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Sample records for pediatric reference intervals

  1. National Survey of Adult and Pediatric Reference Intervals in Clinical Laboratories across Canada: A Report of the CSCC Working Group on Reference Interval Harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeli, Khosrow; Higgins, Victoria; Seccombe, David; Collier, Christine P; Balion, Cynthia M; Cembrowski, George; Venner, Allison A; Shaw, Julie

    2017-11-01

    Reference intervals are widely used decision-making tools in laboratory medicine, serving as health-associated standards to interpret laboratory test results. Numerous studies have shown wide variation in reference intervals, even between laboratories using assays from the same manufacturer. Lack of consistency in either sample measurement or reference intervals across laboratories challenges the expectation of standardized patient care regardless of testing location. Here, we present data from a national survey conducted by the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists (CSCC) Reference Interval Harmonization (hRI) Working Group that examines variation in laboratory reference sample measurements, as well as pediatric and adult reference intervals currently used in clinical practice across Canada. Data on reference intervals currently used by 37 laboratories were collected through a national survey to examine the variation in reference intervals for seven common laboratory tests. Additionally, 40 clinical laboratories participated in a baseline assessment by measuring six analytes in a reference sample. Of the seven analytes examined, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and creatinine reference intervals were most variable. As expected, reference interval variation was more substantial in the pediatric population and varied between laboratories using the same instrumentation. Reference sample results differed between laboratories, particularly for ALT and free thyroxine (FT4). Reference interval variation was greater than test result variation for the majority of analytes. It is evident that there is a critical lack of harmonization in laboratory reference intervals, particularly for the pediatric population. Furthermore, the observed variation in reference intervals across instruments cannot be explained by the bias between the results obtained on instruments by different manufacturers. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists

  2. Population-Based Pediatric Reference Intervals in General Clinical Chemistry: A Swedish Survey.

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    Ridefelt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Very few high quality studies on pediatric reference intervals for general clinical chemistry and hematology analytes have been performed. Three recent prospective community-based projects utilising blood samples from healthy children in Sweden, Denmark and Canada have substantially improved the situation. The Swedish survey included 701 healthy children. Reference intervals for general clinical chemistry and hematology were defined.

  3. CLSI-based transference of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals to Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays.

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    Abou El Hassan, Mohamed; Stoianov, Alexandra; Araújo, Petra A T; Sadeghieh, Tara; Chan, Man Khun; Chen, Yunqi; Randell, Edward; Nieuwesteeg, Michelle; Adeli, Khosrow

    2015-11-01

    The CALIPER program has established a comprehensive database of pediatric reference intervals using largely the Abbott ARCHITECT biochemical assays. To expand clinical application of CALIPER reference standards, the present study is aimed at transferring CALIPER reference intervals from the Abbott ARCHITECT to Beckman Coulter AU assays. Transference of CALIPER reference intervals was performed based on the CLSI guidelines C28-A3 and EP9-A2. The new reference intervals were directly verified using up to 100 reference samples from the healthy CALIPER cohort. We found a strong correlation between Abbott ARCHITECT and Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays, allowing the transference of the vast majority (94%; 30 out of 32 assays) of CALIPER reference intervals previously established using Abbott assays. Transferred reference intervals were, in general, similar to previously published CALIPER reference intervals, with some exceptions. Most of the transferred reference intervals were sex-specific and were verified using healthy reference samples from the CALIPER biobank based on CLSI criteria. It is important to note that the comparisons performed between the Abbott and Beckman Coulter assays make no assumptions as to assay accuracy or which system is more correct/accurate. The majority of CALIPER reference intervals were transferrable to Beckman Coulter AU assays, allowing the establishment of a new database of pediatric reference intervals. This further expands the utility of the CALIPER database to clinical laboratories using the AU assays; however, each laboratory should validate these intervals for their analytical platform and local population as recommended by the CLSI. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pediatric Reference Intervals for Free Thyroxine and Free Triiodothyronine

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    Jang, Megan; Guo, Tiedong; Soldin, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The clinical value of free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) analysis depends on the reference intervals with which they are compared. We determined age- and sex-specific reference intervals for neonates, infants, and children 0–18 years of age for FT4 and FT3 using tandem mass spectrometry. Methods Reference intervals were calculated for serum FT4 (n = 1426) and FT3 (n = 1107) obtained from healthy children between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2008, from Children's National Medical Center and Georgetown University Medical Center Bioanalytical Core Laboratory, Washington, DC. Serum samples were analyzed using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with deuterium-labeled internal standards. Results FT4 reference intervals were very similar for males and females of all ages and ranged between 1.3 and 2.4 ng/dL for children 1 to 18 years old. FT4 reference intervals for 1- to 12-month-old infants were 1.3–2.8 ng/dL. These 2.5 to 97.5 percentile intervals were much tighter than reference intervals obtained using immunoassay platforms 0.48–2.78 ng/dL for males and 0.85–2.09 ng/dL for females. Similarly, FT3 intervals were consistent and similar for males and females and for all ages, ranging between 1.5 pg/mL and approximately 6.0 pg/mL for children 1 month of age to 18 years old. Conclusions This is the first study to provide pediatric reference intervals of FT4 and FT3 for children from birth to 18 years of age using LC/MS/MS. Analysis using LC/MS/MS provides more specific quantification of thyroid hormones. A comparison of the ultrafiltration tandem mass spectrometric method with equilibrium dialysis showed very good correlation. PMID:19583487

  5. CLSI-based transference and verification of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals for 29 Ortho VITROS 5600 chemistry assays.

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    Higgins, Victoria; Truong, Dorothy; Woroch, Amy; Chan, Man Khun; Tahmasebi, Houman; Adeli, Khosrow

    2018-03-01

    Evidence-based reference intervals (RIs) are essential to accurately interpret pediatric laboratory test results. To fill gaps in pediatric RIs, the Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals (CALIPER) project developed an age- and sex-specific pediatric RI database based on healthy pediatric subjects. Originally established for Abbott ARCHITECT assays, CALIPER RIs were transferred to assays on Beckman, Roche, Siemens, and Ortho analytical platforms. This study provides transferred reference intervals for 29 biochemical assays for the Ortho VITROS 5600 Chemistry System (Ortho). Based on Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines, a method comparison analysis was performed by measuring approximately 200 patient serum samples using Abbott and Ortho assays. The equation of the line of best fit was calculated and the appropriateness of the linear model was assessed. This equation was used to transfer RIs from Abbott to Ortho assays. Transferred RIs were verified using 84 healthy pediatric serum samples from the CALIPER cohort. RIs for most chemistry analytes successfully transferred from Abbott to Ortho assays. Calcium and CO 2 did not meet statistical criteria for transference (r 2 reference intervals, 29 successfully verified with approximately 90% of results from reference samples falling within transferred confidence limits. Transferred RIs for total bilirubin, magnesium, and LDH did not meet verification criteria and are not reported. This study broadens the utility of the CALIPER pediatric RI database to laboratories using Ortho VITROS 5600 biochemical assays. Clinical laboratories should verify CALIPER reference intervals for their specific analytical platform and local population as recommended by CLSI. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric reference intervals for general clinical chemistry components - merging of studies from Denmark and Sweden.

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    Ridefelt, Peter; Hilsted, Linda; Juul, Anders; Hellberg, Dan; Rustad, Pål

    2018-05-28

    Reference intervals are crucial tools aiding clinicians when making medical decisions. However, for children such values often are lacking or incomplete. The present study combines data from separate pediatric reference interval studies of Denmark and Sweden in order to increase sample size and to include also pre-school children who were lacking in the Danish study. Results from two separate studies including 1988 healthy children and adolescents aged 6 months to 18 years of age were merged and recalculated. Eighteen general clinical chemistry components were measured on Abbott and Roche platforms. To facilitate commutability, the NFKK Reference Serum X was used. Age- and gender-specific pediatric reference intervals were defined by calculating 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles. The data generated are primarily applicable to a Nordic population, but could be used by any laboratory if validated for the local patient population.

  7. Pediatric reference value distributions and covariate-stratified reference intervals for 29 endocrine and special chemistry biomarkers on the Beckman Coulter Immunoassay Systems: a CALIPER study of healthy community children.

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    Karbasy, Kimiya; Lin, Danny C C; Stoianov, Alexandra; Chan, Man Khun; Bevilacqua, Victoria; Chen, Yunqi; Adeli, Khosrow

    2016-04-01

    The CALIPER program is a national research initiative aimed at closing the gaps in pediatric reference intervals. CALIPER previously reported reference intervals for endocrine and special chemistry markers on Abbott immunoassays. We now report new pediatric reference intervals for immunoassays on the Beckman Coulter Immunoassay Systems and assess platform-specific differences in reference values. A total of 711 healthy children and adolescents from birth to reference intervals calculated in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) EP28-A3c guidelines. Complex profiles were observed for all 29 analytes, necessitating unique age and/or sex-specific partitions. Overall, changes in analyte concentrations observed over the course of development were similar to trends previously reported, and are consistent with biochemical and physiological changes that occur during childhood. Marked differences were observed for some assays including progesterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone where reference intervals were higher than those reported on Abbott immunoassays and parathyroid hormone where intervals were lower. This study highlights the importance of determining reference intervals specific for each analytical platform. The CALIPER Pediatric Reference Interval database will enable accurate diagnosis and laboratory assessment of children monitored by Beckman Coulter Immunoassay Systems in health care institutions worldwide. These reference intervals must however be validated by individual labs for the local pediatric population as recommended by CLSI.

  8. Transference of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals to biochemical assays on the Roche cobas 6000 and the Roche Modular P.

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    Higgins, Victoria; Chan, Man Khun; Nieuwesteeg, Michelle; Hoffman, Barry R; Bromberg, Irvin L; Gornall, Doug; Randell, Edward; Adeli, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals (CALIPER) has recently established pediatric age- and sex-specific reference intervals for over 85 biochemical markers on the Abbott Architect system. Previously, CALIPER reference intervals for several biochemical markers were successfully transferred from Abbott assays to Roche, Beckman, Ortho, and Siemens assays. This study further broadens the CALIPER database by performing transference and verification for 52 biochemical assays on the Roche cobas 6000 and the Roche Modular P. Using CLSI C28-A3 and EP9-A2 guidelines, transference of the CALIPER reference intervals was attempted for 16 assays on the Roche cobas 6000 and 36 on the Modular P. Calculated reference intervals were further verified using 100 healthy CALIPER samples. Most assays showed strong correlation between assay systems and were transferable from Abbott to the Roche cobas 6000 (81%) and the Modular P (86%). Bicarbonate and magnesium were not transferable on either system and calcium and prealbumin were not transferable to the Modular P. Of the transferable analytes, 62% and 61% were verified on the cobas 6000 and the Modular P, respectively. This study extends the utility of the CALIPER database to two additional analytical systems, which facilitates the broad application of CALIPER reference intervals at pediatric centers utilizing Roche biochemical assays. Transference studies across different analytical platforms can later be collectively analyzed in an attempt to develop common reference intervals across all clinical chemistry instruments to harmonize laboratory test interpretation in diagnosis and monitoring of pediatric disease. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complex reference values for endocrine and special chemistry biomarkers across pediatric, adult, and geriatric ages: establishment of robust pediatric and adult reference intervals on the basis of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

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    Adeli, Khosrow; Higgins, Victoria; Nieuwesteeg, Michelle; Raizman, Joshua E; Chen, Yunqi; Wong, Suzy L; Blais, David

    2015-08-01

    Defining laboratory biomarker reference values in a healthy population and understanding the fluctuations in biomarker concentrations throughout life and between sexes are critical to clinical interpretation of laboratory test results in different disease states. The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) has collected blood samples and health information from the Canadian household population. In collaboration with the Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals (CALIPER), the data have been analyzed to determine reference value distributions and reference intervals for several endocrine and special chemistry biomarkers in pediatric, adult, and geriatric age groups. CHMS collected data and blood samples from thousands of community participants aged 3 to 79 years. We used serum samples to measure 13 immunoassay-based special chemistry and endocrine markers. We assessed reference value distributions and, after excluding outliers, calculated age- and sex-specific reference intervals, along with corresponding 90% CIs, according to CLSI C28-A3 guidelines. We observed fluctuations in biomarker reference values across the pediatric, adult, and geriatric age range, with stratification required on the basis of age for all analytes. Additional sex partitions were required for apolipoprotein AI, homocysteine, ferritin, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. The unique collaboration between CALIPER and CHMS has enabled, for the first time, a detailed examination of the changes in various immunochemical markers that occur in healthy individuals of different ages. The robust age- and sex-specific reference intervals established in this study provide insight into the complex biological changes that take place throughout development and aging and will contribute to improved clinical test interpretation. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  10. Pediatric Reference Intervals for Several Biochemical Analytes in School Children in Central Taiwan

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    Dong-Shang Lai

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: Our study provides new pediatric reference intervals (2.5th–97.5th percentiles of 60–99 mg/dL for serum glucose concentrations, 8–38 IU/L for ALT, 0.4–1.1 mg/L for Cr, 8.7–18.0 mg/L for BUN, and 10–34 for B/C ratio. The B/C ratio in children was higher than those of adults, possibily due to that children had a higher intake of protein.

  11. CLSI-based transference of the CALIPER database of pediatric reference intervals from Abbott to Beckman, Ortho, Roche and Siemens Clinical Chemistry Assays: direct validation using reference samples from the CALIPER cohort.

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    Estey, Mathew P; Cohen, Ashley H; Colantonio, David A; Chan, Man Khun; Marvasti, Tina Binesh; Randell, Edward; Delvin, Edgard; Cousineau, Jocelyne; Grey, Vijaylaxmi; Greenway, Donald; Meng, Qing H; Jung, Benjamin; Bhuiyan, Jalaluddin; Seccombe, David; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-09-01

    The CALIPER program recently established a comprehensive database of age- and sex-stratified pediatric reference intervals for 40 biochemical markers. However, this database was only directly applicable for Abbott ARCHITECT assays. We therefore sought to expand the scope of this database to biochemical assays from other major manufacturers, allowing for a much wider application of the CALIPER database. Based on CLSI C28-A3 and EP9-A2 guidelines, CALIPER reference intervals were transferred (using specific statistical criteria) to assays performed on four other commonly used clinical chemistry platforms including Beckman Coulter DxC800, Ortho Vitros 5600, Roche Cobas 6000, and Siemens Vista 1500. The resulting reference intervals were subjected to a thorough validation using 100 reference specimens (healthy community children and adolescents) from the CALIPER bio-bank, and all testing centers participated in an external quality assessment (EQA) evaluation. In general, the transferred pediatric reference intervals were similar to those established in our previous study. However, assay-specific differences in reference limits were observed for many analytes, and in some instances were considerable. The results of the EQA evaluation generally mimicked the similarities and differences in reference limits among the five manufacturers' assays. In addition, the majority of transferred reference intervals were validated through the analysis of CALIPER reference samples. This study greatly extends the utility of the CALIPER reference interval database which is now directly applicable for assays performed on five major analytical platforms in clinical use, and should permit the worldwide application of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pediatric Reference Intervals for Free Thyroxine and Free Triiodothyronine by Equilibrium Dialysis-Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

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    La'ulu, Sonia L; Rasmussen, Kyle J; Straseski, Joely A

    2016-03-05

    Thyroid hormone concentrations fluctuate during growth and development. To accurately diagnose thyroid disease in pediatric patients, reference intervals (RIs) should be established with appropriate age groups from an adequate number of healthy subjects using the most exact methods possible. Obtaining statistically useful numbers of healthy patients is particularly challenging for pediatric populations. The objective of this study was to determine non-parametric RIs for free thyroxine (fT4) and free triiodothyronine (fT3) using equilibrium dialysis-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with over 2200 healthy children 6 months-17 years of age. Subjects were negative for both thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and had normal thyrotropin concentrations. The study included 2213 children (1129 boys and 1084 girls), with at least 120 subjects (average of 125) from each year of life, except for the 6 month to 1 year age group (n=96). Non-parametric RIs (95th percentile) for fT4 were: 18.0-34.7 pmol/L (boys and girls, 6 months-6 years) and 14.2-25.7 pmol/L (boys and girls, 7-17 years). RIs for fT3 were: 5.8-13.1 pmol/L (girls, 6 months-6 years); 5.7-11.8 pmol/L (boys, 6 months-6 years); 5.7-10.0 pmol/L (boys and girls, 7-12 years); 4.5-8.6 pmol/L (girls, 13-17 years); and 5.2-9.4 pmol/L (boys, 13-17 years). Numerous significant differences were observed between pediatric age groups and previously established adult ranges. This emphasizes the need for well-characterized RIs for thyroid hormones in the pediatric population.

  13. Quality specifications for the extra-analytical phase of laboratory testing: Reference intervals and decision limits.

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    Ceriotti, Ferruccio

    2017-07-01

    Reference intervals and decision limits are a critical part of the clinical laboratory report. The evaluation of their correct use represents a tool to verify the post analytical quality. Four elements are identified as indicators. 1. The use of decision limits for lipids and glycated hemoglobin. 2. The use, whenever possible, of common reference values. 3. The presence of gender-related reference intervals for at least the following common serum measurands (besides obviously the fertility relate hormones): alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatine kinase (CK), creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), IgM, ferritin, iron, transferrin, urate, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct). 4. The presence of age-related reference intervals. The problem of specific reference intervals for elderly people is discussed, but their use is not recommended; on the contrary it is necessary the presence of pediatric age-related reference intervals at least for the following common serum measurands: ALP, amylase, creatinine, inorganic phosphate, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, urate, insulin like growth factor 1, white blood cells, RBC, Hb, Hct, alfa-fetoprotein and fertility related hormones. The lack of such reference intervals may imply significant risks for the patients. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems: a model study defining age- and gender-specific reference intervals and trajectories for plasma creatinine in a pediatric population.

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    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas; Sørensen, Steen

    2015-09-01

    The knowledge of physiological fluctuation and variation of even commonly used biochemical quantities in extreme age groups and during development is sparse. This challenges the clinical interpretation and utility of laboratory tests in these age groups. To explore the utility of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high-resolution gender- and age-groups. Normal probability plots were used to deduce parameters of the normal distributions from healthy creatinine values in the mixed hospital datasets. Furthermore, temporal trajectories were generated from repeated measurements to examine developmental patterns in periods of changing creatinine levels. Creatinine shows great age dependence from birth throughout childhood. We computed and replicated 95% reference intervals in narrow gender and age bins and showed them to be comparable to those determined in healthy population studies. We identified pronounced transitions in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods with pronounced heterogeneity and valid reference intervals. Furthermore, part of the heterogeneity in creatinine distribution is likely due to differences in biological and chronological age of children and should be considered when using age-specific reference intervals.

  15. Haemostatic reference intervals in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Jørgensen, Maja; Klajnbard, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Haemostatic reference intervals are generally based on samples from non-pregnant women. Thus, they may not be relevant to pregnant women, a problem that may hinder accurate diagnosis and treatment of haemostatic disorders during pregnancy. In this study, we establish gestational age-specific refe......Haemostatic reference intervals are generally based on samples from non-pregnant women. Thus, they may not be relevant to pregnant women, a problem that may hinder accurate diagnosis and treatment of haemostatic disorders during pregnancy. In this study, we establish gestational age......-specific reference intervals for coagulation tests during normal pregnancy. Eight hundred one women with expected normal pregnancies were included in the study. Of these women, 391 had no complications during pregnancy, vaginal delivery, or postpartum period. Plasma samples were obtained at gestational weeks 13......-20, 21-28, 29-34, 35-42, at active labor, and on postpartum days 1 and 2. Reference intervals for each gestational period using only the uncomplicated pregnancies were calculated in all 391 women for activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, fibrin D-dimer, antithrombin, free protein S...

  16. Haemostatic reference intervals in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Jørgensen, Maja; Klajnbard, Anna

    2010-01-01

    largely unchanged during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum and were within non-pregnant reference intervals. However, levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, and coagulation factors VII, VIII, and IX increased markedly. Protein S activity decreased substantially, while free protein S decreased slightly and total......Haemostatic reference intervals are generally based on samples from non-pregnant women. Thus, they may not be relevant to pregnant women, a problem that may hinder accurate diagnosis and treatment of haemostatic disorders during pregnancy. In this study, we establish gestational age......-20, 21-28, 29-34, 35-42, at active labor, and on postpartum days 1 and 2. Reference intervals for each gestational period using only the uncomplicated pregnancies were calculated in all 391 women for activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, fibrin D-dimer, antithrombin, free protein S...

  17. Indirect methods for reference interval determination - review and recommendations.

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    Jones, Graham R D; Haeckel, Rainer; Loh, Tze Ping; Sikaris, Ken; Streichert, Thomas; Katayev, Alex; Barth, Julian H; Ozarda, Yesim

    2018-04-19

    Reference intervals are a vital part of the information supplied by clinical laboratories to support interpretation of numerical pathology results such as are produced in clinical chemistry and hematology laboratories. The traditional method for establishing reference intervals, known as the direct approach, is based on collecting samples from members of a preselected reference population, making the measurements and then determining the intervals. An alternative approach is to perform analysis of results generated as part of routine pathology testing and using appropriate statistical techniques to determine reference intervals. This is known as the indirect approach. This paper from a working group of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) Committee on Reference Intervals and Decision Limits (C-RIDL) aims to summarize current thinking on indirect approaches to reference intervals. The indirect approach has some major potential advantages compared with direct methods. The processes are faster, cheaper and do not involve patient inconvenience, discomfort or the risks associated with generating new patient health information. Indirect methods also use the same preanalytical and analytical techniques used for patient management and can provide very large numbers for assessment. Limitations to the indirect methods include possible effects of diseased subpopulations on the derived interval. The IFCC C-RIDL aims to encourage the use of indirect methods to establish and verify reference intervals, to promote publication of such intervals with clear explanation of the process used and also to support the development of improved statistical techniques for these studies.

  18. Estimation of individual reference intervals in small sample sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ase Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Eller, Nanna Hurwitz

    2007-01-01

    In occupational health studies, the study groups most often comprise healthy subjects performing their work. Sampling is often planned in the most practical way, e.g., sampling of blood in the morning at the work site just after the work starts. Optimal use of reference intervals requires...... from various variables such as gender, age, BMI, alcohol, smoking, and menopause. The reference intervals were compared to reference intervals calculated using IFCC recommendations. Where comparable, the IFCC calculated reference intervals had a wider range compared to the variance component models...

  19. Uptake of recommended common reference intervals for chemical pathology in Australia.

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    Jones, Graham Rd; Koetsier, Sabrina

    2017-05-01

    Background Reference intervals are a vital part of reporting numerical pathology results. It is known, however, that variation in reference intervals between laboratories is common, even when analytical methods support common reference intervals. In response to this, in Australia, the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists together with the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia published in 2014 a set of recommended common reference intervals for 11 common serum analytes (sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, creatinine male, creatinine female, calcium, calcium adjusted for albumin, phosphate, magnesium, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and total protein). Methods Uptake of recommended common reference intervals in Australian laboratories was assessed using data from four annual cycles of the RCPAQAP reference intervals external quality assurance programme. Results Over three years, from 2013 to 2016, the use of the recommended upper and lower reference limits has increased from 40% to 83%. Nearly half of the intervals in use by enrolled laboratories in 2016 have been changed in this time period, indicating an active response to the guidelines. Conclusions These data support the activities of the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists and Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia in demonstrating a change in laboratory behaviour to reduce unnecessary variation in reference intervals and thus provide a consistent message to doctor and patients irrespective of the laboratory used.

  20. Age- and Gender-Specific Reference Intervals for Fasting Blood Glucose and Lipid Levels in School Children Measured With Abbott Architect c8000 Chemistry Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Waleed; Albanyan, Esam; Altwaijri, Yasmin; Tamim, Hani; Alhussein, Fahad

    2012-04-01

    Reference intervals for pubertal characteristics are influenced by genetic, geographic, dietary and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish age-specific reference intervals of glucose and lipid levels among local school children. This was cross-sectional study, conducted among Saudi school children. Fasting blood samples were collected from 2149 children, 1138 (53%) boys and 1011 (47%) girls, aged 6 to 18 years old. Samples were analyzed on the Architect c8000 Chemistry System (Abbott Diagnostics, USA) for glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL. Reference intervals were established by nonparametric methods between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. Significant differences were observed between boys and girls for cholesterol and triglycerides levels in all age groups (P glucose levels except at age 12 to 13 years. Saudi children have comparable serum cholesterol levels than their Western counterparts. This may reflect changing dietary habits and increasing affluence in Saudi Arabia. Increased lipid screening is anticipated, and these reference intervals will aid in the early assessment of cardiovascular and diabetes risk in Saudi pediatric populations.

  1. Reference Intervals of Common Clinical Chemistry Analytes for Adults in Hong Kong.

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    Lo, Y C; Armbruster, David A

    2012-04-01

    Defining reference intervals is a major challenge because of the difficulty in recruiting volunteers to participate and testing samples from a significant number of healthy reference individuals. Historical literature citation intervals are often suboptimal because they're be based on obsolete methods and/or only a small number of poorly defined reference samples. Blood donors in Hong Kong gave permission for additional blood to be collected for reference interval testing. The samples were tested for twenty-five routine analytes on the Abbott ARCHITECT clinical chemistry system. Results were analyzed using the Rhoads EP evaluator software program, which is based on the CLSI/IFCC C28-A guideline, and defines the reference interval as the 95% central range. Method specific reference intervals were established for twenty-five common clinical chemistry analytes for a Chinese ethnic population. The intervals were defined for each gender separately and for genders combined. Gender specific or combined gender intervals were adapted as appropriate for each analyte. A large number of healthy, apparently normal blood donors from a local ethnic population were tested to provide current reference intervals for a new clinical chemistry system. Intervals were determined following an accepted international guideline. Laboratories using the same or similar methodologies may adapt these intervals if deemed validated and deemed suitable for their patient population. Laboratories using different methodologies may be able to successfully adapt the intervals for their facilities using the reference interval transference technique based on a method comparison study.

  2. Systematic review of serum steroid reference intervals developed using mass spectrometry.

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    Tavita, Nevada; Greaves, Ronda F

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the published literature to determine the available serum/plasma steroid reference intervals generated by mass spectrometry (MS) methods across all age groups in healthy subjects and to suggest recommendations to achieve common MS based reference intervals for serum steroids. MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed databases were used to conduct a comprehensive search for English language, MS-based reference interval studies for serum/plasma steroids. Selection of steroids to include was based on those listed in the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs, Chemical Pathology, Endocrine Program. This methodology has been registered onto the PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews (ID number: CRD42015029637). After accounting for duplicates, a total of 60 manuscripts were identified through the search strategy. Following critical evaluation, a total of 16 studies were selected. Of the 16 studies, 12 reported reference intervals for testosterone, 11 for 17 hydroxy-progesterone, nine for androstenedione, six for cortisol, three for progesterone, two for dihydrotestosterone and only one for aldosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate. No studies established MS-based reference intervals for oestradiol. As far as we are aware, this report provides the first comparison of the peer reviewed literature for serum/plasma steroid reference intervals generated by MS-based methods. The reference intervals based on these published studies can be used to inform the process to develop common reference intervals, and agreed reporting units for mass spectrometry based steroid methods. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nationwide Multicenter Reference Interval Study for 28 Common Biochemical Analytes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liangyu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Min; Tao, Zhihua; Li, Shijun; Wang, Liang; Cheng, Xinqi; Qin, Xuzhen; Han, Jianhua; Li, Pengchang; Hou, Li'an; Yu, Songlin; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Qiu, Ling

    2016-03-01

    A nationwide multicenter study was conducted in the China to explore sources of variation of reference values and establish reference intervals for 28 common biochemical analytes, as a part of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Committee on Reference Intervals and Decision Limits (IFCC/C-RIDL) global study on reference values. A total of 3148 apparently healthy volunteers were recruited in 6 cities covering a wide area in China. Blood samples were tested in 2 central laboratories using Beckman Coulter AU5800 chemistry analyzers. Certified reference materials and value-assigned serum panel were used for standardization of test results. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explore sources of variation. Need for partition of reference intervals was evaluated based on 3-level nested ANOVA. After secondary exclusion using the latent abnormal values exclusion method, reference intervals were derived by a parametric method using the modified Box-Cox formula. Test results of 20 analytes were made traceable to reference measurement procedures. By the ANOVA, significant sex-related and age-related differences were observed in 12 and 12 analytes, respectively. A small regional difference was observed in the results for albumin, glucose, and sodium. Multiple regression analysis revealed BMI-related changes in results of 9 analytes for man and 6 for woman. Reference intervals of 28 analytes were computed with 17 analytes partitioned by sex and/or age. In conclusion, reference intervals of 28 common chemistry analytes applicable to Chinese Han population were established by use of the latest methodology. Reference intervals of 20 analytes traceable to reference measurement procedures can be used as common reference intervals, whereas others can be used as the assay system-specific reference intervals in China.

  4. Complete Blood Count Reference Intervals for Healthy Han Chinese Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Runqing; Guo, Wei; Qiao, Rui; Chen, Wenxiang; Jiang, Hong; Ma, Yueyun; Shang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete blood count (CBC) reference intervals are important to diagnose diseases, screen blood donors, and assess overall health. However, current reference intervals established by older instruments and technologies and those from American and European populations are not suitable for Chinese samples due to ethnic, dietary, and lifestyle differences. The aim of this multicenter collaborative study was to establish CBC reference intervals for healthy Han Chinese adults. Methods A total of 4,642 healthy individuals (2,136 males and 2,506 females) were recruited from six clinical centers in China (Shenyang, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu, and Xi’an). Blood samples collected in K2EDTA anticoagulant tubes were analyzed. Analysis of variance was performed to determine differences in consensus intervals according to the use of data from the combined sample and selected samples. Results Median and mean platelet counts from the Chengdu center were significantly lower than those from other centers. Red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), and hematocrit (HCT) values were higher in males than in females at all ages. Other CBC parameters showed no significant instrument-, region-, age-, or sex-dependent difference. Thalassemia carriers were found to affect the lower or upper limit of different RBC profiles. Conclusion We were able to establish consensus intervals for CBC parameters in healthy Han Chinese adults. RBC, HGB, and HCT intervals were established for each sex. The reference interval for platelets for the Chengdu center should be established independently. PMID:25769040

  5. Reference intervals for selected serum biochemistry analytes in cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson-Lamb, Gavin C; Schoeman, Johan P; Hooijberg, Emma H; Heinrich, Sonja K; Tordiffe, Adrian S W

    2016-02-26

    Published haematologic and serum biochemistry reference intervals are very scarce for captive cheetahs and even more for free-ranging cheetahs. The current study was performed to establish reference intervals for selected serum biochemistry analytes in cheetahs. Baseline serum biochemistry analytes were analysed from 66 healthy Namibian cheetahs. Samples were collected from 30 captive cheetahs at the AfriCat Foundation and 36 free-ranging cheetahs from central Namibia. The effects of captivity-status, age, sex and haemolysis score on the tested serum analytes were investigated. The biochemistry analytes that were measured were sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, urea and creatinine. The 90% confidence interval of the reference limits was obtained using the non-parametric bootstrap method. Reference intervals were preferentially determined by the non-parametric method and were as follows: sodium (128 mmol/L - 166 mmol/L), potassium (3.9 mmol/L - 5.2 mmol/L), magnesium (0.8 mmol/L - 1.2 mmol/L), chloride (97 mmol/L - 130 mmol/L), urea (8.2 mmol/L - 25.1 mmol/L) and creatinine (88 µmol/L - 288 µmol/L). Reference intervals from the current study were compared with International Species Information System values for cheetahs and found to be narrower. Moreover, age, sex and haemolysis score had no significant effect on the serum analytes in this study. Separate reference intervals for captive and free-ranging cheetahs were also determined. Captive cheetahs had higher urea values, most likely due to dietary factors. This study is the first to establish reference intervals for serum biochemistry analytes in cheetahs according to international guidelines. These results can be used for future health and disease assessments in both captive and free-ranging cheetahs.

  6. Population based reference intervals for common blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population based reference intervals for common blood haematological and biochemical parameters in the Akuapem north district. K.A Koram, M.M Addae, J.C Ocran, S Adu-amankwah, W.O Rogers, F.K Nkrumah ...

  7. Reference intervals for selected serum biochemistry analytes in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Hudson-Lamb

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Published haematologic and serum biochemistry reference intervals are very scarce for captive cheetahs and even more for free-ranging cheetahs. The current study was performed to establish reference intervals for selected serum biochemistry analytes in cheetahs. Baseline serum biochemistry analytes were analysed from 66 healthy Namibian cheetahs. Samples were collected from 30 captive cheetahs at the AfriCat Foundation and 36 free-ranging cheetahs from central Namibia. The effects of captivity-status, age, sex and haemolysis score on the tested serum analytes were investigated. The biochemistry analytes that were measured were sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, urea and creatinine. The 90% confidence interval of the reference limits was obtained using the non-parametric bootstrap method. Reference intervals were preferentially determined by the non-parametric method and were as follows: sodium (128 mmol/L – 166 mmol/L, potassium (3.9 mmol/L – 5.2 mmol/L, magnesium (0.8 mmol/L – 1.2 mmol/L, chloride (97 mmol/L – 130 mmol/L, urea (8.2 mmol/L – 25.1 mmol/L and creatinine (88 µmol/L – 288 µmol/L. Reference intervals from the current study were compared with International Species Information System values for cheetahs and found to be narrower. Moreover, age, sex and haemolysis score had no significant effect on the serum analytes in this study. Separate reference intervals for captive and free-ranging cheetahs were also determined. Captive cheetahs had higher urea values, most likely due to dietary factors. This study is the first to establish reference intervals for serum biochemistry analytes in cheetahs according to international guidelines. These results can be used for future health and disease assessments in both captive and free-ranging cheetahs.

  8. Harmonising Reference Intervals for Three Calculated Parameters used in Clinical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David; Koerbin, Gus; Potter, Julia M; Glasgow, Nicholas; West, Nic; Abhayaratna, Walter P; Cavanaugh, Juleen; Armbruster, David; Hickman, Peter E

    2016-08-01

    For more than a decade there has been a global effort to harmonise all phases of the testing process, with particular emphasis on the most frequently utilised measurands. In addition, it is recognised that calculated parameters derived from these measurands should also be a target for harmonisation. Using data from the Aussie Normals study we report reference intervals for three calculated parameters: serum osmolality, serum anion gap and albumin-adjusted serum calcium. The Aussie Normals study was an a priori study that analysed samples from 1856 healthy volunteers. The nine analytes used for the calculations in this study were measured on Abbott Architect analysers. The data demonstrated normal (Gaussian) distributions for the albumin-adjusted serum calcium, the anion gap (using potassium in the calculation) and the calculated serum osmolality (using both the Bhagat et al. and Smithline and Gardner formulae). To assess the suitability of these reference intervals for use as harmonised reference intervals, we reviewed data from the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia/Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (RCPA/AACB) bias survey. We conclude that the reference intervals for the calculated serum osmolality (using the Smithline and Gardner formulae) may be suitable for use as a common reference interval. Although a common reference interval for albumin-adjusted serum calcium may be possible, further investigations (including a greater range of albumin concentrations) are needed. This is due to the bias between the Bromocresol Green (BCG) and Bromocresol Purple (BCP) methods at lower serum albumin concentrations. Problems with the measurement of Total CO 2 in the bias survey meant that we could not use the data for assessing the suitability of a common reference interval for the anion gap. Further study is required.

  9. Recommended Nordic paediatric reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Linda; Rustad, Pål; Aksglæde, Lise

    2013-01-01

    healthy Danish children were collected for establishing reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties (Alanine transaminase, Albumin, Alkaline phosphatase, Aspartate transaminase, Bilirubin, Calcium, Cholesterol, Creatinine, Creatine kinase, HDL-Cholesterol, Iron, Lactate dehydrogenase, LDL...... values of X for the properties and statistical calculations carried out as performed in the NORIP study. Thus commutable (regarding analytical method) reference intervals for 20 properties were established and for LDL-Cholesterol reference intervals were reported for the specific analytical method...... employed. The data were compared to previous studies and to those obtained from the youngest age group in the NORIP study. Marked age differences were observed for most of the properties. Several properties also showed gender-related differences, mainly at the onset of puberty. Data are presented...

  10. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.; Minhas, Anum; Frush, D.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  11. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Hannah, E-mail: Hannah.norris@duke.edu; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Minhas, Anum; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  12. Estimating reliable paediatric reference intervals in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridefelt, Peter; Hellberg, Dan; Aldrimer, Mattias; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Very few high-quality studies on paediatric reference intervals for general clinical chemistry and haematology analytes have been performed. Three recent prospective community-based projects utilising blood samples from healthy children in Sweden, Denmark and Canada have substantially improved the situation. The present review summarises current reference interval studies for common clinical chemistry and haematology analyses. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reference intervals for serum total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reference intervals of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations were determined on 309 blood donors from an urban and peri-urban population of Botswana. Using non-parametric methods to establish 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of the distribution, the intervals were: total cholesterol 2.16 ...

  14. Reference Intervals of Alpha-Fetoprotein and Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Apparently Healthy Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao-Ming; Guo, Xu-Xiao; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Guo-Ming

    2016-12-12

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to calculate 95% reference intervals and double-sided limits of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) according to the CLSI EP28-A3 guideline. MATERIAL AND METHODS Serum AFP and CEA values were measured in samples from 26 000 healthy subjects in the Shuyang area receiving general health checkups. The 95% reference intervals and upper limits were calculated by using MedCalc. RESULTS We provided continuous reference intervals from 20 years old to 90 years old for AFP and CEA. The reference intervals were: AFP, 1.31-7.89 ng/ml (males) and 1.01-7.10 ng/ml (females); CEA, 0.51-4.86 ng/ml (males) and 0.35-3.45ng/ml (females). AFP and CEA were significantly positively correlated with age in both males (r=0.196 and r=0.198) and females (r=0.121 and r=0.197). CONCLUSIONS Different races or populations and different detection systems may result in different reference intervals for AFP and CEA. Continuous reference intervals of age changes are more accurate than age groups.

  15. Resampling methods in Microsoft Excel® for estimating reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorsson, Elvar

    2015-01-01

    Computer-intensive resampling/bootstrap methods are feasible when calculating reference intervals from non-Gaussian or small reference samples. Microsoft Excel® in version 2010 or later includes natural functions, which lend themselves well to this purpose including recommended interpolation procedures for estimating 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles. 
The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to resampling estimation techniques in general and in using Microsoft Excel® 2010 for the purpose of estimating reference intervals in particular.
 Parametric methods are preferable to resampling methods when the distributions of observations in the reference samples is Gaussian or can transformed to that distribution even when the number of reference samples is less than 120. Resampling methods are appropriate when the distribution of data from the reference samples is non-Gaussian and in case the number of reference individuals and corresponding samples are in the order of 40. At least 500-1000 random samples with replacement should be taken from the results of measurement of the reference samples.

  16. Changing reference intervals for haemoglobin in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg-Nørholt, Judith; Frederiksen, Henrik; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Based on international experiences and altering demography the reference intervals (RI) for haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations in blood were changed in Denmark in 2013 from 113 - 161 g/L to 117 - 153 g/L for women and from 129 - 177 g/L to 134 - 170 g/L for men. The aim of this study w...

  17. [Establishing biological reference intervals of alanine transaminase for clinical laboratory stored database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Song, Binbin; Shen, Junfei; Wu, Jiong; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Beili; Pan, Baishen

    2015-08-25

    To establish an indirect reference interval based on the test results of alanine aminotransferase stored in a laboratory information system. All alanine aminotransferase results were included for outpatients and physical examinations that were stored in the laboratory information system of Zhongshan Hospital during 2014. The original data were transformed using a Box-Cox transformation to obtain an approximate normal distribution. Outliers were identified and omitted using the Chauvenet and Tukey methods. The indirect reference intervals were obtained by simultaneously applying nonparametric and Hoffmann methods. The reference change value was selected to determine the statistical significance of the observed differences between the calculated and published reference intervals. The indirect reference intervals for alanine aminotransferase of all groups were 12 to 41 U/L (male, outpatient), 12 to 48 U/L (male, physical examination), 9 to 32 U/L (female, outpatient), and 8 to 35 U/L (female, physical examination), respectively. The absolute differences when compared with the direct results were all smaller than the reference change value of alanine aminotransferase. The Box-Cox transformation combined with the Hoffmann and Tukey methods is a simple and reliable technique that should be promoted and used by clinical laboratories.

  18. Evaluation of locally established reference intervals for hematology and biochemistry parameters in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, Collins; Oyaro, Boaz; Odipo, Richard; Otieno, Fredrick; Alemnji, George; Williamson, John; Zeh, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Important differences have been demonstrated in laboratory parameters from healthy persons in different geographical regions and populations, mostly driven by a combination of genetic, demographic, nutritional, and environmental factors. Despite this, European and North American derived laboratory reference intervals are used in African countries for patient management, clinical trial eligibility, and toxicity determination; which can result in misclassification of healthy persons as having laboratory abnormalities. An observational prospective cohort study known as the Kisumu Incidence Cohort Study (KICoS) was conducted to estimate the incidence of HIV seroconversion and identify determinants of successful recruitment and retention in preparation for an HIV vaccine/prevention trial among young adults and adolescents in western Kenya. Laboratory values generated from the KICoS were compared to published region-specific reference intervals and the 2004 NIH DAIDS toxicity tables used for the trial. About 1106 participants were screened for the KICoS between January 2007 and June 2010. Nine hundred and fifty-three participants aged 16 to 34 years, HIV-seronegative, clinically healthy, and non-pregnant were selected for this analysis. Median and 95% reference intervals were calculated for hematological and biochemistry parameters. When compared with both published region-specific reference values and the 2004 NIH DAIDS toxicity table, it was shown that the use of locally established reference intervals would have resulted in fewer participants classified as having abnormal hematological or biochemistry values compared to US derived reference intervals from DAIDS (10% classified as abnormal by local parameters vs. >40% by US DAIDS). Blood urea nitrogen was most often out of range if US based intervals were used: 83% by US based reference intervals. Differences in reference intervals for hematological and biochemical parameters between western and African populations

  19. Hematologic and serum chemistry reference intervals for free-ranging lions (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Miriam; Keet, Dewald F; Nielen, Mirjam

    2013-08-01

    Hematologic and serum chemistry values are used by veterinarians and wildlife researchers to assess health status and to identify abnormally high or low levels of a particular blood parameter in a target species. For free-ranging lions (Panthera leo) information about these values is scarce. In this study 7 hematologic and 11 serum biochemistry values were evaluated from 485 lions from the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Significant differences between sexes and sub-adult (≤ 36 months) and adult (>36 months) lions were found for most of the blood parameters and separate reference intervals were made for those values. The obtained reference intervals include the means of the various blood parameter values measured in captive lions, except for alkaline phosphatase in the subadult group. These reference intervals can be utilized for free-ranging lions, and may likely also be used as reference intervals for captive lions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Haematological and biochemical reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsli, Anne Randi; Fahlman, Åsa; Evans, Alina L.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundEstablishment of haematological and biochemical reference intervals is important to assess health of animals on individual and population level. Reference intervals for 13 haematological and 34 biochemical variables were established based on 88 apparently healthy free-ranging brown bears...... and marking for ecological studies. For each of the variables, the reference interval was described based on the 95% confidence interval, and differences due to host characteristics sex and age were included if detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of reference intervals for free-ranging brown...... and the differences due to host factors age and gender can be useful for evaluation of health status in free-ranging European brown bears....

  1. Reference Value Advisor: a new freeware set of macroinstructions to calculate reference intervals with Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffré, Anne; Concordet, Didier; Braun, Jean-Pierre; Trumel, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    International recommendations for determination of reference intervals have been recently updated, especially for small reference sample groups, and use of the robust method and Box-Cox transformation is now recommended. Unfortunately, these methods are not included in most software programs used for data analysis by clinical laboratories. We have created a set of macroinstructions, named Reference Value Advisor, for use in Microsoft Excel to calculate reference limits applying different methods. For any series of data, Reference Value Advisor calculates reference limits (with 90% confidence intervals [CI]) using a nonparametric method when n≥40 and by parametric and robust methods from native and Box-Cox transformed values; tests normality of distributions using the Anderson-Darling test and outliers using Tukey and Dixon-Reed tests; displays the distribution of values in dot plots and histograms and constructs Q-Q plots for visual inspection of normality; and provides minimal guidelines in the form of comments based on international recommendations. The critical steps in determination of reference intervals are correct selection of as many reference individuals as possible and analysis of specimens in controlled preanalytical and analytical conditions. Computing tools cannot compensate for flaws in selection and size of the reference sample group and handling and analysis of samples. However, if those steps are performed properly, Reference Value Advisor, available as freeware at http://www.biostat.envt.fr/spip/spip.php?article63, permits rapid assessment and comparison of results calculated using different methods, including currently unavailable methods. This allows for selection of the most appropriate method, especially as the program provides the CI of limits. It should be useful in veterinary clinical pathology when only small reference sample groups are available. ©2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Serum TSH reference interval in healthy Finnish adults using the Abbott Architect 2000i Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Tanner, Pirjo; Välimäki, Matti J; Hämäläinen, Esa

    2011-07-01

    Current serum TSH reference intervals have been criticized as they were established from unselected background populations. A special concern is that the upper limit, which defines subclinical hypothyroidism, is too high. The objective was to redefine the TSH reference interval in the adult Finnish population. The current reference interval for the widely used Abbott Architect method in Finland is 0.4-4.0 mU/L. Serum TSH and free T4 concentrations were derived from 606 healthy, non-pregnant, 18-91-year-old Finns from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) and the possible effects of age, sex and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) status were evaluated. After excluding TPOAb-positive subjects and outliers, a reference population of 511 subjects was obtained. In the reference population, no statistically significant gender- or age-specific differences in mean TSH (1.55 ± 3.30 mU/L) or TSH reference intervals were observed. The new reference interval was 0.5-3.6 mU/L (2.5th-97.5th percentiles). The current upper TSH reference limit is 10% too high. A TSH > 3.6 mU/L, confirmed with a repeat TSH sampling, may indicate subclinical hypothyroidism. Differences in ethnicity, regional iodine-intake and analytical methods underline the need for redefining the TSH reference interval in central laboratories in different countries.

  3. Reference interval of thyroxine and thyrotropin of healthyterm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish a local Reference Interval of Serum Thyroxine (T4) and Serum Thyroid stimulating Hormone(TSH) of healthy Nigerian Newborns in Jos University Teaching Hospital Jos. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty healthy term Nigerian Newborns who fulfilled the criteria for inclusion were ...

  4. Leukocyte Reference Intervals for Free-Ranging Hummingbirds in Northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safra, Noa; Christopher, Mary M; Ernest, Holly B; Bandivadekar, Ruta; Tell, Lisa A

    2018-04-04

      Hummingbirds are specialized nectarivores and important ecological pollinators that are the focus of conservation efforts as well as scientific investigations of metabolism and flight dynamics. Despite their importance, basic information is lacking about hummingbird blood cells. We aimed to establish reference intervals for total and differential leukocyte counts from healthy free-ranging hummingbirds in northern California. Hummingbirds were captured in five counties in spring and summer of 2012. A drop of blood was used to prepare smears for total white blood cell estimate and 200-cell differential leukocyte counts. Reference Value Advisor was used for descriptive statistics and calculation of reference intervals. Blood smears from 42 Anna's Hummingbirds ( Calypte anna) and 33 Black-chinned Hummingbirds ( Archilochus alexandri) were included. The only significant differences in leukocyte counts were due to age, and juvenile hummingbirds had significantly higher lymphocyte counts than adult hummingbirds ( Phummingbirds.

  5. Continuous age- and sex-adjusted reference intervals of urinary markers for cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes: a novel approach to the definition of reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørkrid, Lars; Rowe, Alexander D; Elgstoen, Katja B P; Olesen, Jess H; Ruijter, George; Hall, Patricia L; Tortorelli, Silvia; Schulze, Andreas; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Salomons, Gajja S; Rinaldo, Piero

    2015-05-01

    Urinary concentrations of creatine and guanidinoacetic acid divided by creatinine are informative markers for cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CDSs). The renal excretion of these substances varies substantially with age and sex, challenging the sensitivity and specificity of postanalytical interpretation. Results from 155 patients with CDS and 12 507 reference individuals were contributed by 5 diagnostic laboratories. They were binned into 104 adjacent age intervals and renormalized with Box-Cox transforms (Ξ). Estimates for central tendency (μ) and dispersion (σ) of Ξ were obtained for each bin. Polynomial regression analysis was used to establish the age dependence of both μ[log(age)] and σ[log(age)]. The regression residuals were then calculated as z-scores = {Ξ - μ[log(age)]}/σ[log(age)]. The process was iterated until all z-scores outside Tukey fences ±3.372 were identified and removed. Continuous percentile charts were then calculated and plotted by retransformation. Statistically significant and biologically relevant subgroups of z-scores were identified. Significantly higher marker values were seen in females than males, necessitating separate reference intervals in both adolescents and adults. Comparison between our reconstructed reference percentiles and current standard age-matched reference intervals highlights an underlying risk of false-positive and false-negative events at certain ages. Disease markers depending strongly on covariates such as age and sex require large numbers of reference individuals to establish peripheral percentiles with sufficient precision. This is feasible only through collaborative data sharing and the use of appropriate statistical methods. Broad application of this approach can be implemented through freely available Web-based software. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  6. Estimation of reference intervals from small samples: an example using canine plasma creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffré, A; Braun, J P; Trumel, C; Concordet, D

    2009-12-01

    According to international recommendations, reference intervals should be determined from at least 120 reference individuals, which often are impossible to achieve in veterinary clinical pathology, especially for wild animals. When only a small number of reference subjects is available, the possible bias cannot be known and the normality of the distribution cannot be evaluated. A comparison of reference intervals estimated by different methods could be helpful. The purpose of this study was to compare reference limits determined from a large set of canine plasma creatinine reference values, and large subsets of this data, with estimates obtained from small samples selected randomly. Twenty sets each of 120 and 27 samples were randomly selected from a set of 1439 plasma creatinine results obtained from healthy dogs in another study. Reference intervals for the whole sample and for the large samples were determined by a nonparametric method. The estimated reference limits for the small samples were minimum and maximum, mean +/- 2 SD of native and Box-Cox-transformed values, 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles by a robust method on native and Box-Cox-transformed values, and estimates from diagrams of cumulative distribution functions. The whole sample had a heavily skewed distribution, which approached Gaussian after Box-Cox transformation. The reference limits estimated from small samples were highly variable. The closest estimates to the 1439-result reference interval for 27-result subsamples were obtained by both parametric and robust methods after Box-Cox transformation but were grossly erroneous in some cases. For small samples, it is recommended that all values be reported graphically in a dot plot or histogram and that estimates of the reference limits be compared using different methods.

  7. Reference Intervals of Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Analytes for 1-Year-Old Korean Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Ryun; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Roh, Eun Youn; Chang, Ju Young

    2016-09-01

    Reference intervals need to be established according to age. We established reference intervals of hematology and chemistry from community-based healthy 1-yr-old children and analyzed their iron status according to the feeding methods during the first six months after birth. A total of 887 children who received a medical check-up between 2010 and 2014 at Boramae Hospital (Seoul, Korea) were enrolled. A total of 534 children (247 boys and 287 girls) were enrolled as reference individuals after the exclusion of data obtained from children with suspected iron deficiency. Hematology and clinical chemistry analytes were measured, and the reference value of each analyte was estimated by using parametric (mean±2 SD) or nonparametric methods (2.5-97.5th percentile). Iron, total iron-binding capacity, and ferritin were measured, and transferrin saturation was calculated. As there were no differences in the mean values between boys and girls, we established the reference intervals for 1-yr-old children regardless of sex. The analysis of serum iron status according to feeding methods during the first six months revealed higher iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation levels in children exclusively or mainly fed formula than in children exclusively or mainly fed breast milk. We established reference intervals of hematology and clinical chemistry analytes from community-based healthy children at one year of age. These reference intervals will be useful for interpreting results of medical check-ups at one year of age.

  8. Reference intervals for N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in amniotic fluid between 10 and 34 weeks of gestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waltraut M Merz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In adult and pediatric cardiology, n-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (nt-proBNP serves as biomarker in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular dysfunction. Elevated levels of circulating nt-proBNP are present in fetal conditions associated with myocardial pressure or volume load. Compared to fetal blood sampling, amniocentesis is technically easier and can be performed from early pregnancy onwards. We aimed to investigate amniotic fluid (AF nt-proBNP concentrations in normal pregnancies between 10 and 34 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Nt-proBNP and total protein (TP was measured in AF by chemiluminescence assay (photometry, respectively. To adjust for a potential dilutional effect, the AF-nt-proBNP/AF-TP ratio was analyzed. Reference intervals were constructed by regression modeling across gestational age. RESULTS: 132 samples were analyzed. A negative correlation between AF-nt-proBNP/AF-TP ratio and gestational age was observed. Curves for the mean and the 5% and 95% reference interval between 10 and 34 weeks of gestation were established. CONCLUSION: In normal pregnancy, nt-proBNP is present in AF and decreases during gestation. Our data provide the basis for research on AF-nt-proBNP as biomarker in fetal medicine.

  9. Haematological and biochemical reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Establishment of haematological and biochemical reference intervals is important to assess health of animals on individual and population level. Reference intervals for 13 haematological and 34 biochemical variables were established based on 88 apparently healthy free-ranging brown bears (39 males and 49 females) in Sweden. The animals were chemically immobilised by darting from a helicopter with a combination of medetomidine, tiletamine and zolazepam in April and May 2006–2012 in the county of Dalarna, Sweden. Venous blood samples were collected during anaesthesia for radio collaring and marking for ecological studies. For each of the variables, the reference interval was described based on the 95% confidence interval, and differences due to host characteristics sex and age were included if detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of reference intervals for free-ranging brown bears in Sweden. Results The following variables were not affected by host characteristics: red blood cell, white blood cell, monocyte and platelet count, alanine transaminase, amylase, bilirubin, free fatty acids, glucose, calcium, chloride, potassium, and cortisol. Age differences were seen for the majority of the haematological variables, whereas sex influenced only mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, aspartate aminotransferase, lipase, lactate dehydrogenase, β-globulin, bile acids, triglycerides and sodium. Conclusions The biochemical and haematological reference intervals provided and the differences due to host factors age and gender can be useful for evaluation of health status in free-ranging European brown bears. PMID:25139149

  10. Reference intervals for platelet aggregation assessed by multiple electrode platelet aggregometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Peter; Villadsen, Kirsten; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Analyses of platelet aggregation in hirudin whole blood using Multiplate® was validated. Reference intervals for the most commonly used agonists were established, and the association between platelet aggregation, age, gender and haematological values was analysed. Material...... and methods We included 121 healthy individuals to establish reference intervals and six healthy individuals for evaluation of the day-to-day variation. Platelet aggregation was evaluated on hirudin whole blood employing Multiplate® induced by arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen and ristocetin (RISTOlow...... after adjusting for age and gender except for RISTOhigh. A positive significant association was found between platelet count and platelet aggregation (p

  11. [Investigation of reference intervals of blood gas and acid-base analysis assays in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the upper and lower limits and their sources of reference intervals in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays. The data of reference intervals were collected, which come from the first run of 2014 External Quality Assessment (EQA) program in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays performed by National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL). All the abnormal values and errors were eliminated. Data statistics was performed by SPSS 13.0 and Excel 2007 referring to upper and lower limits of reference intervals and sources of 7 blood gas and acid-base analysis assays, i.e. pH value, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. Values were further grouped based on instrument system and the difference between each group were analyzed. There were 225 laboratories submitting the information on the reference intervals they had been using. The three main sources of reference intervals were National Guide to Clinical Laboratory Procedures [37.07% (400/1 079)], instructions of instrument manufactures [31.23% (337/1 079)] and instructions of reagent manufactures [23.26% (251/1 079)]. Approximately 35.1% (79/225) of the laboratories had validated the reference intervals they used. The difference of upper and lower limits in most assays among 7 laboratories was moderate, both minimum and maximum (i.e. the upper limits of pH value was 7.00-7.45, the lower limits of Na+ was 130.00-156.00 mmol/L), and mean and median (i.e. the upper limits of K+ was 5.04 mmol/L and 5.10 mmol/L, the upper limits of PCO2 was 45.65 mmHg and 45.00 mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), as well as the difference in P2.5 and P97.5 between each instrument system group. It was shown by Kruskal-Wallis method that the P values of upper and lower limits of all the parameters were lower than 0.001, expecting the lower limits of Na+ with P value 0.029. It was shown by Mann-Whitney that the statistic differences were found among instrument

  12. Establishment of 25-OH-vitamin D reference interval by radioimmunoassay and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianbo; Huang Xianzhong; Hu Chaohui; Zu Yuli; Zhu Qingyi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To establish reference interval of 25-OH-vitamin D (25-OH-Vit D) by radioimmunoassay and provide suggestion for clinical applications. Method: Collecting 204 healthy persons specimens, and validating and establishing reference interval of 25-OH-Vit D by treatment of outlying observations, judgement of data distributions and analysis of test results. Results: The reference interval of 25-OH-Vit D established in our laboratory is 16.0-39.7 ng/ml for adolescents and 11.7-40.0 ng/ml for adults. Conclusions: The levels of 25-OH-Vit D in humans depend on their age, sex and life style. Some people's vitamin D intake is not enough. Doctors should pay attention to the sufficient 25-OH-Vit D needed when evaluate vitamin D intake. (authors)

  13. Serum zinc reference intervals and its relationship with dietary, functional, and biochemical indicators in 6- to 9-year-old healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Xavier Alves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc is an important cause of morbidity, particularly among young children. The dietary, functional, and biochemical indicators should be used to assess zinc status and to indicate the need for zinc interventions. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the zinc status and reference intervals for serum zinc concentration considering dietary, functional, and biochemical indicators in apparently healthy children in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Design: The cross-sectional study included 131 healthy children: 72 girls and 59 boys, aged between 6 and 9 years. Anthropometric assessment was made by body mass index (BMI and age; dietary assessment by prospective 3-day food register, and an evaluation of total proteins was performed. Zinc in the serum samples was analyzed in triplicate in the same assay flame, using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: With respect to dietary assessment, only the intake of fiber and calcium was below the recommendations by age and gender. All subjects were eutrophic according to BMI and age classification. Zinc intake correlated with energy (p=0.0019, protein (p=0.0054, fat (p<0.0001, carbohydrate (p=0.0305, fiber (p=0.0465, calcium (p=0.0006, and iron (p=0.0003 intakes. Serum zinc correlated with protein intake (p=0.0145 and serum albumin (p=0.0141, globulin (p=0.0041, and albumin/globulin ratio (p=0.0043. Biochemical parameters were all within the normal reference range. Reference intervals for basal serum zinc concentration were 0.70–1.14 µg/mL in boys, 0.73–1.17 µg/mL in girls, and 0.72–1.15 µg/mL in the total population. Conclusions: This study presents pediatric reference intervals for serum zinc concentration, considering dietary, functional, and biochemical indicators, which are useful to establish the zinc status in specific groups. In this regard, there are few studies in the literature conducted under these conditions, which make it an innovative methodology.

  14. Valid analytical performance specifications for combined analytical bias and imprecision for the use of common reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Lund, Flemming; Fraser, Callum G; Sandberg, Sverre; Sölétormos, György

    2018-01-01

    Background Many clinical decisions are based on comparison of patient results with reference intervals. Therefore, an estimation of the analytical performance specifications for the quality that would be required to allow sharing common reference intervals is needed. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended a minimum of 120 reference individuals to establish reference intervals. This number implies a certain level of quality, which could then be used for defining analytical performance specifications as the maximum combination of analytical bias and imprecision required for sharing common reference intervals, the aim of this investigation. Methods Two methods were investigated for defining the maximum combination of analytical bias and imprecision that would give the same quality of common reference intervals as the IFCC recommendation. Method 1 is based on a formula for the combination of analytical bias and imprecision and Method 2 is based on the Microsoft Excel formula NORMINV including the fractional probability of reference individuals outside each limit and the Gaussian variables of mean and standard deviation. The combinations of normalized bias and imprecision are illustrated for both methods. The formulae are identical for Gaussian and log-Gaussian distributions. Results Method 2 gives the correct results with a constant percentage of 4.4% for all combinations of bias and imprecision. Conclusion The Microsoft Excel formula NORMINV is useful for the estimation of analytical performance specifications for both Gaussian and log-Gaussian distributions of reference intervals.

  15. Obesity in pediatric ALL survivors: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Kelly, Michael J; Saltzman, Edward; Must, Aviva; Roberts, Susan B; Parsons, Susan K

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies of survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have drawn heterogeneous conclusions regarding the prevalence of obesity and risk factors for developing obesity in pediatric ALL survivors. We sought to determine the prevalence of obesity in pediatric ALL survivors and examine risk factors for obesity through a systematic review and meta-analysis. A MEDLINE search was performed from its inception through 2013. Studies met the inclusion criteria if they (1) included at least 10 survivors of pediatric ALL; (2) assessed the prevalence or indicators of obesity; and (3) compared obesity among ALL survivors to a reference population or external control group. Extracted data included patient and treatment characteristics, study design, population used for comparison, and prevalence of obesity. Forty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Despite significant heterogeneity among the studies (I(2) = 96%), the mean BMI z score in 1742 pediatric ALL survivors was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.60-1.06), which corresponds to the 80th BMI percentile, indicating a significantly higher BMI in pediatric ALL survivors than the reference population. Subgroup analyses found a high prevalence of obesity in ALL survivors regardless of survivors' receipt of cranial irradiation, gender, or age at diagnosis. Obesity is prevalent in pediatric ALL survivors and is independent of patient- and treatment-related characteristics. Clinicians need to screen for obesity and its associated health conditions early in survivorship.

  16. BRIDGING GAPS BETWEEN ZOO AND WILDLIFE MEDICINE: ESTABLISHING REFERENCE INTERVALS FOR FREE-RANGING AFRICAN LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Heather M; Govender, Danny; Shikwambana, Purvance; Chappell, Patrick; Jolles, Anna

    2017-06-01

    The International Species Information System has set forth an extensive database of reference intervals for zoologic species, allowing veterinarians and game park officials to distinguish normal health parameters from underlying disease processes in captive wildlife. However, several recent studies comparing reference values from captive and free-ranging animals have found significant variation between populations, necessitating the development of separate reference intervals in free-ranging wildlife to aid in the interpretation of health data. Thus, this study characterizes reference intervals for six biochemical analytes, eleven hematologic or immune parameters, and three hormones using samples from 219 free-ranging African lions ( Panthera leo ) captured in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Using the original sample population, exclusion criteria based on physical examination were applied to yield a final reference population of 52 clinically normal lions. Reference intervals were then generated via 90% confidence intervals on log-transformed data using parametric bootstrapping techniques. In addition to the generation of reference intervals, linear mixed-effect models and generalized linear mixed-effect models were used to model associations of each focal parameter with the following independent variables: age, sex, and body condition score. Age and sex were statistically significant drivers for changes in hepatic enzymes, renal values, hematologic parameters, and leptin, a hormone related to body fat stores. Body condition was positively correlated with changes in monocyte counts. Given the large variation in reference values taken from captive versus free-ranging lions, it is our hope that this study will serve as a baseline for future clinical evaluations and biomedical research targeting free-ranging African lions.

  17. Immunological and hematological reference intervals among HIV-seronegative pregnant women in northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genetu M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Meaza Genetu,1 Debasu Damtie,1 Meseret Workineh,1 Biniam Mathewos Tebeje,1,2 Bamlaku Enawgaw,3 Tekalign Deressa1 1Department of Immunology and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia; 2Molecular Parasitology Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia; 3Department of Hematology and Immunohematology, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Pregnancy is a state characterized by profound physiological hematological changes. However, hematological reference intervals being used in clinical practice in Ethiopia are derived from nonlocal general populations, despite the significant variations reported previously. The aim of this study was to determine the immunological and hematological reference intervals in healthy pregnancy among HIV-seronegative pregnant women in northwest Ethiopia.Materials and methods: A total of 200 healthy, HIV-seronegative pregnant women were enrolled from February 2015 to June 2015 in a cross-sectional study setting at Gondar University Hospital. Sociodemographic and obstetric data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Blood samples collected from each participant were used to define the immunological and hematological parameters. The mean, median, and 95% interval values were calculated for the immunological and hematological parameters. P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant for all variables.Results: This study found that there were changes in CD4+ T-cell count, platelet count, and hematocrit (HCT values as pregnancy advances. The calculated combined reference intervals for the absolute CD4+ T-cell count and platelet count were 712.47–760.67 and 221.25–240.14, respectively. A progressive decline in the platelet count was observed as pregnancy advanced, with 95

  18. Clinical chemistry reference intervals of healthy adult populations in Gojjam Zones of Amhara National Regional State, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Zewdie; Amuamuta, Asmare; Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Zenebe, Yohannes; Adem, Yesuf; Abera, Bayeh; Gebeyehu, Wondemu; Gebregziabher, Yakob

    2017-01-01

    Reference interval is crucial for disease screening, diagnosis, monitoring, progression and treatment efficacy. Due to lack of locally derived reference values for the parameters, clinicians use reference intervals derived from western population. But, studies conducted in different African countries have indicated differences between locally and western derived reference values. Different studies also indicated considerable variation in clinical chemistry reference intervals by several variables such as age, sex, geographical location, environment, lifestyle and genetic variation. This study aimed to determine the reference intervals of common clinical chemistry parameters of the community of Gojjam Zones, Northwest Ethiopia. Population based cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2015 to December 2016 in healthy adult populations of Gojjam zone. Data such as, medical history, physical examination and socio-demographic data were collected. In addition, laboratory investigations were undertaken to screen the population. Clinical chemistry parameters were measured using Mindray BS 200 clinical chemistry autoanalyzer as per the manufacturer's instructions. Descriptive statistics was used to calculate mean, median and 95th percentiles. Independent sample T-test and one way ANOVA were used to see association between variables. After careful screening of a total of 799 apparently healthy adults who were consented for this study, complete data from 446 (224 females and 222 males) were included for the analysis. The mean age of both the study participants was 28.8 years. Males had high (Preference intervals of amylase, LDH, total protein and total bilirubin were not significantly different between the two sex groups (P>0.05). Mean, median, 95% percentile values of AST, ALP, amylase, LDH, creatinine, total protein, total bilirubin, and direct bilirubin across all age groups of participants were similar (P>0.05). But, there was a significant difference in the

  19. Pediatric Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists Pediatric Specialists Article Body ​Your pediatrician may refer your child to a pediatric specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Pediatric specialists ...

  20. 'Aussie normals': an a priori study to develop clinical chemistry reference intervals in a healthy Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerbin, G; Cavanaugh, J A; Potter, J M; Abhayaratna, W P; West, N P; Glasgow, N; Hawkins, C; Armbruster, D; Oakman, C; Hickman, P E

    2015-02-01

    Development of reference intervals is difficult, time consuming, expensive and beyond the scope of most laboratories. The Aussie Normals study is a direct a priori study to determine reference intervals in healthy Australian adults. All volunteers completed a health and lifestyle questionnaire and exclusion was based on conditions such as pregnancy, diabetes, renal or cardiovascular disease. Up to 91 biochemical analyses were undertaken on a variety of analytical platforms using serum samples collected from 1856 volunteers. We report on our findings for 40 of these analytes and two calculated parameters performed on the Abbott ARCHITECTci8200/ci16200 analysers. Not all samples were analysed for all assays due to volume requirements or assay/instrument availability. Results with elevated interference indices and those deemed unsuitable after clinical evaluation were removed from the database. Reference intervals were partitioned based on the method of Harris and Boyd into three scenarios, combined gender, males and females and age and gender. We have performed a detailed reference interval study on a healthy Australian population considering the effects of sex, age and body mass. These reference intervals may be adapted to other manufacturer's analytical methods using method transference.

  1. [Age- and sex-specific reference intervals for 10 health examination items: mega-data from a Japanese Health Service Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suka, Machi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Kawai, Tadashi; Aoki, Yoshikazu; Yamane, Noriyuki; Yamauchi, Kuniaki

    2005-07-01

    To determine age- and sex-specific reference intervals for 10 health examination items in Japanese adults. Health examination data were accumulated from 24 different prefectural health service associations affiliated with the Japan Association of Health Service. Those who were non-smokers, drank less than 7 days/week, and had a body mass index of 18.5-24.9kg/m2 were sampled as a reference population (n = 737,538; 224,947 men and 512,591 women). After classified by age and sex, reference intervals for 10 health examination items (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, uric acid, AST, ALT, gamma-GT, and hemoglobin) were estimated using the parametric and nonparametric methods. In every item except for hemoglobin, men had higher reference intervals than women. Systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, and glucose showed an upward trend in values with increasing age. Hemoglobin showed a downward trend in values with increasing age. Triglyceride, ALT, and gamma-GT reached a peak in middle age. Overall, parametric estimates showed narrower reference intervals than non-parametric estimates. Reference intervals vary with age and sex. Age- and sex-specific reference intervals may contribute to better assessment of health examination data.

  2. The impact of change in albumin assay on reference intervals, prevalence of 'hypoalbuminaemia' and albumin prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley-Grant, Deon; Herbert, Mike; Cornes, Michael P; Barlow, Ian M; Ford, Clare; Gama, Rousseau

    2016-01-01

    We studied the impact on reference intervals, classification of patients with hypoalbuminaemia and albumin infusion prescriptions on changing from a bromocresol green (BCG) to a bromocresol purple (BCP) serum albumin assay. Passing-Bablok regression analysis and Bland-Altman plot were used to compare Abbott BCP and Roche BCG methods. Linear regression analysis was used to compare in-house and an external laboratory Abbott BCP serum albumin results. Reference intervals for Abbott BCP serum albumin were derived in two different laboratories using pathology data from adult patients in primary care. Prescriptions for 20% albumin infusions were compared one year before and one year after changing the albumin method. Abbott BCP assay had a negative bias of approximately 6 g/L compared with Roche BCG method.There was good agreement (y = 1.04 x - 1.03; R(2 )= 0.9933) between in-house and external laboratory Abbott BCP results. Reference intervals for the serum albumin Abbott BCP assay were 31-45 g/L, different to those recommended by Pathology Harmony and the manufacturers (35-50 g/L). Following the change in method there was a large increase in the number of patients classified as hypoalbuminaemic using Pathology Harmony references intervals (32%) but not when retrospectively compared to locally derived reference intervals (16%) compared with the previous year (12%). The method change was associated with a 44.6% increase in albumin prescriptions. This equated to an annual increase in expenditure of £35,234. We suggest that serum albumin reference intervals be method specific to prevent misclassification of albumin status in patients. Change in albumin methodology may have significant impact on hospital resources. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Reference intervals and variation for urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol in healthy men and women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, A H; Christensen, J M

    2001-01-01

    Reference intervals for urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol in 120 healthy individuals performing their routine work were established according to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory...... Medicine (IFCC) for use in the risk assessment of exposure to occupational stress. Reference intervals were established for three different times of the day: in morning samples (05.45-07.15) the limit of detection (LOD) was 2.10 micromol epinephrine/mol creatinine (82 women) and 2.86 micromol epinephrine....../mol creatinine (37 men), and the reference interval was 3.6-29.1 micromol norepinephrine/mol creatinine and 2.3-52.8 micromol cortisol/mol creatinine (119 women and men); in afternoon samples (15.30-18.30) the reference interval was 0.64-10.8 micromol epinephrine/mol creatinine (82 women), 1.20-11.2 micromol...

  4. Reference interval computation: which method (not) to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Igor Y; Wilson, Andrew R; Delgado, Julio C

    2012-07-11

    When different methods are applied to reference interval (RI) calculation the results can sometimes be substantially different, especially for small reference groups. If there are no reliable RI data available, there is no way to confirm which method generates results closest to the true RI. We randomly drawn samples obtained from a public database for 33 markers. For each sample, RIs were calculated by bootstrapping, parametric, and Box-Cox transformed parametric methods. Results were compared to the values of the population RI. For approximately half of the 33 markers, results of all 3 methods were within 3% of the true reference value. For other markers, parametric results were either unavailable or deviated considerably from the true values. The transformed parametric method was more accurate than bootstrapping for sample size of 60, very close to bootstrapping for sample size 120, but in some cases unavailable. We recommend against using parametric calculations to determine RIs. The transformed parametric method utilizing Box-Cox transformation would be preferable way of RI calculation, if it satisfies normality test. If not, the bootstrapping is always available, and is almost as accurate and precise as the transformed parametric method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Trimester specific reference intervals for thyroid function tests in normal Indian pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Tarun; Juhi, Juhi Agarwal; Wilfred, Reena; Kanwar, Ratnesh S; Sethi, Jyoti; Bhadra, Kuntal; Nair, Sirimavo; Singh, Satveer

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of thyroid function during pregnancy is critical, for initiation of thyroid hormone therapy, as well as for adjustment of thyroid hormone dose in hypothyroid cases. We evaluated pregnant women who had no past history of thyroid disorders and studied their thyroid function in each trimester. 86 normal pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy were selected for setting reference intervals. All were healthy, euthyroid and negative for thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb). These women were serially followed throughout pregnancy. 124 normal nonpregnant subjects were selected for comparison. Thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and anti-TPO were measured using Roche Elecsys 1010 analyzer. Urinary iodine content was determined by simple microplate method. The 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles were calculated as the reference intervals for thyroid hormone levels during each trimester. SPSS (version 14.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for data processing and analysis. The reference intervals for the first, second and third trimesters for the following parameters: TSH 0.09-6.65, 0.51-6.66, 0.91-4.86 µIU/mL, FT4 9.81-18.53, 8.52-19.43, 7.39-18.28 pM/L and FT3 3.1-6.35, 2.39-5.12, 2.57-5.68 pM/L respectively. Thyroid hormone concentrations significantly differed during pregnancy at different stages of gestation. The pregnant women in the study had median urinary iodine concentration of 150-200 µg/l during each trimester. The trimester-specific reference intervals for thyroid tests during pregnancy have been established for pregnant Indian women serially followed during pregnancy using 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles.

  6. Reference intervals for C-peptide and insulin derived from a general adult Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Pia Bükmann; Linneberg, Allan René; Hansen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    calculated with and without the inclusion of persons who were prediabetic, according to two definitions (The World Health Organization (WHO) and American Diabetes Association (ADA)). To ensure the correctness of calibration, the control pools were analyzed by a reference laboratory. The reference intervals...

  7. Verification of serum reference intervals for free light chains in a local South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlin, Annalise E; Rensburg, Megan A; Ipp, Hayley; Germishuys, Jurie J; Erasmus, Rajiv T

    2013-11-01

    Monoclonal serum free light chain measurements are used to follow up and manage patients with monoclonal gammopathies, and abnormal serum free light chain ratios are associated with risk of progression in certain diseases. We aimed to validate the reference intervals in our population. Reference intervals for κ and λ free light chains were established on 120 healthy adults. Creatinine levels were measured to exclude renal dysfunction and serum protein electrophoresis was performed. All creatinine values were within normal limits. After exclusion of subjects with abnormal serum protein electrophoreses, 113 subjects were available for analysis. The 95% reference interval was 6.3-20.6 mg/L for κ free light chains, 8.7-25.9 mg/L for λ free light chains and 0.46-1.23 for free light chain ratio. Most of the values fell within the manufacturer's recommended limits and therefore could be used for our population.

  8. Reference intervals and longitudinal changes in copeptin and MR-proADM concentrations during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosen, Annemiek M C P; van der Linden, Ivon J M; Schrauwen, Lianne; Theeuwes, Alisia; de Groot, Monique J M; Ermens, Antonius A M

    2017-11-27

    Vasopressin and adrenomedullin and their stable by-products copeptin and midregional part of proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) are promising biomarkers for the development of preeclampsia. However, clinical use is hampered by the lack of trimester-specific reference intervals. We therefore estimated reference intervals for copeptin and MR-proADM in disease-free Dutch women throughout pregnancy. Apparently healthy low risk pregnant women were recruited. Exclusion criteria included current or past history of endocrine disease, multiple pregnancy, use of medication known to influence thyroid function and current pregnancy as a result of hormonal stimulation. Women who miscarried, developed hyperemesis gravidarum, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, hemolysis elevated liver enzymes and low platelets, diabetes or other disease, delivered prematurely or had a small for gestational age neonate were excluded from analyses. Blood samples were collected at 9-13 weeks (n=98), 27-29 weeks (n=94) and 36-39 weeks (n=91) of gestation and at 4-13 weeks post-partum (PP) (n=89). Sixty-two women had complete data during pregnancy and PP. All analyses were performed on a Kryptor compact plus. Copeptin increases during pregnancy, but 97.5th percentiles remain below the non-pregnant upper reference limit (URL) provided by the manufacturer. MR-proADM concentrations increase as well during pregnancy. In trimesters 2 and 3 the 97.5th percentiles are over three times the non-pregnant URL provided by the manufacturer. Trimester- and assay-specific reference intervals for copeptin and MR-proADM should be used. In addition, consecutive measurements and the time frame between measurements should be considered as the differences seen with or in advance of preeclampsia can be expected to be relatively small compared to the reference intervals.

  9. The establishment of tocopherol reference intervals for Hungarian adult population using a validated HPLC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Gábor; Szpisjak, László; Bajtai, Attila; Siska, Andrea; Klivényi, Péter; Ilisz, István; Földesi, Imre; Vécsei, László; Zádori, Dénes

    2017-09-01

    Evidence suggests that decreased α-tocopherol (the most biologically active substance in the vitamin E group) level can cause neurological symptoms, most likely ataxia. The aim of the current study was to first provide reference intervals for serum tocopherols in the adult Hungarian population with appropriate sample size, recruiting healthy control subjects and neurological patients suffering from conditions without symptoms of ataxia, myopathy or cognitive deficiency. A validated HPLC method applying a diode array detector and rac-tocol as internal standard was utilized for that purpose. Furthermore, serum cholesterol levels were determined as well for data normalization. The calculated 2.5-97.5% reference intervals for α-, β/γ- and δ-tocopherols were 24.62-54.67, 0.81-3.69 and 0.29-1.07 μm, respectively, whereas the tocopherol/cholesterol ratios were 5.11-11.27, 0.14-0.72 and 0.06-0.22 μmol/mmol, respectively. The establishment of these reference intervals may improve the diagnostic accuracy of tocopherol measurements in certain neurological conditions with decreased tocopherol levels. Moreover, the current study draws special attention to the possible pitfalls in the complex process of the determination of reference intervals as well, including the selection of study population, the application of internal standard and method validation and the calculation of tocopherol/cholesterol ratios. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 参考区间的研究进展%Research Progress of the reference interval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小东; 王文瑞

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:The biological reference interval not only exists in different laboratories, individual and geographical background operation, also the inlfuenced of different by way of life,in the natural environment and social environment, So to establish the biological reference interval is very important for understanding a nation’s disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention. This paper from many aspects -the basic concept andcurrent study andformulate procedures and methods and matters needing attention and validation and transfer of the reference interval and so on,to introduc the biological reference interval.%生物参考区间不但存在不同实验室的操作背景、个体和地域差异,也受不同生活方式、身处的自然环境与社会环境的影响,因此制定具有针对性的参考区间对于一个国家的疾病诊断、治疗与预防具有十分重要的意义,本文从基本概念、研究现状、制定步骤与方法、注意事项、验证与转移等方面介绍生物参考区间的研究进展。

  11. Establishment of reference intervals for plasma protein electrophoresis in Indo-Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Mark; Matthews, Beren J; Limpus, Colin J; Mills, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and haematological parameters are increasingly used to diagnose disease in green sea turtles. Specific clinical pathology tools, such as plasma protein electrophoresis analysis, are now being used more frequently to improve our ability to diagnose disease in the live animal. Plasma protein reference intervals were calculated from 55 clinically healthy green sea turtles using pulsed field electrophoresis to determine pre-albumin, albumin, α-, β- and γ-globulin concentrations. The estimated reference intervals were then compared with data profiles from clinically unhealthy turtles admitted to a local wildlife hospital to assess the validity of the derived intervals and identify the clinically useful plasma protein fractions. Eighty-six per cent {19 of 22 [95% confidence interval (CI) 65-97]} of clinically unhealthy turtles had values outside the derived reference intervals, including the following: total protein [six of 22 turtles or 27% (95% CI 11-50%)], pre-albumin [two of five, 40% (95% CI 5-85%)], albumin [13 of 22, 59% (95% CI 36-79%)], total albumin [13 of 22, 59% (95% CI 36-79%)], α- [10 of 22, 45% (95% CI 24-68%)], β- [two of 10, 20% (95% CI 3-56%)], γ- [one of 10, 10% (95% CI 0.3-45%)] and β-γ-globulin [one of 12, 8% (95% CI 0.2-38%)] and total globulin [five of 22, 23% (8-45%)]. Plasma protein electrophoresis shows promise as an accurate adjunct tool to identify a disease state in marine turtles. This study presents the first reference interval for plasma protein electrophoresis in the Indo-Pacific green sea turtle.

  12. Pediatric primary care providers' perspectives regarding hospital discharge communication: a mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyenaar, JoAnna K; Bergert, Lora; Mallory, Leah A; Engel, Richard; Rassbach, Caroline; Shen, Mark; Woehrlen, Tess; Cooperberg, David; Coghlin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Effective communication between inpatient and outpatient providers may mitigate risks of adverse events associated with hospital discharge. However, there is an absence of pediatric literature defining effective discharge communication strategies at both freestanding children's hospitals and general hospitals. The objectives of this study were to assess associations between pediatric primary care providers' (PCPs) reported receipt of discharge communication and referral hospital type, and to describe PCPs' perspectives regarding effective discharge communication and areas for improvement. We administered a questionnaire to PCPs referring to 16 pediatric hospital medicine programs nationally. Multivariable models were developed to assess associations between referral hospital type and receipt and completeness of discharge communication. Open-ended questions asked respondents to describe effective strategies and areas requiring improvement regarding discharge communication. Conventional qualitative content analysis was performed to identify emergent themes. Responses were received from 201 PCPs, for a response rate of 63%. Although there were no differences between referral hospital type and PCP-reported receipt of discharge communication (relative risk 1.61, 95% confidence interval 0.97-2.67), PCPs referring to general hospitals more frequently reported completeness of discharge communication relative to those referring to freestanding children's hospitals (relative risk 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.26-2.51). Analysis of free text responses yielded 4 major themes: 1) structured discharge communication, 2) direct personal communication, 3) reliability and timeliness of communication, and 4) communication for effective postdischarge care. This study highlights potential differences in the experiences of PCPs referring to general hospitals and freestanding children's hospitals, and presents valuable contextual data for future quality improvement initiatives

  13. Reference intervals of spinal mobility measures in normal individuals: the mobility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramiro, Sofia; van Tubergen, Astrid; Stolwijk, Carmen; van der Heijde, Desiree; Royston, Patrick; Landewe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To establish reference intervals (RIs) for spinal mobility measures as recommended for patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and to determine the effect of age, height and gender on spinal mobility, in normal individuals. Methods A cross-sectional study (MOBILITY) was conducted among

  14. Reference Intervals for Non-Fasting CVD Lipids and Inflammation Markers in Pregnant Indigenous Australian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Tracy L; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Clausen, Don; Weatherall, Loretta; Keogh, Lyniece; Pringle, Kirsty G; Rae, Kym M

    2017-10-14

    Indigenous Australians experience high rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The origins of CVD may commence during pregnancy, yet few serum reference values for CVD biomarkers exist specific to the pregnancy period. The Gomeroi gaaynggal research project is a program that undertakes research and provides some health services to pregnant Indigenous women. Three hundred and ninety-nine non-fasting samples provided by the study participants (206 pregnancies and 175 women) have been used to construct reference intervals for CVD biomarkers during this critical time. A pragmatic design was used, in that women were not excluded for the presence of chronic or acute health states. Percentile bands for non-linear relationships were constructed according to the methods of Wright and Royston (2008), using the xriml package in StataIC 13.1. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, cystatin-C and alkaline phosphatase increased as gestational age progressed, with little change seen in high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and γ glutamyl transferase. Values provided in the reference intervals are consistent with findings from other research projects. These reference intervals will form a basis with which future CVD biomarkers for pregnant Indigenous Australian women can be compared.

  15. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  16. Establishment of a paediatric age-related reference interval for the measurement of urinary total fractionated metanephrines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, Alison

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Normetanephrine and metanephrine are intermediate metabolites of noradrenaline and adrenaline metabolism. To assess whether normetanephrine and metanephrine analysis may aid in the diagnosis of Neuroblastoma, a reference interval for these metabolites must first be established. AIM: The overall aim of this study was to establish a paediatric age-related reference interval for the measurement of total fractionated metanephrines. METHODS: A total of 267 urine samples were analysed following acid hydrolysis. This releases the metanephrines from their sulphate-bound metabolites. The samples were analysed using reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electro-chemical detection on a Gilson automated sequential trace enrichment of dialysate sample system. RESULTS: Data were analysed using Minitab Release version 14. Outliers were removed using the Dixon\\/Reed one-third rule. Partitioning of the age groups was achieved using Harris and Boyd\\'s standard normal deviate test. Non-parametric analysis of the data was performed, followed by the establishment of the 2.5th and the 97.5th reference limits. CONCLUSIONS: The established reference intervals are described in Table 2.

  17. Hematology reference intervals for neonatal Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panousis, Nikolaos; Siachos, Nektarios; Kitkas, Georgios; Kalaitzakis, Emmanouil; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, Maria; Valergakis, Georgios E

    2018-01-09

    Data regarding hematologic reference intervals (RI) for neonatal calves have not been published yet. The aims of this study were: a) to establish hematology RIs for neonatal Holstein calves, b) to compare them with the RIs for lactating cows, and c) to investigate the relationship of age and gender with the hematologic profile of calves. Two-hundred and fifty-four clinically healthy Holstein calves (1-9days old, from 30 farms) and 82 healthy Holstein cows (between 30 and 150days in milk, from 10 farms) were blood sampled once for a complete blood count evaluation, using the ADVIA 120 hematology analyzer. An additional blood sample was collected from each calf for serum total protein concentration measurement. RIs and age-related RIs were calculated with the Reference Value Advisor freeware. Comparisons between calves and cows and between male and female calves were performed with t-test or Mann-Whitney test. Red blood cell count (RBC), white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts in calves were higher, while mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were lower than in cows. Lymphocyte and platelets showed a notable increase through age. Finally, female calves had higher RBC, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration than males. Age-specific RIs should be used for the interpretation of the complete blood count in Holstein calves. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A global multicenter study on reference values: 1. Assessment of methods for derivation and comparison of reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Ozarda, Yesim; Barth, Julian H; Klee, George; Qiu, Ling; Erasmus, Rajiv; Borai, Anwar; Evgina, Svetlana; Ashavaid, Tester; Khan, Dilshad; Schreier, Laura; Rolle, Reynan; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Kimura, Shogo; Kawano, Reo; Armbruster, David; Mori, Kazuo; Yadav, Binod K

    2017-04-01

    The IFCC Committee on Reference Intervals and Decision Limits coordinated a global multicenter study on reference values (RVs) to explore rational and harmonizable procedures for derivation of reference intervals (RIs) and investigate the feasibility of sharing RIs through evaluation of sources of variation of RVs on a global scale. For the common protocol, rather lenient criteria for reference individuals were adopted to facilitate harmonized recruitment with planned use of the latent abnormal values exclusion (LAVE) method. As of July 2015, 12 countries had completed their study with total recruitment of 13,386 healthy adults. 25 analytes were measured chemically and 25 immunologically. A serum panel with assigned values was measured by all laboratories. RIs were derived by parametric and nonparametric methods. The effect of LAVE methods is prominent in analytes which reflect nutritional status, inflammation and muscular exertion, indicating that inappropriate results are frequent in any country. The validity of the parametric method was confirmed by the presence of analyte-specific distribution patterns and successful Gaussian transformation using the modified Box-Cox formula in all countries. After successful alignment of RVs based on the panel test results, nearly half the analytes showed variable degrees of between-country differences. This finding, however, requires confirmation after adjusting for BMI and other sources of variation. The results are reported in the second part of this paper. The collaborative study enabled us to evaluate rational methods for deriving RIs and comparing the RVs based on real-world datasets obtained in a harmonized manner. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Frequency of Metabolic Risk Factors in Children with Urinary Tract Stones Referred to Hamadan Pediatric Nephrology Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.E. Momtaz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Urinary stones are among the most common complaints referred to nephrologist and urologists. Although incidence of urolithiasis is low in children compared to adults and only 7% of all urinary stones are diagnosed before the age of 16 but stones are detected more frequently in pediatric age group in recent years. Metabolic derangements, infection, neurogenic bladder and urinary obstruction are major risk factors of urolithiasis. Common metabolic risk factors of urolithiasis in children are hypercalciuria, uricosuria, hypocitraturia, hyperoxaluria, metabolic acidosis and cystinuria. There are many clinical studies about the frequency of these metabolic risk factors with different results reflecting difference in diet, geographic area and genetics in study populations. In this study we tried to evaluate the frequency of metabolic causes of urinary stones in children referred to Hamadan pediatric nephrology clinic.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study 156 patients referred due to urinary stones to pediatric nephrology clinic underwent thorough metabolic evaluations including: serum calcium,phosphorus, uric acid, creatinine and non fasting random urine sample for calcium, creatinine , uric acid , oxalate, citrate and cystine . urine solute: creatinine ratios were calculated and compared with normative data.Results: Of 156 patients 136(87.2% had metabolic derangements including: hyperuricosuria in 71 (45.5%, hypercalciuria in 41(26.3%, hypocitraturia in 26 (16.7%, hyperoxaluria in 16(10.3%,cystinuria in 1(0.6% and metabolic acidosis in 39 (25%.Conclusion: High rate of metabolic derangement in pediatric urinary stone patients mandates proper metabolic evaluation in all of them. hyperuricosuria was the most common metbolic finding instead of hypercalciuria in this study. This could be due to differences in diet, geographic area and genetic background in various populations.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci

  20. Trimester-specific reference intervals for haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Catherine

    2011-11-26

    Abstract Background: Diabetes in pregnancy imposes additional risks to both mother and infant. These increased risks are considered to be primarily related to glycaemic control which is monitored by means of glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)). The correlation of HbA(1c) with clinical outcomes emphasises the need to measure HbA(1c) accurately, precisely and for correct interpretation, comparison to appropriately defined reference intervals. Since July 2010, the HbA(1c) assay in Irish laboratories is fully metrologically traceable to the IFCC standard. The objective was to establish trimester-specific reference intervals in pregnancy for IFCC standardised HbA(1c) in non-diabetic Caucasian women. Methods: The authors recruited 311 non-diabetic Caucasian pregnant (n=246) and non-pregnant women (n=65). A selective screening based on risk factors for gestational diabetes was employed. All subjects had a random plasma glucose <7.7 mmol\\/L and normal haemoglobin level. Pregnancy trimester was defined as trimester 1 (T1, n=40) up to 12 weeks +6 days, trimester 2 (T2, n=106) 13-27 weeks +6 days, trimester 3 (T3, n=100) >28 weeks to term. Results: The normal HbA(1c) reference interval for Caucasian non-pregnant women was 29-37 mmol\\/mol (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial; DCCT: 4.8%-5.5%), T1: 24-36 mmol\\/mol (DCCT: 4.3%-5.4%), T2: 25-35 mmol\\/mol (DCCT: 4.4%-5.4%) and T3: 28-39 mmol\\/mol (DCCT: 4.7%-5.7%). HbA(1c) was significantly decreased in trimesters 1 and 2 compared to non-pregnant women. Conclusions: HbA(1c) trimester-specific reference intervals are required to better inform the management of pregnancies complicated by diabetes.

  1. Reference intervals for serum osteocalcin concentrations in adult men and women from the study of health in Pomerania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Anke; Friedrich, Nele; Spielhagen, Christin; Rettig, Rainer; Ittermann, Till; Nauck, Matthias; Wallaschofski, Henri

    2013-03-13

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a bone-specific protein produced primarily by osteoblasts during bone formation. Besides its role in bone formation, osteocalcin may play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism and male fertility. To interpret serum OC data, reference intervals adapted to a specific laboratory method are needed. A healthy reference population was selected from the first follow-up of the Study of Health in Pomerania. Serum OC concentrations were measured with the IDS-iSYS N-Mid Osteocalcin assay on the IDS-iSYS Automated System (Immunodiagnostic Systems, Frankfurt am Main, Germany). The reference interval was defined as the central 95% range (2.5th-97.5th percentile). Age-specific reference intervals were calculated by quantile regression for 1107 men (25-79 years) and 545 premenopausal women (25-54 years). The reference interval for 498 postmenopausal women (50-79 years) was calculated irrespective of age. Median (1st-3rd quartile) serum OC concentrations were 15.4 ng/mL (12.0-19.4 ng/mL) in men, 14.4 ng/mL (11.3-18.5 ng/mL) in premenopausal women, and 18.6 ng/mL (13.6-25.6 ng/mL) in postmenopausal women. Serum OC concentrations were highest in men and premenopausal women aged 25-29 years, were stable during midlife, and rose again after 65 years of age in men and at transition to menopause in women. Serum OC concentrations were lower in women taking oral contraceptives or who were under hormone replacement therapy after menopause and in subjects with diabetes mellitus or with body mass index  30 kg/m2 than in subjects without these conditions. We established sex-specific adult reference intervals for the serum OC concentration measured by the IDS-iSYS N-Mid Osteocalcin assay.

  2. An appraisal of statistical procedures used in derivation of reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Boyd, James C

    2010-11-01

    When conducting studies to derive reference intervals (RIs), various statistical procedures are commonly applied at each step, from the planning stages to final computation of RIs. Determination of the necessary sample size is an important consideration, and evaluation of at least 400 individuals in each subgroup has been recommended to establish reliable common RIs in multicenter studies. Multiple regression analysis allows identification of the most important factors contributing to variation in test results, while accounting for possible confounding relationships among these factors. Of the various approaches proposed for judging the necessity of partitioning reference values, nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) is the likely method of choice owing to its ability to handle multiple groups and being able to adjust for multiple factors. Box-Cox power transformation often has been used to transform data to a Gaussian distribution for parametric computation of RIs. However, this transformation occasionally fails. Therefore, the non-parametric method based on determination of the 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles following sorting of the data, has been recommended for general use. The performance of the Box-Cox transformation can be improved by introducing an additional parameter representing the origin of transformation. In simulations, the confidence intervals (CIs) of reference limits (RLs) calculated by the parametric method were narrower than those calculated by the non-parametric approach. However, the margin of difference was rather small owing to additional variability in parametrically-determined RLs introduced by estimation of parameters for the Box-Cox transformation. The parametric calculation method may have an advantage over the non-parametric method in allowing identification and exclusion of extreme values during RI computation.

  3. Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivars, Katrin; Nelson, Nina; Theodorsson, Annette; Theodorsson, Elvar; Ström, Jakob O; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life. 130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life. Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

  4. International longitudinal pediatric reference standards for bone mineral content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Burrows, Melonie; Bachrach, Laura K; Lloyd, Tom; Petit, Moira; Macdonald, Heather; Mirwald, Robert L; Bailey, Don; McKay, Heather

    2010-01-01

    To render a diagnosis pediatricians rely upon reference standards for bone mineral density or bone mineral content, which are based on cross-sectional data from a relatively small sample of children. These standards are unable to adequately represent growth in a diverse pediatric population. Thus, the goal of this study was to develop sex and site-specific standards for BMC using longitudinal data collected from four international sites in Canada and the United States. Data from four studies were combined; Saskatchewan Paediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (n=251), UBC Healthy Bones Study (n=382); Penn State Young Women's Health Study (n=112) and Stanford's Bone Mineral Accretion study (n=423). Males and females (8 to 25 years) were measured for whole body (WB), total proximal femur (PF), femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) BMC (g). Data were analyzed using random effects models. Bland-Altman was used to investigate agreement between predicted and actual data. Age, height, weight and ethnicity independently predicted BMC accrual across sites (Paccrual; Hispanic 75.4 (28.2) g less BMC accrual; Blacks 82.8 (26.3) g more BMC accrual with confounders of age, height and weight controlled. We report similar findings for the PF and FN. Models for females for all sites were similar with age, height and weight as independent significant predictors of BMC accrual (Paccounting for age, size, sex and ethnicity. In conclusion, when interpreting BMC in pediatrics we recommend standards that are sex, age, size and ethnic specific. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reference interval determination of hemoglobin fractions in umbilical cord and placental blood by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bó, Suzane Dal; de Oliveira Lemos, Fabiane Kreutz; Pedrazzani, Fabiane Spagnol; Cagliari, Cláudia Rosa; Scotti, Luciana

    2016-04-01

    Umbilical cord and placental blood (UCPB) is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells widely used to treat diseases that did not have effective treatments until recently. Umbilical cord and placental blood banks (UCPBBs) are needed to be created to store UCPB. UCPB is collected immediately after birth, processed, and frozen until infusion. Detection of abnormal hemoglobins is one of UCPB screening tests available. The objective of the present study was to determine the reference interval for HbA, HbF, and HbA2 in UCPB using capillary electrophoresis. Methods: Observational retrospective study of UCPB samples undergoing hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed between April 2012 and May 2013. We analyzed 273 UCPB samples. All cords met the criteria of BrasilCORD. We found 19.9% (10.5–36.7%) for HbA, 80.1% (62.7–89.4%) for HbF, and 0.1% (0.0–0.6%) for HbA2. Data were expressed as median (P2.5–P97.5). Establishing specific reference intervals is the best option for most tests because such ranges reflect the status of the population in which the tests will be applied. The use of appropriate reference intervals ensures that clinical labs provide reliable information, thus enabling clinicians to correctly interpret results and choose the best approach for the target population.

  6. Blood and Plasma Biochemistry Reference Intervals for Wild Juvenile American Alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew T; Kupar, Caitlin A; Kelley, Meghan D; Finger, John W; Tuberville, Tracey D

    2016-07-01

    : American alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis ) are one of the most studied crocodilian species in the world, yet blood and plasma biochemistry information is limited for juvenile alligators in their northern range, where individuals may be exposed to extreme abiotic and biotic stressors. We collected blood samples over a 2-yr period from 37 juvenile alligators in May, June, and July to establish reference intervals for 22 blood and plasma analytes. We observed no effect of either sex or blood collection time on any analyte investigated. However, our results indicate a significant correlation between a calculated body condition index and aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase. Glucose, total protein, and potassium varied significantly between sampling sessions. In addition, glucose and potassium were highly correlated between the two point-of-care devices used, although they were significantly lower with the i-STAT 1 CG8+ cartridge than with the Vetscan VS2 Avian/Reptile Rotor. The reference intervals presented herein should provide baseline data for evaluating wild juvenile alligators in the northern portion of their range.

  7. Accuracy of a pediatric early warning score in the recognition of clinical deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Oliveira Freitas Miranda

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the accuracy of the version of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score translated and adapted for the Brazilian context, in the recognition of clinical deterioration. Method: a diagnostic test study to measure the accuracy of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, in relation to a reference standard. The sample consisted of 271 children, aged 0 to 10 years, blindly evaluated by a nurse and a physician, specialists in pediatrics, with interval of 5 to 10 minutes between the evaluations, for the application of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context and of the reference standard. The data were processed and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and VassarStats.net programs. The performance of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context was evaluated through the indicators of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, area under the ROC curve, likelihood ratios and post-test probability. Results: the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context showed sensitivity of 73.9%, specificity of 95.5%, positive predictive value of 73.3%, negative predictive value of 94.7%, area under Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve of 91.9% and the positive post-test probability was 80%. Conclusion: the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, presented good performance, considered valid for the recognition of clinical deterioration warning signs of the children studied.

  8. Reference intervals for thyreotropin and thyroid hormones for healthy adults based on the NOBIDA material and determined using a Modular E170

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Hilsted, Linda

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to establish Nordic reference intervals for thyreotropin (TSH) and the thyroid hormones in heparinized plasma. METHODS: We used 489 heparinized blood samples, collected in the morning, from the Nordic NOBIDA reference material, from healthy adults...... for the thyroid hormones, but not TSH, followed a Gaussian distribution. There were more TPO-ab and Tg-ab positive women than men. After exclusion of the TPO-ab and the Tg-ab positive individuals, the reference interval TSH was 0.64 (0.61-0.72) to 4.7 (4.4-5.0) mIU/L. The exclusion of these ab-positive samples...... also minimized the differences in TSH concentrations between the sexes and the different Nordic countries. For the thyroid hormones, there were only minor differences between the reference intervals between the Nordic populations and between men and women. These reference intervals were unaffected...

  9. Hemoglobin concentrations in 358 apparently healthy 80-year-old Danish men and women. Should the reference interval be adjusted for age?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Ovesen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims: In elderly Danes, reference intervals for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations are derived from younger population groups. The aim was to examine reference intervals for Hb and cut-off limits for anemia by application of criteria for normality to a representative population of 80...

  10. Establishment of reference intervals for complete blood count parameters during normal pregnancy in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aiwei; Yang, Shuo; Zhang, Jie; Qiao, Rui

    2017-11-01

    To observe the changes of complete blood count (CBC) parameters during pregnancy and establish appropriate reference intervals for healthy pregnant women. Healthy pregnant women took the blood tests at all trimesters. All blood samples were processed on Sysmex XE-2100. The following CBC parameters were analyzed: red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), white blood cell count (WBC), and leukocyte differential count. Reference intervals were established using the 2.5th and 97.5th percentile of the distribution. Complete blood count parameters showed dynamic changes during trimesters. RBC, Hb, Hct declined at trimester 1, reaching their lowest point at trimester 2, and began to rise again at trimester 3. WBC, neutrophil count (Neut), monocyte count (MONO), RDW, and PDW went up from trimester 1 to trimester 3. On the contrary, MCHC, lymphocyte count (LYMPH), PLT, and MPV gradually descended during pregnancy. There were statistical significances in all CBC parameters between pregnant women and normal women, regardless of the trimesters (Ppregnancy) as follows: RBC 4.50 vs 3.94×10 12 /L, Hb 137 vs 120 g/L, WBC 5.71 vs 9.06×10 9 /L, LYMPH% 32.2 vs 18.0, Neut% 58.7 vs 75.0, and PLT 251 vs 202×10 9 /L. The changes of CBC parameters during pregnancy are described, and reference intervals for Beijing pregnant women are demonstrated in this study. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Determination of hematology and plasma chemistry reference intervals for 3 populations of captive Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsche, Mark A; Arnold, Jill; Jenkins, Erin; Townsend, Howard; Rosemary, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    The imperiled status of Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus), a large, long-lived, anadromous fish found along the Atlantic coast of North America, has prompted efforts at captive propagation for research and stock enhancement. The purpose of this study was to establish hematology and plasma chemistry reference intervals of captive Atlantic sturgeon maintained under different culture conditions. Blood specimens were collected from a total of 119 fish at 3 hatcheries: Lamar, PA (n = 36, ages 10-14 years); Chalk Point, MD (n = 40, siblings of Lamar); and Horn Point, Cambridge, MD (n = 43, mixed population from Chesapeake Bay). Reference intervals (using robust techniques), median, mean, and standard deviations were determined for WBC, RBC, thrombocytes, PCV, HGB, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and absolute counts for lymphocytes (L), neutrophils (N), monocytes, and eosinophils. Chemistry analytes included concentrations of total proteins, albumin, glucose, urea, calcium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride, and globulins, AST, CK, and LDH activities, and osmolality. Mean concentrations of total proteins, albumin, and glucose were at or below the analytic range. Statistical comparisons showed significant differences among hatcheries for each remaining plasma chemistry analyte and for PCV, RBC, MCHC, MCH, eosinophil and monocyte counts, and N:L ratio throughout all 3 groups. Therefore, reference intervals were calculated separately for each population. Reference intervals for fish maintained under differing conditions should be established per population. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  12. Reference intervals for serum lipids and prevalence of dyslipidaemia in 6-12-year-old children: The Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Martin Frank; Fredriksen, Per Morten; Hjelle, Ole Petter; Lindberg, Morten

    2018-05-01

    Elevated serum lipid concentrations in childhood are thought to be risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease later in life. The present study aims to provide age- and gender-related reference intervals for total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol in healthy school children. We also investigated the prevalence of dyslipidaemia using the published criteria for these biomarkers. Venous blood and anthropometric data were collected from 1340 children in the HOPP study, aged between 6 and 12 years. Age- and gender-related reference intervals (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles) were established according to the IFCC recommendations, using the software RefVal 4.10. Gender differences were observed for total cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol, but not for HDL cholesterol. Age differences were observed for total cholesterol. The reference intervals were in the range of 3.1-5.9 mmol/L for total cholesterol, 1.0-2.4 mmol/L for HDL cholesterol and 1.4-4.2 mmol/L for non-HDL cholesterol. Dyslipidaemia prevalence was as follows: increased TC 9.6%, decreased HDL 1.6%, and increased non-HDL 5.6%. Age- and gender-related reference intervals in a Norwegian population are similar to those reported in other countries. The prevalence of dyslipidaemia among Norwegian children is significant, emphasising the importance of appropriate reference intervals in clinical practice.

  13. Reference intervals for mean platelet volume and immature platelet fraction determined on a sysmex XE5000 hematology analyzer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikala Klok; Bathum, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background New parameters describing the platelet population of the blood are mean platelet volume (MPV), which is a crude estimate of thrombocyte reactivity, and immature platelet fraction (IPF), which reflects megakaryopoietic activity. This study aimed to define reference intervals for MPV...... and IPF and to investigate whether separate reference intervals according to smoking status, age or sex are necessary.Methods Blood samples were obtained from subjects participating in The Danish General Suburban Population Study. MPV and IPF measurements were performed by the use of the Sysmex XE-5000...

  14. Adrenal Hormones in Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus): Influential Factors and Reference Intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Leslie B.; Wells, Randall S.; Kellar, Nick; Balmer, Brian C.; Hohn, Aleta A.; Lamb, Stephen V.; Rowles, Teri; Zolman, Eric S.; Schwacke, Lori H.

    2015-01-01

    Inshore common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are exposed to a broad spectrum of natural and anthropogenic stressors. In response to these stressors, the mammalian adrenal gland releases hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone to maintain physiological and biochemical homeostasis. Consequently, adrenal gland dysfunction results in disruption of hormone secretion and an inappropriate stress response. Our objective herein was to develop diagnostic reference intervals (RIs) for adren...

  15. Serum ARCHITECT PIVKA-II reference interval in healthy Chinese adults: Sub-analysis from a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cunling; Hu, Jian; Yang, Jia; Chen, Zhaoyun; Li, Huijun; Wei, Lianhua; Zhang, Wei; Xing, Hao; Sang, Guoyao; Wang, Xiaoqin; Han, Ruilin; Liu, Ping; Li, Zhihui; Li, Zhiyan; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Li, Shunjun; Dai, Shuyang; Wang, Nianyue; Yang, Yongfeng; Ma, Li; Soh, Andrew; Beshiri, Agim; Shen, Feng; Yang, Tian; Fan, Zhuping; Zheng, Yijie; Chen, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has been widely used as a biomarker for liver cancer diagnosis in Japan for decades. However, the reference intervals for serum ARCHITECT PIVKA-II have not been established in the Chinese population. Thus, this study aimed to measure serum PIVKA-II levels in healthy Chinese subjects. This is a sub-analysis from the prospective, cross-sectional and multicenter study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03047603). A total of 892 healthy participants (777 Han and 115 Uygur) with complete health checkup results were recruited from 7 regional centers in China. Serum PIVKA-II level was measured by ARCHITECT immunoassay. All 95% reference ranges were estimated by nonparametric method. The distribution of PIVKA-II values showed significant difference with ethnicity and sex, but not age. The 95% reference range of PIVKA-II was 13.62-40.38 mAU/ml in Han Chinese subjects and 15.16-53.74 mAU/ml in Uygur subjects. PIVKA-II level was significantly higher in males than in females (P < 0.001). The 95% reference range of PIVKA-II was 15.39-42.01 mAU/ml in Han males while 11.96-39.13 mAU/ml in Han females. The reference interval of serum PIVKA-II on the Architect platform was established in healthy Chinese adults. This will be valuable for future clinical and laboratory studies performed using the Architect analyzer. Different ethnic backgrounds and analytical methods underline the need for redefining the reference interval of analytes such as PIVKA-II, in central laboratories in different countries. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Establishment of a paediatric age-related reference interval for the measurement of urinary total fractionated metanephrines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Normetanephrine and metanephrine are intermediate metabolites of noradrenaline and adrenaline metabolism. To assess whether normetanephrine and metanephrine analysis may aid in the diagnosis of Neuroblastoma, a reference interval for these metabolites must first be established.

  17. Serum reference interval of ARCHITECT alpha-fetoprotein in healthy Chinese Han adults: Sub-analysis of a prospective multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cunling; Yang, Jia; Wei, Lianhua; Hu, Jian; Song, Jiaqi; Wang, Xiaoqin; Han, Ruilin; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Soh, Andrew; Beshiri, Agim; Fan, Zhuping; Zheng, Yijie; Chen, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been widely used in clinical practice for decades. However, large-scale survey of serum reference interval for ARCHITECT AFP is still absent in Chinese population. This study aimed to measure serum AFP levels in healthy Chinese Han subjects, which is a sub-analysis of an ongoing prospective, cross-sectional, multi-center study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03047603). This analysis included a total of 530 participants (41.43±12.14years of age on average, 48.49% males), enrolled from 5 regional centers. Serum AFP level was measured by ARCHITECT immunoassay. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.4 and R software. AFP distribution did not show significant correlation with age or sex. The overall median and interquartile range of AFP was 2.87 (2.09, 3.83) ng/mL. AFP level did not show a trend of increasing with age. The new reference interval was 2.0-7.07ng/mL (LOQ- 97.5th percentiles). The reference interval for ARCHITECT AFP is updated with the data of adequate number of healthy Han adults. This new reference interval is more practical and applicable in Chinese adults. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI vol (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI vol - and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI vol for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose differences up to

  19. Serum prolactin revisited: parametric reference intervals and cross platform evaluation of polyethylene glycol precipitation-based methods for discrimination between hyperprolactinemia and macroprolactinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Martin; Pedersen, Susanne Møller

    2017-10-26

    Hyperprolactinemia diagnosis and treatment is often compromised by the presence of biologically inactive and clinically irrelevant higher-molecular-weight complexes of prolactin, macroprolactin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of two macroprolactin screening regimes across commonly used automated immunoassay platforms. Parametric total and monomeric gender-specific reference intervals were determined for six immunoassay methods using female (n=96) and male sera (n=127) from healthy donors. The reference intervals were validated using 27 hyperprolactinemic and macroprolactinemic sera, whose presence of monomeric and macroforms of prolactin were determined using gel filtration chromatography (GFC). Normative data for six prolactin assays included the range of values (2.5th-97.5th percentiles). Validation sera (hyperprolactinemic and macroprolactinemic; n=27) showed higher discordant classification [mean=2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.4] for the monomer reference interval method compared to the post-polyethylene glycol (PEG) recovery cutoff method (mean=1.8; 95% CI 0.8-2.8). The two monomer/macroprolactin discrimination methods did not differ significantly (p=0.089). Among macroprolactinemic sera evaluated by both discrimination methods, the Cobas and Architect/Kryptor prolactin assays showed the lowest and the highest number of misclassifications, respectively. Current automated immunoassays for prolactin testing require macroprolactin screening methods based on PEG precipitation in order to discriminate truly from falsely elevated serum prolactin. While the recovery cutoff and monomeric reference interval macroprolactin screening methods demonstrate similar discriminative ability, the latter method also provides the clinician with an easy interpretable monomeric prolactin concentration along with a monomeric reference interval.

  20. Lipid Panel Reference Intervals for Amazon Parrots (Amazona species).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravich, Michelle; Cray, Carolyn; Hess, Laurie; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01

    The lipoprotein panel is a useful diagnostic tool that allows clinicians to evaluate blood lipoprotein fractions. It is a standard diagnostic test in human medicine but is poorly understood in avian medicine. Amazon parrots (Amazona species) are popular pets that frequently lead a sedentary lifestyle and are customarily fed high-fat diets. Similar to people with comparable diets and lifestyles, Amazon parrots are prone to obesity and atherosclerosis. In human medicine, these conditions are typically correlated with abnormalities in the lipoprotein panel. To establish reference intervals for the lipoprotein panel in Amazon parrots, plasma samples from 31 captive Amazon parrots were analyzed for concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). The data were also grouped according to sex, diet, body condition score, and age. Aside from HDL levels, which were significantly different between male and female parrots, no intergroup differences were found for any of the lipoprotein fractions.

  1. EXPLORATORY PLASMA BIOCHEMISTRY REFERENCE INTERVALS FOR URAL OWLS (STRIX URALENSIS, PALLAS 1771) FROM THE AUSTRIAN REINTRODUCTION PROJECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanclova, Gabriela; Vobornik, Angela; Zink, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The Ural owl (Strix uralensis) is the biggest forest-living owl in Austria; however, it became extinct in Austria through poaching and habitat loss more than half a century ago. The birds examined in the present study were breeding pairs from the reintroduction project with the aim of determining exploratory plasma biochemistry reference intervals in Ural owls and evaluating the amount of biological variation between seasons, sexes, and ages. A total of 45 birds were sampled, including 13 adult males, 14 adult females, and 18 juvenile birds. Remarkably, almost all of the analytes showed significant differences between the subgroups, primarily between seasons, followed by age and sex. Only creatinkinase, glucose, lactatdehydrogenase, and triglycerides did not show any significant variations. Despite partitioning of reference values into subgroups according to biological variation diminishing the number of reference individuals in the respective groups, the resulting smaller reference intervals will improve medical assessment. The results of the present study once again demonstrate that significant seasonal fluctuations must be expected and considered in the interpretation. It can be assumed that these differences are probably even greater in free-range birds with considerable changes in food quantity and quality during and between years.

  2. Reference intervals for glucose, beta-cell polypeptides and counterregulatory factors during prolonged fasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wildner-Christensen, M; Eshøj, O

    2001-01-01

    To establish reference intervals for the pancreatic beta-cell response and the counterregulatory hormone response to prolonged fasting, we studied 33 healthy subjects (16 males, 17 females) during a 72-h fast. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin levels decreased (P ... of counterregulatory factors increased during the fast [P fasting (P ... decreased from the second to third day of fasting (P = 0.03). Males had higher glucose and glucagon levels and lower FFA levels during the fast (P

  3. A multicenter study on PIVKA reference interval of healthy population and establishment of PIVKA cutoff value for hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X; Tang, G; Gao, R; Guo, Z; Liu, Z; Yu, S; Chen, M; Tao, Z; Li, S; Liu, M; Wang, L; Hou, L; Xia, L; Cheng, X; Han, J; Qiu, L

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reference interval of protein-induced vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) in China population and to evaluate its medical decision level for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosis. To determine the reference range for Chinese individuals, a total of 855 healthy subjects in five typical regions of China were enrolled in this study to obtain a 95% reference interval. In a case-control study which recruited the subjects diagnosed with HCC, metastatic liver cancer, bile duct cancer, hepatitis, cirrhosis, other benign liver diseases and the subjects administrated anticoagulant, receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine PIVKA-II cutoff value for a medical decision. The concentration of PIVKA-II had no relationship with age or gender and that region was a significant factor associated with the level of PIVKA-II. The 95% reference interval determined in this study for PIVKA-II in Chinese healthy individuals was 28 mAU/mL, and the cutoff value which to distinguish patients with HCC from disease control groups is 36.5 mAU/mL. In clinical applications, it is recommended that each laboratory chooses their own reference interval based on the regional population study or cutoff value for disease diagnosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Reference intervals for stone risk factors in 24-h urine among healthy adults of the Han population in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zanlin; Li, Xiaoxia; Cui, Zelin; Wu, Wenqi; Liu, Yongda; Ou, Lili; Liang, Yueping; Zhao, Zhijian; Liu, Yang; Mai, Xing; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Cai, Chao; Yang, Houmeng; Zeng, Guohua

    2018-03-28

    The aim of the study was to establish reference intervals for 24-h urinary stone risk factors in the healthy Chinese Han population. From May 2013 to July 2014, we collected and analyzed 24-h urine samples from healthy adult Han population during a cross-sectional study across China. The protocol for analysis of 24-h urine included volume, pH, oxalate, citrate, sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorous, creatinine, urate, magnesium, the ion activity products of calcium oxalate (AP(CaOx) indexs) and calcium phosphate (AP(CaP) indexs). We calculated the reference intervals according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2008 guidelines and compared them with those recorded in other studies. A total of 132 male and 123 female healthy subjects with a mean (SD, range) age of 52.4 (15.2, 19-89) years were eligible in the final analysis. Men had higher 24-h excretion of creatinine, calcium, urate and phosphorus and lower levels of citrate, magnesium, chloride, sodium and potassium than women. AP(CaOx) indexs and AP(CaP) indexs were significantly higher among men than women. When urinary findings were compared with the reference intervals, most of our data showed a high abnormality rate, especially for creatinine, calcium, citrate, magnesium, chloride, sodium and potassium. The present study revealed the normal metabolic status for stone risk factors of the Chinese Han population. It is therefore necessary for each country or region to define their own reference intervals for comparison of stone risk factors between patients and healthy subjects.

  5. A critical evaluation of the Beckman Coulter Access hsTnI: Analytical performance, reference interval and concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Carel J; Tate, Jillian R; Wilgen, Urs; Cullen, Louise; Ungerer, Jacobus P J

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the analytical performance, outlier rate, carryover and reference interval of the Beckman Coulter Access hsTnI in detail and compared it with historical and other commercial assays. We compared the imprecision, detection capability, analytical sensitivity, outlier rate and carryover against two previous Access AccuTnI assay versions. We established the reference interval with stored samples from a previous study and compared the concordances and variances with the Access AccuTnI+3 as well as with two commercial assays. The Access hsTnI had excellent analytical sensitivity with the calibration slope 5.6 times steeper than the Access AccuTnI+3. The detection capability was markedly improved with the SD of the blank 0.18-0.20 ng/L, LoB 0.29-0.33 ng/L and LoD 0.58-0.69 ng/L. All the reference interval samples had a result above the LoB value. At a mean concentration of 2.83 ng/L the SD was 0.28 ng/L (CV 9.8%). Carryover (0.005%) and outlier (0.046%) rates were similar to the Access AccuTnI+3. The combined male and female 99th percentile reference interval was 18.2 ng/L (90% CI 13.2-21.1 ng/L). Concordance amongst the assays was poor with only 16.7%, 19.6% and 15.2% of samples identified by all 4 assays as above the 99th, 97.5th and 95th percentiles. Analytical imprecision was a minor contributor to the observed variances between assays. The Beckman Coulter Access hsTnI assay has excellent analytical sensitivity and precision characteristics close to zero. This allows cTnI measurement in all healthy individuals and the capability to identify numerically small differences between serial samples as statistically significant. Concordance in healthy individuals remains poor amongst assays. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reference Interval and Subject Variation in Excretion of Urinary Metabolites of Nicotine from Non-Smoking Healthy Subjects in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Å. M.; Garde, A. H.; Christensen, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    for determination of cotinine was carried out on 27 samples from non-smokers and smokers. Results obtained from the RIA method showed 2.84 [confidence interval (CI): 2.50; 3.18] times higher results compared to the GC-MS method. A linear correlation between the two methods was demonstrated (rho=0.96). CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: Passive smoking has been found to be a respiratory health hazard in humans. The present study describes the calculation of a reference interval for urinary nicotine metabolites calculated as cotinine equivalents on the basis of 72 non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke less than 25....... Parametric reference interval for excretion of nicotine metabolites in urine from non-smokers was established according to International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) for use of risk assessment of exposure to tobacco smoke...

  7. Reference intervals of citrated-native whole blood thromboelastography in premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Mario; Guaragni, Brunetta; Pezzotti, Elena; Rodriguez-Perez, Carmen; Chirico, Gaetano

    2017-12-01

    Bleeding due to acquired coagulation disorders is a common complication in premature neonates. In this clinical setting, standard coagulation laboratory tests might be unsuitable to investigate the hemostatic function as they reflect the concentration of pro-coagulant proteins but not of anti-coagulant proteins. Thromboelastography (TEG), providing a more complete assessment of hemostasis, may be able to overcome some of these limitations. Unfortunately, experience on the use of TEG in premature neonates is very limited and, in particular in this population, reference ranges of TEG parameters have not been yet evaluated. To evaluate TEG in preterm neonates, and to assess their reference ranges. One hundred and eighteen preterm neonates were analyzed for TEG in a retrospective cohort study. Double-sided 95% reference intervals were calculated using a bootstrap method after Box-Cox transformation. TEG parameters were compared between early-preterm and moderate-/late-preterm neonates and between bleeding and non-bleeding preterm neonates. Comparing early-preterm with moderate-/late-preterm neonates, TEG parameters were not statistically different, except for fibrinolysis which was significantly higher in early preterm neonates. Platelet count significantly correlated with α angle and MA parameters. Bleeding and non-bleeding neonates had similar TEG values. These results reinforce the concept that in stable preterm neonates, in spite of lower concentration of pro- and anti-coagulants proteins, the hemostasis is normally balanced and well functioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analytical performance, reference values and decision limits. A need to differentiate between reference intervals and decision limits and to define analytical quality specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Jensen, Esther A; Brandslund, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    of the values of analytical components measured on reference samples from reference individuals. Decision limits are based on guidelines from national and international expert groups defining specific concentrations of certain components as limits for decision about diagnosis or well-defined specific actions....... Analytical quality specifications for reference intervals have been defined for bias since the 1990s, but in the recommendations specified in the clinical guidelines analytical quality specifications are only scarcely defined. The demands for negligible biases are, however, even more essential for decision...... limits, as the choice is no longer left to the clinician, but emerge directly from the concentration. Even a small bias will change the number of diseased individuals, so the demands for negligible biases are obvious. A view over the analytical quality as published gives a variable picture of bias...

  9. The biomedical piglet: establishing reference intervals for haematology and clinical chemistry parameters of two age groups with and without iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Domenico; Dondi, Francesco; Barone, Francesca; Serafini, Federica; Elmi, Alberto; Giunti, Massimo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Forni, Monica; Bacci, Maria L

    2017-01-17

    The similarities between swine and humans in physiological and genomic patterns, and the great correlation in size and anatomy, make pigs extremely useful in preclinical studies. New-born piglets can represent a model for congenital and genetic diseases in new-born children. It is known that piglets may have significant differences in clinicopathological results compared to adult pigs. Therefore, adult laboratory reference intervals cannot be applied to piglets. The aim of this study was to compare haematological and chemical variables in piglets of two ages and determinate age-related reference intervals for commercial hybrid young pigs. Blood samples were collected under general anaesthesia from 130 animals divided into five- (P5) and 30- (P30) day-old piglets. Only P30 animals were treated with parenteral iron after birth. Samples were analysed using automated haematology (ADVIA 2120) and chemistry analysers, and age-related reference intervals were calculated. Significant higher values of RBC, Hb and HCT were observed in P30 animals when compared to P5, with an opposite trend for MCV. These results were associated with a reduction of the RBC regeneration process and the thrombopoietic response. The TSAT and TIBC were significantly higher in P30 compared to P5; however, piglets remained iron deficient compared to adult reference intervals reported previously. In conclusion, this paper emphasises the high variability occurring in clinicopathological variables between new-born and 30-day-old pigs, and between piglets and adult pigs. This study provides valuable reference data for piglets at precise ages and could be used in the future as historical control improving the Reduction in animal experiments, as suggested by the 3Rs principle.

  10. Comprehensive haematological indices reference intervals for a healthy Omani population: First comprehensive study in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and Middle Eastern countries based on age, gender and ABO blood group comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Avinash Daniel; Al-Busaidi, Raiya; Al-Lawati, Rabab H.; Morsi, Magdi

    2018-01-01

    Background Reference intervals for venous blood parameters differs with age, gender, geographic region, and ethnic groups. Hence local laboratory reference intervals are important to improve the diagnostic accuracy of health assessments and diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive published reference intervals established in Oman, the Gulf Cooperation Council or Middle Eastern countries. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for full blood count in healthy Omani adults. Methods Venous blood specimens were collected from 2202 healthy individuals aged 18 to 69 years from January 2012 to April 2017, and analysed by Sysmex XS-1000i and Cell-Dyn Sapphire automated haematology analysers. Results were statistically analysed and compared by gender, age, and ABO blood group. The lower and upper reference limits of the haematology reference intervals were established at the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles respectively. Results Reference intervals were calculated for 17 haematology parameters which included red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet parameters. Red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelet and platelet haematocrit counts of the healthy donors were significantly different between males and females at all ages (p values of RBC, HGB and HCT than females. Other complete blood count parameters showed no significant differences between genders, age groups, instruments, or blood groups. Our study showed a lower haemoglobin limit for the normal reference interval in males and females than the currently used in Oman. Conclusions Data from this study established specific reference intervals which could be considered for general use in Oman. The differences in haematology reference intervals highlights the necessity to establish reference intervals for venous blood parameters among the healthy population in each country or at least in each region. PMID:29621271

  11. Comprehensive haematological indices reference intervals for a healthy Omani population: First comprehensive study in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and Middle Eastern countries based on age, gender and ABO blood group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mawali, Adhra; Pinto, Avinash Daniel; Al-Busaidi, Raiya; Al-Lawati, Rabab H; Morsi, Magdi

    2018-01-01

    Reference intervals for venous blood parameters differs with age, gender, geographic region, and ethnic groups. Hence local laboratory reference intervals are important to improve the diagnostic accuracy of health assessments and diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive published reference intervals established in Oman, the Gulf Cooperation Council or Middle Eastern countries. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for full blood count in healthy Omani adults. Venous blood specimens were collected from 2202 healthy individuals aged 18 to 69 years from January 2012 to April 2017, and analysed by Sysmex XS-1000i and Cell-Dyn Sapphire automated haematology analysers. Results were statistically analysed and compared by gender, age, and ABO blood group. The lower and upper reference limits of the haematology reference intervals were established at the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles respectively. Reference intervals were calculated for 17 haematology parameters which included red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet parameters. Red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelet and platelet haematocrit counts of the healthy donors were significantly different between males and females at all ages (p < 0.05), with males having higher mean values of RBC, HGB and HCT than females. Other complete blood count parameters showed no significant differences between genders, age groups, instruments, or blood groups. Our study showed a lower haemoglobin limit for the normal reference interval in males and females than the currently used in Oman. Data from this study established specific reference intervals which could be considered for general use in Oman. The differences in haematology reference intervals highlights the necessity to establish reference intervals for venous blood parameters among the healthy population in each country or at least in each region.

  12. Reference intervals for putative biomarkers of drug-induced liver injury and liver regeneration in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Ben; Clarke, Joanna I; Walker, Lauren E; Brillant, Nathalie; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Park, B Kevin; Pirmohamed, Munir; Antoine, Daniel J

    2018-05-02

    The potential of mechanistic biomarkers to improve the prediction of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and hepatic regeneration is widely acknowledged. We sought to determine reference intervals for new biomarkers of DILI and regeneration as well as to characterize their natural variability and impact of diurnal variation. Serum samples from 200 healthy volunteers were recruited as part of a cross sectional study; of these, 50 subjects had weekly serial sampling over 3 weeks, while 24 had intensive blood sampling over a 24h period. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), MicroRNA-122 (miR-122), high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), total keratin-18 (FL-K18), caspase cleaved keratin-18 (cc-K18), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) were assessed by validated assays. Reference intervals were established for each biomarker based on the 97.5% quantile (90% CI) following the assessment of fixed effects in univariate and multivariable models (ALT 50 (41-50) U/l, miR-122 3548 (2912-4321) copies/µl, HMGB1 2.3 (2.2-2.4) ng/ml, FL-K18 475 (456-488) U/l, cc-K18 272 (256-291) U/l, GLDH 27 (26-30) U/l and CSF-1 2.4 (2.3-2.9) ng/ml). There was a small but significant intra-individual time random effect detected but no significant impact of diurnal variation was observed, with the exception of GLDH. Reference intervals for novel DILI biomarkers have been described for the first time. An upper limit of a reference range might represent the most appropriate method to utilize these data. Regulatory authorities have published letters of support encouraging further qualification of leading candidate biomarkers. These data can now be used to interpret data from exploratory clinical DILI studies and to assist their further qualification. Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) has a big impact on patient health and the development of new medicines. Unfortunately, currently used blood-based tests to assess liver injury and recovery suffer from insufficiencies. Newer blood

  13. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-02-01

    To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there may be large differences in child size. These DRLs were obtained at the largest pediatric hospital in Chile, with an active optimization program, and could be used by other hospitals in the Latin America region to compare their current patient dose values and determine whether corrective action is appropriate. © 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Determination of Age-Dependent Reference Ranges for Coagulation Tests Performed Using Destiny Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Fatma Demet; Serdar, Muhittin; Merve Ari, Elif; Onur Oztan, Mustafa; Hikmet Kozcu, Sureyya; Tarhan, Huseyin; Cakmak, Ozgur; Zeytinli, Merve; Yasar Ellidag, Hamit

    2016-06-01

    In order to apply the right treatment for hemostatic disorders in pediatric patients, laboratory data should be interpreted with age-appropriate reference ranges. The purpose of this study was to determining age-dependent reference range values for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen tests, and D-dimer tests. A total of 320 volunteers were included in the study with the following ages: 1 month - 1 year (n = 52), 2 - 5 years (n = 50), 6 - 10 years (n = 48), 11 - 17 years (n = 38), and 18 - 65 years (n = 132). Each volunteer completed a survey to exclude hemostatic system disorder. Using a nonparametric method, the lower and upper limits, including 95% distribution and 90% confidence intervals, were calculated. No statistically significant differences were found between PT and aPTT values in the groups consisting of children. Thus, the reference ranges were separated into child and adult age groups. PT and aPTT values were significantly higher in the children than in the adults. Fibrinogen values in the 6 - 10 age group and the adult age group were significantly higher than in the other groups. D-dimer levels were significantly lower in those aged 2 - 17; thus, a separate reference range was established. These results support other findings related to developmental hemostasis, confirming that adult and pediatric age groups should be evaluated using different reference ranges.

  15. Measuring the differences in work ratios between pediatric and adult ophthalmologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Joo; Chang, Jee Ho; Kim, Seung Hoon; Park, Song Hee; Kim, Sunghoon

    2017-06-01

    To assess the differences in work needed for pediatric and adult ophthalmologic examinations. Seven ophthalmology residents conducted slit-lamp and refraction examinations on children 3-7 years of age and adults 20-69 years of age. The examiners reported the magnitude estimate (ME) of their work in relation to two references (cross-reference ME): average adult examination and average pediatric examination. The examination time was also measured. For the slit-lamp examination, 50 children and 58 adults were recruited. The ME was 1.45 (95% CI, 1.30-1.62) times higher for the pediatric examinations than for the adult examinations when the reference was an average adult case. With respect to time, the pediatric examinations took 1.22 (95% CI, 1.06-1.41) times longer than the adult examinations. For the refraction examinations, 58 children and 96 adults were recruited. The ME was 1.35 (95% CI, 1.21-1.52) times higher for the pediatric examinations. The pediatric examination took 1.32 (95% CI, 1.16-1.50) times longer than the adult examination. The cross-reference ME ratios measuring the pediatric over adult examinations against both the pediatric and adult reference cases were equivalent in both the slit-lamp and the refraction examinations; however, the ME and time ratios of the pediatric over the adult examinations were not equivalent for the slit-lamp or for the refraction examinations. The cross-reference ME showed that pediatric ophthalmologic examinations require more work than the adult examination with validity and reliability. The time estimate was insufficient as a single indicator for work estimation. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum biochemical reference intervals for free-living Sand Tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) from east Australian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otway, Nicholas M

    2015-06-01

    Sharks are top-order predators in ocean food chains and the star attractions in aquaria worldwide. Unfortunately, blood biochemistry reference intervals (RI) have been determined for few species. The study aims to establish serum biochemical RI for free-living Sand Tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) off eastern Australia. Thirty-seven sharks were captured and their sex, length, weight, reproductive maturity, and health status were recorded. After blood collection, serum analytes were quantified using standard analytical and statistical methods. Reference intervals, means, medians, and 90% confidence intervals were generated. Physiologic data from live and necropsied sharks were used to enhance the study results. Thirty healthy sharks were included in the study. Albumin could not be detected. With the exception of ALP activity, values were unaffected by sex, length, weight, age, and life-history stage. The means (RI) were: sodium 258 (249-267) mmol/L, potassium 5.0 (4.3-5.7) mmol/L, chloride 242 (227-257) mmol/L, inorganic phosphate 1.8 (1.7-2.0) mmol/L, total calcium 3.9 (3.3-4.4) mmol/L, magnesium 1.9 (1.6-2.2) mmol/L, glucose 2.7 (2.2-3.2) mmol/L, urea 377 (360-394) mmol/L, ALP 20 (8-31) U/L, ALT 3 U/L (no RI), AST 29 (13-45) U/L, CK 42 (5-79) U/L, total protein 30 (24-36) g/L, triglyceride 0.3 (0.1-0.6) mmol/L, cholesterol 1.4 (0.9-2.1) mmol/L, creatinine 32 μmol/L (no RI), total bilirubin 1.5 μmol/L (no RI), and osmolarity 1082 (1027-1136) mmol/L. These preliminary RI will assist with the clinical evaluation and treatment of captive and free-living Sand Tiger sharks worldwide. Studies with more animals will increase the precision of upper and lower reference limits. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  17. Pediatric blood volumes: a one-page reference guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, J; Reitan, J

    1998-10-01

    At our institution, a multidisciplinary team met to work out a blood volume policy for our pediatric patients' laboratory testing. Because we are a cancer center, many of our patients are on protocols and/or are in the hospital for an extended period of time. These factors result in multiple blood draws. It is important to manage the volumes used so that we do not compromise the hematological status of our pediatric patients. The concerns of nurses and laboratory technologists were discussed and a three-tiered system was designed consisting of adult volumes, volumes for inflexibility to verify or add to the original order without resticking the patient increase at each tier. It is imperative to the overall quality of care for all patients that discretion is used when following these guidelines. When it is medically prudent to restrict the blood volumes taken from any patient, it should be done. However, when it is not medically necessary, the increased costs and potential decrease in the quality of laboratory service outweighs the desire to use smaller blood volumes.

  18. Population based reference intervals for common blood haematological and biochemical parameters in the akuapem north district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koram, Ka; Addae, Mm; Ocran, Jc; Adu-Amankwah, S; Rogers, Wo; Nkrumah, Fk

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the reference intervals for commonly used blood haematology and biochemical parameters in an adult (18-55yrs) population of residents of Mampong Akuapem. This was a population based cross sectional study of a randomly selected sample of the adult population of Mampong. The sample was selected from an updated census list of the Mampong area. Median values (95% range) for measured parameters were established as follows: Haemoglobin, (males) 14.2 g/dl (females) 12.0 g/dl Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), (female) 19.6 U/L (males) 26.1 U/L and Creatinine, (males) 108 mmol/L (females) 93 mmol/L. In comparison to reference values that are commonly used in Ghana, the haemoglobulin levels from this study were lower, and liver function parameters higher. This could be a result of genetic or environmental differences and calls for the need to establish site specific reference values applicable to our population.

  19. Pediatric Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew J; Hornby, Laura; Witteman, William; Shemie, Sam D

    2016-03-01

    Although pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death is increasing in frequency, there are no national or international donation after circulatory determination of death guidelines specific to pediatrics. This scoping review was performed to map the pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death literature, identify pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death knowledge gaps, and inform the development of national or regional pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death guidelines. Terms related to pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death were searched in Embase and MEDLINE, as well as the non-MEDLINE sources in PubMed from 1980 to May 2014. Seven thousand five hundred ninety-seven references were discovered and 85 retained for analysis. All references addressing pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death were considered. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not address pediatric patients, animal or laboratory studies, surgical techniques, and local pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death protocols. Narrative reviews and opinion articles were the most frequently discovered reference (25/85) and the few discovered studies were observational or qualitative and almost exclusively retrospective. Retained references were divided into themes and analyzed using qualitative methodology. The main discovered themes were 1) studies estimating the number of potential pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death donors and their impact on donation; 2) ethical issues in pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death; 3) physiology of the dying process after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy; 4) cardiac pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death; and 5) neonatal pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death. Donor estimates suggest that pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death will

  20. Age- and Gender-Specific Reference Intervals for Fasting Blood Glucose and Lipid Levels in School Children Measured With Abbott Architect c8000 Chemistry Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Tamimi, Waleed; Albanyan, Esam; Altwaijri, Yasmin; Tamim, Hani; Alhussein, Fahad

    2012-01-01

    Reference intervals for pubertal characteristics are influenced by genetic, geographic, dietary and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish age-specific reference intervals of glucose and lipid levels among local school children. This was cross-sectional study, conducted among Saudi school children. Fasting blood samples were collected from 2149 children, 1138 (53%) boys and 1011 (47%) girls, aged 6 to 18 years old. Samples were analyzed on the Architect c8000...

  1. Reference values for serum leptin in healthy non-obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Christiansen, Michael; Louise Hedley, Paula; Esmann Fonvig, Cilius; Stjernholm, Theresa; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-11-01

    Adipokines are biologically active, low-molecular weight peptides, which play a major role in metabolic homeostasis in humans. Leptin has gained increasing attention in pediatrics as a biomarker for various metabolic pathologies. Yet, its usefulness is hampered by the relative lack of reference values from pediatric settings. Accordingly, this study aims to evaluate serum concentrations of leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R), and free leptin index (FLI) in healthy Danish schoolchildren aged 6-18 years and subsequently to establish reference intervals across sex and age groups. A total of 1193 healthy, non-obese Danish schoolchildren (730 girls, 463 boys) aged 6-18 years (median 11.9) were examined by trained medical staff. Serum leptin and sOB-R concentrations in venous fasting blood samples were quantitated by immunoassay. Percentile curves of leptin, sOB-R, and free leptin index were calculated using the General Additive Model for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS). Significant age and sex-dependent differences in circulating leptin levels were found. In boys, the median leptin concentration for all ages combined was 3.35 μg/L (95%-interval: 0.71-22.47) and in girls, it was 9.89 ng/L (95%-interval: 2.06-41.49). For SOB-R, no sex-specific difference was found, and the median sOB-R concentration was 8.24 μg/L (IQR: 3.58-23.74; range: < 1.56-744.15). We demonstrated an age-dependent correlation with both serum leptin concentration and free leptin index with a gradual and significant increase in girls throughout childhood and adolescence and a significantly higher leptin concentration and free leptin index bell-shaped peak in early adolescence in boys.

  2. Evaluation of the medication process in pediatric patients: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despina Koumpagioti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to meta-analyze studies that have assessed the medication errors rate in pediatric patients during prescribing, dispensing, and drug administration. SOURCES: searches were performed in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Trip databases, selecting articles published in English from 2001 to 2010. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: a total of 25 original studies that met inclusion criteria were selected, which referred to pediatric inpatients or pediatric patients in emergency departments aged 0-16 years, and assessed the frequency of medication errors in the stages of prescribing, dispensing, and drug administration. CONCLUSIONS: the combined medication error rate for prescribing errors to medication orders was 0.175 (95% Confidence Interval: [CI] 0.108-0.270, the rate of prescribing errors to total medication errors was 0.342 (95% CI: 0.146-0.611, that of dispensing errors to total medication errors was 0.065 (95% CI: 0.026-0.154, and that ofadministration errors to total medication errors was 0.316 (95% CI: 0.148-0.550. Furthermore, the combined medication error rate for administration errors to drug administrations was 0.209 (95% CI: 0.152-0.281. Medication errors constitute a reality in healthcare services. The medication process is significantly prone to errors, especially during prescription and drug administration. Implementation of medication error reduction strategies is required in order to increase the safety and quality of pediatric healthcare.

  3. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  4. [Influence of gender, age and season on thyroid hormone reference interval].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L; Wang, D C; Xu, T; Cheng, X Q; Sun, Q; Hu, Y Y; Liu, H C; Lu, S Y; Yang, G H; Wang, Z J

    2018-05-29

    Objective: Using clinical "big data" , to investigate the factors that affect the levels of thyroid hormones, and to explore the partitioning criteria for reference intervals (RI) of these hormones. Methods: An observation study was conducted. Information of 107 107 individuals undergoing routine physical examination in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from September 1(st,) 2013 to August 31(st,) 2016 was collected, thyroid hormone of these subjects were detected. To explore the test results distribution and differences of TSH, FT4 and FT3 by gender and age; according to the seasonal division standard of China Meteorological Administration, the study period was divided into four seasons, and the seasonal fluctuation on TSH was analyzed.To define the appropriate partition by gender, age and season according to significant difference analysis. Results: In male and female, the distributions of TSH were 1.779(0.578-4.758), 2.023(0.420-5.343)mU/L, respectively, and the level of TSH in female was higher than in male ( Z =-37.600, P groups by 65 years old and female were divided by 50 years old, respectively, and the distributions of TSH in male and female of older group were 1.818(0.528-5.240), 2.111(0.348-5.735)mU/L, in younger group were 1.778(0.582-4.696), 1.991(0.427-5.316)mU/L. The level of TSH in older group was significantly higher than in younger group ( Z =-2.269, -10.400, all P group was much wider than in younger. The distribution of whole in spring, summer and autumn was 1.869( 0.510-5.042)mU/L, in winter was 1.978(0.527-5.250) mU/L, and the difference between them had statistical significance ( Z =-15.000, P age significantly affect the serum levels of TSH, FT4, and FT3, the distribution of TSH in female and elder group are wider than in male, and that of FT4, FT3 are lower.Seasons significantly affect the serum TSH level, the peak value is observed in winter. There are obviously differences between "rough" RIs and manufacture recommended RIs. Each

  5. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, Aisling; Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A.; Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children's hospital admission reports were rated higher

  6. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Handbook of selected organ doses for projections common in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstein, M.; Beck, T.J.; Warner, G.G.

    1979-05-01

    This handbook contains data from which absorbed dose (mrad) to selected organs can be estimated for common projections in pediatric radiology. The organ doses are for three reference patients: a newborn (0 to 6 months), a 1-year old child, and a 5-year old child. One intent of the handbook is to permit the user to evaluate the effect on organ dose to these reference pediatric patients as a function of certain changes in technical parameters used in or among facilities. A second intent is to permit a comparison to be made of organ doses as a function of age. This comparison can be extended to a reference adult by referring to the previous Handbook of Selected Organ Doses fo Projections Common in Diagnostic Radiology, FDA 76-8031. Assignment of organ doses to individual pediatric patients using the Handbook data is not recommended unless the physical characteristics of the patient closely correlate with one of the three reference pediatric patients given in Appendix A

  8. Adrenal Vein Catecholamine Levels and Ratios: Reference Intervals Derived from Patients with Primary Aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Candy W C; O'Toole, Samuel Matthew; Tirador, Roger Kent; Akker, Scott A; Matson, Matthew; Perry, Leslie; Druce, Maralyn Rose; Dekkers, Tanja; Deinum, Jaap; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Drake, William Martyn

    2017-06-01

    Phaeochromocytoma localisation is generally reliably achieved with modern imaging techniques, particularly in sporadic cases. On occasion, however, there can be diagnostic doubt due to the presence of bilateral adrenal abnormalities, particularly in patients with mutations in genes predisposing them to the development of multiple phaeochromocytomas. In such cases, surgical intervention is ideally limited to large or functional lesions due to the long-term consequences associated with hypoadrenalism. Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) for catecholamines has been used in this situation to guide surgery, although there are few data available to support diagnostic thresholds. Retrospective analyses of AVS results from 2 centres were carried out. A total of 172 patients (88 men, 84 women) underwent AVS under cosyntropin stimulation for the diagnosis of established primary aldosteronism (PA) with measurement of adrenal and peripheral venous cortisol, aldosterone and catecholamines. Six patients (3 men, 3 women) with phaeochromocytoma underwent AVS for diagnostic purposes with subsequent histological confirmation. Reference intervals for the adrenal venous norepinephrine to epinephrine ratio were created from the PA group. Using the 97.5th centile (1.21 on the left, 1.04 on the right), the false negative rate in the phaeochromocytoma group was 0%. In conclusion, this study describes the largest dataset of adrenal venous catecholamine measurements and provides reference intervals in patients without phaeochromocytoma. This strengthens the certainty with which conclusions related to adrenal venous sampling for catecholamines can be drawn, acknowledging the procedure is not part of the routine diagnostic workup and is an adjunct for use only in difficult clinical cases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Reference intervals of plasma calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium for African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fernanda M; Gaunt, Stephen D; Kearney, Michael T; Rich, Gregory A; Tully, Thomas N

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and magnesium (Mg) are important elements for body homeostasis in several diseases associated with imbalances in the plasma concentration of these ions. This is the first published report of reference intervals for Mg in association with Ca and P levels for psittacine species. One milliliter of blood was collected from 26 Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) and 24 African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus). The plasma concentrations of Ca, P, and Mg were determined for each sample. Statistical analyses were performed including all data (analysis 1) and after exclusion of the subjects with Ca > or = 14.00 mg/dl (3.5 mmol) (analysis 2). The data from analysis 1 have a narrower interval than that observed in analysis 2. Following the normality test (Shapiro-Wilk, alpha = 0.05), the univariate and mean procedures were run. For the reference intervals, the lower and upper values were used, after elimination of the outliers calculated by Blom scores from the ranked variables. The analysis 1 references for the Hispaniolans were Ca = 8.80-10.40 mg/dl (2.20-2.60 mmol/L), P = 1.80-4.40 mg/dl (0.58-1.42 mmol/L), Mg = 1.80-3.10 mg/dl (0.74-1.27 mmol/L), and Ca:P ratio = 2.62-5.39; for the African greys analysis 1 references were Ca = 8.20-20.20 mg/dl (2.05-5.05 mmol/L), P = 2.50-5.90 mg/dl (0.81-1.91 mmol/L), Mg = 2.10-3.40 mg/dl (0.82-1.4 mmol/L), and Ca:P ratio = 1.81-3.77. The analysis 2 references for the Hispaniolans were Ca = 8.80-10.30 mg/dl (2.20-2.58 mmol/L), P = 1.80-3.80 mg/dl (0.58-1.23 mmol/L), Mg = 1.90-3.00 mg/dl (0.82-1.07 mmol/L), Ca:P ratio = 2.62-5.39; for the African greys analysis 2 references were Ca = 1.07 mmol/L), Ca:P ratio = 1.67-3.50. The results of this study are important for evaluating Mg concentrations in relation to the Ca and P parameters in psittacines. This information will be particularly helpful for veterinarians evaluating the hypocalcemic syndrome in African grey parrots and other disease processes

  10. Validity Evidence for a Serious Game to Assess Performance on Critical Pediatric Emergency Medicine Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, James M; Scalzo, Anthony J; Borgman, Matthew A; Watson, Christopher M; Byrnes, Chelsie E; Chang, Todd P; Auerbach, Marc; Kessler, David O; Feldman, Brian L; Payne, Brian S; Nibras, Sohail; Chokshi, Riti K; Lopreiato, Joseph O

    2018-01-26

    We developed a first-person serious game, PediatricSim, to teach and assess performances on seven critical pediatric scenarios (anaphylaxis, bronchiolitis, diabetic ketoacidosis, respiratory failure, seizure, septic shock, and supraventricular tachycardia). In the game, players are placed in the role of a code leader and direct patient management by selecting from various assessment and treatment options. The objective of this study was to obtain supportive validity evidence for the PediatricSim game scores. Game content was developed by 11 subject matter experts and followed the American Heart Association's 2011 Pediatric Advanced Life Support Provider Manual and other authoritative references. Sixty subjects with three different levels of experience were enrolled to play the game. Before game play, subjects completed a 40-item written pretest of knowledge. Game scores were compared between subject groups using scoring rubrics developed for the scenarios. Validity evidence was established and interpreted according to Messick's framework. Content validity was supported by a game development process that involved expert experience, focused literature review, and pilot testing. Subjects rated the game favorably for engagement, realism, and educational value. Interrater agreement on game scoring was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.91, 95% confidence interval = 0.89-0.9). Game scores were higher for attendings followed by residents then medical students (Pc game and written test scores (r = 0.84, P game scores to assess knowledge of pediatric emergency medicine resuscitation.

  11. Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Measures During and After Pregnancy and Age- and Sex-Specific Reference Intervals in African Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, Lee; Gee, Melaney K; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R

    2015-07-01

    Clinical decisions and experimental analyses often involve the assessment of hematology and clinical chemistry. Using clinical pathology to assess the health status of NHP in breeding colonies or data from studies than involve pregnancy can often be complicated by pregnancy status. This study had 2 objectives regarding the hematology and clinical chemistry of African green monkeys (AGM, Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus): 1) to compare pregnant or recently postpartum animals with nonpregnant, nonlactating animals and 2) to create age- and sex-specific reference intervals. Subjects in this study were 491 AGM from the Vervet Research Colony of the Wake Forest University Primate Center. Results indicated that changes in BUN, serum total protein, albumin, ALP, GGT, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, total CO2, globulins, lipase, amylase, WBC, neutrophils, lymphocytes, platelets, RBC, Hgb, and Hct occur during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Age- and sex-specific reference intervals consistent with guidelines from the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology were established and further expand the understanding of how to define health in AGM on the basis of clinical pathology. The combination of understanding the changes that occur in pregnancy and postpartum and expansive reference intervals will help guide clinical and experimental decisions.

  12. Adaptive Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Control for PMSM Drives with a Modified Reference Frame

    KAUST Repository

    Chaoui, Hicham

    2017-01-10

    In this paper, an adaptive interval type-2 fuzzy logic control scheme is proposed for high-performance permanent magnet synchronous machine drives. This strategy combines the power of type-2 fuzzy logic systems with the adaptive control theory to achieve accurate tracking and robustness to higher uncertainties. Unlike other controllers, the proposed strategy does not require electrical transducers and hence, no explicit currents loop regulation is needed, which yields a simplified control scheme. But, this limits the machine\\'s operation range since it results in a higher energy consumption. Therefore, a modified reference frame is also proposed in this paper to decrease the machine\\'s consumption. To better assess the performance of the new reference frame, comparison against its original counterpart is carried-out under the same conditions. Moreover, the stability of the closed-loop control scheme is guaranteed by a Lyapunov theorem. Simulation and experimental results for numerous situations highlight the effectiveness of the proposed controller in standstill, transient, and steady-state conditions.

  13. Serodiagnosis of celiac disease in children referred for evaluation of anemia: A pediatric hematology unit′s experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children presenting with typical clinical features of celiac disease (CD are diagnosed relatively easily, however, diagnosis remains challenging and is often delayed when they present with ′difficult to treat anemia′ without overt gastrointestinal manifestations. Index study was undertaken to report profile of patients referred to pediatric hematology unit with ′difficult anemia′ who subsequently were diagnosed with CD. Materials and Methods: The records of 83 patients (1988-2008 with CD were scrutinized retrospectively who had presented with predominant hematological manifestations. Results: CD was confirmed histologically in 31 (37%, while 52 (63% were diagnosed by serology alone. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.0 ± 2.8 years. The mean duration of symptom-diagnosis interval was 40.9 ± 30.6 months. Eighty-one (98% children had anemia (Hb < 11 g/dl and 55 (66% had received iron supplements without discernible benefit. Thirty-nine (47% patients received a blood transfusion. Thirty-six (43% patients did not have diarrhea. Majority of the patients had either a microcytic-hypochromic (48% or dimorphic (43% anemia. Twenty-four (33% had thrombocytosis, while 5 (7% had thrombocytopenia. Mean duration of follow-up for patients on roll in the clinic for more than six months was 17.7 ± 20.9 months. Conclusion: Pediatricians and hematologists need to be aware of the extra-intestinal manifestations of CD. Prolonged duration of symptoms and a diagnosis at a relatively older age is striking in children presenting with predominantly hematological manifestations. Investigations for CD are recommended in children presenting with iron deficiency anemia refractory to hematinics or who have coexisting growth retardation. Necessity for biopsy in overtly symptomatic cases is discussed.

  14. Testosterone, free testosterone, and free androgen index in women: Reference intervals, biological variation, and diagnostic value in polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.N.; Sluss, P.M.; Hayes, F.J.; Blincko, S.; Knol, D.L.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Heijboer, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of our study was to determine reference intervals and biologic variation for testosterone (T), free testosterone (fT), and free androgen index (FAI) in women with accurate methods and to test the discriminative value of these parameters in a polycystic ovary syndrome

  15. Intervalos de referência longitudinais de parâmetros doplervelocimétricos materno-fetais Longitudinal reference intervals of maternal-fetal Doppler parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelsilene Mota Carvalho Tavares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Criar intervalos de referência longitudinais para os valores de índices de pulsatilidade (IP dos fluxos nas artérias umbilicais (AU, cerebral média (ACM e uterinas (AUt e IP venoso do fluxo no ducto venoso (DV com uma amostra da população brasileira. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional longitudinal realizado de fevereiro de 2010 a maio de 2012. Gestantes de baixo risco foram submetidas a exames ultrassonográficos quinzenais da 18ª a 40ª semana para obtenção dos IP das AU, AUt, ACM e IP venoso do DV. Modelos lineares mistos foram usados para elaboração de intervalos de referência longitudinais (percentis 5, 50 e 95 dos IP dos vasos mencionados. Os IP das porções placentária e abdominal do cordão umbilical foram comparados por meio do teste t de amostras independentes. Valores de p bilaterais menores do que 0,05 foram considerados significativos. RESULTADOS: Cento e sessenta e quatro gestantes foram submetidas a 1.242 exames ultrassonográficos. Houve redução significativa nos valores de todos esses parâmetros com o avançar da IG. Entre a 18ª e a 40ª semana de gravidez, as medianas de IP da AU (porções abdominal e placentária do cordão, da ACM, do DV e do IP médio das AUt variaram de 1,19 a 0,74; 1,33 a 0,78; 1,56 a 1,39; 0,58 a 0,41; e 0,98 a 0,66, respectivamente. As equações obtidas para predição das medianas foram: IP-AU=1,5602786 - (0,020623 x IG; Logaritmo do IP-ACM=0,8149111 - (0,004168 x IG - [0,002543 x (IG - 28,7756²]; Logaritmo do IP-DV=-0,26691- (0,015414 x IG; IP-AUt=1,2362403 - (0,014392 x IG. Houve diferença significativa entre os IP-AU obtidos nas extremidades placentária e abdominal fetal (pPURPOSE: To create longitudinal reference intervals for pulsatility index (PI of the umbilical (UA, middle cerebral (MCA, uterine (UtA arteries and ductus venosus (DV in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: A longitudinal observational study performed from February 2010 to May 2012. Low risk pregnancies were

  16. Variação da evapotranspiração de referência calculada em diferentes intervalos de tempo Variation of the reference evapotranspiration calculated for different times interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro J. Back

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Valores de evapotranspiração de referência foram calculados em intervalos de um, cinco, dez, quinze dias e mensal. Foram utilizados dados meteorológicos da Estação Meteorológica de Urussanga - SC (latitude 28°31'S, longitude 49°19'W referentes ao período de 1981 a 2004. A evapotranspiração de referência foi calculada pelo método de Penman-Monteith com base nas médias das variáveis meteorológicas dos diferentes períodos estudados. Observou-se que não houve diferenças significativas nas médias de evapotranspiração calculadas nos diversos intervalos de tempo. No entanto, houve diferenças significativas na dispersão dos valores em torno da média. Para valores diários, foi obtido coeficiente de variação (C.V. entre 30 e 40%, e para valores mensais, variou entre 6% e 12%. Observou-se, também, que os dados de evapotranspiração se ajustaram à distribuição Beta, e assim foram estimados, para cada mês, os valores de evapotranspiração de referência com probabilidades de 5; 10; 25; 50; 75; 90 e 95%.Reference evapotranspiration values were calculated for time interval of one, five, ten, fifteen days and monthly. Meteorological series data from 1981 to 2004 from Urussanga Weather Station (latitude 28°31'S, longitude 49°19'W were used to calculate reference evapotranspiration with Penman-Monteith method with mean of meteorological variables for every time intervals. No difference was observed in average reference evapotranspiration computed in all time steps. However, some difference in variations of data around the average was observed. For daily value, the variation coefficient varies from 30 to 40% and for monthly values de coefficient variation varied from 6 to 12%. It was observed that the reference evapotranspirations adjusted very well to Beta distribution probability, and the reference evapotranspiration with probability of 5; 10; 25; 50; 75; 90 e 95% was estimated.

  17. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.cl [Medical Technology Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty, Tarapaca University, Arica 1000000 (Chile); Miranda, Patricia [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago 7500539 (Chile); Vano, Eliseo [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University and IdIS, San Carlos Hospital, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  18. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm 2 for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm 2 for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm 2 for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm 2 for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm 2 /kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there may be large differences

  19. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP1-03: Establishment of Provincial Diagnostic Reference Levels in Pediatric Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonkopi, E; O’Brien, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To establish provincial diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in pediatric general radiography and computed tomography (CT) as a tool for the optimization of exposure parameters. Methods: Patient dose survey was conducted in the only pediatric hospital in the province of Nova Scotia. The DRLs were established as the 75th percentile of patient dose distributions in different age groups. For routine radiography projections the DRLs were determined in terms of entrance surface dose (ESD) calculated from the radiation output measurements and the tube current-exposure time product (mAs) recorded for each examination. Patient thickness was measured by the technologist during the examination. The CR and DR systems, employing respectively a fixed technique and phototiming, were evaluated separately; a two-tailed Student’s t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the means of dose distributions. The CT studies included routine head, chest, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP) values were extracted retrospectively from PACS. The correction factors based on the effective diameter of the patient were applied to the CT dosimetry metrics based on the standard phantoms. Results: The provincial DRLs were established in the following age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 year olds. In general radiography the DR systems demonstrated slightly lower dose than the CR for all views, however the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05) for all examinations. In CT the provincial DRLs were lower than the published data, except for head DLPs in all age categories. This might be due to the small patient sample size in the survey. Future work will include additional CT data collection over an extended period of time. Conclusion: Provincial DRLs were established in the dedicated children’s hospital to provide guidance for the other facilities in examinations of pediatric

  20. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP1-03: Establishment of Provincial Diagnostic Reference Levels in Pediatric Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkopi, E [Dalhousie University (Canada); Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Ctr (Canada); O’Brien, K [Dalhousie University (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish provincial diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in pediatric general radiography and computed tomography (CT) as a tool for the optimization of exposure parameters. Methods: Patient dose survey was conducted in the only pediatric hospital in the province of Nova Scotia. The DRLs were established as the 75th percentile of patient dose distributions in different age groups. For routine radiography projections the DRLs were determined in terms of entrance surface dose (ESD) calculated from the radiation output measurements and the tube current-exposure time product (mAs) recorded for each examination. Patient thickness was measured by the technologist during the examination. The CR and DR systems, employing respectively a fixed technique and phototiming, were evaluated separately; a two-tailed Student’s t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the means of dose distributions. The CT studies included routine head, chest, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP) values were extracted retrospectively from PACS. The correction factors based on the effective diameter of the patient were applied to the CT dosimetry metrics based on the standard phantoms. Results: The provincial DRLs were established in the following age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 year olds. In general radiography the DR systems demonstrated slightly lower dose than the CR for all views, however the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05) for all examinations. In CT the provincial DRLs were lower than the published data, except for head DLPs in all age categories. This might be due to the small patient sample size in the survey. Future work will include additional CT data collection over an extended period of time. Conclusion: Provincial DRLs were established in the dedicated children’s hospital to provide guidance for the other facilities in examinations of pediatric

  1. Cálcio ionizado no soro: estimativa do intervalo de referência e condições de coleta Serum ionized calcium: reference interval estimation and blood collection condictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adagmar Andriolo

    2004-04-01

    methodology with favorable cost/benefice ratio. The use of this methodology implies in reference interval estimation. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the reference interval for serum ionized calcium, and to evaluate interferences in tourniquet time application, and interferences in sample refrigeration before analysis. MATERIAL AND METHOD: to estimate the reference interval we included the results of 11,320 consecutive calcium ionized determinations accomplished from January 2000 to November 2002; in order to evaluate the effect of sample refrigeration, 16 samples were collected in duplicate, so that one tube was placed in ice bath and the other was maintained in room temperature. To evaluate the effect of tourniquet application time, we collected blood samples from one arm of 6 normal subjects, immediately after, and from the other arm, after 3 minutes of the tourniquet application. The blood was collected in evacuated tubes with gel separator and centrifuged up to 30 minutes after collection. All determinations were performed up to 4 hours after the centrifugation by ion-selective electrode. RESULTS: regarding to the central 95% data distribution, the inferior and superior limits were, respectively, 1.11 (confidence interval of 90%: 1.1 to 1.11 and 1.4mmol/l (confidence interval of 90%: 1.39 to 1.41. No significant differences were detected between results with and without refrigeration and between samples with less than 1 and after 3 minutes of tourniquet application.

  2. Reference interval for the disc-macula distance to disc diameter ratio in a large population of healthy Japanese adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study presents the calculated reference interval for the disc-to-macula distance to disc diameter ratio (DM:DD) based on a large population of healthy Japanese adults. A total of 308 consecutive, healthy Japanese adults were examined in this prospective observational study. Eighteen subjects were also excluded because of poor quality of the fundus photograph of one or both eyes; 290 (161 men and 129 women) were included in this study. For each subject, a color fundus photograph of one eye, either the right or left, was randomly selected and used for analysis. On the photograph, the distances between the fovea and the nearest temporal margin of the optic disc (Dft), and the two kinds of disc diameters (D1 and D2), which bisected at right angles and one of which was directed to the fovea (D1), were measured. DM:DD was estimated using the formula: (2Dft + D1)/(D1 + D2). The mean ± standard deviation of DM:DD was 2.91 ± 0.49 for men and 2.96 ± 0.54 for women; there was no sex difference (P = .78, Mann–Whitney U test). Also, almost no relationship was found between DM:DD and age (ρ = −.12, P = .04, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient). The data did not fit a normal distribution (P < .001, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test). The estimated reference interval for DM:DD corresponding to the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles was 2.12 to 4.18. Using a nonparametric approach, the reference interval for DM:DD of a large population of healthy Japanese adults was calculated to be 2.12 to 4.18, regardless of age or sex. PMID:28403107

  3. Evaluation of a radioimmunoassay and establishment of a reference interval for salivary cortisol in healthy subjects in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, A H; Christensen, J M

    2003-01-01

    leave during the past year, and smoking habits was established. Reference intervals for salivary cortisol in 120 healthy individuals performing their routine work were established according to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Federation of Clinical...... min after awakening. Salivary cortisol was not affected by age, body mass index, gender, smoking habits or days of sick leave during the past year....

  4. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Aisling [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Program for Patient Safety and Quality, Boston, MA (United States); Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine refers to imaging examinations done in babies, young children and teenagers. Nuclear ... nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is made by passing x-rays ...

  6. A multicenter nationwide reference intervals study for common biochemical analytes in Turkey using Abbott analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarda, Yesim; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Aslan, Diler; Aybek, Hulya; Ari, Zeki; Taneli, Fatma; Coker, Canan; Akan, Pinar; Sisman, Ali Riza; Bahceci, Onur; Sezgin, Nurzen; Demir, Meltem; Yucel, Gultekin; Akbas, Halide; Ozdem, Sebahat; Polat, Gurbuz; Erbagci, Ayse Binnur; Orkmez, Mustafa; Mete, Nuriye; Evliyaoglu, Osman; Kiyici, Aysel; Vatansev, Husamettin; Ozturk, Bahadir; Yucel, Dogan; Kayaalp, Damla; Dogan, Kubra; Pinar, Asli; Gurbilek, Mehmet; Cetinkaya, Cigdem Damla; Akin, Okhan; Serdar, Muhittin; Kurt, Ismail; Erdinc, Selda; Kadicesme, Ozgur; Ilhan, Necip; Atali, Dilek Sadak; Bakan, Ebubekir; Polat, Harun; Noyan, Tevfik; Can, Murat; Bedir, Abdulkerim; Okuyucu, Ali; Deger, Orhan; Agac, Suret; Ademoglu, Evin; Kaya, Ayşem; Nogay, Turkan; Eren, Nezaket; Dirican, Melahat; Tuncer, GulOzlem; Aykus, Mehmet; Gunes, Yeliz; Ozmen, Sevda Unalli; Kawano, Reo; Tezcan, Sehavet; Demirpence, Ozlem; Degirmen, Elif

    2014-12-01

    A nationwide multicenter study was organized to establish reference intervals (RIs) in the Turkish population for 25 commonly tested biochemical analytes and to explore sources of variation in reference values, including regionality. Blood samples were collected nationwide in 28 laboratories from the seven regions (≥400 samples/region, 3066 in all). The sera were collectively analyzed in Uludag University in Bursa using Abbott reagents and analyzer. Reference materials were used for standardization of test results. After secondary exclusion using the latent abnormal values exclusion method, RIs were derived by a parametric method employing the modified Box-Cox formula and compared with the RIs by the non-parametric method. Three-level nested ANOVA was used to evaluate variations among sexes, ages and regions. Associations between test results and age, body mass index (BMI) and region were determined by multiple regression analysis (MRA). By ANOVA, differences of reference values among seven regions were significant in none of the 25 analytes. Significant sex-related and age-related differences were observed for 10 and seven analytes, respectively. MRA revealed BMI-related changes in results for uric acid, glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyltransferase. Their RIs were thus derived by applying stricter criteria excluding individuals with BMI >28 kg/m2. Ranges of RIs by non-parametric method were wider than those by parametric method especially for those analytes affected by BMI. With the lack of regional differences and the well-standardized status of test results, the RIs derived from this nationwide study can be used for the entire Turkish population.

  7. The use of regression analysis in determining reference intervals for low hematocrit and thrombocyte count in multiple electrode aggregometry and platelet function analyzer 100 testing of platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Gerhardus J A J M; Houben, Rik; Wetzels, Rick J H; Verhezen, Paul W M; Oerle, Rene van; Ten Cate, Hugo; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Lancé, Marcus D

    2017-11-01

    Low platelet counts and hematocrit levels hinder whole blood point-of-care testing of platelet function. Thus far, no reference ranges for MEA (multiple electrode aggregometry) and PFA-100 (platelet function analyzer 100) devices exist for low ranges. Through dilution methods of volunteer whole blood, platelet function at low ranges of platelet count and hematocrit levels was assessed on MEA for four agonists and for PFA-100 in two cartridges. Using (multiple) regression analysis, 95% reference intervals were computed for these low ranges. Low platelet counts affected MEA in a positive correlation (all agonists showed r 2 ≥ 0.75) and PFA-100 in an inverse correlation (closure times were prolonged with lower platelet counts). Lowered hematocrit did not affect MEA testing, except for arachidonic acid activation (ASPI), which showed a weak positive correlation (r 2 = 0.14). Closure time on PFA-100 testing was inversely correlated with hematocrit for both cartridges. Regression analysis revealed different 95% reference intervals in comparison with originally established intervals for both MEA and PFA-100 in low platelet or hematocrit conditions. Multiple regression analysis of ASPI and both tests on the PFA-100 for combined low platelet and hematocrit conditions revealed that only PFA-100 testing should be adjusted for both thrombocytopenia and anemia. 95% reference intervals were calculated using multiple regression analysis. However, coefficients of determination of PFA-100 were poor, and some variance remained unexplained. Thus, in this pilot study using (multiple) regression analysis, we could establish reference intervals of platelet function in anemia and thrombocytopenia conditions on PFA-100 and in thrombocytopenia conditions on MEA.

  8. Entrance surface dose measurements in pediatric radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, L.A.; Yoshimura, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of pediatric radiological examinations was carried out in a reference pediatric hospital of the city of Sao Paulo, in order to investigate the doses to children undergoing conventional X-ray examinations. The results showed that the majority of pediatric patients are below 4 years, and that about 80% of the examinations correspond to chest projections. Doses to typical radiological examinations were measured in vivo with thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Ti and LiF: Mg, Cu, P) attached to the skin of the children to determine entrance surface dose (ESD). Also homogeneous phantoms were used to obtain ESD to younger children, because the technique uses a so small kVp that the dosimeters would produce an artifact image in the patient radiograph. Four kinds of pediatric examinations were investigated: three conventional examinations (chest, skull and abdomen) and a fluoroscopic procedure (barium swallow). Relevant information about kVp and mAs values used in the examinations was collected, and we discuss how these parameters can affect the ESD. The ESD values measured in this work are compared to reference levels published by the European Commission for pediatric patients. The results obtained (third-quartile of the ESD distribution) for chest AP examinations in three age groups were: 0.056 mGy (2-4 years old); 0.068 mGy (5-9 years old); 0.069 mGy (10-15 years old). All of them are below the European reference level (0.100 mGy). ESD values measured to the older age group in skull and abdomen AP radiographs (mean values 3.44 and 1.20 mGy, respectively) are above the European reference levels (1.5 mGy to skull and 1.0 mGy to abdomen). ESD values measured in the barium swallow examination reached 10 mGy in skin regions corresponding to thyroid and esophagus. It was noticed during this survey that some technicians use, improperly, X-ray fluoroscopy in conventional examinations to help them in positioning the patient. The results presented here are a

  9. Assessment of HIV-1 patient recruitability in the Republic of Guinea-Bissau using African versus North American hematology and biochemistry reference intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Román, Victor Raúl; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Leo-Hansen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Hematology and biochemistry reference intervals have been derived from healthy, HIV-negative populations to guide clinical trials worldwide. However, it is less clear how such values may be applied to clinical trials involving HIV-infected individuals. We show that contradictory interpretations...

  10. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Extension of academic pediatric radiology to the community setting: experience in two sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K.; Share, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Children are better served by radiologists and technical personnel trained in the care of pediatric patients. However, a variety of obstacles may limit the access of children to dedicated pediatric imaging facilities. Objective. We designed and implemented two models for providing community-based imaging by academic pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods. The first site was an outpatient clinic staffed by physicians from the university-affiliated children's hospital. Imaging services included radiography, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound. The second site was a full-service community hospital radiology department staffed by a group practice, with pediatric imaging covered by the children's hospital radiologists. Facility, equipment, and protocol modifications were required to maintain quality standards. Success of these models was determined by volume statistics, referring physician/patient satisfaction surveys, and quality-assurance (QA) programs. Results. The outpatient satellite had a 48 % increase in total examinations from the first year to the second year and 87 % the third year. Pediatric examinations in the community hospital increased over 1000 % the first 7 months. Referring physicians reported increased diagnostic information and patient satisfaction compared to previous service. QA efforts revealed improved image quality when pediatric radiologists were present, but some continuing difficulties off-hours. Conclusion. We successfully implemented pediatric imaging programs in previously underserved communities. This resulted in increased pediatric radiologist supervision and interpretation of examinations performed on children and improved referring physician and patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  12. Pediatric interventional radiology: vascular interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. (author)

  13. Survey of doses and frequency of X-ray examinations on children at the intensive care unit of a large reference pediatric hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa de Azevedo, Ana Cecilia; Osibote, Adelaja Otolorin; Bastos Boechat, Marcia Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This work aims to evaluate the entrance surface dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) resulting from pediatric radiological procedures with the use of portable X-ray equipments. Materials and methods: The software DoseCal was used to evaluate the doses imparted to patients. The children were classified according to their weight and age groups, and the study included three sectors of the intensive care unit of a large reference pediatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Results: A total of 518 radiographs have been performed (424 for chest and 94 for abdomen). The statistical data were compared with previously published results. The BOD is presented for the most exposed organs. Conclusion: The mean value of ESD and E varied widely among neonates. The highest number of radiographs per infant peaked 33 for chest examination in the age group 0-1 year

  14. MO-E-18A-01: Imaging: Best Practices In Pediatric Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, C; Strauss, K; MacDougall, R; Sammet, C

    2014-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children's hospitals. Areas of focus will include general radiography, the use of manual and automatic dose management in computed tomography, and enterprise-wide radiation dose management in the pediatric practice. The educational program will begin with a discussion of the complexities of exposure factor control in pediatric projection radiography. Following this introduction will be two lectures addressing the challenges of computed tomography (CT) protocol optimization in the pediatric population. The first will address manual CT protocol design in order to establish a managed radiation dose for any pediatric exam on any CT scanner. The second CT lecture will focus on the intricacies of automatic dose modulation in pediatric imaging with an emphasis on getting reliable results in algorithmbased technique selection. The fourth and final lecture will address the key elements needed to developing a comprehensive radiation dose management program for the pediatric environment with particular attention paid to new regulations and obligations of practicing medical physicists. Learning Objectives: To understand how general radiographic techniques can be optimized using exposure indices in order to improve pediatric radiography. To learn how to establish diagnostic dose reference levels for pediatric patients as a function of the type of examination, patient size, and individual design characteristics of the CT scanner. To learn how to predict the patient's radiation dose prior to the exam and manually adjust technique factors if necessary to match the patient's dose to the department's established dose reference levels. To learn how to utilize manufacturer-provided automatic dose modulation technology to consistently achieve patient

  15. MO-E-18A-01: Imaging: Best Practices In Pediatric Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, C; Strauss, K; MacDougall, R; Sammet, C [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bellaire, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children's hospitals. Areas of focus will include general radiography, the use of manual and automatic dose management in computed tomography, and enterprise-wide radiation dose management in the pediatric practice. The educational program will begin with a discussion of the complexities of exposure factor control in pediatric projection radiography. Following this introduction will be two lectures addressing the challenges of computed tomography (CT) protocol optimization in the pediatric population. The first will address manual CT protocol design in order to establish a managed radiation dose for any pediatric exam on any CT scanner. The second CT lecture will focus on the intricacies of automatic dose modulation in pediatric imaging with an emphasis on getting reliable results in algorithmbased technique selection. The fourth and final lecture will address the key elements needed to developing a comprehensive radiation dose management program for the pediatric environment with particular attention paid to new regulations and obligations of practicing medical physicists. Learning Objectives: To understand how general radiographic techniques can be optimized using exposure indices in order to improve pediatric radiography. To learn how to establish diagnostic dose reference levels for pediatric patients as a function of the type of examination, patient size, and individual design characteristics of the CT scanner. To learn how to predict the patient's radiation dose prior to the exam and manually adjust technique factors if necessary to match the patient's dose to the department's established dose reference levels. To learn how to utilize manufacturer-provided automatic dose modulation technology to consistently achieve patient

  16. Measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) employing the ADVIA Centaur platform. Validation, reference interval and comparison to UniQ RIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Heickendorff, Lene; Nexo, Ebba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) was introduced as a part of the hepatic cirrhotic marker enhanced liver fibrosis™ test on the automated ADVIA Centaur® immunoassay platform (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA...... UniQ PIIINP RIA assay (Orion Diagnostica, Espoo, Finland) using 55 patient samples (range=3.7-43.3 µg/L). Furthermore, we established a reference interval based on samples from 287 blood donors. Results: In the concentration range 2.5-11.9 µg/L, the total imprecision was below 8%. Comparison...... PIIINP assay is suitable for routine use with our newly defined reference interval. The results obtained by Centaur correlates well with those obtained by the previously employed RIA, though the absolute values are higher....

  17. Nationwide survey of radiation exposure during pediatric computed tomography examinations and proposal of age-based diagnostic reference levels for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Yasutaka; Miyazaki, Osamu; Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Shimada, Yoshiya; Akahane, Keiichi; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) have not been established in Japan. To propose DRLs for CT of the head, chest and abdomen for three pediatric age groups. We sent a nationwide questionnaire by post to 339 facilities. Questions focused on pediatric CT technology, exposure parameters, CT protocols, and radiation doses for age groups <1 year, 1-5 years, and 6-10 years. For the three age groups in the 196 facilities that responded, the 75th percentile values of volume CT dose index based on a 16-cm phantom (CTDI vol 16 [mGy]) for head, chest and abdominal CT were for infants 39.1, 11.1 and 12.0, respectively; for 1-to 5-year-olds 46.9, 14.3 and 16.7, respectively; and for 6-to 10-year-olds 67.7, 15.0 and 17.0, respectively. The corresponding dose-length products (DLP 16 [mGy·cm]) for head, chest and abdominal CT were for infants 526.1, 209.1 and 261.5, respectively; for 1-to 5-year-olds 665.5, 296.0 and 430.8, respectively; and for 6-to 10-year-olds 847.9, 413.0 and 532.2, respectively. The majority of CTDI vol 16 and DLP 16 values for the head were higher than DRLs reported from other countries. For risk reduction, it is necessary to establish DRLs for pediatric CT in Japan. (orig.)

  18. Nationwide survey of radiation exposure during pediatric computed tomography examinations and proposal of age-based diagnostic reference levels for Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takei, Yasutaka [Kanazawa University, Department of Quantum Medical Technology, Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro [Kanazawa University, Department of Quantum Medical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ishikawa (Japan); Shimada, Yoshiya; Akahane, Keiichi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Medical Exposure Research Project, Chiba (Japan); Muramatsu, Yoshihisa [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Department of Radiology, Chiba (Japan); Fujii, Keisuke [Nagoya University, Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi (Japan); Suzuki, Shoichi [Fujita Health University, Faculty of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Aichi (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) have not been established in Japan. To propose DRLs for CT of the head, chest and abdomen for three pediatric age groups. We sent a nationwide questionnaire by post to 339 facilities. Questions focused on pediatric CT technology, exposure parameters, CT protocols, and radiation doses for age groups <1 year, 1-5 years, and 6-10 years. For the three age groups in the 196 facilities that responded, the 75th percentile values of volume CT dose index based on a 16-cm phantom (CTDI{sub vol} 16 [mGy]) for head, chest and abdominal CT were for infants 39.1, 11.1 and 12.0, respectively; for 1-to 5-year-olds 46.9, 14.3 and 16.7, respectively; and for 6-to 10-year-olds 67.7, 15.0 and 17.0, respectively. The corresponding dose-length products (DLP 16 [mGy·cm]) for head, chest and abdominal CT were for infants 526.1, 209.1 and 261.5, respectively; for 1-to 5-year-olds 665.5, 296.0 and 430.8, respectively; and for 6-to 10-year-olds 847.9, 413.0 and 532.2, respectively. The majority of CTDI{sub vol} 16 and DLP 16 values for the head were higher than DRLs reported from other countries. For risk reduction, it is necessary to establish DRLs for pediatric CT in Japan. (orig.)

  19. Adrenal Hormones in Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus: Influential Factors and Reference Intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie B Hart

    Full Text Available Inshore common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus are exposed to a broad spectrum of natural and anthropogenic stressors. In response to these stressors, the mammalian adrenal gland releases hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone to maintain physiological and biochemical homeostasis. Consequently, adrenal gland dysfunction results in disruption of hormone secretion and an inappropriate stress response. Our objective herein was to develop diagnostic reference intervals (RIs for adrenal hormones commonly associated with the stress response (i.e., cortisol, aldosterone that account for the influence of intrinsic (e.g., age, sex and extrinsic (e.g., time factors. Ultimately, these reference intervals will be used to gauge an individual's response to chase-capture stress and could indicate adrenal abnormalities. Linear mixed models (LMMs were used to evaluate demographic and sampling factors contributing to differences in serum cortisol and aldosterone concentrations among bottlenose dolphins sampled in Sarasota Bay, Florida, USA (2000-2012. Serum cortisol concentrations were significantly associated with elapsed time from initial stimulation to sample collection (p<0.05, and RIs were constructed using nonparametric methods based on elapsed sampling time for dolphins sampled in less than 30 minutes following net deployment (95% RI: 0.91-4.21 µg/dL and following biological sampling aboard a research vessel (95% RI: 2.32-6.68 µg/dL. To examine the applicability of the pre-sampling cortisol RI across multiple estuarine stocks, data from three additional southeast U.S. sites were compared, revealing that all of the dolphins sampled from the other sites (N = 34 had cortisol concentrations within the 95th percentile RI. Significant associations between serum concentrations of aldosterone and variables reported in previous studies (i.e., age, elapsed sampling time were not observed in the current project (p<0.05. Also, approximately 16% of

  20. Adrenal Hormones in Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus): Influential Factors and Reference Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Leslie B; Wells, Randall S; Kellar, Nick; Balmer, Brian C; Hohn, Aleta A; Lamb, Stephen V; Rowles, Teri; Zolman, Eric S; Schwacke, Lori H

    2015-01-01

    Inshore common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are exposed to a broad spectrum of natural and anthropogenic stressors. In response to these stressors, the mammalian adrenal gland releases hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone to maintain physiological and biochemical homeostasis. Consequently, adrenal gland dysfunction results in disruption of hormone secretion and an inappropriate stress response. Our objective herein was to develop diagnostic reference intervals (RIs) for adrenal hormones commonly associated with the stress response (i.e., cortisol, aldosterone) that account for the influence of intrinsic (e.g., age, sex) and extrinsic (e.g., time) factors. Ultimately, these reference intervals will be used to gauge an individual's response to chase-capture stress and could indicate adrenal abnormalities. Linear mixed models (LMMs) were used to evaluate demographic and sampling factors contributing to differences in serum cortisol and aldosterone concentrations among bottlenose dolphins sampled in Sarasota Bay, Florida, USA (2000-2012). Serum cortisol concentrations were significantly associated with elapsed time from initial stimulation to sample collection (p<0.05), and RIs were constructed using nonparametric methods based on elapsed sampling time for dolphins sampled in less than 30 minutes following net deployment (95% RI: 0.91-4.21 µg/dL) and following biological sampling aboard a research vessel (95% RI: 2.32-6.68 µg/dL). To examine the applicability of the pre-sampling cortisol RI across multiple estuarine stocks, data from three additional southeast U.S. sites were compared, revealing that all of the dolphins sampled from the other sites (N = 34) had cortisol concentrations within the 95th percentile RI. Significant associations between serum concentrations of aldosterone and variables reported in previous studies (i.e., age, elapsed sampling time) were not observed in the current project (p<0.05). Also, approximately 16% of Sarasota Bay

  1. Medical errors in hospitalized pediatric trauma patients with chronic health conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compares medical errors in pediatric trauma patients with and without chronic conditions. Methods: The 2009 Kids’ Inpatient Database, which included 123,303 trauma discharges, was analyzed. Medical errors were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. The medical error rates per 100 discharges and per 1000 hospital days were calculated and compared between inpatients with and without chronic conditions. Results: Pediatric trauma patients with chronic conditions experienced a higher medical error rate compared with patients without chronic conditions: 4.04 (95% confidence interval: 3.75–4.33 versus 1.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.98–1.16 per 100 discharges. The rate of medical error differed by type of chronic condition. After controlling for confounding factors, the presence of a chronic condition increased the adjusted odds ratio of medical error by 37% if one chronic condition existed (adjusted odds ratio: 1.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.21–1.5, and 69% if more than one chronic condition existed (adjusted odds ratio: 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.48–1.53. In the adjusted model, length of stay had the strongest association with medical error, but the adjusted odds ratio for chronic conditions and medical error remained significantly elevated even when accounting for the length of stay, suggesting that medical complexity has a role in medical error. Higher adjusted odds ratios were seen in other subgroups. Conclusion: Chronic conditions are associated with significantly higher rate of medical errors in pediatric trauma patients. Future research should evaluate interventions or guidelines for reducing the risk of medical errors in pediatric trauma patients with chronic conditions.

  2. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment. METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark...... was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...... (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]). CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other...

  3. Resident Education Curriculum in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology: The Short Curriculum 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Hina J; Karjane, Nicole; Teelin, Karen; Abraham, Margaret; Holt, Stephanie; Chelvakumar, Gayaythri; Dumont, Tania; Huguelet, Patricia S; Conner, Lindsay; Wheeler, Carol; Fleming, Nathalie

    2018-04-01

    The degree of exposure to pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) varies across residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible for training residents and providing opportunities within their programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by creating and systematically updating the Short Curriculum. This curriculum outlines specific learning objectives that are central to PAG education and lists essential resources for learners' reference. This updated curriculum replaces the previous 2014 publication with added content, resources, and updated references. Additionally, attention to the needs of learners in pediatrics and adolescent medicine is given greater emphasis in this revised North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Short Curriculum 2.0. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Elective penicillin skin testing in a pediatric outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Barbara Capes; Wedner, H James; Bloomberg, Gordon R

    2006-12-01

    Adverse reactions associated with penicillin-type antibiotics are common in pediatric practice, leading to the subsequent unnecessary use of alternative antibiotics. IgE-mediated penicillin allergy represents only a fraction of these adverse reactions. To examine (1) the trend of penicillin skin test reactivity during a recent 10-year interval, (2) the relative distribution of specific reagents related to a positive skin test result, and (3) skin test reactivity as a function of reaction history. Penicillin testing using 3 reagents--benzylpenicilloyl polylysine, penicillin G, and sodium penicilloate (penicillin A)--was conducted in a prospective study of 359 consecutive patients referred to an outpatient pediatric allergy clinic between January 1, 1993, and May 31, 2003. We also retrospectively reviewed penicillin skin test results for 562 children previously tested between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 1992. Between 1993 and 2003, the prevalence of penicillin skin test sensitivity markedly declined. Of all the positive skin test results between 1979 and 2002, either penicillin G or sodium penicilloate or both identified 34%, with sodium penicilloate alone responsible for 8.5%. The rate of positive skin test reactions was not significantly different between patients with vs without a history of suggestive IgE-mediated reactions. A marked decline in penicillin skin test sensitivity in the pediatric age group is identified. The minor determinant reagents penicillin G and sodium penicilloate are both necessary for determining potential penicillin allergy. Relating history alone to potential penicillin sensitivity is unreliable in predicting the presence or absence of a positive skin test result.

  5. Establishment of radiation doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in a large pediatric hospital in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olgar, T.; Sahmaran, T.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients are more sensitive to ionizing radiation when compared with adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation doses for some common pediatric x-ray examinations performed with various digital radiography systems. Quality control tests of the digital radiography systems were carried out according to international published protocols before the pediatric dose measurements. Radiation dose measurement was performed by using the x-ray tube outputs and thermoluminescent dosimeter dose measurement methods. In the present study, radiation doses were assessed for 247 chest, 230 pelvis, 194 skull and 73 abdomen x-ray examinations and in total 744 pediatric patients doses were measured. Pediatric patients were classified into four age groups 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 years as given by European Commission guidance. Effective doses were determined for each examination using a PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo program. The mean measured entrance skin doses for the age interval 1-5 years and AP projection by using tube output measurement methods were 149 μGy for chest, 304 μGy for pelvis, 387 μGy for skull and 199 μGy for abdomen examinations. The radiation dose results obtained in this study were in the range of the published results in the literature. (authors)

  6. Extension of academic pediatric radiology to the community setting: experience in two sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecklund, K.; Share, J.C. [Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-01-01

    Background. Children are better served by radiologists and technical personnel trained in the care of pediatric patients. However, a variety of obstacles may limit the access of children to dedicated pediatric imaging facilities. Objective. We designed and implemented two models for providing community-based imaging by academic pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods. The first site was an outpatient clinic staffed by physicians from the university-affiliated children's hospital. Imaging services included radiography, fluoroscopy, and ultrasound. The second site was a full-service community hospital radiology department staffed by a group practice, with pediatric imaging covered by the children's hospital radiologists. Facility, equipment, and protocol modifications were required to maintain quality standards. Success of these models was determined by volume statistics, referring physician/patient satisfaction surveys, and quality-assurance (QA) programs. Results. The outpatient satellite had a 48 % increase in total examinations from the first year to the second year and 87 % the third year. Pediatric examinations in the community hospital increased over 1000 % the first 7 months. Referring physicians reported increased diagnostic information and patient satisfaction compared to previous service. QA efforts revealed improved image quality when pediatric radiologists were present, but some continuing difficulties off-hours. Conclusion. We successfully implemented pediatric imaging programs in previously underserved communities. This resulted in increased pediatric radiologist supervision and interpretation of examinations performed on children and improved referring physician and patient satisfaction. (orig.)

  7. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 500 Welcome Bonus for AAPD Members! Pediatric Dentist Toolkit Now Available! AAPD Coding and Insurance Manual 2018 Updates Looking to Find a Job? Looking to Fill a Position? Try the New AAPD Career Center Download the AAPD Reference Manual App Today! ...

  8. Biochemical reference intervals and intestinal microflora of free-ranging Ricord's iguanas (Cyclura ricordii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Roberto; Ramer, Jan; Reichard, Tim; Tolson, Peter J; Christopher, Mary M

    2007-09-01

    Caribbean iguanas, including the Ricord's iguana (Cyclura ricordii) are ranked as critically endangered on the International Union of the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. The taxon is endemic to Hispaniola, where it inhabits xeric lowlands and is found in a very limited range in two subpopulations in the southwestern area of the island. The goals of this study were to obtain and analyze plasma biochemical and intestinal microbiological data from Ricord's iguanas in the subpopulation of the Neiba Valley, on Cabritos Island National Park, Dominican Republic, and to establish biochemical reference intervals. A total of 23 blood samples from clinically healthy iguanas (16 males, 7 females) and 14 fecal samples from clinically healthy iguanas were analyzed. Adult female iguanas had higher concentrations of cholesterol, phosphorus, triglycerides, urea, uric acid, and aspartate transaminase activity compared with male iguanas, although the difference was not statistically significant. Seventeen bacterial isolates were obtained, including: Salmonella sp. (serogroup B; serogroup D negative) Escherichia coli, Brevibacterium sp., Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus durans. These data will help contribute to the management and recovery of Ricord's iguana populations.

  9. Trends in US Pediatric Drowning Hospitalizations, 1993–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Mary E.; Robbins, James M.; Baker, Susan P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the United States, drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury death in children aged 1 to 19 years, accounting for nearly 1100 deaths per year. Although a decline in overall fatal drowning deaths among children has been noted, national trends and disparities in pediatric drowning hospitalizations have not been reported. METHODS: To describe trends in pediatric drowning in the United States and provide national benchmarks for state and regional comparisons, we analyzed existing data (1993–2008) from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest, longitudinal, all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. Children aged 0 to 19 years were included. Annual rates of drowning-related hospitalizations were determined, stratified by age, gender, and outcome. RESULTS: From 1993 to 2008, the estimated annual incidence rate of pediatric hospitalizations associated with drowning declined 49% from 4.7 to 2.4 per 100 000 (P drowning hospitalization declined from 0.5 (95% confidence interval, 0.4–0.7) deaths per 100 000 in 1993–1994 to 0.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.2–0.4) in 2007–2008 (P drowning have decreased over the past 16 years. Our study provides national estimates of pediatric drowning hospitalization that can be used as benchmarks to target and assess prevention strategies. PMID:22250031

  10. Reference intervals for free t/sub 3/ and free t/sub 4/ in pakistani euthyroid patients: effect of age and gender on thyroid function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, R.; Abbas, H.G.

    2014-01-01

    To establish reference intervals for Free Triiodothyronine (FT3) and Free Thyroxine (FT4) in euthyroid subjects and to assess the effect of age and gender on FT3 and FT4. Study Design: Cross-sectional, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (INMOL), Lahore, from January 2009 to April 2011. Methodology: FT3 and FT4 were measured in 852 euthyroid patients. Those with previous thyroid surgery, on thyroid related medication and severe non-thyroid illness were excluded. Results: There were 215 males and 637 females with mean age of 46 years. The reference intervals, revealed by this study, for FT3 and FT4 were 2.80 - 5.39 pmol/L and 11.9 - 22.2 pmol/L respectively. The mean difference between gender groups and age groups was found statistically significant for FT3 (gender: p = 0.001; age: p = 0.001) but statistically insignificant for FT4 (gender: p=0.147; age: p=0.201). Conclusion: There was no effect of gender and age on FT3 and FT4. The age with serum FT3 and FT4 significantly negatively correlated but this correlation was stronger for FT3 as compared to FT4 levels. Reference intervals of FT3 and FT4 for male (2.99 - 5.63 pmol/L, 12.3 - 22.6 pmol/L) and female (2.77 - 5.29 pmol/L, 11.7 - 22.1 pmol/L) respectively are suggested. (author)

  11. Pediatric fractures – an educational needs assessment of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixon AC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Dixon Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Objectives: To determine the gaps in knowledge of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents with regards to acute fracture identification and management. Due to their predominantly medical prior training, fractures may be an area of weakness requiring a specific curriculum to meet their needs. Methods: A questionnaire was developed examining comfort level and performance on knowledge based questions of trainees in the following areas: interpreting musculoskeletal X-rays; independently managing pediatric fractures, physical examination techniques, applied knowledge of fracture management, and normal development of the bony anatomy. Using modified Dillman technique the instrument was distributed to pediatric emergency medicine residents at seven Canadian sites. Results: Out of 43 potential respondents, 22 (51% responded. Of respondents, mean comfort with X-ray interpretation was 69 (62–76 95% confidence interval [CI] while mean comfort with fracture management was only 53 (45–63 95% CI; mean comfort with physical exam of shoulder 60 (53–68 95% CI and knee 69 (62–76 95% CI was low. Less than half of respondents (47%; 95% CI 26%–69% could accurately identify normal wrist development, correctly manage a supracondylar fracture (39%; 95% CI 20%–61%, or identify a medial epicondyle fracture (44%; 95% CI 24%–66%. Comfort with neurovascular status of the upper (mean 82; 95% CI 75–89 and lower limb (mean 81; 95% CI 74–87 was high. Interpretation: There are significant gaps in knowledge of physical exam techniques, fracture identification and management among pediatric emergency medicine trainees. A change in our current teaching methods is required to meet this need. Keywords: pediatric, fractures, education, radiologic interpretation

  12. Performance of Bedside Lung Ultrasound by a Pediatric Resident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Chen; Grundtvig, Natalia; Klug, Bent Helmuth

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that lung ultrasound is a good, radiation-free alternative to chest radiography in children with pneumonia. We investigated how bedside lung ultrasound performed by a pediatric resident compared with chest radiography in children with suspected pneumonia. METHODS......: This was a prospective study comparing bedside lung ultrasound to chest radiography as the reference standard. Children aged 0 to 15 years with suspected pneumonia at a pediatric emergency department were included and underwent chest radiography and lung ultrasound. A pediatric resident with minimal practical ultrasound...

  13. Perception of pediatric neurology among non-neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mohammed M S

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric neurology is considered a relatively new and evolving subspecialty. In Saudi Arabia, neurologic disorders in children are common, and the demand for trained pediatric neurologists is strong. The aim was to study the perception of the pediatric neurology specialty among practicing generalists and their referral practices. Attendees of a symposium on pediatric epilepsy comprehensive review for the generalist were included. A structured 25-item questionnaire was designed to examine their demographics, training, practice, and referral patterns. One hundred nineteen participants attended the symposium, and 90 (76%) questionnaires were returned. Attendees' ages were 22 to 70 years (mean 32 years), with 65.5% female physicians. There were 32% consultants, 51% trainees, and 17% students. Most physicians (67%) were practicing general pediatrics. Only 36% received a structured pediatric neurology rotation during training. Children with neurologic complaints constituted 28.5% of those seen in their practice, and they referred 32.5% of them to pediatric neurology. Only 32% were moderately or highly confident in making the diagnosis or providing the appropriate treatment. Those who received a structured pediatric neurology rotation felt more comfortable in their management (P = .03). Many physicians (38.5%) had no direct access to a pediatric neurologist for referrals. To conclude, pediatric neurologic disorders are common in daily practice. Most generalists did not receive a structured neurology rotation during their training and were not highly confident in diagnosing and treating these children. Given the limited number of pediatric neurologists, I highly recommend that generalists receive appropriate neurologic training.

  14. Pediatric urinary incontinence: Classification, evaluation, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.J. Schaeffer

    tinuous incontinence refers to constant leakage of urine and can occur even in .... evaluation of pediatric urinary incontinence and guide which tests, if any, should ..... ments taken during bladder filling and storage include the maximal bladder ...

  15. Inappropriately Timed Pediatric Orthopaedic Referrals From the Emergency Department Result in Unnecessary Appointments and Financial Burden for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Taylor J; Blumberg, Todd J; Shah, Apurva S; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2018-03-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are among the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) visits in the pediatric population. Many such injuries can be managed with a single follow-up outpatient visit. However, untimely (ie, premature) referrals by emergency physicians to orthopaedic surgeons are common and may inadvertently create need for a second visit, generating unnecessary expenditures. We sought to elucidate the cost of premature musculoskeletal follow-up visits to the patients, families, and the health care system. We performed a retrospective review of pediatric patients with acute musculoskeletal injuries referred from our ED (without a formal orthopaedic consult) to our outpatient clinic. Patients were retrospectively reviewed in a consecutive fashion. The appropriateness of the recommended follow-up time interval was determined for each patient, and the direct and indirect cost of the inappropriate services were calculated utilizing a combination of traditional cost accounting techniques and time-driven activity-based costing. The characteristics of patients with appropriate and untimely follow-up referrals were compared. Two hundred consecutive referrals from the ED were reviewed. Overall, 96.5% of the follow-up visits recommended by the ED were premature, which led 106 (53%) patients to require a second visit to complete their clinical care. Patients who required a second visit were significantly younger (P=0.005), more likely to be male (P=0.042), more likely to have a fracture (Pcost of $342.93 per patient. Untimely referrals for follow-up of acute pediatric musculoskeletal conditions are very common and represent a significant financial burden to patients, families, and the health care system. Over 40% of unnecessary visits resulted from just 3 diagnoses. Improved orthopaedic follow-up guidelines, particularly for these readily recognizable conditions, and feedback to referring providers may reduce poorly timed clinic visits and decrease costs in

  16. Media education in pediatric residencies: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Frintner, Mary Pat; Mulligan, Deborah A; Fuld, Gilbert L; Olson, Lynn M

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the current state of residency education with respect to counseling parents about media usage and whether trainees consider it to be adequate. A national survey of graduating pediatric residents was conducted in the United States to determine the amount of training they receive on traditional and new media, their perceptions of its quality, and their self-reported practices regarding talking to families about media usage. A 58% response rate was achieved with no evidence of response bias based on age or gender. Only 38% rated their residency program as "very good" or "excellent" in preparing them to provide anticipatory guidance on the effects of media on children and adolescents. In logistic regression analyses, controlling for demographic characteristics, more training on media issues was a significant predictor for usually/always advising families on traditional, passive media (adjusted odds ratio = 3.29; 95% confidence interval 2.26-4.81) and usually/always advising families on new, interactive media use (adjusted odds ratio = 3.96; 95% confidence interval 2.61-6.00) during well-child visits. The majority of residents believe their training on children in media is inadequate. Enhanced training on media is needed in US pediatric residencies. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe versus Moderate Criteria for the New Pediatric Case Definition for ME/CFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard; Porter, Nicole; Shelleby, Elizabeth; Till, Lindsay; Bell, David S.; Lapp, Charles W.; Rowe, Kathy; De Meirleir, Kenny

    2009-01-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for pediatric ME/CFS are structurally based on the Canadian Clinical Adult case definition, and have more required specific symptoms than the (Fukuda et al. Ann Intern Med 121:953-959, 1994) adult case definition. Physicians specializing in pediatric ME/CFS referred thirty-three pediatric patients with ME/CFS and 21…

  18. Pediatric Dentist Density and Preventive Care Utilization for Medicaid Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, James F; Kim, Amy S; Scott, JoAnna M; Chi, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate county-level pediatric dentist density and dental care utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 604,885 zero- to 17-year-olds enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid Program for 11-12 months in 2012. The relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density, defined as the number of pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children, and preventive dental care utilization was evaluated using linear regression models. In 2012, 179 pediatric dentists practiced in 16 of the 39 counties in Washington. County-level pediatric dentist density varied from zero to 5.98 pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. County-level preventive dental care utilization ranged from 32 percent to 81 percent, with 62 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children utilizing preventive dental services. County-level density was significantly associated with county-level dental care utilization (Slope equals 1.67, 95 percent confidence interval equals 0.02, 3.32, Pchildren who utilize preventive dental care services. Policies aimed at improving pediatric oral health disparities should include strategies to increase the number of oral health care providers, including pediatric dentists, in geographic areas with large proportions of Medicaid-enrolled children.

  19. Predictors of missed appointments in patients referred for congenital or pediatric cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, University of Michigan Health System, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lowery, Ray; Yu, Sunkyung [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, University of Michigan Health System, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ghadimi Mahani, Maryam [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Congenital cardiac magnetic resonance is a limited resource because of scanner and physician availability. Missed appointments decrease scheduling efficiency, have financial implications and represent missed care opportunities. To characterize the rate of missed appointments and identify modifiable predictors. This single-center retrospective study included all patients with outpatient congenital or pediatric cardiac MR appointments from Jan. 1, 2014, through Dec. 31, 2015. We identified missed appointments (no-shows or same-day cancellations) from the electronic medical record. We obtained demographic and clinical factors from the medical record and assessed socioeconomic factors by U.S. Census block data by patient ZIP code. Statistically significant variables (P<0.05) were included into a multivariable analysis. Of 795 outpatients (median age 18.5 years, interquartile range 13.4-27.1 years) referred for congenital cardiac MR, a total of 91 patients (11.4%) missed appointments; 28 (3.5%) missed multiple appointments. Reason for missed appointment could be identified in only 38 patients (42%), but of these, 28 (74%) were preventable or could have been identified prior to the appointment. In multivariable analysis, independent predictors of missed appointments were referral by a non-cardiologist (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.8, P=0.0002), referral for research (AOR 3.6, P=0.01), having public insurance (AOR 2.1, P=0.004), and having scheduled cardiac MR from November to April (AOR 1.8, P=0.01). Demographic factors can identify patients at higher risk for missing appointments. These data may inform initiatives to limit missed appointments, such as targeted education of referring providers and patients. Further data are needed to evaluate the efficacy of potential interventions. (orig.)

  20. Pediatric phantoms for use in dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Hwang, J.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-01-01

    Estimating absorbed doses to children from external and internal radiation sources has become important to the nuclear industry and pediatric nuclear medicine. The Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section at ORNL has recently completed the design of mathematical representations of children of ages newborn, 1 year, and 5 years old. These mathematical representations will be referred to as pediatric phantoms. Using these phantoms, relevant energy deposition data have been developed which establish a meaningful model for use in estimating radiation dose to children

  1. MO-G-17A-04: Internal Dosimetric Calculations for Pediatric Nuclear Imaging Applications, Using Monte Carlo Simulations and High-Resolution Pediatric Computational Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kagadis, GC [University of Patras, Rion, Ahaia (Greece); Loudos, G [Technical Educational Institute of Athens, Aigaleo, Attiki (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Our purpose is to evaluate the administered absorbed dose in pediatric, nuclear imaging studies. Monte Carlo simulations with the incorporation of pediatric computational models can serve as reference for the accurate determination of absorbed dose. The procedure of the calculated dosimetric factors is described, while a dataset of reference doses is created. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and a series of pediatric computational models, developed by the “IT'IS Foundation”. The series of the phantoms used in our work includes 6 models in the range of 5–14 years old (3 boys and 3 girls). Pre-processing techniques were applied to the images, to incorporate the phantoms in GATE simulations. The resolution of the phantoms was set to 2 mm3. The most important organ densities were simulated according to the GATE “Materials Database”. Several used radiopharmaceuticals in SPECT and PET applications are being tested, following the EANM pediatric dosage protocol. The biodistributions of the several isotopes used as activity maps in the simulations, were derived by the literature. Results: Initial results of absorbed dose per organ (mGy) are presented in a 5 years old girl from the whole body exposure to 99mTc - SestaMIBI, 30 minutes after administration. Heart, kidney, liver, ovary, pancreas and brain are the most critical organs, in which the S-factors are calculated. The statistical uncertainty in the simulation procedure was kept lower than 5%. The Sfactors for each target organ are calculated in Gy/(MBq*sec) with highest dose being absorbed in kidneys and pancreas (9.29*10{sup 10} and 0.15*10{sup 10} respectively). Conclusion: An approach for the accurate dosimetry on pediatric models is presented, creating a reference dosage dataset for several radionuclides in children computational models with the advantages of MC techniques. Our study is ongoing, extending our investigation to other reference models and

  2. MO-G-17A-04: Internal Dosimetric Calculations for Pediatric Nuclear Imaging Applications, Using Monte Carlo Simulations and High-Resolution Pediatric Computational Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kagadis, GC; Loudos, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to evaluate the administered absorbed dose in pediatric, nuclear imaging studies. Monte Carlo simulations with the incorporation of pediatric computational models can serve as reference for the accurate determination of absorbed dose. The procedure of the calculated dosimetric factors is described, while a dataset of reference doses is created. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and a series of pediatric computational models, developed by the “IT'IS Foundation”. The series of the phantoms used in our work includes 6 models in the range of 5–14 years old (3 boys and 3 girls). Pre-processing techniques were applied to the images, to incorporate the phantoms in GATE simulations. The resolution of the phantoms was set to 2 mm3. The most important organ densities were simulated according to the GATE “Materials Database”. Several used radiopharmaceuticals in SPECT and PET applications are being tested, following the EANM pediatric dosage protocol. The biodistributions of the several isotopes used as activity maps in the simulations, were derived by the literature. Results: Initial results of absorbed dose per organ (mGy) are presented in a 5 years old girl from the whole body exposure to 99mTc - SestaMIBI, 30 minutes after administration. Heart, kidney, liver, ovary, pancreas and brain are the most critical organs, in which the S-factors are calculated. The statistical uncertainty in the simulation procedure was kept lower than 5%. The Sfactors for each target organ are calculated in Gy/(MBq*sec) with highest dose being absorbed in kidneys and pancreas (9.29*10 10 and 0.15*10 10 respectively). Conclusion: An approach for the accurate dosimetry on pediatric models is presented, creating a reference dosage dataset for several radionuclides in children computational models with the advantages of MC techniques. Our study is ongoing, extending our investigation to other reference models and evaluating the

  3. Analytical validation and reference intervals for freezing point depression osmometer measurements of urine osmolality in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Samantha; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José Joaquín; Balestra, Graziano; Caldin, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Urine osmolality (UOsm) is considered the most accurate measure of urine concentration and is used to assess body fluid homeostasis and renal function. We performed analytical validation of freezing point depression measurement of canine UOsm, to establish reference intervals (RIs) and to determine the effect of age, sex, and reproductive status on UOsm in dogs. Clinically healthy dogs ( n = 1,991) were retrospectively selected and stratified in groups by age (young [0-12 mo], adults [13-84 mo], and seniors [>84 mo]), sex (females and males), and reproductive status (intact and neutered). RIs were calculated for each age group. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were dogs, and 366-2,178 mOsm/kg in seniors. Senior dogs had a significantly lower UOsm than young and adult dogs ( p dogs ( p dogs.

  4. Clinical predictors and impact of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in pediatric hypertension referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Marguerite L; Ferguson, Michael A; Zachariah, Justin P

    2014-09-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP) is rising in children. Significant proportions of children have reactive hypertension or masked hypertension, making ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) a valuable tool, although with potential economic implications. In youth referred for elevated BP, we sought clinic BP combinations that obviated the need for ABPM and to specify the economic role of ABPM. In a retrospective pediatric referral cohort (N = 170), we examine clinic systolic BP (SBP) predictors of components of ABPM hypertension and their combination. In economic analyses, we compared effectiveness and charges of three diagnostic pathways: (1) clinic BP alone; (2) abnormal clinic BP prompting ABPM; or (3) universal ABPM. ABPM hypertension occurred in 55 (32.4%) and reactive hypertension in 37 (21.8%), average automated (β = 0.208; 95% confidence interval, 0.027, 0.389; P = .03) and maximum auscultatory clinic SBP (β = 0.160; 95% confidence interval 0.022, 0.299; P = .02) were associated with ABPM SBP mean, but none predicted SBP load. No clinic SBP combination was associated with ABPM hypertension. Universal ABPM accrued the lowest average charge per hypertensive youth identified ($10,948). We did not identify a clinic SBP combination that predicted ABPM hypertension in youth referred for elevated BP. Universal ABPM, in this context, may be the most economically and clinically efficient diagnostic strategy. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Comparison between 2 groups of nursing professionals on the knowledge of pediatric pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobete Prieto, C; Rey Galán, C; Kiza, A H

    2015-01-01

    To compare infant pain knowledge between a group of nurses who work in a pediatric hospital and one that works in a general hospital. Descriptive study based on the use of a validated questionnaire for assessing the knowledge and attitudes of nurses about pediatric pain (Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain [PNKAS]). PNKAS questionnaire was distributed to the nursing staff of a pediatric hospital and a general hospital and the results were compared. The average score obtained in the pediatric vs. the general hospital was: mean, 51.7% vs. 47.2%, 95% confidence interval, 47.5 to 56% vs. 43.6 to 50.8% (P=.098). There were no differences between the scores in the PNKAS questionnaire between nurses working exclusively with children and nurses working with general population. Training on pediatric pain needs to be improved in nurses caring for sick children. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. [Full blood count reference values in children of 8 to 12 years old residing at 2,760 m above sea level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando García-Miranda, L; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-04-01

    To determine reference values for full blood count parameters in a population of children 8 to 12 years old, living at an altitude of 2760 m above sea level. Our sample consisted of 102 individuals on whom a full blood count was performed. The parameters included: total number of red blood cells, platelets, white cells, and a differential count (millions/μl and %) of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and basophils. Additionally, we obtained values for hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, concentration of corpuscular hemoglobin and red blood cell distribution width. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric test, to divide the sample in quartiles and obtain the lower and upper limits for our intervals. Moreover, the values for the intervals obtained from this analysis were compared to intervals obtained estimating+- 2 standard deviations above and below from our mean values. Our results showed significant differences compared to normal interval values reported for the adult Mexican population in most of the parameters studied. The full blood count is an important laboratory test used routinely for the initial assessment of a patient. Values of full blood counts in healthy individuals vary according to gender, age and geographic location; therefore, each population should have its own reference values. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Reference interval for the disc-macula distance to disc diameter ratio in a large population of healthy Japanese adults: A prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ken-Ichi

    2017-04-01

    This study presents the calculated reference interval for the disc-to-macula distance to disc diameter ratio (DM:DD) based on a large population of healthy Japanese adults.A total of 308 consecutive, healthy Japanese adults were examined in this prospective observational study. Eighteen subjects were also excluded because of poor quality of the fundus photograph of one or both eyes; 290 (161 men and 129 women) were included in this study. For each subject, a color fundus photograph of one eye, either the right or left, was randomly selected and used for analysis. On the photograph, the distances between the fovea and the nearest temporal margin of the optic disc (Dft), and the two kinds of disc diameters (D1 and D2), which bisected at right angles and one of which was directed to the fovea (D1), were measured. DM:DD was estimated using the formula: (2Dft + D1)/(D1 + D2).The mean ± standard deviation of DM:DD was 2.91 ± 0.49 for men and 2.96 ± 0.54 for women; there was no sex difference (P = .78, Mann-Whitney U test). Also, almost no relationship was found between DM:DD and age (ρ = -.12, P = .04, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient). The data did not fit a normal distribution (P < .001, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test). The estimated reference interval for DM:DD corresponding to the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles was 2.12 to 4.18.Using a nonparametric approach, the reference interval for DM:DD of a large population of healthy Japanese adults was calculated to be 2.12 to 4.18, regardless of age or sex.

  8. Pediatric otorhinolaryngology anno 2008: towards European standards for training?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Verwoerd, Carel

    2009-06-01

    The Union Européen des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has been promoting harmonization of specialist training programs in Europe. Anticipating a future contribution to a European standard for training specialists for tertiary care of children with otorhinolaryngology (ORL)-related problems this Round Table was organized by ESPO. The presentations refer to six European countries. The number of ORL specialists (including pediatric ORL specialists) appeared to vary from +\\/-8 to +\\/-1 per 100,000 inhabitants, suggesting significant differences as far as their contribution to health care is concerned. Numbers for pediatricians vary from 12 to 3 and for family doctors from 50 to 100 per 100,000. In two countries pediatric ORL has the status of an official sub-specialty for tertiary care, requiring at least 2 years of additional training for qualified ORL specialists. In three other countries specific centers for pediatric ORL are present, although the sub-specialty has no official status. In the last a center for pediatric otorhinolaryngology has not yet been established and facilities for training in pediatric ORL are not available. For each country various aspects of current practice of tertiary ORL care for children are presented. It is concluded that a European standard for pediatric ORL could be most useful, if it would not only refer to current diagnostic and therapeutic skills but also to relevant scientific knowledge and skills. However, it should be recognized that the relevance of today\\'s standards is restricted, as medicine and medical technology are rapidly developing.

  9. Pediatric urinary tract infection: imaging techniques with special reference to voiding cystoerethrography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Blickman

    1991-01-01

    textabstractUrinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common infection in childhood. Large hospital-based pediatric series report an incidence of 3-5%. Dickinson prospectively determined that 1.7/1000 boys and 3.1/1 000 girls annually present with a UTI. This corresponds to about 780

  10. [An analysis of articles published by academic groups in pediatrics in Chinese Journal of Pediatrics and their citations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiurong; Hu, Yanping; Li, Linping

    2014-08-01

    To explore academic significance and guiding function played by subspecialty groups of the Society of Pediatrics, Chinese Medical Association on Chinese pediatric clinical practice through a statistical analysis of the articles published by the subspecialty groups. Bibliometric methods were used to analyze the number of articles, article types, total citations, highly cited articles and the distribution of citing journals. Totally 7 156 articles were published in Chinese Journal of Pediatrics from 1993 (31) to 2012 (51), of which 187 by subspecialty groups of pediatrics (2.6%), with a total citations of 11 985. Among them, 137 articles were cited with a citation rate of 73.3% and average citations for each article was 64.1. Articles classified as clinical guidelines had been totally cited for 10 900 times with average citations of 123.86 per article. The article on Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy diagnosis and clinical index was cited 1 791 times ranked in highly cited literatures. All the top three cited literature periodicals were core journals of pediatrics, and 10 periodicals among the top 20 were in pediatrics and the rest in other medical fields. The number of the articles published by the subspecialty groups of pediatrics was increasing year by year though the portion it in the total number of the articles in the journal was not large. However, the citation frequency of the articles by the subspecialty groups of pediatrics was high, making an obvious contribution to the total citations of Chinese Journal of Pediatrics. The total citation rate of clinical guideline articles and their average rate was higher than those of other articles published in this journal, which meant that this type of articles provided academic references with guiding significance for clinical practice of pediatrics and for other medical fields as well.

  11. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  12. Management of pediatric splenic injuries in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lindsay A; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2012-03-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries has become the standard of care in hemodynamically stable children. This study compares the management of these injuries between pediatric and nonpediatric hospitals in Canada. Data were obtained from the Canadian Institute of Health Information trauma database on all patients aged 2 to 16 years, admitted to a Canadian hospital with a diagnosis of splenic injury between May 2002 and April 2004. Variables included age, sex, associated major injuries, splenic procedures, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, blood transfusions, and length of stay. Hospitals were coded as pediatric or nonpediatric. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine associations between hospital type and outcomes. Of 1284 cases, 654 were managed at pediatric hospitals and 630 at nonpediatric centers. Patients at pediatric centers tended to be younger and more likely to have associated major injuries. Controlling for covariates, including associated major injuries, patients managed at pediatric centers were less likely to undergo splenectomy compared with those managed at nonpediatric centers (odds ratio [OR], 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.4). The risk of receiving blood products, admission to the ICU, and staying in hospital for more than 5 days was associated only with having associated major injuries. Even in the presence of other major injuries, successful NOM of blunt splenic injuries occurs more frequently in pediatric hospitals in Canada. This has policy relevance regarding education of adult surgeons about the appropriateness of NOM in children and developing guidelines on appropriate regional triaging of pediatric patients with splenic injury in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interval stability for complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Kirillov, Sergey; Kurths, Jürgen; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2018-04-01

    Stability of dynamical systems against strong perturbations is an important problem of nonlinear dynamics relevant to many applications in various areas. Here, we develop a novel concept of interval stability, referring to the behavior of the perturbed system during a finite time interval. Based on this concept, we suggest new measures of stability, namely interval basin stability (IBS) and interval stability threshold (IST). IBS characterizes the likelihood that the perturbed system returns to the stable regime (attractor) in a given time. IST provides the minimal magnitude of the perturbation capable to disrupt the stable regime for a given interval of time. The suggested measures provide important information about the system susceptibility to external perturbations which may be useful for practical applications. Moreover, from a theoretical viewpoint the interval stability measures are shown to bridge the gap between linear and asymptotic stability. We also suggest numerical algorithms for quantification of the interval stability characteristics and demonstrate their potential for several dynamical systems of various nature, such as power grids and neural networks.

  14. Comparative study of dose descriptor in pediatric computed tomography exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finatto, Jerusa Dalbosco; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da; Froner, Ana Paula Pastre; Pimentel, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the dose descriptor, volumetric Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI), a pediatric patients sample undergoing to skull CT, comparing the results with the diagnostic reference levels of the literature. Were collected volumetric CTDI values of all skull CT exams performed retrospectively in children of 0-10 years of age in a period of 12 months in a large hospital size. Patients, in a total of 103, were divided into four groups, where the criterion of separation used was age, trying to use the same division used in international references dose descriptors. In all acquisitions we used the pediatric protocol and the Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) available on the equipment. The CDTI values, with and without the use of AEC for pediatric studies, were compared. There was a reduction of approximately 100% in the absorbed dose value due to the use of the AEC. From the data collected and analyzed in this work, it is concluded that the use of dose reduction systems is relevant, such as the Care Dose, to maintain volumetric CTDI values within the reference levels. Also it is important the observation of range of children age to the appropriate choice of parameters used in the test protocol. The values obtained are according to the diagnostic reference levels from the literature

  15. Pediatric MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric MS Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Support Pediatric Providers ... system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS In 2018 the U.S. Food and Drug ...

  16. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Temporal Reference, Attentional Modulation, and Crossmodal Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqi Wan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Crossmodal assimilation effect refers to the prominent phenomenon by which ensemble mean extracted from a sequence of task-irrelevant distractor events, such as auditory intervals, assimilates/biases the perception (such as visual interval of the subsequent task-relevant target events in another sensory modality. In current experiments, using visual Ternus display, we examined the roles of temporal reference, materialized as the time information accumulated before the onset of target event, as well as the attentional modulation in crossmodal temporal interaction. Specifically, we examined how the global time interval, the mean auditory inter-intervals and the last interval in the auditory sequence assimilate and bias the subsequent percept of visual Ternus motion (element motion vs. group motion. We demonstrated that both the ensemble (geometric mean and the last interval in the auditory sequence contribute to bias the percept of visual motion. Longer mean (or last interval elicited more reports of group motion, whereas the shorter mean (or last auditory intervals gave rise to more dominant percept of element motion. Importantly, observers have shown dynamic adaptation to the temporal reference of crossmodal assimilation: when the target visual Ternus stimuli were separated by a long gap interval after the preceding sound sequence, the assimilation effect by ensemble mean was reduced. Our findings suggested that crossmodal assimilation relies on a suitable temporal reference on adaptation level, and revealed a general temporal perceptual grouping principle underlying complex audio-visual interactions in everyday dynamic situations.

  18. Five-year follow-up of Community Pediatrics Training Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Goldshore, Matt; Solomon, Barry S; Guyer, Bernard; Grason, Holly

    2014-07-01

    To compare community involvement of pediatricians exposed to enhanced residency training as part of the Dyson Community Pediatrics Training Initiative (CPTI) with involvement reported by a national sample of pediatricians. A cross-sectional analyses compared 2008-2010 mailed surveys of CPTI graduates 5 years after residency graduation with comparably aged respondents in a 2010 mailed national American Academy of Pediatrics survey of US pediatricians (CPTI: n = 234, response = 56.0%; national sample: n = 243; response = 59.9%). Respondents reported demographic characteristics, practice characteristics (setting, time spent in general pediatrics), involvement in community child health activities in past 12 months, use of ≥1 strategies to influence community child health (eg, educate legislators), and being moderately/very versus not at all/minimally skilled in 6 such activities (eg, identify community needs). χ(2) statistics assessed differences between groups; logistic regression modeled the independent association of CPTI with community involvement adjusting for personal and practice characteristics and perspectives regarding involvement. Compared with the national sample, more CPTI graduates reported involvement in community pediatrics (43.6% vs 31.1%, P .05). Differences in involvement remained in adjusted analyses with greater involvement by CPTI graduates (adjusted odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.5-3.7). Five years after residency, compared with their peers, more CPTI graduates report having skills and greater community pediatrics involvement. Enhanced residency training in community pediatrics may lead to a more engaged pediatrician workforce. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Laboratory reference intervals during pregnancy, delivery and the early postpartum period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klajnbard, Anna; Szecsi, Pal Bela; Colov, Nina P

    2010-01-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy may affect laboratory parameters. Reference values based on samples from non-pregnant women are not necessarily useful for clinical decisions during pregnancy. There is a need to establish reference values during pregnancy in order to recognize pathological ...

  20. Laboratory reference intervals during pregnancy, delivery and the early postpartum period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klajnbard, Anna; Szecsi, Pal Bela; Colov, Nina P

    2010-01-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy may affect laboratory parameters. Reference values based on samples from non-pregnant women are not necessarily useful for clinical decisions during pregnancy. There is a need to establish reference values during pregnancy in order to recognize pathological...

  1. Usage and Attitudes Towards Natural Remedies and Homeopathy in General Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André-Michael Beer MD, PhD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the global approach and country differences in physicians’ usage, knowledge, and attitudes towards natural remedies and homeopathy in pediatric practice, an online survey involving 582 general pediatricians and general practitioners treating pediatric diseases was conducted in 6 countries. Overall, 17% of the pediatric prescriptions refer to phytotherapy and 15% refer to homeopathic preparations. Natural remedies and homeopathic preparations are more frequently used in upper respiratory tract infections, infant colic, sleep disturbances, and recurrent infections. In the majority of cases, they are used together with chemical drugs. Both treatment options are typically used if parents are concerned about side effects of conventional drugs or prefer natural remedies for themselves. Physicians express high interest in natural remedies and homeopathy; however, their knowledge is variable. Lack of proven efficacy, knowledge on mechanism of action, and information on indications are main factors that limit their usage.

  2. Usage and Attitudes Towards Natural Remedies and Homeopathy in General Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, André-Michael; Burlaka, Ievgeniia; Buskin, Stephen; Kamenov, Borislav; Pettenazzo, Andrea; Popova, Diana; Riveros Huckstadt, María Pilar; Sakalinskas, Virgilijus; Oberbaum, Menachem

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the global approach and country differences in physicians’ usage, knowledge, and attitudes towards natural remedies and homeopathy in pediatric practice, an online survey involving 582 general pediatricians and general practitioners treating pediatric diseases was conducted in 6 countries. Overall, 17% of the pediatric prescriptions refer to phytotherapy and 15% refer to homeopathic preparations. Natural remedies and homeopathic preparations are more frequently used in upper respiratory tract infections, infant colic, sleep disturbances, and recurrent infections. In the majority of cases, they are used together with chemical drugs. Both treatment options are typically used if parents are concerned about side effects of conventional drugs or prefer natural remedies for themselves. Physicians express high interest in natural remedies and homeopathy; however, their knowledge is variable. Lack of proven efficacy, knowledge on mechanism of action, and information on indications are main factors that limit their usage. PMID:27493983

  3. Electrocardiographic PR-interval duration and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Vibe; Nielsen, Jonas Bille; Skov, Morten Wagner

    2017-01-01

    Background Because of ambiguous reports in the literature, we aimed to investigate the association between PR interval and the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death, heart failure, and pacemaker implantation, allowing for a nonlinear relationship. MethodsWe included 293,111 individuals...... into 7 groups based on the population PR interval distribution. Cox models were used, with reference to a PR interval between 152 and 161 ms (40th to heart failure...... adjustment. A long PR interval conferred an increased risk of heart failure ( > 200 ms; HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.22-1.42; P 200 ms (HR, 3...

  4. Recent advances in pediatric interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    During the last 10 years, there have been major technological achievements in pediatric interventional cardiology. In addition, there have been several advances in cardiac imaging, especially in 3-dimensional imaging of echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and cineangiography. Therefore, more types of congenital heart diseases can be treated in the cardiac catheter laboratory today than ever before. Furthermore, lesions previously considered resistant to interventional therapies can now be managed with high success rates. The hybrid approach has enabled the overcoming of limitations inherent to percutaneous access, expanding the application of endovascular therapies as adjunct to surgical interventions to improve patient outcomes and minimize invasiveness. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has become a successful alternative therapy. However, most of the current recommendations about pediatric cardiac interventions (including class I recommendations) refer to off-label use of devices, because it is difficult to study the safety and efficacy of catheterization and transcatheter therapy in pediatric cardiac patients. This difficulty arises from the challenge of identifying a control population and the relatively small number of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Nevertheless, the pediatric interventional cardiology community has continued to develop less invasive solutions for congenital heart defects to minimize the need for open heart surgery and optimize overall outcomes. In this review, various interventional procedures in patients with congenital heart disease are explored.

  5. Laryngeal ultrasound and pediatric vocal fold nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkasuwan, Julina; Devore, Danielle; Hollas, Sarah; Jones, Jeremy; Tran, Brandon

    2017-03-01

    The term vocal fold nodules refers to bilateral thickening of the membranous folds with minimal impairment of the vibratory properties of the mucosa. Nodules are thought to be related to repetitive mechanical stress, associated with voice use patterns. Diagnosis is typically made in the office via either rigid or flexible laryngeal stroboscopy. Depending on the individual child, obtaining an optimal view of the larynx can be difficult if not impossible. Recent advances in high-frequency ultrasonography allows for transcervical examination of laryngeal structures. The goal of this project was to determine if laryngeal ultrasound (LUS) can be used to identify vocal fold nodules in dysphonic children. Prospective case-control study in which the patient acted as his or her own control. Forty-six pediatric patients were recruited for participation in this study; the mean age was 4.8 years. Twenty-three did not have any vocal fold lesions and 23 had a diagnosis of vocal fold nodules on laryngeal stroboscopy. Recorded LUSs were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the nodule status. There was substantial inter-rater agreement (κ = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.89) between the two radiologists regarding the presence of nodules. There was also substantial agreement (κ = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.72-1) between LUS and laryngeal stroboscopy. Sensitivity of LUS was 100% (95% CI: 85%-100%) and specificity was 87% (95% CI: 66%-97%). LUS can be used to identify vocal fold nodules in children with substantial agreement with laryngeal stroboscopy. 3b Laryngoscope, 127:676-678, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. National ambulatory antibiotic prescribing patterns for pediatric urinary tract infection, 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Hillary L; Shapiro, Daniel J; Hersh, Adam L

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate patterns of ambulatory antibiotic use and to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for pediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs). We examined antibiotics prescribed for UTIs for children aged younger than 18 years from 1998 to 2007 using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Amoxicillin-clavulanate, quinolones, macrolides, and second- and third-generation cephalosporins were classified as broad-spectrum antibiotics. We evaluated trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing patterns and performed multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Antibiotics were prescribed for 70% of pediatric UTI visits. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic (49% of visits). Broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed one third of the time. There was no increase in overall use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (P = .67); however, third-generation cephalosporin use doubled from 12% to 25% (P = .02). Children younger than 2 years old (odds ratio: 6.4 [95% confidence interval: 2.2-18.7, compared with children 13-17 years old]), females (odds ratio: 3.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.6-8.5]), and temperature ≥ 100.4°F (odds ratio: 2.9 [95% confidence interval: 1.0-8.6]) were independent predictors of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. Race, physician specialty, region, and insurance status were not associated with antibiotic selection. Ambulatory care physicians commonly prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics for the treatment of pediatric UTIs, especially for febrile infants in whom complicated infections are more likely. The doubling in use of third-generation cephalosporins suggests that opportunities exist to promote more judicious antibiotic prescribing because most pediatric UTIs are susceptible to narrower alternatives.

  7. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    for the diagnosis, treatment, monitoring and evaluation of the patient. Reference intervals enable clinicians to evaluate thyroid function. Several pediatric reference intervals for thyroid function test. 1-4 have been published . Newborn screening for congenital hypothyroidism. 5. (CH) in sub- Saharan Africa is still a mirage,.

  8. Use of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and awareness of brain gadolinium deposition among pediatric providers in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mithal, Leena B.; Patel, Payal S.; Mithal, Divakar; Palac, Hannah L.; Rozenfeld, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous recent articles have reported brain gadolinium deposition when using linear but not macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). To determine the current landscape of gadolinium use among pediatric institutions and the knowledge base of radiologists and referring providers with regard to GBCAs and brain gadolinium deposition. We e-mailed voluntary closed surveys to 5,390 physicians in various pediatric professional societies between January 2016 and March 2016. We used chi-square and Fisher exact tests to compare response distributions among specialties. We found that 80% of surveyed pediatric hospitals use macrocyclic contrast agents. In the last year, 58% switched their agent, most commonly to gadoterate meglumine, with the most common reason being brain gadolinium deposition. Furthermore, surveys indicated that 23% of hospitals are considering switching, and, of these, 83% would switch to gadoterate meglumine; the most common reasons were brain gadolinium deposition and safety. Radiologists were more aware of brain gadolinium deposition than non-radiologist physicians (87% vs. 26%; P<0.0001). Radiologists and referring providers expressed similar levels of concern (95% and 89%). Twelve percent of radiologists and 2% of referring providers reported patients asking about brain gadolinium deposition. Radiologists were significantly more comfortable addressing patient inquiries than referring pediatric physicians (48% vs. 6%; P<0.0001). The number of MRIs requested by referring pediatric physicians correlated with their knowledge of brain gadolinium deposition, contrast agent used by their hospital, and comfort discussing brain gadolinium deposition with patients (P<0.0001). Since the discovery of brain gadolinium deposition, many pediatric hospitals have switched to or plan to switch to a more stable macrocyclic MR contrast agent, most commonly gadoterate meglumine. Despite this, there is need for substantial further education of radiologists and

  9. Use of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and awareness of brain gadolinium deposition among pediatric providers in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithal, Leena B. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Patel, Payal S. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mithal, Divakar [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Chicago, IL (United States); Palac, Hannah L. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rozenfeld, Michael N. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Numerous recent articles have reported brain gadolinium deposition when using linear but not macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). To determine the current landscape of gadolinium use among pediatric institutions and the knowledge base of radiologists and referring providers with regard to GBCAs and brain gadolinium deposition. We e-mailed voluntary closed surveys to 5,390 physicians in various pediatric professional societies between January 2016 and March 2016. We used chi-square and Fisher exact tests to compare response distributions among specialties. We found that 80% of surveyed pediatric hospitals use macrocyclic contrast agents. In the last year, 58% switched their agent, most commonly to gadoterate meglumine, with the most common reason being brain gadolinium deposition. Furthermore, surveys indicated that 23% of hospitals are considering switching, and, of these, 83% would switch to gadoterate meglumine; the most common reasons were brain gadolinium deposition and safety. Radiologists were more aware of brain gadolinium deposition than non-radiologist physicians (87% vs. 26%; P<0.0001). Radiologists and referring providers expressed similar levels of concern (95% and 89%). Twelve percent of radiologists and 2% of referring providers reported patients asking about brain gadolinium deposition. Radiologists were significantly more comfortable addressing patient inquiries than referring pediatric physicians (48% vs. 6%; P<0.0001). The number of MRIs requested by referring pediatric physicians correlated with their knowledge of brain gadolinium deposition, contrast agent used by their hospital, and comfort discussing brain gadolinium deposition with patients (P<0.0001). Since the discovery of brain gadolinium deposition, many pediatric hospitals have switched to or plan to switch to a more stable macrocyclic MR contrast agent, most commonly gadoterate meglumine. Despite this, there is need for substantial further education of radiologists and

  10. Understanding psychological distress among pediatric cancer caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Gina E; Warner, Echo L; Morreall, Deborah K; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Kinney, Anita Y; Fluchel, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Few studies have examined distress in caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. We evaluated the association of socioeconomic, demographic, and patient clinical factors on caregivers' self-reported psychological distress associated with having a child with cancer. N = 366 pediatric cancer caregivers completed a self-administered questionnaire from July 2010 to July 2012. The Impact of Event Scale (IES), along with two subscales "intrusion" and "avoidance" measured caregiver cancer-specific distress, with higher scores indicating greater distress. Multivariable linear regression models were used to calculate coefficients (β) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of IES by socioeconomic, demographic, and clinical factors. Average caregiver IES score was 31.2 (standard deviation (SD) = 16.9, range 0-75). Mean intrusion score was 18.1 (SD 9.8, range 0-35) and avoidance score was 12.8 (SD 9.0, range 0-40). Caregivers with household incomes psychological distress for caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. These findings underscore the importance of developing and testing interventions aimed at evaluating and addressing the psychosocial needs for high-risk caregivers in addition to those of patients.

  11. Innovation in pediatric clinical education: application of the essential competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Birkmeier, Marisa; Anderson, Deborah K; Martin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    At the Section on Pediatrics Education Summit in July 2012, consensus was achieved on 5 essential core competencies (ECCs) that represent a knowledge base essential to all graduates of professional physical therapist education programs. This article offers suggestions for how clinical instructors (CIs) might use the ECCs to identify student needs and guide student learning during a pediatric clinical education experience. Pediatric CIs potentially might choose to use the ECCs as a reference tool in clinical education to help (1) organize and develop general, clinic-specific clinical education objectives, (2) develop and plan individualized student learning experiences, (3) identify student needs, and (4) show progression of student learning from beginner to intermediate to entry level. The ECCs may offer CIs insights into the role of pediatric clinical education in professional physical therapist education.

  12. Portal vein thrombosis in children and adolescents: 20 years experience of a pediatric hepatology reference center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Menezes Ferri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Portal vein thrombosis refers to a total or partial obstruction of the blood flow in this vein due to a thrombus formation. It is an important cause of portal hypertension in the pediatric age group with high morbidity rates due to its main complication - the upper gastrointestinal bleeding. OBJECTIVE: To describe a group of patients with portal vein thrombosis without associated hepatic disease of the Pediatric Hepatology Clinic of the Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil with emphasis on diagnosis, presentation form and clinical complications, and the treatment of portal hypertension. METHODS: This is a descriptive study of a series of children and adolescents cases assisted from January 1990 to December 2010. The portal vein thrombosis diagnosis was established by ultrasound. RESULTS: Of the 55 studied patients, 30 (54.5% were male. In 29 patients (52.7%, none of the risk factors for portal vein thrombosis was observed. The predominant form of presentation was the upper gastrointestinal bleeding (52.7%. In 20 patients (36.4%, the initial manifestation was splenomegaly. During the whole following period of the study, 39 patients (70.9% showed at least one episode of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The mean age of patients in the first episode was 4.6 ± 3.4 years old. The endoscopic procedure carried out in the urgency or electively for search of esophageal varices showed its presence in 84.9% of the evaluated patients. The prophylactic endoscopic treatment was performed with endoscopic band ligation of varices in 31.3% of patients. Only one died due to refractory bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: The portal vein thrombosis is one of the most important causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children. In all non febrile children with splenomegaly and/or hematemesis and without hepatomegaly and with normal hepatic function tests, it should be suspect of portal vein thrombosis. Thus, an

  13. Pediatric magnet ingestions: the dark side of the force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C; Otjen, Jeffrey P; Drugas, George T

    2014-05-01

    Pediatric magnet ingestions are increasing. Commercial availability of rare-earth magnets poses a serious health risk. This study defines incidence, characteristics, and management of ingestions over time. Cases were identified by searching radiology reports from June 2002 to December 2012 at a children's hospital and verified by chart and imaging review. Relative risk (RR) regressions determined changes in incidence and interventions over time. In all, 98% of ingestions occurred since 2006; 57% involved multiple magnets. Median age was 8 years (range 0 to 18); 0% of single and 56% of multiple ingestions required intervention. Compared with 2007 to 2009, ingestions increased from 2010 to 2012 (RR = 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 3.0). Intervention proportion was unchanged (RR = .94, 95% confidence interval .4 to 2.2). Small spherical magnets comprised 26.8% of ingestions since 2010; 86% involved multiple magnets and 47% required intervention. Pediatric magnet ingestions and interventions have increased. Multiple ingestions prompt more imaging and surgical interventions. Magnet safety standards are needed to decrease risk to children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias in Northern Alberta. Establishment of reference intervals for HbF and HbA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Capote, Karina; Higgins, Trefor N

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the incidence of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias in Northern Alberta and calculate the reference intervals (RI) for hemoglobin (Hb) HbF and HbA2. A retrospective ad-hoc analysis of the structural Hb variants and thalassemias identified on patients who had a hemoglobinopathy/thalassemia investigation performed between February 1 to December 31, 2013. Results were extracted from the Laboratory Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using MedCalc® version 11.4.2.0 for Windows software. 6616 hemoglobinopathy/thalassemia investigations and HbS screens were physician requested and 602 Hb variants were fortuitously found during HbA1c analysis. 3438 were interpreted as "normal" and 532 were classified as iron deficient. 3306 individuals, with age ranging from 3 to 92 years were included in the RI calculation. HbA2 RI was 2.3% to 3.4% and HbF 0.0% to 1.8%. 524 and 423 α and β thalassemia traits respectively were identified. Additionally ten δβ thalassemia traits and twelve cases of HbH disease were identified. Regarding hemoglobinopathies, 7% were classified as α-chain variants and 93% as β-chain variants with HbS (46%), HbE (16%), HbD Punjab (8%) and HbC (7%) traits being the most prevalent. We also documented 20 homozygous hemoglobinopathies and 36 compound/double heterozygous hemoglobinopathies. A wide diversity of hemoglobinopathies is found in the Northern Alberta population, 80% of the hemoglobinopathies were found as a reflex to HbA1c testing. Reference intervals for HbF and HbA2 were established. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic reference activities for nuclear medicine in Australia and New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towson, J.E.; Smart, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear medicine centres in Australia and New Zealand were surveyed in 1998 on behalf of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine (ANZSNM) and the Australasian Radiation Protection Society (ARPS) in order to establish diagnostic reference levels. A survey form was mailed to all centres, requesting information on the usual radiopharmaceutical activity administered to a standard adult patient and how the activity is calculated for children. The overall response rate was 89.5%. Data was obtained for 80 imaging procedures and 17 non-imaging tracer studies. For the 68 procedures for which data was available from 10 or more centres, the Most Common Activity and the Reference Activity were found from the mode and 75 th percentile of the distribution of activities. A follow-up survey of the 8 hospital centres specialising in pediatric nuclear medicine in Australia was conducted in 1999-2000. Data on the maximum and minimum administered activities (A max and A min ) was obtained for 43 pediatric imaging procedures. A max values were significantly less than the Reference Activities determined for adults. The median values of A max and A min are recommended as Pediatric Reference Activities. The effective dose from the Reference Activities was calculated for adults (male and female) and children. The survey results are available on the ANZSNM and ARPS web sites at http://www.anzsnm.org.au and http://www.arps.org.au. (author)

  16. Obesity after pediatric liver transplantation: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Shikha S; Alonso, Estella M; Zeitler, Phil; Yin, Wanron; Anand, Ravinder

    2012-12-01

    Pediatric obesity has become a significant public health concern. The historical focus in pediatric liver transplant (LT) has been undernutrition, with limited knowledge regarding obesity. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of obesity in pediatric LT, compare it to National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) data, and identify risk factors for obesity in pediatric LT. SPLIT, which collects pediatric LT data at 39 centers, was queried for subjects ages 2 to 18 years at follow-up, LT between 1995 and 2007, and with at least 1 body mass index measured 1 to 5 years after LT. Of 1706 individuals included, 44% had biliary atresia (47% boys, 58% white, mean age at LT 4.6 years). Of these individuals, 19% were obese at 1 year and 18% at 3 years, higher than in the general pediatric population reported by 2003-2004 NHANES, whereas 11% obesity at 5 years after LT was similar to NHANES data. Using logistic regression, Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-2.23), steroid use at follow-up (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.23-1.77), overweight (OR 4.34, 95% CI 2.91-6.68), and obesity (OR 10.62, 95% CI 5.9-19.65) at LT independently predicted post-LT obesity. These findings suggest a need to broaden standard care to include obesity assessment and intervention in routine pre- and posttransplant care.

  17. Pediatric computed tomography dose of head and chest exams: a bibliography revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Capaverde, Alexandre S.; Vanni, Stefania; Mazzola, Carolina F.S.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da

    2015-01-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) imaging diagnosis it is responsible for over 34% of the radiation dose given to society, only in Brazil there is around 3833 CT equipment. There are two dose index in CT, the CTDI vol and DLP that represents the Computed Tomography dose index and the product of the CTDI vol by the length of irradiation. This paper has as objective describe the values of CTDI vol e DLP for pediatric exams of chest and head. This is an exploratory study of bibliography revision on the PubMed data base using the index terms with the following crossing: Computed Tomography AND Reference Levels AND Dose. The search was limited by published studies on the last 5 years with patients among 0 and 15 years, in English or Portuguese. Besides that, were included references guides suggest by scientific and governmental organizations on the last 5 years. The data analysis was made using the four readings of Gil: exploratory, selective, analytic and interpretative. By the Exploratory Reading were located 23 articles. On the Selective Reading were excluded 4 articles and on the Analytic Reading 9 articles. The Interpretative Reading was made using 7 publications. Regarding the references guides were includes 3 guides. The Portaria MS453/98 was included for being the only national publication. All data were characterized between practical levels and reference levels. The conclusion is that there is no consensus between the reference levels for the selected articles, for pediatric exams. Besides that, the national legislation do not have reference levels for pediatric CT. (author)

  18. Differences in characteristics among new pediatric neurology patients: the effect of a newly established private pediatric neurology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleave, Jeanne; Woodruff, Brian; Freed, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    To investigate changes in volume and characteristics of new patients referred when a private pediatric neurology practice (PP) opened in 2004 in an area served primarily by an academic medical center's (AMC) pediatric neurology practice. Retrospective analysis of medical and billing records to examine changes in volume, diagnosis, and sociodemographic factors of new patients at the AMC from July 2004 to June 2005; the PP during the same period; and the AMC during the year before. One year after the PP opened, 40% more new pediatric neurology patients were seen in this area than the year before. Compared with the AMC, PP saw a greater proportion of seizures (34% vs 26%, P 20 miles from the practice (32% vs 64%, P pediatric neurology patients in this area. After the PP opened, the AMC continued to care for most patients with rare diseases and fewer financial resources. Future research should examine whether the increase in volume reflects relief of pent-up demand or increased referral rates due to eased access, and should elucidate how differences in patient populations at academic and private subspecialty practices relate to access to subspecialty care and financial well-being of academic practices.

  19. Trimester- and Assay-Specific Thyroid Reference Intervals for Pregnant Women in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfang Xing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The guidelines of the American Thyroid Association (ATA recommend an upper limit reference interval (RI of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH of 2.5 mIU/L in the first trimester of pregnancy and 3.0 mIU/L in subsequent trimesters, but some reported ranges in China are significantly higher. Our study aimed to establish trimester- and assay-specific RIs for thyroid hormones in normal pregnant Chinese women. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 2540 women with normal pregnancies (first trimester, n=398; second trimester, n=797; third trimester, n=1345 and 237 healthy nonpregnant control subjects were recruited. Serum TSH, free thyroxin (FT4, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb, and thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb levels were determined by automated chemiluminescence with an Immulite 2000 system (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany. After outliers were excluded, the 2.5–97.5th percentiles were used to define the RIs. Results. The RIs of thyroid function in the first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy and in nonpregnant controls were 0.07–3.96, 0.27–4.53, 0.48–5.40, and 0.69–5.78 mIU/L for TSH and 9.16–18.12, 8.67–16.21, 7.80–13.90, and 8.24–16.61 pmol/L for FT4, respectively. Conclusion. The trimester- and assay-specific RIs of thyroid function during pregnancy differed between trimesters, which suggests that it is advisable to detect and avoid misclassification of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy for women in Henan, China.

  20. Research training among pediatric residency programs: a national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Erika L; Naifeh, Monique M; Stevenson, Michelle D; Todd, Christopher; Henry, Emilie D; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Gerber, Linda M; Li, Su-Ting T

    2014-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) states that "residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little guidance for effectively integrating scholarly activity into residency. This study was conducted to understand how pediatric residency programs meet ACGME requirements and to identify characteristics of successful programs. The authors conducted an online cross-sectional survey of all pediatric residency program directors in October 2012, assessing program characteristics, resident participation in scholarly activity, program infrastructure, barriers, and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify characteristics of programs in the top quartile for resident scholarly activity participation. The response rate was 52.8% (105/199 programs). Seventy-seven (78.6%) programs required scholarly activity, although definitions were variable. When including only original research, systematic reviews or meta-analyses, and case reports or series with references, resident participation averaged 56% (range 0%-100%). Characteristics associated with high-participation programs included a scholarly activity requirement (odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-30.0); program director belief that all residents should present work regionally or nationally (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 1.5-15.1); and mentorship by >25% of faculty (OR = 3.6, CI = 1.2-11.4). Only 47.1% (41) of program directors were satisfied with resident participation, and only 30.7% (27) were satisfied with the quality of research training provided. The findings suggest that resident scholarly activity experience is highly variable and suboptimal. Identifying characteristics of successful programs can improve the resident research training experience.

  1. Children and adolescents with gender identity disorder referred to a pediatric medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spack, Norman P; Edwards-Leeper, Laura; Feldman, Henry A; Leibowitz, Scott; Mandel, Francie; Diamond, David A; Vance, Stanley R

    2012-03-01

    To describe the patients with gender identity disorder referred to a pediatric medical center. We identify changes in patients after creation of the multidisciplinary Gender Management Service by expanding the Disorders of Sex Development clinic to include transgender patients. Data gathered on 97 consecutive patients gender behaviors, provided letters from current mental health professional, and parental support. Main descriptive measures included gender, age, Tanner stage, history of gender identity development, and psychiatric comorbidity. Genotypic male:female ratio was 43:54 (0.8:1); there was a slight preponderance of female patients but not significant from 1:1. Age of presentation was 14.8 ± 3.4 years (mean ± SD) without sex difference (P = .11). Tanner stage at presentation was 4.1 ± 1.4 for genotypic female patients and 3.6 ± 1.5 for genotypic male patients (P = .02). Age at start of medical treatment was 15.6 ± 2.8 years. Forty-three patients (44.3%) presented with significant psychiatric history, including 20 reporting self-mutilation (20.6%) and suicide attempts (9.3%). After establishment of a multidisciplinary gender clinic, the gender identity disorder population increased fourfold. Complex clinical presentations required additional mental health support as the patient population grew. Mean age and Tanner Stage were too advanced for pubertal suppressive therapy to be an affordable option for most patients. Two-thirds of patients were started on cross-sex hormone therapy. Greater awareness of the benefit of early medical intervention is needed. Psychological and physical effects of pubertal suppression and/or cross-sex hormones in our patients require further investigation.

  2. Fundamentals in Biostatistics for Research in Pediatric Dentistry: Part I - Basic Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrocho-Rangel, J A; Ruiz-Rodríguez, M S; Pozos-Guillén, A J

    The purpose of this report was to provide the reader with some basic concepts in order to better understand the significance and reliability of the results of any article on Pediatric Dentistry. Currently, Pediatric Dentists need the best evidence available in the literature on which to base their diagnoses and treatment decisions for the children's oral care. Basic understanding of Biostatistics plays an important role during the entire Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) process. This report describes Biostatistics fundamentals in order to introduce the basic concepts used in statistics, such as summary measures, estimation, hypothesis testing, effect size, level of significance, p value, confidence intervals, etc., which are available to Pediatric Dentists interested in reading or designing original clinical or epidemiological studies.

  3. National Ambulatory Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns for Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection, 1998–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Daniel J.; Hersh, Adam L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate patterns of ambulatory antibiotic use and to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for pediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs). METHODS: We examined antibiotics prescribed for UTIs for children aged younger than 18 years from 1998 to 2007 using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Amoxicillin-clavulanate, quinolones, macrolides, and second- and third-generation cephalosporins were classified as broad-spectrum antibiotics. We evaluated trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing patterns and performed multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic use. RESULTS: Antibiotics were prescribed for 70% of pediatric UTI visits. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic (49% of visits). Broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed one third of the time. There was no increase in overall use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (P = .67); however, third-generation cephalosporin use doubled from 12% to 25% (P = .02). Children younger than 2 years old (odds ratio: 6.4 [95% confidence interval: 2.2–18.7, compared with children 13–17 years old]), females (odds ratio: 3.6 [95% confidence interval: 1.6–8.5]), and temperature ≥100.4°F (odds ratio: 2.9 [95% confidence interval: 1.0–8.6]) were independent predictors of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. Race, physician specialty, region, and insurance status were not associated with antibiotic selection. CONCLUSIONS: Ambulatory care physicians commonly prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics for the treatment of pediatric UTIs, especially for febrile infants in whom complicated infections are more likely. The doubling in use of third-generation cephalosporins suggests that opportunities exist to promote more judicious antibiotic prescribing because most pediatric UTIs are susceptible to narrower

  4. [Focus of childhood obesity from pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-López, Erika F; Macías-Rosales, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalences of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically in the last two decades in the adult and children population. The Organization for Cooperation and Economic Development reported in 2010 that Mexico ranks first worldwide in childhood obesity. The 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey reported that one of every three teenagers are overweight and obese. In the last decades, pediatric hospitals in different parts of the world reported the prevalence of secondary malnutrition, since in those days overweight and obesity did not represent health problems. Currently, the prevalence of overweight and obesity has been scarcely studied in pediatric hospitals. In the Hospital de Pediatría (Children's Hospital) of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social's Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente it is reported a prevalence of overweight of 15.4 % and obesity of 12.2 %, which reflects a nutritional transition.Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in this pediatric hospital of reference, one could conclude that the pediatrician should be able to make a correct evaluation of the nutritional state, because, if he does not detect these problems, we will be condemning children to suffer from a chronic disease for the rest of their lives, and with all the implications in the short, medium and long term.

  5. Pediatric Gastroenterology in Cuba: Evolution and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Guillot, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    INTRODUCTION The professional practice of pediatric gastroenterology arose in Cuba as an expression of the specialty's development internationally and Cuba's new strategies in public health, and in response to national needs for health care expertise in digestive diseases of infants, older children and adolescents. OBJECTIVES Describe the history of pediatric gastroenterology's development in Cuba since its inception at the National Gastroenterology Institute in the early 1970s, its contributions, and efforts to extend it to pediatric hospitals throughout Cuba. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION This is a historical review based on document analysis. Institutional sources from the National Gastroenterology Institute and Ministry of Public Health were reviewed, as well as international and national literature on the history of pediatric gastroenterology and unpublished texts since its emergence in 1972. DEVELOPMENT Although pediatric gastroenterology has not been formally recognized as a medical specialty in Cuba, there have been important achievements in establishing a network of specialized health care services for digestive diseases of children and adolescents. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and other auxiliary diagnostic modalities have been introduced for children and play a major role in clinical trials and research. This article describes the international context that promoted the specialty's development in Cuba. Reference is made to specialized training from its initial stages in 1972, its consolidation as an emerging discipline in Cuban medicine, and its diffusion in Latin American and Caribbean countries. Professional development and specialized training to meet health human resource needs in pediatric hospitals are described, as well as Cuban participation in the Latin American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. National and international milestones, publications, awards and recognitions that indicate advances despite difficulties are also

  6. Evaluation of Pediatric Questions on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination-An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Nunez, Leah; Barfield, William R; Mooney, James F

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric orthopaedics is tested frequently on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE). The most recent data on the pediatrics section of the OITE were generated from content 10 years old. The purpose of this study is to assess the pediatric orthopaedic questions on the 2011 to 2014 OITE, and to compare question categories and cognitive taxonomy with previous data. Four years (2011 to 2014) of OITE questions, answers, and references were reviewed. The number of pediatric questions per year was recorded, as well as presence of a clinical photo or imaging modality. Each question was categorized and assigned a cognitive taxonomy level. Categories included: knowledge; knowledge-treatment modalities; diagnosis; diagnosis/recognition of associated conditions; diagnosis/further studies; and diagnosis/treatment. Cognitive taxonomy levels included: simple recall, interpretation of data, and advanced problem-solving. The 3 most commonly covered topics were upper extremity trauma (17.4%), scoliosis (10.1%), and developmental dysplasia of the hip (5.7%). Compared with previous data, the percentage of pediatric questions was constant (13% vs. 14%). Categorically, the more recent OITE examinations contained significantly fewer questions testing simple knowledge (19% vs. 39%, P=0.0047), and significantly more questions testing knowledge of treatment modalities (17% vs. 9%, P=0.016) and diagnosis with associated conditions (19% vs. 9%, P=0.0034). Regarding cognitive taxonomy, there was a significant increase in the average number of questions that required advanced problem-solving (57% vs. 46%, P=0.048). Significantly more questions utilized clinical photographs and imaging studies (62% vs. 48%, P=0.012). The most common reference materials provided to support correct responses included Lovell and Winter's Pediatric Orthopaedics (25.7%) and the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (23.4%). Although the percentage of pediatric questions on the OITE has remained essentially

  7. Pharmacological management of obesity in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Cassie L; Harris, John Brock; Harris, Kira B

    2015-02-01

    To review current evidence of pharmacological options for managing pediatric obesity and provide potential areas for future research. A MEDLINE search (1966 to October 2014) was conducted using the following keywords: exenatide, liraglutide, lorcaserin, metformin, obesity, orlistat, pediatric, phentermine, pramlintide, topiramate, weight loss, and zonisamide. Identified articles were evaluated for inclusion, with priority given to randomized controlled trials with orlistat, metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, topiramate, and zonisamide in human subjects and articles written in English. References were also reviewed for additional trials. Whereas lifestyle modification is considered first-line therapy for obese pediatric patients, severe obesity may benefit from pharmacotherapy. Orlistat is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication for pediatric obesity and reduced body mass index (BMI) by 0.5 to 4 kg/m(2), but gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects may limit use. Metformin has demonstrated BMI reductions of 0.17 to 1.8 kg/m(2), with mild GI adverse effects usually managed with dose titration. Exenatide reduced BMI by 1.1 to 1.7 kg/m(2) and was well-tolerated with mostly transient or mild GI adverse effects. Topiramate and zonisamide reduced weight when used in the treatment of epilepsy. Future studies should examine efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in addition to lifestyle modifications for pediatric obesity. Lifestyle interventions remain the treatment of choice in pediatric obesity, but concomitant pharmacotherapy may be beneficial in some patients. Orlistat should be considered as second-line therapy for pediatric obesity. Evidence suggests that other diabetes and antiepileptic medications may also provide weight-loss benefits, but safety should be further evaluated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Adherence to AHA Guidelines When Adapted for Augmented Reality Glasses for Assisted Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Gervaix, Alain; Haddad, Kevin; Lacroix, Laurence; Schrurs, Philippe; Sahin, Ayhan; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-05-29

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are nowadays recognized as the world's most authoritative resuscitation guidelines. Adherence to these guidelines optimizes the management of critically ill patients and increases their chances of survival after cardiac arrest. Despite their availability, suboptimal quality of CPR is still common. Currently, the median hospital survival rate after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest is 36%, whereas it falls below 10% for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Among emerging information technologies and devices able to support caregivers during resuscitation and increase adherence to AHA guidelines, augmented reality (AR) glasses have not yet been assessed. In order to assess their potential, we adapted AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines for AR glasses. The study aimed to determine whether adapting AHA guidelines for AR glasses increased adherence by reducing deviation and time to initiation of critical life-saving maneuvers during pediatric CPR when compared with the use of PALS pocket reference cards. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups of voluntary pediatric residents, comparing AR glasses to PALS pocket reference cards during a simulation-based pediatric cardiac arrest scenario-pulseless ventricular tachycardia (pVT). The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds in each allocation group, from onset of pVT to the first defibrillation attempt. Secondary outcomes were time elapsed to (1) initiation of chest compression, (2) subsequent defibrillation attempts, and (3) administration of drugs, as well as the time intervals between defibrillation attempts and drug doses, shock doses, and number of shocks. All these outcomes were assessed for deviation from AHA guidelines. Twenty residents were randomized into 2 groups. Time to first defibrillation attempt (mean: 146 s) and adherence to AHA guidelines in terms of time to other

  9. Defining pediatric inpatient cardiology care delivery models: A survey of pediatric cardiology programs in the USA and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Antonio R; Neish, Steven R; Challman, Melissa; Feltes, Timothy F

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of children with cardiac disease is one of the most prevalent and costly pediatric inpatient conditions. The design of inpatient medical services for children admitted to and discharged from noncritical cardiology care units, however, is undefined. North American Pediatric Cardiology Programs were surveyed to define noncritical cardiac care unit models in current practice. An online survey that explored institutional and functional domains for noncritical cardiac care unit was crafted. All questions were multi-choice with comment boxes for further explanation. The survey was distributed by email four times over a 5-month period. Most programs (n = 45, 60%) exist in free-standing children's hospitals. Most programs cohort cardiac patients on noncritical cardiac care units that are restricted to cardiac patients in 39 (54%) programs or restricted to cardiac and other subspecialty patients in 23 (32%) programs. The most common frontline providers are categorical pediatric residents (n = 58, 81%) and nurse practitioners (n = 48, 67%). However, nurse practitioners are autonomous providers in only 21 (29%) programs. Only 33% of programs use a postoperative fast-track protocol. When transitioning care to referring physicians, most programs (n = 53, 72%) use facsimile to deliver pertinent patient information. Twenty-two programs (31%) use email to transition care, and eighteen (25%) programs use verbal communication. Most programs exist in free-standing children's hospitals in which the noncritical cardiac care units are in some form restricted to cardiac patients. While nurse practitioners are used on most noncritical cardiac care units, they rarely function as autonomous providers. The majority of programs in this survey do not incorporate any postoperative fast-track protocols in their practice. Given the current era of focused handoffs within hospital systems, relatively few programs utilize verbal handoffs to the referring pediatric

  10. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  11. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In the late 1980s all Danish children with type 1 diabetes were invited for a nationwide evaluation of glycemic control. Approximately 75% (n = 720) participated and have later been referred to as The Danish Cohort of Pediatric Diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987). The results were surprisingly poor glycemic...... control among these young patients which lead to a great emphasis on glycemic control in the Danish Pediatric Departments. In 1995 the participants were invited for yet another evaluation but this time with main focus on early signs of microvascular complications - 339 participated. The mean HbA1c had...

  12. Time to pediatric epilepsy surgery is longer and developmental outcomes lower for government compared with private insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Jason S; Dadour, Andrew; Oh, Taemin; Baca, Christine B; Vickrey, Barbara G; Vassar, Stefanie; Sankar, Raman; Salamon, Noriko; Vinters, Harry V; Mathern, Gary W

    2013-07-01

    It is unclear if socioeconomic factors like type of insurance influence time to referral and developmental outcomes for pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. This study determined whether private compared with state government insurance was associated with shorter intervals of seizure onset to surgery and better developmental quotients for pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. A consecutive cohort (n = 420) of pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery were retrospectively categorized into those with Medicaid (California Children's Services; n = 91) or private (Preferred Provider Organization, Health Maintenance Organization, Indemnity; n = 329) insurance. Intervals from seizure onset to referral and surgery and Vineland developmental assessments were compared by insurance type with the use of log-rank tests. Compared with private insurance, children with Medicaid had longer intervals from seizure onset to referral for evaluation (log-rank test, P = .034), and from seizure onset to surgery (P = .017). In a subset (25%) that had Vineland assessments, children with Medicaid compared with private insurance had lower Vineland scores presurgery (P = .042) and postsurgery (P = .003). Type of insurance was not associated with seizure severity, types of operations, etiology, postsurgical seizure-free outcomes, and complication rate. Compared with Medicaid, children with private insurance had shorter intervals from seizure onset to referral and to epilepsy surgery, and this was associated with lower Vineland scores before surgery. These findings may reflect delayed access for uninsured children who eventually obtained state insurance. Reasons for the delay and whether longer intervals before epilepsy surgery affect long-term cognitive and developmental outcomes warrant further prospective investigations.

  13. The role of imaging in pediatric radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowe, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The pediatric radiation oncologist is involved in treating a different spectrum of tumors that is generally seen by the adult radiation oncologist. More than one-third of pediatric patients with malignancies suffer from acute lymphocytic leukemia and lymphomas. Approximately one-quarter of the patients have primary tumors of the brain and central nervous system, while the remaining patients mostly present with mesenchymal sarcomas as opposed to the carcinomas more generally seen in adult practice. Pediatric tumors are frequently deep seated and therefore more difficult to evaluate by physical examination that the typical adult epithelial tumors. In the following sections, the various tumor types and locations are discussed with reference to the specific imaging requirements for each of the groups. This is preceded by a brief introduction to modern radiation oncology in order to clarify the role of these modalities

  14. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P., E-mail: paul.segars@duke.edu; Norris, Hannah; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Samei, E. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Minhas, Anum; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: We previously developed a set of highly detailed 4D reference pediatric extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 yr with organ and tissue masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. In this work, we extended this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of varying age and height and body mass percentiles representative of the public at large. The models will provide a library of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric imaging protocols. Methods: High resolution positron emission tomography-computed tomography data obtained from the Duke University database were reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity. The CT portion of the data was then segmented with manual and semiautomatic methods to form a target model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric XCAT reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the nonsegmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. The mass for each major tissue was calculated and compared to linearly interpolated ICRP values for different ages. Results: Sixty four new pediatric phantoms were created in this manner. Each model contains the same level of detail as the original XCAT reference phantoms and also includes parameterized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. For the phantoms that were 10 yr old and younger, we included both sets of reproductive organs. This gave them the capability to simulate both male and female anatomy. With this, the population can be expanded to 92. Wide anatomical variation was clearly seen amongst the phantom models, both in organ shape and size, even for

  15. Overweight and obesity: overrepresentation in the pediatric reconstructive burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Theresa; Gottschlich, Michele M; Allgeier, Chris; Khoury, Jane; Kagan, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric burn patients are predisposed to excessive weight gain in the reconstructive period, but the cause is unclear. An overweight (OW) or obese (OB) condition is associated with numerous health risks, decreased physical function, and increased morbidity. The purpose of this study was to compare the frequency of OW status in reconstructive, pediatric burn patients with the prevalence in the US population. The authors reviewed the records of 1533 pediatric patients, >1 year from acute burn, admitted for an elective reconstructive procedure. Body mass index between 85th and 95th percentile, according to the National Center for Health Statistics for 2000 growth charts, was classified as OW, and body mass index >95th percentile was classified as OB. Frequency of OW and OB and racial disparity was calculated as a percentage of total patients and compared with pediatric data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 1999 to 2006, a nationally representative sample. The rate of OW and OB was 16.3 and 24.1%, respectively, in the authors' pediatric burn population. White patients had OW and OB rates of 15.9 and 23.6%, respectively, compared with 18.2 and 30.2%, respectively, in black patients. All OW and OB rates were outside the 95% confidence interval of the nationally representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey population. The rates of OW and OB in pediatric reconstructive burn patients exceed the US population standard across age and race stratifications. The prevention and treatment of excessive weight gain should be a component of rehabilitation in pediatric burns.

  16. Social pediatrics: weaving horizontal and vertical threads through pediatric residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Levy, Rebecca; Atkinson, Adelle; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Shouldice, Michelle

    2017-01-13

    Social pediatrics teaches pediatric residents how to understand disease within their patients' social, environmental and political contexts. It's an essential component of pediatric residency training; however there is very little literature that addresses how such a broad-ranging topic can be taught effectively. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize social pediatric education in our pediatric residency training in order to identify strengths and gaps. A social pediatrics curriculum map was developed, attending to 3 different dimensions: (1) the intended curriculum as prescribed by the Objectives of Training for Pediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), (2) the formal curriculum defined by rotation-specific learning objectives, and (3) the informal/hidden curriculum as reflected in resident and teacher experiences and perceptions. Forty-one social pediatric learning objectives were extracted from the RCPSC Objectives of Training for Pediatrics, most were listed in the Medical Expert (51%) and Health Advocate competencies (24%). Almost all RCPSC social pediatric learning objectives were identified in more than one rotation and/or seminar. Adolescent Medicine (29.2%), Pediatric Ambulatory Medicine (26.2%) and Developmental Pediatrics (25%) listed the highest proportion of social pediatric learning objectives. Four (10%) RCPSC social pediatric objectives were not explicitly named within learning objectives of the formal curriculum. The informal curriculum revealed that both teachers and residents viewed social pediatrics as integral to all clinical encounters. Perceived barriers to teaching and learning of social pediatrics included time constraints, particularly in a tertiary care environment, and the value of social pediatrics relative to medical expert knowledge. Despite the lack of an explicit thematic presentation of social pediatric learning objectives by the Royal College and residency training program

  17. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T 1 and T 2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T 1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T 2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially

  18. Factors affecting subspecialty referrals by pediatric primary care providers for children with obesity-related comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Carolyn O; Milliren, Carly E; Feldman, Henry A; Taveras, Elsie M

    2013-08-01

    To determine referral patterns from pediatric primary care to subspecialists for overweight/obesity and related comorbidities. We used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to identify overweight/obesity and 5 related comorbidities in primary care visits between 2005 and 2009 by children 6 to 18 years. The primary outcome was whether the visit ended in referral. We used multivariable analysis to examine factors associated with referral. We identified 34,225 database visits. A total of 17.1% were with overweight (body mass index=85th to 94th percentile) or obese (body mass index≥95th percentile) patients. A total of 7.1% of primary care visits with overweight/obese children ended in referral. Referral was more likely when obesity was the reason for visit (odds ratio=2.83; 95% confidence interval=1.61-4.97) but was not associated with presence of a comorbidity (odds ratio=1.35; 95% confidence interval=0.75-2.44). Most overweight or obese children are not referred, regardless of comorbidity status. One reason may be low levels of appropriate diagnosis.

  19. Perceived barriers to pediatrician and family practitioner participation in pediatric clinical trials: Findings from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Rachel G; Corneli, Amy; Bradley, John; Farley, John; Jafri, Hasan S; Lin, Li; Nambiar, Sumathi; Noel, Gary J; Wheeler, Chris; Tiernan, Rosemary; Smith, P Brian; Roberts, Jamie; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2018-03-01

    Despite legislation to stimulate pediatric drug development through clinical trials, enrolling children in trials continues to be challenging. Non-investigator (those who have never served as a clinical trial investigator) providers are essential to recruitment of pediatric patients, but little is known regarding the specific barriers that limit pediatric providers from participating in and referring their patients to clinical trials. We conducted an online survey of pediatric providers from a wide variety of practice types across the United States to evaluate their attitudes and awareness of pediatric clinical trials. Using a 4-point Likert scale, providers described their perception of potential barriers to their practice serving as a site for pediatric clinical trials. Of the 136 providers surveyed, 52/136 (38%) had previously referred a pediatric patient to a trial, and only 17/136 (12%) had ever been an investigator for a pediatric trial. Lack of awareness of existing pediatric trials was a major barrier to patient referral by providers, in addition to consideration of trial risks, distance to the site, and time needed to discuss trial participation with parents. Overall, providers perceived greater challenges related to parental concerns and parent or child logistical barriers than study implementation and ethics or regulatory barriers as barriers to their practice serving as a trial site. Providers who had previously been an investigator for a pediatric trial were less likely to be concerned with potential barriers than non-investigators. Understanding the barriers that limit pediatric providers from collaboration or inhibit their participation is key to designing effective interventions to optimize pediatric trial participation.

  20. Classification, diagnostic criteria, and treatment recommendations for orofacial manifestations in HIV-infected pediatric patients. Collaborative Workgroup on Oral Manifestations of Pediatric HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, F J; Flaitz, C; Catapano, P; Murray, P; Milnes, A R; Dorenbaum, A

    1999-01-01

    The criteria for diagnosis of HIV-related oral lesions in adults are well established, but corresponding criteria in the pediatric population are not as well defined. The Collaborative Workgroup on the Oral Manifestations of Pediatric HIV infection reached a consensus, based upon available data, as to the presumptive and definitive criteria to diagnose the oral manifestations of HIV infection in children. Presumptive criteria refer to the clinical features of the lesions, including signs and symptoms, whereas definitive criteria require specific laboratory tests. In general, it is recommended that definitive criteria be established whenever possible. Orofacial manifestations have been divided into three groups: 1) those commonly associated with pediatric HIV infection; 2) those less commonly associated with pediatric HIV infection; and 3) those strongly associated with HIV infection but rare in children. Orofacial lesions commonly associated with pediatric HIV infection include candidiasis, herpes simplex infection, linear gingival erythema, parotid enlargement, and recurrent aphthous stomatitis. In contrast, orofacial lesions strongly associated with HIV infection but rare in children include Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and oral hairy leukoplakia. Treatment recommendations, specific for this age group, have been included for some of the more common HIV-related orofacial manifestations.

  1. Dose study in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac procedures in a digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez Marquez, J.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Luquero Llopis, N.; Vano Carruana, E.; Corredoira, S.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Plaza Aparicio, R.; Tellez-Cepeda Ruiz, M.

    2011-01-01

    In La Paz Hospital in Madrid has recently installed a biplane x-ray equipment in the Department of Pediatric Cardiology. It is a digital system equipped with two amorphous silicon detectors. There has been a characterization of the equipment prior to commissioning for clinical use. It was later followed up on the dose delivered to pediatric patients undergoing various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Yet the absence of reference values for interventional cardiology child dose, the values obtained were used to establish baseline dose by age group that will serve as initial references and allow our radiation dose compared with those of other centers and check that the skin dose are in most cases below the thresholds for deterministic effects.

  2. Pediatric travel consultation in an integrated clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson , J C; Fischer , P R; Hale , D C; Derrick , D

    2001-01-01

    In May 1997, a pediatric travel service was created within a larger integrated University-County Health Department international travel clinic. The purpose of the service was to further enhance the travel advice and care provided to children and their parents or guardians. The current study was designed to describe the care of children in this setting and to compare the care of children seen in the Pediatric Travel Service with that of children seen by other providers. All pediatric patients (defined as individuals Mexico, South America, and Southeast Asia. When compared to travelers seen in the Regular Clinic, individuals in the Pediatric Travel Service group were more likely to travel for humanitarian work, and for parental work relocation. Persons in the Regular Clinic were more likely to travel to Mexico and Central America. They were also more likely to travel on vacation and for missionary work or study. Hepatitis B and tetanus-diphtheria booster vaccinations were given more frequently to travelers seen in the Regular Clinic. Also, ciprofloxacin and antimotility agents were more commonly prescribed in this group. No differences were noted in the duration of travel or in the time interval between clinic visit and departure. While general travel advice was considered to be similar in both clinic groups, some differences were observed in the frequency of administration of certain vaccines and prescriptions of medications. These differences were likely due to a difference in age in the two study groups. The high volume and success of the clinic suggest that integrated pediatric and adult travel services in a coordinated setting can be effective.

  3. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections: Role of Otolaryngologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Kara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections, refers to a disorder in children who manifest symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or tic disorders associated with acute exacerbations. Although autoimmune responses following infections with streptococcus have been hypothesized to be responsible, there is still controversies about the pathophysiology and treatment. In this article, the treatment methods of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections and the role of otolaryngologist were discussed.

  4. Umbria-Marche Basin, Central Italy: A Reference Section for the Aptian-Albian Interval at Low Latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Paes de Almeida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the Cretaceous Period, the Aptian-Albian interval (125–99.6 Ma, Ogg et al., 2008 was a critical time on a global scale. This is evident from 1 changes in the nature of the ocean-climate system brought about by increased ocean crust production coupled with active midplate and plate margin volcanism in a shifting paleogeography (Skelton et al., 2003; 2 cyclic deposition and preservation of common “black shales”, some of them termed Oceanic Anoxic Events(OAE1a to OAE1d (Schlanger and Jenkyns, 1976; Arthur et al., 1990; 3 periodic changes in redox conditions at the ocean bottom (Oceanic Red Beds, ORBs (Wang et al., 2009; and 4 rapid biotic radiations and turnovers (Leckie et al., 2002. The Aptian-Albian time is also of interest for one of the most noteworthy geomagnetic events, namely the post-M0r “Cretaceous Quiet Zone”. This long and constant normal polarity superchron without any convincing true reversal to date (Satolli et al., 2008 precludes usage of reversals magnetostratigraphy from the Aptian through the Santonian. The Poggio le Guaine core was designed to provide a high-resolution age model and a high-resolution relative magnetic paleointensity reference curve for the Aptian-Albian interval of the long normal Cretaceous superchron; it was also designed to understand the causal linkages among geological, biogeochemical, oceanographic and climatic eventsas well as their consequences. The core was drilled at Poggio le Guaine, where the most continuous, complete, and best preserved Aptian-Albian succession is exposed throughout the Umbria-Marche Basin (UMB of the northern Apennines of central Italy (Fig. 1. It represents a continuous record of fossiliferous pelagic rocks extending from the Albian-Cenomanian boundary down to the uppermost Barremian (99.6–126 Ma. In this progress report we present the first preliminary findings of this ongoing project.

  5. Pediatric lead exposure from imported Indian spices and cultural powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cristiane Gurgel; Schaider, Laurel Anne; Brabander, Daniel Joseph; Woolf, Alan David

    2010-04-01

    Significant lead poisoning has been associated with imported nonpaint products. To describe cases of pediatric lead intoxication from imported Indian spices and cultural powders, determine lead concentrations in these products, and predict effects of ingestion on pediatric blood lead levels (BLLs). Cases and case-study information were obtained from patients followed by the Pediatric Environmental Health Center (Children's Hospital Boston). Imported spices (n = 86) and cultural powders (n = 71) were analyzed for lead by using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The simple bioaccessibility extraction test was used to estimate oral bioavailability. The integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model for lead in children was used to predict population-wide geometric mean BLLs and the probability of elevated BLLs (>10 microg/dL). Four cases of pediatric lead poisoning from Indian spices or cultural powders are described. Twenty-two of 86 spices and foodstuff products contained >1 microg/g lead (for these 22 samples, mean: 2.6 microg/g [95% confidence interval: 1.9-3.3]; maximum: 7.6 microg/g). Forty-six of 71 cultural products contained >1 microg/g lead (for 43 of these samples, mean: 8.0 microg/g [95% confidence interval: 5.2-10.8]; maximum: 41.4 microg/g). Three sindoor products contained >47% lead. With a fixed ingestion of 5 microg/day and 50% bioavailability, predicted geometric mean BLLs for children aged 0 to 4 years increased from 3.2 to 4.1 microg/dL, and predicted prevalence of children with a BLL of >10 microg/dL increased more than threefold (0.8%-2.8%). Chronic exposure to spices and cultural powders may cause elevated BLLs. A majority of cultural products contained >1 microg/g lead, and some sindoor contained extremely high bioaccessible lead levels. Clinicians should routinely screen for exposure to these products.

  6. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for CT imaging research and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Frush, Jack; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Minhas, Anum; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Miller, M. I.; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul

    2014-03-01

    With the increased use of CT examinations, the associated radiation dose has become a large concern, especially for pediatrics. Much research has focused on reducing radiation dose through new scanning and reconstruction methods. Computational phantoms provide an effective and efficient means for evaluating image quality, patient-specific dose, and organ-specific dose in CT. We previously developed a set of highly-detailed 4D reference pediatric XCAT phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years with organ and tissues masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. We now extend this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of a variety of ages and height and weight percentiles, representative of the public at large. High resolution PET-CT data was reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity and was then segmented with manual and semi-automatic methods to form a target model. A Multi-Channel Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (MC-LDDMM) algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the non-segmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. 3D CT data was simulated from the phantoms to demonstrate their ability to generate realistic, patient quality imaging data. The population of pediatric phantoms developed in this work provides a vital tool to investigate dose reduction techniques in 3D and 4D pediatric CT.

  7. Pediatric referrals to psychiatry in a Tertiary Care General Hospital: A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bheemsain Tekkalaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with chronic physical illnesses frequently have psychiatric comorbidities, which often go un-noticed and may lead to more resource utilization and morbidity. Pediatric liaison services can be effectively used to bridge this gap. Literature on pediatric liaison services is sparse. Aims: To study the referral patterns, reasons for referrals, psychiatric diagnoses and interventions in children and adolescents referred to psychiatry department in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of all children and adolescents below 19 years of age, referred to psychiatry department from 2010 to 2015, was done. Data was collected and statistical analysis was done. Results: Two hundred and nine subjects were included in the study. Mean age of sample was 12.15 (±4.20 years, with about 66.02% being males. About 54.06% of the participants were referred from pediatricians. Almost three fourth (72.25% of children had no diagnosable physical illness. Intellectual disability (19.62% was the most common psychiatric diagnosis, followed by depressive disorders (14.35%, and dissociative disorders (12.92%. Conclusions: In our study, majority of the referrals were the adolescent males from pediatric department. Intellectual disability, depressive disorder, and stress-related disorders were the common diagnoses. The fact that three-fourth of the referred children had no physical illness implies lack of awareness, stigma toward mental illness, and pathway of care.

  8. Reference intervals and physiologic alterations in hematologic and biochemical values of free-ranging desert tortoises in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.; Wallis, I.R.; Nagy, K.A.; Henen, B.T.; Peterson, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    Desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) populations have experienced precipitous declines resulting from the cumulative impact of habitat loss, and human and disease-related mortality. Evaluation of hematologic and biochemical responses of desert tortoises to physiologic and environmental factors can facilitate the assessment of stress and disease in tortoises and contribute to management decisions and population recovery. The goal of this study was to obtain and analyze clinical laboratory data from free-ranging desert tortoises at three sites in the Mojave Desert (California, USA) between October 1990 and October 1995, to establish reference intervals, and to develop guidelines for the interpretation of laboratory data under a variety of environmental and physiologic conditions. Body weight, carapace length, and venous blood samples for a complete blood count and clinical chemistry profile were obtained from 98 clinically healthy adult desert tortoises of both sexes at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural area (western Mojave), Goffs (eastern Mojave) and Ivanpah Valley (northeastern Mojave). Samples were obtained four times per year, in winter (February/March), spring (May/June), summer (July/August), and fall (October). Years of near-, above- and below-average rainfall were represented in the 5 yr period. Minimum, maximum and median values, and central 95 percentiles were used as reference intervals and measures of central tendency for tortoises at each site and/or season. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance for significant (P < 0.01) variation on the basis of sex, site, season, and interactions between these variables. Significant sex differences were observed for packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, aspartate transaminase activity, and cholesterol, triglyceride, calcium, and phosphorus concentrations. Marked seasonal variation was observed in most parameters in conjunction with reproductive cycle, hibernation, or seasonal

  9. The impact of pediatric-specific dose modulation curves on radiation dose and image quality in head computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Joana; Paulo, Graciano; Foley, Shane; Rainford, Louise; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The volume of CT examinations has increased with resultant increases in collective dose values over the last decade. To analyze the impact of the tube current and voltage modulation for dose values and image quality of pediatric head CT examinations. Head CT examinations were performed on anthropomorphic phantoms and four pediatric age categories before and after the introduction of dedicated pediatric curves for tube voltage and current modulation. Local diagnostic reference levels were calculated. Visual grading characteristic image quality evaluation was performed by four pediatric neuroradiologists and image noise comparisons were performed. Pediatric-specific modulation curves demonstrated a 49% decrease in mean radiation dose for phantom examinations. The local diagnostic reference levels (CTDIvol) for clinical examinations decreased by 52%, 41%, 46% and 40% for newborn, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, respectively. Visual grading characteristic image quality was maintained for the majority of age categorizations (area under the curve = 0.5) and image noise measurements did not change (P = 0.693). Pediatric-specific dose modulation curves resulted in an overall mean dose reduction of 45% with no significant differences in subjective or objective image quality findings. (orig.)

  10. The impact of pediatric-specific dose modulation curves on radiation dose and image quality in head computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joana; Paulo, Graciano [Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, ESTESC, DMIR, Coimbra (Portugal); Foley, Shane; Rainford, Louise [University College Dublin, School of Medicine and Medical Science, Health Science Centre, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEntee, Mark F. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumberland Campus, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    The volume of CT examinations has increased with resultant increases in collective dose values over the last decade. To analyze the impact of the tube current and voltage modulation for dose values and image quality of pediatric head CT examinations. Head CT examinations were performed on anthropomorphic phantoms and four pediatric age categories before and after the introduction of dedicated pediatric curves for tube voltage and current modulation. Local diagnostic reference levels were calculated. Visual grading characteristic image quality evaluation was performed by four pediatric neuroradiologists and image noise comparisons were performed. Pediatric-specific modulation curves demonstrated a 49% decrease in mean radiation dose for phantom examinations. The local diagnostic reference levels (CTDIvol) for clinical examinations decreased by 52%, 41%, 46% and 40% for newborn, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, respectively. Visual grading characteristic image quality was maintained for the majority of age categorizations (area under the curve = 0.5) and image noise measurements did not change (P = 0.693). Pediatric-specific dose modulation curves resulted in an overall mean dose reduction of 45% with no significant differences in subjective or objective image quality findings. (orig.)

  11. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadel, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. (orig.)

  12. SPECT/CT in pediatric patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, Helen R. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Pediatric Radiologist and Nuclear Medicine Physician, Division of Nuclear Medicine Department of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging is becoming the standard of care in pediatric imaging. Indications are mainly for oncologic imaging including mIBG scintigraphy for neuroblastoma and I-123 post surgical imaging of children with thyroid carcinoma, bone scintigraphy for back pain, children referred from sports medicine and neurodevelopmentally delayed children presenting with pain symptoms. The studies provide improved diagnostic accuracy, and oncologic imaging that includes optimized CT as part of the SPECT/CT study may decrease the number of studies and sedation procedures an individual child may need. The studies, however, must be tailored on an individual basis as the addition of the CT study can increase exposure to the child and should only be performed after appropriate justification and with adherence to optimized low dose pediatric protocols. (orig.)

  13. The use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction in pediatric head CT: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorona, G A; Zuccoli, G; Sutcavage, T; Clayton, B L; Ceschin, R C; Panigrahy, A

    2013-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction techniques facilitate CT dose reduction; though to our knowledge, no group has explored using iterative reconstruction with pediatric head CT. Our purpose was to perform a feasibility study to assess the use of ASIR in a small group of pediatric patients undergoing head CT. An Alderson-Rando head phantom was scanned at decreasing 10% mA intervals relative to our standard protocol, and each study was then reconstructed at 10% ASIR intervals. An intracranial region of interest was consistently placed to estimate noise. Our ventriculoperitoneal shunt CT protocol was subsequently modified, and patients were scanned at 20% ASIR with approximately 20% mA reductions. ASIR studies were anonymously compared with older non-ASIR studies from the same patients by 2 attending pediatric neuroradiologists for diagnostic utility, sharpness, noise, and artifacts. The phantom study demonstrated similar noise at 100% mA/0% ASIR (3.9) and 80% mA/20% ASIR (3.7). Twelve pediatric patients were scanned at reduced dose at 20% ASIR. The average CTDI(vol) and DLP values of the 20% ASIR studies were 22.4 mGy and 338.4 mGy-cm, and for the non-ASIR studies, they were 28.8 mGy and 444.5 mGy-cm, representing statistically significant decreases in the CTDI(vol) (22.1%, P = .00007) and DLP (23.9%, P = .0005) values. There were no significant differences between the ASIR studies and non-ASIR studies with respect to diagnostic acceptability, sharpness, noise, or artifacts. Our findings suggest that 20% ASIR can provide approximately 22% dose reduction in pediatric head CT without affecting image quality.

  14. Pediatric neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric neurocritical care is an emerging multidisciplinary field of medicine and a new frontier in pediatric critical care and pediatric neurology. Central to pediatric neurocritical care is the goal of improving outcomes in critically ill pediatric patients with neurological illness or injury and limiting secondary brain injury through optimal critical care delivery and the support of brain function. There is a pressing need for evidence based guidelines in pediatric neurocritical care, notably in pediatric traumatic brain injury and pediatric stroke. These diseases have distinct clinical and pathophysiological features that distinguish them from their adult counterparts and prevent the direct translation of the adult experience to pediatric patients. Increased attention is also being paid to the broader application of neuromonitoring and neuroprotective strategies in the pediatric intensive care unit, in both primary neurological and primary non-neurological disease states. Although much can be learned from the adult experience, there are important differences in the critically ill pediatric population and in the circumstances that surround the emergence of neurocritical care in pediatrics.

  15. Multidisciplinary Management of Pediatric Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley J; McDonald, Patrick J; Cordingley, Dean; Reimer, Karen; Nijjar, Satnam; Koltek, Mark; Hosain, Shahid; Johnston, Janine; Mansouri, Behzad; Sawyer, Scott; Silver, Norm; Girardin, Richard; Larkins, Shannon; Vis, Sara; Selci, Erin; Davidson, Michael; Gregoire, Scott; Sam, Angela; Black, Brian; Bunge, Martin; Essig, Marco; MacDonald, Peter; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics and outcomes of pediatric sports-related concussion (SRC) patients who were evaluated and managed at a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program and examine the healthcare resources and personnel required to meet the needs of this patient population. We conducted a retrospective review of all pediatric SRC patients referred to the Pan Am Concussion Program from September 1st, 2013 to May 25th, 2015. Initial assessments and diagnoses were carried out by a single neurosurgeon. Return-to-Play decision-making was carried out by the multidisciplinary team. 604 patients, including 423 pediatric SRC patients were evaluated at the Pan Am Concussion Program during the study period. The mean age of study patients was 14.30 years (SD: 2.32, range 7-19 years); 252 (59.57%) were males. Hockey (182; 43.03%) and soccer (60; 14.18%) were the most commonly played sports at the time of injury. Overall, 294 (69.50%) of SRC patients met the clinical criteria for concussion recovery, while 75 (17.73%) were lost to follow-up, and 53 (12.53%) remained in active treatment at the end of the study period. The median duration of symptoms among the 261 acute SRC patients with complete follow-up was 23 days (IQR: 15, 36). Overall, 25.30% of pediatric SRC patients underwent at least one diagnostic imaging test and 32.62% received referral to another member of our multidisciplinary clinical team. Comprehensive care of pediatric SRC patients requires access to appropriate diagnostic resources and the multidisciplinary collaboration of experts with national and provincially-recognized training in TBI.

  16. Primary care: constipation and encopresis treatment strategies and reasons to refer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philichi, Lisa; Yuwono, Melawati

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess constipation and encopresis treatment strategies of primary care providers and determine reasons to refer to a pediatric gastroenterology specialist. A closed-ended questionnaire was mailed to a convenience sampling of 237 pediatric primary care providers. Ninety-one questionnaires were returned with a 38% response rate: 74 (81%) pediatricians and 17 (19%) nurse practitioners. The majority of responders recommended pharmacologic treatment and diet changes. Many providers (73%) estimated a 75%-100% success rate when managing constipation, whereas 19% providers estimated a greater than 80% success rate with encopresis patients. The number one reason to refer was unresponsiveness to treatment (71%), followed by parents want a second opinion (15%), rule out organic cause (9%), and management is too time-consuming (5%). Both primary care providers and pediatric gastroenterologists use medication strategies, but diet recommendations are not the same. Unresponsiveness to treatment is the main reason for referral. If better management can occur in the primary care setting, costly specialty services may be avoided and possibly reduce healthcare costs.

  17. The McGill Interactive Pediatric OncoGenetic Guidelines: An approach to identifying pediatric oncology patients most likely to benefit from a genetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, Catherine; Coltin, Hallie; Witkowski, Leora; Mourad, Stephanie; Malkin, David; Foulkes, William D

    2017-08-01

    Identifying cancer predisposition syndromes in children with tumors is crucial, yet few clinical guidelines exist to identify children at high risk of having germline mutations. The McGill Interactive Pediatric OncoGenetic Guidelines project aims to create a validated pediatric guideline in the form of a smartphone/tablet application using algorithms to process clinical data and help determine whether to refer a child for genetic assessment. This paper discusses the initial stages of the project, focusing on its overall structure, the methodology underpinning the algorithms, and the upcoming algorithm validation process. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  19. Reference values for venous and capillary S100B in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrand, Ramona; Romner, Bertil; Lanke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The current management guidelines for pediatric mild head injury (MHI) liberally recommend computed tomography (CT) and frequent admission. Serum protein S100B, currently used in management of adult head injury, has recently shown potential for reducing unnecessary CT scans after pediatric mild h...... head injury. Capillary sampling in children is commonly used when venous sampling fails or is inappropriate. We present reference values for both venous and capillary samples of protein S100B in children....

  20. Characteristics of pediatric multiple sclerosis: The Turkish pediatric multiple sclerosis database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Ünsal; Anlar, Banu; Gücüyener, Kıvılcım

    2017-11-01

    To document the clinical and paraclinical features of pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) in Turkey. Data of MS patients with onset before age 18 years (n = 193) were collected from 27 pediatric neurology centers throughout Turkey. Earlier-onset (<12 years) and later-onset (≥12 years) groups were compared. There were 123 (63.7%) girls and 70 (36.3%) boys aged 4-17 years, median 14 years at disease onset. Family history of MS was 6.5%. The first presentation was polysymptomatic in 55.4% of patients, with brainstem syndromes (50.3%), sensory disturbances (44%), motor symptoms (33.2%), and optic neuritis (26.4%) as common initial manifestations. Nineteen children had facial paralysis and 10 had epileptic seizures at first attack; 21 (11%) were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Oligoclonal bands were identified in 68% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular (96%), cortical/juxtacortical (64.2%), brainstem (63%), cerebellum (51.4%), and spinal cord (67%) involvement. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) were abnormal in 52%; serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were low in 68.5% of patients. The earlier-onset group had a higher rate of infection/vaccination preceding initial attack, initial diagnosis of ADEM, longer interval between first 2 attacks, and more disability accumulating in the first 3 years of the disease. Brainstem and cerebellum are common sites of clinical and radiological involvement in pediatric-onset MS. VEP abnormalities are frequent even in patients without history of optic neuropathy. Vitamin D status does not appear to affect the course in early disease. MS beginning before 12 years of age has certain characteristics in history and course. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential and Limitations of Cochrane Reviews in Pediatric Cardiology: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poryo, Martin; Khosrawikatoli, Sara; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Meyer, Sascha

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine has contributed substantially to the quality of medical care in pediatric and adult cardiology. However, our impression from the bedside is that a substantial number of Cochrane reviews generate inconclusive data that are of limited clinical benefit. We performed a systematic synopsis of Cochrane reviews published between 2001 and 2015 in the field of pediatric cardiology. Main outcome parameters were the number and percentage of conclusive, partly conclusive, and inconclusive reviews as well as their recommendations and their development over three a priori defined intervals. In total, 69 reviews were analyzed. Most of them examined preterm and term neonates (36.2%), whereas 33.3% included also non-pediatric patients. Leading topics were pharmacological issues (71.0%) followed by interventional (10.1%) and operative procedures (2.9%). The majority of reviews were inconclusive (42.9%), while 36.2% were conclusive and 21.7% partly conclusive. Although the number of published reviews increased during the three a priori defined time intervals, reviews with "no specific recommendations" remained stable while "recommendations in favor of an intervention" clearly increased. Main reasons for missing recommendations were insufficient data (n = 41) as well as an insufficient number of trials (n = 22) or poor study quality (n = 19). There is still need for high-quality research, which will likely yield a greater number of Cochrane reviews with conclusive results.

  2. Underserved Areas and Pediatric Resident Characteristics: Is There Reason for Optimism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraque-Arena, Danielle; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William L

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether resident characteristics and experiences are related to practice in underserved areas. Cross-sectional survey of a national random sample of pediatric residents (n = 1000) and additional sample of minority residents (n = 223) who were graduating in 2009 was conducted. Using weighted logistic regression, we examined relationships between resident characteristics (background, values, residency experiences, and practice goals) and reported 1) expectation to practice in underserved area and 2) postresidency position in underserved area. Response rate was 57%. Forty-one percent of the residents reported that they had an expectation of practicing in an underserved area. Of those who had already accepted postresidency positions, 38% reported positions in underserved areas. Service obligation in exchange for loans/scholarships and primary care/academic pediatrics practice goals were the strongest predictors of expectation of practicing in underserved areas (respectively, adjusted odds ratio 4.74, 95% confidence interval 1.87-12.01; adjusted odds ratio 3.48, 95% confidence interval 1.99-6.10). Other significant predictors include hospitalist practice goals, primary care practice goals, importance of racial/ethnic diversity of patient population in residency selection, early plan (before medical school) to care for underserved families, mother with a graduate or medical degree, and higher score on the Universalism value scale. Service obligation and primary care/academic pediatrics practice goal were also the strongest predictors for taking a postresidency job in underserved area. Trainee characteristics such as service obligations, values of humanism, and desire to serve underserved populations offer the hope that policies and public funding can be directed to support physicians with these characteristics to redress the maldistribution of physicians caring for children. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  3. Establishment of reference intervals for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, free and total thyroxine, and free and total triiodothyronine for the Beckman Coulter DxI-800 analyzers by indirect method using data obtained from Chinese population in Zhejiang Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yu-Xia; Zhou, Yong-Lie; Xia, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In order to establish suitable reference intervals of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free (unbound) T4 (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), total thyroxine (T4), and total triiodothyronine (T3) for the patients collected in Zhejiang, China, an indirect method was developed using the data from the people presented for routine health check-up. Fifteen thousand nine hundred and fifty-six person's results were reviewed. Box-Cox or Case Rank was used to transform the data to normal distribution. Tukey and Box-Plot methods were used to exclude the outliers. Nonparametric method was used to establish the reference intervals following the EP28-A3c guideline. Pearson correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between hormone levels and age, while Mann-Whitney U test was employed for quantification of concentration differences on the people who are younger and older than 50 years old. Reference intervals were 0.66-4.95 mIU/L (TSH), 8.97-14.71 pmol/L (FT4), 3.75-5.81 pmol/L (FT3), 73.45-138.93 nmol/L (total T4), and 1.24-2.18 nmol/L (total T3) in male; conversely, reference intervals for female were 0.72-5.84 mIU/L (TSH), 8.62-14.35 pmol/L (FT4), 3.59-5.56 pmol/L (FT3), 73.45-138.93 nmol/L (total T4), and 1.20-2.10 nmol/L (total T3). FT4, FT3, and total T3 levels in male and FT4 level in female had an inverse correlation with age. Total T4 and TSH levels in female were directly correlated. Significant differences in these hormones were also found between younger and older than 50 years old except FT3 in female. Indirect method can be applied for establishment of reference intervals for TSH, FT4, FT3, total T4, and total T3. The reference intervals are narrower than those previously established. Age factor should also be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Socioeconomic position and the primary care interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Anders

    2018-01-01

    to the easiness to interpret the symptoms of the underlying cancer. Methods. We conducted a population-based cohort study using survey data on time intervals linked at an individually level to routine collected data on demographics from Danish registries. Using logistic regression we estimated the odds......Introduction. Diagnostic delays affect cancer survival negatively. Thus, the time interval from symptomatic presentation to a GP until referral to secondary care (i.e. primary care interval (PCI)), should be as short as possible. Lower socioeconomic position seems associated with poorer cancer...... younger than 45 years of age and older than 54 years of age had longer primary care interval than patients aged ‘45-54’ years. No other associations for SEP characteristics were observed. The findings may imply that GPs are referring patients regardless of SEP, although some room for improvement prevails...

  5. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  6. Risk Factors for Gaps in Care during Transfer from Pediatric to Adult Cystic Fibrosis Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ostrenga, Joshua; Petren, Kristofer; Fink, Aliza K; D'Agostino, Emma; Strassle, Camila; Schechter, Michael S; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    With improved survival into adulthood, the number of dedicated adult cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs has expanded in the United States over the past decade. Transfer from pediatric to adult CF programs represents a potential time for lapses in recommended health care. To describe variability in transfer between pediatric and adult CF care programs and to identify factors associated with prolonged gaps in care. Using the U.S. CF Foundation Patient Registry, we identified individuals with CF who transferred care from a pediatric to an adult CF care program during 2007 to 2013. A gap in care was defined as the time in days between the last recorded pediatric encounter and the first recorded adult encounter. A hierarchical multivariable regression model was applied to investigate the effect of program- and patient-level factors on gaps in care. There were 1,946 individuals at 155 pediatric CF programs who transferred to an adult CF program during the analytic period. The mean age at transfer was 21.1 years, with 68% transferring care between ages 18 and 21 years. The mean gap in care during transfer was 183 days (median, 106 d; range, 2-1,843 d); 47% had a less than 100-day gap, and 13% had a greater than or equal to 365-day gap (prolonged gap). Prolonged gaps in care were more likely to occur among those younger than age 18 years (odds ratio, 3.33; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-5.37) at the time of transfer and those who transferred to an adult program that was in a different city from their pediatric or affiliate program (odds ratio, 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-3.17). Having any health insurance coverage was associated with decreased likelihood of prolonged gaps (private insurance vs. no insurance [odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.23] or any government insurance versus no insurance [odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.18]). Lung function, nutritional status, and receipt of intravenous antibiotics in the final year of

  7. US Emergency Department Trends in Imaging for Pediatric Nontraumatic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Lauren M; Goyal, Monika K; Badolato, Gia M; Chamberlain, James M; Cohen, Joanna S

    2017-10-01

    To describe national emergency department (ED) trends in computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound imaging for the evaluation of pediatric nontraumatic abdominal pain from 2007 through 2014. We used data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to measure trends in CT and ultrasound use among children with nontraumatic abdominal pain. We performed multivariable logistic regression to measure the strength of the association of ED type (pediatric versus general ED) with CT and ultrasound use adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of an estimated 21.1 million ED visits for nontraumatic abdominal pain, 14.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.2%-16.0%) had CT imaging only, 10.9% (95% CI, 9.7%-12.1%) had ultrasound imaging only, and 1.9% (95% CI, 1.4%-2.4%) received both CT and ultrasound. The overall use of CT and ultrasound did not significantly change over the study period ( P trend .63 and .90, respectively). CT use was lower among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17-0.69). Conversely, ultrasound use was higher among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 2.14; 95% CI, 1.29-3.55). CT imaging for pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain has plateaued since 2007 after the steady increase seen in the preceding 9 years. Among this population, an increased likelihood of CT imaging was demonstrated in general EDs compared with pediatric EDs, in which there was a higher likelihood of ultrasound imaging. Dissemination of pediatric-focused radiology protocols to general EDs may help optimize radiation exposure in children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Elaboração e validação de intervalos de referência longitudinais de peso fetal com uma amostra da população brasileira Elaboration and validation of longitudinal reference intervals of fetal weight with a sample of the Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Luciana de Paula Furlan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Elaborar modelos de predição de peso fetal e de percentis longitudinais de peso fetal estimado (PFE com uma amostra da população brasileira. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional prospectivo. Dois grupos de gestantes foram recrutados: Grupo EPF (estimativa de peso fetal: pacientes para elaboração (EPF-El e validação (EPF-Val de um modelo de predição de peso fetal; Grupo IRL (intervalos de referência longitudinais: gestantes para elaboração (IRL-El e validação (IRL-Val de intervalos de referência longitudinais de PFE. Regressão polinomial foi utilizada com os dados do subgrupo EPF-El para gerar o modelo de predição de peso fetal. O desempenho deste modelo foi comparado com os de outros disponíveis na literatura. Modelos lineares mistos foram usados para elaboração de intervalos longitudinais de PFE com os dados do subgrupo IRL-El. Os dados do subgrupo IRL-Val foram usados para validação destes intervalos. RESULTADOS: Quatrocentos e cinqüenta e oito pacientes compuseram o Grupo EPF (EPF-El: 367; EPF-Val: 91 e 315 o Grupo IRL (IRL-El: 265; IRL-Val: 50. A fórmula para cálculo do PFE foi: PFE=-8,277+2,146xDBPxCAxCF-2,449xCFxDBP². Os desempenhos de outras fórmulas para estimativa de peso fetal em nossa amostra foram significativamente piores do que os do modelo gerado neste estudo. Equações para predição de percentis condicionais de PFE foram derivadas das avaliações longitudinais do subgrupo IRL-El e validadas com os dados do subgrupo IRL-Val. CONCLUSÕES: descrevemos um método para adaptação de intervalos de referência longitudinais de PFE, sendo este obtido por meio de fórmulas geradas em uma amostra da população brasileira.PURPOSES: To elaborate models for the estimation of fetal weight and longitudinal reference intervals of estimated fetal weight (EFW using a sample of the Brazilian population. METHODS: Prospective observational study. Two groups of patients were evaluated: Group EFW (estimation of

  9. Dose survey of pediatric and adult patients in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamadain, K.E.M.; Azevedo, A.C.P.; And others

    2006-01-01

    A survey of radiation doses to children and adults from diagnostic radiography has been carried out in seven hospitals in Sudan. In four hospitals only pediatric examinations were died. In two hospitals only adult patients were recorded and in one hospital both kinds of patients (pediatric and adults) were evaluated. For pediatric patients only chest x-ray examination was evaluated and children were divided according to age ranges: from (0-1) and 5) years for chest AP only and from (5-10) and (10-15) for chest PA. For adult patients the examinations were chest AP and PA, abdomen AP and skull AP and PA. Entrance Surface Dose SD) and the Effective Dose (E) were calculated using the Dose Cal software. The mean ESD r children, measured in p.Gy, ranged from (45-53) and (53-56) for (0-1) and (1-5) years, respectively and from (55-71) and (68-85) for (5-10) and (10-15) years, respectively. In two of le pediatric hospitals the mean ESD values were greater than the CEC Reference Dose Levels. In El bulk and Si nar hospitals the values ranged from 167-261 and 186-308 μGy for the age ranges (0-1) and (1-5) respectively and 167-194 and 279-312 μGy for the age ranges of (5-10) and (10-15) respectively. For adult patients the ESD and E dose values evaluated in Alfisal hospital presented values comparable with the CEC Reference Dose Level. However for Alshorta hospital the values were higher for the chest AP and PA with results for ESD 0.446 and 0.551 mGy respectively

  10. Pediatric Sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Sinusitis Pediatric Sinusitis Patient Health Information News media interested in ... sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to diagnose because symptoms of ...

  11. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucaya, Javier [Vall d' Hebron Hospitals, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology and Inst. of Diagnostic Imaging; Hospital Quiron, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Strife, Janet L. (eds.) [Cincinnati Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center

    2008-07-01

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  12. Biologics in pediatric psoriasis - efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Sunil; Mahajan, Rahul

    2018-01-01

    Childhood psoriasis is a special situation that is a management challenge for the treating dermatologist. As is the situation with traditional systemic agents, which are commonly used in managing severe psoriasis in children, the biologics are being increasingly used in the recalcitrant disease despite limited data on long term safety. Areas covered: We performed an extensive literature search to collect evidence-based data on the use of biologics in pediatric psoriasis. The relevant literature published from 2000 to September 2017 was obtained from PubMed, using the MeSH words 'biologics', 'biologic response modifiers' and 'treatment of pediatric/childhood psoriasis'. All clinical trials, randomized double-blind or single-blind controlled trials, open-label studies, retrospective studies, reviews, case reports and letters concerning the use of biologics in pediatric psoriasis were screened. Articles covering the use of biologics in pediatric psoriasis were screened and reference lists in the selected articles were scrutinized to identify other relevant articles that had not been found in the initial search. Articles without relevant information about biologics in general (e.g. its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and adverse effects) and its use in psoriasis in particular were excluded. We screened 427 articles and finally selected 41 relevant articles. Expert opinion: The available literature on the use of biologics such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents, and anti-IL-12/23 agents like ustekinumab suggests that these are effective and safe in managing severe pediatric psoriasis although there is an urgent need to generate more safety data. Dermatologists must be careful about the potential adverse effects of the biologics before administering them to children with psoriasis. It is likely that with rapidly evolving scenario of biologics in psoriasis, these will prove to be very useful molecules particularly in managing severe and recalcitrant

  13. Perspectives on Canadian core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia: a survey of graduate fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Crawford, Mark W

    2015-10-01

    Educators in anesthesia have an obligation to ensure that fellowship programs are training anesthesiologists to meet the highest standards of performance in clinical and academic practice. The objective of this survey was to characterize the perspectives of graduates of Canadian core fellowship programs in pediatric anesthesia (during a ten-year period starting in 2003) on the adequacies and inadequacies of fellowship training. We conducted an electronic survey of graduates from eight departments of pediatric anesthesia in Canada who completed one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia from 2003 to 2013. A novel survey design was implemented, and the content and structure of the design were tested before distribution. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, details of training and practice settings, perceived self-efficacy in subspecialty practices, research experience, and perspectives on one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were determined. The survey was sent to 132 anesthesiologists who completed core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia in Canada. Sixty-five (49%) completed and eligible surveys were received. Most of the anesthesiologists surveyed perceived that 12 months of core fellowship training are sufficient to acquire the knowledge and critical skills needed to practice pediatric anesthesia. Subspecialty areas most frequently perceived to require improved training included pediatric cardiac anesthesia, chronic pain medicine, and regional anesthesia. This survey reports perceived deficiencies in domains of pediatric anesthesia fellowship training. These findings should help guide the future development of core and advanced fellowship training programs in pediatric anesthesia.

  14. Reviewing interval cancers: Time well spent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gower-Thomas, Kate; Fielder, Hilary M.P.; Branston, Lucy; Greening, Sarah; Beer, Helen; Rogers, Cerilan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To categorize interval cancers, and thus identify false-negatives, following prevalent and incident screens in the Welsh breast screening programme. SETTING: Breast Test Wales (BTW) Llandudno, Cardiff and Swansea breast screening units. METHODS: Five hundred and sixty interval breast cancers identified following negative mammographic screening between 1989 and 1997 were reviewed by eight screening radiologists. The blind review was achieved by mixing the screening films of women who subsequently developed an interval cancer with screen negative films of women who did not develop cancer, in a ratio of 4:1. Another radiologist used patients' symptomatic films to record a reference against which the reviewers' reports of the screening films were compared. Interval cancers were categorized as 'true', 'occult', 'false-negative' or 'unclassified' interval cancers or interval cancers with minimal signs, based on the National Health Service breast screening programme (NHSBSP) guidelines. RESULTS: Of the classifiable interval films, 32% were false-negatives, 55% were true intervals and 12% occult. The proportion of false-negatives following incident screens was half that following prevalent screens (P = 0.004). Forty percent of the seed films were recalled by the panel. CONCLUSIONS: Low false-negative interval cancer rates following incident screens (18%) versus prevalent screens (36%) suggest that lower cancer detection rates at incident screens may have resulted from fewer cancers than expected being present, rather than from a failure to detect tumours. The panel method for categorizing interval cancers has significant flaws as the results vary markedly with different protocol and is no more accurate than other, quicker and more timely methods. Gower-Thomas, K. et al. (2002)

  15. Psychiatric outcomes after pediatric sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley J; Koltek, Mark; Hosain, Shahid; Cordingley, Dean; Chu, Stephanie; Selci, Erin; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were twofold: (1) to examine the prevalence of emotional symptoms among children and adolescents with a sports-related concussion (SRC) who were referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program and (2) to examine the prevalence, clinical features, risk factors, and management of postinjury psychiatric outcomes among those in this clinical population. The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with SRC referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program between September 2013 and October 2014. Clinical assessments carried out by a single neurosurgeon included clinical history, physical examination, and Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) scoring. Postinjury psychiatric outcomes were defined as a subjective worsening of symptoms of a preinjury psychiatric disorder or new and isolated suicidal ideation or diagnosis of a novel psychiatric disorder (NPD). An NPD was defined as a newly diagnosed psychiatric disorder that occurred in a patient with or without a lifetime preinjury psychiatric disorder after a concussion. Clinical resources, therapeutic interventions, and clinical and return-to-play outcomes are summarized. One hundred seventy-four patients (mean age 14.2 years, 61.5% male) were included in the study. At least 1 emotional symptom was reported in 49.4% of the patients, and the median emotional PCSS subscore was 4 (interquartile range 1-8) among those who reported at least 1 emotional symptom. Overall, 20 (11.5%) of the patients met the study criteria for a postinjury psychiatric outcome, including 14 patients with an NPD, 2 patients with isolated suicidal ideation, and 4 patients with worsening symptoms of a preinjury psychiatric disorder. Female sex, a higher initial PCSS score, a higher emotional PCSS subscore, presence of a preinjury psychiatric history, and presence of a family history of psychiatric illness were significantly associated with postinjury psychiatric outcomes

  16. Anti-Müllerian Hormone and Its Clinical Use in Pediatrics with Special Emphasis on Disorders of Sex Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Johansen, Marie; Hagen, Casper P; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2013-01-01

    Using measurements of circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in diagnosing and managing reproductive disorders in pediatric patients requires thorough knowledge on normative values according to age and gender. We provide age- and sex-specific reference ranges for the Immunotech assay and conver......Using measurements of circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in diagnosing and managing reproductive disorders in pediatric patients requires thorough knowledge on normative values according to age and gender. We provide age- and sex-specific reference ranges for the Immunotech assay...

  17. Using Simulation to Model Improvements in Pediatric Bed Placement in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambton, Judith; Roeder, Theresa; Saltzman, Robert; Param, Lila; Fernandes, Roxanne

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this project was to use an interdisciplinary approach to analyze strategies through simulation technology for improving patient flow in a pediatric hospital. Various statistics have been offered on the number of children admitted annually to hospitals. For administrators, particularly in smaller systems, the financial burden of equipping and staffing pediatric units often outweighs the moral desire to maintain a pediatric unit as a viable option for patients and pediatricians. Discrete event simulation was used to model current operations of a pediatric unit. Cost analysis was conducted using simulation reflecting various percentages of patients being referred to a discharge holding area (DHA) upon discharge and of the use of all private rooms. Both DHA and private rooms resulted in increased patient volumes. Administrators should consider the use of a DHA and/or private rooms to ease the census strains of pediatric units and the resultant revenue of this service.

  18. Mobile Health Applications for Pediatric Care: Review and Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Samantha Sangie; Murugiah, Muthu Kumar; Soh, Yee Chang; Wong, Tin Wui; Ming, Long Chiau

    2018-05-01

    Despite the surge in mobile health (mHealth) applications (apps) about pediatric care in commercial app stores, to our knowledge, reviews of the quality of such apps are lacking. Consequently, it is a great challenge for health care professionals (HCPs) to identify appropriate and reliable mHealth apps for delivering health care services. Thus, we performed a structured review of the extant literature about mHealth apps in pediatric care and quality assessment of selected apps found in commercial app stores. A review and comparison of mHealth apps in pediatric care found in Google's Play Store (Android system) and Apple's App Store (iOS system) were performed. For the structured review of the available literature, Google Scholar, PubMed, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and Science Direct online databases were used for the literature search. The assessment criteria used for comparison included requirement for Internet connection, size of application, information on disease, diagnostic tools, medical calculator, information on disease treatments, dosage recommendations, and drug interaction checker. Fifty mHealth apps for general pediatric care and 8 mHealth apps for specific pediatric diseases were discussed in the literature. Of the 90 mHealth apps we reviewed, 27 that fulfilled the study criteria were selected for quality assessment. Medscape, Skyscape, and iGuideline scored the highest (score=7), while PediaBP scored the lowest (score=3). Medscape, Skyscape, and iGuideline are the most comprehensive mHealth apps for HCPs as quick references for pediatric care. More studies about mHealth apps in pediatric care are warranted to ensure the quality and reliability of mHealth apps.

  19. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, total and free T4 during the neonatal period: Establishing regional reference intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sheikhbahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH, the most common etiology of preventable mental retardation in children, is estimated to be more prevalent among Asian population. Aims: Since thyroid function tests (TFTs varied among different ages and geographical regions, in this study, the neonatal thyroid reference intervals in a healthy neonatal population is determined for the first time in Iran. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study performed on 246 healthy term newborns aged between 2 days and 1 month. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture from all subjects. The median, 2.5 th , 5 th , 95 th , and 97.5 th percentile of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, as well as the total and free T4 were assessed among different age groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Predictive Analytics Software (PASW Statistics 18 was used for the analysis. Results: Serum TSH, total and free T4 concentration peaked in 5 th to 7 th days of life, continued over 2 weeks, then decreased and started reaching to adult reference range. A significant negative correlation between age and serum concentration of TSH (P = 0.02, total T4 (P = 0.01 and free T4 (P = 0.01 was found. Conclusion: This study yielded fairly different values for TFTs compared compared values found in other countries and also different from values reported for laboratory kits we used. These differences were assumed to be due to variations in ethnicity, age, and laboratory methods used. Due to the lack of international standardization, conducting multicenter studies helps in making a more precise evaluation of thyroid status in neonates.

  20. Specifying real-time systems with interval logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, John

    1988-01-01

    Pure temporal logic makes no reference to time. An interval temporal logic and an extension to that logic which includes real time constraints are described. The application of this logic by giving a specification for the well-known lift (elevator) example is demonstrated. It is shown how interval logic can be extended to include a notion of process. How the specification language and verification environment of EHDM could be enhanced to support this logic is described. A specification of the alternating bit protocol in this extended version of the specification language of EHDM is given.

  1. Pediatric Dentistese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Asokan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful practice of pediatric dentistry depends on the establishment of a good relationship between the dentist and the child. Such a relationship is possible only through effective communication. Pediatric dentistry includes both an art and a science component. The focus has been mostly on the technical aspects of our science, and the soft skills we need to develop are often forgotten or neglected. This paper throws light on the communication skills we need to imbibe to be a successful pediatric dentist. A new terminology “Pediatric Dentistese” has been coined similar to motherese, parentese, or baby talk. Since baby talk cannot be applied to all age groups of children, pediatric dentistese has been defined as “the proactive development-based individualized communication between the pediatric dentist and the child which helps to build trust, allay fear, and treat the child effectively and efficiently.”

  2. Parent-Reported Penicillin Allergy Symptoms in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyles, David; Chiu, Asriani; Simpson, Pippa; Nimmer, Mark; Adams, Juan; Brousseau, David C

    2017-04-01

    Children often present to the pediatric emergency department (ED) with a reported penicillin allergy. The true incidence of pediatric penicillin allergy is low, and patients may be inappropriately denied first-line antibiotics. We hypothesized that more than 70% of reported penicillin allergies in the pediatric ED are low risk for true allergy. Parents of children presenting to the pediatric ED with parent-reported penicillin allergy completed an allergy questionnaire. The questionnaire included age at allergy diagnosis, symptoms of allergy, and time to allergic reaction from first dose. The allergy symptoms were dichotomized into high and low risk in consultation with a pediatric allergist before questionnaire implementation. A total of 605 parents were approached; 500 (82.6%) completed the survey. The median (interquartile range) age of the children at diagnosis was 1 year (7 months, 2 years); 75% were diagnosed before their third birthday. Overall, 380 (76%) (95% confidence interval 72.3, 79.7) children had exclusively low-risk symptoms. The most commonly reported symptoms were rash (466, 92.8%) and itching (203, 40.6%). Of the 120 children with one or more high-risk symptom, facial swelling (50, 10%) was the most common. Overall, 354 children (71%) were diagnosed after their first exposure to penicillin. Symptom onset within 24 hours of medication administration occurred in 274 children (54.8%). Seventy-six percent of patients with parent-reported penicillin allergy have symptoms unlikely to be consistent with true allergy. Determination of true penicillin allergy in patients with low-risk symptoms may permit the increased use of first-line penicillin antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Chemistry Reference Intervals for C57BL/6J, C57BL/6N, and C3HeB/FeJ Mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Gordon P; Rathkolb, Birgit; Oestereicher, Manuela A; Lengger, Christoph J; Moerth, Corinna; Micklich, Kateryna; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Wolf, Eckhard; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Although various mouse inbred strains are widely used to investigate disease mechanisms and to establish new therapeutic strategies, sex-specific reference intervals for laboratory diagnostic analytes that are generated from large numbers of animals have been unavailable. In this retrospective study, we screened data from more than 12,000 mice phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic from January 2006 through June 2014 and selected animals with the genetic background of C57BL/6J, C57BL/6N, or C3HeB/FeJ. In addition, we distinguished between the C57BL/6NTac substrain and C57BL/6N mice received from other vendors. The corresponding data sets of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, inorganic phosphate), lipids (cholesterol, triglyceride), and enzyme activities (ALT, AST, ALP, α-amylase) and urea, albumin, and total protein levels were analyzed. Significant effects of age and sex on these analytes were identified, and strain- or substrain- and sex-specific reference intervals for 90- to 135-d-old mice were calculated. In addition, we include an overview of the literature that reports clinical chemistry values for wild-type mice of different strains. Our results support researchers interpreting clinical chemistry values from various mouse mutants and corresponding wild-type controls based on the examined strains and substrains.

  4. Assessment of Regional Pediatric Computed Tomography Dose Indices in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, A; Vaideki, K; Govindarajan, K N; Jayakumar, S; Devanand, B

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to assess Tamil Nadu pediatric computed tomography (CT) diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) by collecting radiation dose data for the most commonly performed CT examinations. This work was performed for thirty CT scanners installed in various parts of the Tamil Nadu region. The patient cohort was divided into two age groups: <1 year, and 1-5 years. CT dose indices were measured using a 10 cm 3 pencil ion chamber with pediatric head and body polymethyl methacrylate phantoms. Dose data such as volumetric CT dose index (CTDI v ) and dose length product (DLP) on a minimum of twenty average-sized pediatric patients in each category were recorded to calculate a mean site CTDI v and DLP value. The rounded 75 th percentile was used to calculate a pediatric DRL for each hospital, and then region by compiling all results. Data were collected for 3600 pediatric patients. Pediatric CT DRL for two age groups: <1 year (CTDI v and DLP of head [20 mGy, 352 mGy.cm], chest [7 mGy, 120 mGy.cm] and abdomen [12 mGy, 252 mGy.cm]), and 1-5 years (CTDI v and DLP of head [38 mGy, 505 mGy.cm], chest [8 mGy, 132 mGy.cm] and abdomen [14 mGy, 270 mGy.cm]) for select procedures have been calculated. Proposed pediatric DRLs of CTDI v and DLP for head procedure were lower, and for chest and abdomen procedures were higher than European pediatric DRLs for both age groups.

  5. Guideline for fluoroscopy of low gastrointestinal tract in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Mi Jung; Lim, Yun Jung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Lim, Gye Yeon; Lee, Hee Jung

    2015-01-01

    Although the availability of CT, MRI and endoscopy has resulted in a marked decline in fluoroscopic procedures in adult patients, fluoroscopy remains an important and frequently used procedure in pediatric patients because there is no appropriate choice of diagnostic imaging or treatment modality for certain diseases. The Korean Society of Pediatric Radiology has formulated evidence-based guidelines for fluoroscopy of the lower intestinal tract in the pediatric population (under age 18 including neonates) in order to assist physicians in clinical practice. The guidelines offer standards of examination practice including radiation doses that are as low as reasonably achievable for children under 18 years old, including neonates, for fluoroscopy of the lower intestinal tract, which has typically used relatively high doses. The recommendations of these guidelines should not be used as an absolute standard, and physicians should always refer to methods that do not adhere to the guidelines when those methods are considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation

  6. Radiographic measurements of hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity - new reference intervals based on 2,038 19-year-old Norwegians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborie, Lene Bjerke; Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); Engesaeter, Ingvild Oevsteboe [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bergen (Norway); Lehmann, Trude Gundersen; Engesaeter, Lars Birger [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bergen (Norway); Sera, Francesco; Dezateux, Carol [UCL Institute of Child Health, MRC Centre of Epidemiology for Child Health, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Normative references for radiographic measurements commonly used in the diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip at skeletal maturity are incomplete. The present study therefore aimed to establish new gender-specific standards for measurements reflecting the acetabular morphology, namely Sharp's angle, the acetabular roof angle of Toennis (AA) and the acetabular depth-width ratio (ADR), and measurements reflecting the position of the femoral head related to the acetabulum, namely the center-edge (CE) angle of Wiberg, the refined CE angle of Ogata, and the femoral head extrusion index (FHEI). The joint space width (JSW) is also reported. The population-based 1989 Bergen Birth Cohort (n = 3,935) was invited at age 19 years to a follow-up during 2007-09, of which 2,038 (52 %) attended. A standardized antero-posterior radiograph was assessed. The normative references are presented as mean {+-} standard deviation (SD) and 2.5-97.5 percentiles with 95 % confidence intervals. A total of 2,011 (841 males, 1,170 females, mean age 18.6 (SD 0.6)) radiographs were analyzed. Sharp's angle was 38.8 {+-} 3.5 in males and 40.7 {+-} 3.5 in females, with 97.5 percentiles of 46 and 47 , respectively. The CE angle was 32.1 {+-} 6.1 in males and 31.0 {+-} 6.1 in females, with 2.5 percentiles of 21 and 20 , respectively. The FHEI was 86.0 % {+-} 6.3 % in males and 85.6 % {+-} 6.6 % in females, with 2.5 percentiles of 74 and 73 , respectively. Updated gender-specific reference ranges for radiographic measurements commonly used for hip dysplasia at skeletal maturity are reported, similar to or slightly wider than those described in the literature. Statistically significant gender differences have been confirmed for most of the measurements. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding: Perspectives from the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Claudio; Oliva, Salvatore; Martellossi, Stefano; Miele, Erasmo; Arrigo, Serena; Graziani, Maria Giovanna; Cardile, Sabrina; Gaiani, Federica; de’Angelis, Gian Luigi; Torroni, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    There are many causes of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in children, and this condition is not rare, having a reported incidence of 6.4%. Causes vary with age, but show considerable overlap; moreover, while many of the causes in the pediatric population are similar to those in adults, some lesions are unique to children. The diagnostic approach for pediatric GIB includes definition of the etiology, localization of the bleeding site and determination of the severity of bleeding; timely and accurate diagnosis is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with GIB, the “Gastro-Ped Bleed Team” of the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SIGENP) carried out a systematic search on MEDLINE via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) to identify all articles published in English from January 1990 to 2016; the following key words were used to conduct the electronic search: “upper GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “lower GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “obscure GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “GIB” and “endoscopy” [all fields]; “GIB” and “therapy” [all fields]. The identified publications included articles describing randomized controlled trials, reviews, case reports, cohort studies, case-control studies and observational studies. References from the pertinent articles were also reviewed. This paper expresses a position statement of SIGENP that can have an immediate impact on clinical practice and for which sufficient evidence is not available in literature. The experts participating in this effort were selected according to their expertise and professional qualifications. PMID:28293079

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of pediatric onset isolated dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Giovanna; Carecchio, Miryam; Zibordi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Nardocci, Nardo

    2018-03-01

    Isolated dystonia refers to a genetic heterogeneous group of progressive conditions with onset of symptoms during childhood or adolescence, progressive course with frequent generalization and marked functional impairment. There are well-known monogenic forms of isolated dystonia with pediatric onset such as DYT1 and DYT6 transmitted with autosomal dominant inheritance and low penetrance. Genetic findings of the past years have widened the etiological spectrum and the phenotype. The recently discovered genes (GNAL, ANO-3, KTM2B) or variant of already known diseases, such as Ataxia-Teleangectasia, are emerging as another causes of pediatric onset dystonia, sometimes with a more complex phenotype, but their incidence is unknown and still a considerable number of cases remains genetically undetermined. Due to the severe disability of pediatric onset dystonia treatment remains unsatisfactory and still mainly based upon oral pharmacological agents. However, deep brain stimulation is now extensively applied with good to excellent results especially when patients are treated early during the course of the disease. Copyright © 2018 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Establishment of reference intervals of clinical chemistry analytes for the adult population in Saudi Arabia: a study conducted as a part of the IFCC global study on reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borai, Anwar; Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Al Masaud, Abdulaziz; Tamimi, Waleed; Bahijri, Suhad; Armbuster, David; Bawazeer, Ali; Nawajha, Mustafa; Otaibi, Nawaf; Khalil, Haitham; Kawano, Reo; Kaddam, Ibrahim; Abdelaal, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    This study is a part of the IFCC-global study to derive reference intervals (RIs) for 28 chemistry analytes in Saudis. Healthy individuals (n=826) aged ≥18 years were recruited using the global study protocol. All specimens were measured using an Architect analyzer. RIs were derived by both parametric and non-parametric methods for comparative purpose. The need for secondary exclusion of reference values based on latent abnormal values exclusion (LAVE) method was examined. The magnitude of variation attributable to gender, ages and regions was calculated by the standard deviation ratio (SDR). Sources of variations: age, BMI, physical exercise and smoking levels were investigated by using the multiple regression analysis. SDRs for gender, age and regional differences were significant for 14, 8 and 2 analytes, respectively. BMI-related changes in test results were noted conspicuously for CRP. For some metabolic related parameters the ranges of RIs by non-parametric method were wider than by the parametric method and RIs derived using the LAVE method were significantly different than those without it. RIs were derived with and without gender partition (BMI, drugs and supplements were considered). RIs applicable to Saudis were established for the majority of chemistry analytes, whereas gender, regional and age RI partitioning was required for some analytes. The elevated upper limits of metabolic analytes reflects the existence of high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Saudi population.

  10. Clinical pathology reference intervals for an in-water population of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in Core Sound, North Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Terra R; McNeill, Joanne Braun; Avens, Larisa; Hall, April Goodman; Goshe, Lisa R; Hohn, Aleta A; Godfrey, Matthew H; Mihnovets, A Nicole; Cluse, Wendy M; Harms, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) is found throughout the waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It is a protected species throughout much of its range due to threats such as habitat loss, fisheries interactions, hatchling predation, and marine debris. Loggerheads that occur in the southeastern U.S. are listed as "threatened" on the U.S. Endangered Species List, and receive state and federal protection. As part of an on-going population assessment conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, samples were collected from juvenile loggerhead sea turtles in Core Sound, North Carolina, between 2004 and 2007 to gain insight on the baseline health of the threatened Northwest Atlantic Ocean population. The aims of the current study were to establish hematologic and biochemical reference intervals for this population, and to assess variation of the hematologic and plasma biochemical analytes by season, water temperature, and sex and size of the turtles. Reference intervals for the clinical pathology parameters were estimated following Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Season, water temperature, sex, and size of the turtles were found to be significant factors of variation for parameter values. Seasonal variation could be attributed to physiological effects of decreasing photoperiod, cooler water temperature, and migration during the fall months. Packed cell volume, total protein, and albumin increased with increasing size of the turtles. The size-related differences in analytes documented in the present study are consistent with other reports of variation in clinical pathology parameters by size and age in sea turtles. As a component of a health assessment of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles in North Carolina, this study will serve as a baseline aiding in evaluation of trends for this population and as a diagnostic tool for assessing the health and prognosis for loggerhead sea turtles undergoing rehabilitation.

  11. Clinical pathology reference intervals for an in-water population of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in Core Sound, North Carolina, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terra R Kelly

    Full Text Available The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta is found throughout the waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It is a protected species throughout much of its range due to threats such as habitat loss, fisheries interactions, hatchling predation, and marine debris. Loggerheads that occur in the southeastern U.S. are listed as "threatened" on the U.S. Endangered Species List, and receive state and federal protection. As part of an on-going population assessment conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, samples were collected from juvenile loggerhead sea turtles in Core Sound, North Carolina, between 2004 and 2007 to gain insight on the baseline health of the threatened Northwest Atlantic Ocean population. The aims of the current study were to establish hematologic and biochemical reference intervals for this population, and to assess variation of the hematologic and plasma biochemical analytes by season, water temperature, and sex and size of the turtles. Reference intervals for the clinical pathology parameters were estimated following Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Season, water temperature, sex, and size of the turtles were found to be significant factors of variation for parameter values. Seasonal variation could be attributed to physiological effects of decreasing photoperiod, cooler water temperature, and migration during the fall months. Packed cell volume, total protein, and albumin increased with increasing size of the turtles. The size-related differences in analytes documented in the present study are consistent with other reports of variation in clinical pathology parameters by size and age in sea turtles. As a component of a health assessment of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles in North Carolina, this study will serve as a baseline aiding in evaluation of trends for this population and as a diagnostic tool for assessing the health and prognosis for loggerhead sea turtles undergoing

  12. Maternal Residential Proximity to Major Roadways and Pediatric Embryonal Tumors in Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetha V. Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The environmental determinants of pediatric embryonal tumors remain unclear. Because of the growing concern over the impact of exposures to traffic-related air pollution on pediatric cancer, we conducted a population-based study evaluating the impact of maternal residential proximity to major roadways on the risk of pediatric embryonal tumors in offspring. We identified children diagnosed with neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, retinoblastoma, or hepatoblastoma at <5 years of age from the Texas Cancer Registry and selected unaffected controls from birth certificates. Two residential proximity measures were used: (1 distance to the nearest major roadway, and (2 within 500 m of a major roadway. Logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (aOR and 95% confidence interval (CI for each proximity measure on pediatric embryonal tumors. The odds of an embryonal tumor were increased in children born to mothers living within 500 m of a major roadway (aOR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.54. This was consistent for most tumor subtypes, with the strongest associations observed for unilateral retinoblastoma (aOR = 2.57, 95% CI: 1.28, 5.15, for every kilometer closer the mother lived to the nearest major roadway. These findings contribute to the growing evidence that traffic-related air pollution may increase risk for certain pediatric tumors.

  13. Resampling Approach for Determination of the Method for Reference Interval Calculation in Clinical Laboratory Practice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Igor Y.; Wilson, Andrew R.; Delgado, Julio C.

    2010-01-01

    Reference intervals (RI) play a key role in clinical interpretation of laboratory test results. Numerous articles are devoted to analyzing and discussing various methods of RI determination. The two most widely used approaches are the parametric method, which assumes data normality, and a nonparametric, rank-based procedure. The decision about which method to use is usually made arbitrarily. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that using a resampling approach for the comparison of RI determination techniques could help researchers select the right procedure. Three methods of RI calculation—parametric, transformed parametric, and quantile-based bootstrapping—were applied to multiple random samples drawn from 81 values of complement factor B observations and from a computer-simulated normally distributed population. It was shown that differences in RI between legitimate methods could be up to 20% and even more. The transformed parametric method was found to be the best method for the calculation of RI of non-normally distributed factor B estimations, producing an unbiased RI and the lowest confidence limits and interquartile ranges. For a simulated Gaussian population, parametric calculations, as expected, were the best; quantile-based bootstrapping produced biased results at low sample sizes, and the transformed parametric method generated heavily biased RI. The resampling approach could help compare different RI calculation methods. An algorithm showing a resampling procedure for choosing the appropriate method for RI calculations is included. PMID:20554803

  14. Impact of Music in Reducing Patient Anxiety During Pediatric Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselman, Andrew; Bergen, Michael; Stefanov, Dimitre; Goldfisher, Rachelle; Amodio, John

    2016-03-31

    The use of noninvasive ultrasound examinations can potentially result in significant anxiety in the pediatric population. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of music during pediatric ultrasound examinations to reduce anxiety measured by heart rate. A total of 44 patients were recruited; 21 controls and 23 experimental. Each participant was randomized to either music or no music (control) after parental consent was obtained. Pulse oximeters were used to monitor heart rate at 15 second intervals for a total of 1 minute, with mean values calculated prior to entering the procedure room, during the middle of the procedure, and after the procedure was completed. The total scan time was determined from the initial image acquisition until the last image recorded by the ultrasound technologist. At the completion of each procedure, the ultrasound technologist scored the ease of performance for the scan on a subjective scale of 1-10 based on prior experience. When utilizing music during pediatric ultrasounds examinations, our study demonstrated significantly decreased heart rate variability from pre-procedural to post-procedural periods. There was no statistical significant difference in total scan time or ultrasound technologist scoring between the two groups. This study demonstrates that music is an inexpensive and effective means of reducing anxiety during pediatric ultrasound as indicated by heart rate.

  15. Impact of music in reducing patient anxiety during pediatric ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Kesselman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of noninvasive ultrasound examinations can potentially result in significant anxiety in the pediatric population. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of music during pediatric ultrasound examinations to reduce anxiety measured by heart rate. A total of 44 patients were recruited; 21 controls and 23 experimental. Each participant was randomized to either music or no music (control after parental consent was obtained. Pulse oximeters were used to monitor heart rate at 15 second intervals for a total of 1 minute, with mean values calculated prior to entering the procedure room, during the middle of the procedure, and after the procedure was completed. The total scan time was determined from the initial image acquisition until the last image recorded by the ultrasound technologist. At the completion of each procedure, the ultrasound technologist scored the ease of performance for the scan on a subjective scale of 1-10 based on prior experience. When utilizing music during pediatric ultrasounds examinations, our study demonstrated significantly decreased heart rate variability from pre-procedural to post-procedural periods. There was no statistical significant difference in total scan time or ultrasound technologist scoring between the two groups. This study demonstrates that music is an inexpensive and effective means of reducing anxiety during pediatric ultrasound as indicated by heart rate.

  16. Reference Values for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory and the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale in Adolescent Athletes by Sport and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder Valier, Alison R; Welch Bacon, Cailee E; Bay, R Curtis; Molzen, Eileen; Lam, Kenneth C; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2017-10-01

    Effective use of patient-rated outcome measures to facilitate optimal patient care requires an understanding of the reference values of these measures within the population of interest. Little is known about reference values for commonly used patient-rated outcome measures in adolescent athletes. To determine reference values for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) and the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (MFS) in adolescent athletes by sport and sex. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A convenience sample of interscholastic adolescent athletes from 9 sports was used. Participants completed the PedsQL and MFS during one testing session at the start of their sport season. Data were stratified by sport and sex. Dependent variables included the total PedsQL score and the 5 PedsQL subscale scores: physical functioning, psychosocial functioning, emotional functioning, social functioning, and school functioning. Dependent variables for the MFS included 3 subscale scores: general functioning, sleep functioning, and cognitive functioning. Summary statistics were reported for total and subscale scores by sport and sex. Among 3574 males and 1329 female adolescent athletes, the PedsQL scores (100 possible points) generally indicated high levels of health regardless of sport played. Mean PedsQL total and subscales scores ranged from 82.6 to 95.7 for males and 83.9 to 95.2 for females. Mean MFS subscale scores (100 possible points) ranged from 74.2 to 90.9 for males and 72.8 to 87.4 for females. Healthy male and female adolescent athletes reported relatively high levels of health on the PedsQL subscales and total scores regardless of sport; no mean scores were lower than 82.6 points for males or 83.9 points for females. On the MFS, males and females tended to report low effect of general and cognitive fatigue regardless of sport; mean scores were higher than 83.5 points for males and 83.8 points for females. Clinically, athletes who score below the

  17. Identification of children who may benefit from self-hypnosis at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ran D; Geisler, Susan C

    2005-01-01

    Background Emotional difficulties can trigger respiratory symptoms. Thus, children presenting with respiratory complaints may benefit from a psychological intervention. The purpose of this study was to define the proportion of patients referred to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center who may benefit from instruction in self-hypnosis, as a psychological intervention. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all newly referred patients to the SUNY Upstate Medical University Pediatric Pulmonary Center during an 18 month period beginning January 1, 2000. Patients were offered hypnosis if they presented with symptoms or signs suggestive of psychological difficulties. Hypnosis was taught in one or two 15–45 minute sessions by a pediatric pulmonologist. Results Of 725 new referrals, 424 were 0–5 years old, 193 were 6–11 years old, and 108 were 12–18 years old. Diagnoses of anxiety, habit cough, or vocal cord dysfunction accounted for 1% of the 0–5 year olds, 20% of the 6–11 year olds, and 31% of the 12–18 year olds. Hypnotherapy was offered to 1% of 0–5 year olds, 36% of 6–11 year olds, and 55% of 12–18 year olds. Of 81 patients who received instruction in self-hypnosis for anxiety, cough, chest pain, dyspnea, or inspiratory difficulties, 75% returned for follow-up, and among the returning patients 95% reported improvement or resolution of their symptoms. Conclusion A large number of patients referred to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center appeared to benefit from instruction in self-hypnosis, which can be taught easily as a psychological intervention. PMID:15850484

  18. Identification of children who may benefit from self-hypnosis at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisler Susan C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emotional difficulties can trigger respiratory symptoms. Thus, children presenting with respiratory complaints may benefit from a psychological intervention. The purpose of this study was to define the proportion of patients referred to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center who may benefit from instruction in self-hypnosis, as a psychological intervention. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all newly referred patients to the SUNY Upstate Medical University Pediatric Pulmonary Center during an 18 month period beginning January 1, 2000. Patients were offered hypnosis if they presented with symptoms or signs suggestive of psychological difficulties. Hypnosis was taught in one or two 15–45 minute sessions by a pediatric pulmonologist. Results Of 725 new referrals, 424 were 0–5 years old, 193 were 6–11 years old, and 108 were 12–18 years old. Diagnoses of anxiety, habit cough, or vocal cord dysfunction accounted for 1% of the 0–5 year olds, 20% of the 6–11 year olds, and 31% of the 12–18 year olds. Hypnotherapy was offered to 1% of 0–5 year olds, 36% of 6–11 year olds, and 55% of 12–18 year olds. Of 81 patients who received instruction in self-hypnosis for anxiety, cough, chest pain, dyspnea, or inspiratory difficulties, 75% returned for follow-up, and among the returning patients 95% reported improvement or resolution of their symptoms. Conclusion A large number of patients referred to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center appeared to benefit from instruction in self-hypnosis, which can be taught easily as a psychological intervention.

  19. What Determines the Response: Test or Reference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukova, S. V.; Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The stability of sensory memory has been studied by presenting a reference stimulus, a delay, and a test stimulus. As has been pointed out by Lages and Treisman (1998 Vision Research 38 557-572), the usual measure of performance depends only on the effect of test variations on the responses. The Weber fraction characterizing performance is more properly called the test stimulus Weber fraction. We measure the relative contribution of the test and reference to the response by the ratio of the test Weber fraction to the reference Weber fraction. The stimuli were two dark lines on a bright background. Seven reference separations, varying from 9.5 to 16.7 arc min, were intermixed in each run. Interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 50, 200 and 2000 msec and intertrial intervals (ITI) of 500 and 2500 msec were investigated. When the ISI was short (50 or 200 msec), for both ITIs, responses were determined equally by the test and reference. For the long ISI (2000 msec), the reference stimulus contributed less. However, only for the 500 msec ITI (and not for all observers) was the contribution of the reference stimulus negligible, as Treisman's criterion setting theory might suggest.

  20. Interval selection with machine-dependent intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Bohmova K.; Disser Y.; Mihalak M.; Widmayer P.

    2013-01-01

    We study an offline interval scheduling problem where every job has exactly one associated interval on every machine. To schedule a set of jobs, exactly one of the intervals associated with each job must be selected, and the intervals selected on the same machine must not intersect.We show that deciding whether all jobs can be scheduled is NP-complete already in various simple cases. In particular, by showing the NP-completeness for the case when all the intervals associated with the same job...

  1. Unicystic plexiform ameloblastoma: An insight for pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavagal C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas have been categorized broadly into three biologic variants: cystic (unicystic, solid, and peripheral. The term plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma refers to a pattern of epithelial proliferation that has been described in cystic lesions of the jaws. Although the histology suggests that cystic ameloblastomas follow a biologically low-grade course, recent evidence suggests that they may often behave clinically as biologically aggressive tumors. This is supported by the high incidence of cortical perforation, tooth resorption, lesion size, bony destruction, and a high rate of recurrence after simple enucleation. This article tries to provide an insight for pediatric dentists regarding this biologically distinct entity. A literature review on the topic has been added along with a case report highlighting the state-of-the-art approach and management of such ameloblastomas, in pediatric patients.

  2. Pediatric Academic Productivity: Pediatric Benchmarks for the h- and g-Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudy, Megan M; Rowe, Tashi L; Dover, George J; Cheng, Tina L

    2016-02-01

    To describe h- and g-indices benchmarks in pediatric subspecialties and general academic pediatrics. Academic productivity is measured increasingly through bibliometrics that derive a statistical enumeration of academic output and impact. The h- and g-indices incorporate the number of publications and citations. Benchmarks for pediatrics have not been reported. Thirty programs were selected randomly from pediatric residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The h- and g-indices of department chairs were calculated. For general academic pediatrics, pediatric gastroenterology, and pediatric nephrology, a random sample of 30 programs with fellowships were selected. Within each program, an MD faculty member from each academic rank was selected randomly. Google Scholar via Harzing's Publish or Perish was used to calculate the h-index, g-index, and total manuscripts. Only peer-reviewed and English language publications were included. For Chairs, calculations from Google Scholar were compared with Scopus. For all specialties, the mean h- and g-indices significantly increased with academic rank (all P calculation using different bibliographic databases only differed by ±1. Mean h-indices increased with academic rank and were not significantly different across the pediatric specialties. Benchmarks for h- and g-indices in pediatrics are provided and may be one measure of academic productivity and impact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Clarissa Barbon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Pediatric portal hypertension management is a team approach between the patient, the patient's family, the primary caregiver, and specialty providers. Evidence-based practice guidelines have not been established in pediatrics. This article serves as a review for the primary care NP in the management of pediatric portal hypertension, discussing the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of pediatric portal hypertension, diagnostic tests, and treatment and management options. PMID:28406835

  4. Accuracy of a pediatric early warning score in the recognition of clinical deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Juliana de Oliveira Freitas; Camargo, Climene Laura de; Nascimento, Carlito Lopes; Portela, Daniel Sales; Monaghan, Alan

    2017-07-10

    to evaluate the accuracy of the version of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score translated and adapted for the Brazilian context, in the recognition of clinical deterioration. a diagnostic test study to measure the accuracy of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, in relation to a reference standard. The sample consisted of 271 children, aged 0 to 10 years, blindly evaluated by a nurse and a physician, specialists in pediatrics, with interval of 5 to 10 minutes between the evaluations, for the application of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context and of the reference standard. The data were processed and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and VassarStats.net programs. The performance of the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context was evaluated through the indicators of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, area under the ROC curve, likelihood ratios and post-test probability. the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context showed sensitivity of 73.9%, specificity of 95.5%, positive predictive value of 73.3%, negative predictive value of 94.7%, area under Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve of 91.9% and the positive post-test probability was 80%. the Brighton Pediatric Early Warning Score for the Brazilian context, presented good performance, considered valid for the recognition of clinical deterioration warning signs of the children studied. avaliar a acurácia da versão traduzida e adaptada do Brighton Paediatric Early Warning Score para o contexto brasileiro, no reconhecimento da deterioração clínica. estudo de teste diagnóstico para medir a acurácia do Brighton Paediatric Early Warning Score, para o contexto brasileiro, em relação a um padrão de referência. A amostra foi composta por 271 crianças de 0 a 10 anos, avaliadas de forma cega por uma enfermeira e um médico, especialistas em pediatria, com

  5. Reference values of thirty-one frequently used laboratory markers for 75-year-old males and females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryden, Ingvar; Lind, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background We have previously reported reference values for common clinical chemistry tests in healthy 70-year-old males and females. We have now repeated this study 5 years later to establish reference values also at the age of 75. It is important to have adequate reference values for elderly patients as biological markers may change over time, and adequate reference values are essential for correct clinical decisions. Methods We have investigated 31 frequently used laboratory markers in 75-year-old males (n = 354) and females (n = 373) without diabetes. The 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles for these markers were calculated according to the recommendations of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry. Results Reference values are reported for 75-year-old males and females for 31 frequently used laboratory markers. Conclusion There were minor differences between reference intervals calculated with and without individuals with cardiovascular diseases. Several of the reference intervals differed from Scandinavian reference intervals based on younger individuals (Nordic Reference Interval Project). PMID:22300333

  6. Cardiac Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Pediatric Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Hother, Anne-Louise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. OBJECTIVE: To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances...... and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet...... groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (pMalnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide...

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected. - Highlights: • Pediatric radiation dose has been evaluated for three of the most common fluoroscopic procedures. • Radiation doses were measured using calibrated TLD GR200A. • Pediatric patients of concern and ESAK doses showed large variations. • The patient doses in this study are within the reported studies suggesting that the pediatric patients are adequately protected

  8. An emerging etiological factor for hand injuries in the pediatric population: public exercise equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akşam, Berrak; Akşam, Ersin; Ceran, Candemir; Demirseren, Mustafa Erol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the role of public exercise equipment in pediatric hand traumas as a preventable etiological factor. Pediatric patients with hand injuries referred from the emergency department were evaluated retrospectively. Age and gender of the patients, timing, etiology, mechanism of hand trauma, localization of the injury, diagnoses of the patients, and hospitalization rates were reviewed. Amongst the 310 pediatric patients evaluated, 31 patients (10%) experienced injury related to public exercise equipment. Within this group of patients, most were between 5 to 9 years of age, and all injuries were blunt and crush type. Lacerations and fractures were the main diagnoses. Complex injuries that required inpatient care were reported in 19.3% of the patients. Public exercise equipment-related injuries are increasingly prevalent in pediatric hand traumas. Preventive actions such as shielding the moving parts should be taken to reduce these rates.

  9. QT interval prolongation in users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in an elderly surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Haelst, Ingrid M M; van Klei, Wilton A; Doodeman, Hieronymus J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and the occurrence of QT interval prolongation in an elderly surgical population. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients (> 60 years) scheduled for outpatient...... preanesthesia evaluation in the period 2007 until 2012. The index group included elderly users of an SSRI. The reference group of nonusers of antidepressants was matched to the index group on sex and year of scheduled surgery (ratio, 1:1). The primary outcome was the occurrence of QT interval prolongation shown...... on electrocardiogram. The QT interval was corrected for heart rate (QTc interval). The secondary outcome was the duration of the QTc interval. The outcomes were adjusted for confounding by using regression techniques. RESULTS: The index and reference groups included 397 users of an SSRI and 397 nonusers, respectively...

  10. Cardiovascular comorbidities of pediatric psoriasis among hospitalized children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwa, Lauren; Kwa, Michael C; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease in adults. Little is known about cardiovascular risk in pediatric psoriasis. To determine if there is an association between pediatric psoriasis and cardiovascular comorbidities. Data were analyzed from the 2002-2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, which included 4,884,448 hospitalized children aged 0-17 years. Bivariate and multivariate survey logistic regression models were created to calculate the odds of psoriasis on cardiovascular comorbidities. In multivariate survey logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity, pediatric psoriasis was significantly associated with 5 of 10 cardiovascular comorbidities (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]), including obesity (3.15 [2.46-4.05]), hypertension (2.63 [1.93-3.59]), diabetes (2.90 [1.90-4.42]), arrhythmia (1.39 [1.02-1.88]), and valvular heart disease (1.90 [1.07-3.37]). The highest odds of cardiovascular risk factors occurred in blacks and Hispanics and children ages 0-9 years, but there were no sex differences. The study was limited to hospitalized children. We were unable to assess the impact of psoriasis treatment or family history on cardiovascular risk. Pediatric psoriasis is associated with higher odds of multiple cardiovascular comorbidities among hospitalized patients. Strategies for mitigating excess cardiovascular risk in pediatric psoriasis need to be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of hand-held echocardiography in outpatient pediatric cardiology management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Alan; Sable, Craig; Prasad, Aparna; Spurney, Christopher; Harahsheh, Ashraf; Clauss, Sarah; Colyer, Jessica; Gierdalski, Marcin; Johnson, Ashley; Pearson, Gail D; Rosenthal, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Adult patient series have shown hand-held echocardiography (echo) units (HHE) to be accurate for rapid diagnosis and triage. This is the first study to evaluate the ability of HHE to inform decision making in outpatient pediatric cardiology. New pediatric cardiology patients in outpatient clinics staffed by six pediatric cardiologists (experience 1-17 years) were prospectively enrolled if an echocardiogram (echo) was ordered during their initial visit. After history and physical examination and before a standard echo, the cardiologists performed a bedside HHE examination (GE Vscan 1.7-3.8 MHz), documented findings, and made a clinical decision. Diagnoses and decisions based on HHE were compared with final management after the standard echo. The study enrolled 101 subjects (ages 9 days to 19 years). The cardiologists considered HHE imaging adequate for decision making for 80 of the 101 subjects. For 77 of the 80 subjects with acceptable HHE imaging (68/68 normal and 9/12 abnormal standard echoes), the HHE-based primary diagnoses and decisions agreed with the final management. The sensitivity of HHE was 75 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 43-94 %) and the positive predictive value 100 % (95 % CI 66-100 %) for pediatric heart disease. The agreement between standard echocardiography and HHE imaging was substantial (κ = 0.82). Excluding one of the least experienced cardiologists, HHE provided the basis for correct cardiac diagnoses and management for all the subjects with acceptable HHE imaging (58/58 normal and 9/9 abnormal echoes). In outpatient pediatric cardiology, HHE has potential as a tool to complement physical examination. Further investigation is needed to evaluate how value improves with clinical experience.

  12. Creating a pediatric digital library for pediatric health care providers and families: using literature and data to define common pediatric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Donna; Kingsley, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to complete a literature-based needs assessment with regard to common pediatric problems encountered by pediatric health care providers (PHCPs) and families, and to develop a problem-based pediatric digital library to meet those needs. The needs assessment yielded 65 information sources. Common problems were identified and categorized, and the Internet was manually searched for authoritative Web sites. The created pediatric digital library (www.generalpediatrics.com) used a problem-based interface and was deployed in November 1999. From November 1999 to November 2000, the number of hyperlinks and authoritative Web sites increased 51.1 and 32.2 percent, respectively. Over the same time, visitors increased by 57.3 percent and overall usage increased by 255 percent. A pediatric digital library has been created that begins to bring order to general pediatric resources on the Internet. This pediatric digital library provides current, authoritative, easily accessed pediatric information whenever and wherever the PHCPs and families want assistance.

  13. Interpregnancy interval and risk of autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnes, Nina; Surén, Pål; Bresnahan, Michaeline; Hornig, Mady; Lie, Kari Kveim; Lipkin, W Ian; Magnus, Per; Nilsen, Roy Miodini; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Schjølberg, Synnve; Susser, Ezra Saul; Øyen, Anne-Siri; Stoltenberg, Camilla

    2013-11-01

    A recent California study reported increased risk of autistic disorder in children conceived within a year after the birth of a sibling. We assessed the association between interpregnancy interval and risk of autistic disorder using nationwide registry data on pairs of singleton full siblings born in Norway. We defined interpregnancy interval as the time from birth of the first-born child to conception of the second-born child in a sibship. The outcome of interest was autistic disorder in the second-born child. Analyses were restricted to sibships in which the second-born child was born in 1990-2004. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by fitting ordinary logistic models and logistic generalized additive models. The study sample included 223,476 singleton full-sibling pairs. In sibships with interpregnancy intervals autistic disorder, compared with 0.13% in the reference category (≥ 36 months). For interpregnancy intervals shorter than 9 months, the adjusted OR of autistic disorder in the second-born child was 2.18 (95% confidence interval 1.42-3.26). The risk of autistic disorder in the second-born child was also increased for interpregnancy intervals of 9-11 months in the adjusted analysis (OR = 1.71 [95% CI = 1.07-2.64]). Consistent with a previous report from California, interpregnancy intervals shorter than 1 year were associated with increased risk of autistic disorder in the second-born child. A possible explanation is depletion of micronutrients in mothers with closely spaced pregnancies.

  14. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L C; Vano, E; Gutierrez, F; Rodriguez, C; Gilarranz, R; Manzanas, M J

    2007-01-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for 2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers

  15. The codesign of an interdisciplinary team-based intervention regarding initiating palliative care in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Douglas L; Walter, Jennifer K; Casas, Jessica A; DiDomenico, Concetta; Szymczak, Julia E; Feudtner, Chris

    2018-04-07

    Children with advanced cancer are often not referred to palliative or hospice care before they die or are only referred close to the child's death. The goals of the current project were to learn about pediatric oncology team members' perspectives on palliative care, to collaborate with team members to modify and tailor three separate interdisciplinary team-based interventions regarding initiating palliative care, and to assess the feasibility of this collaborative approach. We used a modified version of experience-based codesign (EBCD) involving members of the pediatric palliative care team and three interdisciplinary pediatric oncology teams (Bone Marrow Transplant, Neuro-Oncology, and Solid Tumor) to review and tailor materials for three team-based interventions. Eleven pediatric oncology team members participated in four codesign sessions to discuss their experiences with initiating palliative care and to review the proposed intervention including patient case studies, techniques for managing uncertainty and negative emotions, role ambiguity, system-level barriers, and team communication and collaboration. The codesign process showed that the participants were strong supporters of palliative care, members of different teams had preferences for different materials that would be appropriate for their teams, and that while participants reported frustration with timing of palliative care, they had difficulty suggesting how to change current practices. The current project demonstrated the feasibility of collaborating with pediatric oncology clinicians to develop interventions about introducing palliative care. The procedures and results of this project will be posted online so that other institutions can use them as a model for developing similar interventions appropriate for their needs.

  16. Clinical negligence claims in pediatric surgery in England: pattern and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyoka, Mandela

    2015-02-01

    We hypothesized that there has been an increase in the number of successful litigation claims in pediatric surgery in England. Our aim was to report the incidence, causes, and costs of clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service (NHS) in relation to pediatric surgery. We queried the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) on litigation claims among children undergoing pediatric surgery in England (2004-2012). We decided a priori to only examine closed cases (decision and payment made). Data included year of claim, year of payment of claim, payment per claim, paid-to-closed ratio, and severity of outcome of clinical incident. Out of 112 clinical negligence claims in pediatric surgery, 93 (83%) were finalized-73 (65%) were settled and damages paid to the claimant and 20 (18%) were closed with no payment, and 19 (17%) remain open. The median payment was £13,537 (600-500,000) and median total cost borne by NHSLA was £31,445 (600-730,202). Claims were lodged at a median interval of 2 (0-13) years from time of occurrence with 55 (75%) cases being settled within the 3 years of being received. The commonest reasons for claims were postoperative complications (n=20, 28%), delayed treatment (n=16, 22%), and/or diagnosis (n=14, 19%). Out of 73, 17 (23%) closed claims resulted in case fatality. Conclusion: Two-thirds of all claims in pediatric surgery resulted in payment to claimant, and the commonest reasons for claims were postoperative complications, delayed treatment, and/or diagnosis. Nearly a quarter of successful claims were in cases where negligence resulted in case fatality. Pediatric surgeons should be aware of common diagnostic and treatment shortfalls as high-risk areas of increased susceptibility to clinical negligence claims. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. 78 FR 48438 - Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...] Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... of Subcommittee: Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee. General Function... pediatric ethical issues. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on September 9, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 5:30...

  18. Myocarditis - pediatric

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007307.htm Myocarditis - pediatric To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in ...

  19. Influences upon pediatricians’ willingness to refer patients to clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Dalen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeanne Dalen1, Robert D Annett2, Janet L Brody1, Mandy L Perryman31Center for Family and Adolescent Research, Oregon Research Institute, Portland, OR, USA; 2University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA; 3School of Education and Human Development, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, UA, USAPurpose: The purpose of this brief report is to determine factors that influence the willingness of pediatricians to refer their patients to clinical research and to explore the relationship between pediatrician characteristics and self-reported number of patients referred to clinical research.Method: Forty-three pediatricians from an academic pediatrics department of a university children’s hospital in Albuquerque, New Mexico rated how influential 10 reasons would be in their decision to refer a patient to pediatric clinical research.Results: Differences among the influences for pediatrician referral to research were observed. The most influential consideration for referral was the scientific merit of the study, followed by patient benefit. Contextual factors and physician compensation were identified as the least important reasons pediatricians refer patients to research. Analyses also revealed significant relationships between referrals made and percentage of time spent in research activities.Conclusions: Pediatricians may be more likely to refer their patients to clinical research studies when they believe the purpose of the study is meaningful to patients as well as to future patient populations. In addition, characteristics of the individual pediatricians may play an important role in actual referral behavior.Keywords: recruitment, clinical research, adolescent research, pediatrician attitudes

  20. Perceived barriers to pediatrician and family practitioner participation in pediatric clinical trials: Findings from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel G. Greenberg

    2018-03-01

    Of the 136 providers surveyed, 52/136 (38% had previously referred a pediatric patient to a trial, and only 17/136 (12% had ever been an investigator for a pediatric trial. Lack of awareness of existing pediatric trials was a major barrier to patient referral by providers, in addition to consideration of trial risks, distance to the site, and time needed to discuss trial participation with parents. Overall, providers perceived greater challenges related to parental concerns and parent or child logistical barriers than study implementation and ethics or regulatory barriers as barriers to their practice serving as a trial site. Providers who had previously been an investigator for a pediatric trial were less likely to be concerned with potential barriers than non-investigators. Understanding the barriers that limit pediatric providers from collaboration or inhibit their participation is key to designing effective interventions to optimize pediatric trial participation.

  1. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jimmy C; Bansal, Manish; Behera, Sarina K; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cardis, Brian; Hokanson, John S; Kakavand, Bahram; Jedeikin, Roy

    2017-12-01

    As part of the American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section effort to develop quality metrics (QMs) for ambulatory pediatric practice, the chest pain subcommittee aimed to develop QMs for evaluation of chest pain. A group of 8 pediatric cardiologists formulated candidate QMs in the areas of history, physical examination, and testing. Consensus candidate QMs were submitted to an expert panel for scoring by the RAND-UCLA modified Delphi process. Recommended QMs were then available for open comments from all members. These QMs are intended for use in patients 5-18 years old, referred for initial evaluation of chest pain in an ambulatory pediatric cardiology clinic, with no known history of pediatric or congenital heart disease. A total of 10 candidate QMs were submitted; 2 were rejected by the expert panel, and 5 were removed after the open comment period. The 3 approved QMs included: (1) documentation of family history of cardiomyopathy, early coronary artery disease or sudden death, (2) performance of electrocardiogram in all patients, and (3) performance of an echocardiogram to evaluate coronary arteries in patients with exertional chest pain. Despite practice variation and limited prospective data, 3 QMs were approved, with measurable data points which may be extracted from the medical record. However, further prospective studies are necessary to define practice guidelines and to develop appropriate use criteria in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Transmission line sag calculations using interval mathematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaalan, H. [Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Washington, DC (United States)]|[US Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, NY (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Electric utilities are facing the need for additional generating capacity, new transmission systems and more efficient use of existing resources. As such, there are several uncertainties associated with utility decisions. These uncertainties include future load growth, construction times and costs, and performance of new resources. Regulatory and economic environments also present uncertainties. Uncertainty can be modeled based on a probabilistic approach where probability distributions for all of the uncertainties are assumed. Another approach to modeling uncertainty is referred to as unknown but bounded. In this approach, the upper and lower bounds on the uncertainties are assumed without probability distributions. Interval mathematics is a tool for the practical use and extension of the unknown but bounded concept. In this study, the calculation of transmission line sag was used as an example to demonstrate the use of interval mathematics. The objective was to determine the change in cable length, based on a fixed span and an interval of cable sag values for a range of temperatures. The resulting change in cable length was an interval corresponding to the interval of cable sag values. It was shown that there is a small change in conductor length due to variation in sag based on the temperature ranges used in this study. 8 refs.

  3. PedAM: a database for Pediatric Disease Annotation and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jinmeng; An, Zhongxin; Ming, Yue; Guo, Yongli; Li, Wei; Li, Xin; Liang, Yunxiang; Guo, Dongming; Tai, Jun; Chen, Geng; Jin, Yaqiong; Liu, Zhimei; Ni, Xin; Shi, Tieliu

    2018-01-04

    There is a significant number of children around the world suffering from the consequence of the misdiagnosis and ineffective treatment for various diseases. To facilitate the precision medicine in pediatrics, a database namely the Pediatric Disease Annotations & Medicines (PedAM) has been built to standardize and classify pediatric diseases. The PedAM integrates both biomedical resources and clinical data from Electronic Medical Records to support the development of computational tools, by which enables robust data analysis and integration. It also uses disease-manifestation (D-M) integrated from existing biomedical ontologies as prior knowledge to automatically recognize text-mined, D-M-specific syntactic patterns from 774 514 full-text articles and 8 848 796 abstracts in MEDLINE. Additionally, disease connections based on phenotypes or genes can be visualized on the web page of PedAM. Currently, the PedAM contains standardized 8528 pediatric disease terms (4542 unique disease concepts and 3986 synonyms) with eight annotation fields for each disease, including definition synonyms, gene, symptom, cross-reference (Xref), human phenotypes and its corresponding phenotypes in the mouse. The database PedAM is freely accessible at http://www.unimd.org/pedam/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Pediatric oncologic endosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Goedecke, Jan; Muensterer, Oliver J

    2017-08-01

    Despite increasing popularity of minimal-invasive techniques in the pediatric population, their use in diagnosis and management of pediatric malignancy is still debated. Moreover, there is limited evidence to clarify this controversy due to low incidence of each individual type of pediatric tumor, huge diversity of the disease entity, heterogeneity of surgical technique, and lack of well-designed studies on pediatric oncologic minimal-invasive surgery. However, a rapid development of medical instruments and technologies accelerated the current trend toward less invasive surgery, including oncologic endosurgery. The aim of this article is to review current literatures about the application of the minimal-invasive approach for pediatric tumors and to give an overview of the current status, indications, individual techniques, and future perspectives.

  5. How Do US Pediatric Residency Programs Teach and Evaluate Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Cara; Hoffman, Benjamin D; Moon, Rachel Y

    2017-07-01

    In 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education updated requirements for training in community pediatrics and advocacy in pediatric residency programs. In light of this update, the aim of this study was to better understand how community pediatrics is being taught and evaluated in pediatric residency programs in the United States. Cross-sectional exploratory study using a Web-based survey of pediatric residency program directors in September 2014. Questions focused on teaching and evaluation of 10 community pediatrics competencies. Of 85 programs (43% response rate), 30% offered a separate training track and/or 6-block individualized curriculum in community pediatrics or advocacy. More than 75% required all residents to learn 7 of 10 competencies queried. Respondents in urban settings were more likely to teach care of special populations (P = .02) and public speaking (P pediatrics and advocacy teaching among responding US pediatric residency programs. Although respondents reported a variety of teaching and evaluation methods, there were few statistically significant differences between programs. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Attention for pediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2005-01-01

    Radiological interventions possess wide utilization in the diagnosis and treatment for pediatric patients. Pediatric interventional radiology is an important branch of interventional radiology and also an important branch of pediatric radiology. Pediatric interventional radiology has grown substantially over the last 30 years, radiologists closely cooperation with surgeons and other physicians providing a new horizon in the management of pediatric diseases in western countries. It includes pediatric cardiac interventional radiology, pediatric neuro-interventional radiology, pediatric vascular interventional radiology, pediatric nonvascular interventional radiology, pediatric tumor interventional radiology and others. In the United States, every children hospital which owns two hundred beds has to have special trained interventional radiologists in radiologic department installing with advanced digital subtraction angiographic equipment. Interventional therapeutic procedures and diagnostic angiography have been proceeding more and more for the congenital and acquired diseases of children. The promising results give use uprising and interventional therapy as an alternative or a replacement or supplement to surgical operation. Pediatric interventional radiology is rather underdeveloped in China with a few special pediatric interventional radiologist, lack of digital subtraction angiography equipment. Pediatric radiologists have no enough field for interventional procedures such as pediatric neuro-interventional radiology and pediatric vascular interventional radiology. In the contrary adult interventional radiologists do have better interventional jobs in China and Pediatric cardiologists also share the same trend. They perform angiocardiography for congenital heart diseases and treat congenital heart disease with interventional procedures including balloon dilation of valves and vessels, coil embolization of collaterals, patent ducts and other arterial fistulae

  7. Estimating clinical chemistry reference values based on an existing data set of unselected animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimauro, Corrado; Bonelli, Piero; Nicolussi, Paola; Rassu, Salvatore P G; Cappio-Borlino, Aldo; Pulina, Giuseppe

    2008-11-01

    In an attempt to standardise the determination of biological reference values, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) has published a series of recommendations on developing reference intervals. The IFCC recommends the use of an a priori sampling of at least 120 healthy individuals. However, such a high number of samples and laboratory analysis is expensive, time-consuming and not always feasible, especially in veterinary medicine. In this paper, an alternative (a posteriori) method is described and is used to determine reference intervals for biochemical parameters of farm animals using an existing laboratory data set. The method used was based on the detection and removal of outliers to obtain a large sample of animals likely to be healthy from the existing data set. This allowed the estimation of reliable reference intervals for biochemical parameters in Sarda dairy sheep. This method may also be useful for the determination of reference intervals for different species, ages and gender.

  8. Event- and interval-based measurement of stuttering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Ana Rita S; Jesus, Luis M T; Hall, Andreia; Leahy, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Event- and interval-based measurements are two different ways of computing frequency of stuttering. Interval-based methodology emerged as an alternative measure to overcome problems associated with reproducibility in the event-based methodology. No review has been made to study the effect of methodological factors in interval-based absolute reliability data or to compute the agreement between the two methodologies in terms of inter-judge, intra-judge and accuracy (i.e., correspondence between raters' scores and an established criterion). To provide a review related to reproducibility of event-based and time-interval measurement, and to verify the effect of methodological factors (training, experience, interval duration, sample presentation order and judgment conditions) on agreement of time-interval measurement; in addition, to determine if it is possible to quantify the agreement between the two methodologies The first two authors searched for articles on ERIC, MEDLINE, PubMed, B-on, CENTRAL and Dissertation Abstracts during January-February 2013 and retrieved 495 articles. Forty-eight articles were selected for review. Content tables were constructed with the main findings. Articles related to event-based measurements revealed values of inter- and intra-judge greater than 0.70 and agreement percentages beyond 80%. The articles related to time-interval measures revealed that, in general, judges with more experience with stuttering presented significantly higher levels of intra- and inter-judge agreement. Inter- and intra-judge values were beyond the references for high reproducibility values for both methodologies. Accuracy (regarding the closeness of raters' judgements with an established criterion), intra- and inter-judge agreement were higher for trained groups when compared with non-trained groups. Sample presentation order and audio/video conditions did not result in differences in inter- or intra-judge results. A duration of 5 s for an interval appears to be

  9. Imaging Pediatric Spondylolysis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofte, Josef N; CarlLee, Tyler L; Holte, Andrew J; Sitton, Sean E; Weinstein, Stuart L

    2017-05-15

    A systematic review. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based recommendation for when and how to employ imaging studies when diagnosing back pain thought to be caused by spondylolysis in pediatric patients. Spondylolysis is a common structural cause of back pain in pediatric patients. The radiologic methods and algorithms used to diagnose spondylolysis are inconsistent among practitioners. A literature review was performed in PubMed and Cochrane databases using the search terms "spondylolysis," "pediatric," "adolescent," "juvenile," "young," "lumbar," "MRI," "bone scan," "CT," and "SPECT." After inclusion criteria were applied, 13 articles pertaining to diagnostic imaging of pediatric spondylolysis were analyzed. Ten papers included sensitivity calculations for comparing imaging performance. The average sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) as the standard of reference was 81.4%. When compared with single-photon emission CT (SPECT), the average sensitivity of CT was 85% and the sensitivity of MRI was 80%. Thirteen studies made a recommendation as to how best to perform diagnostic imaging of patients with clinically suspected spondylolysis. When compared with two-view plain films, bone scans had seven to nine times the effective radiation dose, while four-view plain films and CT were approximately double. Of the diagnostic methods examined, MRI was the most expensive followed by CT, bone scan, four-view plain films, and two-view plain films. Due to their efficacy, low cost, and low radiation exposure, we find two-view plain films to be the best initial study. With unusual presentations or refractory courses, practitioners should pursue advanced imaging. MRI should be used in early diagnosis and CT in more persistent courses. However, the lack of rigorous studies makes it difficult to formulate concrete recommendations. 3.

  10. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Patient Resources Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Pediatric Stroke » Introduction Introduction What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Introduction Types of Stroke Diagnosis and Treatment ...

  11. Sedation in Pediatric Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seak Hee Oh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD has become an established diagnostic and therapeutic modality in pediatric gastroenterology. Effective sedation strategies have been adopted to improve patient tolerance during pediatric EGD. For children, safety is a fundamental consideration during this procedure as they are at a higher risk of severe adverse events from procedural sedation compared to adults. Therefore, a detailed risk evaluation is required prior to the procedure, and practitioners should be aware of the benefits and risks associated with sedation regimens during pediatric EGD. In addition, pediatric advanced life support by endoscopists or immediate intervention by anesthesiologists should be available in the event that severe adverse events occur during pediatric EGD.

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Overweight and Obesity Among a Multiethnic Population of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L; Lupo, Philip J; Danysh, Heather E; Okcu, Mehmet F; Scheurer, Michael E; Kamdar, Kala Y

    2016-08-01

    As previous studies of obesity in survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have primarily been conducted among non-Hispanic white survivors or children treated on older protocols, our objective was to describe the prevalence and correlates of overweight status among an ethnically diverse population of pediatric ALL survivors, largely treated with more contemporary therapies. We evaluated the overweight/obesity status of pediatric ALL survivors (n=406) followed in the Texas Children's Cancer Center between 2004 and 2014. Survivors were classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese on the basis of their body mass index at their most current follow-up visit. Our results showed that Hispanic ethnicity (39% of the subjects) was associated with being overweight (adjusted odds ratio=1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-3.14) or obese (adjusted odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-5.06) at follow-up, even after adjusting for cranial radiotherapy (CRT) exposure. Body mass index z-score at diagnosis was also associated with overweight/obesity at follow-up. In addition, there was a statistically significant interaction between younger age at diagnosis and CRT, indicating that younger age at diagnosis was associated with obesity among patients who received CRT. These findings may help identify pediatric ALL patients that are at increased risk of being overweight or obese after treatment.

  13. Factors influencing pediatric Injury Severity Score and Glasgow Coma Scale in pediatric automobile crashes: results from the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Peter F; Brown, J Kristine; Sochor, Mark R; Wang, Stewart C; Eichelberger, Martin E

    2006-11-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for more than 50% of pediatric injuries. Triage of pediatric patients to appropriate centers can be based on the crash/injury characteristics. Pediatric motor vehicle crash/injury characteristics can be determined from an in vitro laboratory using child crash dummies. However, to date, no detailed data with respect to outcomes and crash mechanism have been presented with a pediatric in vivo model. The Crash Injury Research Engineering Network is comprised of 10 level 1 trauma centers. Crashes were examined with regard to age, crash severity (DeltaV), crash direction, restraint use, and airbag deployment. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) as outcomes. Standard age groupings (0-4, 5-9, 10-14, and 15-18) were used. The database is biases toward a survivor population with few fatalities. Four hundred sixty-one motor vehicle crashes with 2500 injuries were analyzed (242 boys, 219 girls). Irrespective of age, DeltaV > 30 mph resulted in increased ISS and decreased GCS (eg, for 0-4 years, DeltaV 30: ISS = 19.5, GCS = 10.6; P 15) injuries than did backseat passengers (odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-3.4). A trend was noted for children younger than 12 years sitting in the front seat to have increased ISS and decreased GCS with airbag deployment but was limited by case number. A reproducible pattern of increased ISS and lower GCS characterized by high severity, lateral crashes in children was noted. Further analysis of the specific injuries as a function and the crash characteristic can help guide management and prevention strategies.

  14. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology: experience report in the Federal District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Bruna Marcela Lima de; Salviano, Cristiane Feitosa; Martins, Gisele

    2018-01-01

    To describe the creation and implementation of the extension program Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology, developed in the outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in the Federal District. This is an experience report regarding the implementation of an outpatient service aimed at children and adolescents with symptoms of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Because it is an extension program linked to the university, it follows a different model of care, valuing empowerment, informed and shared decision making, which results in a stronger bond between patients, family and the Pediatric Urology nursing team. It has also become a privileged space for the production and use of scientific knowledge, associated with the principles of evidence-based practice. This project shows a different performance of the nurse-specialist-professor-researcher in Pediatric Urology Nursing, and it has become a reference in the Federal District, mainly for undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

  15. Multichannel interval timer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turko, B.T.

    1983-10-01

    A CAMAC based modular multichannel interval timer is described. The timer comprises twelve high resolution time digitizers with a common start enabling twelve independent stop inputs. Ten time ranges from 2.5 μs to 1.3 μs can be preset. Time can be read out in twelve 24-bit words either via CAMAC Crate Controller or an external FIFO register. LSB time calibration is 78.125 ps. An additional word reads out the operational status of twelve stop channels. The system consists of two modules. The analog module contains a reference clock and 13 analog time stretchers. The digital module contains counters, logic and interface circuits. The timer has an excellent differential linearity, thermal stability and crosstalk free performance

  16. Use of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Halley; O'Donnell, Jennifer M; Gordon, Catherine M

    2017-11-01

    Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is a vital tool for assessing bone health in patients at risk for fragility fractures. In pediatric patients, this technology is used in conjunction with clinical fracture history to diagnosis osteoporosis and monitor treatment response. Childhood and adolescence is characterized by linear growth and bone mass accrual; thus there are important differences in the interpretation of bone measurements obtained by DXA in these young patients. This review aims to explore the current indications for DXA use and interpretation of DXA in the pediatric age group using currently available reference databases. Limitations of DXA in pediatric patients, specifically in children with short stature, will be explored. We will review several pathophysiologic mechanisms that may lead to low bone density in children, discussing representative diseases and the recommendations for monitoring bone health with DXA in these conditions. Finally, we will highlight new methods by which DXA imaging can gather additional information on bone health in children and may improve our ability to predict fractures and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellows' Perception of Quality of Attending Supervision and Medical Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hubert A; Hajduk, John; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Suresh, Santhanam; Nizamuddin, Sarah L; McCarthy, Robert; Jagannathan, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate supervision has been shown to reduce medical errors in anesthesiology residents and other trainees across various specialties. Nonetheless, supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellows has yet to be evaluated. The main objective of this survey investigation was to evaluate supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellows in the United States. We hypothesized that there was an indirect association between perceived quality of faculty supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellow trainees and the frequency of medical errors reported. A survey of pediatric fellows from 53 pediatric anesthesiology fellowship programs in the United States was performed. The primary outcome was the frequency of self-reported errors by fellows, and the primary independent variable was supervision scores. Questions also assessed barriers for effective faculty supervision. One hundred seventy-six pediatric anesthesiology fellows were invited to participate, and 104 (59%) responded to the survey. Nine of 103 (9%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-16%) respondents reported performing procedures, on >1 occasion, for which they were not properly trained for. Thirteen of 101 (13%, 95% CI, 7%-21%) reported making >1 mistake with negative consequence to patients, and 23 of 104 (22%, 95% CI, 15%-31%) reported >1 medication error in the last year. There were no differences in median (interquartile range) supervision scores between fellows who reported >1 medication error compared to those reporting ≤1 errors (3.4 [3.0-3.7] vs 3.4 [3.1-3.7]; median difference, 0; 99% CI, -0.3 to 0.3; P = .96). Similarly, there were no differences in those who reported >1 mistake with negative patient consequences, 3.3 (3.0-3.7), compared with those who did not report mistakes with negative patient consequences (3.4 [3.3-3.7]; median difference, 0.1; 99% CI, -0.2 to 0.6; P = .35). We detected a high rate of self-reported medication errors in pediatric anesthesiology fellows in the United States

  18. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  19. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry reference data for GE Lunar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bo; Shepherd, John A; Levine, Michael A; Steinberg, Dee; Wacker, Wynn; Barden, Howard S; Ergun, David; Wu, Xin P

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999-2004) includes adult and pediatric comparisons for total body bone and body composition results. Because dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements from different manufacturers are not standardized, NHANES reference values currently are applicable only to a single make and model of Hologic DXA system. The purpose of this study was to derive body composition reference curves for GE Healthcare Lunar DXA systems. Published values from the NHANES 1999-2004 survey were acquired from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Using previously reported cross-calibration equations between Hologic and GE-Lunar, we converted the total body and regional bone and soft-tissue measurements from NHANES 1999-2004 to GE-Lunar values. The LMS (LmsChartMaker Pro Version 3.5) curve fitting method was used to generate GE-Lunar reference curves. Separate curves were generated for each sex and ethnicity. The reference curves were also divided into pediatric (≤20 years old) and adult (>20 years old) groups. Adult reference curves were derived as a function of age. Additional relationships of pediatric DXA values were derived as a function of height, lean mass, and bone area. Robustness was tested between Hologic and GE-Lunar Z-score values. The NHANES 1999-2004 survey included a sample of 20,672 participants' (9630 female) DXA scans. A total of 8056 participants were younger than 20 yr and were included in the pediatric reference data set. Participants enrolled in the study who weighed more than 136 kg (over scanner table limit) were excluded. The average Z-scores comparing the new GE-Lunar reference curves are close to zero, and the standard deviation of the Z-scores are close to one for all variables. As expected, all measurements on the GE-Lunar reference curves for participants younger than 20 yr increase monotonically with age. In the adult population, most of the curves are constant at younger

  20. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  1. What Is a Pediatric Rheumatologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Rheumatologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... a pediatric rheumatologist. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Rheumatologists Have? Pediatric rheumatologists are medical doctors who ...

  2. A Convex Hull-Based New Metric for Quantification of Bladder Wall Irregularity in Pediatric Patients With Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stember, Joseph N; Newhouse, Jeffrey; Behr, Gerald; Alam, Shumyle

    2017-11-01

    Early identification and quantification of bladder damage in pediatric patients with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) is crucial to guiding effective treatment and may affect the eventual clinical outcome, including progression of renal disease. We have developed a novel approach based on the convex hull to calculate bladder wall trabecularity in pediatric patients with CAKUT. The objective of this study was to test whether our approach can accurately predict bladder wall irregularity. Twenty pediatric patients, half with renal compromise and CAKUT and half with normal renal function, were evaluated. We applied the convex hull approach to calculate T, a metric proposed to reflect the degree of trabeculation/bladder wall irregularity, in this set of patients. The average T value was roughly 3 times higher for diseased than healthy patients (0.14 [95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.17] versus 0.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.07] for normal bladders). This disparity was statistically significant (P hull-based procedure can measure bladder wall irregularity. Because bladder damage is a reversible precursor to irreversible renal parenchymal damage, applying such a measure to at-risk pediatric patients can help guide prompt interventions to avert disease progression. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Assessment of regional pediatric computed tomography dose indices in Tamil Nadu

    OpenAIRE

    A Saravanakumar; K Vaideki; K N Govindarajan; S Jayakumar; B Devanand

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to assess Tamil Nadu pediatric computed tomography (CT) diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) by collecting radiation dose data for the most commonly performed CT examinations. This work was performed for thirty CT scanners installed in various parts of the Tamil Nadu region. The patient cohort was divided into two age groups:

  5. Commentary: Pediatric Epilepsy: A Good Fit for Pediatric Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani; Smith, Gigi

    2011-01-01

    While there are an abundance of pediatric neuropsychologists working with youth with epilepsy (YWE), other subspecialty psychologists have played minimal roles in clinical and research endeavors in pediatric epilepsy. Thus, the purpose of this commentary was to describe (a) the needs of YWE due to the intermittent nature of seizures and difficulties with disease management, (b) increased risk for psychosocial comorbidities, (c) limited access to care, and (d) provide recommendations for how pediatric psychologists can become involved in the clinical care and research activities for YWE. PMID:21148174

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  7. Pediatric dental chair vs. traditional dental chair: A pediatric dentist′s poll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Barjatya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Proper positioning of the child patient, can not only have positive ramifications for the operator′s posture, comfort, and career longevity - it can also lead to better treatment and increased productivity. The aim of the survey questionnaire was to assess the utilization, need, and attitude concerning dental chairs among pediatric dentist while working on and managing the child patient. Study Design: The questions were structured using adobe forms central online software, regarding the user-friendliness of pediatric dental chair vs. traditional adult dental chair available in the market. Results: Our result shows that out of 337 respondents, 79% worked on pediatric dental chair, whereas 21% had no experience of it. Of these 79% pediatric dentist, 48% preferred pediatric dental chair. But pediatric dental problem still has certain disadvantages like higher cost, leg space problem, lower availability, etc. Conclusion: During the research it was found that ergonomics and usability issues were the main problems. Thus, pediatric dental chair is not so popular in the current scenario. This study allowed for general ideas for the improvement of dental chairs and thus improved dental chair would fill the gap in the current scenario.

  8. Guideline for the management of pediatric idiopathic constipation and soiling. Multidisciplinary team from the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, B; Wise, C G; Olson, A; Kochhar, P; Marcus, S; Coran, A

    1999-04-01

    To develop an evidence-based guideline for the primary pediatric care of children (birth to 18 years old) with idiopathic constipation and soiling. References were identified through a MEDLINE search from January 1975 through January 1998 to address 3 focus questions: (1) the best path to early, accurate diagnosis; (2) best methods for adequate clean-out; and (3) best approaches to promote patient and family compliance with management. Twenty-five references were identified. References were reviewed by a multidisciplinary team and graded according to the following criteria: randomized controlled trial; controlled trial, no randomization; observational study; and expert opinion. Evidence tables were developed for each focus question. An algorithm and clinical care guideline were developed by consultation and consensus among team members. Emphasis was placed on methods to promote early identification of pediatric idiopathic constipation and soiling, to recognize points of referral, and to increase patient and family compliance with treatment through use of education, developmentally based interventions, and variables for tracking success of management. An algorithm and guideline for pediatric idiopathic constipation and soiling are presented for use by primary care physicians.

  9. Pediatric dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: interpretation and clinical and research application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Sub Lim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Peak bone mass is established predominately during childhood and adolescence. It is an important determinant of future resistance to osteoporosis and fractures to gain bone mass during growth. The issue of low bone density in children and adolescents has recently attracted much attention and the use of pediatric dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA is increasing. The process of interpretation of pediatric DXA results is different from that of adults because normal bone mineral density (BMD of children varies by age, body size, pubertal stage, skeletal maturation, sex, and ethnicity. Thus, an appropriate normal BMD Z-score reference value with Z-score should be used to detect and manage low BMD. Z-scores below -2.0 are generally considered a low BMD to pediatrician even though diagnoses of osteoporosis in children and adolescents are usually only made in the presence of at least one fragility fracture. This article will review the basic knowledge and practical guidelines on pediatric DXA based on the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD Pediatric Official Positions. Also discussed are the characteristics of normal Korean children and adolescents with respect to BMD development. The objective of this review is to help pediatricians to understand when DXA will be useful and how to interpret pediatric DXA reports in the clinical practice for management of children with the potential to develop osteoporosis in adulthood.

  10. Economic Burden of Pediatric Asthma: Annual Cost of Disease in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Laleh; Dashti, Raheleh; Pourpak, Zahra; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Movahedi, Masoud; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Soheili, Habib; Bokaie, Saied; Kazemnejad, Anoushiravan; Moin, Mostafa

    2018-02-01

    Asthma is the first cause of children hospitalization and need for emergency and impose high economic burden on the families and governments. We aimed to investigate the economic burden of pediatric asthma and its contribution to family health budget in Iran. Overall, 283 pediatric asthmatic patients, who referred to two tertiary pediatric referral centers in Tehran capital of Iran, included from 2010-2012. Direct and indirect asthma-related costs were recorded during one-year period. Data were statistically analyzed for finding association between the costs and factors that affect this cost (demographic variables, tobacco smoke exposure, control status of asthma and asthma concomitant diseases). Ninety-two (32.5%) females and 191(67.5%) males with the age range of 1-16 yr old were included. We found the annual total pediatrics asthma related costs were 367.97±23.06 USD. The highest cost belonged to the medications (69%) and the lowest one to the emergency (2%). We noticed a significant increasing in boys' total costs ( P =0.011), and 7-11 yr old age group ( P =0.018). In addition, we found significant association between total asthma costs and asthma control status ( P =0.011). The presence of an asthmatic child can consume nearly half of the health budget of a family. Our results emphasis on improving asthma management programs, which leads to successful control status of the disease and reduction in economic burden of pediatric asthma.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  15. Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology: experience report in the Federal District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Marcela Lima de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the creation and implementation of the extension program Advanced Practice Nursing in Pediatric Urology, developed in the outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in the Federal District. Method: This is an experience report regarding the implementation of an outpatient service aimed at children and adolescents with symptoms of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Results: Because it is an extension program linked to the university, it follows a different model of care, valuing empowerment, informed and shared decision making, which results in a stronger bond between patients, family and the Pediatric Urology nursing team. It has also become a privileged space for the production and use of scientific knowledge, associated with the principles of evidence-based practice. Conclusion: This project shows a different performance of the nurse-specialist-professor-researcher in Pediatric Urology Nursing, and it has become a reference in the Federal District, mainly for undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

  16. Speech and language pathology & pediatric HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzlaff, C

    1999-12-01

    Children with HIV have critical speech and language issues because the virus manifests itself primarily in the developing central nervous system, sometimes causing speech, motor control, and language disabilities. Language impediments that develop during the second year of life seem to be especially severe. HIV-infected children are also susceptible to recurrent ear infections, which can damage hearing. Developmental issues must be addressed for these children to reach their full potential. A decline in language skills may coincide with or precede other losses in cognitive ability. A speech pathologist can play an important role on a pediatric HIV team. References are included.

  17. Pediatric imaging essentials. Radiography, ultrasound, CT, and MRI in neonates and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, Michael

    2014-01-01

    For all radiologists treating infants and children, knowledge of best practices in pediatric imaging is essential to safely obtaining high-quality images and achieving accurate diagnoses. This practical text covers current guidelines and key topics in the field, including choice of modality, equipment and dosages, child-specific diseases, typical imaging findings, differential diagnostic aspects and safety factors. This book is invaluable for all clinicians and radiologists who diagnose and manage this sensitive population. Special features: - Explores the use of all standard imaging modalities in children as compared to adults, especially with regard to ultrasound, CT, and MRI - Supplies more than 600 high-quality images to help in interpreting findings, including imaging of suspected child abuse - Shows how to adapt examination protocols and equipment requirements for the specialized needs of pediatric patients - Describes important safety protection measures in children utilizing the ALARA principle of radiation exposure (''As Low As Reasonably Achievable'') - Summarizes a wide array of pediatric diseases and disorders in a concise, checklist format, including clinical features, imaging findings, differential diagnosis, associated syndromes, and treatment recommendations - Includes lists of indications, summary tables, imaging protocols, case studies, and quiz questions to test your knowledge This book provides a fundamental understanding of imaging in infants and children and is an ideal, practice-oriented reference for residents, fellows in pediatric radiology, and general radiologists. It is also written for pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, and other interested doctors and specialists who want to know more about imaging specifics in the pediatric age group.

  18. Pediatric imaging essentials. Radiography, ultrasound, CT, and MRI in neonates and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, Michael (ed.) [Graz University Hospital (Austria). Div. of Pediatric Radiology

    2014-03-01

    For all radiologists treating infants and children, knowledge of best practices in pediatric imaging is essential to safely obtaining high-quality images and achieving accurate diagnoses. This practical text covers current guidelines and key topics in the field, including choice of modality, equipment and dosages, child-specific diseases, typical imaging findings, differential diagnostic aspects and safety factors. This book is invaluable for all clinicians and radiologists who diagnose and manage this sensitive population. Special features: - Explores the use of all standard imaging modalities in children as compared to adults, especially with regard to ultrasound, CT, and MRI - Supplies more than 600 high-quality images to help in interpreting findings, including imaging of suspected child abuse - Shows how to adapt examination protocols and equipment requirements for the specialized needs of pediatric patients - Describes important safety protection measures in children utilizing the ALARA principle of radiation exposure (''As Low As Reasonably Achievable'') - Summarizes a wide array of pediatric diseases and disorders in a concise, checklist format, including clinical features, imaging findings, differential diagnosis, associated syndromes, and treatment recommendations - Includes lists of indications, summary tables, imaging protocols, case studies, and quiz questions to test your knowledge This book provides a fundamental understanding of imaging in infants and children and is an ideal, practice-oriented reference for residents, fellows in pediatric radiology, and general radiologists. It is also written for pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, and other interested doctors and specialists who want to know more about imaging specifics in the pediatric age group.

  19. Dehydration treatment practices among pediatrics-trained and non-pediatrics trained emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jeranil; Liu, Deborah R; Nager, Alan L

    2012-04-01

    We sought to survey emergency physicians in the United States regarding the management of pediatric dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis. We hypothesized that responses from physicians with dedicated pediatric training (PT), that is, board certification in pediatrics or pediatric emergency medicine, would differ from responses of physicians with no dedicated pediatric training (non-PT). An anonymous survey was mailed to randomly selected members of the American College of Emergency Physicians and sent electronically to enrollees of Brown University pediatric emergency medicine listserv. The survey consisted of 17 multiple-choice questions based on a clinical scenario depicting a 2-year-old with acute gastroenteritis and moderate dehydration. Questions asked related to treatment preferences, practice setting, and training information. One thousand sixty-nine surveys were received: 997 surveys were used for data analysis, including 269 PT physicians and 721 non-PT physicians. Seventy-nine percent of PT physicians correctly classified the scenario patient as moderately dehydrated versus 71% of non-PT physicians (P = 0.063). Among those who correctly classified the patient, 121 PT physicians (58%) and 350 non-PT physicians (68%) would initially hydrate the patient with intravenous fluids. Pediatrics-trained physicians were more likely to initially choose oral or nasogastric hydration compared with non-PT physicians (P = 0.0127). Pediatrics-trained physicians were less likely to perform laboratory testing compared with the non-PT group (n = 92, 45%, vs n = 337, 66%; P dehydrated children, significantly more PT physicians, compared with non-PT physicians, follow established guidelines.

  20. Social work in a pediatric primary health care team in a group practice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J V; Lebowitz, M L; Anderson, F P

    1976-01-01

    The inclusion of a psychiatric social worker as a member of a pediatric team in a prepaid group practice extends the range of pediatric mental health services to children. This paper discusses the collaboration of the social worker with the pediatricians and allied health personnel on the team in dealing with the emotional problems of referred children and their parents. Case examples are included. All cases seen by the social worker during a 6-month period are reviewed. With available psychiatric backup a wide range of emotional problems are identified, and effective mental health care is provided.

  1. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  2. Establishing a surgical outreach program in the developing world: pediatric strabismus surgery in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditta, Lauren C; Pereiras, Lilia Ana; Graves, Emily T; Devould, Chantel; Murchison, Ebony; Figueroa, Ligia; Kerr, Natalie C

    2015-12-01

    To report our experince in establishing a sustainable pediatric surgical outreach mission to an underserved population in Guatemala for treatment of strabismic disorders. A pediatric ophthalmic surgical outreach mission was established. Children were evaluated for surgical intervention by 3 pediatric ophthalmologists and 2 orthoptists. Surgical care was provided at the Moore Pediatric Surgery Center, Guatemala City, over 4 days. Postoperative care was facilitated by Guatemalan physicians during the second year. In year 1, patients 1-17 years of age were referred by local healthcare providers. In year 2, more than 60% of patients were prescreened by a local pediatric ophthalmologist. We screened 47% more patients in year 2 (132 vs 90). Diagnoses included congenital and acquired esotropia, consecutive and acquired exotropia, congenital nystagmus, Duane syndrome, Brown syndrome, cranial nerve palsy, dissociated vertical deviation, and oblique muscle dysfunction. Overall, 42% of the patients who were screened underwent surgery. We performed 21 more surgeries in our second year (58 vs 37), a 57% increase. There were no significant intra- or postoperative complications. Surgical outreach programs for children with strabismic disorders in the developing world can be established through international cooperation, a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers, and medical equipment allocations. Coordinating care with local pediatric ophthalmologists and medical directors facilitates best practice management for sustainability. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of radiotherapy for pediatric CNS atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (single institute experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-W.; Wong, T.-T.; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak; Huang, P.-I.; Chang, K.-P.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Yen, S.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess outcomes and prognostic factors in radiotherapy of pediatric central nervous system atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with central nervous system AT/RT were retrospectively reviewed after curative radiotherapy as primary or adjuvant therapy between January 1990 and December 2003. Overall and failure-free survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank method was used to compare the effects of dosage (>50 Gy or ≤50 Gy) and treatment duration (>45 days or ≤45 days). Multivariate analysis was performed for prognostic factors. Results: Median overall survival and failure-free survival were 17 and 11 months, respectively. The 3 longest-surviving patients were older, underwent gross tumor removal, and completed both craniospinal and focal boost irradiation. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant relationship between the following: overall survival and performance status (p = 0.019), failure-free survival and total irradiation dose (p = 0.037), time interval between surgery and radiotherapy initiation (p = 0.031), and time interval between surgery and radiotherapy end point (p = 0.047). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is crucial in the treatment of AT/RT. We recommend initiating radiotherapy immediately postoperatively and before systemic chemotherapy in pediatric patients ≥3 years of age

  4. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed

  5. Roentgenometric reference values in the long bones of the extermities of newborn children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, I.; Georgieva, P.

    1983-01-01

    Roentgenometric study was performed on 1302 roentgenograms of the long bones of the extremities of newborn children. Maximal lenght and diaphysis lenght of each roentgenographed bone were measured in antero-posterior projection. Careful statistical analysis was made. The referent values were determined. The roentgenometric reference values in the long bones of the extremities of newborn children have gained acceptance in everyday clinical roentgenographic and pediatric practice for differentiation of norm from pathology and in forensic medicine for indentification. (authors)

  6. Mortality in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith Ju-Ming; Jit, Mark; Sultana, Rehena; Mok, Yee Hui; Yeo, Joo Guan; Koh, Jia Wen Janine Cynthia; Loh, Tsee Foong; Lee, Jan Hau

    2017-01-01

    Sparse and conflicting evidence exists regarding mortality risk from pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to determine the pooled mortality in pediatric ARDS and to describe its trend over time. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched from 1960 to August 2015. Keywords or medical subject headings (MESH) terms used included "respiratory distress syndrome, adult," "acute lung injury," "acute respiratory insufficiency," "acute hypoxemic respiratory failure," "pediatrics," and "child." Study inclusion criteria were (1) pediatric patients aged 0 days to 18 years, (2) sufficient baseline data described in the pediatric ARDS group, and (3) mortality data. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective observational studies were eligible. Data on study characteristics, patient demographics, measures of oxygenation, and mortality were extracted using a standard data extraction form. Independent authors conducted the search, applied the selection criteria, and extracted the data. Methodological quality of studies was assessed. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed to obtain pooled estimates of mortality. Meta-regression was performed to analyze variables contributing to change in mortality over time. Eight RCTs and 21 observational studies (n = 2274 patients) were included. Pooled mortality rate was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19-31). There was a decrease in mortality rates over 3 epochs (≤2000, 2001-2009, and ≥2010: 40% [95% CI: 24-59], 35% [95% CI: 21-51], and 18% [95% CI: 12-26], respectively, P < .001). Observational studies reported a higher mortality rate than RCTs (27% [95% CI: 24-29] versus 16% [95% CI: 12-20], P < .001). Earlier year of publication was an independent factor associated with mortality. Overall mortality rate in pediatric ARDS is approximately 24%. Studies conducted and published later were associated with better survival.

  7. Adaptive Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Control for PMSM Drives with a Modified Reference Frame

    KAUST Repository

    Chaoui, Hicham; Khayamy, Mehdy; Aljarboua, Abdullah Abdulaziz

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive interval type-2 fuzzy logic control scheme is proposed for high-performance permanent magnet synchronous machine drives. This strategy combines the power of type-2 fuzzy logic systems with the adaptive control theory

  8. Analysis and synthesis for interval type-2 fuzzy-model-based systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hongyi; Lam, Hak-Keung; Gao, Yabin

    2016-01-01

    This book develops a set of reference methods capable of modeling uncertainties existing in membership functions, and analyzing and synthesizing the interval type-2 fuzzy systems with desired performances. It also provides numerous simulation results for various examples, which fill certain gaps in this area of research and may serve as benchmark solutions for the readers. Interval type-2 T-S fuzzy models provide a convenient and flexible method for analysis and synthesis of complex nonlinear systems with uncertainties.

  9. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  10. Characteristics of Prolonged Concussion Recovery in a Pediatric Subspecialty Referral Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Master, Christina L.; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Wiebe, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify pre-existing characteristics associated with prolonged recovery from concussion in a sample of patients referred to a pediatric sports medicine clinic. Study design This was a retrospective, exploratory cohort study of 247 patients age 5-18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from July 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits (3740) was chosen for further review and abstraction. Statistical comparisons between subsets of patients were conducted using exact chi-square tests, logistic regression, quantile regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves. Results The median time until returning to school part-time was 12 days (interquartile range (IQR) 6-21); until returning to school full-time without accommodations was 35 days (IQR 11-105); until becoming symptom-free was 64 days (IQR 18-119); and until being fully cleared to return to sports was 75 days (IQR 30-153). 73% of all patients were symptomatic for >4 weeks, 73% were prescribed some form of school accommodation, and 61% reported a decline in grades. Characteristics associated with a prolonged recovery included a history of depression or anxiety; an initial complaint of dizziness; abnormal convergence or symptom provocation following oculomotor examination on physical examination; and history of prior concussion. Conclusion Pediatric and adolescent patients with concussion may experience cognitive and emotional morbidity that can last for several months following injury. Clinicians should consider specific pre-existing characteristics and presenting symptoms that may be associated with a more complicated recovery for concussion patients. PMID:25262302

  11. Comparison of MR enterography and histopathology in the evaluation of pediatric Crohn disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillman, Jonathan R.; Ladino-Torres, Maria F.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Adler, Jeremy; DeMatos-Malliard, Vera [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McHugh, Jonathan B. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khalatbari, S. [University of Michigan Institute for Clinical Health Research (MICHR), Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-12-15

    While MR enterography (MRE) is commonly used to identify segments of bowel affected by Crohn disease in children, there is little data to support this practice. To assess the ability of MRE to identify segments of small bowel and colon affected by pediatric Crohn disease using histopathology as the reference standard. Pediatric MRE examinations performed between April 2009 and December 2010 were identified. Subjects were excluded if they did not have Crohn disease, if they had Crohn disease but no correlative histopathology within 2 months of imaging, or if they had undergone prior bowel resection. Pertinent MRE and histopathology reports were reviewed, and normal and abnormal bowel segments were documented. Thirty-two pediatric MRE examinations were identified with correlative histopathology. MRE had an overall sensitivity of 94% for detecting the presence of Crohn disease, in general. At the bowel segmental level, MRE had a sensitivity of 66%, specificity of 90%, positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 76%. The terminal ileum was abnormal by MRE in 11 of 15 (73%) subjects lacking a diagnostic biopsy of this bowel segment. MRE successfully identifies small bowel and colon segments affected by pediatric Crohn disease. (orig.)

  12. Pediatric Voiding Cystourethrogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scan for mobile link. Children's (Pediatric) Voiding Cystourethrogram A children’s (pediatric) voiding cystourethrogram uses fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray – to examine a child’s bladder ...

  13. Pediatric Asthma Care Coordination in Underserved Communities: A Quasiexperimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevic, Mary R; Stoll, Shelley; Wilkin, Margaret; Song, Peter X K; Baptist, Alan; Lara, Marielena; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Persky, Victoria; Uyeda, Kimberly; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Wang, Wen; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2016-11-01

    To assess the effect of care coordination on asthma outcomes among children in underserved urban communities. We enrolled children, most of whom had very poorly or not well-controlled asthma, in medical-social care coordination programs in Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2011 to 2014. Participants (n = 805; mean age = 7 years) were 60% male, 50% African American, and 42% Latino. We assessed asthma symptoms and health care utilization via parent interview at baseline and 12 months. To prevent overestimation of intervention effects, we constructed a comparison group using bootstrap resampling of matched control cases from previous pediatric asthma trials. At follow-up, intervention participants had 2.2 fewer symptom days per month (SD = 0.3; P < .01) and 1.9 fewer symptom nights per month (SD = 0.35; P < .01) than did the comparison group. The relative risk in the past year associated with the intervention was 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.45, 0.89) for an emergency department visit and 0.69 (95% CI = 0.47, 1.01) for hospitalization. Care coordination may improve pediatric asthma symptom control and reduce emergency department visits. Expanding third-party reimbursement for care coordination services may help reduce pediatric asthma disparities.

  14. Pediatric catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: descriptive analysis of 45 patients from the "CAPS Registry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Horacio; Rodríguez-Pintó, Ignasi; Cervera, Ricard; Gregory, Simone; de Meis, Ernesto; Rodrigues, Carlos Ewerton Maia; Aikawa, Nádia Emi; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Springer, Janusz; Niedzwiecki, Maciej; Espinosa, Gerard

    2014-02-01

    Given the lack of information about catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pediatric patients, the objective of the current study was to describe the clinical characteristics, laboratory features, treatment, and outcome of pediatric patients with catastrophic APS and compare them with the adult patients with catastrophic APS. We identified patients who were under 18years of age at time of catastrophic APS diagnosis included in the international registry of patients with catastrophic APS (CAPS Registry). Their main demographic and clinical characteristics, laboratory features, treatment, and outcome were described and compared with those of adult patients with catastrophic APS. From the 446 patients included in the CAPS Registry as of May 2013, 45 (10.3%) patients developed 46 catastrophic events before 18years of age (one patient presented two episodes). Overall, 32 (71.1%) patients were female and the mean age was 11.5±4.6years (range, 3months-18years). A total of 31 (68.9%) patients suffered from primary APS and 13 (28.9%) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The main differences between the two groups of patients were the higher prevalence of infections as precipitating factor for catastrophic event in the pediatric population (60.9% versus 26.8% in the adult population, p<0.001) and of peripheral vessel thrombosis (52.2% versus 34.3%, p=0.017). In addition, catastrophic APS was the first manifestation of APS more frequently in pediatric patients (86.6% versus 45.2%, p<0.001). Interestingly, pediatric patients showed a trend of lower mortality, although the difference was not statistically significant (26.1% versus 40.2%; odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.96-3.79; p=0.063). No differences were found neither in the laboratory features nor in the isolated or combination treatments between groups. Catastrophic APS in pediatric patients is a rare disease. There are minimal differences in the clinical and laboratory features, treatment, and

  15. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI. Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85% have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD. Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD- BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined.

  16. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Arne; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Graf, Norbert; Laws, Hans Jürgen; Voigt, Sebastian; Piening, Brar; Geffers, Christine; Agyeman, Philipp; Ammann, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI). Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85%) have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD). Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD-associated BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined. PMID:27274442

  17. Trimming the fat: identification of risk factors associated with obesity in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundiyil, Josef G; Christiano-Smith, Danielle; Greenberger, Sarah; Cramm, Kelly; Latimer-Pierson, Janese; Modica, Renee F

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess which knowledge deficits and dietary habits in an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) population are risk factors for obesity. This cross-sectional study in an urban pediatric ED used a modified version of the Diet and Health Knowledge Survey, an in-person interview questionnaire, to collect data on demographics, dietary knowledge, and practices. All patients aged 2 to 17 years were enrolled in the study over a 4-month period. Subjects were excluded if they were in extremis, pregnant, incarcerated, institutionalized, considered an emancipated minor, or consumed only a modified consistency diet. One hundred seventy-nine subjects were enrolled in this study. Based on body mass index, the prevalence of obesity in our study population was 24%. Parents with obese children answered a mean of 62.9% (95% confidence interval, 60.4%-65.5%) of knowledge questions correctly, whereas all others scored 60.3% (95% confidence interval, 58.3%-62.3%) correctly. Based on the univariate analysis, 10 predictors met inclusion criteria into logistic regression analysis: screen time (P = 0.03), race (P = 0.08), sex (P = 0.04), parental education (P = 0.08), parental estimation that child is overweight (P obesity were independently associated with obesity. Knowledge deficiencies regarding healthy nutrition among parents in an urban pediatric ED population were not significantly associated with having obese children; however, specific habits were. Emergency physicians may provide a valuable role in identification and brief behavioral intervention in high-risk populations during the current epidemic of childhood obesity.

  18. Pediatric echocardiograms performed at primary centers: Diagnostic errors and missing links!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraf, Rahul P; Suresh, PV; Maheshwari, Sunita; Shah, Sejal S

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the accuracy of pediatric echocardiograms done at non-tertiary centers and to evaluate the relationship of inaccurate interpretations with age, echocardiogram performer and complexity of congenital heart disease (CHD). The echocardiogram reports of 182 consecutive children with CHD (5 days-16 years) who were evaluated at a non-tertiary center and subsequently referred to our center were reviewed. Age of the child at echocardiogram, echocardiogram performer and complexity of CHD were noted. These reports were compared with echocardiogram done at our center. Discrepancies were noted and categorized. To assess our own error rate, we compared our echocardiogram reports with the findings obtained during surgery (n = 172), CT scan (n = 9) or cardiac catheterization reports (n = 1). Most of the children at the non-tertiary center (92%) underwent echocardiogram by personnel other than a pediatric cardiologist. Overall, diagnostic errors were found in 69/182 (38%) children. Moderate and major discrepancies affecting the final management were found in 42/182 (23%) children. Discrepancies were higher when the echocardiogram was done by personnel other than pediatric cardiologist (P < 0.01) and with moderate and high complexity lesions (P = 0.0001). There was no significant difference in proportion of these discrepancies in children ≤ 1 year vs. >1 year of age. A significant number of pediatric echocardiograms done at non-tertiary centers had discrepancies that affected the management of these children. More discrepancies were seen when the echocardiogram performer was not a pediatric cardiologist and with complex CHD

  19. Pediatric MATCH Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infographic explaining NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH, a cancer treatment clinical trial for children and adolescents, from 1 to 21 years of age, that is testing the use of precision medicine for pediatric cancers.

  20. Enhancing the Pediatric Drug Development Framework to Deliver Better Pediatric Therapies Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Health care professionals involved in the clinical management of children have long appreciated the limited number of therapies suitably evaluated for their optimal use in the pediatric population. In the past century, advances in regulatory policy significantly evolved adult drug evaluation. The scarcity of available patient populations, practical complexities of drug development research, and minimal financial returns have hampered pharmaceutical investment in the study of therapies for children. More recently, pediatric policy and legislation in the United States and Europe have instituted a system of obligations and incentives to stimulate investment in pediatric drug development. These initiatives, in conjunction with a more sophisticated process of drug discovery and development, have led to significant advancements in the labeling of drugs for pediatric use. Facilitated by the emergence of new targets, precision medicine, and innovations in regulatory science, there is now a subtle shift in focus toward drug development research for children rather than simply in children. Although there has been an increase in pediatric studies of investigational agents and labeling of pediatric information for use, there have been unintended consequences of existing policies. As a result, limited progress has been made in certain therapeutic areas and for off-patent therapies. Future policy reform to enhance the availability and accessibility of pediatric medicines should not only reflect an understanding not only of the successes of existing policy and legislative initiatives but also constructively address failures and unintended consequences. Taken together, policy reform, global cooperation, and innovation in regulatory science will more ably deliver better pediatric therapies tomorrow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Common reference intervals for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in serum: results from an IFCC multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Henny, Joseph; Queraltó, Josep; Ziyu, Shen; Özarda, Yeşim; Chen, Baorong; Boyd, James C; Panteghini, Mauro

    2010-11-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) measurements are important for the assessment of liver damage. The aim of this study was to define the reference intervals (RIs) for these enzymes in adults, paying attention to standardization of the methods used and careful selection of the reference population. AST, ALT and GGT were measured with commercial analytical systems standardized to the IFCC-recommended reference measurement systems. Three centers (two in Italy and one in China) measured their own freshly collected samples; one of these centers also measured frozen samples from the Nordic Countries RI Project and from a Turkish center. RIs were generated using non-parametric techniques from the results of 765 individuals (411 females and 354 males, 18-85 years old) selected on the basis of the results of other laboratory tests and a specific questionnaire. AST results from the four regions (Milan, Beijing, Bursa and Nordic Countries) were statistically different, but these differences were too small to be clinically relevant. Likewise, differences between the upper reference limits for genders was only 1.7 U/L (0.03 μkat/L), allowing a single RI of 11-34 U/L (0.18-0.57 μkat/L) to be defined. Interregional differences were not statistically significant for ALT, but partitioning was required due to significant gender differences. RIs for ALT were 8-41 U/L (0.13-0.68 μkat/L) for females and 9-59 U/L (0.15-0.99 μkat/L) for males, respectively. The upper reference limits for GGT from the Nordic Country population were higher than those from the other three regions and results from this group were excluded from final calculations. The GGT RIs were 6-40 U/L (0.11-0.66 μkat/L) for females and 12-68 U/L (0.20- 1.13 μkat/L) for males, respectively. For AST and ALT, the implementation of common RIs appears to be possible, because no differences between regions were observed. However, a common RI for GGT that is

  2. Are pediatric Open Access journals promoting good publication practice? An analysis of author instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerpohl, Joerg J; Wolff, Robert F; Antes, Gerd; von Elm, Erik

    2011-04-09

    Several studies analyzed whether conventional journals in general medicine or specialties such as pediatrics endorse recommendations aiming to improve publication practice. Despite evidence showing benefits of these recommendations, the proportion of endorsing journals has been moderate to low and varied considerably for different recommendations. About half of pediatric journals indexed in the Journal Citation Report referred to the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) but only about a quarter recommended registration of trials. We aimed to investigate to what extent pediatric open-access (OA) journals endorse these recommendations. We hypothesized that a high proportion of these journals have adopted recommendations on good publication practice since OA electronic publishing has been associated with a number of editorial innovations aiming at improved access and transparency. We identified 41 journals publishing original research in the subject category "Health Sciences, Medicine (General), Pediatrics" of the Directory of Open Access Journals http://www.doaj.org. From the journals' online author instructions we extracted information regarding endorsement of four domains of editorial policy: the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts, trial registration, disclosure of conflicts of interest and five major reporting guidelines such as the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement. Two investigators collected data independently. The Uniform Requirements were mentioned by 27 (66%) pediatric OA journals. Thirteen (32%) required or recommended trial registration prior to publication of a trial report. Conflict of interest policies were stated by 25 journals (61%). Advice about reporting guidelines was less frequent: CONSORT was referred to by 12 journals (29%) followed by other reporting guidelines (MOOSE, PRISMA or STARD) (8 journals, 20%) and STROBE (3 journals, 7%). The EQUATOR

  3. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  4. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  5. Survey of pediatric MDCT radiation dose from university hospitals in Thailand. A preliminary for national dose survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla Univ., Hat Yai (Thailand)], e-mail: supikak@yahoo.com; Trinavarat, Panruethai [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Visrutaratna, Pannee [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai Univ., Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Increasing pediatric CT usage worldwide needs the optimization of CT protocol examination. Although there are previous published dose reference level (DRL) values, the local DRLs should be established to guide for clinical practice and monitor the CT radiation. Purpose: To determine the multidetector CT (MDCT) radiation dose in children in three university hospitals in Thailand in four age groups using the CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP). Material and Methods: A retrospective review of CT dosimetry in pediatric patients (<15 years of age) who had undergone head, chest, and abdominal MDCT in three major university hospitals in Thailand was performed. Volume CTDI (CTDIvol) and DLP were recorded, categorized into four age groups: <1 year, 1- < 5 years, 5- <10 years, and 10- <15 years in each scanner. Range, mean, and third quartile values were compared with the national reference dose levels for CT in pediatric patients from the UK and Switzerland according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendation. Results: Per age group, the third quartile values for brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were, respectively, in terms of CTDIvol: 25, 30, 40, and 45 mGy; 4.5, 5.7, 10, and 15.6 mGy; 8.5, 9, 14, and 17 mGy; and in terms of DLP: 400, 570, 610, and 800 mGy cm; 80, 140, 305, and 470 mGy cm; and 190, 275, 560,765 mGy cm. Conclusion: This preliminary national dose survey for pediatric CT in Thailand found that the majority of CTDIvol and DLP values in brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were still below the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the UK and Switzerland regarding to ICRP recommendation.

  6. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  7. Relationship Between the Functional Status Scale and the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scales FREE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Funai, Tomohiko; Clark, Amy; Moler, Frank; Shanley, Thomas; Meert, Kathy; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Carcillo, Joseph; Berger, John T.; Doctor, Allan; Berg, Robert A.; Dalton, Heidi; Wessel, David L.; Harrison, Rick E.; Dean, J. Michael; Jenkins, Tammara L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Functional status assessment methods are important as outcome measures for pediatric critical care studies. Objective To investigate the relationships between the 2 functional status assessment methods appropriate for large-sample studies, the Functional Status Scale (FSS) and the Pediatric Overall Performance Category and Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (POPC/PCPC) scales. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective cohort study with random patient selection at 7 sites and 8 children’s hospitals with general/medical and cardiac/cardiovascular pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Participants included all PICU patients younger than 18 years. Main Outcomes and Measures Functional Status Scale and POPC/PCPC scores determined at PICU admission (baseline) and PICU discharge. We investigated the association between the baseline and PICU discharge POPC/PCPC scores and the baseline and PICU discharge FSS scores, the dispersion of FSS scores within each of the POPC/PCPC ratings, and the relationship between the FSS neurologic components (FSS-CNS) and the PCPC. Results We included 5017 patients. We found a significant (P < .001) difference between FSS scores in each POPC or PCPC interval, with an FSS score increase with each worsening POPC/PCPC rating. The FSS scores for the good and mild disability POPC/PCPC ratings were similar and increased by 2 to 3 points for the POPC/PCPC change from mild to moderate disability, 5 to 6 points for moderate to severe disability, and 8 to 9 points for severe disability to vegetative state or coma. The dispersion of FSS scores within each POPC and PCPC rating was substantial and increased with worsening POPC and PCPC scores. We also found a significant (P < .001) difference between the FSS-CNS scores between each of the PCPC ratings with increases in the FSS-CNS score for each higher PCPC rating. Conclusions and Relevance The FSS and POPC/PCPC system

  8. Analysis of an In-Service Examination for Core Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Chang, Benjamin; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about designing an effective residency curriculum for pediatric craniofacial surgery. This study elucidates the pediatric craniofacial curriculum of the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Examination (PSITE) to facilitate knowledge acquisition during residency. Approximately, 6 consecutive PSITEs were reviewed for pediatric craniofacial questions (2010-2015). Subjects were categorized according to topics on the American Board of Plastic Surgery written board examination. Questions were categorized using an educational taxonomy model. Answer references were categorized by source and publication lag. Of 1174 PSITE questions, 147 tested pediatric craniofacial topics (12.5%). Questions appeared predominately in the Craniomaxillofacial section (83.0%, p < 0.001). The annual representation was stable more than 6 years (range: 10.2%-14.4%, p = 0.842). Question taxonomy favored interpretation (45.6%) and decision-making (40.8%) over recall (13.6%, p < 0.001) skills, and 41 questions had an associated image (27.9%) and most were photographic (76.7%, p < 0.001). The most frequently tested categories on the American Board of Plastic Surgery written examination content outline were craniofacial anomalies (23.5%), benign and malignant tumors (17.6%), and cleft lip and palate (12.5%). Overall, 80 unique journals were cited 304 times with a mean publication lag of 9.4 ± 10.9 years. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (34.5%) was the most cited journal (p < 0.001). These data may assist in designating core knowledge competency in pediatric craniofacial surgery for plastic surgery residents. A further understanding of PSITE utility for core knowledge competency in pediatric craniofacial surgery would be the focus of future work. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  10. SU-E-I-68: Practical Considerations On Implementation of the Image Gently Pediatric CT Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Adams, C; Lumby, C; Dillon, J; Woods, E; Richer, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: One limitation associated with the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols is practical implementation of the recommended manual techniques. Inconsistency as a result of different practice is a possibility among technologist. An additional concern is the added risk of data error that would result in over or underexposure. The Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) features automatically reduce radiation for children. However, they do not work efficiently for the patients of very small size and relative large size. This study aims to implement the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols in the practical setting while maintaining the use of AEC features for pediatric patients of varying size. Methods: Anthropomorphological abdomen phantoms were scanned in a CT scanner using the Image Gently pediatric protocols, the AEC technique with a fixed adult baseline, and automatic protocols with various baselines. The baselines were adjusted corresponding to patient age, weight and posterioranterior thickness to match the Image Gently pediatric CT manual techniques. CTDIvol was recorded for each examination. Image noise was measured and recorded for image quality comparison. Clinical images were evaluated by pediatric radiologists. Results: By adjusting vendor default baselines used in the automatic techniques, radiation dose and image quality can match those of the Image Gently manual techniques. In practice, this can be achieved by dividing pediatric patients into three major groups for technologist reference: infant, small child, and large child. Further division can be done but will increase the number of CT protocols. For each group, AEC can efficiently adjust acquisition techniques for children. This implementation significantly overcomes the limitation of the Image Gently manual techniques. Conclusion: Considering the effectiveness in clinical practice, Image Gently Pediatric CT protocols can be implemented in accordance with AEC techniques, with adjusted baselines, to

  11. The Heavy Burden of Psychiatric Comorbidity in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Large Comparative Study of a Psychiatrically Referred Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gagan; Petty, Carter; Wozniak, Janet; Henin, Aude; Fried, Ronna; Galdo, Maribel; Kotarski, Meghan; Walls, Sarah; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to systematically examine patterns of psychiatric comorbidity in referred youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) including autistic disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. Consecutively referred children and adolescents to a pediatric psychopharmacology program were assessed with…

  12. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  13. A reference dosimetric system for dose interval of radiotherapy based on alanine/RPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Orlando; Galante, Ocimar L.; Campos, Leticia L.

    2001-01-01

    This work describes the development of a reference dosimetric system based on alanine/EPR for radiotherapy dose levels. Currently the IPEN is concluding a similar system for the dose range used for irradiation of products, 10-10 5 Gy. The objective of this work is to present the efforts towards to improve the measure accuracy for doses in the range between 1-10 Gy. This system could be used as reference by radiotherapy services, as much in the quality control of the equipment, as for routine accompaniment of more complex handling where the total doses can reach some grays. The system uses alanine as detector and electronic paramagnetic resonance - EPR as measure technique. To reach accuracy better than 5% mathematical studies on the best optimization of the EPR spectrometer parameters and methods for the handling of the EPR sign are discussed. (author)

  14. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  15. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  16. Comparisons between Full-time and Part-time Pediatric Emergency Physicians in Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Anne; Tuan, Pao-Lan; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wu, Chang-Teng; Chao, Minston; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Chang, Yu-Ching

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric emergency medicine is a young field that has established itself in recent decades. Many unanswered questions remain regarding how to deliver better pediatric emergency care. The implementation of full-time pediatric emergency physicians is a quality improvement strategy for child care in Taiwan. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of care under different physician coverage models in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The medical records of 132,398 patients visiting the pediatric ED of a tertiary care university hospital during January 2004 to December 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Full-time pediatric emergency physicians are the group specializing in the pediatric emergency medicine, and they only work in the pediatric ED. Part-time pediatricians specializing in other subspecialties also can work an extra shift in the pediatric ED, with the majority working in their inpatient and outpatient services. We compared quality performance indicators, including: mortality rate, the 72-hour return visit rate, length of stay, admission rate, and the rate of being kept for observation between full-time and part-time pediatric emergency physicians. An average of 3678 ± 125 [mean ± standard error (SE)] visits per month (with a range of 2487-6646) were observed. The trends in quality of care, observed monthly, indicated that the 72-hour return rate was 2-6% and length of stay in the ED decreased from 11.5 hours to 3.2 hours over the study period. The annual mortality rate within 48 hours of admission to the ED increased from 0.04% to 0.05% and then decreased to 0.02%, and the overall mortality rate dropped from 0.13% to 0.07%. Multivariate analyses indicated that there was no change in the 72-hour return visit rate for full-time pediatric emergency physicians; they were more likely to admit and keep patients for observation [odds ratio = 1.43 and odds ratio = 1.71, respectively], and these results were similar to those of senior

  17. Symptoms and Mucosal Changes Stable During Rapid Increase of Pediatric Celiac Disease in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitnes, Ann-Christin R; Vikskjold, Florin B; Jóhannesdóttir, Gróa B; Perminow, Gøri; Olbjørn, Christine; Andersen, Solveig N; Bentsen, Beint S; Rugtveit, Jarle; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to study whether the incidence of pediatric celiac disease (CD) in South-Eastern Norway changed from 2000 to 2010. We also examined whether there was a change in symptoms and histopathological morphology in the duodenal biopsies during the same period. In 3 hospitals in South-Eastern Norway, records from pediatric patients (0-14.9 years) diagnosed with CD during two 3-year periods (2000-2002 and 2008-2010) were reviewed. Only cases with a duodenal biopsy diagnosis of CD classified as Marsh grade 2 and 3a-c were included. Frequencies of symptoms, anthropometric data, and laboratory results were compared, in addition to re-examinations of histological sections from one of the hospitals. A total of 400 cases were diagnosed with a female to male ratio of 1.5:1. The incidence rate for 2000 to 2002 was 15.9 cases per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval 12.8-19.4), compared with 45.5 cases per 100,000 person-years during 2008 to 2010 (95% confidence interval 40.5-50.9), P symptoms and the distribution of histopathological changes were similar in the 2 periods, whereas weight z scores and hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in the first period. We found a 3-fold increase in the incidence rate for CD in the Norwegian pediatric population during the decade 2000 to 2010. Slightly higher weight and hemoglobin levels at diagnosis in the latter period may be due to improved CD awareness. Unaltered relative frequencies of symptoms and histopathological changes in the gut, however, suggest a true increase of CD in Norwegian children.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE OF THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENT ABOUT NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KADIAVAR

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high leve of skill & knowledge is required in circumstances of cardiopulmonary resucitation which represents the most urgent clinical situations. The difficulties for pediatric residents who are fronted with the most cases of pediatric & neonatal resucitation are due to different causes of cardiorespiratory arrest in camparison to adults. This study aimed to assess the knowledge & their personal attitude toward the neonatal & pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitatin. Methods: By cross - sectional multicenter study between the pediatric residents who were studied in the teaching hospitals in Tehran (1378-90. Data were gathered among 140 residents by self-completed questionnaires which were included three parts as. demographic information assessment of their attitude by summation of score via ranking list questions and total score from assessment to their knowledge by different scenarios which were formatted in the multiple choice questions. Results: 35.7% of the residents studied in the first year of residency 35.0% in the second year and the remainder (29/3% in the third year More than 90% of them considered their knowledge about neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation low & less than average. Net only 80% of the residents self - assessed their actual ability about this issue low but also declaired the insufficient education during the medical training. The total score of knowledge assessment was 14.7 + 1_0.54 from 30 without any significant relations among the residents in different hospitals or various levels of pediatric residency. (P value= 0.1 , 0.7 There was not significant correlation between the total score from their attitude & their knowledge. Conclusion: Pediatric residents as the key personnel in the management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the neonates and children should have enough knowledge and skills about this topic. This survey demonstrates a low level of the pediatric & neonatal

  19. Reference Intervals for Urinary Cotinine Levels and the Influence of Sampling Time and Other Predictors on Its Excretion Among Italian Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Protano

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS exposure remains a public health problem worldwide. The aims are to establish urinary (u- cotinine reference values for healthy Italian children, to evaluate the role of the sampling time and of other factors on children’s u-cotinine excretion. (2 Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 330 children. Information on participants was gathered by a questionnaire and u-cotinine was determined in two samples for each child, collected during the evening and the next morning. (3 Results: Reference intervals (as the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of the distribution in evening and morning samples were respectively equal to 0.98–4.29 and 0.91–4.50 µg L−1 (ETS unexposed and 1.39–16.34 and 1.49–20.95 µg L−1 (ETS exposed. No statistical differences were recovered between median values found in evening and morning samples, both in ETS unexposed and exposed. Significant predictors of u-cotinine excretions were ponderal status according to body mass index of children (β = 0.202; p-value = 0.041 for evening samples; β = 0.169; p-value = 0.039 for morning samples and paternal educational level (β = −0.258; p-value = 0.010; for evening samples; β = −0.013; p-value = 0.003 for morning samples. (4 Conclusions: The results evidenced the need of further studies for assessing the role of confounding factors on ETS exposure, and the necessity of educational interventions on smokers for rising their awareness about ETS.

  20. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  1. The risk of malignancy among biologic-naïve pediatric psoriasis patients: A retrospective cohort study in a US claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yun; Nordstrom, Beth L

    2017-08-01

    Little published literature exists regarding malignancy risk in pediatric psoriasis patients. To compare malignancy risk in biologic-naïve pediatric psoriasis patients with a matched pediatric population without psoriasis. This retrospective cohort study used IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims data covering 1998-2008. Cancer incidence was compared with the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data using standardized incidence ratios (SIR), and between cohorts using Cox models. Among 9045 pediatric psoriasis patients and 77,206 comparators, 18 probable or highly probable cancers were identified. Pediatric psoriasis patients had a nonsignificantly lower incidence than comparators (hazard ratio [HR] 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05-3.54). The HR increased to 1.67 (95% CI 0.54-5.18) when cancer diagnosed during the first 90 days of follow-up was included. The pediatric psoriasis cohort had a significantly increased lymphoma rate compared with SEER (SIR 5.42, 95% CI 1.62-12.94), but no significant increase relative to the comparator cohort. Misclassification of disease and outcome might have occurred with patients in the claims database. Patients with pediatric psoriasis showed no significant increase in overall cancer risk compared with those without psoriasis. A potential increased risk for lymphoma was observed when compared with the general population. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiodiagnosis in pediatrics today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanova, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    The fields of radiodiagnosis application in pediatrics are considered. The improvement of roentgenologic methods and application of various contrast proparations enable to study and precisely differentiate congenital and acquired diseases. The scope of roentgenology application in pediatrics extends due to differentiation of pediatric specialities. New methods of investigation with decreasing radiation exposure to minimal are realized [ru

  3. Relationship between heart rate and quiescent interval of the cardiac cycle in children using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei [Texas Children' s Hospital, E. B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Bogale, Saivivek [Baylor University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Golriz, Farahnaz [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Imaging the heart in children comes with the challenge of constant cardiac motion. A prospective electrocardiography-triggered CT scan allows for scanning during a predetermined phase of the cardiac cycle with least motion. This technique requires knowing the optimal quiescent intervals of cardiac cycles in a pediatric population. To evaluate high-temporal-resolution cine MRI of the heart in children to determine the relationship of heart rate to the optimal quiescent interval within the cardiac cycle. We included a total of 225 consecutive patients ages 0-18 years who had high-temporal-resolution cine steady-state free-precession sequence performed as part of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or magnetic resonance angiography study of the heart. We determined the location and duration of the quiescent interval in systole and diastole for heart rates ranging 40-178 beats per minute (bpm). We performed the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare the duration of quiescent interval in systole and diastole for each heart rate group. The duration of the quiescent interval at heart rates <80 bpm and >90 bpm was significantly longer in diastole and systole, respectively (P<.0001 for all ranges, except for 90-99 bpm [P=.02]). For heart rates 80-89 bpm, diastolic interval was longer than systolic interval, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). We created a chart depicting optimal quiescent intervals across a range of heart rates that could be applied for prospective electrocardiography-triggered CT imaging of the heart. The optimal quiescent interval at heart rates <80 bpm is in diastole and at heart rates ≥90 bpm is in systole. The period of quiescence at heart rates 80-89 bpm is uniformly short in systole and diastole. (orig.)

  4. Pediatric Melanoma and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Importance—Pediatric melanoma occurs, albeit rarely. Should patients be treated by today’s medical standards, or be subjected to medically unnecessary clinical studies? Observations—We identified international, industry-sponsored pediatric melanoma studies triggered by regulatory demands in www.clinicaltrials.gov and further pediatric melanoma studies demanded by European Union pediatric investigation plans. We retrieved related regulatory documents from the internet. We analyzed these studies for rationale and medical beneficence on the basis of physiology, pediatric clinical pharmacology and rationale. Regulatory authorities define children by chronological age, not physiologically. Newborns’ organs are immature but they develop and mature rapidly. Separate proof of efficacy in underage patients is justified formally/regulatorily but lacks medical sense. Children—especially post-puberty—and adults vis-a-vis medications are physiologically very similar. Two adolescent melanoma studies were terminated in 2016 because of waning recruitment, while five studies in pediatric melanoma and other solid tumors, triggered by European Union pediatric investigation plans, continue recruiting worldwide. Conclusions and Relevance—Regulatory-demanded pediatric melanoma studies are medically superfluous. Melanoma patients of all ages should be treated with effective combination treatment. Babies need special attention. Children need dose-finding and pharmacokinetic studies but adolescents metabolize and respond to drugs similarly to adults. Institutional Review Boards/ethics committees should suspend ongoing questionable pediatric melanoma studies and reject newly submitted questionable studies.

  5. Etiology of pediatric acute liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Jing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric acute liver failure (PALF is a complex syndrome with rapid progression, and the cause of PALF is age-dependent. This article analyzes the common causes of PALF in clinical practice, including infection factors, inherited metabolic factors, poisoning and drugs, abnormal perfusion, and autoimmune diseases, among which infection factors are the most common cause. With the improvement in diagnosis and treatment techniques, the diagnostic rate of PALF caused by inherited metabolic diseases and autoimmune diseases keeps increasing. Due to the small number of PALF patients, there lacks experience in etiological diagnosis. This article summarizes related reports, in order to provide a reference for screening the causes of PALF.

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Cycloplegia on Astigmatism Measurements in a Pediatric Amblyopic Population: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sunali; Phillips, Paul H; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Lowery, R Scott

    2018-06-18

    To study the effect of cycloplegia on astigmatism measurements in pediatric patients with amblyopia. This was a prospective comparative clinical study. Participants 4 to 17 years old were recruited from the patient population at the Arkansas Children's Hospital eye clinic after informed consent was obtained. Autorefractor measurements were used to obtain values of refractive error in amblyopic and non-amblyopic patients before and after cycloplegia. The groups were subdivided into myopia and hyperopia and with and without underlying amblyopia. The refractive error was expressed as sphere, cylinder, axis of astigmatism, and spherical equivalent. The treatment effect was summarized as the mean difference (95% confidence interval) for each outcome. No statistically significant difference was found on the axis and power of astigmatism before and after cycloplegia in the patients with amblyopia (P = .28 and .99, respectively). Non-cycloplegic autorefraction measurements may be considered safe for refining astigmatism power and axis in pediatric patients with amblyopia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 201X; XX(X):XXXX.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Concurrent Surgery and the Role of the Pediatric Attending Surgeon: Comparing Parents' and Surgeons' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jennie K; Ibarra, Christopher; Feinn, Richard S; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Carter, Cordelia W

    2018-06-01

    The common practice of performing concurrent or overlapping operations has been intensely scrutinized by lay media and academic press to investigate its safety and cost-effectiveness. However, there is little information about its use within the pediatric population. Even less is known about parents' expectations about the surgeon's role on the day of operation and how they align with those of pediatric surgeons and surgical trainees, despite the potential for significant discrepancies in expectations to erode trust and damage the physician-family relationship. A 5-point Likert-style survey was designed to characterize expectations about the degree of involvement by pediatric attending surgeons throughout a surgical case (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly agree). The survey was administered to parents of pediatric patients undergoing elective operations during a 3-month interval at a single academic institution. The survey was also administered to surgeons and surgical residents at the same institution. Multivariate multiplicity-adjusted t-tests were used to identify significant differences between responders. One hundred and ten parents and 84 pediatric surgeons and trainees completed the survey. Parents' responses to the survey ranged from 4.15 to 4.89, compared with 2.75 to 4.86 from surgeons. The differences achieved statistical significance (p children. There is a significant mismatch between parents' expectations and those of pediatric surgeons about the role of the surgeon on the day of operation, with parents consistently expecting more direct involvement by the attending surgeon. These discrepancies can have implications for both parent/patient satisfaction and medical education. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study on risk insight for additional ILRT interval extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, M. R.; Hong, S. Y.; Kim, M. K.; Chung, B. S.; Oh, H. C.

    2005-01-01

    In U.S., the containment Integrated Leakage Rate Test (ILRT) interval was extended from 3 times per 10 years to once per 10 years based on NUREG-1493 'Performance-Based Containment Leak-Test Program' in 1995. In September, 2001, ILRT interval was extended up to once per 15 years based on Nuclear Energy Industry (NEI) provisional guidance 'Interim Guidance for Performing Risk Impact Assessments In Support of One-Time Extensions for Containment Integrated Leakage Rate Test Surveillance Intervals'. In Korea, the containment ILRT was performed with 5 year interval. But, in MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology) Notice 2004-15 'Standard for the Leak- Rate Test of the Nuclear Reactor Containment', the extension of the ILRT interval to once per 10 year can be allowed if some conditions are met. So, the safety analysis for the extension of Yonggwang Nuclear (YGN) Unit 1 and 2 ILRT interval extension to once per 10 years was completed based on the methodology in NUREG-1493. But, during review process by regulatory body, KINS, it was required that some various risk insight or index for risk analysis should be developed. So, we began to study NEI interim report for 15 year ILRT interval extension. As previous analysis based on NUREG-1493, MACCS II (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System) computer code was used for the risk analysis of the population, and the population dose was selected as a reference index for the risk evaluation

  9. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... children, and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Gastroenterologists Have? Pediatric gastroenterologists are medical doctors who ...

  10. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Endocrinologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... the teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Endocrinologists Have? Pediatric endocrinologists are medical doctors who ...

  11. What Is a Pediatric Geneticist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Geneticist? Page Content Article Body Fortunately, most children ... with similar problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Geneticists Have? Pediatric geneticists are medical doctors who ...

  12. What Is a Pediatric Urologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Urologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... treat your child. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Urologists Have? Pediatric urologists are medical doctors who ...

  13. Valores de referência para carboxiemoglobina Reference values for carboxyhemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa P. B. de Siqueira

    1997-12-01

    the present study, the RV for carboxyhemoglobin (COHb was determined for the South of Minas Gerais. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The COHb was analyzed by the Beutler and West (1984 spectrophotometric method, optimized in our laboratory. In all the samples, analyses of some biochemical and hematological parameters were made to evaluate the health condition of a population of 200 volunteer non-smokers occupationally not exposed to CO. Each individual answered a questionnaire to obtain data pertinent to the interpretation of the results. The reference values were expressed as mean values ± standard deviation, with a 95% confidence interval, and an upper reference value. The statistical distribution of the results was made so as to enable comparisons between the results of groups of workers, rather than individual evaluations, to be made. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The mean value ± standard deviation was 1.0% ± 0.75; the 95% confidence interval was 0,9 - 1.1% and the upper reference value was 2.5%. By the t Student test (p < 0.05, no difference was detected between the values related to sex, age or ingestion of alcoholic beverages. The reference values obtained were close to those reported for others countries.

  14. Pediatric and Gynecologic Rates of Documentation of Last Menstrual Period in Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Kristl; Mirea, Lucia; Williamson, Amy

    2018-03-08

    The American Academy of Pediatrics and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have identified the menstrual cycle as essential in assessing overall health of adolescent girls. Menses should be considered a "vital sign" and documentation of last menstrual period (LMP) is recommended at every patient encounter. The aim of this study was to estimate and compare LMP documentation among adolescent and pediatric health care providers. A retrospective cohort study identified a random sample of 50 female patients seen in the general pediatrics (PEDS), adolescent medicine (AM), and pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) ambulatory clinics at Phoenix Children's Hospital between January 1, 2016 and March 31, 2016. Rates of LMP documentation were compared between clinics using the Pearson χ 2 test. Multivariable logistic regression analyses quantified the association of clinic and LMP documentation, with adjustments for visit reason, provider gender, and age at presentation. Rates of LMP documentation were 100% for adolescent gynecologists, but significantly lower for general pediatricians (14%) and AM (60%) providers (P < .0001). These findings were confirmed in multivariable analyses (PAG vs PEDS: odds ratio [OR], 280; 95% confidence interval [CI], 32-2331; PAG vs AM: OR, 34; 95% CI, 4.4-270; AM vs PEDS: OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.3-11.0). Adolescent gynecologists document LMP routinely. In contrast, LMP documentation rates in AM, and especially in PEDS, were significantly lower. Quality improvement methods such as incorporation of an LMP section into the vitals portion of an electronic medical record could help improve rates of compliance. Copyright © 2018 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  16. Retention of knowledge and skills in pediatric basic life support amongst pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkhorst, Mathijs; Coopmans, Michelle; Draaisma, Jos M T; Bot, Petra; Hogeveen, Marije

    2018-05-07

    Retention of resuscitation skills is usually assessed at a predefined moment, which enables participants to prepare themselves, possibly introducing bias. In this multicenter study, we evaluated the retention of knowledge and skills in pediatric basic life support (PBLS) amongst 58 pediatricians and pediatric residents with an unannounced examination. Practical PBLS skills were assessed with a validated scoring instrument, theoretical knowledge with a 10-item multiple-choice test (MCQ). Participants self-assessed their PBLS capabilities using five-point Likert scales. Background data were collected with a questionnaire. Of our participants, 21% passed the practical PBLS exam: 29% failed on compressions/ventilations, 31% on other parts of the algorithm, 19% on both. Sixty-nine percent passed the theoretical test. Participants who more recently completed a PBLS course performed significantly better on the MCQ (p = 0.03). This association was less clear-cut for performance on the practical exam (p = 0.11). Older, attending pediatricians with more years of experience in pediatrics performed less well than their younger colleagues (p basic life support (PBLS) in daily practice. Poor retention of skills supposedly accounts for this incompetence. Without regular exposure, resuscitation skills usually deteriorate within 3 to 6 months after training. • Examination of resuscitation skills usually takes place after training. Also, in most studies evaluating retention of skills, participants are tested at a predefined moment. Inasmuch as participants are able to prepare themselves, these assessments do not reflect the ad hoc resuscitation capabilities of pediatricians and residents. What is New: • In this study, pediatricians and pediatric residents had to complete an unannounced PBLS exam at variable time intervals from last certification. Retention of PBLS skills was rather poor (pass rate 21%). • The PBLS skills of older, attending pediatricians with many

  17. The US pediatric nephrology workforce: a report commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, William A; Meyers, Kevin E; Kirkwood, Suzanne J; Ruch-Ross, Holly S; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    The US pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. This report describes clinical and nonclinical activities, motivations and disincentives to a career in pediatric nephrology, future workforce needs, trainee recruitment, and possible explanations for personnel shortages. An e-mail survey was sent in 2013 to all identified US-trained or -practicing pediatric nephrologists. Of 504 respondents, 51% are men, 66% are US graduates, and 73% work in an academic setting. About 20% of trained pediatric nephrologists no longer practice pediatric nephrology. Among the 384 respondents practicing pediatric nephrology full or part-time in the United States, the mean work week was 56.1±14.3 hours, with time divided between patient care (59%), administration (13%), teaching (10%), clinical research (9%), basic research (6%), and other medical activities (3%). Most (>85%) care for dialysis and transplantation patients. The median number of weeks annually on call is 16, and 29% work with one or no partner. One-third of US pediatric nephrologists (n=126) plan to reduce or stop clinical nephrology practice in the next 5 years, and 53% plan to fully or partially retire. Almost half the division chiefs (47%) report inadequate physician staffing. Ongoing efforts to monitor and address pediatric nephrology workforce issues are needed. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Seminar Pediatrics. Medical and Technical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montivero, M.; Nespral, D.O.; Alak, Maria del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine has organized the 'Seminar Pediatrics - Medical and Technical Applications', held in Buenos Aires in May 2012, in order to collaborate with the scientific growth of nuclear medicine in pediatrics. The main topics covered were: management of pediatric patients and medical application in childhood, dosimetry in pediatric nuclear medicine, scope of radioisotope - studies in nephrourological pathologies, PET in pediatrics, among others.

  19. Systematic review of the clinical course, natural history, and prognosis for pediatric mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Ryan; Carroll, Linda J; Cancelliere, Carol

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on prognosis after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus (2001-2012), as well as reference lists of eligible articles, and relevant systematic reviews and meta...

  20. Toward a Model of Pediatric Speech Sound Disorders (SSD) for Differential Diagnosis and Therapy Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, Hayo; Maassen, Bernardus; Maas, Edwin; van Lieshout, Pascal; Maassen, Ben; Terband, Hayo

    2016-01-01

    The classification and differentiation of pediatric speech sound disorders (SSD) is one of the main questions in the field of speech- and language pathology. Terms for classifying childhood and SSD and motor speech disorders (MSD) refer to speech production processes, and a variety of methods of

  1. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Frederick D; Gelfand, Michael J; Drubach, Laura A; Treves, S Ted; Fahey, Frederic H

    2015-04-01

    were age 5 years or younger. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, updated radiation dose estimates can guide efforts to reduce radiation exposure and provide current information for discussing radiation exposure and risk with referring physicians, patients and families. There can be substantial differences in radiation exposure for the same procedure, depending upon which of these two guidelines is followed. This discordance identifies opportunities for harmonization of the guidelines, which may lead to further reduction in nuclear medicine radiation doses in children.

  2. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Frederick D.; Drubach, Laura A.; Treves, S. Ted; Fahey, Frederic H.; Gelfand, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    were age 5 years or younger. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, updated radiation dose estimates can guide efforts to reduce radiation exposure and provide current information for discussing radiation exposure and risk with referring physicians, patients and families. There can be substantial differences in radiation exposure for the same procedure, depending upon which of these two guidelines is followed. This discordance identifies opportunities for harmonization of the guidelines, which may lead to further reduction in nuclear medicine radiation doses in children. (orig.)

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  4. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ Handout for Patients and Families What Is Pediatric Palliative Care? Pediatric Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is ... life for both the child and the family. Pediatric palliative care is provided by a team of ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the measurement of whole body muscle mass: A comparison of interval gap methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmanns, K.; McBean, K.; Thoirs, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is commonly used in body composition research to measure whole body skeletal muscle mass (SM). MRI calculation methods of SM can vary by analysing the images at different slice intervals (or interval gaps) along the length of the body. This study compared SM measurements made from MRI images of apparently healthy individuals using different interval gap methods to determine the error associated with each technique. It was anticipated that the results would inform researchers of optimum interval gap measurements to detect a predetermined minimum change in SM. Methods: A method comparison study was used to compare eight interval gap methods (interval gaps of 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm) against a reference 10 mm interval gap method for measuring SM from twenty MRI image sets acquired from apparently healthy participants. Pearson product-moment correlation analysis was used to determine the association between methods. Total error was calculated as the sum of the bias (systematic error) and the random error (limits of agreement) of the mean differences. Percentage error was used to demonstrate proportional error. Results: Pearson product-moment correlation analysis between the reference method and all interval gap methods demonstrated strong and significant associations (r > 0.99, p < 0.0001). The 40 mm interval gap method was comparable with the 10 mm interval reference method and had a low error (total error 0.95 kg, −3.4%). Analysis methods using wider interval gap techniques demonstrated larger errors than reported for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), a technique which is more available, less expensive, and less time consuming than MRI analysis of SM. Conclusions: Researchers using MRI to measure SM can be confident in using a 40 mm interval gap technique when analysing the images to detect minimum changes less than 1 kg. The use of wider intervals will introduce error that is no better

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  8. Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, Stephen F.; Finke, Whitney; Wu, Isaac C.; Ho, Chang Y.; Hibbard, Roberta A.; Hicks, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Two board-certified fellowship-trained neuroradiologists at an academic pediatric hospital independently interpreted the head CTs, compared their interpretations to determine inter-reader discrepancy rates, and resolved discrepancies to establish a consensus second interpretation. The primary interpretation was compared to the consensus second interpretation using the RADPEER trademark scoring system to determine the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates. MRI and/or surgical findings were used to validate the primary interpretation or second interpretation when possible. The diagnosis of abusive head trauma was made using clinical and imaging data by a child abuse specialist to separate patients into abusive head trauma and non-abusive head trauma groups. Discrepancy rates were compared for both groups. Lastly, primary interpretations and second interpretations were evaluated for discussion of imaging findings concerning for abusive head trauma. There were statistically significant differences between primary interpretation-second interpretation versus inter-reader overall and major discrepancy rates (28% vs. 6%, P=0.0001; 16% vs. 1%, P=0.0001). There were significant differences in the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates for abusive head trauma patients compared to non-abusive head trauma

  9. Radiologic head CT interpretation errors in pediatric abusive and non-abusive head trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kralik, Stephen F.; Finke, Whitney; Wu, Isaac C.; Ho, Chang Y. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Hibbard, Roberta A.; Hicks, Ralph A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Child Protection Programs, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Pediatric head trauma, including abusive head trauma, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to identify and evaluate radiologic interpretation errors of head CTs performed on abusive and non-abusive pediatric head trauma patients from a community setting referred for a secondary interpretation at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective search identified 184 patients <5 years of age with head CT for known or potential head trauma who had a primary interpretation performed at a referring community hospital by a board-certified radiologist. Two board-certified fellowship-trained neuroradiologists at an academic pediatric hospital independently interpreted the head CTs, compared their interpretations to determine inter-reader discrepancy rates, and resolved discrepancies to establish a consensus second interpretation. The primary interpretation was compared to the consensus second interpretation using the RADPEER trademark scoring system to determine the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates. MRI and/or surgical findings were used to validate the primary interpretation or second interpretation when possible. The diagnosis of abusive head trauma was made using clinical and imaging data by a child abuse specialist to separate patients into abusive head trauma and non-abusive head trauma groups. Discrepancy rates were compared for both groups. Lastly, primary interpretations and second interpretations were evaluated for discussion of imaging findings concerning for abusive head trauma. There were statistically significant differences between primary interpretation-second interpretation versus inter-reader overall and major discrepancy rates (28% vs. 6%, P=0.0001; 16% vs. 1%, P=0.0001). There were significant differences in the primary interpretation-second interpretation overall and major discrepancy rates for abusive head trauma patients compared to non-abusive head trauma

  10. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Methods: Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high...... in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. Conclusions: The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods...... with pronounced heterogeneity and valid reference intervals. Furthermore, part of the heterogeneity in creatinine distribution is likely due to differences in biological and chronological age of children and should be considered when using age-specific reference intervals....

  11. [Thyroid carcinoma:Experience 57 cases. Is there a different bio-development in pediatric age?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, P; Martínez Ibáñez, V; Galofré, P; Lloret, J; Boix-Ochoa, J

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested a different biodevelopment in the differentiated thyroid cancer in pediatric age. General and pediatric surgeons from different centres has coincided to operate this kind of pediatric pathology that finally conclude the treatment in the nuclear medicine department from the reference hospital. The objectives of this revision is, to confirm de difference in thyroid cancer in pediatric age and to know few factors implicated. A review of 57 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, medullary and anaplastic were excluded, treated in the nuclear medicine department during the last 20 years. 28% were 10 years old (41 cases). This 57 young patients were operated in 22 hospitals and 79% by a general surgeon and 21% by pediatric surgeon. The analysis was performed with SPSS MS Windows 6.0 (chi cuadrado, t-Student-Fisher). There are more reinterventions in patients operated by a general surgeon. There aren't differences between the number of total neck dissections between both groups of surgeons, but when is performed, the incidence of complications is significantly high. In patients < 10 years old, there are more metastasis and more surgical complications. In spite of, all patients still alive. Children < 10 years old, the illness is more local aggressive and the recurrence and lung metastasis is high, more surgical complications. We recommend to concentrate this pathology in a few hospitals to achieve more experience and to avoid complications.

  12. PET imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulkin, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    High-quality PET imaging of pediatric patients is challenging and requires attention to issues commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric nuclear medicine, but uncommon to the imaging of adult patients. These include intravenous access, fasting, sedation, consent, and clearance of activity from the urinary tract. This paper discusses some technical differences involved in pediatric PET to enhance the quality of scans and assure the safety and comfort of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  16. Pediatric emergence delirium: Canadian Pediatric Anesthesiologists' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H David; Mervitz, Deborah; Cravero, Joseph P

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric emergence agitation/delirium (ED) is a cluster of behaviors seen in the early postanesthetic period with negative emotional consequences for families and increased utilization of healthcare resources. Many studies have looked at identifying risk factors for ED and at pharmacologic regimens to prevent ED. There are few published reports on treatment options and efficacy for established ED episodes, and essentially no data concerning current practice in the treatment of ED. We sought to elicit the experience and opinions of Canadian Pediatric Anesthesiologists on the incidence of ED in their practice, definitions and diagnostic criteria, preventative strategies, treatments, and their perceived efficacy. A web-based survey was sent to pediatric anesthesiologists working at academic health science centers across Canada. The participants were selected based on being members of the Canadian Pediatric Anesthesia Society (CPAS), which represents the subspecialty in Canada. All members of CPAS who had e-mail contact information available in the membership database were invited to participate. A total of 209 members out of the total of 211 fulfilled these criteria and were included in the study population. The response rate was 51% (106/209). Of respondents, 42% felt that ED was a significant problem at their institutions, with 45% giving medication before or during anesthesia to prevent the development of ED. Propofol was the most common medication given to prevent ED (68%) and to treat ED (42%). Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) was considered by 38% of respondents as a technique used to prevent ED. Medications used for treatment included propofol (42%), midazolam (31%), fentanyl (10%), morphine (7%), and dexmedetomidine (5%), with 87% of respondents rating effectiveness of treatment as 'usually works quickly with one dose'. We present information on current practice patterns with respect to prophylaxis and treatment of ED among a specialized group of pediatric

  17. Pediatric tinnitus: Incidence of imaging anomalies and the impact of hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rhorie; Kang, Elise; Hopkins, Brandon; Anne, Samantha

    2017-12-01

    Guidelines exist for evaluation and management of tinnitus in adults; however lack of evidence in children limits applicability of these guidelines to pediatric patients. Objective of this study is to determine the incidence of inner ear anomalies detected on imaging studies within the pediatric population with tinnitus and evaluate if presence of hearing loss increases the rate of detection of anomalies in comparison to normal hearing patients. Retrospective review of all children with diagnosis of tinnitus from 2010 to 2015 ;at a tertiary care academic center. 102 pediatric patients with tinnitus were identified. Overall, 53 patients had imaging studies with 6 abnormal findings (11.3%). 51/102 patients had hearing loss of which 33 had imaging studies demonstrating 6 inner ear anomalies detected. This is an incidence of 18.2% for inner ear anomalies identified in patients with hearing loss (95% confidence interval (CI) of 7.0-35.5%). 4 of these 6 inner ear anomalies detected were vestibular aqueduct abnormalities. The other two anomalies were cochlear hypoplasia and bilateral semicircular canal dysmorphism. 51 patients had no hearing loss and of these patients, 20 had imaging studies with no inner ear abnormalities detected. There was no statistical difference in incidence of abnormal imaging findings in patients with and without hearing loss (Fisher's exact test, p ;= ;0.072.) CONCLUSION: There is a high incidence of anomalies detected in imaging studies done in pediatric patients with tinnitus, especially in the presence of hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kerala Pioneering Pediatric Surgery in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric surgeons of Kerala are very proud to have led the development of superspeciality in any branch of medicine in Kerala and also superspeciality of Pediatric surgery in whole of India. Late Prof. Raman Nair returned in 1954 after training under Dr. Everett Koop in US. Same year, in his far-sighted vision for future development of the speciality, he moved to SATH, Medical College, Trivandrum and started Pediatric surgery as a speciality attached to Paediatrics department; this was the beginning of Pediatric surgery in India. He opted for Pediatric surgery as a full time job and did not do any general surgery work in adults. He was the first full time Pediatric surgeon of India; during the next few years, 2 surgeons, one in Calcutta, Prof. UC Chakraboty and Prof. D Anjaneyulu in Hyderabad started working as full time Pediatric surgeons. In Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai, Pediatric surgery developed much later and then all over the country.

  19. Testing and Treatment After Adolescent Sexual Assault in Pediatric Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Samantha; Samuels-Kalow, Margaret; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Scribano, Philip V; French, Benjamin; Wood, Joanne N

    2015-12-01

    To examine rates of recommended of testing and prophylaxis for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and pregnancy in adolescents diagnosed with sexual assault across pediatric emergency departments (EDs) and to determine whether specialized sexual assault pathways and teams are associated with performance of recommended testing and prophylaxis. In this retrospective study of 12- to 18-year-old adolescents diagnosed with sexual assault at 38 EDs in the Pediatric Hospital Information System database from 2004 to 2013, information regarding routine practice for sexual assault evaluations and presence and year of initiation of specialized ED sexual assault pathways and teams was collected via survey. We examined across-hospital variation and identified patient- and hospital-level factors associated with testing and prophylaxis using logistic regression models, accounting for clustering by hospital. Among 12,687 included cases, 93% were female, 79% were <16 years old, 34% were non-Hispanic white, 38% were non-Hispanic black, 21% were Hispanic, and 52% had public insurance. Overall, 44% of adolescents received recommended testing (chlamydia, gonorrhea, pregnancy) and 35% received recommended prophylaxis (chlamydia, gonorrhea, emergency contraception). Across EDs, unadjusted rates of testing ranged from 6% to 89%, and prophylaxis ranged from 0% to 57%. Presence of a specialized sexual assault pathway was associated with increased rates of prophylaxis even after adjusting for case-mix and temporal trends (odds ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 1.86). Evaluation and treatment of adolescent sexual assault victims varied widely across pediatric EDs. Adolescents cared for in EDs with specialized sexual assault pathways were more likely to receive recommended prophylaxis. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  1. Effect of Hemoconcentration on Dural Sinus Computed Tomography Density in a Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurttutan, Nursel; Kizildag, Betul; Sarica, Mehmet Akif; Baykara, Murat

    2016-10-01

    Unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT) is inexpensive, easily available, and the first-choice imaging modality for patients presenting with various neurologic symptoms. Venous thrombosis is not rare in childhood, but diagnosis can be difficult. In some cases, only denser vessels can be used to highlight an issue. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the relationship between X-ray attenuation and hemoconcentration in a pediatric population. This study enrolled 99 pediatric patients who had been referred radiology department for unenhanced brain CT. Images were retrospectively evaluated for measurement of dural sinus densities from four distinct dural sinus locations. Correlation between mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values and hemoglobin/hematocrit (Hb/Htc) levels, as well as age and gender were further analyzed. There was a strong correlation between mean HU and Hb levels (r = 0.411; standard deviation: 0.001) and also between mean HU and Htc levels (r = 0.393; p pediatric group. In conclusion, before deciding between a diagnosis of thrombosis and a determination of normal findings during an evaluation of unenhanced CT in a pediatric population, radiologists should consider complete blood count results as well as H:H ratios. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies

  3. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R. (eds.) [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, Lubbock, TX (United States); Handal, G.A. [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies.

  4. Anomaly-Related Pathologic Atlantoaxial Displacement in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Olga M; Ryabykh, Sergey O; Burcev, Alexander V; Gubin, Alexander V

    2018-06-01

    To analyze clinical and radiologic features of pathologic atlantoaxial displacement (PAAD) in pediatric patients and to compose a treatment algorithm for anomaly-related PAAD. Criteria of different types of PAAD and treatment algorithms have been widely reported in the literature but are difficult to apply to patients with odontoid abnormalities, C2-C3 block, spina bifida C1, and children. We evaluated results of treatment of 29 pediatric patients with PAAD caused by congenital anomalies of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), treated in Ilizarov Center in 2009-2017, including 20 patients with atlantoaxial displacement (AAD) and 9 patients with atlantoaxial rotatory fixation. There were 14 males (48.3%) and 15 females (51.7%). We singled out 3 groups of patients: nonsyndromic (6 patients, 20.7%), Klippel-Feil syndrome (13 patients, 44.8%), and syndromic (10 patients, 34.5%). Odontoid abnormalities and C1 dysplasia were widely represented in the syndromic group. Local symptoms predominated in the nonsyndromic and KFS groups. In the syndromic group, all patients had AAD and myelopathy. A pronounced decrease of space available for chord C1 and increase of anterior atlantodental interval were noted compared with other groups. We present a unified treatment algorithm of pediatric anomaly-related PAAD. Syndromic AAD are often accompanied by anterior and central dislocation and myelopathy and atlantooccipital dissociation. These patients require early aggressive surgical treatment. Nonsyndromic and Klippel-Feil syndrome AAD, atlantoaxial subluxation, and atlantoaxial fixation often manifest by local symptoms and need to eliminate CVJ instability. Existing classifications of symptomatic atlantoaxial displacement are not always suitable for patients with CVJ abnormalities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. When symptoms don't fit: a case series of conversion disorder in the pediatric otolaryngology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulley, Lisa; Kohlert, Scott; Gandy, Hazen; Olds, Janet; Bromwich, Matthew

    2018-05-29

    Conversion disorder refers to functional bodily impairments that can be precipitated by high stress situations including trauma and surgery. Symptoms of conversion disorder may mimic or complicate otolaryngology diseases in the pediatric population. In this report, the authors describe 3 cases of conversion disorder that presented to a pediatric otolaryngology-head and neck surgery practice. This report highlights a unique population of patients who have not previously been investigated. The clinical presentation and management of these cases are discussed in detail. Non-organic otolaryngology symptoms of conversion disorder in the pediatric population are reviewed. In addition, we discuss the challenges faced by clinicians in appropriately identifying and treating these patients and present an approach to management of their care. In this report, the authors highlight the importance of considering psychogenic illnesses in patients with atypical clinical presentations of otolaryngology disorders.

  6. A nationwide survey of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kira, R.; Ishizaki, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Sanefuji, M.; Ichiyama, T.; Oka, A.; Kishi, T.; Kimura, S.; Kubota, M.; Takanashi, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Tamai, H.; Natsume, J.; Hamano, S.; Hirabayashi, S.; Maegaki, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Minagawa, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kira, J.; Kusunoki, S.; Hara, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the CNS in Japan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide survey and collected clinical data on children with ADS aged 15 years or younger, who visited hospitals between 2005 and 2007. Results: Among 977 hospitals enrolled, 723 (74.0%) responded to our inquiries and reported a total of 439 patients as follows: 244 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 117 with multiple sclerosis (MS), 14 with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and 64 with other ADS. We collected and analyzed detailed data from 204 cases, including those with ADEM (66), MS (58), and NMO (10). We observed the following: (1) the estimated annual incidence rate of pediatric ADEM in Japan was 0.40 per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34–0.46), with the lowest prevalence in the north; (2) the estimated prevalence rate of MS was 0.69 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.58–0.80), with the lowest prevalence in the south; (3) NMO in Japan was rare, with an estimated prevalence of 0.06 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.04–0.08); and (4) the sex ratio and mean age at onset varied by ADS type, and (5) male/female ratios correlated with ages at onset in each ADS group. Conclusions: Our results clarify the characteristic clinical features of pediatric ADS in the Japanese population. PMID:27742816

  7. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity.

  8. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAPD AAPD Publications Advertising Brochures Journals & Publications Full Journal Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Oral ...

  9. Five-Year Risk of Interval-Invasive Second Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Diana S. M.; Houssami, Nehmat; Dowling, Emily C.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Lehman, Constance D.; Henderson, Louise M.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Earlier detection of second breast cancers after primary breast cancer (PBC) treatment improves survival, yet mammography is less accurate in women with prior breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine women presenting clinically with second breast cancers after negative surveillance mammography (interval cancers), and to estimate the five-year risk of interval-invasive second cancers for women with varying risk profiles. Methods: We evaluated a prospective cohort of 15 114 women with 47 717 surveillance mammograms diagnosed with stage 0-II unilateral PBC from 1996 through 2008 at facilities in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. We used discrete time survival models to estimate the association between odds of an interval-invasive second breast cancer and candidate predictors, including demographic, PBC, and imaging characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The cumulative incidence of second breast cancers after five years was 54.4 per 1000 women, with 325 surveillance-detected and 138 interval-invasive second breast cancers. The five-year risk of interval-invasive second cancer for women with referent category characteristics was 0.60%. For women with the most and least favorable profiles, the five-year risk ranged from 0.07% to 6.11%. Multivariable modeling identified grade II PBC (odds ratio [OR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15 to 3.31), treatment with lumpectomy without radiation (OR = 3.27, 95% CI = 1.91 to 5.62), interval PBC presentation (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.16), and heterogeneously dense breasts on mammography (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.01 to 2.36) as independent predictors of interval-invasive second breast cancers. Conclusions: PBC diagnosis and treatment characteristics contribute to variation in subsequent-interval second breast cancer risk. Consideration of these factors may be useful in developing tailored post-treatment imaging surveillance plans. PMID:25904721

  10. Effects of body size and gender on the population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin in pediatric malaria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carrie A; Tan, Beesan; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Jung, Donald; Shin, Chang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2013-12-01

    Despite the important role of the antimalarial artesunate and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in malaria treatment efforts, there are limited data on the pharmacokinetics of these agents in pediatric patients. This study evaluated the effects of body size and gender on the pharmacokinetics of artesunate-DHA using data from pediatric and adult malaria patients. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was used to obtain a base model consisting of first-order artesunate absorption and one-compartment models for artesunate and for DHA. Various methods of incorporating effects of body size descriptors on clearance and volume parameters were tested. An allometric scaling model for weight and a linear body surface area (BSA) model were deemed optimal. The apparent clearance and volume of distribution of DHA obtained with the allometric scaling model, normalized to a 38-kg patient, were 63.5 liters/h and 65.1 liters, respectively. Estimates for the linear BSA model were similar. The 95% confidence intervals for the estimated gender effects on clearance and volume parameters for artesunate fell outside the predefined no-relevant-clinical-effect interval of 0.75 to 1.25. However, the effect of gender on apparent DHA clearance was almost entirely contained within this interval, suggesting a lack of an influence of gender on this parameter. Overall, the pharmacokinetics of artesunate and DHA following oral artesunate administration can be described for pediatric patients using either an allometric scaling or linear BSA model. Both models predict that, for a given artesunate dose in mg/kg of body weight, younger children are expected to have lower DHA exposure than older children or adults.

  11. Routine airway surveillance in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergin, Ozgul; Adil, Eelam; Kawai, Kosuke; Watters, Karen; Moritz, Ethan; Rahbar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review airway findings in children with tracheostomies who underwent surveillance direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy (DLB) to determine the yield of routine airway evaluation in these patients. Retrospective chart review at tertiary referral children's hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all of the children with tracheostomies who underwent DLB after tracheostomy between 1984 and 2015. A total of 303 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time interval between tracheostomy and first follow-up DLB was 12.0 months (IQR 4.8-28.9 months). There was no significant difference in the incidence of airway lesions between patients who underwent endoscopy tracheostomy versus those who had a longer time interval between tracheostomy and DLB (p = 0.16). One hundred sixty seven patients (55.1%) were diagnosed with lesions, with suprastomal granulation (39.9%) being the most common. Symptomatic patients were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion identified (69.9% versus 42.0%; p tracheostomy were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion (p = 0.01). The high incidence of airway lesions noted during surveillance DLB support the utility of routine airway endoscopy in pediatric tracheostomy patients. Symptomatic patients, those with ventilator dependence, or cardiopulmonary or trauma indications for tracheostomy are more likely to have airway lesions and should be monitored closely. The ideal time interval between surveillance endoscopies needs to be examined further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Interfacility Transfers to General Pediatric Floors: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Role of Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Jennifer L; Okumura, Megumi J; Hernandez, Lenore; Li, Su-Ting T; Rehm, Roberta S

    2016-01-01

    Children with special health care needs often require health services that are only provided at subspecialty centers. Such children who present to nonspecialty hospitals might require a hospital-to-hospital transfer. When transitioning between medical settings, communication is an integral aspect that can affect the quality of patient care. The objectives of the study were to identify barriers and facilitators to effective interfacility pediatric transfer communication to general pediatric floors from the perspectives of referring and accepting physicians, and then develop a conceptual model for effective interfacility transfer communication. This was a single-center qualitative study using grounded theory methodology. Referring and accepting physicians of children with special health care needs were interviewed. Four researchers coded the data using ATLAS.ti (version 7, Scientific Software Development GMBH, Berlin, Germany), using a 2-step process of open coding, followed by focused coding until no new codes emerged. The research team reached consensus on the final major categories and subsequently developed a conceptual model. Eight referring and 9 accepting physicians were interviewed. Theoretical coding resulted in 3 major categories: streamlined transfer process, quality handoff and 2-way communication, and positive relationships between physicians across facilities. The conceptual model unites these categories and shows how these categories contribute to effective interfacility transfer communication. Proposed interventions involved standardizing the communication process and incorporating technology such as telemedicine during transfers. Communication is perceived to be an integral component of interfacility transfers. We recommend that transfer systems be re-engineered to make the process more streamlined, to improve the quality of the handoff and 2-way communication, and to facilitate positive relationships between physicians across facilities. Copyright

  13. Pediatric vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to define childhood vasculitis and to highlight new causative factors and treatment modalities under the guidance of recently published studies. Childhood vasculitis is difficult to diagnose because of the wide variation in the symptoms and signs. New nomenclature and classification criteria were proposed for the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the genetic susceptibility to pediatric vasculitis as it was in other diseases. Various radiological techniques provide great opportunities in establishing the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Mild central nervous system disease can accompany Henoch-Schonlein purpura and can go unnoticed. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare in children. Increased severity of the disease, subglottic stenosis, and renal disease are described more frequently among children. Biological therapies are used with success in children as in adults. Future studies, whose aims are to evaluate treatment responses, prognosis and to design guidelines for activity, and damage index of vasculitis for children are required. Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the most frequent vasculitides of children. Experience from adult studies for treatment and prognosis are usually used because of low incidence of other vasculitides in children. Multicenter studies of pediatric vasculitis should be conducted to detail treatment responses and prognosis in children.

  14. Referrals for pediatric weight management: the importance of proximity

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    Hagedorn Douglas WJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited access to weight management care can have a negative impact on the health and well-being of obese children and youth. Our objectives were to describe the characteristics of clients referred to a pediatric weight management centre and explore potential differences according to proximity. Methods All demographic and anthropometric data were abstracted from standardized, one-page referral forms, which were received by a pediatric weight management centre in Edmonton, AB (Canada between April, 2005 and April, 2009. Results Referrals (n = 555; 52% male; age [mean +/- standard deviation]: 12.4 +/- 2.6 y; BMI: 32.3 +/- 6.8 kg/m2; BMI percentile: 98.4 +/- 1.7; BMI z-score: 2.3 +/- 0.4 were received from 311 physicians. Approximately 95% of referrals were for boys and girls classified as obese or very obese. Based on postal code data, individuals were dichotomized as either living within (local; n = 455 or beyond (distant; n = 100 the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area. Numerous families resided several hundred kilometres away from our centre. Overall, distant clients were taller, weighed more, and were more overweight than their local counterparts. For distant clients, the degree of overweight was higher in youth versus children. Conclusion Pediatric weight management services must be designed to optimize access to health services, especially for distant clients who may be at increased obesity-related health risk.

  15. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery

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