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Sample records for pediatric type-1 human

  1. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In the late 1980s all Danish children with type 1 diabetes were invited for a nationwide evaluation of glycemic control. Approximately 75% (n = 720) participated and have later been referred to as The Danish Cohort of Pediatric Diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987). The results were surprisingly poor glycemic...... control among these young patients which lead to a great emphasis on glycemic control in the Danish Pediatric Departments. In 1995 the participants were invited for yet another evaluation but this time with main focus on early signs of microvascular complications - 339 participated. The mean HbA1c had...

  2. Ocular manifestations of Type 1 diabetes mellitus in pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Akil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To evaluate the necessity of ocular screening in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. Aims: This study aims to investigate the diabetes-related ocular changes according to the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c level and duration of diabetes in children and compare the results with nondiabetic healthy children. Settings and Design: Observational cross-sectional study designed by ophthalmology and pediatric endocrinology clinics. Subjects and Methods: Forty-two children with Type 1 DM, 42 healthy gender- and age-matched children as controls were enrolled. All patients underwent ophthalmic and physical examination, with a review of medical history and current medication. HbA1c level, best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP, central corneal thickness (CCT, tear break-up time (BUT, Schirmer test, dilated fundus examination findings, central retinal thickness (CRT, and total macular volume (TMV measurements were noted. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Chi-square test for comparison of the group parameters and correlation analyses (Spearman analysis were performed with SPSS statistical software 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: Type 1 DM group exhibited significantly reduced Schirmer test, increased IOP and decreased retinal thickness relative to the age-matched control group (P < 0.05 but no statistically significant difference was found for the BUT (P = 0.182 and for the CCT (P = 0.495. The correlations between the age, duration, HbA1c and IOP, BUT, Schirmer test, TMV, CRT measurements did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: More frequent screening may be needed for complications, including neuropathy-related dry eye syndrome, IOP changes, and diabetic retinopathy in children with Type 1 DM.

  3. Prognostic value of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 3'A mutation in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Eleonora; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Boniotto, Michele; Crovella, Sergio; Salvatori, Francesca; Palomba, Elvia; Pastore, Angela; Cancrini, Caterina; de Martino, Maurizio; Plebani, Anna; Castelli, Guido; Rossi, Paolo; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Amoroso, Antonio; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2002-03-01

    A mutation of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 gene (SDF-1 3'A) was shown to protect adults exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from infection and to affect HIV disease progression in adults. The presence of this mutation in HIV-1-infected Kenyan children did not predict mother-to-child virus transmission. The SDF-1 3'A polymorphism was studied in 256 HIV-1-infected, 118 HIV-1-exposed but uninfected, and 170 unexposed and uninfected children of Italian origin, and the frequency of SDF-1 3'A heterozygosity and homozygosity in each of the 3 groups was similar. Of the 256 HIV-1-infected children, 194 were regularly followed up and were assigned to groups according to disease progression. The frequency of the SDF-1 3'A allele was substantially lower among children with long-term nonprogression than among children with rapid (P =.0329) or delayed (P =.0375) progression. We show that the presence of the SDF-1 3'A gene correlates with accelerated disease progression in HIV-1-infected children born to seropositive mothers but does not protect against mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission.

  4. Drug resistance prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected pediatric populations in Honduras and El Salvador during 1989-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín, Africa; Erazo, Karen; Escobar, Gustavo; de Mulder, Miguel; Yebra, Gonzalo; Martín, Leticia; Jovel, Luis Enrique; Castaneda, Luis; Pérez, Elsy

    2011-05-01

    Emergence of viral resistance is a major obstacle for antiretroviral treatment (ART) effectiveness. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) variants and drug-resistance mutations were identified in naive and antiretroviral drug-experienced children with virologic failure, in Honduras and El Salvador. Dried blood spots (DBS) from 80 individuals (54 from Honduras, 26 from El Salvador) infected during their childhood between 1989 and 2009 were collected in 2009. The HIV pol region was amplified and sequenced to identify antiretroviral-resistant mutations according to the 2009 International AIDS Society. The genotypic drug resistance interpretation was performed using the Stanford algorithm. HIV-1 variants were characterized by phylogenetic analysis and subtyping tools. HIV-1 protease and reverse transcription sequences were obtained from DBS specimens in 71 and 66 patients, respectively, of the 80 patients. All children were native Central Americans carrying subtype B, with a mean age of 9 years, most were male (65%), perinatally infected (96%), with moderate/severe AIDS symptoms (70%), and receiving first line ART at the time of sequencing (65%). Diagnostic delay was frequently observed. Infected children from Honduras presented longer ART experience and clinical outcomes, and more frequent severe symptoms. Resistant variants infected 1 of 11 naive children from El Salvador but none of the perinatally infected naive children from Honduras. Resistance was higher among ART-exposed individuals in both countries and similar for protease inhibitors (16%), nucleoside reverse transcription inhibitors (44%-52%), and nonnucleoside reverse-transcription inhibitors (66.7%). One in 10 pretreated children in each country was infected with resistant viruses to the 3 drug families. Our data support the need for continued surveillance of resistance patterns using DBS at national levels among naive and pretreated children to optimize the ART regimens.

  5. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  6. Sodium Oxybate treatment in pediatric type 1 narcolepsy.

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    Moresco, Monica; Pizza, Fabio; Antelmi, Elena; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2018-03-05

    Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) is a rare chronic neurologic disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hallucinations and disrupted nocturnal sleep, usually with onset during childhood/adolescence. Pediatric NT1 is associated with limitations on children's activities and achievements, especially poor performance at school, difficulty with peers due to disease symptoms and comorbidities including depression, obesity, and precocious puberty. NT1 disease is caused by the selective loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, most probably related to an autoimmune pathophysiology. Indeed a strong genetic predisposition including the HLA system and other associations in genes involved in immune responses has been found together with the triggering role of environmental agents such as H1N1 influenza infections and vaccinations. Sodium Oxybate (SO) is a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric (GHB) acid that is synthetized by neurons in the brain and functions as neurotransmitter. GHB is a central nervous system depressant and produces dose-dependent sedation. SO is a first line medication for cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness in adults with NT1, but can be helpful also for sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucination and sleep paralysis in these patients. Although in the majority of patients narcolepsy develops before 15 years of age, there are no approved treatments for pediatric NT1. However, SO has been widely used off-label to treat narcolepsy symptoms in children and adolescents with NT1 in non-controlled studies, showing a similar safety profile and therapeutic response to adult patients. Current therapy is based only on empirical data shared among expert sleep disorders clinicians. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Spotlight on taliglucerase alfa in the treatment of pediatric patients with type 1 Gaucher disease

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    Gupta P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Punita Gupta,1 Gregory M Pastores2 1Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital, Paterson, New Jersey, USA; 2National Center for Inherited Metabolic Disorders, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Gaucher disease (GD is a heritable storage disorder caused by functional defects of the lysosomal acid β-glucosidase and the accumulation of glucosylceramide within macrophages, resulting in multiple organ dysfunction. There are three commercially available enzyme replacement therapy (ERT products for the treatment of GD type 1 (GD1: imiglucerase, velaglucerase alfa, and taliglucerase alfa. Imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa are produced in different mammalian cell systems; imiglucerase requires postproduction deglycosylation to expose terminal α-mannose residues, which are required for mannose receptor-mediated uptake by target macrophages. These steps are critical to the success of ERT for the treatment of visceral and hematologic manifestations of GD. Taliglucerase alfa is the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved plant-cell-expressed recombinant human protein, using carrot root cell cultures. Furthermore, it does not require postproduction glycosidic modifications. It is indicated for treatment of adults with GD1 in the US, Israel, Australia, Canada, Chile, Brazil, and other countries, and it is additionally approved for the treatment of pediatric patients in the US, Australia, and Canada and for the treatment of hematologic manifestations in pediatric patients with Type 3 GD in Canada and other countries. Our review focuses on the role of taliglucerase alfa in the pediatric population. A literature search through PubMed (from 1995 up till November 2016 of English language articles was performed with the following terms: Gaucher disease, lysosomal storage disease, taliglucerase. Secondary and tertiary references were obtained by reviewing

  8. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  9. Diabetes care provider perceptions on family challenges of pediatric type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric healthcare providers' perspectives on barriers to diabetes self-management among youth with type 1 diabetes and strategies to overcome them were explored qualitatively. Family conflict about diabetes care was viewed as a common problem, addressable by behavioral interventions to improve co...

  10. Pediatric Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Epidemiology, Comorbidities, and Medication Utilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli Farsani, S.

    2015-01-01

    The numbers of patients with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) are increasing globally, both in adults and children. Pediatric diabetes mellitus is an important health concern, since this disease has significant effects on health and quality of life, social function, use of medical services and

  11. Prevalence and impact of initial misclassification of pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Avnish; Rizvi, Ali A; Knight, Lisa M; Jerrell, Jeanette M

    2012-10-01

    To characterize rates of initial misclassification of type 1 diabetes mellitus as type 2/unspecified diabetes mellitus in a cohort of children/adolescents and to examine the impact of misclassification on the risk of diabetes-related complications. An 11-year dataset (1996-2006) was analyzed. Inclusion criteria included age 17 years and younger, enrollees in South Carolina State Medicaid, and diagnosis of type 2/unspecified or type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least two visits, 15 days apart. Survival analysis was used to assess the association of "misclassification" with the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and the cumulative incidence of neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications, after controlling for individual risk factors and comorbid conditions. A total of 1130 individuals meeting the inclusion criteria were studied for a median of 7 years. Of the 1130 individuals, 669 (59.2%) maintained a diagnosis of type 2/unspecified diabetes mellitus, 205 (18.1%) were consistently diagnosed as type 1 diabetes mellitus, and the remaining 256 individuals (22.7%) were misclassified. Insulin treatment was used in 100% of the type 1 diabetes mellitus group and 73% of the misclassified group. Compared with the type 2 diabetes mellitus group, being misclassified was associated with earlier development of DKA (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 5.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.09-8.37), neuropathy (aHR 1.94, CI 1.31-2.88), and nephropathy (aHR 1.72, CI 1.19-2.50), whereas being consistently classified with type 1 diabetes mellitus was associated only with earlier development of DKA (aHR 4.96, CI 2.56-9.61). Proper categorization of pediatric diabetes can be challenging, especially with comorbid obesity. Failure to ascertain type 1 diabetes mellitus in a timely manner in a pediatric population may increase the risk of substandard care and diabetes-related complications.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 diversity has an impact on vaccine efficacy and drug resistance. It is important to know the circulating genetic variants and associated drug-resistance mutations in the context of scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to ...

  13. Reproduction and fertility in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; Prins, J. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Boer, K.; Reiss, P.; Repping, S.; van der Veen, F.

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) affects mostly men and women in their reproductive years. For those who have access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the course of HIV-1 infection has shifted from a lethal to a chronic disease. As a result of this, many patients with HIV-1

  14. The pediatric diabetes consortium: improving care of children with type 1 diabetes through collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Although there are some interactions between the major pediatric diabetes programs in the United States, there has been no formal, independent structure for collaboration, the sharing of information, and the development of joint research projects that utilize common outcome measures. To fill this unmet clinical and research need, a consortium of seven pediatric diabetes centers in the United States has formed the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) through an unrestricted grant from Novo Nordisk, Inc. (Princeton, NJ). This article describes the organizational structure of the PDC and the design of a study of important clinical outcomes in children and adolescents with new-onset, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The outcomes study will describe the changes in A1c levels, the frequency of adverse events (diabetic ketoacidosis/severe hypoglycemia), and the frequency and timing of the "honeymoon" phase in newly diagnosed patients with T1DM over the first 12-24 months of the disease and examine the relationship between these clinical outcomes and demographic, socioeconomic, and treatment factors. This project will also allow the Consortium to develop a cohort of youth with T1DM whose clinical course has been well characterized and who wish to participate in future clinical trials and/or contribute to a repository of biological samples.

  15. Celiac Disease and Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneman Denis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the advent of sensitive and specific serologic testing, routine screening for celiac disease (CD in diabetic populations may not be universal practice, and many clinicians struggle to find the optimal approach to managing CD in pediatric Type 1 diabetes (T1D patients. While some clinicians advocate screening for CD in all patients with T1D, others are unsure whether this is warranted. The diagnosis of patients who present with symptomatic CD, including malabsorption and obvious pathology upon biopsy, remains straightforward, with improvements noted on a gluten-free diet. Many patients identified by screening, however, tend to be asymptomatic. Evidence is inconclusive as to whether the benefits of screening and potentially treating asymptomatic individuals outweigh the harms of managing a population already burdened with a serious illness. This review focuses on current knowledge of CD in children and youth with T1D, highlighting important elements of the disease's pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnostic challenges.

  16. Type 1 diabetes: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care

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    Monaghan M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Monaghan,1,2 Katherine Baumann2 1Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, 2George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor health outcomes, including poor glycemic control, acute and chronic complications, and emergency department admissions. During this developmental period, adolescent and young adult patients also experience significant changes in living situation, education, and/or health care delivery, including transferring from pediatric to adult health care. In recent years, professional and advocacy organizations have proposed expert guidelines to improve the process of preparation for and transition to adult-oriented health care. However, challenges remain and evidence-based practices for preparing youth for adult health care are still emerging. Qualitative research suggests that adolescent and young adult patients rely on health care providers to guide them through the transition process and appreciate a gradual approach to preparing for adult-oriented health care, keeping parents in supportive roles into young adulthood. Patients also benefit from specific referrals and contact information for adult care providers. Promising models of transition care include provision of transition navigators, attendance at a young adult bridge clinic, or joint visits with pediatric and adult care providers. However, much of this research is in its early stages, and more rigorous trials need to be conducted to evaluate health outcomes during transition into adult health care. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the transition process, patient and health care provider perceptions of transition care, and emerging evidence of successful models of care for engagement in adult-oriented health care. Recommendations and resources for health care providers are also presented. Keywords: type 1 diabetes

  17. Paternal involvement in pediatric Type 1 diabetes: fathers' and mothers' psychological functioning and disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer A; Weissbrod, Carol; Schwartz, David D; Taylor, W Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Psychological functioning in fathers of children with Type 1 diabetes has received relatively little attention compared to mothers. This study examined fathers' perceived involvement in their children's diabetes care as it related to mothers' and fathers' pediatric parenting stress, depression, anxiety, marital satisfaction, and sleep, and to their children's diabetes regimen adherence and glycemic control. Eighty-two mothers and 43 fathers completed questionnaires. Multivariate linear regressions were conducted separately for mothers and fathers to determine the relationships between the perceived amount and the perceived helpfulness of father involvement in child diabetes care on parental psychosocial functioning and child diabetes control. Maternal perceptions of father helpfulness and amount of involvement in illness care were related to improved marital satisfaction and fewer depressive symptoms in mothers. In fathers, perception of their own amount of involvement was related to increased pediatric parenting stress and anxiety. Better child regimen adherence was associated with maternal perceptions of father helpfulness but not the amount of their involvement, while paternal perceptions of their own helpfulness were related to poorer glycemic control. These findings suggest that fathers and mothers may react differently to their roles in childhood illness and that perceptions of their involvement may be differently associated with children's glycemic control and regimen adherence.

  18. Quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in breast milk.

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    Ghosh, M K; Kuhn, L; West, J; Semrau, K; Decker, D; Thea, D M; Aldrovandi, G M

    2003-06-01

    The distribution and stability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in breast milk (BM) components remain largely unknown. Inhibitory effects, if any, of BM on HIV RNA and DNA PCR amplification are poorly understood. We have addressed these issues by using virus-spiked BM samples from HIV-negative women. BM samples from HIV-negative women were spiked with HIV-1 virions or cells containing a single integrated copy of HIV DNA (8E5/LAV). After incubation under different experimental conditions, viral RNA was detected by the Roche Amplicor UltraSensitive assay in whole-milk, skim milk, and lipid fractions. We found excellent correlation between HIV-1 input copy and recovery in whole milk (r = 0.965, P milk (r = 0.972, P 0.982). The effects of incubation duration and temperature and repeated freeze-thaw cycles on HIV RNA recovery were analyzed. HIV RNA levels were remarkably stable in whole milk after three freeze-thaw cycles and for up to 30 h at room temperature. Our findings improve the understanding of the dynamics of HIV detection in BM and the conditions for BM sample collection, storage, and processing.

  19. Evaluating Parents' Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Amy E; Patton, Susana R; Van Allen, Jason; Nelson, Michael B; Clements, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    To examine the factor structure and construct validity of the Maternal Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management Scale (MSED) in 135 youth ( Mage  = 13.50  ±  1.83 years), with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The study used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to examine the factor structure and correlations to examine relationships among MSED factors and select parent and child diabetes-related health behaviors and outcomes. EFA identified an 11-item three-factor solution (χ 2 (25, n  = 133)  = 40.22, p  manage their child's diabetes (MSED-M), problem-solve issues surrounding glycemic control (MSED-P), and teach their child about diabetes care (MSED-T). Correlational analyses revealed significant associations between the MSED-M and MSED-T and parent-reported optimism and youth's diabetes-specific self-efficacy. The MSED-T was also associated with glycated hemoglobin and self-monitoring blood glucose. Results provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of a three-factor solution of the MSED. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Predicting Health Resilience in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes: A Test of the Resilience Model Framework.

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    Rohan, Jennifer M; Huang, Bin; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Dolan, Lawrence; Reeves, Grafton; Drotar, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    This research examined whether individual and family-level factors during the transition from late childhood to early adolescence protected individuals from an increased risk of poor glycemic control across time, which is a predictor of future diabetes-related complications (i.e., health resilience). This longitudinal, multisite study included 239 patients with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers. Glycemic control was based on hemoglobin A1c. Individual and family-level factors included: demographic variables, youth behavioral regulation, adherence (frequency of blood glucose monitoring), diabetes self-management, level of parental support for diabetes autonomy, level of youth mastery and responsibility for diabetes management, and diabetes-related family conflict. Longitudinal mixed-effects logistic regression indicated that testing blood glucose more frequently, better self-management, and less diabetes-related family conflict were indicators of health resilience. Multiple individual and family-level factors predicted risk for future health complications. Future research should develop interventions targeting specific individual and family-level factors to sustain glycemic control within recommended targets, which reduces the risk of developing future health complications during the transition to adolescence and adulthood. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Trabecular bone histomorphometry in humans with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Akhter, Mohammed P; Drincic, Andjela; Recker, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have markedly increased risk of fracture, but little is known about abnormalities in bone microarchitecture or remodeling properties that might give insight into the pathogenesis of skeletal fragility in these patients. We report here a case-control study comparing bone histomorphometric and micro-CT results from iliac biopsies in 18 otherwise healthy subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with those from healthy age- and sex-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Five of the diabetics had histories of low-trauma fracture. Transilial bone biopsies were obtained after tetracycline labeling. The biopsy specimens were fixed, embedded, and scanned using a desktop μCT at 16 μm resolution. They were then sectioned and quantitative histomorphometry was performed as previously described by Recker et al. [1]. Two sections, >250 μm apart, were read from the central part of each biopsy. Overall there were no significant differences between diabetics and controls in histomorphometric or micro-CT measurements. However, fracturing diabetics had structural and dynamic trends different from nonfracturing diabetics by both methods of analysis. In conclusion, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus does not result in abnormalities in bone histomorphometric or micro-CT variables in the absence of manifest complications from the diabetes. However, diabetics suffering fractures may have defects in their skeletal microarchitecture that may underlie the presence of excess skeletal fragility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Parent-child relationships in Type 1 diabetes: associations among child behavior, parenting behavior, and pediatric parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweenie, Rachel; Mackey, Eleanor R; Streisand, Randi

    2014-03-01

    Interactions between parents and children can influence behavioral and emotional functioning related to Type 1 diabetes (T1D), yet have been relatively unexplored during preadolescence. The present study examined associations among child problem behaviors, critical parenting behaviors, and pediatric parenting stress in a sample of preadolescent youth with T1D. Data are available from 86 preadolescent-parent dyads who participated in the initial baseline assessment of a randomized controlled trial designed to assess the efficacy of an adherence promotion program. Measures included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Diabetes Family Behavior Checklist, and the Pediatric Inventory for Parents. After controlling for significant demographic and medical characteristics, parents who reported their child's behavior as more problematic reported more difficulty with pediatric parenting stress, which was also associated with more child-reported critical parenting behaviors. Child problem behaviors and critical parenting behaviors were associated with one another, partially via their association with increased pediatric parenting stress. Potential clinical applications include interventions geared toward helping parents manage difficult child behaviors as well as cope with pediatric parenting stress, with the ultimate goal of improving the parent-child relationship and management of T1D.

  3. Insulin resistance, role of metformin and other noninsulin therapies in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in youth is a challenging chronic medical condition. Its management should address not only the glycemic control but also insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk factors which are increasingly recognized to be present in youth with TID. Current knowledge on...

  4. Risk factors and treatment of pediatric chronic diseases : Type 1 diabetes, asthma and allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The increase in the number of children with chronic diseases is a major concern. Early detection through improved screening and diagnostic tests, better diagnosis based on updated

  5. Perspectives on care for young adults with type 1 diabetes transitioning from pediatric to adult health systems: A national survey of pediatric endocrinologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shivani; Garvey, Katharine C; Raymond, Jennifer K; Schutta, Mark H

    2017-11-01

    Healthcare transition from pediatric to adult care for young adults (YA) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with risk of adverse outcomes. Consensus recommendations exist from US professional societies on transition care for YA with T1D, but it is not known whether they have been widely adopted. We describe experiences, barriers, and provider characteristics associated with transition care in a national sample of pediatric endocrinologists. US pediatric endocrinologists identified through the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile were sent an electronic survey. Response rate was 16% (164/1020) representing 32 states. The majority of pediatric endocrinologists (age 44 ± 10; years in practice 12 ± 11) were female (67%) and worked in academic centers (75%). Main reasons for transfer were age (49%) and glycemic control (18%). Barriers to transition included ending long-therapeutic relationships with patients (74%), lack of transition protocols (46%), and perceived deficiencies in adult care (42%). The majority of pediatric endocrinologists reported lack of transition training (68%); those who received training were less likely to have difficulty ending patient relationships [odds ratio (OR) = 0.39, P = .03], more likely to perform patient record transfer to adult systems (OR=1.27, P = .006), and less likely to report patient returns to pediatric care after transfer (OR=0.49, P = .01), independent of endocrinologist gender, years in practice, or practice type. There is wide variation in transition care for YA with T1D among US pediatric endocrinologists despite consensus recommendations. Dissemination of educational programming on transition care and provision of actionable solutions to overcome local health system and perceived barriers is needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Do type 1 fimbriae promote inflammation in the human urinary tract?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsten, G.; Wullt, B.; Schembri, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae have been implicated as virulence factors in animal models of urinary tract infection (UTI), but the function in human disease remains unclear. This study used a human challenge model to examine if type 1 fimbriae trigger inflammation in the urinary tract. The asymptomatic...

  7. Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Inés; Martínez, Rosa; López-Euba, Tamara; Velayos, Teresa; Martínez de LaPiscina, Idoia; Bilbao, José Ramón; Rica, Itxaso; Castaño, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY. 160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY) were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4); 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4); 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4). Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7-48.6) and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29-0.96) and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02-0.18), respectively. The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4) reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes.

  8. Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Urrutia

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY.160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4; 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4; 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4.Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7-48.6 and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29-0.96 and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02-0.18, respectively.The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4 reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes.

  9. Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 in a pediatric patient using the lidocaine patch 5%: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G Frost, MD

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1 requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. Physical rehabilitation is an important component of long-term treatment. Unfortunately, patients with significant allodynia or hyperalgesia characteristic of CRPS-1 often have difficulty progressing through a physical therapy (PT regimen. In most adults with CRPS-1, the treatment of choice is PO opioids. Objective: This article presents a case report of the use of the lidocaine patch 5%, a targeted peripheral analgesic, in a pediatric patient and its effects on reducing pain, improving the patient's overall attitude, and facilitating compliance with ongoing PT. Results: A 10-year-old girl developed CRPS-1 after arthroscopic surgery for a sprained ankle. Attempts at PT were unsuccessful due to inadequate pain relief from various treatment modalities. Therapy with the lidocaine patch 5% was initiated and resulted in significant pain relief, improvements in the patient's attitude, and progress with PT. Conclusion: This case report of a child with CRPS-1 showed that therapy with lidocaine patch 5% may be efficacious in treating children with pain resulting from CRPS-1, thereby increasing the success of PT. Keywords: complex regional pain syndrome, lidocaine patch 5%, targeted peripheral analgesic, pediatrics

  10. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  11. Depressive symptoms in youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: Results of the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium screening assessment of depression in diabetes study

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the frequency of depressive symptoms and the diagnosis and management of depression in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) enrolled in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium T1D and T2D registries. The Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) 2 Self-Report (Short) version ...

  12. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the

  13. Timing of HAART initiation and clinical outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsson, Michele; Fusco, Jennifer S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Thomas, James C.; Porter, Kholoud; Kaufman, Jay S.; Davidian, Marie; White, Alice D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Eron, Joseph J.; del Amo, Julia; Meyer, Laurence; Bucher, Heiner C.; Chene, Geneviève; Pillay, Deenan; Prins, Maria; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Lodi, Sara; Coughlin, Kate; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Muga, Roberto; Kaldor, John; Kelleher, Tony; Ramacciotti, Tim; Gelgor, Linda; Cooper, David; Smith, Don; Gill, John; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Nielsen, Claus; Pedersen, Court; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Guiguet, Marguerite; Vanhems, Philippe; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Ghosn, Jade; Boufassa, Faroudy; Hamouda, Osamah; Geskus, Ronald; van der Helm, Jannie; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the clinical benefit of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation vs deferral in a given month in patients with CD4 cell counts less than 800/μL. In this observational cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters from CASCADE (Concerted Action on

  14. West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pilalas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of West Nile virus lineage 2 in central Macedonia, Greece, in 2010 resulted in large outbreaks for 5 consecutive years. We report a case of viral meningitis in an individual infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which preceded the recognition of the outbreak and was confirmed retrospectively as West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

  15. Differential induction of Toll-like receptors & type 1 interferons by Sabin attenuated & wild type 1 polioviruses in human neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Madhu C; Deshpande, Jagadish M

    2013-01-01

    Polioviruses are the causative agent of paralytic poliomyelitis. Attenuated polioviruses (Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine strains) do not replicate efficiently in neurons as compared to the wild type polioviruses and therefore do not cause disease. This study was aimed to investigate the differential host immune response to wild type 1 poliovirus (wild PV) and Sabin attenuated type 1 poliovirus (Sabin PV) in cultured human neuronal cells. By using flow cytometry and real time PCR methods we examined host innate immune responses and compared the role of toll like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic RNA helicases in cultured human neuronal cells (SK-N-SH) infected with Sabin PV and wild PV. Human neuronal cells expressed very low levels of TLRs constitutively. Sabin PV infection induced significantly higher expression of TLR3, TLR7 and melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5) m-RNA in neuronal cells at the beginning of infection (up to 4 h) as compared to wild PV. Further, Sabin PV also induced the expression of interferon α/β at early time point of infection. The induced expression of IFN α/β gene by Sabin PV in neuronal cells could be suppressed by inhibiting TLR7. Neuronal cell innate immune response to Sabin and wild polioviruses differ significantly for TLR3, TLR7, MDA5 and type 1 interferons. Effects of TLR7 activation and interferon production and Sabin virus replication in neuronal cells need to be actively investigated in future studies.

  16. Differential induction of Toll-like receptors & type 1 interferons by Sabin attenuated & wild type 1 polioviruses in human neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu C Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Polioviruses are the causative agent of paralytic poliomyelitis. Attenuated polioviruses (Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine strains do not replicate efficiently in neurons as compared to the wild type polioviruses and therefore do not cause disease. This study was aimed to investigate the differential host immune response to wild type 1 poliovirus (wild PV and Sabin attenuated type 1 poliovirus (Sabin PV in cultured human neuronal cells. Methods: By using flow cytometry and real time PCR methods we examined host innate immune responses and compared the role of toll like receptors (TLRs and cytoplasmic RNA helicases in cultured human neuronal cells (SK-N-SH infected with Sabin PV and wild PV. Results: Human neuronal cells expressed very low levels of TLRs constitutively. Sabin PV infection induced significantly higher expression of TLR3, TLR7 and melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5 m-RNA in neuronal cells at the beginning of infection (up to 4 h as compared to wild PV. Further, Sabin PV also induced the expression of interferon α/β at early time point of infection. The induced expression of IFN α/β gene by Sabin PV in neuronal cells could be suppressed by inhibiting TLR7. Interpretation & conclusions: Neuronal cell innate immune response to Sabin and wild polioviruses differ significantly for TLR3, TLR7, MDA5 and type 1 interferons. Effects of TLR7 activation and interferon production and Sabin virus replication in neuronal cells need to be actively investigated in future studies.

  17. The Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Immuno-suppression by Human Type 1 Regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGregori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The immuno-regulatory mechanisms of IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1 cells have been widely studied over the years. However, several recent discoveries have shed new light on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that human Tr1 cells use to control immune responses and induce tolerance. In this review we outline the well-known and newly discovered regulatory properties of human Tr1 cells and provide an in-depth comparison of the known suppressor mechanisms of Tr1 cells with FOXP3+ Treg. We also highlight the role that Tr1 cells play in promoting and maintaining tolerance in autoimmunity, allergy, and transplantation.

  18. Anti-liver-kidney microsome antibody type 1 recognizes human cytochrome P450 db1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, M; Yamamoto, A M; Bernard, O; Alvarez, F

    1989-03-15

    Anti-liver-kidney microsome antibody type 1 (LKM1), present in the sera of a group of children with autoimmune hepatitis, was recently shown to recognize a 50 kDa protein identified as rat liver cytochromes P450 db1 and db2. High homology between these two members of the rat P450 IID subfamily and human P450 db1 suggested that anti-LKM1 antibody is directed against this human protein. To test this hypothesis, a human liver cDNA expression library in phage lambda GT-11 was screened using rat P450 db1 cDNA as a probe. Two human cDNA clones were found to be identical to human P450 db1 by restriction mapping. Immunoblot analysis using as antigen, the purified fusion protein from one of the human cDNA clones showed that only anti-LKM1 with anti-50 kDa reactivity recognized the fusion protein. This fusion protein was further used to develop an ELISA test that was shown to be specific for sera of children with this disease. These results: 1) identify the human liver antigen recognized by anti-LKM1 auto-antibodies as cytochrome P450 db1, 2) allow to speculate that mutation on the human P450 db1 gene could alter its expression in the hepatocyte and make it auto-antigenic, 3) provide a simple and specific diagnostic test for this disease.

  19. Type 1 IGF receptor translocates to the nucleus of human tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksic, Tamara; Chitnis, Meenali M.; Perestenko, Olga V.; Gao, Shan; Thomas, Peter H.; Turner, Gareth D.; Protheroe, Andrew S.; Howarth, Mark; Macaulay, Valentine M.

    2010-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is a transmembrane glycoprotein comprising two extracellular α subunits and two β subunits with tyrosine kinase activity. The IGF-1R is frequently upregulated in cancers, and signals from the cell surface to promote proliferation and cell survival. Recent attention has focused on the IGF-1R as a target for cancer treatment. Here we report that the nuclei of human tumor cells contain IGF-1R, detectable using multiple antibodies to α- and ...

  20. Influence of the informal primary caretaker on glycemic control among prepubertal pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Nallely Zurita-Cruz

    2017-03-01

    , materiais e métodos: Foi realizado um estudo transversal comparativo. Foram incluídos 55 pacientes com DM1 menores de 11 anos de idade. Os fatores relacionados aos pacientes associados ao controle glicêmico avaliados foram atividade física, tempo de evolução da DM1 e adesão às indicações médicas. Os fatores relacionados a CFPs avaliados foram escolaridade, aspectos profissionais, traços de depressão (questionário de Beck, funcionalidade familiar (APGAR familiar, ajuda de outra pessoa no cuidado do paciente, estresse (Escala de Estresse Percebido e situação socioeconômica (questionário de Bronfman. Foram realizadas análises de regressão logística multivariada e de regressão linear. Resultados: A idade média dos pacientes era de 8 anos; 29 pacientes apresentavam bom controle glicêmico e 26 não tinham controle. O principal fator de risco associado ao descontrole glicêmico foi o estresse no CFP (RC 24,8; IC de 95% 4,06–151,9, p = 0,001. Ao passo que, de acordo com a análise de regressão linear, constatamos que: o menor nível de escolaridade (β 0,991, IC de 95% 0,238–1,743, p = 0,011 e estresse (β 1,918, IC de 95% 1,10–2,736, p = 0,001 do CFP, bem como a disfunção familiar (β 1,256, IC de 95% 0,336-2,177, p = 0,008, foram associados a níveis maiores de hemoglobina glicosilada. Conclusões: O nível de escolaridade e o estresse do CFP e a disfunção familiar são fatores que influenciam a falta de níveis glicêmicos controlados entre pacientes pré-púberes com DM1. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes, Caregiver, Pediatrics, Palavras-chave: Diabetes tipo 1, Cuidador, Pediatria

  1. A lack of association between vitamin D-binding protein and 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in pediatric type 1 diabetes without microalbuminuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Young Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Vitamin D deficiency is reported to be more common in type 1 diabetes patients and might be associated with the increased urinary loss of vitamin D binding protein (VDBP consequent to impaired 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD circulation. We aimed to evaluate the possible increased urinary loss of VDBP, a correlation between VDBP and circulating 25(OHD level, and risk factors influencing low vitamin D level in pediatric type 1 diabetes patients without microalbuminuria. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of subjects who visited Seoul National University Children’s Hospital between January and March 2013. Forty-two type 1 diabetes patients and 29 healthy controls were included. Biochemical parameters including serum and urine VDBP concentrations were analyzed. Results There was no significant difference in the frequency of vitamin D deficiency or serum 25(OHD level between the 2 groups. The serum and urine VDBP concentrations did not show any difference between the 2 groups. Serum 25(OH D level did not correlate with serum or urine VDBP. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that daylight outdoor hours (β=2.948, P=0.003 and vitamin D intake (β=2.865, P=0.003 affected the 25(OHD level; the presence of type 1 diabetes or urinary VDBP excretion was not significant. Conclusions In pediatric type 1 diabetes patients, urinary VDBP excretion did not contribute to low serum 25(OHD level in the setting of normoalbuminuria. The factors associated with 25(OHD level during winter periods were daylight outdoor hours and vitamin D intake. Further studies including both micro- and macroalbuminuria patients with type 1 diabetes are warranted.

  2. Candidate genes expressed in human islets and their role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storling, Joachim; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease......, but more than 40 additional loci are known to significantly affect T1D risk. Since most of the currently known genetic candidates have annotated immune cell functions, it is generally considered that most of the genetic susceptibility in T1D is caused by variation in genes affecting immune cell function....... Recent studies, however, indicate that most T1D candidate genes are expressed in human islets suggesting that the functions of the genes are not restricted to immune cells, but also play roles in the islets and possibly the β cells. Several candidates change expression levels within the islets following...

  3. Diabetes-associated dry eye syndrome in a new humanized transgenic model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Elagin, Raya B; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) are at high risk of developing lacrimal gland dysfunction. We have developed a new model of human T1D using double-transgenic mice carrying HLA-DQ8 diabetes-susceptibility haplotype instead of mouse MHC-class II and expressing the human beta cell autoantigen Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in pancreatic beta cells. We report here the development of dry eye syndrome (DES) after diabetes induction in our humanized transgenic model. Double-transgenic mice were immunized with DNA encoding human GAD65, either naked or in adenoviral vectors, to induce T1D. Mice monitored for development of diabetes developed lacrimal gland dysfunction. Animals developed lacrimal gland disease (classically associated with diabetes in Non Obese Diabetic [NOD] mice and with T1D in humans) as they developed glucose intolerance and diabetes. Animals manifested obvious clinical signs of dry eye syndrome (DES), from corneal erosions to severe keratitis. Histological studies of peri-bulbar areas revealed lymphocytic infiltration of glandular structures. Indeed, infiltrative lesions were observed in lacrimal/Harderian glands within weeks following development of glucose intolerance. Lesions ranged from focal lymphocytic infiltration to complete acinar destruction. We observed a correlation between the severity of the pancreatic infiltration and the severity of the ocular disease. Our results demonstrate development of DES in association with antigen-specific insulitis and diabetes following immunization with clinically relevant human autoantigen concomitantly expressed in pancreatic beta cells of diabetes-susceptible mice. As in the NOD mouse model and as in human T1D, our animals developed diabetes-associated DES. This specific finding stresses the relevance of our model for studying these human diseases. We believe our model will facilitate studies to prevent/treat diabetes-associated DES as well as human diabetes.

  4. A random PCR screening system for the identification of type 1 human herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Shi, Bisheng; Gong, Yan; Zhang, Xiaonan; Shen, Silan; Qian, Fangxing; Gu, Shimin; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2009-10-01

    Several viral diseases exhibit measles-like symptoms. Differentiation of suspected cases of measles with molecular epidemiological techniques in the laboratory is useful for measles surveillance. In this study, a random PCR screening system was undertaken for the identification of isolates from patients with measles-like symptoms who exhibited cytopathic effects, but who had negative results for measles virus-specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assays. Sequence analysis of random amplified PCR products showed that they were highly homologous to type 1 human herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). The results were further confirmed by an HSV-1-specific TaqMan real-time PCR assay. The random PCR screening system described in this study provides an efficient procedure for the identification of unknown viral pathogens. Measles-like symptoms can also be caused by HSV-1, suggesting the need to include HSV-1 in differential diagnoses of measles-like diseases.

  5. Comparative genetics: synergizing human and NOD mouse studies for identifying genetic causation of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, John P; Chen, Yi-Guang; Mathews, Clayton E

    2012-01-01

    Although once widely anticipated to unlock how human type 1 diabetes (T1D) develops, extensive study of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has failed to yield effective treatments for patients with the disease. This has led many to question the usefulness of this animal model. While criticism about the differences between NOD and human T1D is legitimate, in many cases disease in both species results from perturbations modulated by the same genes or different genes that function within the same biological pathways. Like in humans, unusual polymorphisms within an MHC class II molecule contributes the most T1D risk in NOD mice. This insight supports the validity of this model and suggests the NOD has been improperly utilized to study how to cure or prevent disease in patients. Indeed, clinical trials are far from administering T1D therapeutics to humans at the same concentration ranges and pathological states that inhibit disease in NOD mice. Until these obstacles are overcome it is premature to label the NOD mouse a poor surrogate to test agents that cure or prevent T1D. An additional criticism of the NOD mouse is the past difficulty in identifying genes underlying T1D using conventional mapping studies. However, most of the few diabetogenic alleles identified to date appear relevant to the human disorder. This suggests that rather than abandoning genetic studies in NOD mice, future efforts should focus on improving the efficiency with which diabetes susceptibility genes are detected. The current review highlights why the NOD mouse remains a relevant and valuable tool to understand the genes and their interactions that promote autoimmune diabetes and therapeutics that inhibit this disease. It also describes a new range of technologies that will likely transform how the NOD mouse is used to uncover the genetic causes of T1D for years to come.

  6. Aberrant Food Choices after Satiation in Human Orexin-Deficient Narcolepsy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Holst, Ruth Janke; van der Cruijsen, Lisa; van Mierlo, Petra; Lammers, Gert Jan; Cools, Roshan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Aarts, Esther

    2016-11-01

    Besides influencing vigilance, orexin neurotransmission serves a variety of functions, including reward, motivation, and appetite regulation. As obesity is an important symptom in orexin-deficient narcolepsy, we explored the effects of satiety on food-related choices and spontaneous snack intake in patients with narcolepsy type 1 (n = 24) compared with healthy matched controls (n = 19). In additional analyses, we also included patients with idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 14) to assess sleepiness-related influences. Participants were first trained on a choice task to earn salty and sweet snacks. Next, one of the snack outcomes was devalued by having participants consume it until satiation (i.e., sensory-specific satiety). We then measured the selective reduction in choices for the devalued snack outcome. Finally, we assessed the number of calories that participants consumed spontaneously from ad libitum available snacks afterwards. After satiety, all participants reported reduced hunger and less wanting for the devalued snack. However, while controls and idiopathic hypersomnia patients chose the devalued snack less often in the choice task, patients with narcolepsy still chose the devalued snack as often as before satiety. Subsequently, narcolepsy patients spontaneously consumed almost 4 times more calories during ad libitum snack intake. We show that the manipulation of food-specific satiety has reduced effects on food choices and caloric intake in narcolepsy type 1 patients. These mechanisms may contribute to their obesity, and suggest an important functional role for orexin in human eating behavior. Study registered at Netherlands Trial Register. URL: www.trialregister.nl. Trial ID: NTR4508. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Type 1 Responses of Human Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells to Influenza A Viruses▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gang; Liu, Yinping; Zheng, Jian; Ng, Iris H. Y.; Xiang, Zheng; Lam, Kwok-Tai; Mao, Huawei; Li, Hong; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells are essential constituents of antimicrobial and antitumor defenses. We have recently reported that phosphoantigen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells participated in anti-influenza virus immunity by efficiently killing both human and avian influenza virus-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in vitro. However, little is known about the noncytolytic responses and trafficking program of γδ T cells to influenza virus. In this study, we found that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells expressed both type 1 cytokines and chemokine receptors during influenza virus infection, and IPP-expanded cells had a higher capacity to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Besides their potent cytolytic activity against pandemic H1N1 virus-infected cells, IPP-activated γδ T cells also had noncytolytic inhibitory effects on seasonal and pandemic H1N1 viruses via IFN-γ but had no such effects on avian H5N1 or H9N2 virus. Avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses induced significantly higher CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 production in Vγ9Vδ2 T cells than human seasonal H1N1 virus. CCR5 mediated the migration of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells toward influenza virus-infected cells. Our findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy of using phosphoantigens to boost the antiviral activities of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells against influenza virus infection. PMID:21752902

  8. Induction of immunity to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 by vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElrath, M Juliana; Haynes, Barton F

    2010-10-29

    Recent findings have brought optimism that development of a successful human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine lies within reach. Studies of early events in HIV-1 infection have revealed when and where HIV-1 is potentially vulnerable to vaccine-targeted immune responses. With technical advances in human antibody production, clues about how antibodies recognize HIV-1 envelope proteins have uncovered new targets for immunogen design. A recent vaccine regimen has shown modest efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition. However, inducing long-term T and B cell memory and coping with HIV-1 diversity remain high priorities. Mediators of innate immunity may play pivotal roles in blocking infection and shaping immunity; vaccine strategies to capture these activities are under investigation. Challenges remain in integrating basic, preclinical and clinical research to improve predictions of types of immunity associated with vaccine efficacy, to apply these insights to immunogen design, and to accelerate evaluation of vaccine efficacy in persons at-risk for infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a contemporary human parechovirus type 1 by VIDISCA and characterisation of its full genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drexler Jan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteritis is caused by a spectrum of viruses that is most likely not fully characterised. When testing stool samples by cell culture, virus isolates are sometimes obtained which cannot be typed by current methods. In this study we used VIDISCA, a virus identification method which has not yet been widely applied, on such an untyped virus isolate. Results We found a human parechovirus (HPeV type 1 (strain designation: BNI-788st. Because genomes of contemporary HPeV1 were not available, we determined its complete genome sequence. We found that the novel strain was likely the result of recombination between structural protein genes of an ancestor of contemporary HPeV1 strains and nonstructural protein genes from an unknown ancestor, most closely related to HPeV3. In contrast to the non-structural protein genes of other HPeV prototype strains, the non-structural protein genes of BNI-788st and HPeV3 prototype strains did not co-segregate in bootscan analysis with that of other prototype strains. Conclusion HPeV3 nonstructural protein genes may form a distinct element in a pool of circulating HPeV non-structural protein genes. More research into the complex HPeV evolution is required to connect virus ecology with disease patterns in humans.

  10. The Dynamics of the Human Infant Gut Microbiome in Development and in Progression Toward Type1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Colonization of the fetal and infant gut microbiome results in dynamic changes in diversity, which can impact disease...susceptibility. To examine the relationship between human gut microbiome dynamics throughout infancy and type 1 diabetes (T1D), we examined a cohort of 33...unlimited. The dynamics of the human infant gut microbiome in development and in progression toward type 1 diabetes. The views, opinions and/or

  11. Multiple Restrictions of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Feline Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, Carsten; Zielonka, Jörg; Constabel, Hannelore; Kloke, Björn-Philipp; Rengstl, Benjamin; Battenberg, Marion; Bonci, Francesca; Pistello, Mauro; Löchelt, Martin; Cichutek, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The productive replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) occurs exclusively in defined cells of human or chimpanzee origin, explaining why heterologous animal models for HIV replication, pathogenesis, vaccination, and therapy are not available. This lack of an animal model for HIV-1 studies prompted us to examine the susceptibility of feline cells in order to evaluate the cat (Felis catus) as an animal model for studying HIV-1. Here, we report that feline cell lines harbor multiple restrictions with respect to HIV-1 replication. The feline CD4 receptor does not permit virus infection. Feline T-cell lines MYA-1 and FeT-1C showed postentry restrictions resulting in low HIV-1 luciferase reporter activity and low expression of viral Gag-Pol proteins when pseudotyped vectors were used. Feline fibroblastic CrFK and KE-R cells, expressing human CD4 and CCR5, were very permissive for viral entry and HIV-long terminal repeat-driven expression but failed to support spreading infection. KE-R cells displayed a profound block with respect to release of HIV-1 particles. In contrast, CrFK cells allowed very efficient particle production; however, the CrFK cell-derived HIV-1 particles had low specific infectivity. We subsequently identified feline apolipoprotein B-editing catalytic polypeptide 3 (feAPOBEC3) proteins as active inhibitors of HIV-1 particle infectivity. CrFK cells express at least three different APOBEC3s: APOBEC3C, APOBEC3H, and APOBEC3CH. While the feAPOBEC3C did not significantly inhibit HIV-1, the feAPOBEC3H and feAPOBEC3CH induced G to A hypermutations of the viral cDNA and reduced the infectivity ∼10- to ∼40-fold. PMID:17459941

  12. Immunology in the clinic review series; focus on type 1 diabetes and viruses: the enterovirus link to type 1 diabetes: critical review of human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stene, L C; Rewers, M

    2012-01-01

    OTHER THEMES PUBLISHED IN THIS IMMUNOLOGY IN THE CLINIC REVIEW SERIES Metabolic diseases, host responses, cancer, autoinflammatory diseases, allergy. The hypothesis that under some circumstances enteroviral infections can lead to type 1 diabetes (T1D) was proposed several decades ago, based initially on evidence from animal studies and sero-epidemiology. Subsequently, enterovirus RNA has been detected more frequently in serum of patients than in control subjects, but such studies are susceptible to selection bias and reverse causality. Here, we review critically recent evidence from human studies, focusing on longitudinal studies with potential to demonstrate temporal association. Among seven longitudinal birth cohort studies, the evidence that enterovirus infections predict islet autoimmunity is quite inconsistent in our interpretation, due partially, perhaps, to heterogeneity in study design and a limited number of subjects studied. An association between enterovirus and rapid progression from autoimmunity to T1D was reported by one longitudinal study, but although consistent with evidence from animal models, this novel observation awaits replication. It is possible that a potential association with initiation and/or progression of islet autoimmunity can be ascribed to a subgroup of the many enterovirus serotypes, but this has still not been investigated properly. There is a need for larger studies with frequent sample intervals and collection of specimens of sufficient quality and quantity for detailed characterization of enterovirus. More research into the molecular epidemiology of enteroviruses and enterovirus immunity in human populations is also warranted. Ultimately, this knowledge may be used to devise strategies to reduce the risk of T1D in humans. PMID:22385232

  13. Aspects of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Pediatric Obesity and Type 1 Diabetes: An Overview of Ten Years of Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Tran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 1 diabetes (T1DM are the two most common conditions of altered metabolism in children and adolescents. In both, similar long-term cardiovascular complications are known to occur, mediated in large part by underlying inflammatory and oxidative processes whose biochemical details remain relatively unclear. Through a series of experiments in these patient populations, over the last decade our laboratory has clarified a number of key issues in this field. Interestingly, while obese and type 1 diabetic children often differed in the specific type and magnitude of molecular alterations, in both groups a clear exaggeration of inflammatory and oxidative activation was detected when compared to healthy, age-matched controls. Our main findings include definition of resting and exercise-induced cytokine patterns and leukocyte profiles, patterns of activation of immune cells in vitro, and correlation of the magnitude of observed alterations with severity of obesity and quality of glycemic control. Further, we have identified a series of alterations in growth factor profiles during exercise that parallel inflammatory changes in obese children. This paper offers a concise overview of the salient results from this decade-long research effort.

  14. Short-acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin for adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Birgit; Siebenhofer, Andrea; Jeitler, Klaus; Horvath, Karl; Semlitsch, Thomas; Berghold, Andrea; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2016-06-30

    Short-acting insulin analogue use for people with diabetes is still controversial, as reflected in many scientific debates. To assess the effects of short-acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin in adults with type 1 diabetes. We carried out the electronic searches through Ovid simultaneously searching the following databases: Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R) (1946 to 14 April 2015), EMBASE (1988 to 2015, week 15), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the European (EU) Clinical Trials register (both March 2015). We included all randomised controlled trials with an intervention duration of at least 24 weeks that compared short-acting insulin analogues with regular human insulins in the treatment of adults with type 1 diabetes who were not pregnant. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trials for risk of bias, and resolved differences by consensus. We graded overall study quality using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) instrument. We used random-effects models for the main analyses and presented the results as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We identified nine trials that fulfilled the inclusion criteria including 2693 participants. The duration of interventions ranged from 24 to 52 weeks with a mean of about 37 weeks. The participants showed some diversity, mainly with regard to diabetes duration and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The majority of the trials were carried out in the 1990s and participants were recruited from Europe, North America, Africa and Asia. None of the trials was carried out in a blinded manner so that the risk of performance bias, especially for subjective outcomes such as hypoglycaemia, was present in all of the trials. Furthermore, several trials showed inconsistencies in

  15. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus type 1 in periodontal abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygun, I; Yapar, M; Ozdemir, A; Kubar, A; Slots, J

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies have linked herpesviruses to severe types of periodontal disease, but no information exists on their relationship to periodontal abscesses. The present study determined the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus type 1 (EBV-1) in periodontal abscesses and the effect of treatment on the subgingival occurrence of these viruses. Eighteen adults with periodontal abscesses participated in the study. Subgingival samples were collected from each patient with sterile curettes from an abscess-affected site and a healthy control site. HCMV and EBV-1 were identified by polymerase chain reaction at the time of the abscess and at 4 months after surgical and systemic doxycycline therapy. HCMV was detected in 66.7% of periodontal abscess sites and in 5.6% of healthy sites (P=0.002). EBV-1 occurred in 72.2% of abscess sites but not in any healthy site (Pabscess sites. Posttreatment, HCMV and EBV-1 were not found in any study site. HCMV and EBV-1 genomes are commonly found in periodontal abscesses. These data favor a model in which a herpesvirus infection of the periodontium impairs the host defense and serves as a platform for the entrance of bacterial pathogens into gingival tissue with subsequent risk of abscess development.

  16. Molecular Determinants of Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Transmission and Spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L. Green

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotrophic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infects approximately 15 to 20 million people worldwide, with endemic areas in Japan, the Caribbean, and Africa. The virus is spread through contact with bodily fluids containing infected cells, most often from mother to child through breast milk or via blood transfusion. After prolonged latency periods, approximately 3 to 5% of HTLV-1 infected individuals will develop either adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL, or other lymphocyte-mediated disorders such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The genome of this complex retrovirus contains typical gag, pol, and env genes, but also unique nonstructural proteins encoded from the pX region. These nonstructural genes encode the Tax and Rex regulatory proteins, as well as novel proteins essential for viral spread in vivo such as, p30, p12, p13 and the antisense encoded HBZ. While progress has been made in the understanding of viral determinants of cell transformation and host immune responses, host and viral determinants of HTLV-1 transmission and spread during the early phases of infection are unclear. Improvements in the molecular tools to test these viral determinants in cellular and animal models have provided new insights into the early events of HTLV-1 infection. This review will focus on studies that test HTLV-1 determinants in context to full length infectious clones of the virus providing insights into the mechanisms of transmission and spread of HTLV-1.

  17. A study of genetic variability of human parainfluenza virus type 1 in Croatia, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košutić-Gulija, Tanja; Slovic, Anamarija; Ljubin-Sternak, Sunčanica; Mlinarić-Galinović, Gordana; Forčić, Dubravko

    2016-08-01

    Molecular epidemiology of human parainfluenza viruses type 1 (HPIV1) was investigated. Samples were collected from patients hospitalized in Croatia during the three consecutive epidemic seasons (2011-2014). Results indicated co-circulation of two major genetic clusters of HPIV1. Samples from the current study refer to clades II and III in a phylogenetic tree of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene. Additional phylogenetic trees of fusion (F) and phosphoprotein (P) genes confirmed the topology. Analysis of nucleotide diversity of entire P, F and HN genes demonstrated similar values: 0.0255, 0.0236 and 0.0237, respectively. However, amino acid diversity showed F protein to be the most conserved, while P protein was the most tolerant to mutations. Potential N- and O-glycosylation sites suggested that HPIV1 HN protein is abundantly glycosylated, and a specific N-glycosylation pattern could distinguish between clades II and III. Analysis of potential O-glycosylation sites in F protein indicated that samples from this study have two potential O-glycosylation sites, while publicly available sequences have five potential sites. This study provides data on the molecular characterization and epidemic pattern of HPIV1 in Croatia.

  18. Gastrointestinal transit in nonobese diabetic mouse: an animal model of human diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal transit (GI) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an animal model of human diabetes type 1, was examined in animals with short- (duration 1-5 days) and long-term (duration 28-35 days) diabetes. Blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, and gut neuroendocrine peptide content were also measured. GI was significantly rapid in NOD mice with long-term diabetes (LTD), but was not correlated with blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, or pancreatic insulin content. GI was correlated with duodenal secretin content, but not with the content of other neuroendocrine peptides in the different segments investigated. Whereas antral vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) content in NOD mice with LTD was significantly higher, colonic VIP was lower in NOD mice with short-term diabetes (STD). In the duodenum, whereas the concentration of secretin in NOD mice with both STD and LTD was lower, the gastrin content was higher. Duodenal somatostatin content in NOD mice with LTD was lower. In colon, the content of galanin in NOD mice with LTD was higher than in controls. The decreased content of secretin may be among the factors that cause rapid GI in NOD mice with LTD. Changes in the antral content of VIP, duodenal somatostatin, and colonic galanin in NOD mice with LTD may cause low intestinal secretion and, together with rapid GI, give rise to diarrhoea, which is a common symptom in diabetes.

  19. Type 1 diabetes: Through the lens of human genome and metagenome interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Moghaddas Sani, Hakimeh; Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Omidi, Yadollah

    2018-05-15

    Diabetes is a genetic- and epigenetic-related disease from which a large population worldwide suffers. Some genetic factors along with various mutations related to the immune system for disease mechanism(s) have contrastively been determined. However, sometimes mechanisms have not been fully managed for the clarification of the initiation and/or progression of diseases to help patients. In the recent years, due to familiarity with the role of gut microbiota in the health, it has been found that the changes of the microbial balance in the industrialized societies can cause a battery of modern diseases, for which we have no specific definition of how they emerge. This work aims to explore the relationship between the human gut microbiota and the immune system along with their possible role in avoiding/emerging of type 1 diabetes (T1D) accompanied with the relation between genome and metagenome and their imbalance in causing T1D. Moreover, it provides novel view on how to balance the intestinal microbiota by lifestyle to hinder the mechanisms leading to T1D. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mother-to-child transmission and prevention: successes and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarelli, M; Scarlatti, G

    2011-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimated that an additional 370 000 new human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections occurred in children in 2009, mainly through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Intrapartum transmission contributes to approximately 20-25% of infections, in utero transmission to 5-10% and postnatal transmission to an additional 10-15% of cases. MTCT accounts for only a few hundred infected newborns in those countries in which services are established for voluntary counselling and testing of pregnant women, and a supply of antiretroviral drugs is available throughout pregnancy with recommendations for elective Caesarean section and avoidance of breastfeeding. The single-dose nevirapine regimen has provided the momentum to initiate MTCT programmes in many resource-limited countries; however, regimens using a combination of antiretroviral drugs are needed also to effectively reduce transmission via breastfeeding. 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  1. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and its oncogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-lan ZHANG; Jing-yun WEI; Long WANG; Shi-le HUANG; Ji-long CHEN

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL),a rapidly progressing clonal malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes.Exploring the host-HTLV-1 interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying HTLV-1-mediated tumorigenesis is critical for developing efficient therapies against the viral infection and associated leukemia/lymphoma.It has been demonstrated to date that several HTLV-1 proteins play key roles in the cellular transformation and immortalization of infected T lymphocytes.Of note,the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax inhibits the innate IFN response through interaction with MAVS,STING and RIP1,causing the suppression of TBK1-mediated phosphorylation of IRF3/IRF7.The HTLV-1 protein HBZ disrupts genomic integrity and inhibits apoptosis and autophagy of the target cells.Furthermore,it is revealed that HBZ enhances the proliferation of ATL cells and facilitates evasion of the infected cells from immunosurveillance.These studies provide insights into the molecular mechanisms by which HTLV-1 mediates the formation of cancer as well as useful strategies for the development of new therapeutic interventions against ATL.In this article,we review the recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis,the underlying mechanisms,clinical diagnosis and treatment of the disease caused by HTLV-1 infection.In addition,we discuss the future direction for targeting HTLV-1-associated cancers and strategies against HTLV-1.

  2. Sexual transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Paiva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is endemic in many parts of the world and is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse or from mother to child. Sexual transmission occurs more efficiently from men to women than women to men and might be enhanced by sexually transmitted diseases that cause ulcers and result in mucosal ruptures, such as syphilis, herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2, and chancroid. Other sexually transmitted diseases might result in the recruitment of inflammatory cells and could increase the risk of HTLV-1 acquisition and transmission. Additionally, factors that are associated with higher transmission risks include the presence of antibodies against the viral oncoprotein Tax (anti-Tax, a higher proviral load in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and increased cervicovaginal or seminal secretions. Seminal fluid has been reported to increase HTLV replication and transmission, whereas male circumcision and neutralizing antibodies might have a protective effect. Recently, free virions were discovered in plasma, which reveals a possible new mode of HTLV replication. It is unclear how this discovery might affect the routes of HTLV transmission, particularly sexual transmission, because HTLV transmission rates are significantly higher from men to women than women to men.

  3. Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity in vitro by oligonucleotides which form intramolecular tetrads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, R F; Ojwang, J; Elbaggari, A; Reyes, G R; Tinder, R; McGrath, M S; Hogan, M E

    1995-01-27

    An oligonucleotide (I100-15) composed of only deoxyguanosine and thymidine was able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in culture assay systems. I100-15 did not block virus entry into cells but did reduce viral-specific transcripts. As assessed by NMR and polyacrylamide gel methods, I100-15 appears to form a structure in which two stacked guanosine tetrads are connected by three two-base long loops. Structure/activity experiments indicated that formation of intramolecular guanosine tetrads was necessary to achieve maximum antiviral activity. The single deoxyguanosine nucleotide present in each loop was found to be extremely important for the overall antiviral activity. The toxicity of I100-15 was determined to be well above the 50% effective dose (ED50) in culture which yielded a high therapeutic index (> 100). The addition of a cholesterol moiety to the 3' terminus of I100-15 (I100-23) reduced the ED50 value to less than 50 nM (from 0.12 microM for I100-15) and increased the duration of viral suppression to greater than 21 days (versus 7-10 days for I100-15) after removal of the drug from infected cell cultures. The favorable therapeutic index of such molecules coupled with the prolonged suppression of HIV-1, suggest that such compounds further warrant investigation as potential therapeutic agents.

  4. Intrinsic Stability of Episomal Circles Formed during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, TheodoreC.; Kieffer, Tara L.; Ruff, Christian T.; Buck, Christopher; Gange, Stephen J.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    The development of surrogate markers capable of detecting residual ongoing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy is an important step in understanding viral dynamics and in developing new treatment strategies. In this study, we evaluated the utility of circular forms of the viral genome for the detection of recent infection of cells by HIV-1. We measured the fate of both one-long terminal repeat (1-LTR) and 2-LTR circles following in vitro infection of logarithmically growing CD4+ T cells under conditions in which cell death was not a significant contributing factor. Circular forms of the viral genome were found to be highly stable and to decrease in concentration only as a function of dilution resulting from cell division. We conclude that these DNA circles are not intrinsically unstable in all cell types and suggest that the utility of 2-LTR circle assays in measuring recent HIV-1 infection of susceptible cells in vivo needs to be reevaluated. PMID:11907256

  5. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate [MMS], methyl methanethiosulfonate [MMTS], ultraviolet light [UV], or gamma radiation [GR]) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes

  6. Targeting cysteine residues of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease by reactive free radical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, A; Sehajpal, P K; Ogiste, J S; Lander, H M

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring free radical with many functions. The oxidized form of NO, the nitrosonium ion, reacts with the thiol group of cysteine residues resulting in their modification to S-nitrosothiols. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (HIV-PR) has two cysteine residues that are conserved amongst different viral isolates found in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In an active dimer, these residues are located near the surface of the protease. We have found that treatment of HIV-PR with different NO congeners results in loss of its proteolytic activity and simultaneous formation of S-nitrosothiols. Sodium nitroprusside inhibited HIV-PR up to 70% and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine completely inhibited the protease within 5 min of treatment. The pattern of inhibition by NO donors is comparable to its inhibition by N-acetyl pepstatin. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the modification of HIV-PR by NO as that of S-nitrosation. Our findings point towards a possible role of NO in mediating resistance to HIV-1 infection.

  7. Influence of membrane fluidity on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Shinji; Yusa, Keisuke; Monde, Kazuaki; Akaike, Takaaki; Maeda, Yosuke

    2005-01-01

    For penetration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), formation of fusion-pores might be required for accumulating critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41, followed by multiple-site binding of gp120 with receptors, with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. Correlation between HIV-1 infectivity and fluidity was observed by treatment of fluidity-modulators, indicating that infectivity was dependent on fluidity. A 5% decrease in fluidity suppressed the HIV-1 infectivity by 56%. Contrarily, a 5% increase in fluidity augmented the infectivity by 2.4-fold. An increased temperature of 40 deg C or treatment of 0.2% xylocaine after viral adsorption at room temperature enhanced the infectivity by 2.6- and 1.5-fold, respectively. These were inhibited by anti-CXCR4 peptide, implying that multiple-site binding was accelerated at 40 deg C or by xylocaine. Thus, fluidity of both the plasma membrane and viral envelope was required to form the fusion-pore and to complete the entry of HIV-1

  8. Necroptosis takes place in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Pan

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and dysfunction of the immune system. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the human body are maintained constantly by homeostatic mechanisms that failed during HIV-1 infection, resulting in progressive loss of CD4+ T cells mainly via apoptosis. Recently, a non-apoptotic form of necrotic programmed cell death, named necroptosis, has been investigated in many biological and pathological processes. We then determine whether HIV-1-infected cells also undergo necroptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV-1 not only induces apoptosis, but also mediates necroptosis in the infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Necroptosis-dependent cytopathic effects are significantly increased in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells that is lack of Fas-associated protein-containing death domain (FADD, indicating that necroptosis occurs as an alternative cell death mechanism in the absence of apoptosis. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis mainly occurs in HIV-infected cells and spares bystander damage. Treatment with necrostatin-1(Nec-1, a RIP1 inhibitor that specifically blocks the necroptosis pathway, potently restrains HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect and interestingly, inhibits the formation of HIV-induced syncytia in CD4+ T-cell lines. This suggests that syncytia formation is mediated, at least partially, by necroptosis-related processes. Furthermore, we also found that the HIV-1 infection-augmented tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inducing necroptosis and HIV-1 Envelope and Tat proteins function as its co-factors. Taken together,necroptosis can function as an alternative cell death pathway in lieu of apoptosis during HIV-1 infection, thereby also contributing to HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects. Our results reveal that in addition to apoptosis, necroptosis also plays an important role in HIV-1-induced pathogenesis.

  9. Prevalence of early and late prematurity is similar among pediatric type 1 diabetes patients and the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Adi; Shalitin, Shlomit; Eyal, Ori; Loewenthal, Neta; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit; Levy, Milana; Dally-Gottfried, Orna; Landau, Zohar; Zung, Amnon; Levy-Khademi, Floris; Zangen, David; Tenenbaum-Rakover, Yardena; Rachmiel, Marianna

    2018-02-22

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has increased in recent decades, as has the incidence of preterm births (prematurity and early prematurity (prematurity and birth season were compared with the general population birth registry using Pearson Chi-square test. The study population included 1452 T1DM patients, 52.7% males, and 2 138 668 subjects in the general non-T1DM population, 51.2% males. The prevalence of late and early prematurity was similar between groups (6.1% and 2.2% in the T1DM group vs 5.6% and 2.0% in the general non-T1DM group, P = 0.25 and P = 0.38, respectively). OR for prematurity among T1DM patients was 1.15 (0.95-1.39), P = 0.16. No difference in birth season was demonstrated between preterm and term, in T1DM and general non-T1DM populations. Ethiopian descent was more prevalent among T1DM patients compared with the non-T1DM population, in both term and preterm born. This is the largest population-based study, and the first in the Middle East geographical area, indicating that prematurity, including early prematurity, is not associated with T1DM during childhood. The study was registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov/: NCT02929953. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Phosphorylation regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a pathogenic complex deltaretrovirus, which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In addition to the structural and enzymatic viral gene products, HTLV-1 encodes the positive regulatory proteins Tax and Rex along with viral accessory proteins. Tax and Rex proteins orchestrate the timely expression of viral genes important in viral replication and cellular transformation. Rex is a nucleolar-localizing shuttling protein that acts post-transcriptionally by binding and facilitating the export of the unspliced and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. HTLV-1 Rex (Rex-1 is a phosphoprotein and general protein kinase inhibition correlates with reduced function. Therefore, it has been proposed that Rex-1 function may be regulated through site-specific phosphorylation. Results We conducted a phosphoryl mapping of Rex-1 over-expressed in transfected 293 T cells using a combination of affinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We achieved 100% physical coverage of the Rex-1 polypeptide and identified five novel phosphorylation sites at Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-97, and Ser-106. We also confirmed evidence of two previously identified residues, Ser-70 and Thr-174, but found no evidence of phosphorylation at Ser-177. The functional significance of these phosphorylation events was evaluated using a Rex reporter assay and site-directed mutational analysis. Our results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser-97 and Thr-174 is critical for Rex-1 function. Conclusion We have mapped completely the site-specific phosphorylation of Rex-1 identifying a total of seven residues; Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-70, Ser-97, Ser-106, and Thr-174. Overall, this work is the first to completely map the phosphorylation sites in Rex-1 and provides important insight into

  11. Characterization of human organ donors testing positive for type 1 diabetes-associated autoantibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, A; Granstam, A; Ingvast, S; Härkönen, T; Knip, M; Korsgren, O; Skog, O

    2015-01-01

    In this study we aim to describe the characteristics of non-diabetic organ donors with circulating diabetes-associated autoantibodies collected within the Nordic Network for Islet Transplantation. One thousand and thirty organ donors have been screened in Uppsala for antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and islet antigen-2 (IA-2A). The 32 non-diabetic donors that tested positive for GADA (3·3% of all non-diabetic donors) were studied in more detail, together with 32 matched controls. Mean age among the autoantibody-positive donors was 52·6 (range 21–74), family history of type 1 diabetes (T1D) was unknown, and no donor was genetically predisposed for T1D regarding the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) locus. Subjects were analysed for islet cell antibodies (ICA), insulin autoantibodies (IAA) and zinc transporter 8 antibodies (ZnT8A), and pancreas morphology and clinical data were examined. Eight non-diabetic donors tested positive for two antibodies and one donor tested positive for four antibodies. No insulitis or other signs of a diabetic process were found in any of the donors. While inflammatory cells were present in all donors, subjects with high GADA titres had significantly higher CD45 cell numbers in exocrine tissue than controls. The extent of fibrosis was more pronounced in autoantibody-positive donors, even in subjects with lower GADA titres. Notably, it is possible that events not related directly to T1D (e.g. subclinical pancreatitis) may induce autoantibodies in some cases. PMID:26313035

  12. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  14. Sensitive microculture method for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erice, A; Sannerud, K J; Leske, V L; Aeppli, D; Balfour, H H

    1992-02-01

    A study was conducted to compare our standard culture with a new microculture procedure for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from blood leukocytes. A total of 137 blood specimens from 102 HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals (52 were asymptomatic, 31 were symptomatic, and 19 had AIDS) were cultured in a microculture system in which 10(6) of the patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cocultured with 10(6) phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC from an HIV-1 antibody-negative blood donor in 1.2 ml of culture medium. Results were compared with those of a historical control group of 139 standard HIV-1 cultures from 108 HIV-1 antibody-positive subjects (58 were asymptomatic, 36 were symptomatic, and 14 had AIDS). For standard cultures, 10 x 10(6) of the patients' PBMC were cocultured with 5 x 10(6) PHA-stimulated PBMC from an HIV-1 antibody-negative blood donor in 15 ml of culture medium. HIV-1 was isolated in 128 (93%) microcultures and 133 (96%) standard cultures. Both methods identified more than 75% of the positive cultures within 7 days and 100% of the positive cultures within 14 days. The isolation rates for HIV-1 in microcultures compared with standard cultures were 91 versus 93% (specimens from asymptomatic individuals), 93 versus 96% (specimens from symptomatic individuals), and 97 versus 100% (specimens from patients with AIDS). The median time to positivity for both culture methods was 7 days, and this correlated significantly with symptoms and CD4+ cell counts. The microculture method is a sensitive and less expensive system for isolation of HIV-1 from PBMC of HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals, and we recommend it as the culture method of choice, especially for children and patients with AIDS and severe anemia or leukopenia whose blood volume is an important consideration.

  15. The remarkable frequency of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genetic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onafuwa-Nuga, Adewunmi; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2009-09-01

    The genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) results from a combination of point mutations and genetic recombination, and rates of both processes are unusually high. This review focuses on the mechanisms and outcomes of HIV-1 genetic recombination and on the parameters that make recombination so remarkably frequent. Experimental work has demonstrated that the process that leads to recombination--a copy choice mechanism involving the migration of reverse transcriptase between viral RNA templates--occurs several times on average during every round of HIV-1 DNA synthesis. Key biological factors that lead to high recombination rates for all retroviruses are the recombination-prone nature of their reverse transcription machinery and their pseudodiploid RNA genomes. However, HIV-1 genes recombine even more frequently than do those of many other retroviruses. This reflects the way in which HIV-1 selects genomic RNAs for coencapsidation as well as cell-to-cell transmission properties that lead to unusually frequent associations between distinct viral genotypes. HIV-1 faces strong and changeable selective conditions during replication within patients. The mode of HIV-1 persistence as integrated proviruses and strong selection for defective proviruses in vivo provide conditions for archiving alleles, which can be resuscitated years after initial provirus establishment. Recombination can facilitate drug resistance and may allow superinfecting HIV-1 strains to evade preexisting immune responses, thus adding to challenges in vaccine development. These properties converge to provide HIV-1 with the means, motive, and opportunity to recombine its genetic material at an unprecedented high rate and to allow genetic recombination to serve as one of the highest barriers to HIV-1 eradication.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in Guangdong province of southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the outbreak of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in Guangdong has been documented for more than a decade, the molecular characteristics of such a regional HIV-1 epidemic remained unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By sequencing of HIV-1 pol/env genes and phylogenetic analysis, we performed a molecular epidemiologic study in a representative subset (n  = 200 of the 508 HIV-1-seropositive individuals followed up at the center for HIV/AIDS care and treatment of Guangzhou Hospital of Infectious Diseases. Of 157 samples (54.1% heterosexual acquired adults, 20.4% needle-sharing drug users, 5.7% receivers of blood transfusion, 1.3% men who have sex with men, and 18.5% remained unknown with successful sequencing for both pol and env genes, 105 (66.9% HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE and 24 (15.3% CRF07_BC, 9 (5.7% B', 5 (3.2% CRF08_BC, 5 (3.2% B, 1 (0.6% C, 3 (1.9% CRF02_AG, and 5 (3.2% inter-region recombinants were identified within pol/env sequences. Thirteen (8.3% samples (3 naïves, 6 and 5 received with antiretroviral treatment [ART] 1-21 weeks and ≥24 weeks respectively showed mutations conferring resistance to nucleoside/nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors. Among 63 ART-naïve patients, 3 (4.8% showed single or multiple drug resistant mutations. Phylogenetic analysis showed 8 small clusters (2-3 sequences/cluster with only 17 (10.8% sequences involved. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that sexual transmission with dominant CRF01_AE strain is a major risk for current HIV-1 outbreak in the Guangdong's general population. The transmission with drug-resistant variants is starting to emerge in this region.

  17. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendoza, Carmen; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Requena, Silvia; de Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz; Pirón, María; González, Rocío; Jiménez, Ana; Roc, Lourdes; Treviño, Ana; Benito, Rafael; Fernández-Alonso, Miriam; Aguinaga, Aitziber; Rodríguez, Carmen; García-Costa, Juan; Blanco, Lidia; Ramos, José M; Calderón, Enrique; Eirós, José M; Sauleda, Silvia; Barreiro, Pablo; Soriano, Vicente

    2017-07-31

    : Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is a neglected disease despite roughly 15 million people are chronically infected worldwide. Lifelong less than 10% of carriers develop life-threatening diseases, mostly a subacute myelopathy known as tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) and a lymphoproliferative disorder named adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 is efficiently transmitted perinatally (breastfeeding), sexually (more from men to women) and parenterally (transfusions, injection drug user (IDU), and transplants). To date there is neither prophylactic vaccine nor effective antiviral therapy. A total of 327 cases of HTLV-1 infection had been reported at the HTLV-1 Spanish registry until December 2016, of whom 34 had been diagnosed with TSP and 25 with ATL. Overall 62% were Latin American immigrants and 13% were persons of African origin. The incidence of HTLV-1 in Spain has remained stable for nearly a decade with 20-25 new cases yearly. Of the 21 newly diagnosed HTLV-1 cases during year 2016, one was a native Spaniard pregnant woman, and four presented with symptomatic disease, including three with ATL and one with TSP. Underdiagnosis of HTLV-1 in Spain must be high (iceberg model), which may account for the disproportionate high rate of symptomatic cases (almost 20%) and the late recognition of preventable HTLV-1 transmissions in special populations, such as newborns and transplant recipients. Our current estimate is of 10 000 persons living with HTLV-1 infection in Spain. Given the large flux of immigrants and visitors from HTLV-1 endemic regions to Spain, the expansion of HTLV-1 screening policies is warranted. At this time, it seems worth recommending HTLV testing to all donor/recipient organ transplants and pregnant women regardless place of birth. Although current leukoreduction procedures largely prevent HTLV-1 transmission by blood transfusions, HTLV testing of all first-time donors should be cost-effective contributing to unveil

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization epitope with conserved architecture elicits early type-specific antibodies in experimentally infected chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Debouck, C.; Meloen, R. H.; Smit, L.; Bakker, M.; Asher, D. M.; Wolff, A. V.; Gibbs, C. J.; Gajdusek, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    Chimpanzees are susceptible to infection by divergent strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), none of which cause clinical or immunological abnormalities. Chimpanzees were inoculated with one of four strains of HIV-1: human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type IIIB, lymphadenopathy virus

  19. Influence of the informal primary caretaker on glycemic control among prepubertal pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Nallely Zurita-Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: In prepubertal type 1 diabetic patients (DM1, the availability of an informal primary caregiver (ICP is critical to making management decisions; in this study, the ICP-related risk factors associated with glycemic control were identified. Patients, materials, and methods: A comparative cross-sectional study was performed. Fifty-five patients with DM1 under the age of 11 years were included. The patient-related factors associated with glycemic control evaluated were physical activity, DM1 time of evolution, and adherence to medical indications. The ICP-related factors evaluated were education, employment aspects, depressive traits (Beck questionnaire, family functionality (family APGAR, support of another person in patient care, stress (Perceived Stress Scale, and socioeconomic status (Bronfman questionnaire. Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. Results: The patients' median age was 8 years; 29 patients had good glycemic control, and 26 were uncontrolled. The main risk factor associated with glycemic dyscontrol was stress in the ICP (OR 24.8; 95% CI 4.06-151.9, p = 0.001. While, according to the linear regression analysis it was found that lower level of education (β 0.991, 95% CI 0.238-1.743, p = 0.011 and stress (β 1.918, 95% CI 1.10-2.736, p = 0.001 in the ICP, as well as family dysfunction (β 1.256, 95% CI 0.336-2.177, p = 0.008 were associated with higher levels of glycated hemoglobin. Conclusions: Level of education and stress in the ICP, as well as family dysfunction, are factors that influence the lack of controlled blood glucose levels among prepubertal DM1 patients.

  20. β-arrestins negatively control human adrenomedullin type 1-receptor internalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Danfeng, Jiang; Murakami, Manabu; Hattori, Yuichi; Kato, Johji

    2017-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a potent hypotensive peptide that exerts a powerful variety of protective effects against multiorgan damage through the AM type 1 receptor (AM 1 receptor), which consists of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). Two β-arrestin (β-arr) isoforms, β-arr-1 and β-arr-2, play a central role in the agonist-induced internalization of many receptors for receptor resensitization. Notably, β-arr-biased agonists are now being tested in phase II clinical trials, targeting acute pain and acute heart failure. Here, we examined the effects of β-arr-1 and β-arr-2 on human AM 1 receptor internalization. We constructed a V5-tagged chimera in which the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR was replaced with that of the β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 -AR), and it was transiently transfected into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed RAMP2. The cell-surface expression and internalization of the wild-type or chimeric receptor were quantified by flow cytometric analysis. The [ 125 I]AM binding and the AM-induced cAMP production of these receptors were also determined. Surprisingly, the coexpression of β-arr-1 or -2 resulted in significant decreases in AM 1 receptor internalization without affecting AM binding and signaling prior to receptor internalization. Dominant-negative (DN) β-arr-1 or -2 also significantly decreased AM-induced AM 1 receptor internalization. In contrast, the AM-induced internalization of the chimeric AM 1 receptor was markedly augmented by the cotransfection of β-arr-1 or -2 and significantly reduced by the coexpression of DN-β-arr-1 or -2. These results were consistent with those seen for β 2 -AR. Thus, both β-arrs negatively control AM 1 receptor internalization, which depends on the C-tail of CLR. - Highlights: • We found that β-arrestins 1 and 2 negatively control agonist-induced GPCR internalization. • β-arrestins 1 and 2 significantly inhibits the AM

  1. Phase 3 Trial of Transplantation of Human Islets in Type 1 Diabetes Complicated by Severe Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Bernhard J.; Clarke, William R.; Bridges, Nancy D.; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Bellin, Melena D.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Czarniecki, Christine W.; Goldstein, Julia S.; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Korsgren, Olle; Larsen, Christian P.; Luo, Xunrong; Markmann, James F.; Naji, Ali; Oberholzer, Jose; Posselt, Andrew M.; Rickels, Michael R.; Ricordi, Camillo; Robien, Mark A.; Senior, Peter A.; Shapiro, A.M. James; Stock, Peter G.; Turgeon, Nicole A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) and severe hypoglycemic events (SHEs) cause substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Current therapies are effective in preventing SHEs in 50–80% of patients with IAH and SHEs, leaving a substantial number of patients at risk. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a standardized human pancreatic islet product in subjects in whom IAH and SHEs persisted despite medical treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This multicenter, single-arm, phase 3 study of the investigational product purified human pancreatic islets (PHPI) was conducted at eight centers in North America. Forty-eight adults with T1D for >5 years, absent stimulated C-peptide, and documented IAH and SHEs despite expert care were enrolled. Each received immunosuppression and one or more transplants of PHPI, manufactured on-site under good manufacturing practice conditions using a common batch record and standardized lot release criteria and test methods. The primary end point was the achievement of HbA1c transplant. RESULTS The primary end point was successfully met by 87.5% of subjects at 1 year and by 71% at 2 years. The median HbA1c level was 5.6% (38 mmol/mol) at both 1 and 2 years. Hypoglycemia awareness was restored, with highly significant improvements in Clarke and HYPO scores (P > 0.0001). No study-related deaths or disabilities occurred. Five of the enrollees (10.4%) experienced bleeds requiring transfusions (corresponding to 5 of 75 procedures), and two enrollees (4.1%) had infections attributed to immunosuppression. Glomerular filtration rate decreased significantly on immunosuppression, and donor-specific antibodies developed in two patients. CONCLUSIONS Transplanted PHPI provided glycemic control, restoration of hypoglycemia awareness, and protection from SHEs in subjects with intractable IAH and SHEs. Safety events occurred related to the infusion procedure and immunosuppression, including bleeding

  2. Association between markers of endothelial dysfunction and early signs of renal dysfunction in pediatric obesity and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovecchio, M L; de Giorgis, T; Di Giovanni, I; Chiavaroli, V; Chiarelli, F; Mohn, A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), are increased in youth with obesity and in those with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at similar levels, and whether their levels are associated with markers of renal function. A total of 60 obese youth [M/F: 30/30, age: 12.5 ± 2.8 yr; body mass index (BMI) z-score: 2.26 ± 0.46], 30 with T1D (M/F: 15/15; age: 12.9 ± 2.4 yr; BMI z-score: 0.45 ± 0.77), and 30 healthy controls (M/F: 15/15, age: 12.4 ± 3.3 yr, BMI z-score: -0.25 ± 0.56) were recruited. Anthropometric measurements were assessed and a blood sample was collected to measure ICAM-1, MPO, creatinine, cystatin C and lipid levels. A 24-h urine collection was obtained for assessing albumin excretion rate (AER). Levels of ICAM-1 and MPO were significantly higher in obese [ICAM-1: 0.606 (0.460-1.033) µg/mL; MPO: 136.6 (69.7-220.8) ng/mL] and T1D children [ICAM-1: 0.729 (0.507-0.990) µg/mL; MPO: 139.5 (51.0-321.3) ng/mL] compared with control children [ICAM-1: 0.395 (0.272-0.596) µg/mL MPO: 41.3 (39.7-106.9) ng/mL], whereas no significant difference was found between T1D and obese children. BMI z-score was significantly associated with ICAM-1 (β = 0.21, p = 0.02) and MPO (β = 0.41, p 1). A statistically significant association was also found between ICAM-1 and markers of renal function (AER: β = 0.21, p = 0.03; e-GFR: β = 0.19, p = 0.04), after adjusting for BMI. Obese children have increased markers of endothelial dysfunction and early signs of renal damage, similarly to children with T1D, confirming obesity to be a cardiovascular risk factor as T1D. The association between ICAM-1 with e-GFR and AER confirm the known the association between general endothelial and renal dysfunction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. β-arrestins negatively control human adrenomedullin type 1-receptor internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Danfeng, Jiang; Murakami, Manabu; Hattori, Yuichi; Kato, Johji

    2017-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a potent hypotensive peptide that exerts a powerful variety of protective effects against multiorgan damage through the AM type 1 receptor (AM 1 receptor), which consists of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). Two β-arrestin (β-arr) isoforms, β-arr-1 and β-arr-2, play a central role in the agonist-induced internalization of many receptors for receptor resensitization. Notably, β-arr-biased agonists are now being tested in phase II clinical trials, targeting acute pain and acute heart failure. Here, we examined the effects of β-arr-1 and β-arr-2 on human AM 1 receptor internalization. We constructed a V5-tagged chimera in which the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR was replaced with that of the β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 -AR), and it was transiently transfected into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed RAMP2. The cell-surface expression and internalization of the wild-type or chimeric receptor were quantified by flow cytometric analysis. The [ 125 I]AM binding and the AM-induced cAMP production of these receptors were also determined. Surprisingly, the coexpression of β-arr-1 or -2 resulted in significant decreases in AM 1 receptor internalization without affecting AM binding and signaling prior to receptor internalization. Dominant-negative (DN) β-arr-1 or -2 also significantly decreased AM-induced AM 1 receptor internalization. In contrast, the AM-induced internalization of the chimeric AM 1 receptor was markedly augmented by the cotransfection of β-arr-1 or -2 and significantly reduced by the coexpression of DN-β-arr-1 or -2. These results were consistent with those seen for β 2 -AR. Thus, both β-arrs negatively control AM 1 receptor internalization, which depends on the C-tail of CLR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microvascular Outcomes of Pediatric-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Single-Center Observational Case Reviews in Sana’a, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ahmed Gunaid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microvascular complications of pediatric-onset type 1 diabetes are common in low-income countries. In this study, we aimed at reviewing microvascular outcomes in 6 cases with type 1 diabetes over 14 to 31 years of follow-up. Severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR and/or diabetic macular edema (maculopathy (DME and overt diabetic nephropathy (macroalbuminuria were seen among 4 of 6 patients, whereas severe diabetic peripheral neuropathy with Charcot neuroarthropathy was seen in 1 patient only, who had the longest duration of follow-up. The weighted mean (SD (95% confidence interval hemoglobin A 1c was 8.9 (1.6 (8.4-9.4% [74 (17 (68-80 mmol/mol] for PDR/DME and 8.6 (1.7 (8.0-9.0% [71 (19 (65-77 mmol/mol] for macroalbuminuria. Thyroid autoimmunity was positive in 3 patients with overt hypothyroidism in 2 of them. Worse microvascular outcomes among these cases might be attributed to poor glycemic control, lack of knowledge, and limited financial resources.

  5. Human Immune System Mice for the Study of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 Infection of the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evering, Teresa H.; Tsuji, Moriya

    2018-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice transplanted with human cell populations or tissues, also known as human immune system (HIS) mice, have emerged as an important and versatile tool for the in vivo study of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis, treatment, and persistence in various biological compartments. Recent work in HIS mice has demonstrated their ability to recapitulate critical aspects of human immune responses to HIV-1 infection, and such studies have informed our knowledge of HIV-1 persistence and latency in the context of combination antiretroviral therapy. The central nervous system (CNS) is a unique, immunologically privileged compartment susceptible to HIV-1 infection, replication, and immune-mediated damage. The unique, neural, and glia-rich cellular composition of this compartment, as well as the important role of infiltrating cells of the myeloid lineage in HIV-1 seeding and replication makes its study of paramount importance, particularly in the context of HIV-1 cure research. Current work on the replication and persistence of HIV-1 in the CNS, as well as cells of the myeloid lineage thought to be important in HIV-1 infection of this compartment, has been aided by the expanded use of these HIS mouse models. In this review, we describe the major HIS mouse models currently in use for the study of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis, recent insights from the field, limitations of the available models, and promising advances in HIS mouse model development. PMID:29670623

  6. Expression Profiling of Human Genetic and Protein Interaction Networks in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Bergholdt, R; Brorsson, C

    2009-01-01

    Proteins contributing to a complex disease are often members of the same functional pathways. Elucidation of such pathways may provide increased knowledge about functional mechanisms underlying disease. By combining genetic interactions in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) with protein interaction data we have...

  7. A Human Nuclear Shuttling Protein That Interacts with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Matrix Is Packaged into Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpana; Ott, David; Hope, Thomas J.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2000-01-01

    Active nuclear import of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preintegration complex (PIC) is essential for the productive infection of nondividing cells. Nuclear import of the PIC is mediated by the HIV-1 matrix protein, which also plays several critical roles during viral entry and possibly during virion production facilitating the export of Pr55Gag and genomic RNA. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified a novel human virion-associated matrix-interacting protein (VAN) that is highly conserved in vertebrates and expressed in most human tissues. Its expression is upregulated upon activation of CD4+ T cells. VAN is efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 virions and, like matrix, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, overexpression of VAN significantly inhibits HIV-1 replication in tissue culture. We propose that VAN regulates matrix nuclear localization and, by extension, both nuclear import of the PIC and export of Pr55Gag and viral genomic RNA during virion production. Our data suggest that this regulatory mechanism reflects a more global process for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:11090181

  8. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Kaestle; Alexandra Winkeler; Raphaela Richter; Heinrich Sauer; Jürgen Hescheler; Cornel Fraefel; Maria Wartenberg; Andreas H. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fl...

  9. Founder virus population related to route of virus transmission: a determinant of intrahost human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukashov, V. V.; Goudsmit, J.

    1997-01-01

    We and others have shown that in individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, the adaptive evolution of HIV-1 is influenced by host immune competence. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that in addition to selective forces operating within the host, transmission bottlenecks

  10. Persistence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype B DNA in dried-blood samples on FTA filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Chen; Beck, Ingrid A; Seidel, Kristy D; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2004-08-01

    The stability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA in whole blood collected on filter paper (FTA Card) was evaluated. After >4 years of storage at room temperature in the dark our qualitative assay detected virus at a rate similar to that of our initial test (58 of 60, 97%; P = 0.16), suggesting long-term HIV-1 DNA stability.

  11. Characteristics of primary infection of a European human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B isolate in chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, W. M.; Koornstra, W. H.; Dubbes, R. H.; ten Haaft, P. J.; Verstrepen, B. E.; Jhagjhoorsingh, S. S.; Haaksma, A. G.; Niphuis, H.; Laman, J. D.; Norley, S.; Schuitemaker, H.; Goudsmit, J.; Hunsmann, G.; Heeney, J. L.; Wigzell, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to select, from a panel of candidate European human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) clade B primary virus isolates, one isolate based on replication properties in chimpanzee peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Secondly, to evaluate the in vivo kinetics of

  12. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  13. Virus load in chimpanzees infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: effect of pre-exposure vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haaft, P.; Cornelissen, M.; Goudsmit, J.; Koornstra, W.; Dubbes, R.; Niphuis, H.; Peeters, M.; Thiriart, C.; Bruck, C.; Heeney, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Many reports indicate that a long-term asymptomatic state following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with a low amount of circulating virus. To evaluate the possible effect of stabilizing a low virus load by non-sterilizing pre-exposure vaccination, a quantitative

  14. Molecular epidemiology of endemic human t-lymphotropic virus type 1 in a rural community in guinea-bissau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Tienen (Carla); T.I. de Silva (Thushan); L.C.J. Alcantara (Luiz); C. Onyango (Clayton); S. Jarju (Sheikh); N. Gonçalves (Nato); T. Vincent (Tim); P. Aaby; H. Whittle (Hilton); M. Schim van der Loeff (Maarten); M. Cotten (Matthew)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes lethal adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and severely debilitating HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in up to 5% of infected adults. HTLV-1 is endemic in parts of Africa and the highest

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Endemic Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 in a Rural Community in Guinea-Bissau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienen, Carla; de Silva, Thushan I.; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior; Onyango, Clayton O.; Jarju, Sheikh; Gonçalves, Nato; Vincent, Tim; Aaby, Peter; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten; Cotten, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Background: Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes lethal adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and severely debilitating HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in up to 5% of infected adults. HTLV-1 is endemic in parts of Africa and the highest prevalence in

  16. Maternal Proviral Load and Vertical Transmission of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 in Guinea-Bissau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienen, Carla; McConkey, Samuel J.; de Silva, Thushan I.; Cotten, Matthew; Kaye, Steve; Sarge-Njie, Ramu; da Costa, Carlos; Gonçalves, Nato; Parker, Julia; Vincent, Tim; Jaye, Assan; Aaby, Peter; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of routes of transmission of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) in Guinea-Bissau is largely unknown; vertical transmission is thought to be important, but there are very few existing data. We aimed to examine factors associated with transmission in mothers and

  17. Pneumococcal infections in humans are associated with increased apoptosis and trafficking of type 1 cytokine-producing T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Skinhøj, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , little is known regarding the T-cell response during in vivo infections in humans. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that activated T cells producing type 1 cytokines were engaged in the host response to pneumococcal infections. The phenotype and function of T cells were studied in 22...

  18. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...

  19. Semen parameters of a semen donor before and after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; Cornelissen, M.; de Vries, J. W.; Lowe, S. H.; Jurriaans, S.; Repping, S.; van der Veen, F.

    2004-01-01

    Semen samples from a donor who seroconverted for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) during the period that he was donating at our clinic were stored before and after infection. Semen analysis was done on all of these samples before cryopreservation. Retrospectively, both qualitative and

  20. Cellular gene expression upon human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of CD4(+)-T-cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lehrman, Ginger K.; Mikheeva, Svetlana A.; O'Keeffe, Gemma C.; Katze, Michael G.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Geiss, Gary K.; Mullins, James I.

    2003-01-01

    The expression levels of approximately 4,600 cellular RNA transcripts were assessed in CD4(+)-T-cell lines at different times after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain BRU (HIV-1(BRU)) using DNA microarrays. We found that several classes of genes were inhibited by HIV-1(BRU)

  1. Synergy between type 1 fimbriae expression and C3 opsonisation increases internalisation of E. coli by human tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Wuding; Hong, Yuzhi; Sacks, Steven H; Sheerin, Neil S

    2009-03-31

    Bacterial infection of the urinary tract is a common clinical problem with E. coli being the most common urinary pathogen. Bacterial uptake into epithelial cells is increasingly recognised as an important feature of infection. Bacterial virulence factors, especially fimbrial adhesins, have been conclusively shown to promote host cell invasion. Our recent study reported that C3 opsonisation markedly increases the ability of E. coli strain J96 to internalise into human proximal tubular epithelial cells via CD46, a complement regulatory protein expressed on host cell membrane. In this study, we further assessed whether C3-dependent internalisation by human tubular epithelial cells is a general feature of uropathogenic E. coli and investigated features of the bacterial phenotype that may account for any heterogeneity. In 31 clinical isolates of E. coli tested, C3-dependent internalisation was evident in 10 isolates. Type 1 fimbriae mediated-binding is essential for C3-dependent internalisation as shown by phenotypic association, type 1 fimbrial blockade with soluble ligand (mannose) and by assessment of a type 1 fimbrial mutant. we propose that efficient internalisation of uropathogenic E. coli by the human urinary tract depends on co-operation between type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion and C3 receptor -ligand interaction.

  2. Short-term poor glycemic control and retinal microvascular changes in pediatric Type 1 Diabetes patients in Singapore: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Jun; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Wong, Tien Yin; Lek, Ngee

    2017-06-15

    Poor glycemic control in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) patients is strongly associated with an increased risk of diabetes-related microvascular complications later in life, but it is unclear whether short period of poor glycemic control in children with T1D can cause evident microvascular morphological changes long before any pathological manifestation. Our study aimed to investigate the longitudinal association between poor glycemic control and subsequent changes in retinal microvasculature, in a pilot study of 55 pediatric T1D patients from Singapore after a one-year follow-up. This is a hospital-based, exposure-matched and retrospective longitudinal study. A total of 55 T1D patients were included from Singapore KK Women's and Children Hospital, 28 of whom had poor glycemic control (average glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥8% during the year) while the other 27 age- and gender-matched subjects had good glycemic control (HbA1c Singapore I Vessel Assessment [SIVA], version 4.0, Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore) and a spectrum of retinal vascular parameters (e.g. caliber, tortuosity, branching angle and fractal dimension) were measured quantitatively from 0.5 to 2.0 disc diameters. There was no significant difference in ethnicity, duration of T1D, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and low-density cholesterol lipoprotein (LDL) between the two groups. Retinal imaging was obtained at the end of 1 year of glycemic control assessment. In multiple linear regression adjusting for ethnicity, BMI, LDL and duration of T1D, patients with poor glycemic control tended to have marginally wider retinal arteriolar caliber (6.0 μm, 95% CI: -0.9, 12.8) and had significantly larger retinal arteriolar branching angle (10.1 degrees, 95% CI: 1.4, 18.9) compared with their age- and gender- matched counterparts with good glycemic control. Our findings showed that abnormal retinal microvascular morphology was evident in pediatric patients with T1D after one-year's poor glycemic

  3. β-Cell Replacement in Mice Using Human Type 1 Diabetes Nuclear Transfer Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Lina; Danzl, Nichole; Campbell, Sean R; Viola, Ryan; Williams, Damian; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Phillips, Neil; Poffenberger, Greg; Johannesson, Bjarki; Oberholzer, Jose; Powers, Alvin C; Leibel, Rudolph L; Chen, Xiaojuan; Sykes, Megan; Egli, Dieter

    2018-01-01

    β-Cells derived from stem cells hold great promise for cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here we examine the ability of nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (NT-ESs) derived from a patient with type 1 diabetes to differentiate into β-cells and provide a source of autologous islets for cell replacement. NT-ESs differentiate in vitro with an average efficiency of 55% into C-peptide-positive cells, expressing markers of mature β-cells, including MAFA and NKX6.1. Upon transplantation in immunodeficient mice, grafted cells form vascularized islet-like structures containing MAFA/C-peptide-positive cells. These β-cells adapt insulin secretion to ambient metabolite status and show normal insulin processing. Importantly, NT-ES-β-cells maintain normal blood glucose levels after ablation of the mouse endogenous β-cells. Cystic structures, but no teratomas, were observed in NT-ES-β-cell grafts. Isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed greater variability in β-cell differentiation. Even though different methods of somatic cell reprogramming result in stem cell lines that are molecularly indistinguishable, full differentiation competence is more common in ES cell lines than in induced pluripotent stem cell lines. These results demonstrate the suitability of NT-ES-β-cells for cell replacement for type 1 diabetes and provide proof of principle for therapeutic cloning combined with cell therapy. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Nonproductive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human fetal astrocytes: independence from CD4 and major chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, F; Tresoldi, E; Di Stefano, M; Polo, S; Monaco, M C; Verani, A; Fiore, J R; Lusso, P; Major, E; Chiodi, F; Scarlatti, G

    1999-11-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the brain is associated with neurological manifestations both in adults and in children. The primary target for HIV-1 infection in the brain is the microglia, but astrocytes can also be infected. We tested 26 primary HIV-1 isolates for their capacity to infect human fetal astrocytes in culture. Eight of these isolates, independent of their biological phenotype and chemokine receptor usage, were able to infect astrocytes. Although no sustained viral replication could be demonstrated, the virus was recovered by coculture with receptive cells such as macrophages or on stimulation with interleukin-1beta. To gain knowledge into the molecular events that regulate attachment and penetration of HIV-1 in astrocytes, we investigated the expression of several chemokine receptors. Fluorocytometry and calcium-mobilization assay did not provide evidence of expression of any of the major HIV-1 coreceptors, including CXCR4, CCR5, CCR3, and CCR2b, as well as the CD4 molecule on the cell surface of human fetal astrocytes. However, mRNA transcripts for CXCR4, CCR5, Bonzo/STRL33/TYMSTR, and APJ were detected by RT-PCR. Furthermore, infection of astrocytes by HIV-1 isolates with different chemokine receptor usage was not inhibited by the chemokines SDF-1beta, RANTES, MIP-1beta, or MCP-1 or by antibodies directed against the third variable region or the CD4 binding site of gp120. These data show that astrocytes can be infected by primary HIV-1 isolates via a mechanism independent of CD4 or major chemokine receptors. Furthermore, astrocytes are potential carriers of latent HIV-1 and on activation may be implicated in spreading the infection to other neighbouring cells, such as microglia or macrophages. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Achievement of metabolic control goals set by the American Diabetes Association and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes, Patricia; Martín-Frías, María; Álvarez, Ma Ángeles; Yelmo, Rosa; Alonso, Milagros; Barrio, Raquel

    2015-02-01

    The "T1D Exchange Clinic Registry" of 13.316 pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in U.S. recently revealed that most children have HbA1c values above target levels established by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD). The aim of this study is to assess the proportion of youngsters with T1D who meet the internationally accepted targets for good metabolic control of diabetes at a single, referral Pediatric Diabetes Center in Spain. Cross-sectional study of 236 children and adolescents with T1D controlled at our Pediatric Diabetes Unit. We analyzed the compliance to metabolic goals set by ADA and ISPAD and the differences between patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections. SPSS™ version 21.0. Mean age: 12.6 ± 4.6 years old, mean age at diagnosis: 6.1 ± 4.3 years old and mean diabetes duration: 6.4 ± 4.3 years; 47% female. HbA1c average: 6.7 ± 0.7% (49.7 ± 7.6 mmol/mol). The age-specific ADA and ISPAD HbA1c targets were achieved by 93% and 91% of patients, respectively. Among pump users, 97%/97% met ADA/ISPAD HbA1c targets compared to 87%/88% of MDI users (p = 0.04/p = 0.03), without significant differences in the analysis by groups of age. Among participants, 95%, 62%, 95%, 98% and 89% met HDLc, LDLc, triglycerides, BP and BMI targets. Most patients in our children and adolescent cohort of T1D patients correctly achieve metabolic goals established by ADA and ISPAD with low incidence of hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Peri-islet Basement Membrane, a Barrier to Infiltrating Leukocytes in Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse and Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpos, Eva; Kadri, Nadir; Kappelhoff, Reinhild

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of peri-islet capsules, composed of the peri-islet basement membrane (BM) and subjacent interstitial matrix (IM), in development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice and in human type 1 diabetes. Our data demonstr...... IM are reconstituted once inflammation subsides, indicating that the peri-islet BM-producing cells are not lost due to the inflammation, which has important ramifications to islet transplantation studies.......We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of peri-islet capsules, composed of the peri-islet basement membrane (BM) and subjacent interstitial matrix (IM), in development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice and in human type 1 diabetes. Our data...... demonstrate global loss of peri-islet BM and IM components only at sites of leukocyte infiltration into the islet. Stereological analyses reveal a correlation between incidence of insulitis and the number of islets showing loss of peri-islet BM versus islets with intact BMs, suggesting that leukocyte...

  7. Pancreas transplantation for treatment of generalized allergy to human insulin in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaise, J; Leonet, J; Goffin, E; Lefebvre, C; Tennstedt, D; Vandeleene, B; Buysschaert, M; Squifflet, J P

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old man with a 14-year history of type 1 diabetes, normal renal function, and mild diabetic retinopathy. The patient progressively developed a generalized allergic reaction to two insulin excipients--protamine and metacresol--with systemic manifestations of tremor, tachycardia, vertigo, shortness of breath, and short episodes of unconsciousness causing him to be out of work. In June 2003, he received a vascularized cadaveric pancreas transplant using induction with polyclonal antibodies along with tacrolimus and sirolimus but without steroids. A hyperglycemic episode following corticosteroid therapy for rejection treatment required reintroduction of insulin therapy with prompt reappearance of allergic manifestations. Now, the patient is euglycemic without insulin or allergic manifestations and a glycated hemoglobin of 6.4%.

  8. Development of the pediatric quality of life inventory neurofibromatosis type 1 module items for children, adolescents and young adults: qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutakki, Kavitha; Varni, James W; Steinbrenner, Sheila; Draucker, Claire B; Swigonski, Nancy L

    2017-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is arguably one of the most important measures in evaluating effectiveness of clinical treatments. At present, there is no disease-specific outcome measure to assess the HRQOL of children, adolescents and young adults with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). This study aimed to develop the items and support the content validity for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) NF1 Module for children, adolescents and young adults. The iterative process included multiphase qualitative methods including a literature review, survey of expert opinions, semi-structured interviews, cognitive interviews and pilot testing. Fifteen domains were derived from the qualitative methods, with content saturation achieved, resulting in 115 items. The domains include skin, pain, pain impact, pain management, cognitive functioning, speech, fine motor, balance, vision, perceived physical appearance, communication, worry, treatment, medicines and gastrointestinal symptoms. This study is limited because all participants are recruited from a single-site. Qualitative methods support the content validity for the PedsQL™ NF1 Module for children, adolescents and young adults. The PedsQL™ NF1 Module is now undergoing national multisite field testing for the psychometric validation of the instrument development.

  9. Template Dimerization Promotes an Acceptor Invasion-Induced Transfer Mechanism during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Minus-Strand Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P.; Fay, Philip J.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism of template switching by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase and the role of template dimerization were examined. Homologous donor-acceptor template pairs derived from the HIV-1 untranslated leader region and containing the wild-type and mutant dimerization initiation sequences (DIS) were used to examine the efficiency and distribution of transfers. Inhibiting donor-acceptor interaction was sufficient to reduce transfers in DIS-containin...

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection: Intraindividual Comparison of Cellular Immune Responses against Two Persistent Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, Georg M.; Nguyen, Tam N.; Day, Cheryl L.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Flynn, Theresa; McGowan, Katherine; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Lucas, Michaela; Klenerman, Paul; Chung, Raymond T.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2002-01-01

    Both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) lead to chronic infection in a high percentage of persons, and an expanding epidemic of HIV-1-HCV coinfection has recently been identified. These individuals provide an opportunity for simultaneous assessment of immune responses to two viral infections associated with chronic plasma viremia. In this study we analyzed the breadth and magnitude of the CD8+- and CD4+-T-lymphocyte responses in 22 individuals infected wit...

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 group M consensus and mosaic envelope glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T.; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2017-11-21

    The disclosure relates to nucleic acids mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  12. Use of a novel chimeric mouse model with a functionally active human immune system to study human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    An, Dong Sung; Poon, Betty; Tsong Fang, Raphael Ho; Weijer, Kees; Blom, Bianca; Spits, Hergen; Chen, Irvin S. Y.; Uittenbogaart, Christel H.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a small-animal model to study human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in blood and primary and secondary lymphoid organs. Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice that are neonatally injected with human CD34(+) cells develop a functional human immune system

  13. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kaestle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP. After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector–mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application—injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  14. Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs Associated with Ketosis Events in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalange, Nandu; Aldhouse, Natalie Valerie Jane; Kitchen, Helen; Howard, Daniel; Tutkunkardas, Deniz; Håkan-Bloch, Jonas

    2017-10-01

    Ketosis is a metabolic state associated with insulin deficiency. Untreated, it develops into diabetic ketoacidosis, a significant contributor to mortality and morbidity in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Little is understood about how patients utilize healthcare resources during ketosis events. This study aimed to identify and quantify healthcare resource utilization and provide estimates of associated costs of ketosis events in T1DM, treated unaided or with healthcare professional (HCP) assistance in the UK. Qualitative interviews with adult patients, pediatric carers, and HCPs identified resources used by patients/carers during ketosis events. An online quantitative survey was then used to quantify patients/carers resource use during their/their child's most recent ketosis event, and HCPs estimated patient resource uptake to corroborate the findings. Associated costs estimated from UK data sources were applied to the survey results to calculate the cost of ketosis events in adults and children. Quantitative survey responses from 93 adults, 76 carers, and 52 HCPs were analyzed. Patients and carers monitored ketosis during and following the event with ketone strips and additional glucose strips, and administered treatment comprising insulin and pump set changes where appropriate. Additionally, patients/carers accessed phone services and many received follow-up medical appointments. In total, 70% (n = 65) of adult and 66% (n = 50) of pediatric ketosis events were managed at home, for which resource use costs per event were £23.87 and £38.00 respectively. Remaining events were treated in NHS facilities costing £217.57 per adult and £352.92 per child. Weighted averages identified that ketosis events cost £81.98 per adult and £142.97 per child. Indirect costs from work productivity loss increase these figures to £225.11 per adult and £256.88 per child. Healthcare resource use for ketosis events is high in adults and children with T1DM and

  15. Prevalence of human papilloma virus and human herpes virus types 1-7 in human nasal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaravinos, Apostolos; Bizakis, John; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV), herpes simplex virus-1/-2 (HSV-1/-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6/-7 (HHV-6/-7) in 23 human nasal polyps by applying PCR. Two types of control tissues were used: adjacent inferior/middle turbinates from the patients and inferior/middle turbinates from 13 patients undergoing nasal corrective surgery. EBV was the virus most frequently detected (35%), followed by HPV (13%), HSV-1 (9%), and CMV (4%). The CMV-positive polyp was simultaneously positive for HSV-1. HPV was also detected in the adjacent turbinates (4%) and the adjacent middle turbinate (4%) of one of the HPV-positive patients. EBV, HSV, and CMV were not detected in the adjacent turbinates of the EBV-, HSV- or CMV-positive patients. All mucosae were negative for the VZV, HHV-6, and HHV-7. This is the first study to deal with the involvement of a comparable group of viruses in human nasal polyposis. The findings support the theory that the presence of viral EBV markedly influences the pathogenesis of these benign nasal tumors. The low incidence of HPV detected confirms the hypothesis that HPV is correlated with infectious mucosal lesions to a lesser extent than it is with proliferative lesions, such as inverted papilloma. The low incidence of HSV-1 and CMV confirms that these two herpes viruses may play a minor role in the development of nasal polyposis. Double infection with HSV-1 and CMV may also play a minor, though causative, role in nasal polyp development. VZV and HHV-6/-7 do not appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of these mucosal lesions.

  16. A riboswitch regulates RNA dimerization and packaging in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, Marcel; Huthoff, Hendrik; Russell, Rodney; Liang, Chen; Berkhout, Ben

    2004-01-01

    The genome of retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), consists of two identical RNA strands that are packaged as noncovalently linked dimers. The core packaging and dimerization signals are located in the downstream part of the untranslated leader of HIV-1 RNA-the Psi

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolution in vivo tracked by DNA heteroduplex mobility assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delwart, E. L.; Sheppard, H. W.; Walker, B. D.; Goudsmit, J.; Mullins, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    High mutation rates and strong selective pressures imposed on human immunodeficiency viruses in vivo result in the formation of pools of genetic variants known as quasispecies. DNA heteroduplex mobility and tracking analyses were used to monitor the generation of HIV sequence diversity, to estimate

  18. Human parechovirus type 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6 detection in picornavirus cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Michel; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Berkhout, Ron; Vermeulen-Oost, Wilma; Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Bruisten, Sylvia; Berkhout, Ben; van der Hoek, Lia

    2008-01-01

    Picornavirus cultures that could not be typed in neutralization assays were analyzed by VP1 reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and a virus discovery tool (VIDISCA). Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) were frequently identified, among which were the uncommon isolates HPeV-4, HPeV-5, and HPeV-6. The HPeV-5

  19. Corticotrophin-Releasing Hormone Type 1 Receptor Gene (CRHR1 Variants Predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Onset and Course in Pediatric Injury Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda B. Amstadter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a common and disabling anxiety disorder that may occur in the aftermath of exposure to potentially traumatic life events. PTSD is moderately heritable, but few specific molecular variants accounting for this heritability have been identified. Genes regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1, have been implicated in traumatic-stress related phenotypes but have yet to be studied in relation to PTSD. The present study sought to examine the relation between 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CRHR1 gene and posttraumatic stress symptoms in a prospective study of pediatric injury patients (n = 103 who were first assessed in the acute aftermath of their injury at the hospital. Results indicated that multiple SNPs were associated with acute symptoms at a univariate level, and after correction for multiple testing, rs12944712 was significantly related to acute PTSD symptoms. Longitudinal latent growth curve analyses suggest that rs12944712 is also related to both acute symptom level and trajectory of symptoms over time. The present study adds support for the role of CRHR1 in the stress response following potentially traumatic event exposure in youth. It should be noted that the sample size in this study was small, and therefore statistical power was low; following, results from this study should be considered preliminary. Although results are not definitive, the findings from this study warrant future replication studies on how variation in this gene relates to response to traumatic event exposure in youth.

  20. Corticotrophin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1) variants predict posttraumatic stress disorder onset and course in pediatric injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstadter, Ananda B; Nugent, Nicole R; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Miller, Alisa; Siburian, Richie; Moorjani, Priya; Haddad, Stephen; Basu, Aditi; Fagerness, Jesen; Saxe, Glenn; Smoller, Jordan W; Koenen, Karestan C

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common and disabling anxiety disorder that may occur in the aftermath of exposure to potentially traumatic life events. PTSD is moderately heritable, but few specific molecular variants accounting for this heritability have been identified. Genes regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1), have been implicated in traumatic-stress related phenotypes but have yet to be studied in relation to PTSD. The present study sought to examine the relation between 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRHR1 gene and posttraumatic stress symptoms in a prospective study of pediatric injury patients (n=103) who were first assessed in the acute aftermath of their injury at the hospital. Results indicated that multiple SNPs were associated with acute symptoms at a univariate level, and after correction for multiple testing, rs12944712 was significantly related to acute PTSD symptoms. Longitudinal latent growth curve analyses suggest that rs12944712 is also related to both acute symptom level and trajectory of symptoms over time. The present study adds support for the role of CRHR1 in the stress response following potentially traumatic event exposure in youth. It should be noted that the sample size in this study was small, and therefore statistical power was low; following, results from this study should be considered preliminary. Although results are not definitive, the findings from this study warrant future replication studies on how variation in this gene relates to response to traumatic event exposure in youth.

  1. Lack of an association of miR-938 SNP in IDDM10 with human type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Xiaofan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a newly discovered type of small non-protein coding RNA that function in the inhibition of effective mRNA translation, and may serve as susceptibility genes for various disease developments. The SNP rs12416605, located in human type 1 diabetes IDDM10 locus, changes the seeding sequence (UGU[G/A]CCC of miRNA miR-938 and potentially alters miR-938 targets, including IL-16 and IL-17A. In an attempt to test whether miR-938 may be a susceptibility gene for IDDM10, we assessed the possible association of the miR-938 SNP with T1D in an American Caucasian cohort of 622 patients and 723 healthy controls by TaqMan assay. Our current data do not support the association between the SNP in miR-938 and type 1 diabetes.

  2. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuyo [Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Adhikari, Rewati [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection.

  3. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazuyo; Adhikari, Rewati; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection

  4. [Distribution of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 genomes in the human spinal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Y

    1994-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is well known for its propensity to cause recurrent oral or genital mucosal infections in humans. HSV-1 is involved primarily in oral lesions, whereas HSV-2 is more frequently involved in genital lesions. Based on this, it is thought that HSV-1 may produce latent infections in trigeminal ganglia, and HSV-2 in the sacral ganglia. However the distribution pattern of latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in spinal ganglia remains unknown. Using the polymerase chain reaction we detected latent herpes HSV-1 and HSV-2 in human spinal ganglia obtained from autopsy material. A pair of primers which were specific for a part of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA polymerase domain were employed. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNAs were detected in 11 of 40 (28%) and 15 of 40 (38%) cervical ganglia, respectively, 52 of 103 (50%) and 47 of 103 (46%) thoracic ganglia, 16 of 53 (30%) and 17 of 53 (32%) lumbar ganglia, and 3 of 20 (15%) and 3 of 20 (15%) sacral ganglia. These findings suggest that latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections have a widespread distribution from the cervical ganglia to sacral ganglia. Importantly this study demonstrated latent HSV-1 infection of both the lumbar and sacral ganglia for the first time.

  5. Phenotype Variation in Human Immunodeficiency virus Type 1 Transmission and Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Cavarelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 infects target cells through interaction with the CD4 molecule and chemokine receptors, mainly CCR5 and CXCR4. Viral isolates can be phenotypically classified based on the co-receptor they utilize to infect target cells. Thus, R5 and X4 virus use respectively CCR5 and CXCR4, whereas R5X4 virus can use either CCR5 or CXCR4. This review describes the central role played by co-receptor expression and usage for HIV-1 cell tropism, transmission and pathogenesis. We discuss various hypotheses proposed to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms driving the change of HIV-1 co-receptor usage in the course of infection. Recent insights in the intrinsic variability of R5 viruses and their role in influencing disease progression in both adults and children are also discussed.

  6. Phenotype variation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarelli, Mariangela; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) infects target cells through interaction with the CD4 molecule and chemokine receptors, mainly CCR5 and CXCR4. Viral isolates can be phenotypically classified based on the co-receptor they utilize to infect target cells. Thus, R5 and X4 virus use respectively CCR5 and CXCR4, whereas R5X4 virus can use either CCR5 or CXCR4. This review describes the central role played by co-receptor expression and usage for HIV-1 cell tropism, transmission and pathogenesis. We discuss various hypotheses proposed to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms driving the change of HIV-1 co-receptor usage in the course of infection. Recent insights in the intrinsic variability of R5 viruses and their role in influencing disease progression in both adults and children are also discussed.

  7. Escape from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Weiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV enters cells through a series of molecular interactions between the HIV envelope protein and cellular receptors, thus providing many opportunities to block infection. Entry inhibitors are currently being used in the clinic, and many more are under development. Unfortunately, as is the case for other classes of antiretroviral drugs that target later steps in the viral life cycle, HIV can become resistant to entry inhibitors. In contrast to inhibitors that block viral enzymes in intracellular compartments, entry inhibitors interfere with the function of the highly variable envelope glycoprotein as it continuously adapts to changing immune pressure and available target cells in the extracellular environment. Consequently, pathways and mechanisms of resistance for entry inhibitors are varied and often involve mutations across the envelope gene. This review provides a broad overview of entry inhibitor resistance mechanisms that inform our understanding of HIV entry and the design of new inhibitors and vaccines.

  8. Characterization of the Drosophila ortholog of the human Usher Syndrome type 1G protein sans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Demontis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Usher syndrome (USH is the most frequent deaf-blindness hereditary disease in humans. Deafness is attributed to the disorganization of stereocilia in the inner ear. USH1, the most severe subtype, is associated with mutations in genes encoding myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, and sans. Myosin VIIa, harmonin, cadherin 23, and protocadherin 15 physically interact in vitro and localize to stereocilia tips in vivo, indicating that they form functional complexes. Sans, in contrast, localizes to vesicle-like structures beneath the apical membrane of stereocilia-displaying hair cells. How mutations in sans result in deafness and blindness is not well understood. Orthologs of myosin VIIa and protocadherin 15 have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster and their genetic analysis has identified essential roles in auditory perception and microvilli morphogenesis, respectively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have identified and characterized the Drosophila ortholog of human sans. Drosophila Sans is expressed in tubular organs of the embryo, in lens-secreting cone cells of the adult eye, and in microvilli-displaying follicle cells during oogenesis. Sans mutants are viable, fertile, and mutant follicle cells appear to form microvilli, indicating that Sans is dispensable for fly development and microvilli morphogenesis in the follicle epithelium. In follicle cells, Sans protein localizes, similar to its vertebrate ortholog, to intracellular punctate structures, which we have identified as early endosomes associated with the syntaxin Avalanche. CONCLUSIONS: Our work is consistent with an evolutionary conserved function of Sans in vesicle trafficking. Furthermore it provides a significant basis for further understanding of the role of this Usher syndrome ortholog in development and disease.

  9. Viral RNA annealing activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein require only peptide domains outside the zinc fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rocquigny, H; Gabus, C; Vincent, A; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B; Darlix, J L

    1992-07-15

    The nucleocapsid (NC) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a large number of NC protein molecules, probably wrapping the dimeric RNA genome within the virion inner core. NC protein is a gag-encoded product that contains two zinc fingers flanked by basic residues. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions, NCp15 is ultimately processed into NCp7 and p6 proteins. During virion assembly the retroviral NC protein is necessary for core formation and genomic RNA encapsidation, which are essential for virus infectivity. In vitro NCp15 activates viral RNA dimerization, a process most probably linked in vivo to genomic RNA packaging, and replication primer tRNA(Lys,3) annealing to the initiation site of reverse transcription. To characterize the domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 NC protein necessary for its various functions, the 72-amino acid NCp7 and several derived peptides were synthesized in a pure form. We show here that synthetic NCp7 with or without the two zinc fingers has the RNA annealing activities of NCp15. Further deletions of the N-terminal 12 and C-terminal 8 amino acids, leading to a 27-residue peptide lacking the finger domains, have little or no effect on NC protein activity in vitro. However deletion of short sequences containing basic residues flanking the first finger leads to a complete loss of NC protein activity. It is proposed that the basic residues and the zinc fingers cooperate to select and package the genomic RNA in vivo. Inhibition of the viral RNA binding and annealing activities associated with the basic residues flanking the first zinc finger of NC protein could therefore be used as a model for the design of antiviral agents.

  10. Viral gene products and replication of the human immunodeficiency type 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C D; Park, J; Wakefield, J K

    1994-05-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic represents a modern-day plague that has not only resulted in a tragic loss of people from a wide spectrum of society but has reshaped our viewpoints regarding health care, the treatment of infectious diseases, and social issues regarding sexual behavior. There is little doubt now that the cause of the disease AIDS is a virus known as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The HIV virus is a member of a large family of viruses termed retroviruses, which have as a hallmark the capacity to convert their RNA genome into a DNA form that then undergoes a process of integration into the host cell chromosome, followed by the expression of the viral genome and translation of viral proteins in the infected cell. This review describes the organization of the HIV-1 viral genome, the expression of viral proteins, as well as the functions of the accessory viral proteins in HIV replication. The replication of the viral genome is divided into two phases, the early phase and the late phase. The early phase consists of the interaction of the virus with the cell surface receptor (CD4 molecule in most cases), the uncoating and conversion of the viral RNA genome into a DNA form, and the integration into the host cell chromosome. The late phase consists of the expression of the viral proteins from the integrated viral genome, the translation of viral proteins, and the assembly and release of the virus. Points in the HIV-1 life cycle that are targets for therapeutic intervention are also discussed.

  11. Population migration and the spread of types 1 and 2 human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T C

    1994-03-29

    Over 14 million people are estimated to be infected with the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV), with nearly three-fourths of the infected persons residing in developing countries. One factor responsible for dissemination of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 worldwide was the intense migration of individuals, from rural to urban centers with subsequent return migration and internationally due to civil wars, tourism, business purposes, and the drug trade. In sub-Saharan Africa, between 1960 and 1980, urban centers with more than 500,000 inhabitants increased from 3 to 28, and more than 75 military coups occurred in 30 countries. The result was a massive migration of rural inhabitants to urban centers concomitant with the spread of HIV-1 to large population centers. With the associated demographic, economic, and social changes, an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV-1 was ignited. Migratory patterns were also responsible for the spread of endemic HIV-2 to neighboring West African countries and eventually to Europe, the Americans, and India. Although Southeast Asia was the last region in which HIV-1 was introduced, it has the greatest potential for rapid spread due to population density and inherent risk behaviors. Thus, the migration of poor, rural, and young sexually active individuals to urban centers coupled with large international movements of HIV-infected individuals played a prominent role in the dissemination of HIV globally. The economic recession has aggravated the transmission of HIV by directly increasing the population at risk through increased urban migration, disruption of rural families and cultural values, poverty, and prostitution and indirectly through a decrease in health care provision. Consequently, social and economic reform as well as sexual behavior education need to be intensified if HIV transmission is to be controlled.

  12. Neutralizing antibody response during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: type and group specificity and viral escape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Sönnerborg, A; Svennerholm, B

    1993-01-01

    The paradox that group-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) exist in the majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, whereas the NA response against autologous HIV-1 virus isolates is highly type-specific, motivated us to study the type- and group-specific NA...... demonstrated, suggesting that the majority of the change in neutralization sensitivity is driven by the selective pressure of type-specific NA. Furthermore, no differences were observed in sensitivity to neutralization by anti-carbohydrate neutralizing monoclonal antibodies or the lectin concanavalin A...

  13. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Use of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.; Becker, N.; DelRowe, J.; Davis, L.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is presented. The patient had a localized lesion on his scalp. Evaluation for systemic lymphoma was negative. A biopsy specimen showed superficial and deep dermal infiltrates of pleomorphic lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry was consistent with T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated successfully with local irradiation. He remained free of further systemic and cutaneous recurrences of the lymphoma until he died 8 months after treatment of pneumonia. This case is the first to our knowledge to describe a localized CTCL in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)

  14. Sensitive cell-based assay for determination of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, Ana C; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard M; Rhea, Ariel M; Rose, Justine D; Wylie, Doug; Henry, Kenneth; Wright, Alison; King, Kevin; Archer, John; Poveda, Eva; Soriano, Vicente; Robertson, David L; Olivo, Paul D; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2013-05-01

    CCR5 antagonists are a powerful new class of antiretroviral drugs that require a companion assay to evaluate the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior to use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. In this study, we have developed, characterized, verified, and prevalidated a novel phenotypic test to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (VERITROP) based on a sensitive cell-to-cell fusion assay. A proprietary vector was constructed containing a near-full-length HIV-1 genome with the yeast uracil biosynthesis (URA3) gene replacing the HIV-1 env coding sequence. Patient-derived HIV-1 PCR products were introduced by homologous recombination using an innovative yeast-based cloning strategy. The env-expressing vectors were then used in a cell-to-cell fusion assay to determine the presence of R5 and/or non-R5 HIV-1 variants within the viral population. Results were compared with (i) the original version of Trofile (Monogram Biosciences, San Francisco, CA), (ii) population sequencing, and (iii) 454 pyrosequencing, with the genotypic data analyzed using several bioinformatics tools, i.e., the 11/24/25 rule, Geno2Pheno (2% to 5.75%, 3.5%, or 10% false-positive rate [FPR]), and webPSSM. VERITROP consistently detected minority non-R5 variants from clinical specimens, with an analytical sensitivity of 0.3%, with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. In a pilot study, a 73.7% (56/76) concordance was observed with the original Trofile assay, with 19 of the 20 discordant results corresponding to non-R5 variants detected using VERITROP and not by the original Trofile assay. The degree of concordance of VERITROP and Trofile with population and deep sequencing results depended on the algorithm used to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Overall, VERITROP showed better concordance with deep sequencing/Geno2Pheno at a 0.3% detection threshold (67%), whereas Trofile matched better with population sequencing (79%). However, 454

  15. Current use of metformin in addition to insulin in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: an analysis based on a large diabetes registry in Germany and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Katja; Datz, Nicolin; Engelsberger, Ilse; Grulich-Henn, Jürgen; Hoertenhuber, Thomas; Knauth, Burkhild; Meissner, Thomas; Wiegand, Susanna; Woelfle, Joachim; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-11-01

    With increasing obesity in childhood and adolescence, weight gain, and insulin resistance become also more frequent in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Especially during puberty, insulin therapy often has to be intensified and higher insulin doses are necessary. Some studies point to a beneficial effect of metformin in addition to insulin in these patients. In order to describe current practice and possible benefits, we compared pediatric T1DM patients with insulin plus metformin (n = 525) to patients with insulin therapy only (n = 57 487) in a prospective multicenter analysis. Auxological and treatment data from 58 012 patients aged 1 yr with T1DM in the German/Austrian Diabetes Patienten Verlaufsdokumentation (DPV) registry were analyzed by multivariable mixed regression modeling. Patients with additional metformin were older [median (interquartile range)]: [16.1 (14.1-17.6) vs. 15.2 (11.5-17.5) yr] with female preponderance (61.0 vs. 47.2%, p 1). They had higher body mass index-standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) [+2.03 (+1.29 to +2.56) vs. +0.51 (-0.12 to +1.15); p 1] and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (9.0 vs. 8.6%, p 1). Hypertension (43.7 vs. 24.8%) and dyslipidemia (58.4 vs. 40.6%) were significantly more prevalent. Adjusted insulin dose was significantly higher (0.98 vs. 0.93 IU/kg bodyweight). In a subgroup of 285 patients followed-up longitudinally (average treatment period 1.42 yr), addition of metformin resulted in a slight reduction of BMI-SDS [-0.01 (-2.01 to +1.40)], but did not improve HbA1c or insulin requirement. Additional metformin therapy in T1DM is primarily used in obese females. Additional therapy with metformin was associated with minor benefits. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection

  17. Functional analysis of the interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev nuclear export signal with its cofactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, A.; Li, L.; Gettemeier, T.; Venkatesh, L.K.

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev-mediated nuclear export of viral RNAs involves the interaction of its leucine-rich nuclear export sequence (NES) with nuclear cofactors. In yeast two-hybrid screens of a human lymph node derived cDNA expression library, we identified the human nucleoporin Nup98 as a highly specific and potent interactor of the Rev NES. Using an extensive panel of nuclear export positive and negative mutants of the functionally homologous NESs of the HIV-1 Rev, human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Rex, and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Rev proteins, physiologically significant interaction of hNup98 with the various NESs was demonstrated. Missense mutations in the yeast nuclear export factor Crm1p that abrogated Rev NES interaction with the XXFG repeat-containing nucleoporin, Rab/hRIP, had minimal effects on the interaction of GLFG repeat-containing hNup98. Functional analysis of Nup98 domains required for nuclear localization demonstrated that the entire ORF was required for efficient incorporation into the nuclear envelope. A putative nuclear localization signal was identified downstream of the GLFG repeat region. Whereas overexpression of both full-length Nup98 and the amino-terminal GLFG repeat region, but not the unique carboxy-terminal region, induced significant suppression of HIV unspliced RNA export, lower levels of exogenous Nup98 expression resulted in a relatively modest increase in unspliced RNA export. These results suggest a physiological role for hNup98 in modulating Rev-dependent RNA export during HIV infection

  18. Human antibodies that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vitro do not provide protection in an in vivo model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schutten (Martin); K. Tenner-Racz; P. Racz; D.W. van Bekkum (Dirk); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractRecently, conflicting data have been published about the ability of antibodies which efficiently neutralize T cell-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains to neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in vitro and in vivo. Here we present data indicating that such antibodies

  19. R5 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from rapid progressors lacking X4 strains do not possess X4-type pathogenicity in human thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkowitz, R. D.; van't Wout, A. B.; Kootstra, N. A.; Moreno, M. E.; Linquist-Stepps, V. D.; Bare, C.; Stoddart, C. A.; Schuitemaker, H.; McCune, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Some individuals infected with only R5 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 progress to AIDS as quickly as individuals harboring X4 strains. We determined that three R5 viruses were much less pathogenic than an X4 virus in SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice, suggesting that R5 virus-mediated rapid

  20. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  1. Moderate restriction of macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, Kahoru; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains are able to grow to high titers in human monocyte-derived macrophages. However, it was recently reported that cellular protein SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in human cells of the myeloid lineage, including monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we show that degradation of SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages was associated with moderately enhanced growth of the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. SAMHD1 degradation was induced by treating target macrophages with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) particles containing viral protein X. For undifferentiated monocytes, HIV-2 particle treatment allowed undifferentiated monocytes to be fully permissive for productive infection by the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. In contrast, untreated monocytes were totally resistant to HIV-1 replication. These results indicated that SAMHD1 moderately restricts even a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain in monocyte-derived macrophages, whereas the protein potently restricts HIV-1 replication in undifferentiated monocytes.

  2. Presence of Human Herpesvirus 6B in the Pancreas of Subjects With and Without Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Maja; Skog, Oskar

    The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) A and B in human pancreata and to search for signs of active infection in this organ of subjects with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). Pancreata from brain-dead organ donors with and without T1D were examined for the presence of HHV6 genomic sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), transcripts by reverse transcriptase-PCR, and protein by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative PCR of isolated pancreatic islets and exocrine cell clusters was used to determine the intrapancreatic location of HHV6 DNA. Human herpesvirus 6B genomic sequences were present in 1 of 2 donors who died of acute-onset T1D, 4 of 6 donors with long-standing T1D, and 9 of 12 nondiabetic donors. Higher copy numbers of HHV6B DNA were present in isolated islets than in exocrine tissue from the same donors. No signs of active HHV6 transcription were found. Human herpesvirus 6A was not present in any tested pancreas. The herein presented data demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of a latent HHV6B infection in the pancreas and islets of Langerhans. Whether this virus can contribute to disease in the pancreas remains to be determined.

  3. Genetic and epigenetic mutations affect the DNA binding capability of human ZFP57 in transient neonatal diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglivo, Ilaria; Esposito, Sabrina; De Cesare, Lucia; Sparago, Angela; Anvar, Zahra; Riso, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Marco; Fattorusso, Roberto; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Paolo V

    2013-05-21

    In the mouse, ZFP57 contains three classical Cys2His2 zinc finger domains (ZF) and recognizes the methylated TGC(met)CGC target sequence using the first and the second ZFs. In this study, we demonstrate that the human ZFP57 (hZFP57) containing six Cys2His2 ZFs, binds the same methylated sequence through the third and the fourth ZFs, and identify the aminoacids critical for DNA interaction. In addition, we present evidences indicating that hZFP57 mutations and hypomethylation of the TNDM1 ICR both associated with Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus type 1 result in loss of hZFP57 binding to the TNDM1 locus, likely causing PLAGL1 activation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 quantitative cell microculture as a measure of antiviral efficacy in a multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscus, S A; DeGruttola, V; Gupta, P; Katzenstein, D A; Meyer, W A; LoFaro, M L; Katzman, M; Ragni, M V; Reichelderfer, P S; Coombs, R W

    1995-02-01

    A quantitative cell microculture assay (QMC) was used to measure the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated titer in 109 subjects rolled in an open-label phase I/II study of didanosine monotherapy or combination therapy with zidovudine. The titer was inversely correlated with CD4+ cell count at baseline (r = .37, P = .001). After 12 weeks of therapy, subjects showed a significant decreases in virus titer and those with the highest baseline virus titers had the greatest increase in CD4+ cell number (r = .430, P = .002). The QMC assay was more sensitive (98%) for assessing the antiretroviral effect of therapy than was immune complex-dissociated HIV p24 antigen (32%) or plasma culture (3.4%). Estimated sample sizes for phase I/II clinical trials were derived using the within-subject QMC SD of .72 log10 infectious units per 10(6) PMBC.

  5. Impact of phenotype definition on genome-wide association signals: empirical evaluation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Fellay, Jacques; Colombo, Sara

    2011-01-01

    infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to assess whether differences in type of population (622 seroconverters vs. 636 seroprevalent subjects) or the number of measurements available for defining the phenotype resulted in differences in the effect sizes of associations between single...... nucleotide polymorphisms and the phenotype, HIV-1 viral load at set point. The effect estimate for the top 100 single nucleotide polymorphisms was 0.092 (95% confidence interval: 0.074, 0.110) log(10) viral load (log(10) copies of HIV-1 per mL of blood) greater in seroconverters than in seroprevalent...... available, particularly among seroconverters and for variants that achieved genome-wide significance. Differences in phenotype definition and ascertainment may affect the estimated magnitude of genetic effects and should be considered in optimizing power for discovering new associations....

  6. In vivo emergence of vicriviroc resistance in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C-infected subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibris, Athe M N; Sagar, Manish; Gulick, Roy M; Su, Zhaohui; Hughes, Michael; Greaves, Wayne; Subramanian, Mani; Flexner, Charles; Giguel, Françoise; Leopold, Kay E; Coakley, Eoin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2008-08-01

    Little is known about the in vivo development of resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CCR5 antagonists. We studied 29 subjects with virologic failure from a phase IIb study of the CCR5 antagonist vicriviroc (VCV) and identified one individual with HIV-1 subtype C who developed VCV resistance. Studies with chimeric envelopes demonstrated that changes within the V3 loop were sufficient to confer VCV resistance. Resistant virus showed VCV-enhanced replication, cross-resistance to another CCR5 antagonist, TAK779, and increased sensitivity to aminooxypentane-RANTES and the CCR5 monoclonal antibody HGS004. Pretreatment V3 loop sequences reemerged following VCV discontinuation, implying that VCV resistance has associated fitness costs.

  7. Impact of phenotype definition on genome-wide association signals: empirical evaluation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Fellay, Jacques; Colombo, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Discussion on improving the power of genome-wide association studies to identify candidate variants and genes is generally centered on issues of maximizing sample size; less attention is given to the role of phenotype definition and ascertainment. The authors used genome-wide data from patients...... infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to assess whether differences in type of population (622 seroconverters vs. 636 seroprevalent subjects) or the number of measurements available for defining the phenotype resulted in differences in the effect sizes of associations between single...... available, particularly among seroconverters and for variants that achieved genome-wide significance. Differences in phenotype definition and ascertainment may affect the estimated magnitude of genetic effects and should be considered in optimizing power for discovering new associations....

  8. Comparing effects of insulin analogues and human insulin on nocturnal glycaemia in hypoglycaemia-prone people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P. L.; Tarnow, L.; Bay, C.

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Treatment with insulin analogue reduces the occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia assessed by nocturnal glucose profiles in people with Type 1 diabetes prone to severe hypoglycaemia. Nocturnal glucose profiles provide a more comprehensive assessment of clinical benefit of insulin regimens......Aims: To assess the difference between analogue and human insulin with regard to nocturnal glucose profiles and risk of hypoglycaemia in people with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. Methods: A total of 72 people [46 men, mean ± sd age 54 ± 12 years, mean ± sd HbA1c 65 ± 12 mmol/mol (8.1 ± 1.1......%), mean ± sd duration of diabetes 30 ± 14 years], who participated in a 2-year randomized, crossover trial of basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir/insulin aspart or human NPH insulin/human regular insulin (the HypoAna trial) were studied for 2 nights during each treatment. Venous blood was drawn...

  9. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Proteins Show Distinct Patterns and Mechanisms of Src Kinase Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Alison L.; Dutartre, Hélène; Allen, Kelly; McPhee, Dale A.; Olive, Daniel; Collette, Yves

    1999-01-01

    The nef gene from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) regulates cell function and viral replication, possibly through binding of the nef product to cellular proteins, including Src family tyrosine kinases. We show here that the Nef protein encoded by SIVmac239 interacts with and also activates the human Src kinases Lck and Hck. This is in direct contrast to the inhibitory effect of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Nef on Lck catalytic activity. Unexpectedly, however, the interaction of SIV Nef with human Lck or Hck is not mediated via its consensus proline motif, which is known to mediate HIV-1 Nef binding to Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, and various experimental analyses failed to show significant interaction of SIV Nef with the SH3 domain of either kinase. Instead, SIV Nef can bind Lck and Hck SH2 domains, and its N-terminal 50 amino acid residues are sufficient for Src kinase binding and activation. Our results provide evidence for multiple mechanisms by which Nef binds to and regulates Src kinases. PMID:10364375

  10. Attenuated Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Expressing Ebola Virus Glycoprotein GP Administered Intranasally Is Immunogenic in African Green Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingemann, Matthias; Liu, Xueqiao; Surman, Sonja; Liang, Bo; Herbert, Richard; Hackenberg, Ashley D; Buchholz, Ursula J; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-05-15

    The recent 2014-2016 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak prompted increased efforts to develop vaccines against EBOV disease. We describe the development and preclinical evaluation of an attenuated recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) expressing the membrane-anchored form of EBOV glycoprotein GP, as an intranasal (i.n.) EBOV vaccine. GP was codon optimized and expressed either as a full-length protein or as an engineered chimeric form in which its transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail (TMCT) domains were replaced with those of the HPIV1 F protein in an effort to enhance packaging into the vector particle and immunogenicity. GP was inserted either preceding the N gene (pre-N) or between the N and P genes (N-P) of rHPIV1 bearing a stabilized attenuating mutation in the P/C gene (C Δ170 ). The constructs grew to high titers and efficiently and stably expressed GP. Viruses were attenuated, replicating at low titers over several days, in the respiratory tract of African green monkeys (AGMs). Two doses of candidates expressing GP from the pre-N position elicited higher GP neutralizing serum antibody titers than the N-P viruses, and unmodified GP induced higher levels than its TMCT counterpart. Unmodified EBOV GP was packaged into the HPIV1 particle, and the TMCT modification did not increase packaging or immunogenicity but rather reduced the stability of GP expression during in vivo replication. In conclusion, we identified an attenuated and immunogenic i.n. vaccine candidate expressing GP from the pre-N position. It is expected to be well tolerated in humans and is available for clinical evaluation. IMPORTANCE EBOV hemorrhagic fever is one of the most lethal viral infections and lacks a licensed vaccine. Contact of fluids from infected individuals, including droplets or aerosols, with mucosal surfaces is an important route of EBOV spread during a natural outbreak, and aerosols also might be exploited for intentional virus spread. Therefore, vaccines that protect

  11. Changes in the topology of gene expression networks by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Girón, María Juliana; García-Vallejo, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    One key step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the integration of its viral cDNA. This process is mediated through complex networks of host-virus interactions that alter several normal cell functions of the host. To study the complexity of disturbances in cell gene expression networks by HIV-1 integration, we constructed a network of human macrophage genes located close to chromatin regions rich in proviruses. To perform the network analysis, we selected 28 genes previously identified as the target of cDNA integration and their transcriptional profiles were obtained from GEO Profiles (NCBI). A total of 2770 interactions among the 28 genes located around the HIV-1 proviruses in human macrophages formed a highly dense main network connected to five sub-networks. The overall network was significantly enriched by genes associated with signal transduction, cellular communication and regulatory processes. To simulate the effects of HIV-1 integration in infected macrophages, five genes with the most number of interaction in the normal network were turned off by putting in zero the correspondent expression values. The HIV-1 infected network showed changes in its topology and alteration in the macrophage functions reflected in a re-programming of biosynthetic and general metabolic process. Understanding the complex virus-host interactions that occur during HIV-1 integration, may provided valuable genomic information to develop new antiviral treatments focusing on the management of some specific gene expression networks associated with viral integration. This is the first gene network which describes the human macrophages genes interactions related with HIV-1 integration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin D inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages through the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infected persons are associated with more rapid disease progression and increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We have previously shown that 1α,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D, inhibits HIV replication in human macrophages through the induction of autophagy. In this study, we report that physiological concentrations of 1,25D3 induce the production of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP and autophagic flux in HIV and M. tuberculosis co-infected human macrophages which inhibits mycobacterial growth and the replication of HIV. Using RNA interference for Beclin-1 and the autophagy-related 5 homologue, combined with the chemical inhibitors of autophagic flux, bafilomycin A₁, an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequent acidification, and SID 26681509 an inhibitor of the lysosome hydrolase cathepsin L, we show that the 1,25D3-mediated inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth during single infection or dual infection is dependent not only upon the induction of autophagy, but also through phagosomal maturation. Moreover, through the use of RNA interference for CAMP, we demonstrate that cathelicidin is essential for the 1,25D3 induced autophagic flux and inhibition of HIV replication and mycobacterial growth. The present findings provide a biological explanation for the benefits and importance of vitamin D sufficiency in HIV and M. tuberculosis-infected persons, and provide new insights into novel approaches to prevent and treat HIV infection and related opportunistic infections.

  13. Clinical pathophysiology of human T-lymphotropic virus-type1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa eYamano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a human retrovirus, is the causative agent of a progressive neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HAM/TSP is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and is characterized by unremitting myelopathic symptoms such as spastic paraparesis, lower limb sensory disturbance, and bladder/bowel dysfunction. Approximately 0.25%–3.8% of HTLV-1-infected individuals develop HAM/TSP, which is more common in women than in men. Since the discovery of HAM/TSP, significant advances have been made with respect to elucidating the virological, molecular, and immunopathological mechanisms underlying this disease. These findings suggest that spinal cord invasion by HTLV-1-infected T cells triggers a strong virus-specific immune response and increases proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, leading to chronic lymphocytic inflammation and tissue damage in spinal cord lesions. However, little progress has been made in the development of an optimal treatment for HAM/TSP, more specifically in the identification of biomarkers for predicting disease progression and of molecular targets for novel therapeutic strategies targeting the underlying pathological mechanisms. This review summarizes current clinical and pathophysiological knowledge on HAM/TSP and discusses future focus areas for research on this disease.

  14. Enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-DNA vaccine potency through incorporation of T-helper 1 molecular adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calarota, Sandra A; Weiner, David B

    2004-06-01

    It is clear that the development of a safe and effective vaccine for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a crucial goal for controlling the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic. At present, it is not clear what arm of the immune response correlates with protection from HIV-1 infection or disease. Therefore, a strong cellular and humoral immune response will likely be needed to control this infection. Among different vaccine alternatives, DNA vaccines appeared more than a decade ago, demonstrating important qualities of inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models. However, after several years and various clinical studies in humans, supporting the safety of the HIV-DNA vaccine strategies, it has become clear that their potency should be improved. One way to modulate and enhance the immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine is by including genetic adjuvants such as cytokines, chemokines, or T-cell costimulatory molecules as part of the vaccine itself. Particularly, vaccine immunogenicity can be modulated by factors that attract professional antigen-presenting cells, provide additional costimulation, or enhance the uptake of plasmid DNA. This review focuses on developments in the coadministration of molecular adjuvants for the enhancement of HIV-1 DNA-vaccine potency.

  15. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito

    2005-01-01

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection by the candidate microbicide dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, P; Harman, S; Azijn, H; Armanasco, N; Manlow, P; Perumal, D; de Bethune, M-P; Nuttall, J; Romano, J; Shattock, R

    2009-02-01

    Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains the major route of infection worldwide; thus, there is an urgent need for additional prevention strategies, particularly strategies that could be controlled by women, such as topical microbicides. Potential microbicide candidates must be both safe and effective. Using cellular and tissue explant models, we have evaluated the activity of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine as a vaginal microbicide. In tissue compatibility studies, dapivirine was well tolerated by epithelial cells, T cells, macrophages, and cervical tissue explants. Dapivirine demonstrated potent dose-dependent inhibitory effects against a broad panel of HIV type 1 isolates from different clades. Furthermore, dapivirine demonstrated potent activity against a wide range of NNRTI-resistant isolates. In human cervical explant cultures, dapivirine was able not only to inhibit direct infection of mucosal tissue but also to prevent the dissemination of the virus by migratory cells. Activity was retained in the presence of semen or a cervical mucus simulant. Furthermore, dapivirine demonstrated prolonged inhibitory effects: it was able to prevent both localized and disseminated infection for as long as 6 days posttreatment. The prolonged protection observed following pretreatment of genital tissue and the lack of observable toxicity suggest that dapivirine has considerable promise as a potential microbicide candidate.

  17. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection by the Candidate Microbicide Dapivirine, a Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, P.; Harman, S.; Azijn, H.; Armanasco, N.; Manlow, P.; Perumal, D.; de Bethune, M.-P.; Nuttall, J.; Romano, J.; Shattock, R.

    2009-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains the major route of infection worldwide; thus, there is an urgent need for additional prevention strategies, particularly strategies that could be controlled by women, such as topical microbicides. Potential microbicide candidates must be both safe and effective. Using cellular and tissue explant models, we have evaluated the activity of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine as a vaginal microbicide. In tissue compatibility studies, dapivirine was well tolerated by epithelial cells, T cells, macrophages, and cervical tissue explants. Dapivirine demonstrated potent dose-dependent inhibitory effects against a broad panel of HIV type 1 isolates from different clades. Furthermore, dapivirine demonstrated potent activity against a wide range of NNRTI-resistant isolates. In human cervical explant cultures, dapivirine was able not only to inhibit direct infection of mucosal tissue but also to prevent the dissemination of the virus by migratory cells. Activity was retained in the presence of semen or a cervical mucus simulant. Furthermore, dapivirine demonstrated prolonged inhibitory effects: it was able to prevent both localized and disseminated infection for as long as 6 days posttreatment. The prolonged protection observed following pretreatment of genital tissue and the lack of observable toxicity suggest that dapivirine has considerable promise as a potential microbicide candidate. PMID:19029331

  18. Rapid Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Types 1 and 2 by Use of an Improved Piezoelectric Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severns, Virginia; Branch, Darren W.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Larson, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Disasters can create situations in which blood donations can save lives. However, in emergency situations and when resources are depleted, on-site blood donations require the rapid and accurate detection of blood-borne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2). Techniques such as PCR and antibody capture by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for HIV-1 and HIV-2 are precise but time-consuming and require sophisticated equipment that is not compatible with emergency point-of-care requirements. We describe here a prototype biosensor based on piezoelectric materials functionalized with specific antibodies against HIV-1 and HIV-2. We show the rapid and accurate detection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 in both simple and complex solutions, including human serum, and in the presence of a cross-confounding virus. We report detection limits of 12 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50s) for HIV-1 and 87 TCID50s for HIV-2. The accuracy, precision of measurements, and operation of the prototype biosensor compared favorably to those for nucleic acid amplification. We conclude that the biosensor has significant promise as a successful point-of-care diagnostic device for use in emergency field applications requiring rapid and reliable testing for blood-borne pathogens. PMID:23515541

  19. Fetal and perinatal outcomes in type 1 diabetes pregnancy: a randomized study comparing insulin aspart with human insulin in 322 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Damm, Peter; Kaaja, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy.......The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy....

  20. The use of human cornea organotypic cultures to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevets, Peter; Chucair-Elliott, Ana; Shrestha, Priyadarsini; Jinkins, Jeremy; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Carr, Daniel J J

    2015-10-01

    To determine the utility of human organotypic cornea cultures as a model to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation and neovascularization. Human organotypic cornea cultures were established from corneas with an intact limbus that were retrieved from donated whole globes. One cornea culture was infected with HSV-1 (10(4) plaque-forming units), while the other cornea from the same donor was mock-infected. Supernatants were collected at intervals post-culture with and without infection to determine viral titer (by plaque assay) and pro-angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokine concentration by suspension array analysis. In some experiments, the cultured corneas were collected and evaluated for HSV-1 antigens by immunohistochemical means. Another set of experiments measured susceptibility of human three-dimensional cornea fibroblast constructs, in the presence and absence of TGF-β1, to HSV-1 infection in terms of viral replication and the inflammatory response to infection as a comparison to the organotypic cornea cultures. Organotypic cornea cultures and three-dimensional fibroblast constructs exhibited varying degrees of susceptibility to HSV-1. Fibroblast constructs were more susceptible to infection in terms of infectious virus recovered in a shorter period of time. There were changes in the levels of select pro-angiogenic or proinflammatory cytokines that were dictated as much by the cultures producing them as by whether they were infected with HSV-1 or treated with TGF-β1. Organotypic cornea and three-dimensional fibroblast cultures are likely useful for the identification and short-term study of novel antiviral compounds and virus replication, but are limited in the study of the local immune response to infection.

  1. CTA1-DD adjuvant promotes strong immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins following mucosal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundling, Christopher; Schön, Karin; Mörner, Andreas; Forsell, Mattias N E; Wyatt, Richard T; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Lycke, Nils Y

    2008-12-01

    Strategies to induce potent and broad antibody responses against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) at both systemic and mucosal sites represent a central goal for HIV-1 vaccine development. Here, we show that the non-toxic CTA1-DD adjuvant promoted mucosal and systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses following intranasal (i.n.) immunizations with trimeric or monomeric forms of HIV-1 Env in mice and in non-human primates. Env-specific IgG subclasses in the serum of immunized mice reflected a balanced Th1/Th2 type of response. Strikingly, i.n. immunizations with Env and the CTA1-DD adjuvant induced substantial levels of mucosal anti-Env IgA in bronchial alveolar lavage and also detectable levels in vaginal secretions. By contrast, parenteral immunizations of Env formulated in Ribi did not stimulate mucosal IgA responses, while the two adjuvants induced a similar distribution of Env-specific IgG-subclasses in serum. A single parenteral boost with Env in Ribi adjuvant into mice previously primed i.n. with Env and CTA1-DD, augmented the serum anti-Env IgG levels to similar magnitudes as those observed after three intraperitoneal immunizations with Env in Ribi. The augmenting potency of CTA1-DD was similar to that of LTK63 or CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). However, in contrast to CpG ODN, the effect of CTA1-DD and LTK63 appeared to be independent of MyD88 and toll-like receptor signalling. This is the first demonstration that CTA1-DD augments specific immune responses also in non-human primates, suggesting that this adjuvant could be explored further as a clinically safe mucosal vaccine adjuvant for humoral and cell-mediated immunity against HIV-1 Env.

  2. Changes in the internal structure of the human crystalline lens with diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiemer, N.G.M.; Dubbelman, M.; Hermans, E.A.; Ringens, P.J.; Polak, B.C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 and type 2 on the internal structure of the lens. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Participants and Controls: One hundred seven patients with DM type 1, 106 patients with DM type 2, and 75 healthy control subjects.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  4. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de Morais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2 is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. Aim: To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Materials and Methods: Blood donors (2001-2003 were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Results: Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13% were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116 was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16, HTLV-2 (n=5 and HTLV-untypable (n=3]. Discussion: HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  5. Modulation of the Brd4/P-TEFb interaction by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Zhou, Meisheng; Jang, Moon Kyoo; Huang, Keven; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Ozato, Keiko; Brady, John N

    2007-10-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb), which is composed of CDK9 and cyclin T1, plays an important role in cellular and viral gene expression. Our lab has recently demonstrated that P-TEFb is required for Tax transactivation of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR). P-TEFb is found in two major complexes: the inactive form, which is associated with inhibitory subunits 7SK snRNA and HEXIM1, and the active form, which is associated with, at least in part, Brd4. In this study, we analyzed the effect of Brd4 on human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transcription. Overexpression of Brd4 repressed Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro binding studies suggest that Tax and Brd4 compete for binding to P-TEFb through direct interaction with cyclin T1. Tax interacts with cyclin T1 amino acids 426 to 533, which overlaps the region responsible for Brd4 binding. In vivo, overexpression of Tax decreased the amount of 7SK snRNA associated with P-TEFb and stimulates serine 2 phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain, suggesting that Tax regulates the functionality of P-TEFb. Our results suggest the possibility that Tax may compete and functionally substitute for Brd4 in P-TEFb regulation.

  6. Evolution of R5 and X4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag sequences in vivo: evidence for recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rij, Ronald P. van; Worobey, Michael; Visser, Janny A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is in general established by CCR5-utilizing (R5) virus variants, which persist throughout the course of infection. R5 HIV-1 variants evolve into CXCR4-utilizing (X4) HIV-1 variants in approximately half of the infected individuals. We have previously observed an ongoing genetic evolution with a continuous divergence of envelope gp120 sequences of coexisting R5 and X4 virus variants over time. Here, we studied evolution of gag p17 sequences in two patients who developed X4 variants in the course of infection. In contrast to the envelope gp120 sequences, gag p17 sequences of R5 and X4 virus populations intermingled in phylogenetic trees and did not diverge from each other over time. Statistical evaluation using the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test indicated that the different genomic regions evolved along different topologies, supporting the hypothesis of recombination. Therefore, our data imply that recombination between R5 and X4 HIV-1 variants occurs in vivo

  7. Determination of Coreceptor Usage of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 from Patient Plasma Samples by Using a Recombinant Phenotypic Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouplin, Virginie; Salvatori, Francesca; Cappello, Fanny; Obry, Veronique; Brelot, Anne; Heveker, Nikolaus; Alizon, Marc; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Clavel, François; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2001-01-01

    We developed a recombinant virus technique to determine the coreceptor usage of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from plasma samples, the source expected to represent the most actively replicating virus population in infected subjects. This method is not subject to selective bias associated with virus isolation in culture, a step required for conventional tropism determination procedures. The addition of a simple subcloning step allowed semiquantitative evaluation of virus populations with a different coreceptor (CCR5 or CXCR4) usage specificity present in each plasma sample. This procedure detected mixtures of CCR5- and CXCR4-exclusive virus populations as well as dualtropic viral variants, in variable proportions. Sequence analysis of dualtropic clones indicated that changes in the V3 loop are necessary for the use of CXCR4 as a coreceptor, but the overall context of the V1-V3 region is important to preserve the capacity to use CCR5. This convenient technique can greatly assist the study of virus evolution and compartmentalization in infected individuals. PMID:11119595

  8. Suboptimal inhibition of protease activity in human immunodeficiency virus type 1: Effects on virion morphogenesis and RNA maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Michael D.; Fu, William; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Ptak, Roger G.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2008-01-01

    Protease activity within nascently released human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles is responsible for the cleavage of the viral polyproteins Gag and Gag-Pol into their constituent parts, which results in the subsequent condensation of the mature conical core surrounding the viral genomic RNA. Concomitant with viral maturation is a conformational change in the packaged viral RNA from a loosely associated dimer into a more thermodynamically stable form. In this study we used suboptimal concentrations of two protease inhibitors, lopinavir and atazanavir, to study their effects on Gag polyprotein processing and on the properties of the RNA in treated virions. Analysis of the treated virions demonstrated that even with high levels of inhibition of viral infectivity (IC 90 ), most of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins were processed, although slight but significant increases in processing intermediates of Gag were detected. Drug treatments also caused a significant increase in the proportion of viruses displaying either immature or aberrant mature morphologies. The aberrant mature particles were characterized by an electron-dense region at the viral periphery and an electron-lucent core structure in the viral center, possibly indicating exclusion of the genomic RNA from these viral cores. Intriguingly, drug treatments caused only a slight decrease in overall thermodynamic stability of the viral RNA dimer, suggesting that the dimeric viral RNA was able to mature in the absence of correct core condensation

  9. Leukotrienes are upregulated and associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Caetano Trindade

    Full Text Available Leukotrienes (LTs are lipid mediators involved in several inflammatory disorders. We investigated the LT pathway in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection by evaluating LT levels in HTLV-1-infected patients classified according to the clinical status as asymptomatic carriers (HACs and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP patients. Bioactive LTB(4 and CysLTs were both increased in the plasma and in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1-infected when compared to non-infected. Interestingly, CysLT concentrations were increased in HAM/TSP patients. Also, the concentration of plasma LTB(4 and LTC(4 positively correlated with the HTLV-1 proviral load in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The gene expression levels of LT receptors were differentially modulated in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells of HTLV-1-infected patients. Analysis of the overall plasma signature of immune mediators demonstrated that LT and chemokine amounts were elevated during HTLV-1 infection. Importantly, in addition to CysLTs, IP-10 was also identified as a biomarker for HAM/TSP activity. These data suggest that LTs are likely to be associated with HTLV-1 infection and HAM/TSP development, suggesting their putative use for clinical monitoring.

  10. Modelling the pathogenesis of Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 cardiac phenotype through human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa V; Caioli, Silvia; Murdocca, Michela; Serafino, Annalucia; Girasole, Marco; Dinarelli, Simone; Longo, Giovanni; Pucci, Sabina; Botta, Annalisa; Novelli, Giuseppe; Zona, Cristina; Mango, Ruggiero; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2018-03-15

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disease, autosomal dominant, caused by a CTG repeat expansion in DMPK gene. We assessed the appropriateness of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) as a model to recapitulate some aspects of the pathogenetic mechanism involving cardiac manifestations in DM1 patients. Once obtained in vitro, CMs have been characterized for their morphology and their functionality. CMs DM1 show intranuclear foci and transcript markers abnormally spliced respect to WT ones, as well as several irregularities in nuclear morphology, probably caused by an unbalanced lamin A/C ratio. Electrophysiological characterization evidences an abnormal profile only in CMs DM1 such that the administration of antiarrythmic drugs to these cells highlights even more the functional defect linked to the disease. Finally, Atomic Force Measurements reveal differences in the biomechanical behaviour of CMs DM1, in terms of frequencies and synchronicity of the beats. Altogether the complex phenotype described in this work, strongly reproduces some aspects of the human DM1 cardiac phenotype. Therefore, the present study provides an in vitro model suggesting novel insights into the mechanisms leading to the development of arrhythmogenesis and dilatative cardiomyopathy to consider when approaching to DM1 patients, especially for the risk assessment of sudden cardiac death (SCD). These data could be also useful in identifying novel biomarkers effective in clinical settings and patient-tailored therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Uncovering the Role of Hypermethylation by CTG Expansion in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Using Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Avitzour, Michal; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Schonberger, Oshrat; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Stella; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Birnbaum, Ramon Y; Gepstein, Lior; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-08-11

    CTG repeat expansion in DMPK, the cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), frequently results in hypermethylation and reduced SIX5 expression. The contribution of hypermethylation to disease pathogenesis and the precise mechanism by which SIX5 expression is reduced are unknown. Using 14 different DM1-affected human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, we characterized a differentially methylated region (DMR) near the CTGs. This DMR undergoes hypermethylation as a function of expansion size in a way that is specific to undifferentiated cells and is associated with reduced SIX5 expression. Using functional assays, we provide evidence for regulatory activity of the DMR, which is lost by hypermethylation and may contribute to DM1 pathogenesis by causing SIX5 haplo-insufficiency. This study highlights the power of hESCs in disease modeling and describes a DMR that functions both as an exon coding sequence and as a regulatory element whose activity is epigenetically hampered by a heritable mutation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phosphatidylserine-Liposomes Promote Tolerogenic Features on Dendritic Cells in Human Type 1 Diabetes by Apoptotic Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rodriguez-Fernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is a metabolic disease caused by the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. With its incidence increasing worldwide, to find a safe approach to permanently cease autoimmunity and allow β-cell recovery has become vital. Relying on the inherent ability of apoptotic cells to induce immunological tolerance, we demonstrated that liposomes mimicking apoptotic β-cells arrested autoimmunity to β-cells and prevented experimental T1D through tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC generation. These liposomes contained phosphatidylserine (PS—the main signal of the apoptotic cell membrane—and β-cell autoantigens. To move toward a clinical application, PS-liposomes with optimum size and composition for phagocytosis were loaded with human insulin peptides and tested on DCs from patients with T1D and control age-related subjects. PS accelerated phagocytosis of liposomes with a dynamic typical of apoptotic cell clearance, preserving DCs viability. After PS-liposomes phagocytosis, the expression pattern of molecules involved in efferocytosis, antigen presentation, immunoregulation, and activation in DCs concurred with a tolerogenic functionality, both in patients and control subjects. Furthermore, DCs exposed to PS-liposomes displayed decreased ability to stimulate autologous T cell proliferation. Moreover, transcriptional changes in DCs from patients with T1D after PS-liposomes phagocytosis pointed to an immunoregulatory prolife. Bioinformatics analysis showed 233 differentially expressed genes. Genes involved in antigen presentation were downregulated, whereas genes pertaining to tolerogenic/anti-inflammatory pathways were mostly upregulated. In conclusion, PS-liposomes phagocytosis mimics efferocytosis and leads to phenotypic and functional changes in human DCs, which are accountable for tolerance induction. The herein reported results reinforce the potential of this novel immunotherapy to re-establish immunological

  13. Vitamin D status in youth with type 1 and type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) is not worse than in youth without diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To describe vitamin D levels and prevalence of vitamin D sufficiency, insufficiency and deficiency in a large, ethnically/racially diverse population of youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in comparison to national data and examine the associations between clinical/demographic...

  14. HLA-C is necessary for optimal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human peripheral blood CD4 lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Miriam; Matucci, Andrea; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Soprana, Elisa; Rossolillo, Paola; Lopalco, Lucia; Zipeto, Donato; Siccardi, Antonio G; De Santis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that open conformers of HLA-C on target cells might directly exert an effect on their infectability by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been suggested previously. This was tested by exploiting the peculiar specificity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) L31 for HLA-C open conformers to show that normal levels of Env-driven fusion were restored in HLA-C transfectants of a major histocompatibility complex-deleted (fusion-incompetent) cell line. The physiological relevance of this finding is now confirmed in this report, where small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology was used to silence HLA-C expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 11 healthy donors. Infectability by HIV (strains IIIB and Bal and primary isolates) was significantly reduced (P=0.016) in silenced cells compared with cells that maintained HLA-C expression in 10 of the 11 PBL donors. Normal infectability was resumed, together with HLA-C expression, when the effect of siRNA interference waned after several days in culture. Additional confirmation of the HLA-C effect was obtained in several assays employing HLA-C-positive and -negative cell lines, a number of HIV strains and also pseudoviruses. In particular, viruses pseudotyped with env genes from HIV strains AC10 and QH0692.42 were assayed on siRNA-silenced lymphocytes from three healthy donors: the differences in infection with pseudoviruses were even higher than those observed in infections with normal viruses.

  15. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 LTR DNA contains an intrinsic gene producing antisense RNA and protein products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao Chiu-Bin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While viruses have long been shown to capitalize on their limited genomic size by utilizing both strands of DNA or complementary DNA/RNA intermediates to code for viral proteins, it has been assumed that human retroviruses have all their major proteins translated only from the plus or sense strand of RNA, despite their requirement for a dsDNA proviral intermediate. Several studies, however, have suggested the presence of antisense transcription for both HIV-1 and HTLV-1. More recently an antisense transcript responsible for the HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ protein has been described. In this study we investigated the possibility of an antisense gene contained within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Results Inspection of published sequences revealed a potential transcription initiator element (INR situated downstream of, and in reverse orientation to, the usual HIV-1 promoter and transcription start site. This antisense initiator (HIVaINR suggested the possibility of an antisense gene responsible for RNA and protein production. We show that antisense transcripts are generated, in vitro and in vivo, originating from the TAR DNA of the HIV-1 LTR. To test the possibility that protein(s could be translated from this novel HIV-1 antisense RNA, recombinant HIV antisense gene-FLAG vectors were designed. Recombinant protein(s were produced and isolated utilizing carboxy-terminal FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK sequences. In addition, affinity-purified antisera to an internal peptide derived from the HIV antisense protein (HAP sequences identified HAPs from HIV+ human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusion HIV-1 contains an antisense gene in the U3-R regions of the LTR responsible for both an antisense RNA transcript and proteins. This antisense transcript has tremendous potential for intrinsic RNA regulation because of its overlap with the beginning of all HIV-1 sense RNA transcripts by 25 nucleotides. The

  17. Genetic characterization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in Mozambique: transcontinental lineages drive the HTLV-1 endemic.

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    Ana Carolina P Vicente

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. It has been estimated that 10-20 million people are infected worldwide, but no successful treatment is available. Recently, the epidemiology of this virus was addressed in blood donors from Maputo, showing rates from 0.9 to 1.2%. However, the origin and impact of HTLV endemic in this population is unknown.To assess the HTLV-1 molecular epidemiology in Mozambique and to investigate their relationship with HTLV-1 lineages circulating worldwide.Blood donors and HIV patients were screened for HTLV antibodies by using enzyme immunoassay, followed by Western Blot. PCR and sequencing of HTLV-1 LTR region were applied and genetic HTLV-1 subtypes were assigned by the neighbor-joining method. The mean genetic distance of Mozambican HTLV-1 lineages among the genetic clusters were determined. Human mitochondrial (mt DNA analysis was performed and individuals classified in mtDNA haplogroups.LTR HTLV-1 analysis demonstrated that all isolates belong to the Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype. Mozambican HTLV-1 sequences had a high inter-strain genetic distance, reflecting in three major clusters. One cluster is associated with the South Africa sequences, one is related with Middle East and India strains and the third is a specific Mozambican cluster. Interestingly, 83.3% of HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection was observed in the Mozambican cluster. The human mtDNA haplotypes revealed that all belong to the African macrohaplogroup L with frequencies representatives of the country.The Mozambican HTLV-1 genetic diversity detected in this study reveals that although the strains belong to the most prevalent and worldwide distributed Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype, there is a high HTLV diversity that could be correlated with at least 3 different HTLV-1 introductions

  18. Identification of a Conserved Interface of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vifs with Cullin 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Gertzen, Christoph G W; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger; Münk, Carsten

    2018-03-15

    Members of the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC3 [A3]) family of DNA cytidine deaminases are intrinsic restriction factors against retroviruses. In felids such as the domestic cat ( Felis catus ), the A3 genes encode the A3Z2, A3Z3, and A3Z2Z3 antiviral cytidine deaminases. Only A3Z3 and A3Z2Z3 inhibit viral infectivity factor (Vif)-deficient feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The FIV Vif protein interacts with Cullin (CUL), Elongin B (ELOB), and Elongin C (ELOC) to form an E3 ubiquitination complex to induce the degradation of feline A3s. However, the functional domains in FIV Vif for the interaction with Cullin are poorly understood. Here, we found that the expression of dominant negative CUL5 prevented the degradation of feline A3s by FIV Vif, while dominant negative CUL2 had no influence on the degradation of A3. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, FIV Vif bound to CUL5 but not CUL2. To identify the CUL5 interaction site in FIV Vif, the conserved amino acids from positions 47 to 160 of FIV Vif were mutated, but these mutations did not impair the binding of Vif to CUL5. By focusing on a potential zinc-binding motif (K175-C161-C184-C187) of FIV Vif, we found a conserved hydrophobic region (174IR175) that is important for the CUL5 interaction. Mutation of this region also impaired the FIV Vif-induced degradation of feline A3s. Based on a structural model of the FIV Vif-CUL5 interaction, the 52LW53 region in CUL5 was identified as mediating binding to FIV Vif. By comparing our results to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vif-CUL5 interaction surface (120IR121, a hydrophobic region that is localized in the zinc-binding motif), we suggest that the CUL5 interaction surface in the diverse HIV-1 and FIV Vifs is evolutionarily conserved, indicating a strong structural constraint. However, the FIV Vif-CUL5 interaction is zinc independent, which contrasts with the zinc dependence of HIV-1 Vif. IMPORTANCE Feline

  19. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Alemán

    Full Text Available As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial

  20. Template Dimerization Promotes an Acceptor Invasion-Induced Transfer Mechanism during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Minus-Strand Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P.; Fay, Philip J.; Bambara, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism of template switching by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase and the role of template dimerization were examined. Homologous donor-acceptor template pairs derived from the HIV-1 untranslated leader region and containing the wild-type and mutant dimerization initiation sequences (DIS) were used to examine the efficiency and distribution of transfers. Inhibiting donor-acceptor interaction was sufficient to reduce transfers in DIS-containing template pairs, indicating that template dimerization, and not the mere presence of the DIS, promotes efficient transfers. Additionally, we show evidence that the overall transfer process spans an extended region of the template and proceeds through a two-step mechanism. Transfer is initiated through an RNase H-facilitated acceptor invasion step, while synthesis continues on the donor template. The invasion then propagates towards the primer terminus by branch migration. Transfer is completed with the translocation of the primer terminus at a site distant from the invasion point. In our system, most invasions initiated before synthesis reached the DIS. However, transfer of the primer terminus predominantly occurred after synthesis through the DIS. The two steps were separated by 60 to 80 nucleotides. Sequence markers revealed the position of primer terminus switch, whereas DNA oligomers designed to block acceptor-cDNA interactions defined sites of invasion. Within the region of homology, certain positions on the template were inherently more favorable for invasion than others. In templates with DIS, the proximity of the acceptor facilitates invasion, thereby enhancing transfer efficiency. Nucleocapsid protein enhanced the overall efficiency of transfers but did not alter the mechanism. PMID:12663778

  1. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 prevalence in northeastern Iran, Sabzevar: an epidemiologic-based study and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Hasanpour, Kazem; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Rezaee, S A Rahim; Mashkani, Baratali; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Narges; Farid Hosseini, Reza; Foroghipoor, Mohsen; Soltanifar, Azadeh; Sahebari, Maryam; Azadmanesh, Keyhan; Hassanshahi, Gholahossein; Rafatpanah, Houshang

    2012-09-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is an important global health problem in the world mainly in the endemic areas of HTLV-I infection. It was previously reported that Mashhad, in northeastern Iran, is a new endemic region of HTLV-I. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-I in Sabzevar, located in the southeast of Mashhad. In this cross-sectional study 1445 individuals were selected by multistage cluster sampling. Serum samples were screened for anti-HTLV-I antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); all of the ELISA-positive samples were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Long terminal repeat (LTR) sequencing was carried out to determine the type of HTLV-I in Sabzevar. In the primary screening by ELISA, 26/1445 (1.8%) of those sampled were reactive for HTLV-I antibody. Twenty-four out of 26 samples were confirmed HTLV-I infection by PCR (24/1445). The overall prevalence of HTLV-I infection in Sabzevar is 1.66%. The prevalence of the virus infection in men and women was 2.42% (11/455) and 1.31% (13/989), respectively. Seroprevalence was associated with age, increasing significantly among those older than 30 years (p=0.015), and a history of surgery (p=0.002), imprisonment (p=0.018), and hospitalization (p=0.005). Three out of 24 positive HTLV-I samples were selected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of LTR. The results showed that HTLV-I in Sabzevar belonged to the cosmopolitan subtype. The present study showed Sabzevar is a new endemic area for HTLV-I infection. Our study emphasizes that systemic HTLV-I screening of blood donors in Sabzevar and other cities in Khorasan province is important and should be taken into account.

  2. Envelope conformational changes induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 attachment inhibitors prevent CD4 binding and downstream entry events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsu-Tso; Fan, Li; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; McAuliffe, Brian; Li, Chang-Ben; Yamanaka, Gregory; Zhou, Nannan; Fang, Hua; Dicker, Ira; Dalterio, Richard; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, Tao; Yin, Zhiwei; Ueda, Yasutsugu; Matiskella, John; Kadow, John; Clapham, Paul; Robinson, James; Colonno, Richard; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2006-04-01

    BMS-488043 is a small-molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CD4 attachment inhibitor with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The compound inhibits soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to the 11 distinct HIV envelope gp120 proteins surveyed. Binding of BMS-488043 and that of sCD4 to gp120 are mutually exclusive, since increased concentrations of one can completely block the binding of the other without affecting the maximal gp120 binding capacity. Similarly, BMS-488043 inhibited virion envelope trimers from binding to sCD4-immunoglobulin G (IgG), with decreasing inhibition as the sCD4-IgG concentration increased, and BMS-488043 blocked the sCD4-induced exposure of the gp41 groove in virions. In both virion binding assays, BMS-488043 was active only when added prior to sCD4. Collectively, these results indicate that obstruction of gp120-sCD4 interactions is the primary inhibition mechanism of this compound and that compound interaction with envelope must precede CD4 binding. By three independent approaches, BMS-488043 was further shown to induce conformational changes within gp120 in both the CD4 and CCR5 binding regions. These changes likely prevent gp120-CD4 interactions and downstream entry events. However, BMS-488043 could only partially inhibit CD4 binding to an HIV variant containing a specific envelope truncation and altered gp120 conformation, despite effectively inhibiting the pseudotyped virus infection. Taken together, BMS-488043 inhibits viral entry primarily through altering the envelope conformation and preventing CD4 binding, and other downstream entry events could also be inhibited as a result of these induced conformational changes.

  3. Double control systems for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 by innate and acquired immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannagi, Mari; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kinpara, Shuichi; Shimizu, Yukiko; Takamori, Ayako; Utsunomiya, Atae

    2011-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative retrovirus of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1-specific T-cell responses elicit antitumor and antiviral effects in experimental models, and are considered to be one of the most important determinants of the disease manifestation, since they are activated in HAM/TSP but not in ATL patients. The combination of low T-cell responses and elevated HTLV-1 proviral loads are features of ATL, and are also observed in a subpopulation of HTLV-1 carriers at the asymptomatic stage, suggesting that these features may be underlying risk factors. These risks may potentially be reduced by vaccination to activate HTLV-1-specific T-cell responses. HAM/TSP and ATL patients also differ in their levels of HTLV-1 mRNA expression, which are generally low in vivo but slightly higher in HAM/TSP patients. Our recent study indicated that viral expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells is suppressed by stromal cells in culture through type-I IFNs. The suppression was reversible after isolation from the stromal cells, mimicking a long-standing puzzling phenomenon in HTLV-1 infection where the viral expression is very low in vivo and rapidly induced in vitro. Collectively, HTLV-1 is controlled by both acquired and innate immunity in vivo: HTLV-1-specific T-cells survey infected cells, and IFNs suppress viral expression. Both effects would contribute to a reduction in viral pathogenesis, although they may potentially influence or conflict with one another. The presence of double control systems for HTLV-1 infection provides a new concept for understanding the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-mediated malignant and inflammatory diseases. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Transplantation of macroencapsulated human islets within the bioartificial pancreas βAir to patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Per-Ola; Espes, Daniel; Sedigh, Amir; Rotem, Avi; Zimerman, Baruch; Grinberg, Helena; Goldman, Tali; Barkai, Uriel; Avni, Yuval; Westermark, Gunilla T; Carlbom, Lina; Ahlström, Håkan; Eriksson, Olof; Olerud, Johan; Korsgren, Olle

    2017-12-29

    Macroencapsulation devices provide the dual possibility of immunoprotecting transplanted cells while also being retrievable, the latter bearing importance for safety in future trials with stem cell-derived cells. However, macroencapsulation entails a problem with oxygen supply to the encapsulated cells. The βAir device solves this with an incorporated refillable oxygen tank. This phase 1 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of implanting the βAir device containing allogeneic human pancreatic islets into patients with type 1 diabetes. Four patients were transplanted with 1-2 βAir devices, each containing 155 000-180 000 islet equivalents (ie, 1800-4600 islet equivalents per kg body weight), and monitored for 3-6 months, followed by the recovery of devices. Implantation of the βAir device was safe and successfully prevented immunization and rejection of the transplanted tissue. However, although beta cells survived in the device, only minute levels of circulating C-peptide were observed with no impact on metabolic control. Fibrotic tissue with immune cells was formed in capsule surroundings. Recovered devices displayed a blunted glucose-stimulated insulin response, and amyloid formation in the endocrine tissue. We conclude that the βAir device is safe and can support survival of allogeneic islets for several months, although the function of the transplanted cells was limited (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02064309). © 2018 The Authors. American Journal of Transplantation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Compartmentalized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 originates from long-lived cells in some subjects with HIV-1-associated dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Gretja; Spudich, Serena; Harrington, Patrick; Price, Richard W; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2009-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1-associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t(1/2) mean = 2.27 days). However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t(1/2) range = 9.85 days to no initial decay). The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4(+) T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD.

  6. Compartmentalized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 originates from long-lived cells in some subjects with HIV-1-associated dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretja Schnell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1-associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA, targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t(1/2 mean = 2.27 days. However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t(1/2 range = 9.85 days to no initial decay. The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4(+ T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD.

  7. Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 by fresh-frozen plasma treated with methylene blue and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Manuel; Luis-Hidalgo, Mar; Bracho, María Alma; Blanquer, Amando; Larrea, Luis; Villalba, José; Puig, Nieves; Planelles, Dolores; Montoro, José; González-Candelas, Fernando; Roig, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The risk of transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) has been minimized by introduction of nucleic acid testing (NAT) and pathogen inactivation (PI). This case report describes transmission of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) to two recipients despite these measures. In March 2009 a possible TTI of HIV-1 was identified in a patient that had received pooled buffy coat platelet concentrate (BC-PLT) in November 2005. The subsequent lookback study found two more patients who had received methylene blue (MB)-treated fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and red blood cells (RBCs) from the same donation. In November 2005 the donor had tested negative for both HIV antibodies and HIV-1 RNA by 44 minipool (44 MP) NAT. Repository samples of this donation and samples from the recipients were used for viral load (VL) and sequence analysis. HIV-1 RNA was detectable by individual donation (ID)-NAT in the repository sample from the 2005 window period donation and a VL of 135 copies/mL was measured. HIV-1 infection was confirmed in both recipients of both BC-PLT (65 mL of plasma) and MB-FFP (261 mL of plasma), but not in the patient that had received 4-week-old RBCs (20 mL of plasma). The sequence analysis revealed a close phylogenetic relationship between the virus strains isolated from the donor and recipients, compatible with TTI. Approximately 17,600 and 4400 virions in the MB-FFP and BC-PLT were infectious, but 1350 virions in the RBCs were not. ID-NAT would have prevented this transmission, but the combination of MP-NAT and MB-PI did not. © 2015 AABB.

  8. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection is frequent in rural communities of the southern Andes of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Fanny; Mayer, Erick F; Verdonck, Kristien; Gonzalez, Elsa; Clark, Daniel; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in isolated rural communities in the southern Andes of Peru. We conducted a cross-sectional study in five communities located in three provinces in Ayacucho, Peru. The five communities are located at >3000 meters above sea level and are mainly rural, and more than 85% of the population speaks Quechua. Volunteers aged 12 years and older were included. Clinical and epidemiological data were collected, along with a blood sample for serological testing. We included 397 participants; their median age was 41 years (interquartile range 31-57 years) and 69% were women. According to our definitions, 98% were of Quechua origin. HTLV-1 was diagnosed in 11 people: 0/164 in Cangallo, 3/154 (2%) in Vilcashuaman, and 8/79 (10%) in Parinacochas. There were no cases of HTLV-2. All the HTLV-1-positive participants were born in Ayacucho and were of Quechua origin; they ranged in age from 29 to 87 years (median 56 years) and 10/11 were women. Ten were apparently healthy, and one woman was diagnosed with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Three out of 11 had a family member with a lower limb impairment compatible with HAM/TSP. The fact that HTLV-1 infection was present in two out of three provinces suggests that HTLV-1 could be highly endemic in the southern Andes in the Quechua population. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Elite Controllers Maintain Low Co-Expression of Inhibitory Receptors on CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyan, Kajsa; Nguyen, Son; Betts, Michael R; Sönnerborg, Anders; Buggert, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) elite controllers (ELCs) represent a unique population that control viral replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is well established that expression of multiple inhibitory receptors on CD8+ T cells is associated with HIV-1 disease progression. However, whether reduced co-expression of inhibitory receptors on CD4+ T cells is linked to natural viral control and slow HIV-1 disease progression remains undefined. Here, we report on the expression pattern of numerous measurable inhibitory receptors, associated with T cell exhaustion (programmed cell death-1, CTLA-4, and TIGIT), on different CD4+ T cell memory populations in ELCs and HIV-infected subjects with or without long-term cART. We found that the co-expression pattern of inhibitory receptors was significantly reduced in ELCs compared with HIV-1 cART-treated and viremic subjects, and similar to healthy controls. Markers associated with T cell exhaustion varied among different memory CD4+ T cell subsets and highest levels were found mainly on transitional memory T cells. CD4+ T cells co-expressing all inhibitory markers were positively correlated to T cell activation (CD38+ HLA-DR+) as well as the transcription factors Helios and FoxP3. Finally, clinical parameters such as CD4 count, HIV-1 viral load, and the CD4/CD8 ratio all showed significant associations with CD4+ T cell exhaustion. We demonstrate that ELCs are able to maintain lower levels of CD4+ T cell exhaustion despite years of ongoing viral replication compared with successfully cART-treated subjects. Our findings suggest that ELCs harbor a "healthy" state of inhibitory receptor expression on CD4+ T cells that might play part in maintenance of their control status.

  10. Characterization of Chemokine Receptor Utilization of Viruses in the Latent Reservoir for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Theodore; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Blankson, Joel; Finzi, Diana; Chadwick, Karen; Margolick, Joseph B.; Buck, Christopher; Siliciano, Janet D.; Doms, Robert W.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2000-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4+ T cells provide a long-term reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and are likely to represent the major barrier to virus eradication in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms by which viruses enter the latent reservoir and the nature of the chemokine receptors involved have not been determined. To evaluate the phenotype of the virus in this compartment with respect to chemokine receptor utilization, full-length HIV-1 env genes were cloned from latently infected cells and assayed functionally. We demonstrate that the majority of the viruses in the latent reservoir utilize CCR5 during entry, although utilization of several other receptors, including CXCR4, was observed. No alternative coreceptors were shown to be involved in a systematic fashion. Although R5 viruses are present in the latent reservoir, CCR5 was not expressed at high levels on resting CD4+ T cells. To understand the mechanism by which R5 viruses enter latent reservoir, the ability of an R5 virus, HIV-1 Ba-L, to infect highly purified resting CD4+ T lymphocytes from uninfected donors was evaluated. Entry of Ba-L could be observed when virus was applied at a multiplicity approaching 1. However, infection was limited to a subset of cells expressing low levels of CCR5 and markers of immunologic memory. Naive cells could not be infected by an R5 virus even when challenged with a large inoculum. Direct cell fractionation studies showed that latent virus is present predominantly in resting memory cells but also at lower levels in resting naive cells. Taken together, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that the direct infection of naive T cells is not the major mechanism by which the latent infection of resting T cells is established. PMID:10933689

  11. Rate of positive autoimmune markers in Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 carriers: a case-control study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Ghezeldasht, Sanaz; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Meysam; Mollahosseini, Farzad; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Miri, Rahele; Hatef Fard, MohammadReza; Sahebari, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection with high prevalence in the north-east of Iran, particularly in Mashhad, can lead to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and a variety of autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of autoimmune markers in HTLV carries. Serum samples were obtained from blood donors in Mashhad, northeastern Iran. One hundred and five HTLV-1 positive (cases) and 104 age- and sex-matched HTLV-1 negative donors (controls) were assessed for presence of serum autoimmune markers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean ages of cases and controls were 40.8 ± 9.4 and 41.5 ± 9.3 years, respectively (P = 0.5). In the case group, 81.9% and in the control group 83.7% were male (P = 0.74). The frequency of positive antinuclear antibodies and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in the serum of the two groups were not significantly different (P = 0.68 and P = 0.62, respectively). Only one antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive case (1%) was observed in the group and no anti-phospholipid immunoglobulin G positivity was observed. The frequency of rheumatoid factor (RF) was greater in case group than in the control group, although the difference was not significant (P = 0.08). The amount of RF in all 12 RF positive sera were higher than normal levels (33-37 IU/mL). Because we failed to detect any significant relation between serum autoimmune markers and HTLV-1 infection, and because of the relatively low prevalence of autoimmune diseases, it could be concluded that healthy HTLV-1 carriers do not produce rheumatologic-related auto-antibodies more than the healthy population. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Matrix Degradation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Tuberculosis and Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Naomi F; Wilkinson, Katalin A; Meintjes, Graeme; Tezera, Liku B; Goliath, Rene; Peyper, Janique M; Tadokera, Rebecca; Opondo, Charles; Coussens, Anna K; Wilkinson, Robert J; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2017-07-01

    Extensive immunopathology occurs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) coinfection, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well-defined. Excessive matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity is emerging as a key process but has not been systematically studied in HIV-associated TB. We performed a cross-sectional study of matrix turnover in HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected and -uninfected TB patients and controls, and a prospective cohort study of HIV-1-infected TB patients at risk of TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS), in Cape Town, South Africa. Sputum and plasma MMP concentrations were quantified by Luminex, plasma procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and urinary lipoarabinomannan (LAM) by Alere Determine TB LAM assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors were cultured with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and extracellular matrix in a 3D model of TB granuloma formation. MMP activity differed between HIV-1-infected and -uninfected TB patients and corresponded with specific TB clinical phenotypes. HIV-1-infected TB patients had reduced pulmonary MMP concentrations, associated with reduced cavitation, but increased plasma PIIINP, compared to HIV-1-uninfected TB patients. Elevated extrapulmonary extracellular matrix turnover was associated with TB-IRIS, both before and during TB-IRIS onset. The predominant collagenase was MMP-8, which was likely neutrophil derived and M. tuberculosis-antigen driven. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced matrix degradation was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor doxycycline in vitro. MMP activity in TB differs by HIV-1 status and compartment, and releases matrix degradation products. Matrix turnover in HIV-1-infected patients is increased before and during TB-IRIS, informing novel diagnostic strategies. MMP inhibition is a potential host-directed therapy strategy for prevention and treatment of TB-IRIS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  13. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays.

  14. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  15. Clustering patterns of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteins reveal imprints of immune evasion on HIV-1 global variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusim, K.; Kesmir, Can; Gaschen, B.

    2002-01-01

    The human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely studied, and hundreds of CTL epitopes have been experimentally defined, published, and compiled in the HIV Molecular Immunology Database. Maps of CTL epitopes on HIV-1 protein sequenc...

  16. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed A AboElAsrar

    2012-05-05

    May 5, 2012 ... in type 1 diabetes mellitus: Relationship to microvascular complications ... b Pediatric Molecular Genetics Department, Ankara University, Turkey. Received 15 .... Patients with diabetic nephropathy were classified into two.

  17. Is the change in body mass index among children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus associated with obesity at transition from pediatric to adult care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyanga, Taru; Sellers, Elizabeth Ac; Wicklow, Brandy A; Doupe, Malcolm; Fransoo, Randall

    2016-12-01

    Insulin therapy is lifesaving treatment for individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Its initiation maybe associated with significant weight gain because of change from a catabolic to an anabolic state. Excessive weight-gain increases the risk of obesity and is associated with chronic disease. To examine if change in body mass index (BMI) among children in the 6 months after diagnosis with type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with long-term obesity. This was a population-based retrospective study of 377 children (aged 2-18 yr) with type 1 diabetes. Measured heights and weights were used to calculate BMI z-scores based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cut-points. Generalized Linear Models using BMI group, and age group at diagnosis; postdiagnosis weight change; and sex were applied to assess associations between postdiagnosis weight change and BMI z-score at transition to adult care. Mean BMI z-score increased from 0.28 at diagnosis, to 0.53 at 6 months and 0.66 at transition to adult care. Change in BMI z-scores differed by initial BMI group and magnitude of postdiagnosis weight change. Younger children (11 yr) had higher (p = 0.004) BMI z-scores at diagnosis but not at last visit (p = 0.1) than older (≥11 yr) children at diagnosis. BMI z-score at diagnosis, postdiagnosis weight change, female sex, and longer duration with TID were associated with higher BMI z-score at time of transition. BMI z-score at diagnosis was the strongest predictor of BMI z-score at time of transition to adult care, however; its effect was mediated by magnitude of weight change 6 months after diagnosis, sex, and age group at diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Lipidomic and metabolomic characterization of a genetically modified mouse model of the early stages of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Weir, Jacquelyn M; De Souza, David Peter

    2016-01-01

    as methionine deficits were detected in the pre-type 1 diabetic mice. Additionally higher lysophosphatidylinositol levels and low phosphatidylglycerol levels where novel findings in the pre-type 1 diabetic mice. These observations suggest that metabolomic disturbances precede the onset of T1D.......The early mechanisms regulating progression towards beta cell failure in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood, but it is generally acknowledged that genetic and environmental components are involved. The metabolomic phenotype is sensitive to minor variations in both, and accordingly reflects...... changes that may lead to the development of T1D. We used two different extraction methods in combination with both liquid- and gas chromatographic techniques coupled to mass spectrometry to profile the metabolites in a transgenic non-diabetes prone C57BL/6 mouse expressing CD154 under the control...

  19. Molecular epidemiology of endemic human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 in a rural community in Guinea-Bissau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla van Tienen

    Full Text Available Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 infection causes lethal adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and severely debilitating HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in up to 5% of infected adults. HTLV-1 is endemic in parts of Africa and the highest prevalence in West Africa (5% has been reported in Caio, a rural area in the North-West of Guinea-Bissau. It is not known which HTLV-1 variants are present in this community. Sequence data can provide insights in the molecular epidemiology and help to understand the origin and spread of HTLV-1.To gain insight into the molecular diversity of HTLV-1 in West Africa.HTLV-1 infected individuals were identified in community surveys between 1990-2007. The complete Long Terminal Repeat (LTR and p24 coding region of HTLV-1 was sequenced from infected subjects. Socio-demographic data were obtained from community census and from interviews performed by fieldworkers. Phylogenetic analyses were performed to characterize the relationship between the Caio HTLV-1 and HTLV-1 from other parts of the world.LTR and p24 sequences were obtained from 72 individuals (36 LTR, 24 p24 only and 12 both. Consistent with the low evolutionary change of HTLV-1, many of the sequences from unrelated individuals showed 100% nucleotide identity. Most (45 of 46 of the LTR sequences clustered with the Cosmopolitan HTLV-1 subtype 1a, subgroup D (1aD. LTR and p24 sequences from two subjects were divergent and formed a significant cluster with HTLV-1 subtype 1g, and with the most divergent African Simian T-cell Lymphotropic Virus, Tan90.The Cosmopolitan HTLV-1 1aD predominates in this rural West African community. However, HTLV-1 subtype 1g is also present. This subtype has not been described before in West Africa and may be more widespread than previously thought. These data are in line with the hypothesis that multiple monkey-to-man zoonotic events are contributing to HTLV-1 diversity.

  20. DR_SEQAN: a PC/Windows-based software to evaluate drug resistance using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez-Arias Luis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotypic assays based on DNA sequencing of part or the whole reverse transcriptase (RT- and protease (PR-coding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome have become part of the routine clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to complex interactions between mutations found in viral genes. Results DR_SEQAN is a tool to analyze RT and PR sequences. The program output includes a list containing all of the amino acid changes found in the query sequence in comparison with the sequence of a wild-type HIV-1 strain. Translation of codons containing nucleotide mixtures can result in potential ambiguities or heterogeneities in the amino acid sequence. The program identifies all possible combinations of 2 or 3 amino acids that derive from translation of triplets containing nucleotide mixtures. In addition, when ambiguities affect codons relevant for drug resistance, DR_SEQAN allows the user to select the appropriate mutation to be considered by the program's drug resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance is predicted using a rule-based algorithm, whose efficiency and accuracy has been tested with a large set of drug susceptibility data. Drug resistance predictions given by DR_SEQAN were consistent with phenotypic data and coherent with predictions provided by other publicly available algorithms. In addition, the program output provides two tables showing published drug susceptibility data and references for mutations and combinations of mutations found in the analyzed sequence. These data are retrieved from an integrated relational database, implemented in Microsoft Access, which includes two sets of non-redundant core tables (one for combinations of mutations in the PR and the other for combinations in the RT. Conclusion DR_SEQAN is an easy to use off-line application that provides expert advice on HIV genotypic resistance interpretation. It is

  1. Inhibitory effects of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate on the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Koushi; Honda, Mitsuo; Ikigai, Hajime; Hara, Yukihiko; Shimamura, Tadakatsu

    2002-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), the major tea catechin, is known as a potent anti-bacterial agent. In addition, anti-tumor promoting, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and antiviral activities have been reported. In the present study, we investigated possible anti-human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) activity of EGCg and its mechanisms of action in the viral life cycle. EGCg impinges on each step of the HIV life cycle. Thus, destruction of the viral particles, viral attachment to cells, post-adsorption entry into cells, reverse transcription (RT), viral production from chronically-infected cells, and the level of expression of viral mRNA, were analyzed using T-lymphoid (H9) and monocytoid (THP-1) cell systems, and antiviral protease activity was measured using a cell-free assay. Inhibitory effects of EGCg on specific binding of the virions to the cellular surfaces and changes in the steady state viral regulation (mRNA expression) due to EGCg were not observed. However, EGCg had a destructive effect on the viral particles, and post-adsorption entry and RT in acutely infected monocytoid cells were significantly inhibited at concentrations of EGCg greater than 1 microM, and protease kinetics were suppressed at a concentration higher than 10 microM in the cell-free study. Viral production by THP-1 cells chronically-infected with HIV-1 was also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory effect was enhanced by liposome modification of EGCg. As expected, increased viral mRNA production was observed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated chronically HIV-1-infected cells. This production was significantly inhibited by EGCg treatment of THP-1 cells. In contrast, production of HIV-1 viral mRNA in unstimulated or LPS-stimulated T-lymphoid cells (H9) was not inhibited by EGCg. Anti-HIV viral activity of EGCg may thus result from an interaction with several steps in the HIV-1 life cycle.

  2. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabirmanesh B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR. Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5′untranslated region (5′ UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid detection of HPeV1 by RT-PCR can decrease both the unnecessary use of antibiotics and the costs in clinical practice

  3. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ghazi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR.

     

    Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5untranslated region (5 UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.

     

    Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.

     

    Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid

  4. Effect of Probiotic Bacteria on Microbial Host Defense, Growth, and Immune Function in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Bengmark

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1 infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to

  5. Human leucocyte antigens class II allele and haplotype association with Type 1 Diabetes in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, H; Lemos, A; Couto, A R; Parreira, B; Soares, M; Dutra, I; Bruges-Armas, J; Brehm, A; Abreu, S

    2017-12-01

    This study confirms for Madeira Island (Portugal) population the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) susceptible and protective Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) markers previously reported in other populations and adds some local specificities. Among the strongest T1D HLA associations, stands out, as susceptible, the alleles DRB1*04:05 (OR = 7.3), DQB1*03:02 (OR = 6.1) and DQA1*03:03 (OR = 4.5), as well as the haplotypes DRB1*04:05-DQA1*03:03-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 100.9) and DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 22.1), and DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.07) and DRB1*15:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.04) as protective. HLA-DQA1 positive for Arginine at position 52 (Arg52) (OR = 15.2) and HLA-DQB1 negative for Aspartic acid at the position 57 (Asp57) (OR = 9.0) alleles appear to be important genetic markers for T1D susceptibility, with higher odds ratio values than any single allele and than most of the haplotypes. Genotypes generated by the association of markers Arg52 DQA1 positive and Asp57 DQB1 negative increase T1D susceptibility much more than one would expected by a simple additive effect of those markers separately (OR = 26.9). This study also confirms an increased risk for DRB1*04/DRB1*03 heterozygote genotypes (OR = 16.8) and also a DRB1*04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 haplotype susceptibility dependent on the DRB1*04 allele (DRB1*04:01, OR = 7.9; DRB1*04:02, OR = 3.2; DRB1*04:04, OR = 22.1). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Comparison of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tropism Profiles in Clinical Samples by the Trofile and MT-2 Assays▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the method that is the most widely used to define tropism in the clinic prior to the use of a CCR5 antagonist. By comparison, the MT-2 assay has been used since early in the HIV epidemic to define tropism in clinical specimens. Given that there are few data from direct comparisons of these two assays, we evaluated the performance of the plasma-based Trofile assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based MT-2 assay for the detection of CXCR4 use in defining the tropism of HIV isolates derived from clinical samples. The various samples used for this comparison were derived from participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS who underwent consecutive MT-2 assay testing of their PBMCs at approximately 3-month intervals. This unique sample set was specifically selected because consecutive MT-2 assays had demonstrated a shift from negative to positive in PBMCs, reflecting the first emergence of CXCR4-using virus in PBMCs above the level of detection of the assay in these individuals. Trofile testing was performed with clonal HIV type 1 (HIV-1) variants (n = 21), MT-2 cell culture-derived cells (n = 20) and supernatants (n = 42), and plasma samples (n = 76). Among the clonal HIV-1 variants and MT-2 cell culture-derived samples, the results of the Trofile and MT-2 assays demonstrated a high degree of concordance (95% to 98%). Among consecutive plasma samples, detection of CXCR4-using virus was at or before the time of first detection by the MT-2 assay in 5/10 patients by the original Trofile assay and in 9/10 patients by the enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay. Differences in the time to the first detection of CXCR4 use between the MT-2 assay (PBMCs

  7. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism profiles in clinical samples by the Trofile and MT-2 assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B

    2009-11-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the method that is the most widely used to define tropism in the clinic prior to the use of a CCR5 antagonist. By comparison, the MT-2 assay has been used since early in the HIV epidemic to define tropism in clinical specimens. Given that there are few data from direct comparisons of these two assays, we evaluated the performance of the plasma-based Trofile assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based MT-2 assay for the detection of CXCR4 use in defining the tropism of HIV isolates derived from clinical samples. The various samples used for this comparison were derived from participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS who underwent consecutive MT-2 assay testing of their PBMCs at approximately 3-month intervals. This unique sample set was specifically selected because consecutive MT-2 assays had demonstrated a shift from negative to positive in PBMCs, reflecting the first emergence of CXCR4-using virus in PBMCs above the level of detection of the assay in these individuals. Trofile testing was performed with clonal HIV type 1 (HIV-1) variants (n = 21), MT-2 cell culture-derived cells (n = 20) and supernatants (n = 42), and plasma samples (n = 76). Among the clonal HIV-1 variants and MT-2 cell culture-derived samples, the results of the Trofile and MT-2 assays demonstrated a high degree of concordance (95% to 98%). Among consecutive plasma samples, detection of CXCR4-using virus was at or before the time of first detection by the MT-2 assay in 5/10 patients by the original Trofile assay and in 9/10 patients by the enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay. Differences in the time to the first detection of CXCR4 use between the MT-2 assay (PBMCs

  8. Microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency type-1 viruses in human blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, Chu Chieh; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Yang, Amy X.; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Hewlett, Indira; Duncan, Robert; Puri, Raj K.; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) are transfusion-transmitted human pathogens that have a major impact on blood safety and public health worldwide. We developed a microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of these three viruses. The microarray consists of 16 oligonucleotide probes, immobilized on a silylated glass slide. Amplicons from multiplex PCR were labeled with Cy-5 and hybridized to the microarray. The assay detected 1 International Unit (IU), 10 IU, 20 IU of HBV, HCV, and HIV-1, respectively, in a single multiplex reaction. The assay also detected and discriminated the presence of two or three of these viruses in a single sample. Our data represent a proof-of-concept for the possible use of highly sensitive multiplex microarray assay to screen and confirm the presence of these viruses in blood donors and patients

  9. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  10. A Novel Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1c Molecular Variant in an Indigenous Individual from New Caledonia, Melanesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cassar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is endemic among people of Melanesian descent in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, and in Indigenous populations from Central Australia. Molecular studies revealed that these Australo-Melanesian strains constitute the highly divergent HTLV-1c subtype. New Caledonia is a French overseas territory located in the Southwest Pacific Ocean. HTLV-1 situation is poorly documented in New Caledonia and the molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 infection remains unknown.Studying 500 older adults Melanesian natives from New Caledonia, we aim to evaluate the HTLV-1 seroprevalence and to molecularly characterize HTLV-1 proviral strains.Plasma from 262 men and 238 females (age range: 60-96 years old, mean age: 70.5 were screened for anti-HTLV-1 antibodies by particle agglutination (PA and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA. Serological confirmation was obtained using Western blot assay. DNAs were extracted from peripheral blood buffy coat of HTLV-1 seropositive individuals, and subjected to four series of PCR (LTR-gag; pro-pol; pol-env and tax-LTR. Primers were designed from highly common conserved regions of the major HTLV-1 subtypes to characterize the entire HTLV-1 proviral genome.Among 500 samples, 3 were PA and IFA positive. The overall seroprevalence was 0.6%. The DNA sample from 1 New Caledonian woman (NCP201 was found positive by PCR and the complete HTLV-1 proviral genome (9,033-bp was obtained. The full-length HTLV-1 genomic sequence from a native woman from Vanuatu (EM5, obtained in the frame of our previous studies, was also characterized. Both sequences belonged to the HTLV-1c Australo-Melanesian subtype. The NCP201 strain exhibited 0.3% nucleotide divergence with the EM5 strain from Vanuatu. Furthermore, divergence reached 1.1% to 2.9% with the Solomon and Australian sequences respectively. Phylogenetic analyses on a 522-bp-long fragment of the gp21-env gene showed the existence of two major

  11. Absolute level of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection is not predictive of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Baarle (Debbie); K.C. Wolthers (Katja); E. Hovenkamp (Egbert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); F. Miedema (Frank); M.H.J. van Oers (Marinus); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo study whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load can be used to predict the occurrence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (AIDS-NHL), we determined EBV load longitudinally for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. EBV load in

  12. Absolute level of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection is not predictive of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarle, Debbie; Wolthers, Katja C.; Hovenkamp, Egbert; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Miedema, Frank; van Oers, Marinus H. J.

    2002-01-01

    To study whether Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load can be used to predict the occurrence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (AIDS-NHL), we determined EBV load longitudinally for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. EBV load in peripheral blood

  13. Anti-Aspergillus human host defence relies on type 1 T helper (Th1), rather than type 17 T helper (Th17), cellular immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); F. van de Veerdonk (Frank); R.J. Marijnissen (Renoud); S.C. Cheng (Shih-Chin); A.L. Khoo; M. Hectors (Magda); K. Lagrou (Katrien); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); J. Maertens (Johan); L.A.B. Joosten (Leo); B.J. Kullberg (Bart Jan); M.G. Netea (Mihai)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSummary Both interferon-γ-producing type 1 T helper (Th1)- and interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing Th17 cells have been proposed to be involved in anti-fungal host defence. Although invasive aspergillosis is one of the most severe human fungal infections, little is known regarding the

  14. Increased neutralization sensitivity and reduced replicative capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 after short-term in vivo or in vitro passage through chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaumont, T.; Broersen, S.; van Nuenen, A.; Huisman, H. G.; de Roda Husman, A. M.; Heeney, J. L.; Schuitemaker, H.

    2000-01-01

    Development of disease is extremely rare in chimpanzees when inoculated with either T-cell-line-adapted neutralization-sensitive or primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), at first excluding a role for HIV-1 neutralization sensitivity in the clinical course of infection. Interestingly,

  15. Global dispersal pattern of HIV type 1 subtype CRF01-AE : A genetic trace of human mobility related to heterosexual sexual activities centralized in southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01-AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01-AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. Methods. We assembled a global data set

  16. High-dose interferon-alpha2a exerts potent activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 not associated with antitumor activity in subjects with Kaposi's sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frissen, P. H.; de Wolf, F.; Reiss, P.; Bakker, P. J.; Veenhof, C. H.; Danner, S. A.; Goudsmit, J.; Lange, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity was assessed in HIV-1-infected homosexual and bisexual men receiving 18-36 MIU/day of recombinant interferon (IFN)-alpha2a for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The median baseline HIV-1 RNA level was 4.99 log10 copies/mL. Seventeen subjects (68%)

  17. Establishment of New Transmissible and Drug-Sensitive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Wild Types due to Transmission of Nucleoside Analogue-Resistant Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, Anthony de; Dooren, Maaike van; Hoek, Lian van der; Bouwhuis, Denise; Rooij, Esther de; Gemen, Bob van; Boer, R.J. de; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from 74 persons with acute infections identified eight strains with mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene at positions 41, 67, 68, 70, 215, and 219 associated with resistance to the nucleoside analogue zidovudine (AZT).

  18. Establishment of new transmissible and drug-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 wild types due to transmission of nucleoside analogue-resistant virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ronde, A.; van Dooren, M.; van der Hoek, L.; Bouwhuis, D.; de Rooij, E.; van Gemen, B.; de Boer, R.; Goudsmit, J.

    2001-01-01

    Sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from 74 persons with acute infections identified eight strains with mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene at positions 41, 67, 68, 70, 215, and 219 associated with resistance to the nucleoside analogue zidovudine (AZT).

  19. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) specifically target the HIV-1 protease enzyme. Mutations in the enzyme can result in PI resistance (termed PI mutations); however, mutations in the HIV-1 gag region, the substrate for the protease enzyme, might also lead to PI ...

  20. Multicenter evaluation of the new Abbott Realtime assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schutten (Martin); D. Peters (D.); N. Back (Nicole); A.W. van den Beld (Annewieke); B. Beuselinck (B.); V. Foulongne (V.); A.M. Geretti (Anna Maria); L. Pandiani (L.); M. Tiemann; H.G.M. Niesters (Bert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe analytical performances of the new Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load assays were compared at nine laboratories with different competitor assays. These included the Abbott LcX, Bayer Versant bDNA, Roche COBAS Amplicor, and Roche

  1. Multicenter evaluation of the new Abbott RealTime assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, Martin; Peters, D; Back, N K T; Beld, M; Beuselinck, K; Foulongne, V; Geretti, A-M; Pandiani, L; Tiemann, C; Niesters, H G M

    The analytical performances of the new Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load assays were compared at nine laboratories with different competitor assays. These included the Abbott LcX, Bayer Versant bDNA, Roche COBAS Amplicor, and Roche COBAS

  2. Multicenter evaluation of the new Abbott RealTime assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, M.; Peters, D.; Back, N. K. T.; Beld, M.; Beuselinck, K.; Foulongne, V.; Geretti, A.-M.; Pandiani, L.; Tiemann, C.; Niesters, H. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    The analytical performances of the new Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load assays were compared at nine laboratories with different competitor assays. These included the Abbott LcX, Bayer Versant bDNA, Roche COBAS Amplicor, and Roche COBAS

  3. A novel Dock8 gene mutation confers diabetogenic susceptibility in the LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm rat, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, Tanja; Wedekind, Dirk; Jörns, Anne; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Cuppen, Edwin; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, arose through a spontaneous mutation within the inbred strain LEW.1AR1. A susceptibility locus (Iddm8) on rat chromosome 1 (RNO1) has been identified previously, which is accompanied by autoimmune diabetes and the

  4. Structural requirements for the binding of tRNA Lys3 to reverse transcriptase of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Essink, B. B.; Das, A. T.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is primed by the cellular tRNA Lys3 molecule. Packaging of this tRNA primer during virion assembly is thought to be mediated by specific interactions with the reverse transcriptase (RT) protein. Portions of the tRNA

  5. The Stricter the Better? The Relationship between Targeted HbA1c Values and Metabolic Control of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Marcin; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Wrona, Ewa; Fendler, Wojciech; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Wilson, Jayne; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear how HbA1c recommendations influence metabolic control of paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this we compared reported HbA1c with guideline thresholds. We searched systematically MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies reporting on HbA1c in children with T1DM and grouped them according to targeted HbA1c obtained from regional guidelines. We assessed the discrepancies in the metabolic control between these groups by comparing mean HbA1c extracted from each study and the differences between actual and targeted HbA1c. We included 105 from 1365 searched studies. The median (IQR) HbA1c for the study population was 8.30% (8.00%-8.70%) and was lower in "6.5%" than in "7.5%" as targeted HbA1c level (8.20% (7.85%-8.57%) versus 8.40% (8.20%-8.80%); p = 0.028). Median difference between actual and targeted HbA1c was 1.20% (0.80%-1.70%) and was higher in "6.5%" than in "7.5%" (1.70% (1.30%-2.07%) versus 0.90% (0.70%-1.30%), resp.; p HbA1c levels being closer to the therapeutic goal, but the actual values are still higher than those observed in the "6.5%" group. A meta-analysis of raw data from national registries or a prospective study comparing both approaches is warranted as the next step to examine this subject further.

  6. Pathways to reduce diabetic ketoacidosis with new onset type 1 diabetes: Evidence from a regional pediatric diabetes center: Auckland, New Zealand, 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Eleanor R; Albert, Benjamin B; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S; Gunn, Alistair J; Jefferies, Craig A

    2017-11-01

    There has been little change in the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in children and adolescents in most developed countries. To assess potentially modifiable antecedents of DKA in children Auckland (New Zealand) from 2010 to 2014. DKA and severity were defined according to the ISPAD 2014 guidelines. A total of 263 children presented with new onset T1DM during the 5-year study period at 9.0 years of age (range 1.0-14.7), of whom 61% were NZ-European, 14% Maori, 13% Pacifica, and 11% other. A total of 71 patients (27%) were in DKA, including 31 mild, 20 moderate, and 20 severe DKA. DKA was associated with no family history of T1DM, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values at presentation, self-presenting to secondary care, health care professional contacts in the 4 weeks before final presentation, and greater deprivation. Although a delay in referral from primary care for laboratory testing was common (81/216), only delay for more than 48 hours was associated with increased risk of DKA (11/22 > 48 h vs 12/59 referred at <48 h, P = .013). These data suggest that in addition to lack of family awareness potentially modifiable risk factors for new onset DKA include prolonged delay for laboratory testing and a low index of medical suspicion for T1DM leading to delayed diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Xenotransplantation of human umbilical cord derived stem cells for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Loan Thi-Tung Dang; Anh Nguyen-Tu Bui; Cong Le-Thanh Nguyen; Nhat Chau Truong; Anh Thi-Van Bui; Phuong Thi-Bich Le; Ngoc Kim Phan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Type 1 diabetes mellitus disease (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which pancreatic islets are attacked by the host’s immune system. Although this disease can be treated using some of the current methods, resistance to therapy can develop over time after a long usage of the treatments. Therefore, new strategies to treat T1D have been suggested. This study aims to treat T1D using a new approach to target this autoimmune disease; the approach involves the use of mesenchymal stem c...

  8. Human placental growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and -II, and insulin requirements during pregnancy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Jens; Lauszus, Finn; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    between hPGH and IGF-I in type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated thoroughly. Furthermore, hPGH may be involved in the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy. In this prospective, longitudinal study, 51 type 1 diabetic subjects were followed with repeated blood sampling during...... pregnancy in type 1 diabetic subjects could not be related to hPGH levels.......Human placental GH (hPGH) replaces pituitary GH during pregnancy. hPGH is correlated to serum IGF-I in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by fetoplacental disorders. In gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes no correlation between hPGH and IGF-I has been found. The relationship...

  9. TYK2, a Candidate Gene for Type 1 Diabetes, Modulates Apoptosis and the Innate Immune Response in Human Pancreatic β-Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marroqui, Laura; Dos Santos, Reinaldo Sousa; Fløyel, Tina

    2015-01-01

    histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins, a hallmark of early β-cell inflammation in type 1 diabetes. Importantly, TYK2 inhibition prevented PIC-induced β-cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway of cell death. The present findings suggest that TYK2 regulates apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways...... in pancreatic β-cells via modulation of IFNα signaling, subsequent increase in MHC class I protein, and modulation of chemokines such as CXCL10 that are important for recruitment of T cells to the islets.......Pancreatic β-cells are destroyed by an autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes. Linkage and genome-wide association studies point to >50 loci that are associated with the disease in the human genome. Pathway analysis of candidate genes expressed in human islets identified a central role for interferon...

  10. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  11. Immunogenicity of NYVAC Prime-Protein Boost Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Vaccination and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge of Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kevin O; Santra, Sampa; Parks, Robert; Yates, Nicole L; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Bradley, Todd; Goodman, Derrick; Eaton, Amanda; Stanfield-Oakley, Sherry A; Tartaglia, James; Phogat, Sanjay; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Esteban, Mariano; Gomez, Carmen E; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Korber, Bette; Montefiori, David C; Ferrari, Guido; Vandergrift, Nathan; Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2018-04-15

    A preventive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine is an essential part of the strategy to eradicate AIDS. A critical question is whether antibodies that do not neutralize primary isolate (tier 2) HIV-1 strains can protect from infection. In this study, we investigated the ability of an attenuated poxvirus vector (NYVAC) prime-envelope gp120 boost to elicit potentially protective antibody responses in a rhesus macaque model of mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection. NYVAC vector delivery of a group M consensus envelope, trivalent mosaic envelopes, or a natural clade B isolate B.1059 envelope elicited antibodies that mediated neutralization of tier 1 viruses, cellular cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis. None of the macaques made neutralizing antibodies against the tier 2 SHIV SF162P3 used for mucosal challenge. Significant protection from infection was not observed for the three groups of vaccinated macaques compared to unvaccinated macaques, although binding antibody to HIV-1 Env correlated with decreased viremia after challenge. Thus, NYVAC Env prime-gp120 boost vaccination elicited polyfunctional, nonneutralizing antibody responses with minimal protective activity against tier 2 SHIV mucosal challenge. IMPORTANCE The antibody responses that confer protection against HIV-1 infection remain unknown. Polyfunctional antibody responses correlated with time to infection in previous macaque studies. Determining the ability of vaccines to induce these types of responses is critical for understanding how to improve upon the one efficacious human HIV-1 vaccine trial completed thus far. We characterized the antibody responses induced by a NYVAC-protein vaccine and determined the protective capacity of polyfunctional antibody responses in an R5, tier 2 mucosal SHIV infection model. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Comparative Immunogenicity in Rhesus Monkeys of DNA Plasmid, Recombinant Vaccinia Virus, and Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Minchun; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Freed, Daniel C.; Wilson, Keith A.; Dubey, Sheri; Zhu, De-Min; Nawrocki, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Cellular immune responses, particularly those associated with CD3+ CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), play a primary role in controlling viral infection, including persistent infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Accordingly, recent HIV-1 vaccine research efforts have focused on establishing the optimal means of eliciting such antiviral CTL immune responses. We evaluated several DNA vaccine formulations, a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector, and a replication-defecti...

  13. Identification of Performance Problems in a Commercial Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Enzyme Immunoassay by Multiuser External Quality Control Monitoring and Real-Time Data Analysis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J.; Swantee, C.; Lee, B.; Gunning, H.; Chow, A.; Sidaway, F.; Sherlock, C.; Garceau, R.; Dimech, W.; Malloch, L.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2005, a pilot program was implemented in Canadian laboratories to monitor the performance of the Abbott human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1/2) gO enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Two different external quality control (QC) reagents and a “real-time” software analysis program were evaluated. In November 2005, higher-than-expected calibrator rate values in these kits were first reported at the Ontario Ministry of Health (Etobicoke), followed by the Alberta Provincial Public Healt...

  14. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus is...

  15. Long-term results after cardiac surgery in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Carlos A; Chuquiure, Javier E; Claramonte, Xavier; Muñoz, Josefa; Benito, Natividad; Castro, Miguel A; Pomar, José L; Miró, José M

    2003-06-01

    Assessment of long-term results of immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Retrospective analysis of profile and outcomes of 31 HIV-1-infected patients (35 operations, 1985-2002). Twenty-seven males and four females (mean age 34.67) in three groups: acute infective endocarditis (AIE) 21 (67.74%), coronary (CAD) 5 (16.13%) and non-infective valvular disease (NIVD) 5 (16.13%). HIV factors: drug addiction (23-74.19%), homosexuality (5-16.12%), heterosexuality (3-9.67%), hemodialysis (1-3.22%). HIV stage: A (17), B (2), C (2) in AIE; A (2), B (3) in CAD and A (3), C (2) in NIVD. Mean preoperative CD4 count was 278 cells/microL (12infected patients requiring cardiac surgery, a decrease in AIE, however NIVD and CAD increasingly seen. Cardiac surgery did not blunt CD4 response induced by antiretrovirals. The late cause of death were not AIDS-related events.

  16. Parental Perspectives on a Pediatric Human Non-Subjects Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Kyle B; Clayton, Ellen Wright

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic biorepositories will be important tools to help unravel the effect of common genetic variants on risk for common pediatric diseases. Our objective was to explore how parents would respond to the inclusion of children in an opt-out model biobank. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with parents in hospital-based pediatric clinics. Participants responded to a description of a biorepository already collecting samples from adults. Two coders independently analyzed and coded interviews using framework analysis. Opt-out forms were later piloted in a clinic area. Parental opt-out choices were recorded electronically, with opt-out rates reported here. RESULTS: Parents strongly supported medical research in general and expressed a high level of trust that Vanderbilt University would keep their child's medical information private. Parents were more likely to allow their child's sample to be included in the biorepository than to allow their child to participate in a hypothetical study that would not help or harm their child, but might help other children. Only a minority were able to volunteer a concern raised by the description of the biobank. The opt-out rate was initially high compared with the opt-out rate in the adult biorepository, but after the first week decreased to near the baseline in adult clinics. CONCLUSION: Parents in our study generally support an opt-out model biobank in children. Most would allow their own child's sample to be included. Institutions seeking to build pediatric biobanks may consider the human non-subjects model as a viable alternative to traditional human-subjects biobanks.

  17. Identification of gene products suppressed by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection or gp120 exposure of primary human astrocytes by rapid subtraction hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zao-Zhong; Kang, Dong-Chul; Chen, Yinming; Pekarskaya, Olga; Chao, Wei; Volsky, David J; Fisher, Paul B

    2003-06-01

    Neurodegeneration and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) are the major disease manifestations of HIV-1 colonization of the central nervous system (CNS). In the brain, HIV-1 replicates in microglial cells and infiltrating macrophages and it persists in a low-productive, noncytolytic state in astrocytes. Astrocytes play critical roles in the maintenance of the brain microenvironment, responses to injury, and in neuronal signal transmission, and disruption of these functions by HIV-1 could contribute to HAD. To better understand the potential effects of HIV-1 on astrocyte biology, the authors investigated changes in gene expression using an efficient and sensitive rapid subtraction hybridization approach, RaSH. Primary human astrocytes were isolated from abortus brain tissue, low-passage cells were infected with HIV-1 or mock infected, and total cellular RNAs were isolated at multiple time points over a period of 1 week. This approach is designed to identify gene products modulated early and late after HIV-1 infection and limits the cloning of genes displaying normal cell-cycle fluctuations in astrocytes. By subtracting temporal cDNAs derived from HIV-1-infected astrocytes from temporal cDNAs made from uninfected cells, 10 genes displaying reduced expression in infected cells, termed astrocyte suppressed genes (ASGs), were identified and their suppression was confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Both known and novel ASGs, not reported in current DNA databases, that are down-regulated by HIV-1 infection are described. Northern blotting confirms suppression of the same panel of ASGs by treatment of astrocytes with recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120. These results extend our previous analysis of astrocyte genes induced or enhanced by HIV-1 infection and together they suggest that HIV-1 and viral proteins have profound effects on astrocyte physiology, which may influence their function in the CNS.

  18. Tumultuous relationship between the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) and the human APOBEC-3G and APOBEC-3F restriction factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Simon; Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2009-06-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is dispensable for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in so-called permissive cells but is required for replication in nonpermissive cell lines and for pathogenesis. Virions produced in the absence of Vif have an aberrant morphology and an unstable core and are unable to complete reverse transcription. Recent studies demonstrated that human APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and APOBEC-3F (hA3F), which are selectively expressed in nonpermissive cells, possess strong anti-HIV-1 activity and are sufficient to confer a nonpermissive phenotype. Vif induces the degradation of hA3G and hA3F, suggesting that its main function is to counteract these cellular factors. Most studies focused on the hypermutation induced by the cytidine deaminase activity of hA3G and hA3F and on their Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome. However, recent studies suggested that several mechanisms are involved both in the antiviral activity of hA3G and hA3F and in the way Vif counteracts these antiviral factors. Attempts to reconcile the studies involving Vif in virus assembly and stability with these recent findings suggest that hA3G and hA3F partially exert their antiviral activity independently of their catalytic activity by destabilizing the viral core and the reverse transcription complex, possibly by interfering with the assembly and/or maturation of the viral particles. Vif could then counteract hA3G and hA3F by excluding them from the viral assembly intermediates through competition for the viral genomic RNA, by regulating the proteolytic processing of Pr55(Gag), by enhancing the efficiency of the reverse transcription process, and by inhibiting the enzymatic activities of hA3G and hA3F.

  19. Stabilization of the soluble, cleaved, trimeric form of the envelope glycoprotein complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Rogier W.; Vesanen, Mika; Schuelke, Norbert; Master, Aditi; Schiffner, Linnea; Kalyanaraman, Roopa; Paluch, Maciej; Berkhout, Ben; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Lu, Min; Moore, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex of human immunodeficiency virus type I has evolved a structure that is minimally immunogenic while retaining its natural function of receptor-mediated virus-cell fusion. The Env complex is trimeric; its six individual subunits (three gp120 and three gp41

  20. Comparison of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tropism profiles in clinical samples by the Trofile and MT-2 assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the

  1. Rapid disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals with adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, J.; Veugelers, P. J.; Keet, I. P.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Miedema, F.; Lange, J. M.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relation between the occurrence of adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) prophylaxis and the subsequent course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a cohort of homosexual men. Adverse reactions to TMP-SMZ were associated with a more rapid

  2. Clinical and laboratory profile of pediatric outpatients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, attended in the tertiary public hospital of Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil, and its relationship with the treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rosa Pellicciari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and laboratory profile of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and their relationship with the values of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Methods: We analyzed medical records of 56 patients (2 to 17 years treated at the pediatric endocrinology unit of the Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil, during the period from August 2013 to July 2014. Data such as: age, duration of disease, diabetes etiology (autoimmune or idiopathic, type and number of daily insulin injections, caster at the application site, the HbA1c levels, blood glucose monitoring, candy and soft drinks intake and physical activity were analyzed. For statistical analysis, the patients were divided in two groups: bad control = HbA1c>9%; and good control = HbA1c≤9%, according to the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD. Results: The mean age of the patients studied was equal to 10.5 years; 53.6% (n=30 of them were in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis diagnosis; and 57.1% (n=32 of the group had HbA1c>9%. Bad control group showed older age, being mainly composed of adolescents (p=0,0230. The weekly intake of soft drinks is associated with the bad control group (p=0,0500. The other factors studied showed no statistical difference between the groups. Conclusions: A large percentage of patients with DM1 had inadequate control of the disease, especially in the adolescent age group. The diagnosis of DM1 in childhood and adolescence is still late, with high presence of diabetic ketoacidosis at diagnosis.

  3. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection by the Candidate Microbicide Dapivirine, a Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, P.; Harman, S.; Azijn, H.; Armanasco, N.; Manlow, P.; Perumal, D.; de Bethune, M.-P.; Nuttall, J.; Romano, J.; Shattock, R.

    2008-01-01

    Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains the major route of infection worldwide; thus, there is an urgent need for additional prevention strategies, particularly strategies that could be controlled by women, such as topical microbicides. Potential microbicide candidates must be both safe and effective. Using cellular and tissue explant models, we have evaluated the activity of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine as a vaginal micr...

  4. Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  5. Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasheed, Shabana; Teo, Harvey James Eu Leong; Littooij, Annemieke Simone

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of pediatric patients involves many diverse modalities, including radiography, ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic and angiographic studies. It is therefore important to be aware of potential pitfalls that may be related to these modalities

  6. Novel PI3K/Akt Inhibitors Screened by the Cytoprotective Function of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Baek

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors. PMID:21765914

  7. Novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors screened by the cytoprotective function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Kim

    Full Text Available The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors.

  8. 78 FR 13686 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Review Staff on Pediatric Information Incorporated Into Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... FDA review staff in making decisions about the placement and content of pediatric information in human... assist that office in processing your requests. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Review Staff on Pediatric Information Incorporated Into Human...

  9. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Desta, Semere Tekeste

    2017-01-01

    Høgskulen på Vestlandet Avdeling for helsefag for sykepleiere Tittel: Diabetes type 1 Bakgrunn for val av tema: I 2000 var det ca. 130 000 personer i Norge med diabetes, av disse hadde ca. 20 000 diabetes type 1. I dag er det ca. 230 000 personer som har diabetes i Norge. Av disse ca. 28 000 type 1 diabetes. Tallet viser hvor alvorlig sykdommen er, fordi det har vært og fortsatt er, en økning av antall diabetikere i Norge. Type 1 diabetes kan komme i alle aldersgrupper, men vanligvis...

  10. Identification of a 450-bp region of human papillomavirus type 1 that promotes episomal replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Schmidt, Martin C.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) replicate as nuclear plasmids in infected cells. Since the DNA replication machinery is generally conserved between humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we studied whether HPV-1 DNA can replicate in yeast. Plasmids containing a selectable marker (with or without a yeast centromere) and either the full-length HPV-1 genome or various regions of the viral long control region (LCR) and the 3' end of the L1 gene were introduced into S. cerevisiae and their ability to replicate episomally was investigated. Our results show that HPV-1 sequences promote episomal replication of plasmids although the yeast centromere is required for plasmid retention. We have mapped the autonomously replicating sequence activity of HPV-1 DNA to a 450 base-pair sequence (HPV-1 nt 6783-7232) that includes 293 nucleotides from the 5' region of the viral LCR and 157 nucleotides from the 3' end of the L1 gene. The HPV-1 ARS does not include the binding sites for the viral E1 and E2 proteins, and these proteins are dispensable for replication in S. cerevisiae

  11. 11Beta-HSD type 1 expression in human adipose tissue: impact of gender, obesity, and fat localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Søren Kildeberg; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Fisker, Sanne

    2007-01-01

    of the metabolic syndrome. Our objective was to compare 11beta-HSD1 gene expression in different fat depots (visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, and subcutaneous gluteal) in lean and obese men and women. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A cross-sectional study design was used for healthy patients undergoing minor...... abdominal surgery (lean men, 10), minor gynecological surgery (lean woman, 10), or gastric banding operations (obese men, 10; and obese women, 10). Gene expressions of 11beta-HSD1 in adipose tissue samples were determined by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Lean...... women had lower 11beta-HSD1 gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue compared with men (62% lower, p women. 11Beta-HSD1 mRNA in human adipose tissue was higher in obese subjects compared with lean subjects in both women...

  12. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  13. 11Beta-HSD type 1 expression in human adipose tissue: impact of gender, obesity, and fat localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Søren Kildeberg; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Fisker, Sanne

    2007-01-01

    of the metabolic syndrome. Our objective was to compare 11beta-HSD1 gene expression in different fat depots (visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, and subcutaneous gluteal) in lean and obese men and women. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A cross-sectional study design was used for healthy patients undergoing minor...... women had lower 11beta-HSD1 gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue compared with men (62% lower, p difference was found between obese men and women. 11Beta-HSD1 mRNA in human adipose tissue was higher in obese subjects compared with lean subjects in both women...... and men and in both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. No difference in mRNA expression of 11beta-HSD1 between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue or between subcutaneous adipose tissue from different depots was found. CONCLUSIONS: 11Beta-HSD1 in adipose tissue is increased in obesity in both...

  14. Genome and infection characteristics of human parechovirus type 1: the interplay between viral infection and type I interferon antiviral system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenn-Tzong Chang

    Full Text Available Human parechoviruses (HPeVs, members of the family Picornaviridae, are associated with severe human clinical conditions such as gastrointestinal disease, encephalitis, meningitis, respiratory disease and neonatal sepsis. A new contemporary strain of HPeV1, KVP6 (accession no. KC769584, was isolated from a clinical specimen. Full-genome alignment revealed that HPeV1 KVP6 shares high genome homology with the German strain of HPeV1, 7555312 (accession no. FM178558 and could be classified in the clade 1B group. An intertypic recombination was shown within the P2-P3 genome regions of HPeV1. Cell-type tropism test showed that T84 cells (colon carcinoma cells, A549 cells (lung carcinoma cells and DBTRG-5MG cells (glioblastoma cells were susceptible to HPeV1 infection, which might be relevant clinically. A facilitated cytopathic effect and increased viral titers were reached after serial viral passages in Vero cells, with viral genome mutation found in later passages. HPeV1 is sensitive to elevated temperature because 39C incubation impaired virion production. HPeV1 induced innate immunity with phosphorylation of interferon (IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 and production of type I IFN in A549 but not T84 cells. Furthermore, type I IFN inhibited HPeV1 production in A549 cells but not T84 cells; T84 cells may be less responsive to type I IFN stimulation. Moreover, HPeV1-infected cells showed downregulated type I IFN activation, which indicated a type I IFN evasion mechanism. The characterization of the complete genome and infection features of HPeV1 provide comprehensive information about this newly isolated HPeV1 for further diagnosis, prevention or treatment strategies.

  15. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  16. Type 1 Diabetes Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affiliates JDRF Celebrity Ambassadors JDRF Logo Usage Contact Us Donate Events More Type 1 Diabetes Facts Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune ... about Insulin and T1D Learn More What Is Diabetes? Causes of T1D The Complexity of Diagnosing ... US CAREERS NEWSROOM FOR RESEARCHERS © JDRF 2018 • Privacy Policy • ...

  17. Chest radiographic features of human metapneumovirus infection in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Daniel Dunnavant, F.; Singh, Sudha P.; Ellis, Wendy D.; Payne, Daniel C.; Zhu, Yuwei; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Williams, John V.

    2017-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was identified in 2001 and is a common cause of acute respiratory illness in young children. The radiologic characteristics of laboratory-confirmed HMPV acute respiratory illness in young children have not been systematically assessed. We systematically evaluated the radiographic characteristics of acute respiratory illness associated with HMPV in a prospective cohort of pediatric patients. We included chest radiographs from children <5 years old with acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the prospective New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) study from 2003 to 2009 and were diagnosed with HMPV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 215 HMPV-positive subjects enrolled at our tertiary care children's hospital, 68 had chest radiographs obtained by the treating clinician that were available for review. Two fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists, independently and then in consensus, retrospectively evaluated these chest radiographs for their radiographic features. Parahilar opacities were the most commonly observed abnormality, occurring in 87% of children with HMPV. Hyperinflation also occurred frequently (69%). Atelectasis (40%) and consolidation (18%) appeared less frequently. Pleural effusion and pneumothorax were not seen on any radiographs. The clinical presentations of HMPV include bronchiolitis, croup and pneumonia. Dominant chest radiographic abnormalities include parahilar opacities and hyperinflation, with occasional consolidation. Recognition of the imaging patterns seen with common viral illnesses like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and HMPV might facilitate diagnosis and limit unnecessary antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  18. Chest radiographic features of human metapneumovirus infection in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Daniel Dunnavant, F.; Singh, Sudha P.; Ellis, Wendy D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Payne, Daniel C. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhu, Yuwei [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Griffin, Marie R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Health Policy, Nashville, TN (United States); Edwards, Kathryn M. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Williams, John V. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was identified in 2001 and is a common cause of acute respiratory illness in young children. The radiologic characteristics of laboratory-confirmed HMPV acute respiratory illness in young children have not been systematically assessed. We systematically evaluated the radiographic characteristics of acute respiratory illness associated with HMPV in a prospective cohort of pediatric patients. We included chest radiographs from children <5 years old with acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the prospective New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) study from 2003 to 2009 and were diagnosed with HMPV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 215 HMPV-positive subjects enrolled at our tertiary care children's hospital, 68 had chest radiographs obtained by the treating clinician that were available for review. Two fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists, independently and then in consensus, retrospectively evaluated these chest radiographs for their radiographic features. Parahilar opacities were the most commonly observed abnormality, occurring in 87% of children with HMPV. Hyperinflation also occurred frequently (69%). Atelectasis (40%) and consolidation (18%) appeared less frequently. Pleural effusion and pneumothorax were not seen on any radiographs. The clinical presentations of HMPV include bronchiolitis, croup and pneumonia. Dominant chest radiographic abnormalities include parahilar opacities and hyperinflation, with occasional consolidation. Recognition of the imaging patterns seen with common viral illnesses like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and HMPV might facilitate diagnosis and limit unnecessary antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  19. In Vitro Activation of the IκB Kinase Complex by Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type-1 Tax*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Negi, Veera S.; Keitany, Gladys; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Orth, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I expresses Tax, a 40-kDa oncoprotein that activates IκB kinase (IKK), resulting in constitutive activation of NFκB. Herein, we have developed an in vitro signaling assay to analyze IKK complex activation by recombinant Tax. Using this assay in combination with reporter assays, we demonstrate that Tax-mediated activation of IKK is independent of phosphatases. We show that sustained activation of the Tax-mediated activation of the NFκB pathway is dependent on an intact Hsp90-IKK complex. By acetylating and thereby preventing activation of the IKK complex by the Yersinia effector YopJ, we demonstrate that Tax-mediated activation of the IKK complex requires a phosphorylation step. Our characterization of an in vitro signaling assay system for the mechanism of Tax-mediated activation of the IKK complex with a variety of mutants and inhibitors results in a working model for the biochemical mechanism of Tax-induced activation. PMID:18223255

  20. APOBEC3G-induced hypermutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 is typically a discrete "all or nothing" phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armitage, Andrew E; Deforche, Koen; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    The rapid evolution of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) allows studies of ongoing host-pathogen interactions. One key selective host factor is APOBEC3G (hA3G) that can cause extensive and inactivating Guanosine-to-Adenosine (G-to-A) mutation on HIV plus-strand DNA (termed hypermutation). HIV...... can inhibit this innate anti-viral defense through binding of the viral protein Vif to hA3G, but binding efficiency varies and hypermutation frequencies fluctuate in patients. A pivotal question is whether hA3G-induced G-to-A mutation is always lethal to the virus or if it may occur at sub......-lethal frequencies that could increase viral diversification. We show in vitro that limiting-levels of hA3G-activity (i.e. when only a single hA3G-unit is likely to act on HIV) produce hypermutation frequencies similar to those in patients and demonstrate in silico that potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutation rates...

  1. Association between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and cancer in the black population of Johannesburg and Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitas, F.; Bezwoda, W. R.; Levin, V.; Ruff, P.; Kew, M. C.; Hale, M. J.; Carrara, H.; Beral, V.; Fleming, G.; Odes, R.; Weaving, A.

    1997-01-01

    A case-control study of 913 black cancer patients (aged 15-50 years) was undertaken to measure the association between human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and cancers believed to have an infective aetiology. Controls were patients with cancers believed not to be infective in origin. The prevalence of HIV in the controls of 7.3% (24 of 325) was similar to the background HIV seropositivity in this population. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for age, year of diagnosis, marital status and sex were calculated. There was a strong association between HIV infection and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), with 27 of 33 cases being HIV seropositive, OR = 61.8 (95% CI 19.7-194.2) and an elevated association with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), with 27 of 40 cases being HIV seropositive [OR = 4.8 (95% CI 1.5-14.8)]. The elevated odds ratio for KS associated with HIV infection accords with the observed increases in the incidence of KS in several sub-Saharan African countries where the prevalence of HIV is high. The odds ratio for NHL associated with HIV infection was lower than that reported in developed countries, and the reason for this is not clear. No other cancers, including cervical and liver cancers, showed significantly elevated odds ratios associated with HIV infection. PMID:9184191

  2. Variable epitope libraries: new vaccine immunogens capable of inducing broad human immunodeficiency virus type 1-neutralizing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Niño, Claudia; Pedroza-Roldan, Cesar; Viveros, Monica; Gevorkian, Goar; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2011-07-18

    The extreme antigenic variability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) leads to immune escape of the virus, representing a major challenge in the design of effective vaccine. We have developed a novel concept for immunogen construction based on introduction of massive mutations within the epitopes targeting antigenically variable pathogens and diseases. Previously, we showed that these immunogens carrying large combinatorial libraries of mutated epitope variants, termed as variable epitope libraries (VELs), induce potent, broad and long lasting CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cell response. Moreover, we demonstrated that these T cells recognize more than 50% of heavily mutated variants (5 out of 10 amino acid positions were mutated in each epitope variant) of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop-derived cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope (RGPGRAFVTI) in mice. The constructed VELs had complexities of 10000 and 12500 individual members, generated as plasmid DNA or as M13 phage display combinatorial libraries, respectively, and with structural composition RGPGXAXXXX or XGXGXAXVXI, where X is any of 20 natural amino acids. Here, we demonstrated that sera from mice immunized with these VELs are capable of neutralizing 5 out of 10 viral isolates from Tier 2 reference panel of subtype B envelope clones, including HIV-1 isolates which are known to be resistant to neutralization by several potent monoclonal antibodies, described previously. These data indicate the feasibility of the application of immunogens based on VEL concept as an alternative approach for the development of molecular vaccines against antigenically variable pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyer Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo.

  4. Prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 in blood donors of the Caruaru Blood Center (Hemope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleska Mayara Gomes de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is difficulty in gathering data on the prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus in blood donors as confirmatory testing is not mandatory in Brazil. This suggests there may be an underreporting of the prevalence. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 in donors of a blood bank in Caruaru, Brazil. METHODS: This was an observational, epidemiological, descriptive, longitudinal and retrospective study with information about the serology of donors of the Caruaru Blood Center, Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia de Pernambuco (Hemope from May 2006 to December 2010. The data were analyzed using the Excel 2010 computer program (Microsoft Office(r. RESULTS: Of 61,881 donors, 60 (0.096% individuals were identified as potential carriers of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2. Of these, 28 (0.045% were positive and 32 (0.051% had inconclusive results in the serological screening. Forty-five (0.072% were retested; 17 were positive (0.027% and 3 inconclusive (0.005%. After confirmatory tests, 8 were positive (0.013%. Six (75% of the confirmed cases were women. CONCLUSION: Epidemiological surveys like this are very important in order to create campaigns to attract donors and reduce the costs of laboratory tests.

  5. The p2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag regulates sequential proteolytic processing and is required to produce fully infectious virions.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettit, S C; Moody, M D; Wehbie, R S; Kaplan, A H; Nantermet, P V; Klein, C A; Swanstrom, R

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing sites of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor are cleaved in a sequential manner by the viral protease. We investigated the factors that regulate sequential processing. When full-length Gag protein was digested with recombinant HIV-1 protease in vitro, four of the five major processing sites in Gag were cleaved at rates that differ by as much as 400-fold. Three of these four processing sites were cleaved independently of the others. The CA/p...

  6. Alix serves as an adaptor that allows human parainfluenza virus type 1 to interact with the host cell ESCRT system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Boonyaratanakornkit

    Full Text Available The cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport system functions in cargo-sorting, in the formation of intraluminal vesicles that comprise multivesicular bodies (MVB, and in cytokinesis, and this system can be hijacked by a number of enveloped viruses to promote budding. The respiratory pathogen human parainfluenza virus type I (HPIV1 encodes a nested set of accessory C proteins that play important roles in down-regulating viral transcription and replication, in suppressing the type I interferon (IFN response, and in suppressing apoptosis. Deletion or mutation of the C proteins attenuates HPIV1 in vivo, and such mutants are being evaluated preclinically and clinically as vaccines. We show here that the C proteins interact and co-localize with the cellular protein Alix, which is a member of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (Vps proteins that assemble at endosomal membranes into ESCRT complexes. The HPIV1 C proteins interact with the Bro1 domain of Alix at a site that is also required for the interaction between Alix and Chmp4b, a subunit of ESCRT-III. The C proteins are ubiquitinated and subjected to proteasome-mediated degradation, but the interaction with AlixBro1 protects the C proteins from degradation. Neither over-expression nor knock-down of Alix expression had an effect on HPIV1 replication, although this might be due to the large redundancy of Alix-like proteins. In contrast, knocking down the expression of Chmp4 led to an approximately 100-fold reduction in viral titer during infection with wild-type (WT HPIV1. This level of reduction was similar to that observed for the viral mutant, P(C- HPIV1, in which expression of the C proteins were knocked out. Chmp4 is capable of out-competing the HPIV1 C proteins for binding Alix. Together, this suggests a possible model in which Chmp4, through Alix, recruits the C proteins to a common site on intracellular membranes and facilitates budding.

  7. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  8. Treating Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with a Rapid-Acting Analog Insulin Regimen vs. Regular Human Insulin in Germany: A Long-Term Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, William J; Van Brunt, Kate; Boye, Kristina S; Pollock, Richard F

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of rapid-acting analog insulin relative to regular human insulin in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Germany. The PRIME Diabetes Model, a patient-level, discrete event simulation model, was used to project long-term clinical and cost outcomes for patients with type 1 diabetes from the perspective of a German healthcare payer. Simulated patients had a mean age of 21.5 years, duration of diabetes of 8.6 years, and baseline glycosylated hemoglobin of 7.39%. Regular human insulin and rapid-acting analog insulin regimens reduced glycosylated hemoglobin by 0.312 and 0.402%, respectively. Compared with human insulin, hypoglycemia rate ratios with rapid-acting analog insulin were 0.51 (non-severe nocturnal) and 0.80 (severe). No differences in non-severe diurnal hypoglycemia were modeled. Discount rates of 3% were applied to future costs and clinical benefits accrued over the 50-year time horizon. In the base-case analysis, rapid-acting analog insulin was associated with an improvement in quality-adjusted life expectancy of 1.01 quality-adjusted life-years per patient (12.54 vs. 11.53 quality-adjusted life-years). Rapid-acting analog insulin was also associated with an increase in direct costs of €4490, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €4427 per quality-adjusted life-year gained vs. human insulin. Sensitivity analyses showed that the base case was driven predominantly by differences in hypoglycemia; abolishing these differences reduced incremental quality-adjusted life expectancy to 0.07 quality-adjusted life-years, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €74,622 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Rapid-acting analog insulin is associated with beneficial outcomes in patients with type 1 diabetes and is likely to be considered cost effective in the German setting vs. regular human insulin.

  9. Type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identifi...

  10. Cyclophilin A Levels Dictate Infection Efficiency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Capsid Escape Mutants A92E and G94D ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, Laura M. J.; Schaller, Torsten; Price, Amanda; Fletcher, Adam J.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA) is an important human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cofactor in human cells. HIV-1 A92E and G94D capsid escape mutants arise during CypA inhibition and in certain cell lines are dependent on CypA inhibition. Here we show that dependence on CypA inhibition is due to high CypA levels. Restricted HIV-1 is stable, and remarkably, restriction is augmented by arresting cell division. Nuclear entry is not inhibited. We propose that high CypA levels and capsid mutations combine to disturb uncoating, leading to poor infectivity, particularly in arrested cells. Our data suggest a role for CypA in uncoating the core of HIV-1 to facilitate integration. PMID:19073742

  11. APPLICABILITY OF A HUMAN LACTOFERRIN IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Borovik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern data on efficiency and safety of a recombinant human lactoferrin (hLf and prospects of its use in pediatric practice are presented in the review of literary data. The unique anti-infectious properties of biologically active protein of the hLf, its high antimicrobic, antiviral, antifungal and anti-parasitic activity are noted. Ability to stimulate natural immunity, to interact with other antimicrobic peptides, in particular, with lysozyme and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor is analysed. In this regard it is indicated prospects of application of the hLf in treatment of prematurely born and hypotrophic children, patients with chronic nutritional deficiency for the purpose of prevention of infectious diseases and correction of inflammatory changes in the organism of a child, includingacute respiratory virus and enteric infections in children. It is expedient to apply hLf in surgical practice for reduction of a degree of manifestation of the acute pro-inflammatory response, and also for prevention of infectious complications, especially after abdominal operations, in complex treatment of children with a severe generalized infection and multi-organ failure, for prevention of intrahospital nosocomial infections in children hospitals.Key words: children, prematurely born, nutritional deficiency, infections, lactoferrin, recombinant human lactoferrin.

  12. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave i sykepleie, 2014 Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturst...

  13. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  14. The effect of exercise on the absorption of inhaled human insulin via the AERx(R) iDMS in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Astrid Heide; Kohler, G; Korsatko, S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - This study investigated the effect of moderate exercise on the absorption of inhaled insulin via the AERx(R) insulin Diabetes Management System (iDMS). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - In this randomized, open-label, 4-period cross-over, glucose clamp study 23 non-smoking subjects...... with type 1 diabetes received a dose of 0.19 units/kg inhaled human insulin followed in random order by either 1) no exercise (NOEX), or 30 min exercise starting 2) 30 min after dosing (EX30), 3) 120 min after dosing (EX120), or 4) 240 min after dosing (EX240). RESULTS - Exercise changed the shape...... of the free plasma insulin curves, but compared to NOEX the AUC(ins) for the first 2 hours after start of exercise was unchanged for EX30 and EX240, while 15% decreased for EX120 (p

  15. Cell cycle regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells: antagonistic effects of nuclear envelope breakdown and chromatin condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannioui, Abdelkrim; Schiffer, Cecile; Felix, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    We examined the influence of mitosis on the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in T cells. Single-round infection of cells arrested in G1b or allowed to synchronously proceed through division showed that mitosis delays virus integration until 18-24 h postinfection, whereas integration reaches maximum levels by 15 h in G1b-arrested cells. Subcellular fractionation of metaphase-arrested cells indicated that, while nuclear envelope disassembly facilitates docking of viral DNA to chromatin, chromosome condensation directly antagonizes and therefore delays integration. As a result of the balance between the two effects, virus integration efficiency is eventually up to threefold greater in dividing cells. At the single-cell level, using a green fluorescent protein-expressing reporter virus, we found that passage through mitosis leads to prominent asymmetric segregation of the viral genome in daughter cells without interfering with provirus expression

  16. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-01-01

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1 QH1549.13 blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors suppress UV-induced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression at the posttranscriptional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagoe, S.; Kohda, T.; Oishi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is induced not only by trans activation mediated through a gene product (tat) encoded by the virus but also by treatment of virus-carrying cells with DNA-damaging agents such as UV light. Employing an artificially constructed DNA in which the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, we analyzed the induction process in HeLa cells and found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase suppressed UV-induced HIV-1 gene expression but not tat-mediated expression. We also found that suppression occurs at the posttranscriptional level. These results indicate that HIV-1 gene expression is activated by at least two different mechanisms, one of which involves poly-ADP ribosylation. A possible new role of poly-ADP ribosylation in the regulation of specific gene expression is also discussed

  18. Type 1 narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Matilda; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with unintentional sleep attacks and cataplexy. The disorder is caused by a loss of hypocretinergic neurons in the brain. The specific loss of these neurons in narcolepsy is thought to result from an autoimmune...

  19. Intrapancreatic injection of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells alleviates hyperglycemia and modulates the macrophage state in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimitsu Murai

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease caused by the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, resulting in insulin dependency and hyperglycemia. While transplanted bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BMMSCs have been explored as an alternative therapeutic approach for diseases, the choice of delivery route may be a critical factor determining their sustainability. This study evaluated the effects of intrapancreatic and intravenous injection of human BMMSCs (hBMMSCs in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mouse model. C57/BL6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 115 mg/kg STZ on day 0. hBMMSCs (1 × 106 cells or vehicle were injected into the pancreas or jugular vein on day 7. Intrapancreatic, but not intravenous, hBMMSC injection significantly reduced blood glucose levels on day 28 compared with vehicle injection by the same route. This glucose-lowering effect was not induced by intrapancreatic injection of human fibroblasts as the xenograft control. Intrapancreatically injected fluorescence-labeled hBMMSCs were observed in the intra- and extra-lobular spaces of the pancreas, and intravenously injected cells were in the lung region, although the number of cells mostly decreased within 2 weeks of injection. For hBMMSCs injected twice into the pancreatic region on days 7 and 28, the injected mice had further reduced blood glucose to borderline diabetic levels on day 56. Animals injected with hBMMSCs twice exhibited increases in the plasma insulin level, number and size of islets, insulin-positive proportion of the total pancreas area, and intensity of insulin staining compared with vehicle-injected animals. We found a decrease of Iba1-positive cells in islets and an increase of CD206-positive cells in both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The hBMMSC injection also reduced the number of CD40-positive cells merged with glucagon immunoreactions in the islets. These results suggest that intrapancreatic injection

  20. Perfil clínico e laboratorial de pacientes pediátricos e adolescentes com diabetes tipo 1 Clinical and laboratory profile of pediatric and adolescent patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pereira da Silva Jose

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar a avaliação clínica e laboratorial dos pacientes com diabetes melito tipo 1 em três hospitais públicos em São Paulo (SP, uma vez que o diabetes melito tipo 1 é uma doença crônica que ocorre principalmente em crianças e adolescentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com pacientes em acompanhamento em centros de referência em São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP, Campinas (UNICAMP e São Paulo (Conjunto Hospitalar do Mandaqui. Dados como gênero, idade, duração do diabetes, dose diária de insulina, número de aplicações diárias de insulina e hemoglobina glicosilada (HbA1c foram analisados. RESULTADOS: Foram avaliados 239 pacientes (131 do sexo feminino; a idade média foi de 13,1±4,7 anos e o tempo médio de duração do diabetes foi de 6,6±4,2 anos. As doses diárias de insulina variaram de 0,1 a 1,78 unidades/kg/dia (0,88±0,28, e 180 (74,7% pacientes faziam somente duas aplicações por dia. A HbA1c variou de 4,6 a 17,9% (10,0±2,3%. CONCLUSÕES: Embora os hospitais incluídos neste estudo sejam centros de referência para o seguimento de pacientes com diabetes melito em três cidades do estado de São Paulo, um dos estados mais desenvolvidos do Brasil, o controle da glicemia avaliado através da HbA1c não foi adequado. Isso confirma o fato de que, embora haja esforço de todos os profissionais envolvidos, grandes desafios ainda deverão ser vencidos.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical and laboratory profiles of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus in three public hospitals in São Paulo, Brazil, since type 1 diabetes mellitus is a chronic illness that occurs mainly in the pediatric age group in the Brazilian population. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with patients followed up in reference centers in São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP, Campinas (UNICAMP and São Paulo (Conjunto Hospitalar do Mandaqui. Data about gender, age, diabetes duration, daily insulin dose, number of daily insulin injections, and glycosylated

  1. The C proteins of human parainfluenza virus type 1 block IFN signaling by binding and retaining Stat1 in perinuclear aggregates at the late endosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrick Schomacker

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs play a crucial role in the antiviral immune response. Whereas the C proteins of wild-type human parainfluenza virus type 1 (WT HPIV1 inhibit both IFN-β induction and signaling, a HPIV1 mutant encoding a single amino acid substitution (F170S in the C proteins is unable to block either host response. Here, signaling downstream of the type 1 IFN receptor was examined in Vero cells to define at what stage WT HPIV1 can block, and F170S HPIV1 fails to block, IFN signaling. WT HPIV1 inhibited phosphorylation of both Stat1 and Stat2, and this inhibition was only slightly reduced for F170S HPIV1. Degradation of Stat1 or Stat2 was not observed. The HPIV1 C proteins were found to accumulate in the perinuclear space, often forming large granules, and co-localized with Stat1 and the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (M6PR that is a marker for late endosomes. Upon stimulation with IFN-β, both the WT and F170S C proteins remained in the perinuclear space, but only the WT C proteins prevented Stat1 translocation to the nucleus. In addition, WT HPIV1 C proteins, but not F170S C proteins, co-immunoprecipitated both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated Stat1. Our findings suggest that the WT HPIV1 C proteins form a stable complex with Stat1 in perinuclear granules that co-localize with M6PR, and that this direct interaction between the WT HPIV1 C proteins and Stat1 is the basis for the ability of HPIV1 to inhibit IFN signaling. The F170S mutation in HPIV1 C did not prevent perinuclear co-localization with Stat1, but apparently weakened this interaction such that, upon IFN stimulation, Stat1 was translocated to the nucleus to induce an antiviral response.

  2. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Induced Overexpression of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM) Facilitates Trafficking of Infected Lymphocytes through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curis, Céline; Percher, Florent; Jeannin, Patricia; Montange, Thomas; Chevalier, Sébastien A; Seilhean, Danielle; Cartier, Luis; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Gout, Olivier; Gessain, Antoine; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; Afonso, Philippe V

    2016-08-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). This disease develops upon infiltration of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes into the central nervous system, mostly the thoracic spinal cord. The central nervous system is normally protected by a physiological structure called the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists primarily of a continuous endothelium with tight junctions. In this study, we investigated the role of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, in the crossing of the BBB by HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes. We demonstrated that ALCAM is overexpressed on the surface of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes, both in chronically infected cell lines and in primary infected CD4(+) T lymphocytes. ALCAM overexpression results from the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by the viral transactivator Tax. In contrast, staining of spinal cord sections of HAM/TSP patients showed that ALCAM expression is not altered on the BBB endothelium in the context of HTLV-1 infection. ALCAM blockade or downregulation of ALCAM levels significantly reduced the migration of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes across a monolayer of human BBB endothelial cells. This study suggests a potential role for ALCAM in HAM/TSP pathogenesis. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). This disease is the consequence of the infiltration of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes into the central nervous system (CNS), mostly the thoracic spinal cord. The CNS is normally protected by a physiological structure called the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists primarily of a continuous endothelium with tight junctions. The mechanism of migration of lymphocytes into the CNS is unclear

  3. Generation of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 chronically infected monkey B cell line expressing low levels of endogenous TRIM5alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Barbara; Catone, Stefania; Sgarbanti, Marco; Sernicola, Leonardo; Battistini, Angela; Parolin, Cristina; Titti, Fausto; Borsetti, Alessandra

    2009-12-01

    Several innate cellular antiviral factors exist in mammalian cells that prevent the replication of retroviruses. Among them, the tripartite motif protein (TRIM)5alpha has been shown to block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in several types of Old World monkey cells. Here we report a novel HIV-1 chronically infected monkey B cell line, F6/HIV-1, characterized by very low levels of TRIM5alpha expression that allows HIV-1 to overcome the restriction. Virus produced by F6/HIV-1 cells fails to infect monkey cells but retains the ability to infect human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and T cell lines, although with a reduced infectivity compared to the input virus. Ultrastructural analyses revealed the presence of budding virions at the F6/HIV-1 cells plasma membrane characterized by a typical conical core shell. To our knowledge F6/HIV-1 is the first monkey cell line chronically infected by HIV-1 and able to release infectious particles thus representing a useful tool to gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  4. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K.; Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F.

    1990-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV L , in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own

  5. Inhibitory function of adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit in the process of nuclear translocation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yukiko; Kameoka, Masanori; Shoji-Kawata, Sanae; Iwabu, Yukie; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Fujino, Masato; Natori, Yukikazu; Yura, Yoshiaki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The transfection of human cells with siRNA against adapter-related protein complex 2 alpha 1 subunit (AP2α) was revealed to significantly up-regulate the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This effect was confirmed by cell infection with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 as well as CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Viral adsorption, viral entry and reverse transcription processes were not affected by cell transfection with siRNA against AP2α. In contrast, viral nuclear translocation as well as the integration process was significantly up-regulated in cells transfected with siRNA against AP2α. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that a subpopulation of AP2α was not only localized in the cytoplasm but was also partly co-localized with lamin B, importin β and Nup153, implying that AP2α negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in the process of nuclear translocation of viral DNA in the cytoplasm or the perinuclear region. We propose that AP2α may be a novel target for disrupting HIV-1 replication in the early stage of the viral life cycle

  6. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion–induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo

  7. A human osteosarcoma cell line expressing herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase: studies with radiolabeled (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Kevin W.; Duan Weili; Knaus, Edward E.; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Wiebe, Leonard I.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: (E)-5-(2-Iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) is a pyrimidine nucleoside analogue that accumulates selectively in murine cells expressing herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK). The uptake of [ 125 I]IVFRU in human 143B osteosarcoma cells transduced with a retroviral vector bearing the HSV-1 TK gene (143B-LTK cells) is now reported. Methods: HSV-1 TK gene expression in 143B-LTK cells was confirmed by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. Cell and subcellular uptake of [ 125 I]IVFRU was determined in cell culture, and whole body biodistribution after intravenous injection of [ 125 I]IVFRU was determined using nude mice bearing implanted 143B or 143B-LTK tumors. Results: Although IVFRU was less toxic to the human cell line expressing HSV-1 TK (143B-LTK) than ganciclovir, both IVFRU and ganciclovir were not toxic to the cell line not expressing HSV-1 TK (143B). When cells were exposed to [ 125 I]IVFRU in vitro, only the 143B-LTK cells accumulated radioactivity. The acid-soluble fraction from 143B-LTK cell lysates contained 8-fold greater activity than the acid-insoluble fraction after an 8-h exposure to [ 125 I]IVFRU. Biodistribution of [ 125 I]IVFRU in nude mice bearing subcutaneous 143B and 143B-LTK tumors revealed widespread distribution of the nucleoside in vivo but with specific localization in 143B-LTK tumors. Conclusion: The underlying biochemical process of metabolic entrapment of IVFRU in human osteosarcoma cells expressing HSV-1 TK is responsible for selective localization in these cells. The differences in subcellular distribution into the nucleic acid fraction, and in cytotoxicity, reflect the importance of cell type and lineage as determinants of the performance of gene imaging radiopharmaceuticals

  8. A human osteosarcoma cell line expressing herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase: studies with radiolabeled (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Kevin W. [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2N8 (Canada); Duan Weili [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2N8 (Canada); Knaus, Edward E. [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2N8 (Canada); McEwan, Alexander J.B. [Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2N8 (Canada); Wiebe, Leonard I. [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2N8 (Canada)]. E-mail: leonard.wiebe@ualberta.ca

    2005-07-01

    Introduction: (E)-5-(2-Iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) is a pyrimidine nucleoside analogue that accumulates selectively in murine cells expressing herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK). The uptake of [{sup 125}I]IVFRU in human 143B osteosarcoma cells transduced with a retroviral vector bearing the HSV-1 TK gene (143B-LTK cells) is now reported. Methods: HSV-1 TK gene expression in 143B-LTK cells was confirmed by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. Cell and subcellular uptake of [{sup 125}I]IVFRU was determined in cell culture, and whole body biodistribution after intravenous injection of [{sup 125}I]IVFRU was determined using nude mice bearing implanted 143B or 143B-LTK tumors. Results: Although IVFRU was less toxic to the human cell line expressing HSV-1 TK (143B-LTK) than ganciclovir, both IVFRU and ganciclovir were not toxic to the cell line not expressing HSV-1 TK (143B). When cells were exposed to [{sup 125}I]IVFRU in vitro, only the 143B-LTK cells accumulated radioactivity. The acid-soluble fraction from 143B-LTK cell lysates contained 8-fold greater activity than the acid-insoluble fraction after an 8-h exposure to [{sup 125}I]IVFRU. Biodistribution of [{sup 125}I]IVFRU in nude mice bearing subcutaneous 143B and 143B-LTK tumors revealed widespread distribution of the nucleoside in vivo but with specific localization in 143B-LTK tumors. Conclusion: The underlying biochemical process of metabolic entrapment of IVFRU in human osteosarcoma cells expressing HSV-1 TK is responsible for selective localization in these cells. The differences in subcellular distribution into the nucleic acid fraction, and in cytotoxicity, reflect the importance of cell type and lineage as determinants of the performance of gene imaging radiopharmaceuticals.

  9. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and cell cycle progression: role of cyclin D-cdk and p110Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuveut, C; Low, K G; Maldarelli, F; Schmitt, I; Majone, F; Grassmann, R; Jeang, K T

    1998-06-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is etiologically linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia and various human neuropathies. The Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I has been implicated in cellular transformation. Like other oncoproteins, such as Myc, Jun, and Fos, Tax is a transcriptional activator. How it mechanistically dysregulates the cell cycle is unclear. Previously, it was suggested that Tax affects cell-phase transition by forming a direct protein-protein complex with p16(INK4a), thereby inactivating an inhibitor of G1-to-S-phase progression. Here we show that, in T cells deleted for p16(INK4a), Tax can compel an egress of cells from G0/G1 into S despite the absence of serum. We also show that in undifferentiated myocytes, expression of Tax represses cellular differentiation. In both settings, Tax expression was found to increase cyclin D-cdk activity and to enhance pRb phosphorylation. In T cells, a Tax-associated increase in steady-state E2F2 protein was also documented. In searching for a molecular explanation for these observations, we found that Tax forms a protein-protein complex with cyclin D3, whereas a point-mutated and transcriptionally inert Tax mutant failed to form such a complex. Interestingly, expression of wild-type Tax protein in cells was also correlated with the induction of a novel hyperphosphorylated cyclin D3 protein. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tax might directly influence cyclin D-cdk activity and function, perhaps by a route independent of cdk inhibitors such as p16(INK4a).

  10. Replication-dependent 65R→K reversion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase double mutant K65R + L74V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prem L.; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Lee, Kimberly; Skaggs, Sara; Di San Filippo, Christina Amat; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of the mechanisms of interaction among nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-selected mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) coding sequence is essential for the design of newer drugs and for enhancing our vision of the structure function relationship among amino acids of the polymerase domain of HIV-1. Although several nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors select RT mutations K65R and L74V, the combination of 65R + 74V is rare in clinics. A novel NRTI (-)-β-D-dioxolane-guanosine (DXG) is known to select in vitro either the 65R or 74V mutant virus (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44 (2000) 1783). These mutations were not selected together during repeated passaging of the HIV-1 in the presence of this drug. To analyze the impact of these RT mutations on viral replication, a double mutant containing K65R + L74V was created by site-directed mutagenesis in a pNL4-3 background. Replication kinetic assays revealed that the mutant K65R + L74V is unstable, and 65R→K reversion occurs during replication of virus in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells in the absence of selection pressure. Replication kinetic assays in MT-2 cells demonstrated that double mutant 65R + 74V is highly attenuated for replication and the initiation of reversion is related to the increase in RT activity. Additionally, the suppression of viral replication in the presence of DXG or under suboptimal human recombinant interleukin-2 leads to minimal or no 65R→K reversion. These observations provide evidence that 65R→K reversion in the double mutant 65R + 74V is dependent on a specific rate of viral replication in a pNL4-3 background. A similar phenomenon may occur in vivo, which may have implications for treatment management strategies

  11. Recombinant human hyaluronidase-enabled subcutaneous pediatric rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Coburn H; Etzwiler, Lisa S; Miller, Melissa K; Maher, George; Mace, Sharon; Hostetler, Mark A; Smith, Sharon R; Reinhardt, Neil; Hahn, Barry; Harb, George

    2009-11-01

    The Increased Flow Utilizing Subcutaneously-Enabled (INFUSE)-Pediatric Rehydration Study was designed to assess efficacy, safety, and clinical utility of recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20)-facilitated subcutaneous rehydration in children 2 months to 10 years of age. Patients with mild/moderate dehydration requiring parenteral treatment in US emergency departments were eligible for this phase IV, multicenter, single-arm study. They received subcutaneous injection of 1 mL rHuPH20 (150 U), followed by subcutaneous infusion of 20 mL/kg isotonic fluid over the first hour. Subcutaneous rehydration was continued as needed for up to 72 hours. Rehydration was deemed successful if it was attributed by the investigator primarily to subcutaneous fluid infusion and the child was discharged without requiring an alternative method of rehydration. Efficacy was evaluated in 51 patients (mean age: 1.9 years; mean weight: 11.2 kg). Initial subcutaneous catheter placement was achieved with 1 attempt for 46/51 (90.2%) of patients. Rehydration was successful for 43/51 (84.3%) of patients. Five patients (9.8%) were hospitalized but deemed to be rehydrated primarily through subcutaneous therapy, for a total of 48/51 (94.1%) of patients. No treatment-related systemic adverse events were reported, but 1 serious adverse event occurred (cellulitis at infusion site). Investigators found the procedure easy to perform for 96% of patients (49/51 patients), and 90% of parents (43/48 parents) were satisfied or very satisfied. rHuPH20-facilitated subcutaneous hydration seems to be safe and effective for young children with mild/moderate dehydration. Subcutaneous access is achieved easily, and the procedure is well accepted by clinicians and parents.

  12. Human Factors and Data Logging Processes With the Use of Advanced Technology for Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Systematic Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Marion; Martin, Clare; Franklin, Rachel; Duce, David; Harrison, Rachel

    2018-03-15

    People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) undertake self-management to prevent short and long-term complications. Advanced technology potentially supports such activities but requires consideration of psychological and behavioral constructs and usability issues. Economic factors and health care provider capacity influence access and uptake of advanced technology. Previous reviews have focused upon clinical outcomes or were descriptive or have synthesized studies on adults with those on children and young people where human factors are different. This review described and examined the relationship between human factors and adherence with technology for data logging processes in adults with T1D. A systematic literature search was undertaken by using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Quality appraisal was undertaken and data were abstracted and categorized into the themes that underpinned the human factor constructs that were examined. A total of 18 studies were included. A total of 6 constructs emerged from the data analysis: the relationship between adherence to data logging and measurable outcomes; satisfaction with the transition to advanced technology for self-management; use of advanced technology and time spent on diabetes-related activities; strategies to mediate the complexities of diabetes and the use of advanced technology; cognition in the wild; and meanings, views, and perspectives from the users of technology. Increased treatment satisfaction was found on transition from traditional to advanced technology use-insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM); the most significant factor was when blood glucose levels were consistently technology. The results suggested frustrations with CGM, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, calibration of devices, and alarms. Furthermore implications for "body image" and the way in which "significant others" impacted on the behavior and attitude of the

  13. The influence of diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2 on the thickness, shape, and equivalent refractive index of the human crystalline lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiemer, N.G.M.; Dubbelman, M.; Kostense, P.J.; Ringens, P.J.; Polak, B.C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of diabetes mellitus (DM) types 1 and 2 on the thickness, radius of curvature, equivalent refractive index, and power of the lens. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Participants and Controls: One hundred fourteen patients with DM type 1, 112 patients with

  14. Lower numbers of circulating natural killer T (NK T) cells in individuals with human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) associated neurological disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlovu, L C; Snyder-Cappione, J E; Carvalho, K I; Leal, F E; Loo, C P; bruno, F R; Jha, A R; Devita, D; Hasenkrug, A M; Barbosa, H M R; Segurado, A C; Nixon, D F; Murphy, E L; Kallas, E G

    2009-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects 10–20 million people worldwide. The majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic; however, approximately 3% develop the debilitating neurological disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). There is also currently no cure, vaccine or effective therapy for HTLV-1 infection, and the mechanisms for progression to HAM/TSP remain unclear. NK T cells are an immunoregulatory T cell subset whose frequencies and effector functions are associated critically with immunity against infectious diseases. We hypothesized that NK T cells are associated with HAM/TSP progression. We measured NK T cell frequencies and absolute numbers in individuals with HAM/TSP infection from two cohorts on two continents: São Paulo, Brazil and San Francisco, CA, USA, and found significantly lower levels when compared with healthy subjects and/or asymptomatic carriers. Also, the circulating NK T cell compartment in HAM/TSP subjects is comprised of significantly more CD4+ and fewer CD8+ cells than healthy controls. These findings suggest that lower numbers of circulating NK T cells and enrichment of the CD4+ NK T subset are associated with HTLV-1 disease progression. PMID:19778295

  15. PDZ domain-binding motif of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein augments the transforming activity in a rat fibroblast cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akira; Higuchi, Masaya; Niinuma, Akiko; Ohashi, Minako; Fukushi, Masaya; Oie, Masayasu; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Gejyo, Fumitake; Fujii, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    While human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-2 has not been reported to be associated with such malignant leukemias. HTLV-1 Tax1 oncoprotein transforms a rat fibroblast cell line (Rat-1) to form multiple large colonies in soft agar, and this activity is much greater than that of HTLV-2 Tax2. We have demonstrated here that the increased number of transformed colonies induced by Tax1 relative to Tax2 was mediated by a PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) in Tax1, which is absent in Tax2. Tax1 PBM mediated the interaction of Tax1 with the discs large (Dlg) tumor suppressor containing PDZ domains, and the interaction correlated well with the transforming activities of Tax1 and the mutants. Through this interaction, Tax1 altered the subcellular localization of Dlg from the detergent-soluble to the detergent-insoluble fraction in a fibroblast cell line as well as in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. These results suggest that the interaction of Tax1 with PDZ domain protein(s) is critically involved in the transforming activity of Tax1, the activity of which may be a crucial factor in malignant transformation of HTLV-1-infected cells in vivo

  16. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  17. Validation of Performance of the Gen-Probe Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Load Assay with Genital Swabs and Breast Milk Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVange Panteleeff, Dana; Emery, Sandra; Richardson, Barbra A.; Rousseau, Christine; Benki, Sarah; Bodrug, Sharon; Kreiss, Joan K.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) continues to spread at an alarming rate. The virus may be transmitted through blood, genital secretions, and breast milk, and higher levels of systemic virus in the index case, as measured by plasma RNA viral load, have been shown to correlate with increased risk of transmitting HIV-1 both vertically and sexually. Less is known about the correlation between transmission and HIV-1 levels in breast milk or genital secretions, in part because reliable quantitative assays to detect HIV-1 in these fluids are not available. Here we show that the Gen-Probe HIV-1 viral load assay can be used to accurately quantify viral load in expressed breast milk and in cervical and vaginal samples collected on swabs. Virus could be quantified from breast milk and swab samples spiked with known amounts of virus, including HIV-1 subtypes A, C, and D. As few as 10 copies of HIV-1 RNA could be detected above background threshold levels in ≥77% of assays performed with spiked breast milk supernatants and mock swabs. In genital swab samples from HIV-1-infected women, similar levels of HIV-1 RNA were consistently detected in duplicate swabs taken from the same woman on the same clinic visit, suggesting that the RNA values from a single swab sample can be used to measure genital viral load. PMID:12409354

  18. Molecular determinants of the V3 loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein gp120 responsible for controlling cell tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavda, S C; Griffin, P; Han-Liu, Z; Keys, B; Vekony, M A; Cann, A J

    1994-11-01

    We and others have identified the major determinant of cell tropism in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as the V3 loop of glycoprotein gp120. We have conducted a detailed study of two molecularly cloned isolates of HIV-1, HIVJR-CSF and HIVNL4-3, that differ in their tropism for immortalized CD4+ cell lines, by constructing a series of site-directed mutations within the V3 loop of HIVJR-CSF based on the sequence of HIVNL4-3. The phenotypes of these mutants fall into two classes, those which are viable and those which are not. A spontaneous mutant with significantly altered growth properties was also recovered and found to have an additional single amino acid change in the V3 loop sequence. The carboxy-terminal beta-strand part of the V3 loop is the major determinant of cell tropism. However, the results presented here indicate that the functional role of the V3 loop sequences can only be interpreted properly in the context of the original gp120 backbone from which they were derived. These findings show that over-simplistic interpretation of sequence data derived from unknown mixtures of HIV variants in infected persons may be highly misleading.

  19. Genotypic Characterization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Derived from Antiretroviral Drug-Treated Individuals Residing in Earthquake-Affected Areas in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Bharat Singh; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Joshi, Sunil Kumar; Bastola, Anup; Nakazawa, Minato; Kameoka, Masanori

    2017-09-01

    Molecular epidemiological data on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are limited in Nepal and have not been available in areas affected by the April 2015 earthquake. Therefore, we conducted a genotypic study on HIV-1 genes derived from individuals on antiretroviral therapy residing in 14 districts in Nepal highly affected by the earthquake. HIV-1 genomic fragments were amplified from 40 blood samples of HIV treatment-failure individuals, and a sequencing analysis was performed on these genes. In the 40 samples, 29 protease, 32 reverse transcriptase, 25 gag, and 21 env genes were sequenced. HIV-1 subtyping revealed that subtype C (84.2%, 32/38) was the major subtype prevalent in the region, while CRF01_AE (7.9%, 3/38) and other recombinant forms (7.9%, 3/38) were also detected. In addition, major drug resistance mutations were identified in 21.9% (7/32) of samples, indicating the possible emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance in earthquake-affected areas in Nepal.

  20. Global Dispersal Pattern of HIV Type 1 Subtype CRF01_AE: A Genetic Trace of Human Mobility Related to Heterosexual Sexual Activities Centralized in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01_AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01_AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. We assembled a global data set of 2736 CRF01_AE sequences by pooling sequences from public databases and patient-cohort studies. We estimated viral dispersal patterns, using statistical phylogeographic analysis run over bootstrap trees estimated by the maximum likelihood method. We show that Thailand has been the source of viral dispersal to most areas worldwide, including 17 of 20 sampled countries in Europe. Japan, Singapore, Vietnam, and other Asian countries have played a secondary role in the viral dissemination. In contrast, China and Taiwan have mainly imported strains from neighboring Asian countries, North America, and Africa without any significant viral exportation. The central role of Thailand in the global spread of CRF01_AE can be probably explained by the popularity of Thailand as a vacation destination characterized by sex tourism and by Thai emigration to the Western world. Our study highlights the unique case of CRF01_AE, the only globally distributed non-B clade whose global dispersal did not originate in Africa. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Late radiation effects of low doses from occupational exposure. Antibodies to cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in radiological technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Etsuko; Tanoue, Shozo (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Medical Science); Sawada, Shozo

    1989-05-01

    To elucidate the effects of long-term exposure to low dose irradiation, serostatus of antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was determined in 99 radiological technologists and 96 healthy volunteers. Abnormal seropositivity rate for CMV was significantly higher in technologists working for 15 years or more than in those working for less than 15 years. For the same age group, however, there was no significant difference between technologists and controls. Seropositivity rates for EBV-viral capsid antigen (VSA)/IgG and early antigen (EA)/IgG were significantly higher in technologists working for 15 years or more than in the age-matched control group. In the group of technologists exposed to 0.3 Sv or more, seropositivity rates of these antibodies were significantly higher than in those exposed to less than 0.3 Sv. However, there was no correlation between exposure doses and both EBV-associated nuclear antigen antibody and HTLV-1 antibody. Few technologists seronegative for CMV antibody had seropositive antibodies of EBV-VCA/IgG and EA/IgG. For technologists seropositive for CMV antibody, 31% and 54% were seropositive for EBV-VCA/IgG and EA/IgG antibodies, respectively. (Namekawa, K).

  2. Tax relieves transcriptional repression by promoting histone deacetylase 1 release from the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hanxin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Linton, Rebecca; Park, Hyeon Ung; Schiltz, R Louis; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Brady, John N

    2004-07-01

    Expression of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is regulated by the viral transcriptional activator Tax. Tax activates viral transcription through interaction with the cellular transcription factor CREB and the coactivators CBP/p300. In this study, we have analyzed the role of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) on HTLV-1 gene expression from an integrated template. First we show that trichostatin A, an HDAC inhibitor, enhances Tax expression in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Second, using a cell line containing a single-copy HTLV-1 long terminal repeat, we demonstrate that overexpression of HDAC1 represses Tax transactivation. Furthermore, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay allowed us to analyze the interaction of transcription factors, coactivators, and HDACs with the basal and activated HTLV-1 promoter. We demonstrate that HDAC1 is associated with the inactive, but not the Tax-transactivated, HTLV-1 promoter. In vitro and in vivo glutathione S-transferase-Tax pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that there is a direct physical association between Tax and HDAC1. Importantly, biotinylated chromatin pull-down assays demonstrated that Tax inhibits and/or dissociates the binding of HDAC1 to the HTLV-1 promoter. Our results provide evidence that Tax interacts directly with HDAC1 and regulates binding of the repressor to the HTLV-1 promoter.

  3. Molecular interactions involved in the transactivation of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 promoter mediated by Tax and CREB-2 (ATF-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachon, F; Thebault, S; Peleraux, A; Devaux, C; Mesnard, J M

    2000-05-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein activates viral transcription through three 21-bp repeats located in the U3 region of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat and called Tax-responsive elements (TxREs). Each TxRE contains nucleotide sequences corresponding to imperfect cyclic AMP response elements (CRE). In this study, we demonstrate that the bZIP transcriptional factor CREB-2 is able to bind in vitro to the TxREs and that CREB-2 binding to each of the 21-bp motifs is enhanced by Tax. We also demonstrate that Tax can weakly interact with CREB-2 bound to a cellular palindromic CRE motif such as that found in the somatostatin promoter. Mutagenesis of Tax and CREB-2 demonstrates that both N- and C-terminal domains of Tax and the C-terminal region of CREB-2 are required for direct interaction between the two proteins. In addition, the Tax mutant M47, defective for HTLV-1 activation, is unable to form in vitro a ternary complex with CREB-2 and TxRE. In agreement with recent results suggesting that Tax can recruit the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) on the HTLV-1 promoter, we provide evidence that Tax, CREB-2, and CBP are capable of cooperating to stimulate viral transcription. Taken together, our data highlight the major role played by CREB-2 in Tax-mediated transactivation.

  4. Live Cell Imaging and 3D Analysis of Angiotensin Receptor Type 1a Trafficking in Transfected Human Embryonic Kidney Cells Using Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Parnika; McAllister, Ryan; Urbach, Jeffrey S; Sandberg, Kathryn; Mueller, Susette C

    2017-03-27

    Live-cell imaging is used to simultaneously capture time-lapse images of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR) and intracellular compartments in transfected human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK) cells following stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II). HEK cells are transiently transfected with plasmid DNA containing AT1aR tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Lysosomes are identified with a red fluorescent dye. Live-cell images are captured on a laser scanning confocal microscope after Ang II stimulation and analyzed by software in three dimensions (3D, voxels) over time. Live-cell imaging enables investigations into receptor trafficking and avoids confounds associated with fixation, and in particular, the loss or artefactual displacement of EGFP-tagged membrane receptors. Thus, as individual cells are tracked through time, the subcellular localization of receptors can be imaged and measured. Images must be acquired sufficiently rapidly to capture rapid vesicle movement. Yet, at faster imaging speeds, the number of photons collected is reduced. Compromises must also be made in the selection of imaging parameters like voxel size in order to gain imaging speed. Significant applications of live-cell imaging are to study protein trafficking, migration, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and protein-protein interaction and dynamics, to name but a few.

  5. Cell-to-Cell Contact Results in a Selective Translocation of Maternal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Quasispecies across a Trophoblastic Barrier by both Transcytosis and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagaye, S.; Derrien, M.; Menu, E.; Coïto, C.; Tresoldi, E.; Mauclère, P.; Scarlatti, G.; Chaouat, G.; Barré-Sinoussi, F.; Bomsel, M.

    2001-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission can occur in utero, mainly intrapartum and postpartum in case of breastfeeding. In utero transmission is highly restricted and results in selection of viral variant from the mother to the child. We have developed an in vitro system that mimics the interaction between viruses, infected cells present in maternal blood, and the trophoblast, the first barrier protecting the fetus. Trophoblastic BeWo cells were grown as a tight polarized monolayer in a two-chamber system. Cell-free virions applied to the apical pole neither crossed the barrier nor productively infected BeWo cells. In contrast, apical contact with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) resulted in transcytosis of infectious virus across the trophoblastic monolayer and in productive infection correlating with the fusion of HIV-infected PBMCs with trophoblasts. We showed that viral variants are selected during these two steps and that in one case of in utero transmission, the predominant maternal viral variant characterized after transcytosis was phylogenetically indistinguishable from the predominant child's virus. Hence, the first steps of transmission of HIV-1 in utero appear to involve the interaction between HIV type 1-infected cells and the trophoblastic layer, resulting in the passage of infectious HIV by transcytosis and by fusion/infection, both leading to a selection of virus quasispecies. PMID:11312350

  6. Comparison of variable region 3 sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from infected children with the RNA and DNA sequences of the virus populations of their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Leitner, T; Halapi, E; Wahlberg, J; Marchisio, P; Clerici-Schoeller, M A; Wigzell, H; Fenyö, E M; Albert, J; Uhlén, M

    1993-01-01

    We have compared the variable region 3 sequences from 10 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected infants to virus sequences from the corresponding mothers. The sequences were derived from DNA of uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), DNA of cultured PBMC, and RNA from serum collected at or shortly after delivery. The infected infants, in contrast to the mothers, harbored homogeneous virus populations. Comparison of sequences from the children and clones derived from DNA of the corresponding mothers showed that the transmitted virus represented either a minor or a major virus population of the mother. In contrast to an earlier study, we found no evidence of selection of minor virus variants during transmission. Furthermore, the transmitted virus variant did not show any characteristic molecular features. In some cases the transmitted virus was more related to the virus RNA population of the mother and in other cases it was more related to the virus DNA population. This suggests that either cell-free or cell-associated virus may be transmitted. These data will help AIDS researchers to understand the mechanism of transmission and to plan strategies for prevention of transmission. PMID:8446584

  7. Lack of viral selection in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mother-to-child transmission with primary infection during late pregnancy and/or breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Ana; Andreani, Guadalupe; Ripamonti, Chiara; Dilernia, Dario; Mendez, Ramiro; Rabinovich, Roberto D; Cárdenas, Patricia Coll; Zala, Carlos; Cahn, Pedro; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Martínez Peralta, Liliana

    2008-11-01

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as described for women with an established infection is, in most cases, associated with the transmission of few maternal variants. This study analysed virus variability in four cases of maternal primary infection occurring during pregnancy and/or breastfeeding. Estimated time of seroconversion was at 4 months of pregnancy for one woman (early seroconversion) and during the last months of pregnancy and/or breastfeeding for the remaining three (late seroconversion). The C2V3 envelope region was analysed in samples of mother-child pairs by molecular cloning and sequencing. Comparisons of nucleotide and amino acid sequences as well as phylogenetic analysis were performed. The results showed low variability in the virus population of both mother and child. Maximum-likelihood analysis showed that, in the early pregnancy seroconversion case, a minor viral variant with further evolution in the child was transmitted, which could indicate a selection event in MTCT or a stochastic event, whereas in the late seroconversion cases, the mother's and child's sequences were intermingled, which is compatible with the transmission of multiple viral variants from the mother's major population. These results could be explained by the less pronounced selective pressure exerted by the immune system in the early stages of the mother's infection, which could play a role in MTCT of HIV-1.

  8. Comparison of seropositivity of human T lymphotropic virus type 1 in mycosis fungoides patients and normal volunteers: A case-control study and review of literature

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    Seirafi Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been controversial reports about the possible association between mycosis fungoides (MF, its leukemic variant Sιzary syndrome (SS and human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 in different geographical regions. Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore any association between MF and presence of HTLV-1 infection in Iran. Methods: In a case-control setting, 150 clinically and histopathologically proven MF patients had been admitted to the tertiary referral skin center during a 10-year period and another 150 normal volunteers had been compared with each other for the presence of HTLV-1 infection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect antibodies against HTLV-1, and positive results were confirmed with western blotting. Results: Only three MF patients had HTLV-1 infection, whereas two cases of normal subjects had the infection ( P > 0.05. The only three seropositive MF patients were male and from North-Eastern Iran . Conclusion: This study showed that MF does not correlate with HTLV-1 infection in Iran.

  9. The impact of envelope glycoprotein cleavage on the antigenicity, infectivity, and neutralization sensitivity of Env-pseudotyped human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Carolina; Klasse, Per Johan; Michael, Elizabeth; Kake, Shivani; Barnes, Kelly; Kibler, Christopher W.; Campbell-Gardener, Lila; Si, Zhihai; Sodroski, Joseph; Moore, John P.; Beddows, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Endoproteolytic processing of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoproteins is an obligate part of the biosynthetic pathway that generates functional, fusion-competent Env complexes, which are then incorporated into infectious virions. We have examined the influence of cleavage on Env-specific antibody reactivity, Env incorporation into pseudovirions, and the infectivity and neutralization sensitivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses. To do so, we have used both incompletely processed wild-type (Wt) Env and engineered, cleavage-defective Env mutants. We find that there is no simple association between antibody reactivity to cell surface-expressed Env, and the ability of the same antibody to neutralize virus pseudotyped with the same Env proteins. One explanation for the absence of such an association is the diverse array of Env species present on the surface of transiently transfected cells. We also confirm that cleavage-defective mutants are antigenically different from Wt Env. These findings have implications for the use of Env binding assays as predictors of neutralizing activity, and for the development of cleavage-defective Env trimers for use as subunit immunogens

  10. Balance, functional mobility, and fall occurrence in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Erika Pedreira da; Sá, Katia Nunes; Nunes, Rebeca Freitas Reis; Ribeiro Junior, Antônio Carlos; Lira, Síntia Freitas Bastos; Pinto, Elen Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) may lead to reduced functional mobility and balance. It is important to establish specific parameters that identify these changes and predict the risk of falls in these patients. The aim was to compare balance, functional mobility, and occurrence of falls among patients with and without HAM/TSP and to suggest values to predict the risk of falls in these patients. A cross-sectional study in patients with and without HAM/TSP involved balance assessments based on the berg balance scale (BBS) and functional mobility evaluation based on the timed up and go (TUG) test. From reports of falls, the sensitivity, specificity, and best cutoff points for the risk of falls assessed by these instruments were established using the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve; 5% alpha was considered. We selected 42 participants: 29 with HAM/TSP and 13 without HAM/TSP. There was a statistically significant difference in the occurrence of falls, balance, and functional mobility between the groups (prisk of falls were defined as 50 points for the BBS and 12.28 seconds for the TUG test. Patients with HAM/TSP present reduced functional mobility and balance in relation to those without HAM/TSP. The risk of falls increased for these patients can be evaluated by the values ​​of 50 points using the BBS and 12.28 seconds using the TUG test.

  11. Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metal loproteinase Is Regulated by Sp1 through the Differential Activation of AKT, JNK, and ERK Pathways in Human Prostate Tumor Cells

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    Isis C. Sroka

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We and other investigators have previously shown that membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP is overexpressed in invasive prostate cancer cells. However, the mechanism for this expression is not known. Here, we show that MT1-MMP is minimally expressed in nonmalignant primary prostate cells, moderately expressed in DU-145 cells, and highly expressed in invasive PC-3 and PC-3N cells. Using human MT1-MMP promoter reporter plasmids and mobility shift assays, we show that Spi regulates MT1-MMP expression in DU-145, PC-3, and PC-3N cells and in PC3-N cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and silencing RNA. Investigation of signaling pathway showed that DU-145 cells express constitutively phosphorylated extracellular stress-regulated kinase (ERK, whereas PC-3 and PC-3N cells express constitutively phosphorylated AKT/PKB and c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK. We show that MT1-MMP and Spi levels are decreased in PC-3 and PC-3N cells when phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and JNK are inhibited, and that MT1-MMP levels are decreased in DU-145 cells when MEK is inhibited. Transient transfection of PC-3 and PC-3N cells with a dominant-negative JNK or p85, and of DU-145 cells with a dominant negative ERK, reduces MT1-MMP promoter activity. These results indicate differential signaling control of Spi-mediated transcriptional regulation of MT1-MMP in prostate cancer cell lines.

  12. Establishment of new transmissible and drug-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 wild types due to transmission of nucleoside analogue-resistant virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, A; van Dooren, M; van Der Hoek, L; Bouwhuis, D; de Rooij, E; van Gemen, B; de Boer, R; Goudsmit, J

    2001-01-01

    Sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from 74 persons with acute infections identified eight strains with mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene at positions 41, 67, 68, 70, 215, and 219 associated with resistance to the nucleoside analogue zidovudine (AZT). Follow-up of the fate of these resistant HIV-1 strains in four newly infected individuals revealed that they were readily replaced by sensitive strains. The RT of the resistant viruses changed at amino acid 215 from tyrosine (Y) to aspartic acid (D) or serine (S), with asparagine (N) as a transient intermediate, indicating the establishment of new wild types. When we introduced these mutations and the original threonine (T)-containing wild type into infectious molecular clones and assessed their competitive advantage in vitro, the order of fitness was in accord with the in vivo observations: 215Y types with D, S, or N residues at position 215 may be warranted in order to estimate the threat to long-term efficacy of regimens including nucleoside analogues.

  13. Safety and immunogenicity of an intranasal Sendai virus-based human parainfluenza virus type 1 vaccine in 3- to 6-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adderson, Elisabeth; Branum, Kristen; Sealy, Robert E; Jones, Bart G; Surman, Sherri L; Penkert, Rhiannon; Freiden, Pamela; Slobod, Karen S; Gaur, Aditya H; Hayden, Randall T; Allison, Kim; Howlett, Nanna; Utech, Jill; Allay, Jim; Knight, James; Sleep, Susan; Meagher, Michael M; Russell, Charles J; Portner, Allen; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2015-03-01

    Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV-1) is the most common cause of laryngotracheobronchitis (croup), resulting in tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year in the United States alone. No licensed vaccine is yet available. We have developed murine PIV-1 (Sendai virus [SeV]) as a live Jennerian vaccine for hPIV-1. Here, we describe vaccine testing in healthy 3- to 6-year-old hPIV-1-seropositive children in a dose escalation study. One dose of the vaccine (5 × 10(5), 5 × 10(6), or 5 × 10(7) 50% egg infectious doses) was delivered by the intranasal route to each study participant. The vaccine was well tolerated by all the study participants. There was no sign of vaccine virus replication in the airway in any participant. Most children exhibited an increase in antibody binding and neutralizing responses toward hPIV-1 within 4 weeks from the time of vaccination. In several children, antibody responses remained above incoming levels for at least 6 months after vaccination. Data suggest that SeV may provide a benefit to 3- to 6-year-old children, even when vaccine recipients have preexisting cross-reactive antibodies due to previous exposures to hPIV-1. Results encourage the testing of SeV administration in young seronegative children to protect against the serious respiratory tract diseases caused by hPIV-1 infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Susceptibility Testing by Polymerase Chain Reaction DNA Quantitation: A Method to Measure Drug Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J.; Gorczyca, Paul; Kaplan, Joan C.; D'Aquila, Richard T.

    1992-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA quantitation (PDQ) susceptibility testing rapidly and directly measures nucleoside sensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. PCR is used to quantitate the amount of HIV-1 DNA synthesized after in vitro infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA in cell lysates from cultures maintained at different drug concentrations reflect drug inhibition of virus replication. The results of PDQ susceptibility testing of 2- or 3-day cultures are supported by assays measuring HIV-1 p24 antigen production in supernatants of 7- or 10-day cultures. DNA sequence analyses to identify mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene that cause resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine also support the PDQ results. With the PDQ method, both infectivity titration and susceptibility testing can be performed on supernatants from primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PDQ susceptibility testing should facilitate epidemiologic studies of the clinical significance of drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates.

  15. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

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    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  16. Inferences about the global scenario of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection using data mining of viral sequences

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    Thessika Hialla Almeida Araujo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is mainly associated with two diseases: tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM and adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma. This retrovirus infects five-10 million individuals throughout the world. Previously, we developed a database that annotates sequence data from GenBank and the present study aimed to describe the clinical, molecular and epidemiological scenarios of HTLV-1 infection through the stored sequences in this database. A total of 2,545 registered complete and partial sequences of HTLV-1 were collected and 1,967 (77.3% of those sequences represented unique isolates. Among these isolates, 93% contained geographic origin information and only 39% were related to any clinical status. A total of 1,091 sequences contained information about the geographic origin and viral subtype and 93% of these sequences were identified as subtype “a”. Ethnicity data are very scarce. Regarding clinical status data, 29% of the sequences were generated from TSP/HAM and 67.8% from healthy carrier individuals. Although the data mining enabled some inferences about specific aspects of HTLV-1 infection to be made, due to the relative scarcity of data of available sequences, it was not possible to delineate a global scenario of HTLV-1 infection.

  17. Hyaluronan and Hyaluronan-Binding Proteins Accumulate in Both Human Type 1 Diabetic Islets and Lymphoid Tissues and Associate With Inflammatory Cells in Insulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdani, Marika; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Nagy, Nadine; Day, Anthony J.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan that is present in pancreatic islets, but little is known about its involvement in the development of human type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have evaluated whether pancreatic islets and lymphoid tissues of T1D and nondiabetic organ donors differ in the amount and distribution of HA and HA-binding proteins (hyaladherins), such as inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), versican, and tumor necrosis factor–stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6). HA was dramatically increased both within the islet and outside the islet endocrine cells, juxtaposed to islet microvessels in T1D. In addition, HA was prominent surrounding immune cells in areas of insulitis. IαI and versican were present in HA-rich areas of islets, and both molecules accumulated in diabetic islets and regions exhibiting insulitis. TSG-6 was observed within the islet endocrine cells and in inflammatory infiltrates. These patterns were only observed in tissues from younger donors with disease duration of <10 years. Furthermore, HA and IαI amassed in follicular germinal centers and in T-cell areas in lymph nodes and spleens in T1D patients compared with control subjects. Our observations highlight potential roles for HA and hyaladherins in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24677718

  18. ORIGIN AND PREVALENCE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS TYPE 1 (HTLV-1 AND TYPE 2 (HTLV-2 AMONG INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN THE AMERICAS

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    Arthur Paiva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is found in indigenous peoples of the Pacific Islands and the Americas, whereas type 2 (HTLV-2 is widely distributed among the indigenous peoples of the Americas, where it appears to be more prevalent than HTLV-1, and in some tribes of Central Africa. HTLV-2 is considered ancestral in the Americas and is transmitted to the general population and injection drug users from the indigenous population. In the Americas, HTLV-1 has more than one origin, being brought by immigrants in the Paleolithic period through the Bering Strait, through slave trade during the colonial period, and through Japanese immigration from the early 20th century, whereas HTLV-2 was only brought by immigrants through the Bering Strait. The endemicity of HTLV-2 among the indigenous people of Brazil makes the Brazilian Amazon the largest endemic area in the world for its occurrence. A review of HTLV-1 in all Brazilian tribes supports the African origin of HTLV-1 in Brazil. The risk of hyperendemicity in these epidemiologically closed populations and transmission to other populations reinforces the importance of public health interventions for HTLV control, including the recognition of the infection among reportable diseases and events.

  19. Use of anti-tumor necrosis factor biologics in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis does not change human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 markers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umekita, Kunihiko; Umeki, Kazumi; Miyauchi, Shunichi; Ueno, Shiro; Kubo, Kazuyoshi; Kusumoto, Norio; Takajo, Ichiro; Nagatomo, Yasuhiro; Okayama, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologics are effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, it is still not clear whether this treatment promotes the development of malignancies such as lymphoma. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which is a causative agent of adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL), is prevalent in Japan. Many HTLV-1-positive patients with RA are assumed to exist; however, there have thus far been no reports on the effect of anti-TNF biologics on HTLV-1-positive patients. We analyzed the response to treatment with anti-TNF biologics and change of HTLV-1 markers in two cases of RA. The two cases showed no response based on the European League Against of Rheumatism response criteria 60-96 weeks after administration of anti-TNF biologics (infliximab and etanercept). No signs of ATL were observed and HTLV-1 markers, such as proviral load and clonality of HTLV-1-infected cells, showed no significant change in either of two cases. Therefore, treatment with anti-TNF biologics did not induce activation of HTLV-1, although the effect on RA was not as effective as in HTLV-1-negative patients in this limited study. Further long-term study with a greater number of patients is necessary to clarify the safety and efficacy of anti-TNF biologics in HTLV-1-positive patients with RA.

  20. Uncovering the Role of Hypermethylation by CTG Expansion in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Using Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Avitzour, Michal; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Schonberger, Oshrat; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Stella; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Birnbaum, Ramon Y.; Gepstein, Lior; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Summary CTG repeat expansion in DMPK, the cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), frequently results in hypermethylation and reduced SIX5 expression. The contribution of hypermethylation to disease pathogenesis and the precise mechanism by which SIX5 expression is reduced are unknown. Using 14 different DM1-affected human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, we characterized a differentially methylated region (DMR) near the CTGs. This DMR undergoes hypermethylation as a function of expansion size in a way that is specific to undifferentiated cells and is associated with reduced SIX5 expression. Using functional assays, we provide evidence for regulatory activity of the DMR, which is lost by hypermethylation and may contribute to DM1 pathogenesis by causing SIX5 haplo-insufficiency. This study highlights the power of hESCs in disease modeling and describes a DMR that functions both as an exon coding sequence and as a regulatory element whose activity is epigenetically hampered by a heritable mutation. PMID:26190529

  1. Uncovering the Role of Hypermethylation by CTG Expansion in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Using Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Yanovsky-Dagan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available CTG repeat expansion in DMPK, the cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, frequently results in hypermethylation and reduced SIX5 expression. The contribution of hypermethylation to disease pathogenesis and the precise mechanism by which SIX5 expression is reduced are unknown. Using 14 different DM1-affected human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines, we characterized a differentially methylated region (DMR near the CTGs. This DMR undergoes hypermethylation as a function of expansion size in a way that is specific to undifferentiated cells and is associated with reduced SIX5 expression. Using functional assays, we provide evidence for regulatory activity of the DMR, which is lost by hypermethylation and may contribute to DM1 pathogenesis by causing SIX5 haplo-insufficiency. This study highlights the power of hESCs in disease modeling and describes a DMR that functions both as an exon coding sequence and as a regulatory element whose activity is epigenetically hampered by a heritable mutation.

  2. A Styrene-alt-Maleic Acid Copolymer Is an Effective Inhibitor of R5 and X4 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection

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    Vanessa Pirrone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternating copolymer of styrene and maleic acid (alt-PSMA differs from other polyanionic antiviral agents in that the negative charges of alt-PSMA are provided by carboxylic acid groups instead of sulfate or sulfonate moieties. We hypothesized that alt-PSMA would have activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 comparable to other polyanions, such as the related compound, poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate (PSS. In assays using cell lines and primary immune cells, alt-PSMA was characterized by low cytotoxicity and effective inhibition of infection by HIV-1 BaL and IIIB as well as clinical isolates of subtypes A, B, and C. In mechanism of action assays, in which each compound was added to cells and subsequently removed prior to HIV-1 infection (“washout” assay, alt-PSMA caused no enhancement of infection, while PSS washout increased infection 70% above control levels. These studies demonstrate that alt-PSMA is an effective HIV-1 inhibitor with properties that warrant further investigation.

  3. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 enhances transcriptional activity of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 long terminal repeat through direct interaction with Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lu, Hanxin; Cho, Won-Kyung; Park, Hyeon Ung; Pise-Masison, Cynthia; Brady, John N

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), which methylates histone H3 and other proteins such as p300/CBP, is positively involved in the regulation of Tax transactivation. First, transfection studies demonstrated that overexpression of CARM1 wild-type protein resulted in increased Tax transactivation of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR). In contrast, transfection of a catalytically inactive CARM1 methyltransferase mutant did not enhance Tax transactivation. CARM1 facilitated Tax transactivation of the CREB-dependent cellular GEM promoter. A direct physical interaction between HTLV-1 Tax and CARM1 was demonstrated using in vitro glutathione S-transferase-Tax binding assays, in vivo coimmunoprecipitation, and confocal microscopy experiments. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the activated HTLV-1 LTR promoter showed the association of CARM1 and methylated histone H3 with the template DNA. In vitro, Tax facilitates the binding of CARM1 to the transcription complex. Together, our data provide evidence that CARM1 enhances Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR through a direct interaction between CARM1 and Tax and this binding promotes methylation of histone H3 (R2, R17, and R26).

  4. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  5. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  6. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  7. Interleukin-9 receptor α chain mRNA formation in CD8+ T cells producing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 substance(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.M.; Tsuchie, H.; Detorio, M.A.; Shirono, H.; Hara, C.; Nishimoto, A.; Saji, A.; Koga, J.; Takata, N.; Maniar, J.K.; Saple, D.G.; Taniguchi, K.; Kageyama, S.; Ichimura, H.; Kurimura, T.

    1998-01-01

    A search for gene(s) associated with anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-l) activity of CD8 + T cells was attempted using molecular cloning and the relation between the anti-HIV activity of CD8 + T cells and the interleukin-9 receptor a chain (IL-9R-α) mRNA expression from the cDNA clones obtained was examined. The anti-HIV-l activity of CD8 + T cell culture supernatants was assessed by measuring the level of HIV-l replication in a CD4 + T cell line transfected with an infectious HIV-l DNA clone. IL-9R-a mRNA was assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 5 cases showing high level of anti-HIV-l activity (more than 80% suppression of HIV-l replication), the mRNA was detected in 4 cases. Of 10 cases showing low level of anti-HIV-l activity (less than 80% suppression of HIV-l replication), the mRNA was detected in one case. Soluble recombinant human IL-9 receptor (rhIL-9sR) did not suppress HIV-l replication at a concentration of 1 μg/ml. These data suggest that the IL-9R-a mRNA formation in CD8 + T cells may correlate with and play some role in the anti-HIV-l activity of CD8+ T cells from HIV-l-infected individuals. Key words: CD8+ T cells; anti-HIV-l activity; cytokines; interleukin-9 receptor (authors)

  8. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feuer Gerold

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV1- associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Zemorshidi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis is a chronic progressive neurologic disease which might be associated by brain and spinal cord atrophy and lesions. Here we systematically reviewed the brain and spinal cord abnormalities reported by using magnetic resonance imaging modality on HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients. Methods: PubMed was searched for all the relevant articles which used magnetic resonance imaging for patients with human HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis disease. Included criteria were all the cohort and case series on with at least 10 patients. We had no time limitation for searched articles, but only English language articles were included in our systematic review. Exclusion criteria were none-English articles, case reports, articles with less than 10 patients, spastic paraparesis patients with unknown etiology, and patients with HTLVII. Results: Total of 14 relevant articles were extracted after studying title, abstracts, and full text of the irrelevant articles. Only 2/14 articles, reported brain atrophy incidence. 5/14 articles studied the brain lesions prevalence. Spinal cord atrophy and lesions, each were studied in 6/14 articles.Discussion: According to the extracted data, brain atrophy does not seem to happen frequently in patients with HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. None-specific brain lesions identified in articles are indicative of low specificity of magnetic resonance imaging technique despite its high sensitivity. Conclusion: Prevalence of spinal cord lesions and atrophy in these patients might be due to the degenerative processes associated with aging phenomenon. Further larger studies in endemic areas can more accurately reveal the specificity of magnetic resonance imaging for these patients.

  10. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-infected T lymphocytes impair catabolism and uptake of glutamate by astrocytes via Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymocha, R; Akaoka, H; Dutuit, M; Malcus, C; Didier-Bazes, M; Belin, M F; Giraudon, P

    2000-07-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a chronic progressive myelopathy called tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). In this disease, lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with perivascular infiltration by lymphocytes. We and others have hypothesized that these T lymphocytes infiltrating the CNS may play a prominent role in TSP/HAM. Here, we show that transient contact of human or rat astrocytes with T lymphocytes chronically infected by HTLV-1 impairs some of the major functions of brain astrocytes. Uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes was significantly decreased after transient contact with infected T cells, while the expression of the glial transporters GLAST and GLT-1 was decreased. In two-compartment cultures avoiding direct cell-to-cell contact, similar results were obtained, suggesting possible involvement of soluble factors, such as cytokines and the viral protein Tax-1. Recombinant Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) decreased glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Tax-1 probably acts by inducing TNF-alpha, as the effect of Tax-1 was abolished by anti-TNF-alpha antibody. The expression of glutamate-catabolizing enzymes in astrocytes was increased for glutamine synthetase and decreased for glutamate dehydrogenase, the magnitudes of these effects being correlated with the level of Tax-1 transcripts. In conclusion, Tax-1 and cytokines produced by HTLV-1-infected T cells impair the ability of astrocytes to manage the steady-state level of glutamate, which in turn may affect neuronal and oligodendrocytic functions and survival.

  11. Distinct p300-responsive mechanisms promote caspase-dependent apoptosis by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicot, C; Harrod, R

    2000-11-01

    The dysregulation of cellular apoptosis pathways has emerged as a critical early event associated with the development of many types of human cancers. Numerous viral and cellular oncogenes, aside from their inherent transforming properties, are known to induce programmed cell death, consistent with the hypothesis that genetic defects are required to support tumor survival. Here, we report that nuclear expression of the CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300-binding domain of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transactivator, Tax, triggers an apoptotic death-inducing signal during short-term clonal analyses, as well as in transient cell death assays. Coexpression of the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 increased serum stimulation; incubation with the chemical caspase inhibitor z-Val-Ala-DL-Asp fluoromethylketone antagonized Tax-induced cell death. The CBP/p300-binding defective Tax mutants K88A and V89A exhibited markedly reduced cytotoxic effects compared to the wild-type Tax protein. Importantly, nuclear expression of the minimal CBP/p300-binding peptide of Tax induced apoptosis in the absence of Tax-dependent transcriptional activities, while its K88A counterpart did not cause cell death. Further, Tax-mediated apoptosis was effectively prevented by ectopic expression of the p300 coactivator. We also report that activation of the NF-kappaB transcription pathway by Tax, under growth arrest conditions, results in apoptosis that occurs independent of direct Tax coactivator effects. Our results allude to a novel pivotal role for the transcriptional coactivator p300 in determining cell fate and raise the possibility that dysregulated coactivator usage may pose an early barrier to transformation that must be selectively overcome as a prerequisite for the initiation of neoplasia.

  12. Supernatants from oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts modulate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 promoter activation induced by periodontopathogens in monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, O A; Ebersole, J L; Huang, C B

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial and host cell products during coinfections of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1-positive (HIV-1(+)) patients regulate HIV-1 recrudescence in latently infected cells (e.g. T cells, monocytes/macrophages), impacting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure and progression of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A high frequency of oral opportunistic infections (e.g. periodontitis) in HIV-1(+) patients has been demonstrated; however, their potential to impact HIV-1 exacerbation is unclear. We sought to determine the ability of supernatants derived from oral epithelial cells (OKF4) and human gingival fibroblasts (Gin-4) challenged with periodontal pathogens, to modulate the HIV-1 promoter activation in monocytes/macrophages. BF24 monocytes/macrophages transfected with the HIV-1 promoter driving the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, or Treponema denticola in the presence of supernatants from OKF4 or Gin4 cells either unstimulated or previously pulsed with bacteria. CAT levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cytokine production was evaluated by Luminex beadlyte assays. OKF4 and Gin4 supernatants enhanced HIV-1 promoter activation particularly related to F. nucleatum challenge. An additive effect was observed in HIV-1 promoter activation when monocytes/macrophages were simultaneously stimulated with gingival cell supernatants and bacterial extracts. OKF4 cells produced higher levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukins -6 and -8 in response to F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis. Preincubation of OKF4 supernatants with anti-GM-CSF reduced the additive effect in periodontopathogen-induced HIV-1 promoter activation. These results suggest that soluble mediators produced by gingival resident cells in response to periodontopathogens could contribute to HIV-1 promoter activation in monocytes

  13. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. (Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia))

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  14. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea

  15. Inhibition of microtubules and dynein rescues human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from owl monkey TRIMCyp-mediated restriction in a cellular context-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlica, Paulina; Dufour, Caroline; Berthoux, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    IFN-induced restriction factors can significantly affect the replicative capacity of retroviruses in mammals. TRIM5α (tripartite motif protein 5, isoform α) is a restriction factor that acts at early stages of the virus life cycle by intercepting and destabilizing incoming retroviral cores. Sensitivity to TRIM5α maps to the N-terminal domain of the retroviral capsid proteins. In several New World and Old World monkey species, independent events of retrotransposon-mediated insertion of the cyclophilin A (CypA)-coding sequence in the trim5 gene have given rise to TRIMCyp (also called TRIM5-CypA), a hybrid protein that is active against some lentiviruses in a species-specific fashion. In particular, TRIMCyp from the owl monkey (omkTRIMCyp) very efficiently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Previously, we showed that disrupting the integrity of microtubules (MTs) and of cytoplasmic dynein complexes partially rescued replication of retroviruses, including HIV-1, from restriction mediated by TRIM5α. Here, we showed that efficient restriction of HIV-1 by omkTRIMCyp was similarly dependent on the MT network and on dynein complexes, but in a context-dependent fashion. When omkTRIMCyp was expressed in human HeLa cells, restriction was partially counteracted by pharmacological agents targeting MTs or by small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of dynein. The same drugs (nocodazole and paclitaxel) also rescued HIV-1 from restriction in cat CRFK cells, although to a lesser extent. Strikingly, neither nocodazole, paclitaxel nor depletion of the dynein heavy chain had a significant effect on the restriction of HIV-1 in an owl monkey cell line. These results suggested the existence of cell-specific functional interactions between MTs/dynein and TRIMCyp. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Genotyping of TRIM5 locus in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina, a primate species susceptible to Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xue-Long

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pig-tailed macaques are the only Old World monkeys known to be susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection. We have previously reported that the TRIM5-Cyclophilin A (TRIMCyp fusion in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina is dysfunctional in restricting HIV-1, which may explain why pig-tailed macaques are susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Similar results have also been reported by other groups. However, according to the current primate taxonomy, the previously reported M. nemestrina are further classified into three species, which all belong to the Macaca spp. This calls for the need to look into the previous studies in more details. Results The local species Northern pig-tailed macaque (M. leonina was analyzed for the correlation of TRIM5 structure and HIV-1 infection. Eleven M. leonina animals were analyzed, and all of them were found to possess TRIM5-CypA fusion at the TRIM5 locus. The transcripts encoding the dysfunctional TRIM5-CypA should result from the G-to-T mutation in the 3'-splicing site of intron 6. Polymorphism in the putative TRIMCyp recognition domain was observed. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of M. leonina were susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Consistent with the previous results, expression of the M. leonina TRIMCyp in HeLa-T4 cells rendered the cells resistant to HIV-2ROD but not to SIVmac239 infection. Conclusion The susceptibility of M. leonina to HIV-1 infection is due to the dysfunctional TRIM5-CypA fusion in the TRIM5 locus. This finding should broaden our perspective in developing better HIV/AIDS non-human primate animal models.

  17. High human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroprevalence in men who have sex with men in Buenos Aires, Argentina: risk factors for infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando, Maria de los Angeles; Maulen, Sergio; Weissenbacher, Mercedes; Marone, Rubén; Duranti, Ricardo; Peralta, Liliana Martínez; Salomón, Horacio; Russell, Kevin; Negrete, Monica; Sosa Estani, Sergio; Montano, Silvia; Sanchez, José L; Avila, Maria Mercedes

    2003-10-01

    To determine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence in a sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Buenos Aires City and to identify risk factors associated with HIV type 1 infection. Participants were invited to receive HIV counselling and testing at "NEXO" (a gay non-governmental organization) by means of informative leaflets distributed in gay nightclubs, porno cinemas, gymnasiums, and in the streets. During the encounter, the study was explained by a trained social worker and individuals were invited to volunteer for the study. Diagnosis of HIV was performed using two screening tests and Western Blot assay was used as confirmatory. Human immunodeficiency virus was detected in 96 (13.8%; 95% CI: 11.4-16.7) of 694 MSM. Fourteen (14.6%) of the 96 HIV-positive MSM were already aware of their HIV serostatus. In univariate analysis, HIV-1 infection (odds ratio [OR] >1.5) was found to be associated with older age (30-39 years), being unemployed, a previous sexually transmitted disease (STD) history, and having an HIV-positive partner. Cocaine consumption and irregular use of condoms with occasional partners were also found to be risk factors. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, being unemployed (OR = 3.42; 95% CI: 1.17-9.99) and having an HIV-positive partner (OR = 2.67; 95% CI: 1.09-6.52) remained significant risk factors. The high HIV-1 prevalence observed suggests an urgent need for implementation of effective prevention campaigns. This represents the first cross-sectional epidemiological study of HIV among the high-risk group of MSM in Argentina.

  18. Nonadherence with pediatric human immunodeficiency virus therapy as medical neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gretchen M; Wheeler, J Gary; Tucker, Nancy C; Hackler, Chris; Young, Karen; Maples, Holly D; Darville, Toni

    2004-09-01

    To examine the results of an interventionist approach applied to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children for whom caregiver nonadherence was suspected as the cause of treatment failure. The medical records of a cohort of 16 perinatally HIV-infected children whose care was managed at the Arkansas Children's Hospital Pediatric HIV Clinic for an uninterrupted period of >or=3 years were reviewed through July 2003. Data collected included date of birth, dates of and explanations for clinic visits and hospitalizations, dates of laboratory evaluations, CD4(+) T cell percentages, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, antiretroviral medications, viral resistance tests (eg, phenotype and genotype), and physician-initiated interventions to enhance adherence to the medication regimen. A stepwise interventionist approach was undertaken when patients continued to demonstrate high viral loads, despite documented viral sensitivity to the medication regimen and caregivers' insistence that medications were being administered regularly. Step 1 was prescribing a home health nurse referral, step 2 was administering directly observed therapy (DOT) while the patient was hospitalized for 4 days, and step 3 was submitting a physician-initiated medical neglect report to the Arkansas Department of Human Services. The results for 6 patients for whom this stepwise approach was initiated are reported. Home health nurse referrals failed to result in sustained improvements in adherence in all 6 cases. Viral load assays performed before and after DOT provided an objective measure of the effect of adherence, with 12 hospitalizations resulting in a mean +/- SD decrease in HIV RNA levels of 1.09 +/- 0.5 log(10) copies per mL, with a range of 0.6 to 2.1 log(10) copies per mL. Four families responded to DOT hospitalization, and sustained decreases in the respective patients' viral loads were noted. In 2 cases, medical neglect reports were submitted when DOT did not result in improved adherence. These

  19. Type 1 Tyrosinaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mannion, MA

    2016-06-01

    Tyrosinaemia type 1 (TYR1, OMIM# 276700) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that results from an enzyme defect that leads to a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetase (FAH)1. We present 3 cases of TYR1 in the Irish population over a 9 year period, the only cases known to have been diagnosed in Ireland since 1989. The common presenting symptom was hypoglycaemia and the diagnosis was made by the identification of the pathognomonic biomarker succinylacetone on urine organic acid analysis. We discuss the clinical presentation, biochemical and genetic results including one novel mutation. We also highlight the importance of early initiation of Nitisinone (NTBC), which reduces the complications of TYR1 and the incidence of liver transplantation in this population2.

  20. Standardizing Clinically Meaningful Outcome Measures Beyond HbA1c for Type 1 Diabetes: A Consensus Report of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiostratidou, Gina; Anhalt, Henry; Ball, Dana; Blonde, Lawrence; Gourgari, Evgenia; Harriman, Karen N; Kowalski, Aaron J; Madden, Paul; McAuliffe-Fogarty, Alicia H; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Peters, Anne; Raman, Sripriya; Reifschneider, Kent; Rubin, Karen; Weinzimer, Stuart A

    2017-12-01

    To identify and define clinically meaningful type 1 diabetes outcomes beyond hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) based upon a review of the evidence, consensus from clinical experts, and input from researchers, people with type 1 diabetes, and industry. Priority outcomes include hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). While priority outcomes for type 1 and type 2 diabetes may overlap, type 1 diabetes was the focus of this work. A Steering Committee-comprising representatives from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, JDRF International, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the T1D Exchange-was the decision-making body for the Type 1 Diabetes Outcomes Program. Their work was informed by input from researchers, industry, and people with diabetes through Advisory Committees representing each stakeholder group. Stakeholder surveys were used to identify priority outcomes. The outcomes prioritized in the surveys were hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, DKA, and PROs. To develop consensus on the definitions of these outcomes, the Steering Committee relied on published evidence, their clinical expertise, and feedback from the Advisory Committees. The Steering Committee developed definitions for hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, time in range, and DKA in type 1 diabetes. The definitions reflect their assessment of the outcome's short- and long-term clinical impact on people with type 1 diabetes. Knowledge gaps to be addressed by future research were identified. The Steering Committee discussed PROs and concluded that further type 1 diabetes-specific development is needed. The Steering Committee recommends use of the defined clinically meaningful outcomes beyond HbA 1c in the research, development, and evaluation of type 1 diabetes

  1. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  2. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells in Phenotypic Screening: A Transforming Growth Factor-β Type 1 Receptor Kinase Inhibitor Induces Efficient Cardiac Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowley, Lauren; Koonce, Chad; Peel, Samantha; Jonebring, Anna; Plowright, Alleyn T; Kattman, Steven J; Andersson, Henrik; Anson, Blake; Swanson, Bradley J; Wang, Qing-Dong; Brolen, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    Several progenitor cell populations have been reported to exist in hearts that play a role in cardiac turnover and/or repair. Despite the presence of cardiac stem and progenitor cells within the myocardium, functional repair of the heart after injury is inadequate. Identification of the signaling pathways involved in the expansion and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) will broaden insight into the fundamental mechanisms playing a role in cardiac homeostasis and disease and might provide strategies for in vivo regenerative therapies. To understand and exploit cardiac ontogeny for drug discovery efforts, we developed an in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CPC model system using a highly enriched population of KDR(pos)/CKIT(neg)/NKX2.5(pos) CPCs. Using this model system, these CPCs were capable of generating highly enriched cultures of cardiomyocytes under directed differentiation conditions. In order to facilitate the identification of pathways and targets involved in proliferation and differentiation of resident CPCs, we developed phenotypic screening assays. Screening paradigms for therapeutic applications require a robust, scalable, and consistent methodology. In the present study, we have demonstrated the suitability of these cells for medium to high-throughput screens to assess both proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Using this CPC model system and a small directed compound set, we identified activin-like kinase 5 (transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor kinase) inhibitors as novel and potent inducers of human CPC differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Significance: Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with no treatment available that can result in functional repair. This study demonstrates how differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to identify and isolate cell populations of interest that can translate to the adult human heart. Two separate examples of phenotypic

  4. Attenuation and efficacy of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1 vaccine candidates containing stabilized mutations in the P/C and L genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skiadopoulos Mario H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two recombinant, live attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1 mutant viruses have been developed, using a reverse genetics system, for evaluation as potential intranasal vaccine candidates. These rHPIV1 vaccine candidates have two non-temperature sensitive (non-ts attenuating (att mutations primarily in the P/C gene, namely CR84GHNT553A (two point mutations used together as a set and CΔ170 (a short deletion mutation, and two ts att mutations in the L gene, namely LY942A (a point mutation, and LΔ1710–11 (a short deletion, the last of which has not been previously described. The latter three mutations were specifically designed for increased genetic and phenotypic stability. These mutations were evaluated on the HPIV1 backbone, both individually and in combination, for attenuation, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in African green monkeys (AGMs. Results The rHPIV1 mutant bearing the novel LΔ1710–11 mutation was highly ts and attenuated in AGMs and was immunogenic and efficacious against HPIV1 wt challenge. The rHPIV1-CR84G/Δ170HNT553ALY942A and rHPIV1-CR84G/Δ170HNT553ALΔ1710–11 vaccine candidates were highly ts, with shut-off temperatures of 38°C and 35°C, respectively, and were highly attenuated in AGMs. Immunization with rHPIV1-CR84G/Δ170HNT553ALY942A protected against HPIV1 wt challenge in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. In contrast, rHPIV1-CR84G/Δ170HNT553ALΔ1710–11 was not protective in AGMs due to over-attenuation, but it is expected to replicate more efficiently and be more immunogenic in the natural human host. Conclusion The rHPIV1-CR84G/Δ170HNT553ALY942A and rHPIV1-CR84G/Δ170HNT553ALΔ1710–11 vaccine candidates are clearly highly attenuated in AGMs and clinical trials are planned to address safety and immunogenicity in humans.

  5. UCLA1, a synthetic derivative of a gp120 RNA aptamer, inhibits entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available such as South Africa (47), where this study was conducted, we assessed the sensitivity of a large panel of subtype C isolates derived from adult and pediatric patients at different stages of HIV-1 infection against UCLA1. We examined its neutralization..., 34). These were derived from the CAPRISA 002 acute infection study cohort (18), subtype C reference panel (31), pediatric and AIDS patients? isolates (9, 17), and a subtype C consensus sequence clone (ConC) (26). The subtype C pseudoviruses were...

  6. The inhibition of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 activity by crude and purified human pregnancy plug mucus and mucins in an inhibition assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoeman Leann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The female reproductive tract is amongst the main routes for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV transmission. Cervical mucus however is known to protect the female reproductive tract from bacterial invasion and fluid loss and regulates and facilitates sperm transport to the upper reproductive tract. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize pregnancy plug mucins and determine their anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Methods Pregnancy plug mucins were purified by caesium chloride density-gradient ultra-centrifugation and characterized by Western blotting analysis. The anti-HIV-1 activities of the crude pregnancy plug mucus and purified pregnancy plug mucins was determined by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells. Results The pregnancy plug mucus had MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified pregnancy plug mucins inhibit HIV-1 activity by approximately 97.5%, the crude pregnancy plug mucus failed to inhibit HIV-1 activity. Conclusion Although it is not clear why the crude sample did not inhibit HIV-1 activity, it may be that the amount of mucins in the crude pregnancy plug mucus (which contains water, mucins, lipids, nucleic acids, lactoferrin, lysozyme, immunoglobulins and ions, is insufficient to cause viral inhibition or aggregation.

  7. Human placental growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and -II, and insulin requirements during pregnancy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Jens; Lauszus, Finn; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    between hPGH and IGF-I in type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated thoroughly. Furthermore, hPGH may be involved in the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy. In this prospective, longitudinal study, 51 type 1 diabetic subjects were followed with repeated blood sampling during......PGH was not correlated to the increase in insulin requirements, nor was any consistent relationship revealed during each gestational period. In conclusion, our study suggests a role for hPGH in the regulation of both IGFs and fetal growth in type 1 diabetes. In contrast, the increase in insulin requirements during...... pregnancy in type 1 diabetic subjects could not be related to hPGH levels....

  8. Human prenatal progenitors for pediatric cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, D.

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiovascular tissue engineering is a promising strategy to overcome the lack of autologous, growing replacements for the early repair of congenital malformations in order to prevent secondary damage to the immature heart. Therefore, cells should be harvested during pregnancy as soon as

  9. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 II and p30 II , which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30 II , a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30 II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30 II , a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30 II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30 II -dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30 II -mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30 II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  10. Tax and Semaphorin 4D Released from Lymphocytes Infected with Human Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Their Effect on Neurite Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintremil, Sebastián; Alberti, Carolina; Rivera, Matías; Medina, Fernando; Puente, Javier; Cartier, Luis; Ramírez, Eugenio; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, M Antonieta

    2016-01-01

    Human lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus causing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a neurodegenerative central nervous system (CNS) axonopathy. This virus mainly infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes without evidence of neuronal infection. Viral Tax, secreted from infected lymphocytes infiltrated in the CNS, is proposed to alter intracellular pathways related to axonal cytoskeleton dynamics, producing neurological damage. Previous reports showed a higher proteolytic release of soluble Semaphorin 4D (sSEMA-4D) from CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. Soluble SEMA-4D binds to its receptor Plexin-B1, activating axonal growth collapse pathways in the CNS. In the current study, an increase was found in both SEMA-4D in CD4(+) T cells and sSEMA-4D released to the culture medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HAM/TSP patients compared to asymptomatic carriers and healthy donors. After a 16-h culture, infected PBMCs showed significantly higher levels of CRMP-2 phosphorylated at Ser(522). The effect was blocked either with anti-Tax or anti-SEMA-4D antibodies. The interaction of Tax and sSEMA-4D was found in secreted medium of PBMCs in patients, which might be associated with a leading role of Tax with the SEMA-4D-Plexin-B1 signaling pathway. In infected PBMCs, the migratory response after transwell assay showed that sSEMA-4D responding cells were CD4(+)Tax(+) T cells with a high CRMP-2 pSer(522) content. In the present study, the participation of Tax-sSEMA-4D in the reduction in neurite growth in PC12 cells produced by MT2 (HTLV-1-infected cell line) culture medium was observed. These results lead to the participation of plexins in the reported effects of infected lymphocytes on neuronal cells.

  11. The p2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag regulates sequential proteolytic processing and is required to produce fully infectious virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, S C; Moody, M D; Wehbie, R S; Kaplan, A H; Nantermet, P V; Klein, C A; Swanstrom, R

    1994-12-01

    The proteolytic processing sites of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor are cleaved in a sequential manner by the viral protease. We investigated the factors that regulate sequential processing. When full-length Gag protein was digested with recombinant HIV-1 protease in vitro, four of the five major processing sites in Gag were cleaved at rates that differ by as much as 400-fold. Three of these four processing sites were cleaved independently of the others. The CA/p2 site, however, was cleaved approximately 20-fold faster when the adjacent downstream p2/NC site was blocked from cleavage or when the p2 domain of Gag was deleted. These results suggest that the presence of a C-terminal p2 tail on processing intermediates slows cleavage at the upstream CA/p2 site. We also found that lower pH selectively accelerated cleavage of the CA/p2 processing site in the full-length precursor and as a peptide primarily by a sequence-based mechanism rather than by a change in protein conformation. Deletion of the p2 domain of Gag results in released virions that are less infectious despite the presence of the processed final products of Gag. These findings suggest that the p2 domain of HIV-1 Gag regulates the rate of cleavage at the CA/p2 processing site during sequential processing in vitro and in infected cells and that p2 may function in the proper assembly of virions.

  12. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 and Regulatory T Cells in HTLV-1-Associated Neuroinflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Yamano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and associated with multiorgan inflammatory disorders, including HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP and uveitis. HTLV-1-infected T cells have been hypothesized to contribute to the development of these disorders, although the precise mechanisms are not well understood. HTLV-1 primarily infects CD4+ T helper (Th cells that play a central role in adaptive immune responses. Based on their functions, patterns of cytokine secretion, and expression of specific transcription factors and chemokine receptors, Th cells that are differentiated from naïve CD4+ T cells are classified into four major lineages: Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory (Treg cells. The CD4+CD25+CCR4+ T cell population, which consists primarily of suppressive T cell subsets, such as the Treg and Th2 subsets in healthy individuals, is the predominant viral reservoir of HTLV-1 in both ATL and HAM/TSP patients. Interestingly, CD4+CD25+CCR4+ T cells become Th1-like cells in HAM/TSP patients, as evidenced by their overproduction of IFN-γ, suggesting that HTLV-1 may intracellularly induce T cell plasticity from Treg to IFN-γ+ T cells. This review examines the recent research into the association between HTLV-1 and Treg cells that has greatly enhanced understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying immune dysregulation in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

  13. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax protein complexes with P-TEFb and competes for Brd4 and 7SK snRNP/HEXIM1 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Jang, Moon Kyoo; Huang, Keven; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Brady, John N

    2010-12-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) plays an important role in stimulating RNA polymerase II elongation for viral and cellular gene expression. P-TEFb is found in cells in either an active, low-molecular-weight (LMW) form or an inactive, high-molecular-weight (HMW) form. We report here that human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax interacts with the cyclin T1 subunit of P-TEFb, forming a distinct Tax/P-TEFb LMW complex. We demonstrate that Tax can play a role in regulating the amount of HMW complex present in the cell by decreasing the binding of 7SK snRNP/HEXIM1 to P-TEFb. This is seen both in vitro using purified Tax protein and in vivo in cells transduced with Tax expression constructs. Further, we find that a peptide of cyclin T1 spanning the Tax binding domain inhibits the ability of Tax to disrupt HMW P-TEFb complexes. These results suggest that the direct interaction of Tax with cyclin T1 can dissociate P-TEFb from the P-TEFb/7SK snRNP/HEXIM1 complex for activation of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR). We also show that Tax competes with Brd4 for P-TEFb binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated that Brd4 and P-TEFb are associated with the basal HTLV-1 LTR, while Tax and P-TEFb are associated with the activated template. Furthermore, the knockdown of Brd4 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) activates the HTLV-1 LTR promoter, which results in an increase in viral expression and production. Our studies have identified Tax as a regulator of P-TEFb that is capable of affecting the balance between its association with the large inactive complex and the small active complex.

  14. Dominant-negative effect of hetero-oligomerization on the function of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Carolina; Klasse, Per Johan; Kibler, Christopher W.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.; Beddows, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein forms trimers that mediate interactions with the CD4 receptor and a co-receptor on the target cell surface, thereby triggering viral fusion with the cell membrane. Cleavage of Env into its surface, gp120, and transmembrane, gp41, moieties is necessary for activation of its fusogenicity. Here, we produced pseudoviruses with phenotypically mixed wild-type (Wt) and mutant, cleavage-incompetent Env in order to quantify the effects of incorporating uncleaved Env on virion infectivity, antigenicity and neutralization sensitivity. We modeled the relative infectivity of three such phenotypically mixed viral strains, JR-FL, HXBc2 and a derivative of the latter, 3.2P, as a function of the relative amount of Wt Env. The data were fit very closely (R 2 > 0.99) by models which assumed that only Wt homotrimers were functional, with different approximate thresholds of critical numbers of functional trimers per virion for the three strains. We also produced 3.2P pseudoviruses containing both a cleavage-competent Env that is defective for binding the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (NAb) 2G12, and a cleavage-incompetent Env that binds 2G12. The 2G12 NAb was not able to reduce the infectivity of these pseudoviruses detectably. Their neutralization by the CD4-binding site-directed agents CD4-IgG2 and NAb b12 was also unaffected by 2G12 binding to uncleaved Env. These results further strengthen the conclusion that only homotrimers consisting of cleaved Env are functional. They also imply that the function of a trimer is unaffected sterically by the binding of an antibody to an adjacent trimer

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype B ancestral envelope protein is functional and elicits neutralizing antibodies in rabbits similar to those elicited by a circulating subtype B envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria-Rose, N A; Learn, G H; Rodrigo, A G; Nickle, D C; Li, F; Mahalanabis, M; Hensel, M T; McLaughlin, S; Edmonson, P F; Montefiori, D; Barnett, S W; Haigwood, N L; Mullins, J I

    2005-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a difficult target for vaccine development, in part because of its ever-expanding genetic diversity and attendant capacity to escape immunologic recognition. Vaccine efficacy might be improved by maximizing immunogen antigenic similarity to viruses likely to be encountered by vaccinees. To this end, we designed a prototype HIV-1 envelope vaccine using a deduced ancestral state for the env gene. The ancestral state reconstruction method was shown to be >95% accurate by computer simulation and 99.8% accurate when estimating the known inoculum used in an experimental infection study in rhesus macaques. Furthermore, the deduced ancestor gene differed from the set of sequences used to derive the ancestor by an average of 12.3%, while these latter sequences were an average of 17.3% different from each other. A full-length ancestral subtype B HIV-1 env gene was constructed and shown to produce a glycoprotein of 160 kDa that bound and fused with cells expressing the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. This Env was also functional in a virus pseudotype assay. When either gp160- or gp140-expressing plasmids and recombinant gp120 were used to immunize rabbits in a DNA prime-protein boost regimen, the artificial gene induced immunoglobulin G antibodies capable of weakly neutralizing heterologous primary HIV-1 strains. The results were similar for rabbits immunized in parallel with a natural isolate, HIV-1 SF162. Further design efforts to better present conserved neutralization determinants are warranted.

  16. Balance, functional mobility, and fall occurrence in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Pedreira da Fonseca

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP may lead to reduced functional mobility and balance. It is important to establish specific parameters that identify these changes and predict the risk of falls in these patients. The aim was to compare balance, functional mobility, and occurrence of falls among patients with and without HAM/TSP and to suggest values to predict the risk of falls in these patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study in patients with and without HAM/TSP involved balance assessments based on the berg balance scale (BBS and functional mobility evaluation based on the timed up and go (TUG test. From reports of falls, the sensitivity, specificity, and best cutoff points for the risk of falls assessed by these instruments were established using the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve; 5% alpha was considered. RESULTS: We selected 42 participants: 29 with HAM/TSP and 13 without HAM/TSP. There was a statistically significant difference in the occurrence of falls, balance, and functional mobility between the groups (p<0.05. Good accuracy was determined for the BBS (77% and TUG test (70% and the cutoff points for the risk of falls were defined as 50 points for the BBS and 12.28 seconds for the TUG test. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with HAM/TSP present reduced functional mobility and balance in relation to those without HAM/TSP. The risk of falls increased for these patients can be evaluated by the values of 50 points using the BBS and 12.28 seconds using the TUG test.

  17. Compartmentalized Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Originates from Long-Lived Cells in Some Subjects with HIV-1–Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Gretja; Spudich, Serena; Harrington, Patrick; Price, Richard W.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1–associated dementia (HAD) in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1–associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t1/2 mean = 2.27 days). However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t1/2 range = 9.85 days to no initial decay). The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4+ T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD

  18. Evaluation of a multiple-cycle, recombinant virus, growth competition assay that uses flow cytometry to measure replication efficiency of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Carrie; Wang, Jiong; Jin, Xia; Planelles, Vicente; An, Dong Sung; Tallo, Amanda; Huang, Yangxin; Wu, Hulin; Demeter, Lisa M

    2006-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication efficiency or fitness, as measured in cell culture, has been postulated to correlate with clinical outcome of HIV infection, although this is still controversial. One limitation is the lack of high-throughput assays that can measure replication efficiency over multiple rounds of replication. We have developed a multiple-cycle growth competition assay to measure HIV-1 replication efficiency that uses flow cytometry to determine the relative proportions of test and reference viruses, each of which expresses a different reporter gene in place of nef. The reporter genes are expressed on the surface of infected cells and are detected by commercially available fluorescence-labeled antibodies. This method is less labor-intensive than those that require isolation and amplification of nucleic acids. The two reporter gene products are detected with similar specificity and sensitivity, and the proportion of infected cells in culture correlates with the amount of viral p24 antigen produced in the culture supernatant. HIV replication efficiencies of six different drug-resistant site-directed mutants were reproducibly quantified and were similar to those obtained with a growth competition assay in which the relative proportion of each variant was measured by sequence analysis, indicating that recombination between the pol and reporter genes was negligible. This assay also reproducibly quantified the relative fitness conferred by protease and reverse transcriptase sequences containing multiple drug resistance mutations, amplified from patient plasma. This flow cytometry-based growth competition assay offers advantages over current assays for HIV replication efficiency and should prove useful for the evaluation of patient samples in clinical trials.

  19. Impaired quality of the hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T-cell response in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Judy; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Thompson, Alex J V; Revill, Peter; Iser, David; Slavin, John; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Marks, Pip; Matthews, Gail; Cooper, David A; Kent, Stephen J; Cameron, Paul U; Sasadeusz, Joe; Desmond, Paul; Locarnini, Stephen; Dore, Gregory J; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Lewin, Sharon R

    2009-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells play a key role both in the control of HBV replication and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coinfection and the presence or absence of HBV e (precore) antigen (HBeAg) significantly alter the natural history of chronic HBV infection. We examined the HBV-specific T-cell responses in treatment-naïve HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative HIV-1-HBV-coinfected (n = 24) and HBV-monoinfected (n = 39) Asian patients. Peripheral blood was stimulated with an overlapping peptide library for the whole HBV genome, and tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon cytokine expression in CD8+ T cells was measured by intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. There was no difference in the overall magnitude of the HBV-specific T-cell responses, but the quality of the response was significantly impaired in HIV-1-HBV-coinfected patients compared with monoinfected patients. In coinfected patients, HBV-specific T cells rarely produced more than one cytokine and responded to fewer HBV proteins than in monoinfected patients. Overall, the frequency and quality of the HBV-specific T-cell responses increased with a higher CD4+ T-cell count (P = 0.018 and 0.032, respectively). There was no relationship between circulating HBV-specific T cells and liver damage as measured by activity and fibrosis scores, and the HBV-specific T-cell responses were not significantly different in patients with either HBeAg-positive or HBeAg-negative disease. The quality of the HBV-specific T-cell response is impaired in the setting of HIV-1-HBV coinfection and is related to the CD4+ T-cell count.

  20. Failure in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax in non-hematopoietic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukoshi, Terumi; Komori, Hideyuki; Mizuguchi, Mariko [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Abdelaziz, Hussein [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Hara, Toshifumi [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Higuchi, Masaya [Division of Virology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Tanaka, Yuetsu [Department of Immunology, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, Ryukyu University, Okinawa (Japan); Ohara, Yoshiro [Department of Microbiology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa (Japan); Funato, Noriko [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Fujii, Masahiro [Division of Virology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Nakamura, Masataka, E-mail: naka.gene@tmd.ac.jp [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax (Tax1) plays crucial roles in leukemogenesis in part through activation of NF-κB. In this study, we demonstrated that Tax1 activated an NF-κB binding (gpκB) site of the gp34/OX40 ligand gene in a cell type-dependent manner. Our examination showed that the gpκΒ site and authentic NF-κB (IgκB) site were activated by Tax1 in hematopoietic cell lines. Non-hematopoietic cell lines including hepatoma and fibroblast cell lines were not permissive to Tax1-mediated activation of the gpκB site, while the IgκB site was activated in those cells in association with binding of RelB. However RelA binding was not observed in the gpκB and IgκB sites. Our results suggest that HTLV-1 Tax1 fails to activate the canonical pathway of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. Cell type-dependent activation of NF-κB by Tax1 could be associated with pathogenesis by HTLV-1 infection. - Highlights: • HTLV-1 Tax1 does not activate RelA of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 activates the NF-κB non-canonical pathway in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 does not induce RelA nuclear translocation in those cell lines, unlike TNFα. • The OX40L promoter κB site is activated by ectopic, but not endogenous, RelA.

  1. [Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in a prison population in the years 1989 to 1995].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Agudo, F; Alonso Moreno, F J; Urbina Torija, J

    1998-02-14

    This study was carried out to know the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a penitentiary center, the risk factors and the prevention measures to reduce this infection. 1,173 men from a penitentiary center between 1989-1995 were included. Demographic data, risk factors and penitentiary variables were studied. Antibodies against HIV were found and confirmed using Western blot; tuberculin skin reaction (PPD) and CD4 lymphocyte cant were studied. The mean age was 31.8 (SD 8.8 years). They were 61.5% Spanish people and 48.1% were in prison for second time. The 49.7% used illegal drugs. Overall prevalence of HIV-1 infection was 24.3%. The differences of percentages for HIV-1 infection in intravenous drug users (IVDU) were 67.7% and in non IVDU were 3.8% with a significant statistical difference (chi 2 = 557.5; p tatoos. The global prevalence of tuberculosis infection (PPD positive) was a 43.8%, and was associated to the second time inmates in this penitentiary center (chi 2 = 22.1; p or = 500 x 10(6)/l. We found a high prevalence of HIV-1 and tuberculosis infection and drug use in this penitentiary center. HIV-1 was transmitted and related by sharing syringes between IVDU independent of the stay in prison. The diagnosis of HIV-1 infection was made soon. The treatments of drug users in penitentiary centers and programs for lowering the risk are very important.

  2. Low Proviral Load is Associated with Indeterminate Western Blot Patterns in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infected Individuals: Could Punctual Mutations be Related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Cánepa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: indeterminate Western blot (WB patterns are a major concern for diagnosis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection, even in non-endemic areas. Objectives: (a to define the prevalence of indeterminate WB among different populations from Argentina; (b to evaluate if low proviral load (PVL is associated with indeterminate WB profiles; and (c to describe mutations in LTR and tax sequence of these cases. Results: Among 2031 samples, 294 were reactive by screening. Of them, 48 (16.3% were WB indeterminate and of those 15 (31.3% were PCR+. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR was performed to 52 HTLV-1+ samples, classified as Group 1 (G1: 25 WB+ samples from individuals with pathologies; Group 2 (G2: 18 WB+ samples from asymptomatic carriers (AC; and Group 3 (G3: 9 seroindeterminate samples from AC. Median PVL was 4.78, 2.38, and 0.15 HTLV-1 copies/100 PBMCs, respectively; a significant difference (p=0.003 was observed. Age and sex were associated with PVL in G1 and G2, respectively. Mutations in the distal and central regions of Tax Responsive Elements (TRE 1 and 2 of G3 were observed, though not associated with PVL.The 8403A>G mutation of the distal region, previously related to high PVL, was absent in G3 but present in 50% of WB+ samples (p = 0.03. Conclusions: indeterminateWBresults confirmed later as HTLV-1 positive may be associated with low PVL levels. Mutations in LTR and tax are described; their functional relevance remains to be determined.

  3. The central globular domain of the nucleocapsid protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is critical for virion structure and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, M; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1995-03-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a 72-amino-acid peptide containing two CCHC-type zinc fingers linked by a short basic sequence, 29RAPRKKG35, which is conserved in HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus. The complete three-dimensional structure of NCp7 has been determined by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (N. Morellet, H. de Rocquigny, Y. Mely, N. Jullian, H. Demene, M. Ottmann, D. Gerard, J. L. Darlix, M. C. Fournié-Zaluski, and B. P. Roques, J. Mol. Biol. 235:287-301, 1994) and revealed a central globular domain where the two zinc fingers are brought in close proximity by the RAPRKKG linker. To examine the role of this globular structure and more precisely of the RAPRKKG linker in virion structure and infectivity, we generated HIV-1 DNA mutants in the RAPRKK sequence of NCp7 and analyzed the mutant virions produced by transfected cells. Mutations that probably alter the structure of NCp7 structure led to the formation of very poorly infectious virus (A30P) or noninfectious virus (P31L and R32G). In addition, the P31L mutant did not contain detectable amounts of reverse transcriptase and had an immature core morphology, as determined by electron microscopy. On the other hand, mutations changing the basic nature of NCp7 had poor effect. R29S had a wild-type phenotype, and the replacement of 32RKK34 by SSS (S3 mutant) resulted in a decrease by no more than 100-fold of the virus titer. These results clearly show that the RAPRKKG linker contains residues that are critical for virion structure and infectivity.

  4. Long-term Therapeutic Impact of the Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients Diagnosed With Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Sophie; Lécuroux, Camille; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Seng, Rémonie; Essat, Asma; Morlat, Philippe; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Goujard, Cécile

    2018-05-02

    We aimed to determine the consequences of delayed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection diagnosis by comparing long-term outcomes depending on the time of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation in patients diagnosed during primary HIV infection (PHI). We selected patients from the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS) PRIMO cohort, treated for ≥36 months, with sustained HIV RNA 12 months after infection (deferred ART). We measured inflammatory biomarkers from PHI through the last visit on cART, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell activation and plasma ultrasensitive HIV RNA at the last visit. Inflammation/activation levels were compared with those of uninfected controls. We modeled CD4+ count, CD4:CD8 ratio, and HIV DNA dynamics on cART. The decrease of HIV DNA levels was more marked in the immediate than deferred ART group, leading to a sustained mean difference of -0.6 log10 copies/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immediate ART led to improved CD4+ T-cell counts and CD4:CD8 ratios over the first 4 years of cART. At the last visit (median, 82 months), there was no difference between groups in CD4+ counts, CD4:CD8 ratio, ultrasensitive HIV RNA, or inflammation/activation marker levels. Long-term suppressive cART failed to normalize inflammation levels, which were not associated with immunovirological markers. Antiretroviral therapy initiated during PHI promotes long-term reduction of HIV reservoir size. In patients with sustained virologic suppression, inflammation may be driven by non-HIV-related factors.

  5. Conserved residues in the coiled-coil pocket of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 are essential for viral replication and interhelical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Hongmei; Konstantinidis, Alex K.; Stewart, Kent D.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Ng, Teresa; Swift, Kerry; Matayoshi, Edmund D.; Kati, Warren; Kohlbrenner, William; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 plays an important role in mediating the fusion of HIV with host cells. During the fusion process, three N-terminal helices and three C-terminal helices pack in an anti-parallel direction to form a six-helix bundle. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the gp41 core demonstrated that within each coiled-coil interface, there is a deep and large pocket, formed by a cluster of residues in the N-helix coiled-coil. In this report, we systematically analyzed the role of seven conserved residues that are either lining or packing this pocket on the infectivity and interhelical interaction using novel approaches. Our results show that residues L568, V570, W571, and K574 of the N-helix that are lining the side chain and right wall of the pocket are important for establishing a productive infection. Mutations V570A and W571A completely abolished replication, while replication of the L568A and K574A mutants was significantly attenuated relative to wild type. Similarly, residues W628, W631, and I635 of the C-helix that insert into the pocket are essential for infectivity. The impaired infectivity of these seven mutants is in part attributed to the loss in binding affinity of the interhelical interaction. Molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the coiled-coil further shows that alanine substitution of those residues disrupts the hydrophobic interaction between the N- and C-helix. These results suggest that the conserved residues in the coiled-coil domain play a key role in HIV infection and this coiled-coil pocket is a good target for development of inhibitors against HIV. In addition, our data indicate that the novel fluorescence polarization assay described in this study could be valuable in screening for inhibitors that block the interhelical interaction and HIV entry

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 p30 alters cell cycle G2 regulation of T lymphocytes to enhance cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Lee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is linked to a number of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 and p30, whose roles are still being defined in the virus life cycle and in HTLV-1 virus-host cell interactions. Proviral clones of HTLV-1 with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. p30 expressed exogenously differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and while acting as a repressor of many genes including Tax, in part by blocking tax/rex RNA nuclear export, selectively enhances key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Results Herein, we analyzed the role of p30 in cell cycle regulation. Jurkat T-cells transduced with a p30 expressing lentivirus vector accumulated in the G2-M phase of cell cycle. We then analyzed key proteins involved in G2-M checkpoint activation. p30 expression in Jurkat T-cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylation at serine 216 of nuclear cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25C, had enhanced checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1 serine 345 phosphorylation, reduced expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1, diminished phosphorylation of PLK1 at tyrosine 210 and reduced phosphorylation of Cdc25C at serine 198. Finally, primary human lymphocyte derived cell lines immortalized by a HTLV-1 proviral clone defective in p30 expression were more susceptible to camptothecin induced apoptosis. Collectively these data are consistent with a cell survival role of p30 against genotoxic insults to HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes. Conclusion Collectively, our data are the first to indicate that HTLV-1 p30 expression results in activation of the G2-M cell cycle checkpoint, events that would promote early viral spread and T

  7. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax-Deregulated Autophagy Pathway and c-FLIP Expression Contribute to Resistance against Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhou, Jiansuo; Shi, Juan; Zhang, Yaxi; Liu, Shilian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein is considered to play a central role in the process that leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 Tax-expressing cells show resistance to apoptosis induced by Fas ligand (FasL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). The regulation of Tax on the autophagy pathway in HeLa cells and peripheral T cells was recently reported, but the function and underlying molecular mechanism of the Tax-regulated autophagy are not yet well defined. Here, we report that HTLV-1 Tax deregulates the autophagy pathway, which plays a protective role during the death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis of human U251 astroglioma cells. The cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), which is upregulated by Tax, also contributes to the resistance against DR-mediated apoptosis. Both Tax-induced autophagy and Tax-induced c-FLIP expression require Tax-induced activation of IκB kinases (IKK). Furthermore, Tax-induced c-FLIP expression is regulated through the Tax-IKK-NF-κB signaling pathway, whereas Tax-triggered autophagy depends on the activation of IKK but not the activation of NF-κB. In addition, DR-mediated apoptosis is correlated with the degradation of Tax, which can be facilitated by the inhibitors of autophagy. IMPORTANCE Our study reveals that Tax-deregulated autophagy is a protective mechanism for DR-mediated apoptosis. The molecular mechanism of Tax-induced autophagy is also illuminated, which is different from Tax-increased c-FLIP. Tax can be degraded via manipulation of autophagy and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. These results outline a complex regulatory network between and among apoptosis, autophagy, and Tax and also present evidence that autophagy represents a new possible target for therapeutic intervention for the HTVL-1 related diseases. PMID:24352466

  8. Interferon-alpha mediates restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 replication in primary human macrophages at an early stage of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Cheney

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNα and β are induced directly in response to viral infection, resulting in an antiviral state for the cell. In vitro studies have shown that IFNα is a potent inhibitor of viral replication; however, its role in HIV-1 infection is incompletely understood. In this study we describe the ability of IFNα to restrict HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages in contrast to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition to HIV-1 replication in cells pretreated with IFNα occurred at an early stage in the virus life cycle. Late viral events such as budding and subsequent rounds of infection were not affected by IFNα treatment. Analysis of early and late HIV-1 reverse transcripts and integrated proviral DNA confirmed an early post entry role for IFNα. First strand cDNA synthesis was slightly reduced but late and integrated products were severely depleted, suggesting that initiation or the nucleic acid intermediates of reverse transcription are targeted. The depletion of integrated provirus is disproportionally greater than that of viral cDNA synthesis suggesting the possibility of a least an additional later target. A role for either cellular protein APOBEC3G or tetherin in this IFNα mediated restriction has been excluded. Vpu, previously shown by others to rescue a viral budding restriction by tetherin, could not overcome this IFNα induced effect. Determining both the viral determinants and cellular proteins involved may lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Our results add to the understanding of HIV-1 restriction by IFNα.

  9. A phase I randomized clinical trial of candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine MVA.HIVA administered to Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed O Afolabi

    Full Text Available A vaccine to decrease transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 during breast-feeding would complement efforts to eliminate infant HIV-1 infection by antiretroviral therapy. Relative to adults, infants have distinct immune development, potentially high-risk of transmission when exposed to HIV-1 and rapid progression to AIDS when infected. To date, there have been only three published HIV-1 vaccine trials in infants.We conducted a randomized phase I clinical trial PedVacc 001 assessing the feasibility, safety and immunogenicity of a single dose of candidate vaccine MVA.HIVA administered intramuscularly to 20-week-old infants born to HIV-1-negative mothers in The Gambia.Infants were followed to 9 months of age with assessment of safety, immunogenicity and interference with Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI vaccines. The trial is the first stage of developing more complex prime-boost vaccination strategies against breast milk transmission of HIV-1.From March to October 2010, 48 infants (24 vaccine and 24 no-treatment were enrolled with 100% retention. The MVA.HIVA vaccine was safe with no difference in adverse events between vaccinees and untreated infants. Two vaccine recipients (9% and no controls had positive ex vivo interferon-γ ELISPOT assay responses. Antibody levels elicited to the EPI vaccines, which included diphtheria, tetanus, whole-cell pertussis, hepatitis B virus, Haemophilus influenzae type b and oral poliovirus, reached protective levels for the vast majority and were similar between the two arms.A single low-dose of MVA.HIVA administered to 20-week-old infants in The Gambia was found to be safe and without interference with the induction of protective antibody levels by EPI vaccines, but did not alone induce sufficient HIV-1-specific responses. These data support the use of MVA carrying other transgenes as a boosting vector within more complex prime-boost vaccine strategies against transmission of HIV-1 and

  10. Immunization of mice with the nef gene from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1: Study of immunological memory and long-term toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engström Gunnel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 regulatory protein, Nef, is an attractive vaccine target because it is involved in viral pathogenesis, is expressed early in the viral life cycle and harbors many T and B cell epitopes. Several clinical trials include gene-based vaccines encoding this protein. However, Nef has been shown to transform certain cell types in vitro. Based on these findings we performed a long-term toxicity and immunogenicity study of Nef, encoded either by Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara or by plasmid DNA. BALB/c mice were primed twice with either DNA or MVA encoding Nef and received a homologous or heterologous boost ten months later. In the meantime, the Nef-specific immune responses were monitored and at the time of sacrifice an extensive toxicological evaluation was performed, where presence of tumors and other pathological changes were assessed. Results The toxicological evaluation showed that immunization with MVAnef is safe and does not cause cellular transformation or other toxicity in somatic organs. Both DNAnef and MVAnef immunized animals developed potent Nef-specific cellular responses that declined to undetectable levels over time, and could readily be boosted after almost one year. This is of particular interest since it shows that plasmid DNA vaccine can also be used as a potent late booster of primed immune responses. We observed qualitative differences between the T cell responses induced by the two different vectors: DNA-encoded nef induced long-lasting CD8+ T cell memory responses, whereas MVA-encoded nef induced CD4+ T cell memory responses. In terms of the humoral immune responses, we show that two injections of MVAnef induce significant anti-Nef titers, while repeated injections of DNAnef do not. A single boost with MVAnef could enhance the antibody response following DNAnef prime to the same level as that observed in animals immunized repeatedly with MVAnef. We also demonstrate

  11. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax requires direct access to DNA for recruitment of CREB binding protein to the viral promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzmeier, B A; Giebler, H A; Nyborg, J K

    1998-02-01

    Efficient human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and viral gene expression are dependent upon the virally encoded oncoprotein Tax. To activate HTLV-1 transcription, Tax interacts with the cellular DNA binding protein cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and recruits the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP), forming a nucleoprotein complex on the three viral cyclic AMP-responsive elements (CREs) in the HTLV-1 promoter. Short stretches of dG-dC-rich (GC-rich) DNA, immediately flanking each of the viral CREs, are essential for Tax recruitment of CBP in vitro and Tax transactivation in vivo. Although the importance of the viral CRE-flanking sequences is well established, several studies have failed to identify an interaction between Tax and the DNA. The mechanistic role of the viral CRE-flanking sequences has therefore remained enigmatic. In this study, we used high resolution methidiumpropyl-EDTA iron(II) footprinting to show that Tax extended the CREB footprint into the GC-rich DNA flanking sequences of the viral CRE. The Tax-CREB footprint was enhanced but not extended by the KIX domain of CBP, suggesting that the coactivator increased the stability of the nucleoprotein complex. Conversely, the footprint pattern of CREB on a cellular CRE lacking GC-rich flanking sequences did not change in the presence of Tax or Tax plus KIX. The minor-groove DNA binding drug chromomycin A3 bound to the GC-rich flanking sequences and inhibited the association of Tax and the Tax-CBP complex without affecting CREB binding. Tax specifically cross-linked to the viral CRE in the 5'-flanking sequence, and this cross-link was blocked by chromomycin A3. Together, these data support a model where Tax interacts directly with both CREB and the minor-groove viral CRE-flanking sequences to form a high-affinity binding site for the recruitment of CBP to the HTLV-1 promoter.

  12. Mutations within Four Distinct Gag Proteins Are Required To Restore Replication of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 after Deletion Mutagenesis within the Dimerization Initiation Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen; Rong, Liwei; Quan, Yudong; Laughrea, Michael; Kleiman, Lawrence; Wainberg, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomic RNA segments at nucleotide (nt) positions +240 to +274 are thought to form a stem-loop secondary structure, termed SL1, that serves as a dimerization initiation site for viral genomic RNA. We have generated two distinct deletion mutations within this region, termed BH10-LD3 and BH10-LD4, involving nt positions +238 to +253 and +261 to +274, respectively, and have shown that each of these resulted in significant diminutions in levels of viral infectiousness. However, long-term culture of each of these viruses in MT-2 cells resulted in a restoration of infectiousness, due to a series of compensatory point mutations within four distinct proteins that are normally cleaved from the Gag precursor. In the case of BH10-LD3, these four mutations were MA1, CA1, MP2, and MNC, and they involved changes of amino acid Val-35 to Ile within the matrix protein (MA), Ile-91 to Thr within the capsid (CA), Thr-12 to Ile within p2, and Thr-24 to Ile within the nucleocapsid (NC). The order in which these mutations were acquired by the mutated BH10-LD3 was MNC > CA1 > MP2 > MA1. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed that each of these four substitutions contributed to the increased viability of the mutated BH10-LD3 viruses and that the MNC substitution, which was acquired first, played the most important role in this regard. Three point mutations, MP2, MNC, and MA2, were also shown to be sequentially acquired by viruses that had emerged in culture from the BH10-LD4 deletion. The first two of these were identical to those described above, while the last involved a change of Val-35 to Leu. All three of these substitutions were necessary to restore the infectiousness of mutated BH10-LD4 viruses to wild-type levels, although the MP2 mutation alone, but neither of the other two substitutions, was able to confer some viability on BH10-LD4 viruses. Studies of viral RNA packaging showed that the BH10-LD4 deletion only

  13. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 provirus and phylogenetic analysis in patients with mycosis fungoides and their family relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohat, M; Shohat, B; Mimouni, D; Pauli, G; Ellerbrok, H; David, M; Hodak, E

    2006-08-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma of unknown aetiology. A pathogenic role of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been suggested but remains controversial. To determine whether MF is linked to HTLV-1. Blood samples were collected from 60 patients, 15 family relatives of patients with MF (MFRs), 20 healthy controls and 10 patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The presence of HTLV-1 antibodies in serum was tested by the Western blot rp21e-enhanced test. DNA was extracted from the blood with the Qiagen blood kit. We used 500 ng of DNA either in conventional HTLV-1-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or in real-time PCR using primers sk43 and sk44 together with a tax-specific fluorescent probe. In Western blot, antibodies against three to four HTLV-1 antigens were detected in 52% of patients with MF. All of the patients with HAM/TSP were positive, while only 7% of the MFRs and none of the 20 healthy controls reacted with HTLV-1 antigens in Western blot. One of 60 patients with MF and one of 15 MFRs were positive in HTLV-1 PCR. These two PCR-positive samples which were quantified in real-time PCR showed that fewer than five in 10(6) cells were HTLV-1 infected. We succeeded in amplifying and sequencing the 5' end of the provirus from the blood of the PCR-positive MFR by seminested PCR. A positive result was also obtained in this test. Phylogenetic tree analyses revealed a high homology of this sequence with other HTLV-1 sequences from the Middle East. The above PCR-positive MFR was the brother of a PCR-negative patient with MF. These findings demonstrate that HTLV-1 is probably not the aetiological agent of MF. However, it may play a role in immunosuppression and in the spreading of the disease.

  14. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-09

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4+ T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4+ T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4+ T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50; which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4+ T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID50 of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 μg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID50 of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4+ T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137). PMID:19038780

  16. Production of a dendritic cell-based vaccine containing inactivated autologous virus for therapy of patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C; Rinaldo, Charles R; Riddler, Sharon A

    2009-02-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4(+) T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4(+) T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4(+) T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4(+) T cells. CD4(+) T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50); which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4(+) T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID(50) of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 microg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID(50) of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4(+) T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137).

  17. Identification of novel type 1 diabetes candidate genes by integrating genome-wide association data, protein-protein interactions, and human pancreatic islet gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Regine; Brorsson, Caroline; Palleja, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have heralded a new era in susceptibility locus discovery in complex diseases. For type 1 diabetes, >40 susceptibility loci have been discovered. However, GWAS do not inevitably lead to identification of the gene or genes in a given locus associated with dis......-cells. Our results provide novel insight to the mechanisms behind type 1 diabetes pathogenesis and, thus, may provide the basis for the design of novel treatment strategies.......Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have heralded a new era in susceptibility locus discovery in complex diseases. For type 1 diabetes, >40 susceptibility loci have been discovered. However, GWAS do not inevitably lead to identification of the gene or genes in a given locus associated...... with disease, and they do not typically inform the broader context in which the disease genes operate. Here, we integrated type 1 diabetes GWAS data with protein-protein interactions to construct biological networks of relevance for disease. A total of 17 networks were identified. To prioritize...

  18. HbA1c associated to increased mortality in a Danish cohort of young patients with type 1 diabetes followed for 25 years: The Danish cohort of pediatric diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, K.; Svensson, J.; Johannesen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) has been associated with a higher mortality compared to the general population. The aims of the present study are to determine the mortality rate in a Danish cohort of patients diagnosed with diabetes in childhood and compare these to the general population. Metho...

  19. What causes type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschard, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    To study type 1 diabetes (T1D), excellent animal models exist, both spontaneously diabetic and virus-induced. Based on knowledge from these, this review focuses on the environmental factors leading to T1D, concentrated into four areas which are: (1) The thymus-dependent immune system: T1D is a T...... T cell reaction and less autoimmunity. Glycolipids presented by CD1 molecules are central in this stimulation. (4) Importance of the intestine and gliadin intake: Gluten-free diet dramatically inhibits T1D in animal models, and epidemiological data are supportive of such an effect in humans....... The mechanisms include less subclinical intestinal inflammation and permeability, and changed composition of bacterial flora, which can also be obtained by intake of probiotics. Gluten-free diet is difficult to implement, and short-term intake has no effect. Regarding the onset of the T1D disease process, slow...

  20. Formation of RNA Granule-Derived Capsid Assembly Intermediates Appears To Be Conserved between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and the Nonprimate Lentivirus Feline Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jonathan C; Westergreen, Nick; Barajas, Brook C; Ressler, Dylan T B; Phuong, Daryl J; Swain, John V; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2018-05-01

    During immature capsid assembly in cells, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag co-opts a host RNA granule, forming a pathway of intracellular assembly intermediates containing host components, including two cellular facilitators of assembly, ABCE1 and DDX6. A similar assembly pathway has been observed for other primate lentiviruses. Here we asked whether feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus, also forms RNA granule-derived capsid assembly intermediates. First, we showed that the released FIV immature capsid and a large FIV Gag-containing intracellular complex are unstable during analysis, unlike for HIV-1. We identified harvest conditions, including in situ cross-linking, that overcame this problem, revealing a series of FIV Gag-containing complexes corresponding in size to HIV-1 assembly intermediates. Previously, we showed that assembly-defective HIV-1 Gag mutants are arrested at specific assembly intermediates; here we identified four assembly-defective FIV Gag mutants, including three not previously studied, and demonstrated that they appear to be arrested at the same intermediate as the cognate HIV-1 mutants. Further evidence that these FIV Gag-containing complexes correspond to assembly intermediates came from coimmunoprecipitations demonstrating that endogenous ABCE1 and the RNA granule protein DDX6 are associated with FIV Gag, as shown previously for HIV-1 Gag, but are not associated with a ribosomal protein, at steady state. Additionally, we showed that FIV Gag associates with another RNA granule protein, DCP2. Finally, we validated the FIV Gag-ABCE1 and FIV Gag-DCP2 interactions with proximity ligation assays demonstrating colocalization in situ Together, these data support a model in which primate and nonprimate lentiviruses form intracellular capsid assembly intermediates derived from nontranslating host RNA granules. IMPORTANCE Like HIV-1 Gag, FIV Gag assembles into immature capsids; however, it is not known whether

  1. Forced selection of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variant that uses a non-self tRNA primer for reverse transcription: Involvement of viral RNA sequences and the reverse transcriptase enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, Truus E. M.; Beerens, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 uses the tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a selective primer for reverse transcription. This primer specificity is imposed by sequence complementarity between the tRNA primer and two motifs in the viral RNA genome: the primer-binding site (PBS) and the primer activation

  2. Cooperative Effects of Corticosteroids and Catecholamines upon Immune Deviation of the Type-1/Type-2 Cytokine Balance in Favor of Type-2 Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicru, A. N.; Sams, Clarence F.; Marshall, G. D.

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of studies show strong associations between stress and altered immune function. In vivo studies of chronic and acute stress have demonstrated that cognitive stressors are strongly correlated with high levels of catecholamines (CT) and corticosteroids (CS). Although both CS and CT individually can inhibit the production of T-helper 1 (TH1, type-1 like) cytokines and simultaneously promote the production of T-helper 2 (TH2, type-2 like) cytokines in antigen-specific and mitogen stimulated human leukocyte cultures in vitro, little attention has been focused on the effects of combination CT and CS in immune responses that may be more physiologically relevant. We therefore investigated the combined effects of in vitro CT and CS upon the type-1/type-2 cytokine balance of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a model to study the immunomodulatory effects of superimposed acute and chronic stress. Results demonstrated a significant decrease in type-1 cytokine production (IFN-gamma) and a significant increase in type-2 cytokine production (IL-4, IL-10) in our CS+CT incubated cultures when compared to either CT or CS agents alone. Furthermore, variable enhancement of type-1/type-2 immune deviation occurred depending upon when the CT was added. The data suggest that CS can increase the sensitivity of PBMC to the immunomodulatory effects of CT and establishes an in vitro model to study the combined effects of in vivo type-1/type-2 cytokine alterations observed in acute and chronic stress.

  3. High prevalence of human polyomavirus JC VP1 gene sequences in pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiramizu, B; Hu, N; Frisque, R J; Nerurkar, V R

    2007-05-15

    The oncogenic potential of human polyomavirus JC (JCV), a ubiquitous virus that establishes infection during early childhood in approximately 70% of the human population, is unclear. As a neurotropic virus, JCV has been implicated in pediatric central nervous system tumors and has been suggested to be a pathogenic agent in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Recent studies have demonstrated JCV gene sequences in pediatric medulloblastomas and among patients with colorectal cancer. JCV early protein T-antigen (TAg) can form complexes with cellular regulatory proteins and thus may play a role in tumorigenesis. Since JCV is detected in B-lymphocytes, a retrospective analysis of pediatric B-cell and non-B-cell malignancies as well as other HIV-associated pediatric malignancies was conducted for the presence of JCV gene sequences. DNA was extracted from 49 pediatric malignancies, including Hodgkin disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, large cell lymphoma and sarcoma. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using JCV specific nested primer sets for the transcriptional control region (TCR), TAg, and viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) genes. Southern blot analysis and DNA sequencing were used to confirm specificity of the amplicons. A 215-bp region of the JCV VP1 gene was amplified from 26 (53%) pediatric tumor tissues. The JCV TCR and two JCV gene regions were amplified from a leiomyosarcoma specimen from an HIV-infected patient. The leiomyosarcoma specimen from the cecum harbored the archetype strain of JCV. Including the leiomyosarcoma specimen, three of five specimens sequenced were typed as JCV genotype 2. The failure to amplify JCV TCR, and TAg gene sequences in the presence of JCV VP1 gene sequence is surprising. Even though JCV TAg gene, which is similar to the SV40 TAg gene, is oncogenic in animal models, the presence of JCV gene sequences in pediatric malignancies does not prove causality. In light of the available data on the presence of JCV in normal and cancerous

  4. Unpasteurized Shared Human Milk Use in Pediatric Inpatients: Health and Ethical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, Kimberly H; Sussman-Karten, Karen; Kamin, Daniel; Huh, Susanna Y

    2017-06-01

    Growing evidence supporting the health benefits of human milk, particularly in the preterm population, has led to rising demand for donor human milk in NICUs and pediatric hospitals. There are no previous reports describing the use of unpasteurized shared human milk (USHM) in the hospital setting, but the use of USHM solicited from community donors through social networks appears to be common. Many pediatric hospitals permit inpatients to receive breast milk that has been screened and pasteurized by a human milk banking organization and will provide pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) only to infants who are preterm or have specific medical conditions. These policies are designed to minimize potential adverse effects from improperly handled or screened donor milk and to target patients who would experience the greatest benefit in health outcomes with donor milk use. We explore the ethical and health implications of 2 cases of medically complex infants who did not meet criteria in our tertiary care hospital for the use of PDHM from a regulated human milk bank and were incidentally found to be using USHM. These cases raise questions about how best to balance the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and patient autonomy in the provision of PDHM, a limited resource. Health care staff should ask about USHM use to provide adequate counseling about the risks and benefits of various feeding options in the context of an infant's medical condition. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. [Yeast-like fungi in the gastrointestinal tract in children and adolescents with diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Beata; Kawko, Małgorzata; Zorena, Katarzyna; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the frequency of fungal infections in human populations has increased considerably. The most common type offungus attacking the human organism is Candida albicans. Yeast-like fungi occur naturally in the oral cavity, intestines, vagina, or skin, however in amounts not dangerous to human health. The studies so far have shown that patients with diabetes type 1 (T1DM) to a large degree are exposed to complications related to fungal infections. A substantial growth of fungi observed in diabetic patients may unfavorably affect metabolic compensation, and lead to increased demand for insulin, as well as to the difficult to cure symptom infections. The weaker the immune resistance in patients with diabetes, the greater the risk of ailments related to candidiasis. The article contains a review of recent literature regarding the problems related to occurrence of yeast-like fungi in digestive tract of children with diabetes type 1. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  6. Quantitative and qualitative characterization of human cancer-associated serum glycoprotein antigens expressing epitopes consisting of sialyl or sialyl-fucosyl type 1 chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannagi, R; Kitahara, A; Itai, S; Zenita, K; Shigeta, K; Tachikawa, T; Noda, A; Hirano, H; Abe, M; Shin, S

    1988-07-01

    The levels of carbohydrate antigens having epitopes consisting of type 1 chain (R----Gal beta 1----GlcNAc beta 1----3Gal beta 1----R) in the sera of patients with various malignant and nonmalignant disorders have been investigated with the use of three monoclonal antibodies, N-19-9, FH-7, and FH-9. Serum levels of 2----3 sialylated Lea antigen and 2----6 sialylated Lea antigen, defined respectively by antibodies N-19-9 and FH-7, were found to be frequently high in patients with cancer of the digestive system, particularly pancreatic cancer. High levels of 2----3,2----6 disialylated Lc4 antigen, defined by antibody FH-9, were less frequent in cancer patients when compared with the other two antigens. In patients with nonmalignant disorders, especially renal and autoimmune diseases, serum levels of the two type 1 chain antigens defined by FH-7 and FH-9 were more frequently high than that defined by N-19-9. Molecular weights and other general biochemical characteristics of serum mucin carrying the type 1 chain determinants were not significantly different in cancer patients as compared with patients with nonmalignant disorders. However, the degree of glycosylation of the antigen, as assessed by its solubility in perchloric acid, showed significant differences; i.e., the mucin antigen carrying 2----6 sialylated Lea determinant in the sera of patients with nonmalignant disorders had the highest carbohydrate/protein ratio, followed by the mucin carrying the same determinant in the sera of cancer patients. Mucin antigen carrying 2----3 sialylated Lea antigen or 2----3, 2----6 disialylated Lc4 antigen in cancer patients had the lowest carbohydrate/protein ratio among the four groups tested. Thus, the carbohydrate/protein ratio in the type 1 chain mucin antigens in sera of normal subjects is higher than that in sera of cancer patients (P less than 0.05). This finding is in contrast to previous findings on the mucin antigens carrying the type 2 chain determinant (R. Kannagi

  7. Graduate medical education in humanism and professionalism: a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Herrick, Daniel B; Woolf, Alan D; Leichtner, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    The deterioration of humanism and professionalism during graduate medical training is an acknowledged concern, and programs are required to provide professionalism education for pediatric fellows. We conducted a needs assessment survey in a national sample of 138 first- and second-year gastroenterology fellows (82% response rate). Most believed that present humanism and professionalism education met their needs, but this education was largely informal (eg, role modeling). Areas for formal education desired by >70% included competing demands of clinical practice versus research, difficult doctor-patient relationships, depression/burnout, angry parents, medical errors, work-life balance, and the patient illness experience. These results may guide curricula to formalize humanism and professionalism education in pediatric gastroenterology fellowships.

  8. On-column ligand exchange for structure-based drug design: a case study with human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Wenying; Judge, Russell A.; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Solomon, Larry R.; Harlan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    An on-column ligand- and detergent-exchange method was developed to obtain ligand–protein complexes for an adamantane series of compounds with 11β-HSD1 after a variety of other complexation methods had failed. An interesting byproduct of the method was the observation of artificial trimers in the crystal structures. Successfully forming ligand–protein complexes with specific compounds can be a significant challenge in supporting structure-based drug design for a given protein target. In this respect, an on-column ligand- and detergent-exchange method was developed to obtain ligand–protein complexes of an adamantane series of compounds with 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) after a variety of other complexation methods had failed. This report describes the on-column exchange method and an unexpected byproduct of the method in which artificial trimers were observed in the structures

  9. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cordelli, Ermanno; Rizzi, Alessandro; De Leva, Francesca; Papi, Massimiliano; Ciasca, Gabriele; Samengo, Daniela; Pani, Giovambattista; Pitocco, Dario; Soda, Paolo; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Iannello, Giulio; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC) membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS) able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(pBlood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  10. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(p<0.001 among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. The development of an assay based on Phase separation of the plasma membrane of the Red Blood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  11. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Farabi, Sarah S.

    2016-01-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  12. Lack of T cell dysfunction and programmed cell death in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected chimpanzees correlates with absence of monocytotropic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, H.; Meyaard, L.; Kootstra, N. A.; Dubbes, R.; Otto, S. A.; Tersmette, M.; Heeney, J. L.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    In asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans, disturbed T cell functions such as anergy and programmed cell death, thought to result from inappropriate signaling by antigen-presenting cells due to HIV infection, precede increase in virus load, decline in CD4+ T cell

  13. Recognizing victims of human trafficking in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heather J; Bechtel, Kirsten

    2015-02-01

    Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery that is rapidly expanding in the United States and throughout the world. It is a crime under both the United States and international law. The child and adult victims of human trafficking are denied their basic human rights and subjected to unspeakable physical and emotional harm. Traffickers exert complete control over their victims and are proficient at hiding their condition from authorities. Healthcare practitioners may be the only professionals who come into contact with victims if they present for medical care. This article will describe human trafficking and its potential victims, as well as guide medical management and access to services that will ensure their safety and restore their freedom.

  14. Estimating the timing of mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 using a viral molecular evolution model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Chaillon

    Full Text Available Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT is responsible for most pediatric HIV-1 infections worldwide. It can occur during pregnancy, labor, or breastfeeding. Numerous studies have used coalescent and molecular clock methods to understand the epidemic history of HIV-1, but the timing of vertical transmission has not been studied using these methods. Taking advantage of the constant accumulation of HIV genetic variation over time and using longitudinally sampled viral sequences, we used a coalescent approach to investigate the timing of MTCT.Six-hundred and twenty-two clonal env sequences from the RNA and DNA viral population were longitudinally sampled from nine HIV-1 infected mother-and-child pairs [range: 277-1034 days]. For each transmission pair, timing of MTCT was determined using a coalescent-based model within a Bayesian statistical framework. Results were compared with available estimates of MTCT timing obtained with the classic biomedical approach based on serial HIV DNA detection by PCR assays.Four children were infected during pregnancy, whereas the remaining five children were infected at time of delivery. For eight out of nine pairs, results were consistent with the transmission periods assessed by standard PCR-based assay. The discordance in the remaining case was likely confused by co-infection, with simultaneous introduction of multiple maternal viral variants at the time of delivery.The study provided the opportunity to validate the Bayesian coalescent approach that determines the timing of MTCT of HIV-1. It illustrates the power of population genetics approaches to reliably estimate the timing of transmission events and deepens our knowledge about the dynamics of viral evolution in HIV-infected children, accounting for the complexity of multiple transmission events.

  15. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a Potent, Orally Bioavailable, and Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 with Broad-Spectrum Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades a...

  16. Reduced Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-HBV-Coinfected Individuals Receiving HBV-Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Wightman, Fiona; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Ayres, Anna; Kent, Stephen J.; Sasadeusz, Joseph; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2005-01-01

    Functional hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells are significantly diminished in individuals chronically infected with HBV compared to individuals with self-limiting HBV infection or those on anti-HBV therapy. In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), coinfection with HBV is associated with an increased risk of worsening liver function following antiviral therapy and of more rapid HBV disease progression. Total HBV-specific T-cell responses in subjects with ...

  17. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-01-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritona...

  18. BIRTH-ORDER, DELIVERY ROUTE, AND CONCORDANCE IN THE TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS TYPE-1 FROM MOTHERS TO TWINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULIEGE, AM; AMOS, CI; FELTON, S; BIGGAR, RJ; ZIEGLER, J; CRUIKSHANK, M; LEVY, J; MEATES, MA; GIBB, D; MAYAUX, MJ; TEGLAS, JP; LAURENT, C; BLANCHE, S; ROUZIOUX, C; HELLINGGIESE, G; MATTNER, U; HOEGER, PH; CONLON, T; GRIFFIN, E; DEMARIA, A; BENEDETTO, A; PRINCIPI, N; GIAQUINTO, C; GIANCOMELLI, A; MOK, J; CASABONA, J; FORTUNY, C; URIZ, S; PEREZ, JM; TUSETRUIZ, MC; LEON, P; ELORZA, JFY; CANOSA, C; BRANDLE, B; SEGER, R; NADAL, D; IRION, O; WYLER, CA; DAVIS, P; LALLEMANT, M; LALLEMANTLECOEUR, S; HITIMANA, DG; LEPAGE, P; VANDEPERRE, P; DABIS, F; MARUM, L; NDUGWA, C; TINDYEBWA, D; ACENG, E; MMIRO, F; SUTONGAS, T; OLNESS, K; LAPOINTE, N; RUBINSTEIN, A; BURGE, D; STECHENBERG, BW; COOPER, E; REGAN, AM; SHIPKOWITZ, S; WIZNIA, A; BRUNELL, PA; COURVILLE, T; RUTSTEIN, R; MCINTOSH, K; PETRU, A; OLEARY, M; CHURCH, J; TAYLOR, S; SQUIRES, J; MALLORY, M; YOGEV, R; RAKUSAN, T; PLUMLEY, S; SHELTON, MM; WILFERT, C; LANE, B; ABRAMS, EJ; RANA, S; CHANDAVASU, O; PUVABANDITSIN, S; CHOW, JH; SHAH, K; NACHMAN, S; ONEILL, R; SELWYN, P; SHOENBAUM, E; BARZILAI, A; WARFORD, R; AHERN, L; PAHWA, S; PNUGOTI, N; GARCIATRIAS, DE; BAKSHI, S; LANDESMAN, S; MENDEZ, H; MOROSO, G; MENDEZBAUTISTA, RD; FIKRIG, S; BELMAN, A; KLINE, MW; HANSON, C; EDELSON, P; HINDS, G; VANDYKE, R; CLARK, R; WARA, DW; MANIO, EB; JOHNSON, G; WELLS, L; JOHNSON, JP; ALGER, L; LUZURIAGA, K; MASTRUCCI, T; SUNKUTU, MR; RODRIGUEZ, Z; DOYLE, M; REUBEN, J; BRYSON, Y; DILLON, M; SIMPSON, BJ; ANDIMAN, W; URIBE, P; Klauke, B.

    Background: We evaluated data from prospectively identified twins to understand better the mechanisms and covariates of mother-to-infant transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods: Using data obtained from an international collaboration and multivariate quasilikelihood modeling, we

  19. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and atopic diseases in children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Nancy S. Elbarbary. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Background. Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) is a complex disease resulting from the interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors.1 Worldwide,. T1DM epidemic represents an increasing global.

  20. Human skeletal muscle type 1 fibre distribution and response of stress-sensing proteins along the titin molecule after submaximal exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Satu O A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Flink, Riina; Selänne, Harri P; Gagnon, Sheila S; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Nindl, Bradley C; Lehti, Maarit

    2017-11-01

    Early responses of stress-sensing proteins, muscle LIM protein (MLP), ankyrin repeat proteins (Ankrd1/CARP and Ankrd2/Arpp) and muscle-specific RING finger proteins (MuRF1 and MuRF2), along the titin molecule were investigated in the present experiment after submaximal exhaustive exercise. Ten healthy men performed continuous drop jumping unilaterally on a sledge apparatus with a submaximal height until complete exhaustion. Five stress-sensing proteins were analysed by mRNA measurements from biopsies obtained immediately and 3 h after the exercise from exercised vastus lateralis muscle while control biopsies were obtained from non-exercised legs before the exercise. Decreased maximal jump height and increased serum creatine kinase activities as indirect markers for muscle damage and HSP27 immunostainings on muscle biopsies as a direct marker for muscle damage indicated that the current exercised protocol caused muscle damage. mRNA levels for four (MLP, Ankrd1/CARP, MuRF1 and MuRF2) out of the five studied stress sensors significantly (p exercise. The magnitude of MLP and Ankrd2 responses was related to the proportion of type 1 myofibres. Our data showed that the submaximal exhaustive exercise with subject's own physical fitness level activates titin-based stretch-sensing proteins. These results suggest that both degenerative and regenerative pathways are activated in very early phase after the exercise or probably already during the exercise. Activation of these proteins represents an initial step forward adaptive remodelling of the exercised muscle and may also be involved in the initiation of myofibre repair.

  1. The inhibitory effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker combined with radiation on the proliferation and invasion ability of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiong; Zhao Wei; Li Guiling; Zhang Sheng; Wu Gang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of valsartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 R) blocker, on radiosensitivity, invasive potential and proliferation activity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells(CNE-2) in vitro. Methods: Radiosensitization of valsartan on CNE-2 cells in vitro was investigated by colony forming assay. Effect of AT1R blocker combined with radiation on invasive potential of CNE-2 cells was evaluated using 24-well Matrigel invasion chambers (Transwell). Apoptosis-inducing effect of valsartan combined with radiation on apoptosis of CNE-2 was identified by flow cytometry (FCM). Results: When valsartan was given at 10 -9 , 10 -8 and 10 -7 mol/L combined with radiation, sensitivity enhancement ratios (SER) were 1.10, 1.20 and 1.36, and the invasive inhibition rates were 8.11%, 16.49% and 16.77%, respectively. The SER of valsartan on CNE-2 distinctly increased when the exposure time was increased. After 24 h exposure to 10 -8 mol/L valsartan combined with radiation, the apoptosis rate was 1.89% ± 0.09%, which was higher than 1.62% ± 0.06% in radiation alone group (t=4.79, P<0.05). Conclusions: AT1R blocker valsartan combined with radiation can significantly inhibit the proliferation activity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Valsartan combined with radiation can potently inhibit the invasive potential of CNE-2, which may be involved in the mechanism of valsartan treatment in vivo. (authors)

  2. Effects of Insulin Detemir and NPH Insulin on Body Weight and Appetite-Regulating Brain Regions in Human Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Golen, L.W.; Veltman, D.J.; IJzerman, R.G.; Deijen, J.B.; Heijboer, A.C.; Barkhof, F.; Drent, M.L.; Diamant, M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard

  3. The burden of co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and malaria in pregnant women in sub-saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Parise, Monica E.; Verhoeff, Francine H.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Newman, Robert D.; van Eijk, Anne M.; Rogerson, Stephen J.; Steketee, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malaria are among the leading causes of morbidity during pregnancy. We reviewed available information collected since the first report 15 years ago that HIV impaired the ability of pregnant women to control malaria parasitemia. Results

  4. THE HUMAN FUMARYLACETOACETATE GENE : CHARACTERIZATION OF RESTRICTION-FRAGMENT-LENGTH-POLYMORPHISMS AND IDENTIFICATION OF HAPLOTYPES IN TYROSINEMIA TYPE-1 AND PSEUDODEFICIENCY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROOTWELT, H; KVITTINGEN, EA; HOIE, K; AGSTERIBBE, E; HARTOG, M; BERGER, R

    Deficiency of human fumarylacetoacetase (FAH) activity results in hereditary tyrosinemia type I. Using the restriction enzymes BglII, KpnI and StuI and a 1.3-kb cDNA probe for the FAH gene, we have found 6 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). These RFLPs were utilised in 3 tyrosinemia

  5. Assessing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tropism: Comparison of Assays Using Replication-Competent Virus versus Plasma-Derived Pseudotyped Virions ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Noriaki; Su, Zhaohui; Wilkin, Timothy; Gulick, Roy M.; Flexner, Charles; Hughes, Michael D.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Giguel, Françoise; Greaves, Wayne L.; Coakley, Eoin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus by the Trofile assay was compared to that by assays using virus isolates or replication-competent recombinants. Concordance with the Trofile assay was good, but assays using replicating viruses did not increase substantially the ability to detect the presence of CXCR4-using virus. PMID:19494074

  6. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on body weight and appetite-regulating brain regions in human type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Golen, Larissa W.; Veltman, Dick J.; IJzerman, Richard G.; Deijen, Jan Berend; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Barkhof, Frederik; Drent, Madeleine L.; Diamant, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard

  7. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored CD4 supports human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication, but not cytopathic effect, in T-cell transfectants.

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, W L; Mittler, E S; Avery, P; Lawrence, J P; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Despite equivalent p24 antigen production, HSB-2 T cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPi)-linked CD4 were productively infected without cell death or syncytium formation, unlike HSB-2 transfectants expressing wild-type CD4 (wtCD4). HSB-2 transfectants dually expressing wtCD4 and GPi-linked CD4 formed syncytia and died. Thus, wtCD4 expression is critical for human immunodeficiency virus cytopathic effect in HSB-2 transfectants.

  8. 20 Years of Pediatric Benchmarking in Germany and Austria: Age-Dependent Analysis of Longitudinal Follow-Up in 63,967 Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bohn

    Full Text Available To investigate changes in diabetes treatment over the last two decades in three age-groups of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D from Germany and Austria.63,967 subjects (<18yr with T1D documented between 1995 and 2014 from the DPV-database were included and stratified according to age (0.5-<6, 6-<12, 12-<18yr. Regression models were applied for insulin regimens (<3 and ≥4 injection time points/day, or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII, use of rapid- and long acting insulin analogues, NPH insulin, and frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG/day. Models were adjusted for sex, diabetes duration, and migration background. P-value for trend was given.The number of subjects with <3 injection time points/day decreased from 1995 to 2014 to <5% in all age-groups (p<0.0001. Proportion of patients with ≥4 injections/day increased until the early 2000s, and then declined until 2014. This trend was not found in 6-<12yr olds (p = 0.3403. CSII increased in all age-groups (p<0.0001 with the highest increase in children <6 years (from 0.4% to 79.2%, and the lowest increase in 12-<18 year olds (from 1.0% to 38.9%. NPH insulin decreased in all age-groups (p<0.0001. Insulin analogues, especially rapid-acting, became more frequent in all age-groups (p<0.0001, accounting for 78.4% in 2014 for all subjects. The highest use was found in the youngest children (in 2014: 85.6%, the lowest use in 6-<12 year olds (in 2014: 72.9%. The number of SMBG/day increased from 2.2 to 6.4 with a similar rise in all age-groups (p<0.0001. Frequency was highest in subjects <6yr.In all age-groups, T1D treatment was intensified over the last 20 years. Age-specific differences in trends were particularly observed in the number of patients on CSII, in the number of patients with 4 or more injections/day, and in the frequency of SMBG/day.

  9. Genetic characterization of human herpesvirus type 1: Full-length genome sequence of strain obtained from an encephalitis case from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay P Bondre

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the full-length genome sequence generated from an Indian HSV-1 isolate shared close genetic relationship with the American KOS and Chinese CR38 strains which belonged to the Asian genetic lineage. Recombination analysis of Indian isolate demonstrated multiple recombination crossover points throughout the genome. This full-length genome sequence amplified from the Indian isolate would be helpful to study HSV evolution, genetic basis of differential pathogenesis, host-virus interactions and viral factors contributing towards differential clinical outcome in human infections.

  10. Therapy of Prostate Cancer Using a Human Antibody Targeting the Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor (IGF-IR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    delayed Majeed et al., 2005). All these studies suggest an essential role of IGF-IR in cellular transformation. Hongo et al. [1998] have identified...62:2942–2950. Hongo A, Yumet G, Resnicoff M, Romano G, O’Connor R, Baserga R. 1998. Inhibition of tumorigenesis and induc- tion of apoptosis in human...essential role of IGF-IR in cellular transformation. Hongo et al. [1998] have identified specific tyrosine residues on the b-subunit of the IGF-IR that

  11. Islet-like clusters derived from mesenchymal stem cells in Wharton's Jelly of the human umbilical cord for transplantation to control type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Ching Chao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a widespread interest in developing renewable sources of islet-replacement tissue for type I diabetes mellitus. Human mesenchymal cells isolated from the Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord (HUMSCs, which can be easily obtained and processed compared with embryonic and bone marrow stem cells, possess stem cell properties. HUMSCs may be a valuable source for the generation of islets. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HUMSCs were induced to transform into islet-like cell clusters in vitro through stepwise culturing in neuron-conditioned medium. To assess the functional stability of the islet-like cell clusters in vivo, these cell clusters were transplanted into the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats via laparotomy. Glucose tolerance was measured on week 12 after transplantation accompanied with immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy analysis. These islet-like cell clusters were shown to contain human C-peptide and release human insulin in response to physiological glucose levels. Real-time RT-PCR detected the expressions of insulin and other pancreatic beta-cell-related genes (Pdx1, Hlxb9, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, and Glut-2 in these islet-like cell clusters. The hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was significantly alleviated after xenotransplantation of islet-like cell clusters, without the use of immunosuppressants. In addition to the existence of islet-like cell clusters in the liver, some special fused liver cells were also found, which characterized by human insulin and nuclei-positive staining and possessing secretory granules. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we successfully differentiate HUMSCs into mature islet-like cell clusters, and these islet-like cell clusters possess insulin-producing ability in vitro and in vivo. HUMSCs in Wharton's Jelly of the umbilical cord seem to be the preferential source of stem cells to convert into insulin

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM

  13. GLUT-1-independent infection of the glioblastoma/astroglioma U87 cells by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2006-01-01

    The human glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) functions as a receptor for human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). GLUT-1 is a twelve-transmembrane cell surface receptor with six extracellular (ECL) and seven intracellular domains. To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we utilized polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the large extracellular domain of GLUT-1. The antibodies caused significant blocking of envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and pseudotyped virus infection of HeLa cells but had no significant effect on infection of U87 cells. This differential effect correlated with the detection of high-level surface expression of GLUT-1 on HeLa cells and very weak staining of U87 cells. To investigate this in terms of viral cytotropism, we cloned GLUT-1 cDNA from U87 cells and isolated two different versions of cDNA clones: the wild-type sequence (encoding 492 residues) and a mutant cDNA with a 5-base pair deletion (GLUT-1Δ5) between nucleotides 1329 and 1333. The deletion, also detected in genomic DNA, resulted in a frame-shift and premature termination producing a truncated protein of 463 residues. Transfection of the wild-type GLUT-1 but not GLUT-1Δ5 cDNA into CHO cells resulted in efficient surface expression of the human GLUT-1. Co-expression of GLUT-1 with GLUT-1Δ5 produces a trans-inhibition by GLUT-1Δ5 of GLUT-1-mediated HTLV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated fusion. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated physical interaction of the wild-type and mutant proteins. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated lower GLUT-1 RNA expression in U87 cells. We propose two mechanisms to account for the impaired cell surface expression of GLUT-1 on U87 cells: low GLUT-1 RNA expression and the formation of GLUT-1/GLUT-1Δ5 heterodimers that are retained intracellularly. Significant RNAi-mediated reduction of endogenous GLUT-1 expression impaired HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with HeLa cells but not with U87 cells. We propose a GLUT-1-independent mechanism

  14. Irradiation-induced regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in six human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artman, Meri Tuuli

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently used to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), although, it can be unsuccessful due to radiation resistance of the tumor. Currently, there are no established predictive markers for radiation resistance in SCCHN. The aim of this work was to investigate PAI-1 and VEGF secretion as markers for radiation resistance in six human SCCHN cell lines. The cell lines differed in their basal secretion levels and in their in vitro radiation sensitivity. PAI-1 and VEGF levels increased after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant correlation was detected between radiation-induced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion, which suggests that irradiation-induced secretion of PAI-1 and VEGF are partially regulated by related mechanisms. However, neither basal levels nor radiation-induced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion correlated with radiation resistance. Therefore, PAI-1 and VEGF are most likely not predictive markers for radiation resistance in SCCHN.

  15. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is a Predictor of Incident Non-AIDS Comorbidity and All-Cause Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte M.; Langkilde, Anne; Mejer, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Persistent inflammation and immune activation have been associated with non-AIDS comorbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We aimed to investigate the potential association between soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and incident non......-AIDS comorbidity and all-cause mortality in a well-treated HIV-infected population. suPAR was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and events of comorbidity and mortality were ascertained by registry linkage. The study showed an independent association between a high suPAR level at baseline and increased...... hazard rates for both non-AIDS comorbidities (cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease, liver disease, and cancer) and all-cause mortality....

  16. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 subtype C molecular variants among indigenous australians: new insights into the molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 in Australo-Melanesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cassar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HTLV-1 infection is endemic among people of Melanesian descent in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Molecular studies reveal that these Melanesian strains belong to the highly divergent HTLV-1c subtype. In Australia, HTLV-1 is also endemic among the Indigenous people of central Australia; however, the molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 infection in this population remains poorly documented. FINDINGS: Studying a series of 23 HTLV-1 strains from Indigenous residents of central Australia, we analyzed coding (gag, pol, env, tax and non-coding (LTR genomic proviral regions. Four complete HTLV-1 proviral sequences were also characterized. Phylogenetic analyses implemented with both Neighbor-Joining and Maximum Likelihood methods revealed that all proviral strains belong to the HTLV-1c subtype with a high genetic diversity, which varied with the geographic origin of the infected individuals. Two distinct Australians clades were found, the first including strains derived from most patients whose origins are in the North, and the second comprising a majority of those from the South of central Australia. Time divergence estimation suggests that the speciation of these two Australian clades probably occurred 9,120 years ago (38,000-4,500. CONCLUSIONS: The HTLV-1c subtype is endemic to central Australia where the Indigenous population is infected with diverse subtype c variants. At least two Australian clades exist, which cluster according to the geographic origin of the human hosts. These molecular variants are probably of very ancient origin. Further studies could provide new insights into the evolution and modes of dissemination of these retrovirus variants and the associated ancient migration events through which early human settlement of Australia and Melanesia was achieved.

  17. Stimulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I tax gene product involves the action of inducible cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnlein, E; Siekevitz, M; Ballard, D W; Lowenthal, J W; Rimsky, L; Bogérd, H; Hoffman, J; Wano, Y; Franza, B R; Greene, W C

    1989-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preferentially infects CD4+ T lymphocytes and may exist as a latent provirus within these cells for extended periods. The transition to a productive retroviral infection results in T-cell death and clinically may lead to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Accelerated production of infectious HIV-1 virions appears to be closely linked to a heightened state of T-cell activation. The transactivator (Tax) protein of the type I human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) can produce such an activated T-cell phenotype and augments activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. One Tax-responsive region within the HIV-1 long terminal repeat has been mapped to a locus composed of two 10-base-pair direct repeats sharing homology with the binding site for the eucaryotic transcription factor NF-kappaB (GGGACTTTCC). Tax-expressing Jurkat T cells contain one or more inducible cellular proteins that specifically associate with the HIV-1 enhancer at these binding sites. Microscale DNA affinity precipitation assays identified a Tax-inducible 86-kilodalton protein, HIVEN86A, as one of these HIV-1 enhancer-binding factors. The interaction of HIVEN86A, and presumably other cellular proteins, with the HIV-1 enhancer appears functionally important as oligonucleotides corresponding to this enhancer were sufficient to impart Tax inducibility to an unresponsive heterologous promoter. These findings suggest that the Tax-inducible cellular protein HIVEN86A plays an important role in the transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 enhancer. These specific protein-DNA interactions may also be important for the transition of HIV-1 from a latent to a productive mode of infection. Furthermore, these findings highlight an intriguing biological interplay between HTLV-1 and HIV-1 through a cellular transcriptional pathway that is normally involved in T-cell activation and growth.

  18. Immunization of rabbits with highly purified, soluble, trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein induces a vigorous B cell response and broadly cross-reactive neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald V Quinnan

    Full Text Available Previously we described induction of cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits using a soluble HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein (Env in an adjuvant containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL and QS21 (AS02A. Here, we compared different forms of the same HIV-1 strain R2 Env for antigenic and biophysical characteristics, and in rabbits characterized the extent of B cell induction for specific antibody expression and secretion and neutralizing responses. The forms of this Env that were produced in and purified from stably transformed 293T cells included a primarily dimeric gp140, a trimeric gp140 appended to a GCN4 trimerization domain (gp140-GCN4, gp140-GCN4 with a 15 amino acid flexible linker between the gp120 and gp41 ectodomain (gp140-GCN4-L, also trimeric, and a gp140 with the flexible linker purified from cell culture supernatants as either dimer (gp140-L(D or monomer (gp140-L(M. Multimeric states of the Env proteins were assessed by native gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation. The different forms of gp140 bound broadly cross-reactive neutralizing (BCN human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs similarly in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays. All Envs bound CD4i mAbs in the presence and absence of sCD4, as reported for the R2 Env. Weak neutralization of some strains of HIV-1 was seen after two additional doses in AS02A. Rabbits that were given a seventh dose of gp140-GCN4-L developed BCN responses that were weak to moderate, similar to our previous report. The specificity of these responses did not appear similar to that of any of the known BCN human mAbs. Induction of spleen B cell and plasma cells producing immunoglobulins that bound trimeric gp140-GCN4-L was vigorous, based on ELISpot and flow cytometry analyses. The results demonstrate that highly purified gp140-GCN4-L trimer in adjuvant elicits BCN responses in rabbits accompanied by vigorous B cell induction.

  19. Biodistribution of adult derived human liver stem cells following intraportal infusion in a 17-year-old patient with glycogenosis type 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defresne, Florence; Tondreau, Tatiana; Stéphenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Bourgois, Annick; Najimi, Mustapha; Jamar, François; Sokal, Etienne M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Current treatment of inherited liver inborn errors of metabolism in children consists in appropriate diet and drugs and, for unstable patients, final orthotopic liver transplantation. Unfortunately, liver transplantation remains not easily available because of organ shortage and imposes inherent risks and lifelong immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore alternative treatments are required. Hepatocytes transplantation and its limitations led to consider innovative alternative such as transplantation of adult derived human liver stem cells (ADLHSC). These cells present high proliferative capacity, good resistance to cryopreservation and ability to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells displaying mature hepatocyte functions. Aim: Biodistribution of ADHLSC had never been assessed after infusion through the portal vein in patients. This information is required to determine the safety of the method. Methods: ADHLSC were efficiently labelled with 111-Indium DTPA radiotracer and SPECT imaging was used for the acquisition of whole body imaging to document short term biodistribution of ADHLSC. Results: Following infusion through the portal vein, ADHLSC diffused homogenously throughout the liver and remained strictly within the targeted organ. Images were acquired until 5 days after infusion. At that time, no signal was observed in any other organs except the liver. Urinary excretion of 111-Indium DTPA was also monitored. Conclusion: For the first time, we documented the short term biodistribution of ADHLSC within the liver after infusion through the portal vein

  20. R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 with efficient DC-SIGN use is not selected for early after birth in vertically infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggren, Marie; Navér, Lars; Casper, Charlotte; Ehrnst, Anneka; Jansson, Marianne

    2013-04-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to C-type lectin receptors may result in either enhanced trans-infection of T-cells or virus degradation. We have investigated the efficacy of HIV-1 utilization of DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor, in the setting of intrauterine or intrapartum mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Viruses isolated from HIV-1-infected mothers at delivery and from their vertically infected children both shortly after birth and later during the progression of the disease were analysed for their use of DC-SIGN, binding and ability to trans-infect. DC-SIGN use of a child's earlier virus isolate tended to be reduced as compared with that of the corresponding maternal isolate. Furthermore, the children's later isolate displayed enhanced DC-SIGN utilization compared with that of the corresponding earlier virus. These results were also supported in head-to-head competition assays and suggest that HIV-1 variants displaying efficient DC-SIGN use are not selected for during intrauterine or intrapartum MTCT. However, viruses with increased DC-SIGN use may evolve later in paediatric HIV-1 infections.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 KK26-27 matrix mutants display impaired infectivity, circularization and integration but not nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannioui, Abdelkrim; Nelson, Elisabeth; Schiffer, Cecile

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the role of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 matrix protein (MA) during the virus replication afferent phase. Single-round infection of H9 T lymphocytes showed that the combined mutation of MA Lys residues 26-27 in MA reported nuclear localization signal (NLS)-1 [Haffar, O.K., Popov, S., Dubrovsky, L., Agostini, I., Tang, H., Pushkarsky, T., Nadler, S.G., Bukrinsky, M., 2000. Two nuclear localization signals in the HIV-1 matrix protein regulate nuclear import of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. J. Mol. Biol. 299 (2): 359-368] impaired infectivity, abrogated 2-LTR-circle formation and significantly reduced integration. However, the mutation did not affect viral DNA docking to chromatin in either interphasic or mitotic cells, indicating that MA N-terminal basic domain should not represent a major determinant of HIV-1 nuclear import in T lymphocytes. These data point to a previously unreported role of MA in the late, post-chromatin-binding, afferent phase of HIV-1 replication cycle

  2. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin α interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin α, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin α interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin α interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  3. L-Chicoric acid inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in vivo and is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, Ryan A.; Lee, Deborah J.; McDougall, Brenda R.; King, Peter J.; Victoria, Joseph; Mao Yingqun; Lei Xiangyang; Reinecke, Manfred G.; Robinson, W. Edward

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) must covalently join the viral cDNA into a host chromosome for productive HIV infection. L-Chicoric acid (L-CA) enters cells poorly but is a potent inhibitor of IN in vitro. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), L-CA inhibits integration at concentrations from 500 nM to 10 μM but also inhibits entry at concentrations above 1 μM. Using recombinant HIV IN, steady-state kinetic analyses with L-CA were consistent with a noncompetitive or irreversible mechanism of inhibition. IN, in the presence or absence of L-CA, was successively washed. Inhibition of IN diminished, demonstrating that L-CA was reversibly bound to the protein. These data demonstrate that L-CA is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of IN in vitro and of HIV integration in vivo. Thus, L-CA likely interacts with amino acids other than those which bind substrate

  4. Distribution of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 genomes in human spinal ganglia studied by PCR and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Y; Furuta, Y; Takasu, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, H; Matsukawa, S; Fujioka, Y; Takahashi, H; Kurata, T; Nagashima, K

    1997-06-01

    Clinical data indicate that the recurring herpes simplex virus (HSV) from oro-labial lesions is HSV subtype 1 and that the virus from genital lesions is HSV-2. This suggests that HSV-1 and HSV-2 reside in latent forms in the trigeminal ganglia and sacral ganglia, respectively. However, the distribution of latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in human spinal ganglia has not been fully examined. This report concerns the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) to such a study. By using PCR and employing the respective primers, HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNAs were detected in 207 of 524 samples from 262 spinal ganglia (from the cervical to the sacral ganglia) examined on both sides. The percentages of HSV-1 and HSV-2 detected in a given set of ganglia were similar, indicating an absence of site preference. By ISH, few but positive hybridization signals were detected evenly in sacral ganglia sections. The data suggest that regional specificity of recurrent HSV infections is not due to regional distribution of latent virus, but that local host factors may be important for recurrences.

  5. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elements: blood glucose control and insulin management, exercise, nutrition and support. Medication A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means ... crucial part of your daily routine. Learn more: Nutrition How foods ... meal plans Support Emotional support, while not often initially considered, plays ...

  6. Seroprevalence and correlates of human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type 1 antibodies among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoye AE

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Augustine Ejike Okoye,1 Obike Godswill Ibegbulam,2 Robinson Chukwudi Onoh,3 Paul Olisaemeka Ezeonu,3 Ngozi I Ugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,3 Chukwudi Simon Anigbo,2 Charles E Nonyelu21Department of Haematology and Immunology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 2Department of Haematology and Immunology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH, Ituku-Ozalla, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, NigeriaBackground: Human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus transmitted vertically from mother to child parenterally and sexually by infected lymphocytes.Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies and associated risk factors for HTLV-1 infection among pregnant women in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeast Nigeria.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2010. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited consecutively from the antenatal clinic. Five milliliters of blood was collected from each of the participants into a plain sterile bottle and allowed to clot. The serum obtained was stored at -20°C until required for analysis. The serum samples were then analyzed for antibodies to HTLV-1 using a one-step incubation double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Participants' demographic characteristics and degree of exposure to the risk factors associated with HTLV-1 infection were captured using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of results was done using SPSS version 17.Results: The average age of the pregnant women was 28.94 years (standard deviation 4.17. The age-group with the highest representation was those between the ages of 26 and 30 years. Thirty-six percent of the population was above 30 years old. The result of the tests showed that only one respondent, a 31-year-old pregnant woman tested positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Therefore, the

  7. Requirements for the selective degradation of CD4 receptor molecules by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halawani Dalia

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Vpu targets newly synthesized CD4 receptor for rapid degradation by a process reminiscent of endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD. Vpu is thought to act as an adaptor protein, connecting CD4 to the ubiquitin (Ub-proteasome degradative system through an interaction with β-TrCP, a component of the SCFβ-TrCP E3 Ub ligase complex. Results Here, we provide direct evidence indicating that Vpu promotes trans-ubiquitination of CD4 through recruitment of SCFβ-TrCP in human cells. To examine whether Ub conjugation occurs on the cytosolic tail of CD4, we substituted all four Ub acceptor lysine residues for arginines. Replacement of cytosolic lysine residues reduced but did not prevent Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation and ubiquitination, suggesting that Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation is not entirely dependent on the ubiquitination of cytosolic lysines and as such might also involve ubiquitination of other sites. Cell fractionation studies revealed that Vpu enhanced the levels of ubiquitinated forms of CD4 detected in association with not only the ER membrane but also the cytosol. Interestingly, significant amounts of membrane-associated ubiquitinated CD4 appeared to be fully dislocated since they could be recovered following sodium carbonate salt treatment. Finally, expression of a transdominant negative mutant of the AAA ATPase Cdc48/p97 involved in the extraction of ERAD substrates from the ER membrane inhibited Vpu-mediated CD4 degradation. Conclusion Taken together, these results are consistent with a model whereby HIV-1 Vpu targets CD4 for degradation by an ERAD-like process involving most likely poly-ubiquitination of the CD4 cytosolic tail by SCFβ-TrCP prior to dislocation of receptor molecules across the ER membrane by a process that depends on the AAA ATPase Cdc48/p97.

  8. Drug susceptibility to etravirine and darunavir among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-derived pseudoviruses in treatment-experienced patients with HIV/AIDS in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh-Kyung; Kim, Sung Soon; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Park, Mina; Oh, Hye-Ri; Choi, Ju-Yeon

    2015-04-09

    In South Korea, about 20 types of antiretroviral drugs are used in the treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Since 2010, raltegravir, etravirine, and darunavir have been spotlighted as new drugs for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced adults with resistant HIV-1 in South Korea. In this study, we investigated potential susceptibility of pseudoviruses derived from treatment-experienced Korean patients to etravirine vs efavirenz and to darunavir vs amprenavir and indinavir using a modified single-round assay. Pseudoviruses derived from nine treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV-1 were investigated by comparison with the wild-type strain pNL4-3. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated and drug susceptibility was compared. The intensity of genotypic drug resistance was classified based on the 'SIR' interpretation of the Stanford data base. Drug susceptibility was generally higher for etravirine and darunavir compared with efavirenz, amprenavir, and indinavir in pseudoviruses derived from treatment-experienced patients. Pseudoviruses derived from patients KRB4025 and KRB8014, who exhibited long-term use of protease inhibitors, showed an outside of tested drug concentration, especially for amprenavir and indinavir. However, they exhibited a lower fold-change in resistance to darunavir. Etravirine and darunavir have been used in HAART since 2010 in South Korea. Therefore, these antiretroviral drugs together with other newly introduced antiretroviral drugs are interesting for the optimal treatment of patients with treatment failure. This study may help to find a more effective HAART in the case of HIV-1 infected patients that have difficulty being treated.

  9. Influence of the CCR2-V64I Polymorphism on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Activity and on Chemokine Receptor Function of CCR2b, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Benhur; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Rana, Shalini; Yi, Yanji; Mellado, Mario; Frade, Jose M. R.; Martinez-A., Carlos; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Dean, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are used by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in conjunction with CD4 to infect cells. In addition, some virus strains can use alternative chemokine receptors, including CCR2b and CCR3, for infection. A polymorphism in CCR2 (CCR2-V64I) is associated with a 2- to 4-year delay in the progression to AIDS. To investigate the mechanism of this protective effect, we studied the expression of CCR2b and CCR2b-V64I, their chemokine and HIV-1 coreceptor ...

  10. In vivo activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat by UV type A (UV-A) light plus psoralen and UV-B light in the skin of transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Morrey, John D; Bourn, S M; Bunch, T D; Jackson, M K; Sidwell, R W; Barrows, L R; Daynes, R A; Rosen, C A

    1991-01-01

    UV irradiation has been shown to activate the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) in cell culture; however, only limited studies have been described in vivo. UV light has been categorized as UV-A (400 to 315 nm), -B (315 to 280 nm), or -C (less than 280 nm); the longer wavelengths are less harmful but more penetrative. Highly penetrative UV-A radiation constitutes the vast majority of UV sunlight reaching the earth's surface but is normally harmless. UV-B ir...

  11. Seroprevalence and correlates of human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type 1 antibodies among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Augustine Ejike; Ibegbulam, Obike Godswill; Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka; Ugwu, Ngozi I; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Anigbo, Chukwudi Simon; Nonyelu, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 is a retrovirus transmitted vertically from mother to child parenterally and sexually by infected lymphocytes. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies and associated risk factors for HTLV-1 infection among pregnant women in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeast Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2010. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited consecutively from the antenatal clinic. Five milliliters of blood was collected from each of the participants into a plain sterile bottle and allowed to clot. The serum obtained was stored at -20°C until required for analysis. The serum samples were then analyzed for antibodies to HTLV-1 using a one-step incubation double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Participants' demographic characteristics and degree of exposure to the risk factors associated with HTLV-1 infection were captured using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of results was done using SPSS version 17. The average age of the pregnant women was 28.94 years (standard deviation 4.17). The age-group with the highest representation was those between the ages of 26 and 30 years. Thirty-six percent of the population was above 30 years old. The result of the tests showed that only one respondent, a 31-year-old pregnant woman tested positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Therefore, the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital was 0.5%, with a 95% confidence interval of 0%-2.8%. Some of the sociodemographic risk factors of HTLV-1 infection found to be applicable to the 31-year-old woman who tested positive included positive history of previous sexually transmitted diseases, high parity, low socioeconomic status, female sex, and age above 30 years. The pregnant women that participated in this study were exposed to risk

  12. Mutations in matrix and SP1 repair the packaging specificity of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 mutant by reducing the association of Gag with spliced viral RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristic Natalia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral genome of HIV-1 contains several secondary structures that are important for regulating viral replication. The stem-loop 1 (SL1 sequence in the 5' untranslated region directs HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization and packaging into the virion. Without SL1, HIV-1 cannot replicate in human T cell lines. The replication restriction phenotype in the SL1 deletion mutant appears to be multifactorial, with defects in viral RNA dimerization and packaging in producer cells as well as in reverse transcription of the viral RNA in infected cells. In this study, we sought to characterize SL1 mutant replication restrictions and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of compensation in revertants. Results HIV-1 lacking SL1 (NLΔSL1 did not replicate in PM-1 cells until two independent non-synonymous mutations emerged: G913A in the matrix domain (E42K on day 18 postinfection and C1907T in the SP1 domain (P10L on day 11 postinfection. NLΔSL1 revertants carrying either compensatory mutation showed enhanced infectivity in PM-1 cells. The SL1 revertants produced significantly more infectious particles per nanogram of p24 than did NLΔSL1. The SL1 deletion mutant packaged less HIV-1 genomic RNA and more cellular RNA, particularly signal recognition particle RNA, in the virion than the wild-type. NLΔSL1 also packaged 3- to 4-fold more spliced HIV mRNA into the virion, potentially interfering with infectious virus production. In contrast, both revertants encapsidated 2.5- to 5-fold less of these HIV-1 mRNA species. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of RNA cross-linked with Gag in formaldehyde-fixed cells demonstrated that the compensatory mutations reduced the association between Gag and spliced HIV-1 RNA, thereby effectively preventing these RNAs from being packaged into the virion. The reduction of spliced viral RNA in the virion may have a major role in facilitating infectious virus production, thus restoring the infectivity of NLΔSL1

  13. Initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children in Europe and the United States: comparing clinical practice to guidelines and literature evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweel, Gwenda; Saavedra-Lozano, Jesus; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Ramilo, Octavio; de Groot, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    Several guidelines are available to guide the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children. The recommendations in these guidelines show significant variability. Because there is no well-established evidence on when to start HAART, it is left to the discretion of the pediatrician which guidelines to follow. We conducted a survey concerning the indications for starting antiretroviral therapy among pediatricians involved in the treatment of HIV-infected patients in Europe and the United States. We compared the results of this survey with the guidelines available at the time, the recently adapted guidelines and literature evidence. Our results indicate that in clinical practice HAART was initiated at higher viral loads and lower CD4 counts than recommended by the guidelines. American guidelines recommended and still recommend more aggressive treatment than the European guidelines, and this is reflected in clinical practice. Until recently all guidelines were based on long term risk analyses of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and death performed in cohort data. A recent short term risk analysis makes it possible to calculate the 6 or 12-month risk for progression to AIDS or death for an individual child. Because viral load and CD4 count are typically measured every 3 months, one can argue that it is clinically more relevant to base the decision of when to start HAART on the short term probability of disease progression. Guidelines in Europe are now based on this type of analysis. The American guidelines only adopted the thresholds for CD4 and viral load. The short term risk analysis also shows that the risk for developing AIDS varies markedly with age. This should be reflected in all guidelines. Determining the acceptable risk of disease progression is difficult and influenced by patient-, doctor- and culture-related factors. The controversy over whether or not to treat

  14. Induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) by hypoxia and irradiation in human head and neck carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, Daniela; Bayer, Christine; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke; Sweep, Fred CGJ; Pruschy, Martin; Mengele, Karin; Sprague, Lisa D; Molls, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) often contain highly radioresistant hypoxic regions, nonetheless, radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for these tumours. Reoxygenation during fractionated radiotherapy is desired to render these hypoxic tumour regions more radiosensitive. Hypoxia additionally leads to up-regulation of PAI-1, a protein involved in tumour progression and an established prognostic marker for poor outcome. However, the impact of reoxygenation and radiation on PAI-1 levels is not yet clear. Therefore, we investigated the kinetics of PAI-1 expression and secretion after hypoxia and reoxygenation, and determined the influence of ionizing radiation on PAI-1 levels in the two human SCCHN cell lines, BHY and FaDu. HIF-1α immunoblot was used to visualize the degree of hypoxia in the two cell lines. Cellular PAI-1 expression was investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy. ELISA was used to quantify relative changes in PAI-1 expression (cell lysates) and secretion (cell culture supernatants) in response to various lengths (2 – 4 h) of hypoxic exposure (< 0.66 % O 2 ), reoxygenation (24 h, 20 % O 2 ), and radiation (0, 2, 5 and 10 Gy). HIF-1α expression was induced between 2 and 24 h of hypoxic exposure. Intracellular PAI-1 expression was significantly increased in BHY and FaDu cells as early as 4 h after hypoxic exposure. A significant induction in secreted PAI-1 was seen after 12 to 24 h (BHY) and 8 to 24 h (FaDu) hypoxia, as compared to the normoxic control. A 24 h reoxygenation period caused significantly less PAI-1 secretion than a 24 h hypoxia period in FaDu cells. Irradiation led to an up-regulation of PAI-1 expression and secretion in both, BHY and FaDu cells. Our data suggest that both, short-term (~4 – 8 h) and long-term (~20 – 24 h) hypoxic exposure could increase PAI-1 levels in SCCHN in vivo. Importantly, radiation itself could lead to PAI-1 up-regulation in head and neck tumours, whereas reoxygenation of

  15. Critical amino acids within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein V4 N- and C-terminals contribute to virus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available The importance of the fourth variable (V4 region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env in virus infection has not been well clarified, though the polymorphism of this region has been found to be associated with disease progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. In the present work, we focused on the correlation between HIV-1 gp120 V4 region polymorphism and the function of the region on virus entry, and the possible mechanisms for how the V4 region contributes to virus infectivity. Therefore, we analyzed the differences in V4 sequences along with coreceptor usage preference from CCR5 to CXCR4 and examined the importance of the amino acids within the V4 region for CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic virus entry. In addition, we determined the influence of the V4 amino acids on Env expression and gp160 processing intracellularly, as well as the amount of Env on the pseudovirus surface. The results indicated that V4 tended to have a shorter length, fewer potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS, greater evolutionary distance, and a lower negative net charge when HIV-1 isolates switched from a coreceptor usage preference for CCR5 to CXCR4. The N- and C-terminals of the HIV-1 V4 region are highly conserved and critical to maintain virus entry ability, but only the mutation at position 417 in the context of ADA (a R5-tropic HIV-1 strain resulted in the ability to utilize CXCR4. In addition, 390L, 391F, 414I, and 416L are critical to maintain gp160 processing and maturation. It is likely that the hydrophobic properties and the electrostatic surface potential of gp120, rather than the conformational structure, greatly contribute to this V4 functionality. The findings provide information to aid in the understanding of the functions of V4 in HIV-1 entry and offer a potential target to aid in the development of entry inhibitors.

  16. Pediatric Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) works with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other research activities.

  17. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  18. Lipid peroxidation and total cholesterol in HAART-naïve patients infected with circulating recombinant forms of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Teto

    Full Text Available HIV infection has commonly been found to affect lipid profile and antioxidant defense.To determine the effects of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and viral subtype on patient's cholesterol and oxidative stress markers, and determine whether in the absence of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART, these biochemical parameters could be useful in patient's management and monitoring disease progression in Cameroon. For this purpose, we measured total cholesterol (TC, LDL cholesterol (LDLC, HDL cholesterol (HDLC, total antioxidant ability (TAA, lipid peroxidation indices (LPI, and malondialdehyde (MDA in HIV negative persons and HIV positive HAART-naïve patients infected with HIV-1 group M subtypes.We measured serum TC, LDLC, HDLC, plasma MDA, and TAA concentrations, and calculated LPI indices in 151 HIV-positive HAART-naïve patients and 134 seronegative controls. We also performed gene sequence analysis on samples from 30 patients to determine the effect of viral genotypes on these biochemical parameters. We also determined the correlation between CD4 cell count and the above biochemical parameters.We obtained the following controls/patients values for TC (1.96±0.54/1. 12±0. 48 g/l, LDLC (0. 67±0. 46/0. 43±0. 36 g/l, HDLC (105. 51±28. 10/46. 54±23. 36 mg/dl TAA (0. 63±0. 17/0. 16±0. 16 mM, MDA (0. 20±0. 07/0. 41±0. 10 µM and LPI (0. 34±0. 14/26. 02±74. 40. In each case, the difference between the controls and patients was statistically significant (p<0.05. There was a positive and statistically significant Pearson correlation between CD4 cell count and HDLC (r = +0.272; p<0.01, TAA (r = +0.199; p<0.05 and a negative and statistically significant Pearson correlation between CD4 cell count and LPI (r = -0.166; p<0.05. Pearson correlation between CD4 cell count and TC, CD4cell count and LDLC was positive but not statistically significant while it was negative but not statistically significant with MDA. The

  19. Pediatric MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric MS Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Support Pediatric Providers ... system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS In 2018 the U.S. Food and Drug ...

  20. A single amino acid substitution within the transmembrane domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu protein renders simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVKU-1bMC33) susceptible to rimantadine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Lisa M.; Pacyniak, Erik; Miller, Jean-Marie; Hill, M. Sarah; Stephens, Edward B.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the transmembrane domain (TM) of the Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contributes to the pathogenesis of SHIV KU-1bMC33 in macaques and that the TM domain of Vpu could be replaced with the M2 protein viroporin from influenza A virus. Recently, we showed that the replacement of the TM domain of Vpu with that of the M2 protein of influenza A virus resulted in a virus (SHIV M2 ) that was sensitive to rimantadine [Hout, D.R., Gomez, M.L., Pacyniak, E., Gomez, L.M., Inbody, S.H., Mulcahy, E.R., Culley, N., Pinson, D.M., Powers, M.F., Wong, S.W., Stephens, E.B., 2006. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV KU-1bMC33 ) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques. Virology 344, 541-558]. Based on previous studies of the M2 protein which have shown that the His-X-X-X-Trp motif within the M2 is essential to the function of the M2 proton channel, we have constructed a novel SHIV in which the alanine at position 19 of the TM domain was replaced with a histidine residue resulting in the motif His-Ile-Leu-Val-Trp. The SHIV VpuA19H replicated with similar kinetics as the parental SHIV KU-1bMC33 and pulse-chase analysis revealed that the processing of viral proteins was similar to SHIV KU-1bMC33 . This SHIV VpuA19H virus was found to be more sensitive to the M2 ion channel blocker rimantadine than SHIV M2 . Electron microscopic examination of SHIV VpuA19H -infected cells treated with rimantadine revealed an accumulation of viral particles at the cell surface and within intracellular vesicles, which was similar to that previously observed to SHIV M2 -infected cells treated with rimantadine. These data indicate that the Vpu protein of HIV-1 can be converted into a rimantadine-sensitive ion channel with the alteration of one amino acid and provide

  1. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in the presence of 30% autologous serum. Blocking the CR2 ligand-binding site with monoclonal antibody (mAb) FE8 resulted in significant reduction (37.9+/-11.9%) in C3-fragment deposition, whereas MAC formation was only marginally affected (12.1+/-22.2% reduction). Blocking the CR1 binding-site resulted...

  2. Estratégias que reduzem a transmissão vertical do vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 Strategies to avoid vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Duarte

    2005-12-01

    para evitar a infecção aguda pelo HIV-1 neste período, o que aumenta sobremaneira as taxas de TV desse vírus.Knowledge about the factors or situations that influence the vertical transmission (VT of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1 has led to the implementation of strategies which have promoted a rate decline along the years, from 40% to less than 3% nowadays. One of the major advances in the area has been the prophylactic administration of zidovudine (AZT, in the prenatal phase (oral route, in the predelivery phase (intravenous route and to the newborn (oral route. This intervention may reduce HIV-1 VT 68%, thus being the most effective isolated strategy used so far. In the chronological sequence of advances, it has been observed that a high viral load is the main risk indicator for this type of transmission. As AZT does not reduce the viral load and does not control the residual rate observed in HIV-1 VT, the use of prophylactic schemes using three antiretroviral drugs has been encouraged. Elective caesarean section completes the range of obstetric strategies with major impact on the reduction of HIV-1 VT. Its effectiveness is linked to the observation of the criteria for its indication: viral load assessed after the 34th week of pregnancy with levels over 1000 copies/mL, gestation over 38 weeks confirmed by ultrasonography, intact chorioamniotic membranes, and performed before labor has started. In cases where normal delivery is indicated, it should be remembered that prolonged chorioamniorrhexis, invasive manipulation of the fetus, delivery with instruments and episiotomy are situations to be avoided. Among the postnatal interventions considered important for the reduction of HIV-1 VT are: pediatric reception (this should be done by trained professionals, avoiding microtraumas in the mucosa during the sucking maneuvers, use of neonatal AZT (for a period of six weeks and bottle feeding. Special attention should be given to the orientation for the mother, in

  3. UV-induced transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat and UV-induced secretion of an extracellular factor that induces HIV-1 transcription in nonirradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, B.; Kraemer, M.R.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Ponta, H.; Herrlich, P.

    1989-01-01

    UV irradiation, but not visible sunlight, induces the transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Chimeric constructs carrying all or parts of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat linked to an indicator gene were transfected into HeLa cells or murine and human T-cell lines, and their response to irradiation was tested. The cis-acting element conferring UV responsiveness is identical to the sequence binding transcription factor NF kappa B. UV irradiation enhances NF kappa B binding activity as assayed by gel retardation experiments. Interestingly, the requirement for UV irradiation can be replaced by cocultivation of transfected cells with UV-irradiated nontransfected (HIV-1-negative) cells. A UV-induced extracellular protein factor is detected in the culture medium conditioned by UV-treated cells. The factor is produced upon UV irradiation by several murine and human cell lines, including HeLa, Molt-4, and Jurkat, and acts on several cells. These data suggest that the UV response of keratinocytes in human skin can be magnified and spread to deeper layers that are more shielded, including the Langerhans cells, and that this indirect UV response may contribute to the activation of HIV-1 in humans

  4. Barn og diabetes type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Marte Elise; Sagbakken, Sina Bekkelund

    2017-01-01

    Bacheloroppgave sykepleie, 2017 Bakgrunn: Vi har valgt denne problemstillingen fordi diabetes type 1 er svært utbredt hos barn i Norge. Videre har vi lite erfaringer med barn og ønsket å lære mer om denne pasientgruppen. Vi ønsket videre å se på hvordan vi kan undervise og veilede for å gi god og hensiktsmessig sykepleie til barn og deres familier. Hensikt: Finne ut hvordan sykepleier kan fremme egenomsorg hos barn med diabetes gjennom veiledning og undervisning. Dette er noe som sykepl...

  5. New insights into prevalence, genetic diversity, and proviral load of human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2 in pregnant women in Gabon in equatorial central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etenna, Sonia Lekana-Douki; Caron, Mélanie; Besson, Guillaume; Makuwa, Maria; Gessain, Antoine; Mahé, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2008-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is highly endemic in areas of central Africa; mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission are considered to be the predominant routes. To determine the prevalence and subtypes of HTLV-1/2 in pregnant women in Gabon, we conducted an epidemiological survey in the five main cities of the country. In 907 samples, the HTLV-1 seroprevalence was 2.1%, which is lower than that previously reported. Only one case of HTLV-2 infection was found. The HTLV-1 seroprevalence increased with age and differed between regions (P cosmopolitan subtype A. The new strains of subtype B exhibited wide genetic diversity, but there was no evidence of clustering of specific genomes within geographical regions of the country. Some strains were closely related to simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 strains of great apes, suggesting that in these areas some HTLV-1 strains could arise from relatively recent interspecies transmission. The sole HTLV-2 strain belonged to subtype B. In this study we showed that the prevalence of HTLV-1 in the southeast is one of the highest in the world for pregnant women.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 reservoirs: mechanisms of latency and therapeutic strategies = Reservorios del virus de inmunodeficiencia humana tipo 1 (VIH-1: mecanismos de latencia y estrategias terapéuticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcia Anaya, Eliuth David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 can establish a latent infection in different kind of cells, which constitute the cellular reservoirs for the virus and allow its maintenance in the body indefinitely, even in patients with antiretroviral treatment. The main reservoirs of the HIV-1 are resting CD4+ T cells, although cells like monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, and other cells like hematopoietic stem cells and mast cells may be reservoirs of the virus. There are different mechanisms that contribute to the establishment and maintenance of latency in those cells, and include transcriptional interference, low availability of transcription factors, chromatin condensation, some microRNA that block viral translation, and so on. The knowledge of these mechanisms is crucial for the development of new drugs that may eliminate the virus from the body and lead to a cure.

  7. Summary of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development-best pharmaceuticals for Children Act Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Amidon, Gordon L; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A; Knipp, Gregory T

    2012-11-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community to be an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement, and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric-based classification system. Because there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability, and potentially biorelevant solubilities at different ages, the PBCS Working Group focused on identifying age-specific issues that need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. We summarized the findings of the PBCS Working Group and provided insights into considerations required for the development of a PBCS. Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative Workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS Working Group considered several high-level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS Working Group identified a number of knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to develop a rigorous PBCS. It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it needs to be broken down into several different age groups that account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal (GI) transit. Several critical knowledge gaps were identified, including (1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the GI tract, in the liver, and in the kidney; (2) an incomplete understanding of age-based changes in the GI, liver, and kidney physiology; (3) a clear need to better understand

  8. Different presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia: meta-analysis and analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Fernández J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available José Gutiérrez-Fernández,1 Juan de Dios Luna del Castillo,2 Sara Mañanes-González,1 José Antonio Carrillo-Ávila,1 Blanca Gutiérrez,3 Jorge A Cervilla,3 Antonio Sorlózano-Puerto1 1Department of Microbiology, 2Department of Statistics and Operation Research, 3Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Neurosciences and CIBERSAM, School of Medicine and Biohealth Research Institute (Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria IBS-Granada, University of Granada, Granada, Spain Abstract: In the present study we have performed both a meta-analysis and an analytical study exploring the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in a sample of 143 schizophrenic patients and 143 control subjects. The meta-analysis was performed on papers published up to April 2014. The presence of serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. The detection of microbial DNA in total peripheral blood was performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. The meta-analysis showed that: 1 C. pneumoniae DNA in blood and brain are more common in schizophrenic patients; 2 there is association with parasitism by T. gondii, despite the existence of publication bias; and 3 herpes viruses were not more common in schizophrenic patients. In our sample only anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin G was more prevalent and may be a risk factor related to schizophrenia, with potential value for prevention. Keywords: meta-analysis, analytical study, Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, Toxoplasma gondii, schizophrenia

  9. Characterization of a beta 1----3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase associated with synthesis of type 1 and type 2 lacto-series tumor-associated antigens from the human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, E H

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that activation of a normally unexpressed beta 1----3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase is responsible for the accumulation of a wide diversity of both type 1 and 2 lacto-series antigens in human colonic adenocarcinomas. A beta 1----3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase has been solubilized from the human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW403 by 0.2% Triton X-100 and some of its properties have been studied. The enzyme was active over a broad pH range from 5.8 to 7.5 and had a strict requirement for Mn2+ as a divalent metal ion. Transfer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to lactosylceramide was optimal when assayed in the presence of a final concentration of Triton CF-54 of 0.3%. Inclusion of CDPcholine in the reaction mixture stimulated the activity by protecting the UDP[14C]GlcNAc from hydrolysis by endogenous enzymes. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme were studied. Km values for acceptors nLc4 and nLc6 were determined to be 0.19 mM for each. However, the Vmax values calculated for these acceptors were 150 and 110 pmol/h/mg protein for nLc4 and nLc6, respectively, suggesting reduced potential for further elongation as the chain length increases. The Km for UDPGlcNAc was determined to be 0.17 mM. Studies of the acceptor specificity have indicated transfer of GlcNAc occurs mainly to type 2 chain nonfucosylated structures. However, elongation of the type 1 chain structure Lc4 was also detected.

  10. Exploring diabetes type 1-related stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Samereh; Abazari, Parvaneh; Mardanian, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Empowerment of people with diabetes means integrating diabetes with identity. However, others' stigmatization can influence it. Although diabetes is so prevalent among Iranians, there is little knowledge about diabetes-related stigma in Iran. The present study explored diabetes-related stigma in people living with type 1 diabetes in Isfahan. A conventional content analysis was used with in-depth interview with 26 people with and without diabetes from November 2011 to July 2012. A person with type 1 diabetes was stigmatized as a miserable human (always sick and unable, death reminder, and intolerable burden), rejected marriage candidate (busy spouse, high-risk pregnant), and deprived of a normal life [prisoner of (to must), deprived of pleasure]. Although, young adults with diabetes undergo all aspects of the social diabetes-related stigma; in their opinion they were just deprived of a normal life. It seems that in Isfahan, diabetes-related stigma is of great importance. In this way, conducting an appropriate intervention is necessary to improve the empowerment process in people with type 1 diabetes in order to reduce the stigma in the context.

  11. The serotonergic anatomy of the developing human medulla oblongata: implications for pediatric disorders of homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Hannah C; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Haynes, Robin L; Rognum, Ingvar J; Paterson, David S

    2011-07-01

    The caudal serotonergic (5-HT) system is a critical component of a medullary "homeostatic network" that regulates protective responses to metabolic stressors such as hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hyperthermia. We define anatomically the caudal 5-HT system in the human medulla as 5-HT neuronal cell bodies located in the raphé (raphé obscurus, raphé magnus, and raphé pallidus), extra-raphé (gigantocellularis, paragigantocellularis lateralis, intermediate reticular zone, lateral reticular nucleus, and nucleus subtrigeminalis), and ventral surface (arcuate nucleus). These 5-HT neurons are adjacent to all of the respiratory- and autonomic-related nuclei in the medulla where they are positioned to modulate directly the responses of these effector nuclei. In the following review, we highlight the topography and development of the caudal 5-HT system in the human fetus and infant, and its inter-relationships with nicotinic, GABAergic, and cytokine receptors. We also summarize pediatric disorders in early life which we term "developmental serotonopathies" of the caudal (as well as rostral) 5-HT domain and which are associated with homeostatic imbalances. The delineation of the development and organization of the human caudal 5-HT system provides the critical foundation for the neuropathologic elucidation of its disorders directly in the human brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Pediatric Formulation Initiative: selected reports from working groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoia, George P; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Mattison, Donald

    2008-11-01

    The Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) is a project of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The PFI was established to address the issue of the lack of appropriate formulations in children and to use this activity as a means to improve pediatric formulations, as mandated by the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act of 2002 and 2007. The PFI began in 2005 with the formation of 3 working groups-Scientific, Economics, and Taste and Flavor. These groups began the process of identifying issues, gathering needed information, and considering possible ways to overcome barriers to the development of pediatric drug formulations. The purpose of this supplement was to provide details of the working groups' activities through presentation of full-length articles. Also presented is an article that discusses the 2007 European Union (EU) regulation on medicinal products for pediatric use. Information for this article was gathered from the proceedings of a PFI workshop, sponsored by the NICHD, that was held in Bethesda, Maryland, on December 6 and 7, 2005, as well as postworkshop discussions of the different working groups. The increased awareness that the majority of medications used today have not been labeled for use in children, and have not been tested to define safety, efficacy, and appropriate dosing, has led to the passage of legislation in the United States and in the EU to create incentives to stimulate the testing of drugs in this special population. It is imperative that the problems associated with the compounding and use of extemporaneous formulations as described in this supplement be addressed. Regulatory barriers to the availability of commercially developed pediatric formulations in different countries will need to be minimized or removed. New drug delivery systems will need to be tested and made available to pediatric patients. Further research in the mediators of bitter taste and study of taste blockers

  13. Acurácia, utilidade e complicações da monitorização subcutânea contínua da glicose (CGMS em pacientes pediátricos com diabetes tipo 1 Accuracy, utility and complications of continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico F. R. Maia

    2005-08-01

    median value of 157 mg/dl (< 140 mg/dl. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was detected in 46.7% of these patients. The evaluation of A1c levels in eight (50% patients before continuous glucose monitoring and after 3 months showed a significantly lower level of A1c in this population (8.18±1.5 vs. 7.28±1.3; p = 0.034. The therapeutic management of type 1 diabetes was changed in 100% of patients. No complications were detected in 93.7% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous glucose monitoring system showed to be a very safe, well-tolerated and highly accurate method, with a low complication rate. It is a good method to identify glucose excursion and postprandial hyperglycemia, and to improve metabolic changes in therapeutic strategies, with a significant impact on the A1c levels of pediatric diabetic patients. The efficacy of the continuous glucose monitoring system in detecting hypoglycemia is still unclear in the medical literature.

  14. Making the invisible visible: searching for human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in Brazilian patients with viral hepatitis B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Caterino-de-Araujo

    Full Text Available With this study, the authors hope to alert clinicians regarding the presence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/-2 infections in patients with viral hepatitis B and C in Brazil. HTLV-1/-2 were detected in 1.3% of hepatitis B virus (HBV- and 5.3% of hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected blood samples sent for laboratory viral load measurements. A partial association of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HTLV-1/-2 infection was detected in patients with HCV (HIV+, 27.3%, whereas this association was almost 100% in HBV-infected patients (HIV+, all except one. The high prevalence of HTLV-1/-2 infection among patients with hepatitis C was of concern, as HTLV-1/-2 could change the natural course of subsequent liver disease. The authors suggest including HTLV-1/-2 serology in the battery of tests used when following patients with viral hepatitis in Brazil, regardless of the HIV status.

  15. Making the invisible visible: searching for human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) in Brazilian patients with viral hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele; Alves, Fabiana Aparecida; Campos, Karoline Rodrigues; Lemos, Marcílio Figueiredo; Moreira, Regina Célia

    2018-02-01

    With this study, the authors hope to alert clinicians regarding the presence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/-2) infections in patients with viral hepatitis B and C in Brazil. HTLV-1/-2 were detected in 1.3% of hepatitis B virus (HBV)- and 5.3% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected blood samples sent for laboratory viral load measurements. A partial association of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and HTLV-1/-2 infection was detected in patients with HCV (HIV+, 27.3%), whereas this association was almost 100% in HBV-infected patients (HIV+, all except one). The high prevalence of HTLV-1/-2 infection among patients with hepatitis C was of concern, as HTLV-1/-2 could change the natural course of subsequent liver disease. The authors suggest including HTLV-1/-2 serology in the battery of tests used when following patients with viral hepatitis in Brazil, regardless of the HIV status.

  16. Interleukin-1 antagonism in type 1 diabetes of recent onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Antoinette; Bundy, Brian; Becker, Dorothy J

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, but until now no randomised, controlled trials of blockade of the key innate immune mediator interleukin-1 have been done. We aimed to assess whether canakinumab, a human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1...... antibody, or anakinra, a human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, improved β-cell function in recent-onset type 1 diabetes....

  17. [Neuropsychological performance in neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Del Castillo, Lilia; Martínez Bermejo, Antonio; Portellano Pérez, José Antonio; Tirado Requero, Pilar; Garriz Luis, Alexandra; Velázquez Fragua, Ramón

    2017-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder with various clinical manifestations that affect the peripheral and central nervous system, as well as the skin, bones and endocrine and vascular system. There is still insufficient knowledge of neuropsychological effects of NF1 on children, and there is some controversy about the cognitive deficits that defines the cognitive profile of patients affected by this disorder. In this study an analysis is made of the neuropsychological performance of a group of patients affected by NF1, compared with a control group of healthy children. A comparison was made between the neuropsychological performance of a group of 23 boys and girls with a mean age of 8.7 years (+/-1.39) and diagnosed with NF1, and a control group consisting of 21 healthy children, with mean age of 8.9 years (+/- 1.41) and with similar socio-demographic characteristics. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) was applied to evaluate the subjects of both groups. The group of patients affected with NF1 showed a lower performance in every primary index of WISC IV: Verbal Comprehension Index, Fluid Reasoning Index, Working Memory Index, Processing Speed Index, and full Scale IQ. Only in two subscales were no statistically significant differences observed: similarities and coding. The results show subtle and generalised neuropsychological alterations in the sample of children affected with NF1, which affect most of cognitive domains that have been evaluated. Proper specific and early neuropsychological treatment should be provided in order to prevent the high risk for these children of presenting learning difficulties and school failure. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Sequential immunization with V3 peptides from primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 produces cross-neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates with a matching narrow-neutralization sequence motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Yasuyuki; Takizawa, Mari; Murakami, Toshio; Maeda, Hiroaki; Kimachi, Kazuhiko; Yonemura, Hiroshi; Koyanagi, Satoshi; Shiosaki, Kouichi; Higuchi, Hirofumi; Makizumi, Keiichi; Nakashima, Toshihiro; Osatomi, Kiyoshi; Tokiyoshi, Sachio; Matsushita, Shuzo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2006-06-01

    An antibody response capable of neutralizing not only homologous but also heterologous forms of the CXCR4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) MNp and CCR5-tropic primary isolate HIV-1 JR-CSF was achieved through sequential immunization with a combination of synthetic peptides representing HIV-1 Env V3 sequences from field and laboratory HIV-1 clade B isolates. In contrast, repeated immunization with a single V3 peptide generated antibodies that neutralized only type-specific laboratory-adapted homologous viruses. To determine whether the cross-neutralization response could be attributed to a cross-reactive antibody in the immunized animals, we isolated a monoclonal antibody, C25, which neutralized the heterologous primary viruses of HIV-1 clade B. Furthermore, we generated a humanized monoclonal antibody, KD-247, by transferring the genes of the complementary determining region of C25 into genes of the human V region of the antibody. KD-247 bound with high affinity to the "PGR" motif within the HIV-1 Env V3 tip region, and, among the established reference antibodies, it most effectively neutralized primary HIV-1 field isolates possessing the matching neutralization sequence motif, suggesting its promise for clinical applications involving passive immunizations. These results demonstrate that sequential immunization with B-cell epitope peptides may contribute to a humoral immune-based HIV vaccine strategy. Indeed, they help lay the groundwork for the development of HIV-1 vaccine strategies that use sequential immunization with biologically relevant peptides to overcome difficulties associated with otherwise poorly immunogenic epitopes.

  19. Measuring pediatric hematology-oncology fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism: A novel assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Agrawal, Anurag K; Bhatia, Nita; Cronin, Angel; Jubran, Rima; Kent, Paul; Kersun, Leslie; Rao, Amulya Nageswara; Rose, Melissa; Savelli, Stephanie; Sharma, Mukta; Shereck, Evan; Twist, Clare J; Wang, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Educators in pediatric hematology-oncology lack rigorously developed instruments to assess fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism. We developed a novel 15-item self-assessment instrument to address this gap in fellowship training. Fellows (N = 122) were asked to assess their skills in five domains: balancing competing demands of fellowship, caring for the dying patient, confronting depression and burnout, responding to challenging relationships with patients, and practicing humanistic medicine. An expert focus group predefined threshold scores on the instrument that could be used as a cutoff to identify fellows who need support. Reliability and feasibility were assessed and concurrent validity was measured using three established instruments: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Flourishing Scale (FS), and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE). For 90 participating fellows (74%), the self-assessment proved feasible to administer and had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.81). It was moderately correlated with the FS and MBI (Pearson's r = 0.41 and 0.4, respectively) and weakly correlated with the JSPE (Pearson's r = 0.15). Twenty-eight fellows (31%) were identified as needing support. The self-assessment had a sensitivity of 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 31-69) and a specificity of 77% (95% CI: 65-87) for identifying fellows who scored poorly on at least one of the three established scales. We developed a novel assessment instrument for use in pediatric fellowship training. The new scale proved feasible and demonstrated internal consistency reliability. Its moderate correlation with other established instruments shows that the novel assessment instrument provides unique, nonredundant information as compared to existing scales. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  1. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Reynel; Silvestri, Romano; Ragno, Rino; Artico, Marino; De Martino, Gabriella; La Regina, Giuseppe; Crespan, Emmanuele; Zanoli, Samantha; Hübscher, Ulrich; Spadari, Silvio; Maga, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfone (IAS) nonnucleoside inhibitors have been shown to potently inhibit the growth of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but their exact mechanism of action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we describe the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by selected IAS derivatives. Our results showed that, depending on the substitutions introduced in the IAS common pharmacophore, these compounds can be made selective for different enzyme-substrate complexes. Moreover, we showed that the molecular basis for this selectivity was a different association rate of the drug to a particular enzymatic form along the reaction pathway. By comparing the activities of the different compounds against wild-type RT and the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutant Lys103Asn, it was possible to hypothesize, on the basis of their mechanism of action, a rationale for the design of drugs which could overcome the steric barrier imposed by the Lys103Asn mutation. PMID:16251294

  2. Repression of tax expression is associated both with resistance of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected T cells to killing by tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and with impaired tumorigenicity in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Machiko; Ohashi, Takashi; Nishikawa, Keiko; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Furuta, Rika A; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Hanabuchi, Shino; Harashima, Nanae; Masuda, Takao; Kannagi, Mari

    2004-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Although the viral transactivation factor, Tax, has been known to have apparent transforming ability, the exact function of Tax in ATL development is still not clear. To understand the role of Tax in ATL development, we introduced short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against Tax in a rat HTLV-1-infected T-cell line. Our results demonstrated that expression of siRNA targeting Tax successfully downregulated Tax expression. Repression of Tax expression was associated with resistance of the HTLV-1-infected T cells to Tax-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte killing. This may be due to the direct effect of decreased Tax expression, because the Tax siRNA did not alter the expression of MHC-I, CD80, or CD86. Furthermore, T cells with Tax downregulation appeared to lose the ability to develop tumors in T-cell-deficient nude rats, in which the parental HTLV-1-infected cells induce ATL-like lymphoproliferative disease. These results indicated the importance of Tax both for activating host immune response against the virus and for maintaining the growth ability of infected cells in vivo. Our results provide insights into the mechanisms how the host immune system can survey and inhibit the growth of HTLV-1-infected cells during the long latent period before the onset of ATL.

  3. The human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 p30II protein activates p53 and induces the TIGAR and suppresses oncogene-induced oxidative stress during viral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Megan; Hutchison, Tetiana; Malu, Aditi; White, Averi; Kim, Janice; Gardner, Rachel; Smith, Katie; Nelson, Katherine; Bergeson, Rachel; McKee, Ryan; Harrod, Carolyn; Ratner, Lee; Lüscher, Bernhard; Martinez, Ernest; Harrod, Robert

    2018-05-01

    In normal cells, aberrant oncogene expression leads to the accumulation of cytotoxic metabolites, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can cause oxidative DNA-damage and apoptosis as an intrinsic barrier against neoplastic disease. The c-Myc oncoprotein is overexpressed in many lymphoid cancers due to c-myc gene amplification and/or 8q24 chromosomal translocations. Intriguingly, p53 is a downstream target of c-Myc and hematological malignancies, such as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), frequently contain wildtype p53 and c-Myc overexpression. We therefore hypothesized that p53-regulated pro-survival signals may thwart the cell's metabolic anticancer defenses to support oncogene-activation in lymphoid cancers. Here we show that the Tp53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) promotes c-myc oncogene-activation by the human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) latency-maintenance factor p30 II , associated with c-Myc deregulation in ATL clinical isolates. TIGAR prevents the intracellular accumulation of c-Myc-induced ROS and inhibits oncogene-induced cellular senescence in ATL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and multiple myeloma cells with elevated c-Myc expression. Our results allude to a pivotal role for p53-regulated antioxidant signals as mediators of c-Myc oncogenic functions in viral and non-viral lymphoid tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. De Novo Assembly of Human Herpes Virus Type 1 (HHV-1) Genome, Mining of Non-Canonical Structures and Detection of Novel Drug-Resistance Mutations Using Short- and Long-Read Next Generation Sequencing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitros, Timokratis; Harrison, Ian; Piorkowska, Renata; Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Mbisa, Jean Lutamyo

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus type 1 (HHV-1) has a large double-stranded DNA genome of approximately 152 kbp that is structurally complex and GC-rich. This makes the assembly of HHV-1 whole genomes from short-read sequencing data technically challenging. To improve the assembly of HHV-1 genomes we have employed a hybrid genome assembly protocol using data from two sequencing technologies: the short-read Roche 454 and the long-read Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencers. We sequenced 18 HHV-1 cell culture-isolated clinical specimens collected from immunocompromised patients undergoing antiviral therapy. The susceptibility of the samples to several antivirals was determined by plaque reduction assay. Hybrid genome assembly resulted in a decrease in the number of contigs in 6 out of 7 samples and an increase in N(G)50 and N(G)75 of all 7 samples sequenced by both technologies. The approach also enhanced the detection of non-canonical contigs including a rearrangement between the unique (UL) and repeat (T/IRL) sequence regions of one sample that was not detectable by assembly of 454 reads alone. We detected several known and novel resistance-associated mutations in UL23 and UL30 genes. Genome-wide genetic variability ranged from genomes will be useful in determining genetic determinants of drug resistance, virulence, pathogenesis and viral evolution. The numerous, complex repeat regions of the HHV-1 genome currently remain a barrier towards this goal.

  5. Direct evidence for a chronic CD8+-T-cell-mediated immune reaction to tax within the muscle of a human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1-infected patient with sporadic inclusion body myo