolution of ortho- and clinopyroxene the melts change their composition and become saturated in one or both of those phases. Experimental results (e.g. Tursack & Liang 2012 and references therein) show that the same refers to alkaline basaltic silicate melts and that its reactive percolation in the peridotitic host leads to decrease of Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of olivine and pyroxenes. Thus, the variation of relative volumes of olivine and orthopyroxene as well as the decrease of mg# of rock-forming silicates is well explained by reactive melt percolation in the peridotitic protolith consisting of high mg# olivine and pyroxenes (in the area studied by us that protolith was characterised by olivine containing 90.5 - 92.0 mole % forsterite). The rocks which were subjected to significant decrease of mg# of silicates (down to 84) may be difficult to distinguish from cumulates. However, since the alkaline basaltic melts do not precipitate orthopyroxene under lithospheric pressures, their mineral composition is different than that of mantle harzburgites. Kelemen PB, Dick HJB, Quick JE (1992) Formation of harzburgite by pervasive melt/rock reaction in the upper mantle. Nature 358: 635-641. Tursack E, Liang Y (2012) A comparative study of melt-rock reactions in the mantle: laboratory dissolution experiments and geological field observations. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology 163: 861-876

  8. Late Archaean mantle metasomatism below eastern Indian craton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    crop NDD display mainly four distinct orientations viz., N-S, NNE-SSW, ...... also be trapped either along the grain boundary ... faster plate movements, high angle subduction would be ..... istry of oxide minerals in polymictic xenoliths from the.

  9. Metamorphism, metasomatism and mineralization at Lagoa Real, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato, L.M.

    1985-09-01

    Uranium deposits cumulatively in the 100,000 tonne U 3 O 8 range occur within ductile shear zones transecting Archean basement gneisses of the Sao Francisco Craton, at the Lagoa Real region of south-central Bahia, Brasil. The gneisses, dated at 2.6-3.0Ga, are at amphibolite and granulite facies and overlie to the west, the Proterozoic Espinhaco metasedimentary sequence along a thrust fault. Petrography and mineral chemistry show that in the zones of alteration/mineralization, the original K-feldspar + quartz + albite/oligoclase + hastingsite assemblage, is replaced by albite + aegirine - angite + andradite + hematite assemblages, with or without uraninite. This information along with oxygen isotope, whole rock geochemistry and fluid inclusion studies indicate that the alteration process involves removal of Si, K, Rb, Ba and addition of Na under oxidizing conditions. V, Pb and Sr were introduced along with U via interaction with saline SO 2 - rich, isotopically light fluids under varying water/rock ratios and at temperatures of 500 - 550 0 C. 87 Sr/ 86 Sr systematics suggest that it is unlikely that Sr, and by extension uranium, were introduced by fluids originating from the basement gneisses. Geological constraints and the general alteration pattern are consistent with the release of the mineralizing fluids in response to the overloading of the basement rocks onto the Sedimentary Espinhaco via a thrust mechanism. (Author) [pt

  10. Emerald zoyzia grass development regarding photosynthetically active radiation in different slopes Desenvolvimento da grama-esmeralda em relação à radiação fotossinteticamente ativa em diferentes declividades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchele M. Coan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With this study, the objective was to estimate the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR and to correlate it with the dry matter (MMSPA of the emerald zoysia (Zoysia japonica Steud. on surfaces with different expositions and slopes. The research was conducted at the Experimental Watershed of the Agricultural Engineering Department, School of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences of São Paulo State University (FCAV/UNESP, Brazil, where the surfaces (H, 10 N, 30 N, 50 N, 10 S, 30 S, 50 S, 10 L, 30 L, 50 L, 10 O, 30 O and 50 O were used. To obtain the global solar radiation, it was installed an automated weather station where the PAR (dependent variable was obtained by the equation y = a + bx, and the global radiation was independent. To compare means of MMSPA, it was used the Tukey test at 5% probability, and to assess the relation PAR/MMSPA, the simple linear correlation coefficient. The result showed that the accumulation of these effects in the PAR increases with North exposure and decreases with the South, and exposure to 50N is most suitable for slopes, not having correlation between the PAR and the MMSPA for the surfaces evaluated for the study period.Com este trabalho, o objetivo foi estimar a radiação fotossinteticamente ativa (PAR e correlacioná-la com a massa de matéria seca (MMSPA da grama-esmeralda (Zoysia japonica Steud., em superfícies com diferentes exposições e declividades. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida na Bacia Hidrográfica Experimental do Departamento de Engenharia Rural, FCAV/UNESP, Brasil, onde foram utilizadas as superfícies (H; 10 N; 30 N; 50 N; 10 S; 30 S; 50 S; 10 L; 30 L; 50 L; 10 O; 30 O e 50 O. Para a obtenção da radiação solar global, foi instalada uma estação meteorológica automatizada, onde a PAR (variável dependente foi obtida por meio da equação y = a + bx, e a radiação global foi a independente. Para comparação de médias da MMSPA, utilizou-se o teste de Tukey, a 5% de probabilidade, e para

  11. The Emerald handbook of modern information management

    CERN Document Server

    Matarazzo, James M

    2017-01-01

    This handbook aims to be an integral text for students of library and information science and a ready-reference for information professional practitioners. The chapters provide a construct through which any information professional may learn abut the major challenges facing them in the early part of the 21st century.

  12. Geology of the eastern emerald belt (EEB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Giovani; Terraza, Roberto; Montoya, Diana

    2009-01-01

    The stratigraphic record in EEB begins with an upper Paleozoic basal siliciclastic sequence (Farallones Group, Devonian - Carboniferous), unconformably overlain by basal Cretaceous formations (Bata to the east, Santa Rosa - Ubala - Chivor to the west o the Quetame Massif). The Cretaceous marine ingression took place in a tectonically active basin since Triassic and Jurassic. This tectonic setting last until the end of earliest Cretaceous giving place to a thick sedimentary sequence made of the aforementioned basal units and the Lutitas de Macanal, Las Juntas, Fomeque and Une formations. Paleozoic basement highs normal fault bounded, restrict the Cretaceous sedimentation in the EEB zone, this is evidence especially for the basal Cretaceous units (Berriasian). In this way, to the east of Montecristo Anticline (overlaying Farallones Group) we found conglomerates (Bata Formation), instead to the west sedimentation was mainly lodolithic (Santa Rosa Formation, new litostratigraphic unit). Toward Ubala, overlaying Paleozoic basement (Farallones Anticline) rest a calcareous -Terrigenous set (Ubala Formation new litostratigraphic unit). In Chivor - Malacara area we found evaporitic sets with calcareous rocks (Chivor Formation, new litostratigraphic unit) overlaying Santa Rosa Formation. In Valanginian times the sea regionally drown the area of EEB and give rise to marine offshore conditions (Lutitas de Macanal Formation) with episodic events of gravity flows (El Figaro - Los Cedros members). During Hauterivian to Albian times the accumulation of a sandy - muddy sediments in tidal fats or deltaic systems give rise the record of Las Juntas -Une formations. Finally in Barremian early Albian times there are a siliciclastic - calcareous record of marine offshore environments (Fomeque Formation).

  13. Efficacy and safety of switching from boosted protease inhibitors plus emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate regimens to single-tablet darunavir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide at 48 weeks in adults with virologically suppressed HIV-1 (EMERALD): a phase 3, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Chloe; Molina, Jean-Michel; Negredo, Eugenia; Arribas, José R; Gathe, Joseph; Eron, Joseph J; Van Landuyt, Erika; Lathouwers, Erkki; Hufkens, Veerle; Petrovic, Romana; Vanveggel, Simon; Opsomer, Magda

    2018-01-01

    Simplified regimens with reduced pill burden and fewer side-effects are desirable for people living with HIV. We investigated the efficacy and safety of switching to a single-tablet regimen of darunavir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide versus continuing a regimen of boosted protease inhibitor, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. EMERALD was a phase-3, randomised, active-controlled, open-label, international, multicentre trial, done at 106 sites across nine countries in North America and Europe. HIV-1-infected adults were eligible to participate if they were treatment-experienced and virologically suppressed (viral load <50 copies per mL for ≥2 months; one viral load of 50-200 copies per mL was allowed within 12 months before screening), and patients with a history of virological failure on non-darunavir regimens were allowed. Randomisation was by computer-generated interactive web-response system and stratified by boosted protease inhibitor use at baseline. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to switch to the open-label study regimen or continue the control regimen. The study regimen consisted of a fixed-dose tablet containing darunavir 800 mg, cobicistat 150 mg, emtricitabine 200 mg, and tenofovir alafenamide 10 mg, which was taken once per day for 48 weeks. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants with virological rebound (confirmed viral load ≥50 copies per mL or premature discontinuations, with last viral load ≥50 copies per mL) cumulative through week 48; we tested non-inferiority (4% margin) of the study regimen versus the control regimen in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02269917. The study began on April 1, 2015, and the cutoff date for the week 48 primary analysis was Feb 24, 2017. Of 1141 patients (763 in the study group and 378 in the control group), 664 (58%) had previously received five or more antiretrovirals, including screening

  14. Photographic Documentation of Emerald Spreadwing at TA-3, LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foy, Bernard R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a considerable amount of suitable habitat for odonates, or dragonflies and damselflies. Few of these have been properly documented, however. With photographic documentation, the quality and size of odonate habitat on land owned by the Department of Energy will become more apparent to land managers.

  15. Frederick Law Olmsted y el "Emerald Necklace" de Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Austrich

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available En 1879, Frederick Law Olmsted, el creador del Central Park en Nueva York, Prospect Park en Brooklyn, inventor de la profesión de paisajismo (Landscape Architecture en los EE.UU., arriba a Boston agotado y exhausto. Acaba de renunciar el cargo de paisajista de Central Park, sintiéndose defraudado por las intrigas políticas de la comisión de parques de Nueva York, viajaba a Boston a descansar y pasar un rato con sus amigos en las cercanías de Boston, en Cambridge y Brookline. Su gran amigo, Henry Hobson Richardson, el reconocido arquitecto de la época, vivía y trabajaba en Brookline, y sirve como su anfitrión, tanto como sus amigos en Cambridge.

  16. Teaching Research Methodology and Writing in the Emerald City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry D.

    The major goal of graduate education in speech communication is to advance knowledge about human communication through research and by training minds. Graduate education differs from undergraduate education because it emphasizes not only what we know, but how we come to know. Often, however, graduate education is just seen as being an extension of…

  17. Na-metasomatism in the uranium fields of Singhbhum Shear zone, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Anjan

    2013-01-01

    Singhbhum Shear Zone (SSZ) of eastern India hosts uranium, copper and apatite-magnetite mineralization, which occurs either independently or overlaps in space. SSZ is a nearly 200 km long, 1-5 km wide, intensely techtonized, northward-convex, arcuate mobile belt that separates the Archaean cratonic nucleus to its south from the Proterozoic North Singhbhum Fold Belt on the north. Except Bagjata mines in the eastern sector, majority of the known uranium deposits and mines (e.g. Jaduguda, Bhatin, Narwapahar, Banduhurang and Mohuldih) are situated in the central sector of the shear zone. All the deposits are of low grade (0.05% U 3 O 8 ) and low to medium tonnage. The common rock types of the SSZ are quartz-chlorite schists, quartzsericite schists, quartzite, metaconglomerate, soda granite, quartz-albite bearing schists/gneisses, granophyres and tourmalinite. The mineralization occur as lenticular to tabular bodies, which are (pene-) concordant with dominant planer structures, i.e. foliation parallel with the lithological layering (S 3 II S 0 ). Principal uranium mineral is uraninite with low thorium (UO 2 /ThO 2 =70-150), high lead (PbO =14-15%) and moderate REE contents with minor pitchblende and some secondary minerals near the surface. Many ore minerals, particularly the sulfide phases of Ni, Co, Mo, Cu and Fe are common

  18. Mantle depletion and metasomatism recorded in orthopyroxene in highly depleted peridotites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, James; Liu, Jingao; Pearson, D. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Although trace element concentrations in clinopyroxene serve as a useful tool for assessing the depletion and enrichment history of mantle peridotites, this is not applicable for peridotites in which the clinopyroxene component has been consumed (~ 25% partial melting). Orthopyroxene persists in ...

  19. Geochemical of the sodic-uranium metasomatic mineralization from Espinhas (PB)-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, C.L.P. da.

    1986-01-01

    The radioactive deposit of Espinharas (PB) Brazil, situated in a complex of metamorphic and igneous precambrian rocks using analytical chemical methods, microchemical and radiochemical based on minetalogical and petrographical data is studied. (M.J.C.) [pt

  20. A study of experimental simulation of mantle metasomatism by the proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F.; Sweeney, R.J.; Green, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The chemistry of melts and fluids in the Earth's mantle is essential to understand the processes that generate them and the source areas from which they derive. The characterisation of these phases is particularly relevant with regard to the geochemical changes which would occur in a mantle subjected to the percolation of fluids (for example fluids that derive from a hydrated subducting slab to influence basic geochemistry in subduction zones) and small degree melts which percolate into a relatively cool mantle beneath continents. The development of a technique in the Geology Department of University of Tasmania, of trapping and isolating these small degree melts and fluids in pre-stressed (fractured) olivine disks inserted into run capsules is described. Little success is reported with the analysis of subsurface inclusions in olivine containing trace amounts (e.g. up to 1000 ppm) of elements of interest. This is primarily due to the fact that olivine is a heavy absorber of secondary X-rays principally a function of its higher Fe content. However, some success was achieved in the analysis of small surface melt inclusions where corrections had to be made for the overlap of the beam on the encapsulating olivine. The results carry large uncertainties (20%), primarily due to the smallness of the sample hence the large contribution of underlying olivine, and also of surrounding olivine when the beam is larger than the sample or when the beam drifts off the sample. An example of such measurements is described. Garnets in the peridotite were also analysed and this enabled the calculation of melt-garnet partition coefficients. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Depletion, cryptic metasomatism, and modal metasomatism of central European lithospheric mantle: evidence from elemental and Li isotope compositions of spinel peridotite xenoliths, Kozákov volcano, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medaris Jr., L. G.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, E.; Magna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 8 (2015), s. 1925-1956 ISSN 1437-3254 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Central European lithospheric mantle * geochemistry * geothermometry * Li isotopes * spinel peridotite xenoliths Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.133, year: 2015

  2. ∼1400 Ma alkali metasomatic event in the sericite deposits and basal Aravalli volcanic rocks of Udaipur region, Rajasthan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmakumari, V.M.; Sreenivas, B.; Srinivasan, R.; Gopalan, K.; Roy, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    Paleosols are residual soil profiles of the geological past. They throw light on the climatic conditions prevalent during their formation. Constraining their age is of importance for deciphering the paleoclimatic history of a region. A suite of K-rich spilitic volcanic rocks immediately overlying the paleosol near Nagaria have been analysed

  3. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures arc lavas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The practical utility of hyperspectral remote sensing for early detection of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Hallett; Jennifer Pontius; Mary Martin; Lucie Plourde

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing technology has been used in forest ecology research for the last decade to examine landscape scale patterns of foliar chemistry (nitrogen, cellulose, and lignin) (Martin and Aber 1997), stand productivity (Smith et al. 2002), and soil nitrogen dynamics (Ollinger et al. 2002). More recently, techniques have been developed to map the location...

  5. 76 FR 3077 - Notice of Decision To Revise a Heat Treatment Schedule for Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... plants, fruits, vegetables, and other articles must be treated before they may be moved into the United... of 7 CFR chapter III for fruits, vegetables, and other articles. In Sec. 305.2, paragraph (b) states... would have resulted in some additional drying of the firewood before the treatment. Although the extra...

  6. Risk to ash from emerald ash borer: can biological control prevent the loss of ash stands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Roy G. Van Driesche; Leah S. Bauer; Daniel M. Kashian; Daniel A. Herms

    2015-01-01

    Ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) are an important components of both natural forests and urban plantings in the United States and Canada (Federal Register, 2003; Nowak et al., 2003). There are approximately 16 species of Fraxinus native to North America (Harlow et al., 1996; USGS, 2014), each adapted to different ecological niches across...

  7. The relationship between trees and human health: evidence from the spread of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; David T. Butry; Yvonne L. Michael; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Andrew M. Liebhold; Demetrios Gatziolis; Megan Y. Mao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several recent studies have identified a relationship between the natural environment and improved health outcomes. However, for practical reasons, most have been observational, cross-sectional studies.Purpose: A natural experiment, which provides stronger evidence of causality, was used to...

  8. 76 FR 5679 - Emerald Ash Borer; Addition of Quarantined Areas in Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, New York...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... potentially affected industries deal in ash products. List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 301 Agricultural... interim rule that amended 7 CFR part 301 and that was published at 75 FR 29189 on May 25, 2010. Done in...

  9. The emerald ash borer: a new exotic pest in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Eduard Jendak; Liu Houping; Keneth R. Marchant; Toby R. Petrice; Therese M. Poland; Hui Ye

    2002-01-01

    Yet another new exotic forest pest has been discovered in North America, and this time the infestation is centered in Michigan and Ontario. In May and June 2002, adults of an unidentified buprestid beetle were collected from ash (Fraxinus) trees in the Detroit area of southeastern Michigan.

  10. 75 FR 29189 - Emerald Ash Borer; Addition of Quarantined Areas in Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, New York...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., Indiana, Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Wisconsin have already been..., Henry, Jefferson, Jessamine, Kenton, Oldham, Owen, Pendleton, Scott, Shelby, Trimble, and Woodford.... Shelby County. The entire county. Trimble County. The entire county. Woodford County. The entire county...

  11. 78 FR 59 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Honduran Emerald Hummingbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... used by another hummingbird species to travel between suitable habitats indicate that gaps in suitable..., agricultural cooperatives are raising citrus fruits, corn (maize), rice, and African palm for oil (WWF 2008, p... agricultural plantations. Pesticides and Fertilizers WWF notes that production yield level can only be...

  12. Emerald Dragon Bites vs Veggie Beans: Fun Food Names Increase Children's Consumption of Novel Healthy Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musher-Eizenman, Dara R.; Oehlhof, Marissa Wagner; Young, Kathleen M.; Hauser, Jessica C.; Galliger, Courtney; Sommer, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Caregivers often struggle with food neophobia on the part of young children. This study examined whether labeling novel healthy foods with fun names would increase children's willingness to try those foods and encourage them to eat more of those foods in a child care setting. Thirty-nine toddler and preschool age children (mean age = 3.9 years)…

  13. A bioeconomic analysis of an emerald ash borer invasion of an urban forest with multiple jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Robert G. Haight; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Deborah G. McCullough

    2014-01-01

    Bio-invasions occur in management mosaics where local control affects spread and damage across political boundaries. We address two obstacles to local implementation of optimal regional control of a bio-invasion that damages public and private resources across jurisdictions: lack of local funds to protect the public resource and lack of access to protect the private...

  14. 75 FR 21394 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Revised Critical Habitat for Hine's Emerald...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... critical habitat units are located in Cook, DuPage, and Will Counties in Illinois; Alpena, Mackinac, and... News- Graphic, St. Ignace News, Door County Advocate, Alpena News, Ozaukee Press, and Joliet Herald... commenter asserts that there is little (if any) economic activity in Alpena, Mackinac, or Presque Isle...

  15. Impacts of emerald ash borer-induced tree mortality on leaf litter arthropods and exotic earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Wendy S. Klooster; William T. Barrington; Daniel A. Herns

    2011-01-01

    Because leaf litter occurs at the interface between the soil and atmosphere, the invertebrates inhabiting it represent important linkages between above- and below-ground food webs. The responses of these organisms to forest disturbance brought about by invasive species should therefore have far-reaching ecological effects. The purpose of this study was to explore how...

  16. Leg deformation during imaginal ecdysis in the downy emerald, Cordulia aenea (Odonata, Corduliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Frantsevich, Ludmilla

    2018-04-01

    A dragonfly larva migrates from the water to the shore, perches on a plant stem and grasps it with strongly flexed legs. Adult legs inside the larval exoskeleton fit to the larval legs joint-to-joint. The adult emerges with stretched legs. During the molt, an imaginal leg must follow all the angles in exuvial joints. In turn, larval apodemes are withdrawn from imaginal legs. We visualized transient shapes of the imaginal legs by the instant fixation of insects at different moments of the molt, photographed isolated exuvial legs with the imaginal legs inside and then removed the exuvial sheath. Instant shapes of the imaginal tibia show sharp intrapodomere bends copying the angle in the larval femoro-tibial joint. The site of bending shifts distad during the molt. This is possible if the imaginal leg is pliable. The same problem of leg squeezing is also common in hemimetabolous insects as well as in other arthropods, whereas holometabolous insects overcome problems of a tight confinement either by using leg pliability in other ways but not squeezing (cyclorrhaphan flies, mosquitoes) or by pulling hardened legs out without change of their pupal zigzag configuration (moths, ants, honey bees). The pupal legs are not intended to grasp any external substrate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Peroxiredoxin 6 from the Antarctic emerald rockcod: molecular characterization of its response to warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, A M; Carraro, A; Bakiu, R; Toppo, S; Place, S P; Ferro, D; Santovito, G

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the purification and molecular characterization of two peroxiredoxins (Prdxs), referred to as Prdx6A and Prdx6B, from Trematomus bernacchii, a teleost widely distributed in many areas of Antarctica, that plays a pivotal role in the Antarctic food chain. The two putative amino acid sequences were compared with Prdx6 orthologs from other fish, highlighting a high percentage of identity and similarity with the respective variant, in particular for the residues that are essential for the characteristic peroxidase and phospholipase activities of these enzymes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest the appearance of the two prdx6 genes through a duplication event before the speciation that led to the differentiation of fish families and that the evolution of the two gene variants seems to proceed together with the evolution of fish orders and families. The temporal expression of Prdx6 mRNA in response to short-term thermal stress showed a general upregulation of prdx6b and inhibition of prdx6a, suggesting that the latter is the variant most affected by temperature increase. The variations of mRNA accumulation are more conspicuous in heart than the liver, probably related to behavioral changes of the specimens in response to elevated temperature. These data, together with the peculiar differences between the molecular structures of the two Prdx6s in T. bernacchii as well as in the tropical species Stegastes partitus, suggest an adaptation that allowed these poikilothermic aquatic vertebrates to colonize very different environments, characterized by different temperature ranges.

  18. Manipulating spread and predicting dispersal of isolated emerald ash borer populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold; Therese M. Poland; Robert L. Heyd

    2009-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the spread of an invasive species could potentially be integrated into an effective management strategy to delay dispersal to uninfested areas while concentrating the population in an area where suppression...

  19. Ampulexins: A New Family of Peptides in Venom of the Emerald Jewel Wasp, Ampulex compressa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eugene L; Arvidson, Ryan; Banks, Christopher; Urenda, Jean Paul; Duong, Elizabeth; Mohammed, Haroun; Adams, Michael E

    2018-03-27

    The parasitoid wasp Ampulex compressa injects venom directly into the brain and subesophageal ganglion of the cockroach Periplaneta americana, inducing a 7 to 10 day lethargy termed hypokinesia. Hypokinesia presents as a significant reduction in both escape response and spontaneous walking. We examined aminergic and peptidergic components of milked venom with HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. HPLC coupled with electrochemical detection confirmed the presence of dopamine in milked venom, while mass spectrometry revealed that the venom gland and venom sac have distinct peptide profiles, with milked venom predominantly composed of venom sac peptides. We isolated and characterized novel α-helical, amphipathic venom sac peptides that constitute a new family of venom toxins termed ampulexins. Injection of the most abundant venom peptide, ampulexin 1, into the subesophageal ganglion of cockroaches resulted in a short-term increase in escape threshold. Neither milked venom nor venom peptides interfered with growth of Escherichia coli or Bacillus thuringiensis on agar plates, and exposure to ampulexins or milked venom did not induce cell death in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) or Hi5 cells ( Trichoplusia ni).

  20. Oospila bulava, a new emerald geometrid moth from South America (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Geometrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindt, Aare; Viidalepp, Jaan

    2015-12-15

    Warren (1897) described the genus Oospila for Phorodesma trilunaria Guenée, 1857 from Brazil. Prout (1912; 1932-1933) revised the genus, listing 48 species in the first publication and 58 species in the latter one, in Oospila. Cook and Scoble (1995) grouped eight related genera under Oospila, including 73 species and dividing these into 13 species groups. Pitkin (1996) relied on this revision while publishing a monographic review of the Neotropical geometrine genera. Parsons et al. (1999) attributed the same species that in Cook and Scoble (1995) to the genus. Two species are described later (Viidalepp, 2002; Lévèque & Viidalepp, 2015). While revising collections from the Neotropical region during the last decade, the authors of the present article have found several undescribed taxa: cryptic species are frequently overlooked in large-scale works (Vodă et al., 2014). The result of one case study is published in this article. The primary and subsequent descriptions of relevant taxa are consulted.

  1. American Higher Education: Behind the Emerald City's Curtain. Hudson Briefing Paper, No. 188.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Manno, Bruno V.

    During the last 50 years, American higher education has steadily grown in scale, wealth, and, stature. Despite its current status as the world's education superpower, however, it has begun to encounter public disapproval and consumer resistance. Colleges and universities have been able to ignore productivity concerns because a college education…

  2. The Early Detection of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Using Advanced Geospacial Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B.; Li, J.; Wang, J.; Hall, B.

    2014-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to exploit Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and very high spatial resolution (VHR) data and their synergy with hyperspectral imagery in the early detection of the EAB presence in trees within urban areas and to develop a framework to combine information extracted from multiple data sources. To achieve these, an object-oriented framework was developed to combine information derived from available data sets to characterize ash trees. Within this framework, individual trees were first extracted and then classified into different species based on their spectral information derived from hyperspectral imagery, spatial information from VHR imagery, and for each ash tree its health state and EAB infestation stage were determined based on hyperspectral imagery. The developed framework and methods were demonstrated to be effective according to the results obtained on two study sites in the city of Toronto, Ontario Canada. The individual tree delineation method provided satisfactory results with an overall accuracy of 78 % and 19 % commission and 23 % omission errors when used on the combined very high-spatial resolution imagery and LiDAR data. In terms of the identification of ash trees, given sufficient representative training data, our classification model was able to predict tree species with above 75 % overall accuracy, and mis-classification occurred mainly between ash and maple trees. The hypothesis that a strong correlation exists between general tree stress and EAB infestation was confirmed. Vegetation indices sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content derived from hyperspectral imagery can be used to predict the EAB infestation levels for each ash tree.

  3. Environmental Assessment Addressing the Emerald Breeze Resort, Santa Rosa Island, Fort Walton Beach, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-11

    Road construction and maintenance activities have introduced and spread cogon grass (Imperata cylindrical) and torpedo grass (Panicum repens) to...Chinese tallow, or popcorn tree (Triadica sebifera), cogon grass , Japanese climbing fern (Lygodium japonicum), Chinese privet/hedge (Ligustrum sinense...stormwater wetlands, wildlife habitat swales, grassed filter strips)  Runoff pretreatment practices (e.g., catch basins, in-line storage, manufactured

  4. The upside of the emerald ash borer catastrophe: a feast for woodpeckers

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Cappaert; Deborah McCullough; Therese Poland

    2005-01-01

    Under the most favorable conditions, woodpeckers reduce larval EAB density as effectively as the best pesticides. Woodpeckers work over the entire core region for free and are always more popular than spray trucks.

  5. Rhenium-osmium isotopes in pervasively metasomatized mantle xenoliths from the Bohemian Massif and implications for the reliability of Os model ages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kochergina, Y. V.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Erban, V.; Matusiak-Malek, M.; Puziewicz, J.; Halodová, P.; Špaček, P.; Trubač, J.; Magna, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 430, July 15 (2016), s. 90-107 ISSN 0009-2541 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * depletion age * Ohře/Eger rift * Os isotopes * peridotite xenolith * Re-Os * sub-continental lithospheric mantle Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.347, year: 2016

  6. Chlorine isotopic compositions of apatite in Apollo 14 rocks: Evidence for widespread vapor-phase metasomatism on the lunar nearside ∼4 billion years ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potts, Nicola J.; Barnes, Jessica J.; Tartèse, Romain; Franchi, Ian A.; Anand, Mahesh

    2018-01-01

    Compared to most other planetary materials in the Solar System, some lunar rocks display high δ37Cl signatures. Loss of Cl in a H Cl environment has been invoked to explain the heavy signatures observed in lunar samples, either during volcanic eruptions onto the lunar surface or during large scale

  7. Sodalite Cancrinite Nepheline Syenite of Mendanha Massif, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Called Commercially Blue Guanabara Granite, and its Origin from Deuteric Metasomatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihisa Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta observações de campo, descrições petrográficas e considerações genéticas do sodalita cancrinita nefelina sienito, chamado comercialmente de Granito Cinza Azul Guanabara, que se encontra na zona de contato sudoeste da intrusão alcalina félsica de Mendanha, RJ. Esta rocha ornamental ocorre ao longo do eixo central de um dique sienítico com 15 m de largura. A cor macroscópica em rocha total é caracterizada por saturação baixa (S=5~7 e clareza média (B~62. A cor de minerais opacos tem clareza relativamente alta (B~28. O feldspato alcalino é comumente alterado em muscovita. Os feldspatóides são presentes nos espaços intersticiais do arcabouço de feldspato alcalino. O anfibólio e biotita são alterados em minerais opacos e vermiculita, apresentando pseudomorfo. Os minerais acessórios são magnetita primária e titanita. Existe uma significativa quantidade de carbonatos com quantidade modal de 6,8%, constituindo agregados de forma irregular ou preenchendo espaços. A cor macroscópica dos agregados de feldspatóides varia de azul profundo para azul claro de acordo com o teor relativo de sodalita. A sodalita e cancrinita são originadas de nefelina e foram formadas através de metassomatismo deutérico do fluído rico em Cl

  8. Plutonic mobilization, sodium metasomatism, propylitic wall-rock alteration and element partitioning from Hoehensteinweg uranium occurrence (Northeast Bavaria, F.R.G.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dill, H.

    1983-01-01

    The investigated U deposit near Poppenreuth (Hoehensteinweg) in northeast Bavaria is situated among Upper Proterozoic biotite gneisses and mica schists with ENE- to NE-striking foliation. In this paper, the element distribution is determined of the elements involved in the U-Th petrogenic cycle (Zr, Ce, Th, U, P and Na); as are the mineralogical changes of the primary U minerals. The problem of lithogene element supply is studied. The area abundant in U is compared with other U-bearing sodium enriched host rocks in order to improve the selection of exploration target areas. Content: the primary U and Th minerals; plutonic mobilizates; episyenites and sodium metasomatites; propylitic rocks; U minerals and their relation to the primary U minerals; the origin of Hoehensteinweg uranium deposits. (Auth.)

  9. Plutonic mobilization, sodium metasomatism, propylitic wall-rock alteration and element partitioning from Hoehensteinweg uranium occurrence (Northeast Bavaria, F. R. G. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H. (Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-05-01

    The investigated U deposit near Poppenreuth (Hoehensteinweg) in northeast Bavaria is situated among Upper Proterozoic biotite gneisses and mica schists with ENE- to NE-striking foliation. In this paper, the element distribution is determined of the elements involved in the U-Th petrogenic cycle (Zr, Ce, Th, U, P and Na); as are the mineralogical changes of the primary U minerals. The problem of lithogene element supply is studied. The area abundant in U is compared with other U-bearing sodium enriched host rocks in order to improve the selection of exploration target areas. Content: the primary U and Th minerals; plutonic mobilizates; episyenites and sodium metasomatites; propylitic rocks; U minerals and their relation to the primary U minerals; the origin of Hoehensteinweg uranium deposits.

  10. Carbonate metasomatism and CO2 lithosphere-asthenosphere degassing beneath the western Mediterranean: An integrated model arising from petrological and geophysical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Peccerillo, Angelo; Panza, Giuliano

    2009-03-01

    We present an integrated petrological, geochemical, and geophysical model that offers an explanation for the present-day anomalously high non-volcanic deep (mantle derived) CO 2 emission in the Tyrrhenian region. We investigate how decarbonation or melting of carbonate-rich lithologies from a subducted lithosphere may affect the efficiency of carbon release in the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We propose that melting of sediments and/or continental crust of the subducted Adriatic-Ionian (African) lithosphere at pressure greater than 4 GPa (130 km) may represent an efficient mean for carbon cycling into the upper mantle and into the exosphere in the Western Mediterranean area. Melting of carbonated lithologies, induced by the progressive rise of mantle temperatures behind the eastward retreating Adriatic-Ionian subducting plate, generates low fractions of carbonate-rich (hydrous-silicate) melts. Due to their low density and viscosity, such melts can migrate upward through the mantle, forming a carbonated partially molten CO 2 -rich mantle recorded by tomographic images in the depth range from 130 to 60 km. Upwelling in the mantle of carbonate-rich melts to depths less than 60 - 70 km, induces massive outgassing of CO 2 . Buoyancy forces, probably favored by fluid overpressures, are able to allow migration of CO 2 from the mantle to the surface, through deep lithospheric faults, and its accumulation beneath the Moho and within the lower crust. The present model may also explain CO 2 enrichment of the Etna active volcano. Deep CO 2 cycling is tentatively quantified in terms of conservative carbon mantle flux in the investigated area. (author)

  11. Volatile (Cl, F and S) and major element constraints on subduction-related mantle metasomatism along the alkaline basaltic backarc, Payenia, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frederik Ejvang; Holm, Paul Martin; Hansteen, Thor H.

    2017-01-01

    We present data on volatile (S, F and Cl) and major element contents in olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from alkaline basaltic tephras along the Quaternary Payenia backarc volcanic province (~34°S–38°S) of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ). The composition of Cr-spinel inclusions and h...

  12. The role of evaporites in the formation of gems during metamorphism of carbonate platforms: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Dubessy, Jean; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Banks, David; Branquet, Yannick; Feneyrol, Julien; Fallick, Anthony E.; Martelat, Jean-Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The mineral and fluid inclusions trapped by gemstones during the metamorphism of carbonate platform successions are precious markers for the understanding of gem genesis. The nature and chemical composition of inclusions highlight the major contribution of evaporites through dissolution or fusion, depending on the temperature of formation from greenschist to granulite facies. The fluids are highly saline NaCl-brines circulating either in an open system in the greenschist facies (Colombian and Afghan emeralds) and with huge fluid-rock metasomatic interactions, or sulphurous fluids (ruby, garnet tsavorite, zoisite tanzanite and lapis-lazuli) or molten salts formed in a closed system with a low fluid mobility (ruby in marble) in the conditions of the amphibolite to granulite facies. These chloride-fluoride-sulphate ± carbonate-rich fluids scavenged the metals essential for gem formation. At high temperature, the anions SO4 2-, NO3 -, BO3 - and F- are powerful fluxes which lower the temperature of chloride- and fluoride-rich ionic liquids. They provided transport over a very short distance of aluminium and/or silica and transition metals which are necessary for gem growth. In summary, the genetic models proposed for these high-value and ornamental gems underline the importance of the metamorphism of evaporites formed on continental carbonate shelves and emphasise the chemical power accompanying metamorphism at moderate to high temperatures of evaporite-rich and organic matter-rich protoliths to form gem minerals.

  13. How fast will trees die? A transition matrix model of ash decline in forest stands infested by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen S. Knight; Robert P. Long; Joanne Rebbeck; Annemarie Smith; Kamal Gandhi; Daniel A. Herms

    2008-01-01

    We recorded Fraxinus spp. tree health and other forest stand characteristics for 68 plots in 21 EAB-infested forest stands in Michigan and Ohio in 2005 and 2007. Fraxinus spp. were a dominant component of these stands, with more than 900 ash trees (including Fraxinus americana, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Fraxinus profunda...

  14. Fluid inclusions and stable isotope study of quartz-tourmaline with associated with beryl and emerald mineralization, Kafubu area, Zambia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zachariáš, J.; Pudilová, M.; Žáček, V.; Machovič, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 223, - (2005), s. 136-152 ISSN 0009-2541 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/00/D039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : quartz * tourmaline * beryl Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.940, year: 2005

  15. Laboratory and field response of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to selected regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Francese, Joseph A; Zylstra, Kelley E; Fraser, Ivich; Sawyer, Alan J; Bartels, David W; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-12-01

    Retinal sensitivity of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) was examined with an aim to improve trap efficacy for the beetle. Electroretinogram (ERG) recordings from dark-adapted compound eyes of male and female were measured at different wavelengths across the spectrum ranging from 300 to 700 nm. The spectral sensitivity curves revealed peaks in the UV (340 nm), the violet/purple (420-430 nm), blue (460 nm), and green (540-560 nm) regions of the spectrum. Females were sensitive to red regions of the spectrum (640-670 nm), whereas males were not. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the wavelength and reflectance for ash foliage, purple corrugated plastic traps, as well as the elytra and abdomen of adult A. planipennis. Traps were painted using colors based on ERG and spectrophotometer measurements and compared with purple corrugated plastic traps currently used by the USDA-APHIS-PPQ-EAB National Survey. In a field assay conducted along the edges of several A. planipennis-infested ash stands, there were no significant differences in trap catch among green, red, or purple treatments. Dark blue traps caught significantly fewer A. planipennis than red, light green, or dark purple traps. In a second assay where purple and green treatments were placed in the mid canopy of ash trees (approximately 13 m in height), trap catch was significantly higher on green treatments. We hypothesize that when placed in the mid-canopy, green traps constitute a foliage-type stimulus that elicits food-seeking and/or host seeking behavior by A. planipennis.

  16. Preimaginal stages of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: an invasive pest on ash trees (Fraxinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lourdes Chamorro

    Full Text Available This study provides the most detailed description of the immature stages of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire to date and illustrates suites of larval characters useful in distinguishing among Agrilus Curtis species and instars. Immature stages of eight species of Agrilus were examined and imaged using light and scanning electron microscopy. For A. planipennis all preimaginal stages (egg, instars I-IV, prepupa and pupa were described. A combination of 14 character states were identified that serve to identify larvae of A. planipennis. Our results support the segregation of Agrilus larvae into two informal assemblages based on characters of the mouthparts, prothorax, and abdomen: the A. viridis and A. ater assemblages, with A. planipennis being more similar to the former. Additional evidence is provided in favor of excluding A. planipennis from the subgenus Uragrilus.

  17. 10 Risk to Ash from Emerald Ash Borer: Can Biological Control Prevent the Loss of Ash Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of EAB, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002. As of February 2014, EAB had been detected in 22 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, killing millions of ash ...

  18. Venom and Dufour's glands of the emerald cockroach wasp Ampulex compressa (Insecta, Hymenoptera, Sphecidae): structural and biochemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatzy, Werner; Michels, Jan; Volknandt, Walter; Goller, Stephan; Schulz, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The digger wasp species Ampulex compressa produces its venom in two branched gland tubules. They terminate in a short common duct, which is bifurcated at its proximal end. One leg is linked with the venom reservoir, the other one extends to the ductus venatus. Each venom gland tubule possesses, over its entire length, a cuticle-lined central duct. Around this duct densely packed class 3 gland units each composed of a secretory cell and a canal cell are arranged. The position of their nuclei was demonstrated by DAPI staining. The brush border of the secretory cells surrounds the coiled end-apparatus. Venom is stored in a bladder like reservoir, which is surrounded by a thin reticulated layer of muscle fibres. The reservoir as a whole is lined with class 3 gland units. The tubiform Dufour's gland has a length of about 350 μm (∅ 125 μm) only and is surrounded by a network of pronounced striated muscle fibres. The glandular epithelium is mono-layered belonging to the class 1 type of insect epidermal glands. The gland cells are characterized by conspicuous lipid vesicles. Secretion of material via the gland cuticle into the gland lumen is apparent. Analysis of the polypeptide composition demonstrated that the free gland tubules and the venom reservoir contain numerous proteins ranging from 3.4 to 200 kDa. The polypeptide composition of the Dufour's gland is completely different and contains no lectin-binding glycoproteins, whereas a dominant component of the venom droplets is a glycoprotein of about 80 kDa. Comparison of the venom reservoir contents with the polypeptide pattern of venom droplets revealed that all of the major proteinaceous constituents are secreted. The secreted venom contains exclusively proteins present in the soluble contents of the venom gland. The most abundant compound class in the Dufour's gland consisted of n-alkanes followed by monomethyl-branched alkanes and alkadienes. Heptacosane was the most abundant n-alkane. Furthermore, a single volatile compound, 2-methylpentan-3-one, was identified in various concentrations in the lipid extract of the Dufour's gland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 75 FR 45601 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Emerald Ash Borer; Host...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    .... Done in Washington, DC, this 28\\th\\ day of July 2010. Kevin Shea Acting Administrator, Animal and Plant... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service [Docket No. APHIS-2010-0064... Material from Canada AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Extension of...

  20. Correlation between Scientific Output and Collaboration among LIS Scholars around the World [as Reflected in Emerald Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Danesh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sample of The present investigation was drawn from the total number of LIS articles published in Emereald Database during 2003-2008 period. 8320 articles was produced by 10760 researchers. The most prolific writers, countries having the highest number of articles, the most prolific research centers, and the busiest journals based on article count alone, were identified. Mean coefficient of collaboration among LIS scholars was 0.08. No significant correlation was found between scientific output and degree of collaboration. Findings indicated that in spite of the importance of joint research that would eventually lead to an increase in quality, coefficient of collaboration among LIS scholars is very low.

  1. Issues in robot ethics seen through the lens of a moral Turing Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Anne; Øhrstrøm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Outstanding & highly commended paper in the 2016 Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence (see link above)......Outstanding & highly commended paper in the 2016 Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence (see link above)...

  2. The importance of university facilities for student satisfaction at a Norwegian University

    OpenAIRE

    Hanssen, Thor-Erik Sandberg; Solvoll, Gisle

    2015-01-01

    Author's accepted version (postprint). This article is © Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here (http://hdl.handle.net/11250/301303). Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  3. Supra-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios and other exotic geochemical signatures in rejuvinated Hawaiian magmas as fingerprints of carbonatitic auto-metasomatism in parts of the Hawaiian mantle plume

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rocholl; K. P. Jochum; D. Rhede; B. Stoll; U. Weis

    2014-01-01

    The rejuvenated Honolulu Volcanics (HV), Oahu, Hawaii, comprise small-volume magmas ranging from alkali basalt through basanite and nephelinite to melilite. Their origin is enigmatic and debated, because the magmas are highly enriched in incompatible trace elements but isotopically depleted and erupted some 1.3 Myrs after the Koolau shield building phase had ceased. We have analysed 26 HV basanitic to melilitic tuffs from Salt Lake Crater at Honolu...

  4. Reworking of Archean mantle in the NE Siberian craton by carbonatite and silicate melt metasomatism: Evidence from a carbonate-bearing, dunite-to-websterite xenolith suite from the Obnazhennaya kimberlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Doucet, Luc S.; Xu, Yigang; Golovin, Alexander V.; Oleinikov, Oleg B.

    2018-03-01

    The Obnazhennaya kimberlite in the NE Siberian craton hosts a most unusual cratonic xenolith suite, with common rocks rich in pyroxenes and garnet, and no sheared peridotites. We report petrographic and chemical data for whole rocks (WR) and minerals of 20 spinel and garnet peridotites from Obnazhennaya with Re-depletion Os isotope ages of 1.8-2.9 Ga (Ionov et al., 2015a) as well as 2 pyroxenites. The garnet-bearing rocks equilibrated at 1.6-2.8 GPa and 710-1050 °C. Some xenoliths contain vermicular spinel-pyroxene aggregates with REE patterns in clinopyroxene mimicking those of garnet. The peridotites show significant scatter of Mg# (0.888-0.924), Cr2O3 (0.2-1.4 wt.%) and high NiO (0.3-0.4 wt.%). None are pristine melting residues. Low-CaO-Al2O3 (≤0.9 wt.%) dunites and harzburgites are melt-channel materials. Peridotites with low to moderate Al2O3 (0.4-1.8 wt.%) usually have CaO > Al2O3, and some have pockets of calcite texturally equilibrated with olivine and garnet. Such carbonates, exceptional in mantle xenoliths and reported here for the first time for the Siberian mantle, provide direct evidence for modal makeover and Ca and LREE enrichments by ephemeral carbonate-rich melts. Peridotites rich in CaO and Al2O3 (2.7-8.0 wt.%) formed by reaction with silicate melts. We infer that the mantle lithosphere beneath Obnazhennaya, initially formed in the Mesoarchean, has been profoundly modified. Pervasive inter-granular percolation of highly mobile and reactive carbonate-rich liquids may have reduced the strength of the mantle lithosphere leading the way for reworking by silicate melts. The latest events before the kimberlite eruption were the formation of the carbonate-phlogopite pockets, fine-grained pyroxenite veins and spinel-pyroxene symplectites. The reworked lithospheric sections are preserved at Obnazhennaya, but similar processes could erode lithospheric roots in the SE Siberian craton (Tok) and the North China craton, where ancient melting residues and reworked garnet-bearing peridotites are absent. The modal, chemical and Os-isotope compositions of the Obnazhennaya xenoliths produced by reaction of refractory peridotites with melts are very particular (high Ca/Al, no Mg#-Al correlations, highly variable Cr, low 187Os/188Os, continuous modal range from olivine-rich to low-olivine peridotites, wehrlites and websterites) and distinct from those of fertile lherzolites in off-craton xenoliths and peridotite massifs. These features argue against the concept of 'refertilization' of cratonic and other refractory peridotites by mantle-derived melts as a major mechanism to form fertile to moderately depleted lherzolites in continental lithosphere. The Obnazhennaya xenoliths represent a natural rock series produced by 'refertilization', but include no rocks equivalent in modal, major and trace element to the fertile lherzolites. This study shows that 'refertilization' yields broad, continuous ranges of modal and chemical compositions with common wehrlites and websterites that are rare among off-craton xenoliths.

  5. Field-cage methodology for evaluating climatic suitability for introduced wood-borer parasitoids: preliminary results from the emerald ash borer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Juli Gould; Phil Taylor; Dick Bean; Carol Holko; Roy Van. Driesche

    2011-01-01

    Field-cage methods were developed to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-season releases at both a northern (Michigan) and a southern (...

  6. Modeling potential Emerald Ash Borer spread through GIS/cell-based/gravity models with data bolstered by web-based inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha M. Prasad; Davis Sydnor; Jonathan Bossenbroek; Mark W. Schwartz; Mark W. Schwartz

    2006-01-01

    We model the susceptibility and potential spread of the organism across the eastern United States and especially through Michigan and Ohio using Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data. We are also developing a cell-based model for the potential spread of the organism. We have developed a web-based tool for public agencies and private individuals to enter the...

  7. Karyotype divergence and spreading of 5S rDNA sequences between genomes of two species: darter and emerald gobies ( Ctenogobius , Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Filho, P A; Bertollo, L A C; Cioffi, M B; Costa, G W W F; Molina, W F

    2014-01-01

    Karyotype analyses of the cryptobenthic marine species Ctenogobius boleosoma and C. smaragdus were performed by means of classical and molecular cytogenetics, including physical mapping of the multigene 18S and 5S rDNA families. C. boleosoma has 2n = 44 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 42 acrocentrics; FN = 46) with a single chromosome pair each carrying 18S and 5S ribosomal sites; whereas C. smaragdus has 2n = 48 chromosomes (2 submetacentrics + 46 acrocentrics; FN = 50), also with a single pair bearing 18S rDNA, but an extensive increase in the number of GC-rich 5S rDNA sites in 21 chromosome pairs. The highly divergent karyotypes among Ctenogobius species contrast with observations in several other marine fish groups, demonstrating an accelerated rate of chromosomal evolution mediated by both chromosomal rearrangements and the extensive dispersion of 5S rDNA sequences in the genome. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Emerald Ash Borer Pest Alert, (English version)El barrenador del fresno, el barrenador verde esmeralda del fresno o (Spanish version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah McCullough; Steven Katovich

    2008-01-01

    A beetle from Asia, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was identified in July 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Larval feeding in the tissue between the bark and sapwood disrupts transport of nutrients and...

  9. Degradation of Emerald green in oil paint and its contribution to the rapid change in colour of the Descente des vaches (1834-1835) painted by Theodore Rousseau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, K.; Boon, J.J.; Boitelle, R.; Shimadzu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Descente des vaches (1836) by Theodore Rousseau in the Mesdag Collection in The Hague is barely readable and its paint layers are in poor condition. The surface of the painting is strongly deformed and cracked, the whole painting has darkened and especially the greens have lost all or most of their

  10. Trade-offs in parasitism efficiency and brood size mediate parasitoid coexistence, with implications for biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasitoids often are selected for use as biological control agents because of their high host specificity, yet such host specificity can result in strong interspecific competition. However, few studies have examined if and how various extrinsic factors (such as parasitism efficiency) influence the ...

  11. EMERALD: Emergency visit audit of patients treated under medical oncology in a tertiary cancer center: Logical steps to decrease the burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit; Patil, Vijay M; Noronha, Vanita; Ramaswamy, Anant; Gupta, Sudeep; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Bonda, Avinash; Chandrakanth, M V; Ostwal, Vikas; Khattry, Navin; Banavali, Shripad; Prabhash, Kumar

    2017-01-01

    We are a tertiary care cancer center and have approximately 1000-1500 emergency visits by cancer patients undergoing treatment under the adult medical oncology unit each month. However, due to the lack of a systematic audit, we are unable to plan steps toward the improvement in quality of emergency services, and hence the audit was planned. All emergency visits under the adult medical oncology department in the month of July 2015 were audited. The cause of visit, the demographic details, cancer details, and chemotherapy status were obtained from the electronic medical records. The emergency visits were classified as avoidable or unavoidable. Descriptive statistics were performed. Reasons for avoidable emergency visits were sought. Out of 1199 visits, 1168 visits were classifiable. Six hundred and ninety-six visits were classified as unavoidable (59.6%, 95% CI: 56.7-62.4), 386 visits were classified as probably avoidable visit (33.0%, 95% CI: 30.4-35.8) whereas the remaining 86 (7.4%, 95% CI: 6.0-9.01) were classified as absolutely avoidable. Two hundred and ninety-seven visits happened on weekends (25.6%) and 138 visits converted into an inpatient admission (11.9%). The factors associated with avoidable visits were curative intention of treatment (odds ratio - 2.49), discontinued chemotherapy status (risk ratio [RR] - 8.28), and private category file status (RR - 1.89). A proportion of visits to emergency services can be curtailed. Approximately one-fourth of patients are seen on weekends, and only about one-tenth of patients get admitted.

  12. Evaluation of the host specificity of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host-specificity determination prior to the introduction of non-native natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) is a critical component of the risk assessment for modern classical biological control programs. In the present study, we assessed the host specificity of a newly described parasitoid,...

  13. Field-Cage Methodology for Evaluating Climatic Suitability for Introduced Wood-Borer Parasitoids: Preliminary Results from the Emerald Ash Borer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D.; Duan, Jian J.; Bauer, Leah S.; Gould, Juli; Taylor, Phil; Bean, Dick; Holko, Carol; Driesche, Roy Van

    2011-01-01

    Field-cage methods were developed to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-season releases at both a northern (Michigan) and a southern (Maryland) location within the current North American range of A. planipennis. In August, September and October of 2009, five young green ash trees were selected at each location. Tetrastichus planipennisi and S. agrili were each randomly assigned to one of two cages attached to each tree, surrounding separate sections of trunk in which late-instar A. planipennis had been inserted. The following April, the caged trunk sections were dissected to determine the fate of each A. planipennis larva and the developmental stages of all recovered parasitoid progeny. At both locations, T. planipennisi and S. agrili were able to parasitize hosts and successfully overwinter (i.e., reach adulthood the following spring). For T. planipennisi, successful parasitism (i.e., parasitoid progeny reached adulthood) occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August and September releases in Michigan. At both locations, percent parasitism by T. planipennisi was higher in August and September than in October. For S. agrili, successful parasitism occurred for all caged releases in Maryland, but only for the August release in Michigan. In Maryland, percent parasitism by S. agrili in August and September was higher than in October. The caging method described here should be useful in determining the climatic suitability of other regions before proceeding with large-scale releases of either species and may have utility in other wood-borer parasitoid systems as well. PMID:22233133

  14. Final Environmental Assessment of Construction of Emerald Coast Technology and Research Campus at the University of Florida Reserarch Engineering Education Facility at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    document should be directed to Mr. Larry Chavers. Public comments should be directed to Mr. Mike Spaits. Mr. Chavers and Mr. Spaits can be reached...Section. • Should a gopher tortoise burrow be identified within the proposed path of construction by construction personnel, work will cease until...Natural Resources personnel have investigated the burrow and relocated any gopher tortoise or commensals to a suitable location. 3 • Gopher tortoise and

  15. 75 FR 29521 - Notice of Public Meetings of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Basing the U.S. Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... would also ensure that the Marine Corps' aircrews benefit from the aircraft's major technological... Leisure Lane, Emerald Isle; Western Carteret Public Library, 230 Taylor Notion Road, Cape Carteret...

  16. Mineralogical and Fluid Inclusions Evidence For The Genesis of Umm Addebaa-Umm Kabu Beryl Belt, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, S.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Beryl mineralization in quartz veins and pegmatites, are common deposits of tectonic-hydrothermal and/or igneous origin. The beryl-specialized granites association at Umm Addebaa-Umm Kabu belt is manifested in the field by the development of a system of beryl-bearing pegmatitic pods and quartz veins. The emplacement of these syn-tectonic pegmatitic leucogranites from which K- and Be-rich fluid phases were derived, are confined to the shear zones, as well as a broad zone of alkali metasomatism. Microthermometic studies of primary fluid inclusions within beryl growth zones are consistent with beryl precipitation from H 2 O-CO 2 ± CH 4 bearing saline brines. The estimated fluid composition is approximately 0.88 mol% H 2 O, 0.017 mol% CO 2 ± 0.001 mol% CH 4 and 0.10 mol% NaCl (2- 11 wt.% NaCl eq.). Fluid inclusion results are consistent with that mineralization in pegmatites and quartz veins that are formed by two genetic stages. The first stage is characterized by temperature of formation in the range of 216.4 - 378.3 °C, with corresponding pressures along fluid inclusion isochore paths ranging from 1.04 to 2.25 bar. The second stage is of aqueous fluid represented with low temperature (177-255°C) and pressure ≤ 1 bar, but high saline (16-22 wt.% NaCl eq.) which might explain mixing of the early carbonaceous fluid with late meteoric water accompanied with pressure release. Thus, it can be inferred that the Be-bearing solutions were moderately saline, but CO 2 (and possible CH 4 )-rich fluid implies that Be was most probably complexed by carbonate ( + CH 4 ) - chloride base. The different paragenetic types of emerald and beryl associated with granitoid rocks indicates that the chemistry of the Be-bearing fluids (rather than that of the bulk rock), and syn-tectonic intrusions of leucogranites and pegmatites (Be deriving sources) along major ductile shear zones are the important factors controlling the crystallization of beryl.

  17. Gut microbiota of an invasive subcortical beetle, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, across various life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archana Vasanthakumar; Jo Handelsman; Patrick D. Schloss; Leah S. Bauer; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2008-01-01

    We characterized gut microbial communities in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive phloem-feeding and wood-boring beetle that has caused extensive mortality to urban and forest ash trees. Analyses included both 16S rRNA gene-based and culture-based approaches. We estimated that the emerald ash borer gut harbors 44, 71,...

  18. Effect of Parasitoid: Host Ratio and Parasitoid and Host Group Size on Fitness of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a Parasitoid of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): Implications for Mass-Rearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producing insect natural enemies in laboratories or insectaries for biological pest control is often expensive, and developing cost-effective rearing techniques is a goal of many biological control programs. Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a recently described...

  19. Petrographic study of hypo-thermal and pyro-metasomatic deposits on the oriental border of Tichka mountain (Occidental High Atlas, Morocco); Contribution a l'etude des gites hypothermaux et pyrometasomatiques en fonction de la petrographie dans la bordure orientale du Massif du Tichka (Haut Atlas occidental)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizard, C; Ziegler, V [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    It describes the petrographic and metallogenic study of the oriental side of Tichka mountain (Occidental High Atlas, Morocco) which is the center of an anticlinal system, strongly folded, and approximately SW-NE oriented. The main object of this study is the description of its metallogenic activity and in particular the large variety of paragenesis which have been observed in the oriental part of Tichka mountain where the metamorphism is intense. This area presents a large abundance and diversity of deposits. The structural aspect of the oriental part of the Tichka mountain is described. The petrographic study of the complex structure of the oriental border, in particular the studies of the leucocratic complex of veins and apophyses and of the schistous and calcareous metamorphic complex, leads to make assumptions on the relationship between terminal phase of the metamorphism and the hypo-thermal paragenesis. The abundance of facies and the intensity of metamorphism also give the possibility to establish relationships between the different minerals deposits. The metallogenic study shows that mineralization are all peripheral on the Tichka mountain and increase with the number and size of the apophysis which is observed on the east side. The various hypo-thermal paragenesis are studied in the same order of the associated apophysis. The peripheral meso-thermal deposits of the north area are briefly described to complete the metallogenic aspects of the oriental border of the Tichka mountain. This study shows the nature of the two main factors which originate different types of paragenesis: one is the intrusion deep of the mineralizer, the second is the physical and chemical nature of the medium where the paragenesis occurred. (M.P.)

  20. A preliminary deposit model for lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight; McCauley, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. We emphasize practical aspects of pegmatite geology that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites, or for assessing regions for pegmatite-related mineral resource potential. These deposits are an important link in the world’s supply chain of rare and strategic elements, accounting for about one-third of world lithium production, most of the tantalum, and all of the cesium.

  1. Natural infections of Beauveria bassiana in Agrilus planipennis populations in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louela A. Castrillo; Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Michael H. Griggs; John D. Vandenberg

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera, Buprestidae), is an invasive pest from Asia posing a serious threat to ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Beetles have a 1- or 2...

  2. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. B. Starling Emerald1 2 L. S. Shashidhara1. Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad, India 500 007; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany ...

  3. 75 FR 81258 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Notice of Petition for Waiver of Electrolux...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... associate General Counsel, Electrolux Home Products, Inc., 20445 Emerald Parkway, SW., Suite 250, P.O. Box... insight, to meet the real needs of consumers and professionals. Electrolux's principal clothes washer...

  4. Effective utilisation of generation Y Quantity Surveyors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    together and tested by means of open interview discussions with senior QS professionals. ... employers could better utilise generation Y employees. 2. Literature review .... Literature was reviewed by using search engines (Emerald, Business.

  5. The Monitoring, Detection, Isolation and Assessment of Information Warfare Attacks Through Multi-Level, Multi-Scale System Modeling and Model Based Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    login identity to the one under which the system call is executed, the parameters of the system call execution - file names including full path...Anomaly detection COAST-EIMDT Distributed on target hosts EMERALD Distributed on target hosts and security servers Signature recognition Anomaly...uses a centralized architecture, and employs an anomaly detection technique for intrusion detection. The EMERALD project [80] proposes a

  6. Intrusion Detection: Generics and State-of-the-Art (la Detection de l’intrusion: Modeles generiques et etat de l’art)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    person operating on a host, e.g. identified by a login account; Systems: hardware, operating system; Network services (e.g. PKI, DNS); Applications...mobile-agent technology combined with network topology features. The Emerald environment is a distributed, scalable tool suite, for network surveillance...RAID ’99, Computer Networks, volume 34, number 4, 2000. 21. Source: http://www.sdl.sri.com/ emerald /project.html, 6-11-2000. 22. Lippmann

  7. Occurrence of Cr-bearing beryl in stream sediment from Eskişehir, NW Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Erkoyun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Beryl crystals are found within stream sediments transecting schists in the northeast of Eskişehir, western Anatolia. This paper studied the Eskişehir beryl crystals with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX, infrared spectroscopy (IR and geochemical analyses. Beryl is accompanied by garnet, glaucophane, quartz, epidote, muscovite and chlorite in the stream sediments. The crystals are euhedral emerald (green gem beryl and light bluishgreen aquamarine, with ideal sharp IR bands. Wet chemical analysis of Eskişehir beryl yielded 61.28% SiO2, 15.13% Al2O3, 12.34% BeO, 0.18% Cr2O3, 1.49% MgO, 1.69% Na2O, 0.98% Fe2O3, and 0.008% V2O3, resulting in the formula (Al1.75Cr0.01Mg0.22Fe0.08(Be2.90Si6.00(Na0.32O18. Large Ion Lithophile Elements (LILE (barium, strontium, some transition metals (cobalt, except nickel and High Field Strength Elements (HFSE (niobium, zirconium, and yttrium in stream sediments that are associated with beryl exhibited low content about metamorphic rocks. Beryl formation appears to be controlled by upthrust faults and fractures that juxtaposed them with Cr-bearing ophiolitic units and a regime of metasomatic reactions. Such beryl crystals have also been found in detrital sediments that are derived from the schists.   Presencia de berilios relacionados con Cromo en corrientes sedimentarias de Eskisehir, noroeste de Turquía   Resumen Cristales de berilo fueron encontrados en sedimentos de corrientes que atraviesan en esquistos en el noreste de Eskisehir, al oeste de Anatolia. En este artículo se presentan resultados sobre el estudio de los cristales de berilio de Eskisehir con microscopio electrónico de barrido (SEM-EDX, del inglés Scanning Electron Microscopy, espectroscopia infrarroja y análisis geoquímicos. El berilio estaba acompañado de granate, glaucofana, cuarzo, epidota, moscovita, y clorito en las corrientes sedmientarias. Los cristales son esmeraldas de formas definidas (gema verde de

  8. Geochemical and Os–Hf–Nd–Sr Isotopic Characterization of North Patagonian Mantle Xenoliths: Implications for Extensive Melt Extraction and Percolation Processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mundl, A.; Ntaflos, T.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Bizimis, M.; Bjerg, E. A.; Wegner, W.; Hauzenberger, Ch. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2016), s. 685-715 ISSN 0022-3530 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : metasomatism * Patagonia * radiogenic isotopes * Re–Os * SCLM Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.280, year: 2016

  9. Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbonatites from Puna, Jujuy and Salta, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappettini, Eduardo O.; Rubiolo, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    δ 13 and δ 18 O data from carbonatites indicate that bodies formed by crystallization of carbonate magma with subsequent formation of metasomatic and hydrothermal carbonatitic veins. The isotopic data are consistent with the available geochemical and petrologic information. (author)

  10. Uranium in mantle processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortini, M.

    1984-01-01

    (1) Metasomatism is an effective process in the mantle. It controls the distribution of U, Th and Pb in the mantle before the onset of magma formation. (2) Radioactive disequilibria demonstrate that magma formation is an open-system very fast process in which Ra, U and Th are extracted in large amounts from a mantle source that is geochemically distinct from the mantle fraction from which the melt is formed. (3) Because the enrichment of U, Th and Ra in the magma is so fast, the concept of mineral-melt partition coefficient is not valid for these elements during magma formation. (4) Metasomatism seems to generally produce an increase in μ and a decrease in K of the metasomatized mantle region. (5) Magma formation at oceanic ridges and islands seems to generally produce a decrease in K, in its mantle source region. (6) The major source of U, Th, Ra and Pb in a magma probably is the metasomatic mantle component. Instead, the major source of Sr and Nd in a magma is the non-metasomatic, more 'refractory' mantle component. (7) This proposed model is testable. It predicts isotopic disequilibrium of Pb between coexisting minerals and whole rocks, and a correlation of Pb with Th isotopes. (author)

  11. Calc-sodic zoning in rocks from Lagoa Real uranium Province, state of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raposo, C.; Matos, E.C. de; Brito, W. de

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies of the lithogeochemistry, carried out on various deposits from the Uranium Province of Lagoa Real, show that in relation to the complex and multiphased processes of metasomatism, the sodic metasomatites are younger and were superposed on the potassic metasomatites. Such metasomatites developed in zones of extended and rejuvenated faults, after the transformation of the gnaisses, granitic rocks, amphibolites and ferruginous quartzites into various tectonites (mylonites, blastomylonites and protomylonites). The calcic metasomatism, subsequent to those phases, took place during the course of tectonothermal reactivations marking the termination of the principal metasomatic processes which aftected the rocks of Lagoa Real. The uranium deposit 'Jazida Laranjeiras', centrally situated in the Uranium Province of Lagoa Real is the only deposit in which the uranium mineralization is not intimately associated with the calcic metasomatism. Here, the ratio Na 2 O/CaO in the albitites is in the vicinity of 7,5 whereas in the other deposits this ratio decreases to values of about 1,5. The authors suggest calcic zoning (in the post-albitite phase) along the sigmoidal structure which localizes the uranium deposits, with an increase of the CaO content in the extreme parts of the structure - deposit 'Jazida Cachoeira' in the north and anomaly No. 02/12 in the south. Also suggested is the vertical zoning of calcium, whereby the intensity of the metasomatic phenomenon is increased towards the hanging wall side of the mieral parcel. (Author) [pt

  12. Geochemical evidence for subduction in the early Archaean from quartz-carbonate-fuchsite mineralization, Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pope, Emily Catherine; Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Bird, Dennis K.

    Quartz, carbonate and fuchsite (chromian muscovite) is a common metasomatic assemblage observed in orogenic gold systems, both in Phanerozoic convergent margin settings, and within supracrustal and greenstone belts of Precambrian rocks. Geologic and geochemical observations in younger orogenic...... systems suggest that ore-forming metasomatic fluids are derived from subduction-related devolitilization reactions, implying that orogenic Au-deposits in Archaean and Proterozoic supracrustal rock suites are related to subduction-style plate tectonics beginning early in Earth history. Justification...... with Phanerozoic orogenic deposits and that this type of metasomatism is a unique result of subduction-related processes. Fuchsite from the ISB has a δ18O and δD of 7.7 to 17.9‰ and -115 to -61‰, respectively. δ18O of quartz from the same rocks is between 10.3 and 18.6‰. Muscovite-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry...

  13. Geochemical typification of kimberlite and related rocks of the North Anabar region, Yakutia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargin, A. V.; Golubeva, Yu. Yu.

    2017-11-01

    The results of geochemical typification of kimberlites and related rocks (alneites and carbonatites) of the North Anabar region are presented with consideration of the geochemical specification of their source and estimation of their potential for diamonds. The content of representative trace elements indicates the predominant contribution of an asthenospheric component (kimberlites and carbonatites) in their source, with a subordinate contribution of vein metasomatic formations containing Cr-diopside and ilmenite. A significant contribution of water-bearing potassium metasomatic parageneses is not recognized. According to the complex of geochemical data, the studied rocks are not industrially diamondiferous.

  14. Uranium and thorium in rocks and minerals of Zaangarsk alkaline massif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmodin, S.M.; Gofman, A.M.; Ksenzova, V.I.; Malmova, Z.V.; Nemirovskaya, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    U and Th distribution in rocks of the massif of alkaline-granitoid formation is studied using the methods of γ-spectrometry and neutron- fragment radiography. Predominant accumulation of U and Th in final products of magmatic differentiation - foyaites - is established. U and Th concentrations increased sharply during postmagmatic stage of alkaline massif formation - in permatites and metasomatically alterated rocks (Th/U and U/K ratios can serve as criteria for identification of such formations). The increase of U part, connected with accessory minerals in pegmatites and metasomatically alterated rocks, is pointed out. For U in postmagmatically alterated rocks high concentrations due to microcracks are characteristic [ru

  15. New Data on the Composition of Ophiolite Complexes on Karaginskii Island (Eastern Kamchatka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolotnev, S. G.; Tsukanov, N. V.; Sidorov, E. G.

    2018-03-01

    The geochemistry and composition of peridotite rock-forming minerals from blocks in the serpentinite mélange of Karaginskii Island have been studied. The composition features of the rock-forming minerals are indicative of the fact that they represent abyssal peridotites of the mid-oceanic ridges that did not undergo remelting under suprasubduction conditions. According to the geochemical data, these rocks were subject to metasomatic alterations under mantle conditions in the suprasubduction setting, which were caused by metasomatizing melts and/or fluids generated in the subduction zone.

  16. Water Level Controls on Sap Flux of Canopy Species in Black Ash Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Shannon; Matthew Van Grinsven; Joshua Davis; Nicholas Bolton; Nam Noh; Thomas Pypker; Randall Kolka

    2018-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh.) exhibits canopy dominance in regularly inundated wetlands, suggesting advantageous adaptation. Black ash mortality due to emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) will alter canopy composition and site hydrology. Retention of these forested wetlands requires understanding black ash...

  17. 7 CFR 301.53-2 - Regulated articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulated articles. 301.53-2 Section 301.53-2... articles. The following are regulated articles: (a) The emerald ash borer; firewood of all hardwood (non... article, product, or means of conveyance not listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be designated as...

  18. The Effects of Expert Systems Training versus Content-Based Training on the Troubleshooting Achievement of Onan Corporation Service Personnel. Training and Development Research Center, Project Number Forty-Eight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Edward John

    This study compared the effectiveness and efficiency of trainees in the Onan small products gasoline course under two training curricula: (1) the control group curriculum was the in-place course on the Emerald generator set; and (2) the experimental group curriculum was essentially the same with the addition of one lesson based on methods used by…

  19. Attraction of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and other buprestids to sticky traps of various colors and shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland

    2013-01-01

    The family Buprestidae (Coleoptera) contains numerous economically significant species, including the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, first discovered in North America in 2002. Effective traps for monitoring spread and population densities of EAB and other buprestids are needed. Studies were conducted in 2008 to test different...

  20. EAB induced tree mortality impacts ecosystem respiration and tree water use in an experimental forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Douglas J. Lynch; Kathleen S. Knight; Miquel A. Gonzales-Meler

    2011-01-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) has been spreading across the forest landscape of the Midwest resulting in the rapid decline of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Ash trees represent a dominant riparian species in temperate deciduous forests of the Eastern United States (USDA FIA Database). Prior...

  1. Is tree loss associated with cardiovascular-disease risk in the Women's Health Initiative? A natural experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; Yvonne L. Michael; Demetrios Gatziolis; Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Eric A. Whitsel

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Women's Health Initiative were used to quantify the relationship between the loss of trees to an invasive forest pest—the emerald ash borer—and cardiovascular disease. We estimated semi- parametric Cox proportional hazards model of time to cardiovascular disease, adjusting for confounders. We defined the incidence of cardiovascular disease as acute...

  2. Block Building for Children: Making Buildings of the World with the Ultimate Construction Toy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lester

    This book presents a series of projects for children of all levels of expertise, beginning with abstract patterns, rows, and towers and progressing to step-by-step instructions for 18 projects, including a bridge, boat dock, airport, shopping mall, skyscraper, castle, Greek temple, Toy Store City, City of the Future, and The Emerald City of Oz.…

  3. Proceedings of symposium on ash in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Michler; Matthew D., eds. Ginzel

    2010-01-01

    Includes 5 papers and 30 abstracts covering topics related to the biology and ecology of the ash species, ash utilization and management, emerald ash borer, and other threats to ash, and genetics and conservation of ash species. A paper titled "Population-level variation of Fraxinus americana L. is influenced by climate...

  4. Climate variation alters the synchrony of host–parasitoid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although some research has examined how parasitoids will respond to colder temperatures or experimental warming, we know relatively little about how increased variation in temperature could affect interactions between parasitoids and their hosts. Using a study system consisting of emerald ash borer...

  5. Gypsy moth IPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael L. McManus; Andrew M. Liebhold

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, North American forests have been inundated by a multitude of alien pest invasions. Among these, noteworthy invaders include the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease. These species have greatly altered both the ecological and...

  6. Invasive pests—insects and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Duerr; Paul A. Mistretta

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsNonnative pest species have increasing impacts in the South regardless of climate change, patterns of land ownership, or changes in the composition of vegetation.“New” nonnative invasive insects and diseases will have serious impacts on southern forests over the next 50 years. Some species such as emerald ash borer...

  7. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation and plant regeneration of the hardwood tree species Fraxinus profunda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micah E. Stevens; Paula M. Pijut

    2014-01-01

    Using mature hypocotyls as the initial explants, an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation system was successfully developed for pumpkin ash (Fraxinus profunda). This transformation protocol is an invaluable tool to combat the highly aggressive, non-native emerald ash borer (EAB), which has the potential to...

  8. About Chinese Characters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is perhaps a facet of human nature that makes a person want to beking, and to control others. The character "王" was originally"王",symbolizing the emerald prayer beads worn exclusively by the king. Inthe course of this character’s evolution, however, new connotations were

  9. Characterization of Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) isolates associated with Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) populations in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louela A. Castrillo; Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Michael H. Griggs; John D. Vandenberg

    2010-01-01

    Earlier research in Michigan on fungal entomopathogens of the emerald ash borer (EAB), a major invasive pest of ash trees, resulted in the isolation of Beauveria bassiana from late-instar larvae and pre-pupae. In the present study, some of these isolates were characterized and compared to ash bark- and soil-derived isolates to determine their...

  10. Susceptibility of two hymenopteran parasitoids of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberly M Dean; John D. Vandenberg; Michael H. Griggs; Leah S. Bauer; Melissa K. Fierke

    2012-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, native to Asia, is killing ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) across 15 states and southeastern Canada. Integrated pest management using biological control is the only viable long-term approach for controlling the spread of EAB outside of host resistance. Three hymenopteran parasitoids...

  11. Microbial control of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) with Beauveria bassiana strain GHA: field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Beauveria bassiana strain GHA, applied as BotaniGard ES, on newly colonised and well-established populations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) were evaluated in the field using foliar and trunk sprays in Michigan in 2004-2005. Results from field trials at a newly colonised white ash...

  12. Exploring connections between trees and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey Donovan; Marie. Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Humans have intuitively understood the value of trees to their physical and mental health since the beginning of recorded time. A scientist with the Pacific Northwest Research Station wondered if such a link could be scientifically validated. His research team took advantage of an infestation of emerald ash borer, an invasive pest that kills ash trees, to conduct a...

  13. Heat treatment of firewood : meeting the phytosanitary requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Richard Bergman; Brian K. Brashaw; Scott Myers; Marc Joyal

    2011-01-01

    The movement of firewood within emerald ash borer- (EAB-) infested states and into adjoining states has been a major contributor to the spread of EAB throughout the United States and Canada. In an effort to stop the further spread of EAB from infested areas and to facilitate interstate commerce, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has required and...

  14. Heat sterilization of ash (Fraxinus spp.) firewood : heat-treating options, temperature monitoring and thermal verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Richard Bergman; T. Mace

    2010-01-01

    Because of the potential risk associated with moving emerald ash borer (EAB)-infested firewood, the interstate movement of all hardwood firewood in the USA is currently restricted under the Federal quarantine. Communities and firewood producers are now faced with decisions on how to treat their firewood for interstate commerce. The new US Federal regulations for heat...

  15. The Defense Message System and the U.S. Coast Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    these mail services, the Internet also provides a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and remote login between host computers (TELNET) capabilities. 17 [Ref...the Joint Maritime Intelligence Element (JMIE), Zincdust, and Emerald . [Ref. 27] 4. Secure Data Network The Coast Guard’s Secure Data Network (SDN

  16. A Survey of Automatic Code Generating Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    ID that matches a name in the user’s database file and must then match the password specified for that user. A successful login will allow access to...Software Corp. P.O. Box 10089 Chicago, IL 60610 312-743-2755 PRO-2 Prodata, Inc. 4477 Emerald Suite C-100 Boise, ID 83706 208-342-6878 67 GTP Allen, Emerson

  17. Development of a Semi-Autonomous Underwater Vehicle for Intervention Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-30

    lasts until the program is finished. The graphical user interface, as any other program in DVECS, has to login into the managers, which can be running...serial communication card ( Emerald -MM PC/104 Module from Diamond Systems Corporation) that offers two independent RS-232 serial ports, which are used to

  18. Suur-Helsingi 2050

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise ideekonkursi "Suur-Helsingi 2050" 109 projekti seas võitis WSP Finland Ltd tööga "Emerald", mille põhiautorid on arhitektid Juha Eskolin, Jenni Lautso, Ilona Mansikka ja Tuomas Vuorinen. Projekt tegeleb komplekselt maakasutuse, elustiili, transpordi, maastikukujunduse, energiatootmise ja säästva arenguga

  19. Defense AT&L (Volume 34, Number 4, July-August 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    login /login.jsp>. Mem- bers of the AT&L workforce, industry partners, and the general public now have a single place to register for their respective DAU... Emerald Coast Conference Center, Fort Wal- ton Beach, Fla. This year’s theme will be “Precision Strike Capabilities for the Future Battlefield.” Exhibit

  20. The Resource. Spring 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    HPC system. The configuration of the organizer and an example login session are also included in the guide. Although a PalmTM Organizer is not a...systems follow the theme of precious gems such as Cobalt, Diamond, Emerald , and Ruby. Precious metals, for example, Gold, Silver, and Platinum, are

  1. The use of partial least squares path modeling in international marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henseler, Jörg; Ringle, Christian M.; Sinkovics, Rudolf R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine the status quo of PLS path modeling in international marketing research, we conducted an exhaustive literature review. An evaluation of double-blind reviewed journals through important academic publishing databases (e.g., ABI/Inform, Elsevier ScienceDirect, Emerald Insight,

  2. 50 CFR 36.39 - Public use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Swanson Lakes are only open for sport ice fishing. Andy Simons Unit Emerald Lake Green Lake Harvey... sport ice fishing. South of Sterling Highway Headquarters Lake is restricted to administrative use only... this time, the Refuge Manager will authorize, through public notice, the use of snowmobiles less than...

  3. Survival and phenology of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) reared on a newly developed artificial diet free of host material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melody A. Keena; Hannah Nadel; Juli. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The final phase in the development of an artificial diet that contains no ash host material and the phenology of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Bupresidae) on that diet are documented. A diet containing powdered ash phloem exists, but host material introduces potential variability and contamination, and the cost and...

  4. Seed collection success and failure in fraxinus gene conservation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph D. Zeleznik; Andrew J. David

    2017-01-01

    National seed collection and gene conservation programs have expanded in recent years, especially in response to pressure from non-native pests such as the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis). Since 2008, we have been working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS) and USDA Forest Service (USDA FS) leading seed collection...

  5. Spatial and temporal distribution of trunk-injected 14C-Imidacloprid in Fraxinus trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara R. Tanis; Bert M. Cregg; David Mota-Sanchez; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer) in 2002, researchers have tested several methods of chemical control. Soil drench or trunk injection products containing imidacloprid are commonly used to control adults. However, efficacy can be highly variable andmay be due to uneven translocation of systemic...

  6. Dispersal of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from discrete epicenters in two outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.W. Siegert; D.G. McCullough; D.W. Williams; I. Fraser; T.M. Poland; S.J. Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem- feeding beetle native to Asia, has become one of the most destructive forest pests in North America. Since it was Þrst identified in 2002 in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, dozens of isolated A. planipennis populations have been...

  7. Summary of findings from the Great Plains Tree and Forest Invasives Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Andrew J. Lister; Cody. Sullivan

    2018-01-01

    The Great Plains Tree and Forest Invasives Initiative (GPI) was a cooperative effort of the U.S. Forest Service and state forestry agencies in Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota, with a primary goal of evaluating the tree resources throughout the four-state region as a preparedness measure for the arrival of invasive pests, such as the emerald ash borer...

  8. A technique for mapping urban ash trees using object-based image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Susan J. Crocker; Greg C. Liknes

    2010-01-01

    Ash trees are an important resource in the State of Minnesota and a common fixture lining the streets of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. In 2009, the emerald ash borer (EAB), an invasive pest of ash, was discovered in the city of St. Paul. To properly respond to the new-found threat, decisionmakers would benefit from detailed, spatially explicit information on the...

  9. Quantifying change in riparian ash forests following the introduction of EAB in Michigan and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2012-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae; EAB) is an introduced beetle that kills ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. While most EAB-related ash mortality has been documented in urban areas, the effects of EAB in forested settings, particularly in riparian forests, are not well known. This study utilizes...

  10. Future directions in EAB-affected forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Roy Van Driesche; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    The ability of natural enemies to slow emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), population growth in a given area will play a major role in determining whether many native ash species can persist as functional components of forest ecosystems. Population growth of EAB, like that of any other organism, is...

  11. Evaluation of non-invasive trunk sprays and trunk-injected emamectic benzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; D.L. Cappaert; T.M. Poland; A.C. Anulewicz; P. Lewis; J. Molongoski

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, we continued to evaluate two neo-nicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid and dinotefuron, applied as non-invasive trunk sprays to control emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Neo-nicotinoid products are widely used to protect landscape ash trees because they are relatively safe for humans and non-target species. These...

  12. Evaluation of log submergence to control EAB and preserve black ash for native American basketry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Damon J. Crook; Tina M. Ciaramitaro

    2011-01-01

    Many Native American cultures use black ash, Fraxinus nigra, for basket-making because its ring-porous wood allows the annual layers of xylem to be easily separated. The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) is threatening North America's ash resource including black ash, and a centuries-old native art form. Native...

  13. Retrospective analysis of EAB spread: understanding the effect of landscape pattern on invasion and propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Greg C. Liknes; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2011-01-01

    Spread of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) in the United States has been rapid and extensive. Nearly 10 years after its initial detection near Detroit, Michigan, EAB is now found in 15 states spanning a radius greater than 500 miles. While human activity has been central to facilitating the spread of EAB over long distances, the...

  14. Hard assets : The return on rare diamonds and gems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2012-01-01

    This note examines the investment performance of diamonds and other gems (sapphires, rubies, and emeralds) over the period 1999–2010, using a novel data set of auction transactions. Over our time frame, the annualized real USD returns for white and colored diamonds equaled 6.4% and 2.9%,

  15. Hard Assets : The Returns on Rare Diamonds and Gems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the investment performance of diamonds and other gems (sapphires, rubies, and emeralds) over the period 1999-2010, using a novel data set of auction transactions. Between 1999 and 2010, the annualized real USD returns for white and colored diamonds equaled 6.4% and 2.9%,

  16. Don't Move Firewood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northeastern Area, S& PF USDA Forest Service

    2006-01-01

    Our forests are threatened by nonnative insects that can kill large numbers of trees. Three recently introduced insects, emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and Sirex woodwasp are wood-infesting species that can be transported long distances in firewood. Once transported into new areas, these insects can become established and kill local trees. We must STOP THE...

  17. Firewood Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry; PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources; Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

    2006-01-01

    Help stop the movement of exotic pests. Don't move Firewood! Exotic wood borers like emerald ash borer, Asian Long-horned beetle and Sirex wood wasp threaten Pennsylvania's forestland. Exotic wood boring insects can become established when infested firewood is transported to new areas.

  18. 76 FR 33245 - Endangered Species; File No. 15135

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA466 Endangered..., 132 Conch Court, Emerald Isle, NC 28594, has been issued a permit to take threatened and endangered sea turtles for purposes scientific research. ADDRESSES: The permit and related documents are...

  19. High spatial resolution spectral unmixing for mapping ash species across a complex urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Pontius; Ryan P. Hanavan; Richard A. Hallett; Bruce D. Cook; Lawrence A. Corp

    2017-01-01

    Ash (Fraxinus L.) species are currently threatened by the emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) across a growing area in the eastern US. Accurate mapping of ash species is required to monitor the host resource, predict EAB spread and better understand the short- and long-term effects of EAB on the ash resource...

  20. Hard assets : The return of rare diamonds and gems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc; Spaenjers, Christophe; Grynberg, Roman; Mbayi, Letsema

    This note examines the investment performance of diamonds and other gems (sapphires, rubies, and emeralds) over the period 1999–2010, using a novel data set of auction transactions. Over our time frame, the annualized real USD returns for white and colored diamonds equaled 6.4% and 2.9%,