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Sample records for pediatric otorhinolaryngology sirmione

  1. Pediatric radiology in oto-rhino-laryngology

    OpenAIRE

    von Kalle, T; Koitschev, A

    2014-01-01

    [english] Head and neck diseases in children and adolescents present special diagnostic and differential diagnostic challenges to ENT surgeons as well as to radiologists. Both disciplines have to adapt the latest radiological and interventional technologies to the needs of the pediatric patient in order to enable a minimally invasive but successful diagnostic procedure.High quality sonography by an experienced examiner is often the only imaging technique that is necessary in children and adol...

  2. Pediatric otorhinolaryngology anno 2008: towards European standards for training?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Verwoerd, Carel

    2009-06-01

    The Union Européen des Médecins Spécialistes (UEMS) has been promoting harmonization of specialist training programs in Europe. Anticipating a future contribution to a European standard for training specialists for tertiary care of children with otorhinolaryngology (ORL)-related problems this Round Table was organized by ESPO. The presentations refer to six European countries. The number of ORL specialists (including pediatric ORL specialists) appeared to vary from +\\/-8 to +\\/-1 per 100,000 inhabitants, suggesting significant differences as far as their contribution to health care is concerned. Numbers for pediatricians vary from 12 to 3 and for family doctors from 50 to 100 per 100,000. In two countries pediatric ORL has the status of an official sub-specialty for tertiary care, requiring at least 2 years of additional training for qualified ORL specialists. In three other countries specific centers for pediatric ORL are present, although the sub-specialty has no official status. In the last a center for pediatric otorhinolaryngology has not yet been established and facilities for training in pediatric ORL are not available. For each country various aspects of current practice of tertiary ORL care for children are presented. It is concluded that a European standard for pediatric ORL could be most useful, if it would not only refer to current diagnostic and therapeutic skills but also to relevant scientific knowledge and skills. However, it should be recognized that the relevance of today\\'s standards is restricted, as medicine and medical technology are rapidly developing.

  3. Nigerian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology was established by the Otorhinolaryngological Society of Nigeria, as an international medium for the rapid dissemination of original research and scientific works related to all aspects of academic and clinical practice of Otorhinolaryngology. It aims to promote academic and ...

  4. Pycnodysostosis at otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglam, Tekin; Binnetoglu, Adem; Fatih Topuz, Muhammet; Baş Ikizoglu, Nilay; Ersu, Refika; Turan, Serap; Sarı, Murat

    2017-04-01

    Pycnodysostosis is a rare autosomal, recessive, skeletal dysplasia caused by a mutation in the cathepsin k gene. Pycnodysostosis is characterized by short stature, characteristic facial appearance (delayed closure of fontanelles and cranial sutures, mandibular hypoplasia and angle disorder, blue sclera), and acroosteolysis of the distal phalanges. Our aim was to describe the otorhinolaryngologic findings, differential diagnoses, various treatment options, and followup in eight cases of pycnodysostosis. This retrospective clinical study used data from eight patients diagnosed with pycnodysostosis by a single pediatric endocrinologist primarily based on clinical and radiographic findings. All patients were referred to the otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic by the pediatric endocrinology unit of the Marmara University between February 2013 and March 2015. Detailed medical histories were obtained in all cases and otorhinolaryngologic physical examination, blood assays, electrocardiogram, lateral skull X-rays, chest radiograph, cephalometric investigations, tympanograms, and audiograms were also carried out. Sleep videos of patients were recorded and those with upper airway problems were evaluated for sleep apnea by polysomnography. Informed consent form was obtained from the parents of all patients. Eight patients (7 females and 1 male) displaying proportionate dwarfism were included in the study. They had a mean age of 14.7 years (range: 13-16 y), the mean height of 141.3 cm (range 132-155 cm), and mean weight of 44.4 kg (range: 39.6-49.3 kg). All patients had facial dysmorphism with frontal bossing and the hands and feet had short digits with overlying cutaneous wrinkles that tapered off with large overriding nails. Midfacial hypoplasia and malocclusion were observed in seven of the eight patients (87.5%), four (50%) had micrognathia, and five (62.5%) had proptosis. Tympanograms and audiograms of all patients were type A and normal, and the mean of the pure

  5. First Clinical Consensus and National Recommendations on Tracheostomized Children of the Brazilian Academy of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology (ABOPe) and Brazilian Society of Pediatrics (SBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, Melissa A G; Maunsell, Rebecca; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Lubianca Neto, José Faibes; Schweiger, Cláudia; Miura, Carolina Sponchiado; Chen, Vitor Guo; Manrique, Dayse; Oliveira, Raquel; Gavazzoni, Fabiano; Picinin, Isabela Furtado de Mendonça; Bittencourt, Paulo; Camargos, Paulo; Peixoto, Fernanda; Brandão, Marcelo Barciela; Sih, Tania Maria; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    Tracheostomy is a procedure that can be performed in any age group, including children under 1year of age. Unfortunately health professionals in Brazil have great difficulty dealing with this condition due to the lack of standard care orientation. This clinical consensus by Academia Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia Pediátrica (ABOPe) and Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria (SBP) aims to generate national recommendations on the care concerning tracheostomized children. A group of experts experienced in pediatric tracheostomy (otorhinolaryngologists, intensive care pediatricians, endoscopists, and pediatric pulmonologists) were selected, taking into account the different regions of Brazil and following inclusion and exclusion criteria. The results generated from this document were based on the agreement of the majority of participants regarding the indications, type of cannula, surgical techniques, care, and general guidelines and decannulation. These guidelines can be used as directives for a wide range of health professionals across the country that deal with tracheostomized children. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic Cough in Otorhinolaryngologic Routine

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    Palheta Neto, Francisco Xavier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic cough is sometimes manifested as an imprecise symptom, but of great importance for both the diagnosis and the prognosis. In an otorhinolaryngologic approach, several illnesses that can occur with it can be numbered, including 2 of the 3 main causes of chronic cough. Objective: To identify the main otorhinolaryngologic diseases showing the chronic cough as one of their manifestations. Method: A literature's revision was performed in several scientific articles, specialized books and consultation in Birene and Scielo databases. Literature's revision: cough production in the upper airways is usually associated with an inflammatory reaction by stimulating sensitive receptors of these areas or by mechanic stimulus. The main cause of the chronic cough in the otorhinolaryngology day-to-day is the post-nasal drip, gathering together by itself 02 of the most common diseases: rhinitis and sinusitis. Laryngitis as a result of gastroesophageal reflux (GER stands out in the index of chronic cough etiology, but it is not as severe as GER . Neoplasias are also somewhat frequent causes of cough, and the difficulty in diagnosing the cough cause is common in this disease group. Motility disorder, laryngeal irritation persistence, parasitic disease and injuries by inhalation of toxic products were also found as a cause of cough for longer than 03 months. Conclusion:Chronic cough is a frequent and important finding in otorhinolaryngology and cannot be underestimated, and a careful anamnesis is the best way to determine the etiology and perform a correct treatment for the patient's disease.

  7. Otorhinolaryngological patient injuries in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtivuori, Tuuli; Palonen, Reima; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, Helena; Holi, Tarja; Henriksson, Markus; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2013-10-01

    Otorhinolaryngology (ORL) is considered a specialty associated with few serious patient injuries. Research data that support this belief are, however, scarce. We analyzed claims associated with ORL to determine the number of Finnish cases and the possible common denominators. Register study of ORL cases in the Patient Insurance Centre (PIC), the Regional State Administrative Agencies (RSAA), and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Care (Valvira) during the years 2004 to 2008. These three agencies are the main actors in the field of patient injury in Finland. We analyzed compensated ORL patient injury cases from the PIC and cases associated with the ORL specialty for Valvira and RSAA from 2004 to 2008 and surveyed patient treatment files, statements from specialists, and compensation decisions. Injuries were usually associated with operations; three patients who experienced injuries during these procedures died. Common ORL operations such as tonsillectomy, septoplasty, and paranasal sinus surgery were most often associated with compensated injuries. Serious injuries were few, with a total of 110 out of 422 (26.1%) claims compensated by the PIC. Of the 110 compensated cases, 30 (27.3%) were related to tumor surgery. The most usual compensated case had iatrogenic nerve injury affecting the facial or trigeminal nerves. Of the compensated cases, 79 (71.8%) were treated by specialists, 15 (13.6%) by residents, and the rest by other medical professionals. Patient injuries in ORL are seldom severe and are strongly associated with surgery. A typical compensated injury was one that occurred in a central hospital during working hours. N/A. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of cystic fibrosis: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho, Carolina Pimenta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cystic Fibrosis is the most common recessive autosomic genetic disease among Caucasians. It's caused by mutations in the gene that decodes regulatory protein for transmembrane conductance, resulting in defective transport of chlorine. Objective: Review the literature about Cystic Fibrosis, with emphasis on otorhinolaryngologic manifestations. Method: The online Pub Med databases were researched and we applied the following search terms Fibrosis Cystic and Sinusitis, and Mucoviscidosis and Sinusitis. Conclusions: Although it is not the main cause of death, the otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of the Cystic Fibrosis bring important morbidity to these patients.

  9. Otorhinolaryngology manifestations secondary to oral sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, Claudia; Morales-Angulo, Carmelo

    Over the last few years, oral and pharyngeal signs and symptoms due to oral sex have increased significantly. However, no review articles related to this subject have been found in the medical literature. The objective of our study was to identify otorhinolaryngological manifestations associated with orogenital/oroanal contact, both in adults and children, in the context of consensual sex or sexual abuse. We performed a review of the medical literature on otorhinolaryngological pathology associated with oral sex published in the last 20 years in the PubMed database. Otorhinolaryngological manifestations secondary to oral sex practice in adults can be infectious, tumoral or secondary to trauma. The more common signs and symptoms found in the literature were human papillomavirus infection (above all, condyloma acuminata and papilloma/condyloma), oral or pharyngeal syphilis, gonococcal pharyngitis, herpes simplex virus infection and pharyngitis from Chlamydia trachomatis. The incidence of human papillomavirus -induced oropharyngeal carcinoma has dramatically increased. In children past the neonatal period, the presence of condyloma acuminatus, syphilis, gonorrhoea or palatal ecchymosis (the last one, unless justified by other causes) should make us suspect sexual abuse. Sexual habits have changed in the last decades, resulting in the appearance of otorhinolaryngological pathology that was rarely seen previously. For this reason, it is important for primary care physicians to have knowledge about the subject to perform correct diagnosis and posterior treatment. Some sexual abuse cases in children may also be suspected based on the knowledge of the characteristic oropharyngeal manifestations secondary to them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  10. Laser tissue effects with regard to otorhinolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, B.M.; Werner, J.A.; Rudert, H.

    1994-01-01

    The multitude of medical laser systems with different wavelengths and technical appliances implicates the necessity of fundamental knowledge about the effects of laser beams on living tissue. This is necessary to allow sufficient and therefore successful results for the patient. In this paper tissue effects of the mostly used lasers in otorhinolaryngology, CO-2 laser and Nd:YAG laser will be presented. Influence on blood and lymphatic vessels, wound healing and several CO-2 laser parameters will be discussed. (author)

  11. [Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children and adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, C; Herrmann, I F; Rohrbach, S; Schwemmle, C; Nawka, T

    2015-03-01

    Position Paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology - Current State of Clinical and Endoscopic Diagnostics, Evaluation, and Therapy of Swallowing Disorders in Children and AdultsSwallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration induced pneumonia and malnutrition. On the other hand quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities.Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatrists, are asked for diagnostics and therapy who will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings.A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom oriented treatment is necessary for the mostly complex disorders. The integration of non-medical personnel such as logopeds (speech language pathologists), physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over by them in close cooperation.In particular an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff from intensive care medicine is indispensable.The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists.Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently substitution of the physician is precluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Writing otorhinolaryngology head & neck surgery operative reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, O; Rubin, F; Villeneuve, A; Bonfils, P

    2017-09-01

    Only about ten articles devoted to operative reports have been published in the medical literature, but this document is essential, both medically and legally, to ensure optimal management of operated patients. In this technical note, based on published studies on this subject, the authors describe the key features of operating reports after otorhinolaryngology head & neck surgery and emphasize the need to write this document during the minutes after the end of the operation, the importance of standardization and its teaching role during surgical training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. New Challenges for International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jotz, Geraldo Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology is beginning a new chapter in its history; starting with this issue, the journal will be published by Thieme Medical Publishers. Much as impressionism, which emerged in the late 19th century in France, became the starting point for the development of modern art that conveyed the artists' desire to portray the moment in which a scene took place, the International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology has collaborated with Thieme to better disseminate its content, thereby providing more visibility for its authors. This is an important step in the growth of the journal. The journal will maintain its subsections and will publish supplementary special issues that will accompany the main journal, the first of which will appear in July 2014. For future issues, we will be changing the system of online submission and review of the papers, which will be managed by ScholarOne (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/iaorl. In 2014, we will continue our policy of rewarding articles in the area of meta-analysis that are published in our journal, because these studies form the basis for opinion-making regarding the most varied subjects. In this issue, among the published studies, we highlight the studies related to adenotonsillectomy, rhinoplasty, sensorineural hearing loss, neurotology, allergy, and orofacial issues, seeking challenges, responses, and therapeutic suggestions for several disorders.

  14. Otorhinolaryngology through the works of Hippocrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolidis, L S

    2002-01-01

    This retrospective survey refers to the philosophers and first scientists of the pre-Hippocratic era, which included the foundation of schools in Greece at the time (e.g. Ionia, South Sicily, Kyrinia). During the ensuing Hippocratic era the foundations of medicine as a science were laid. The concepts developed by Hippocrates and his school are set out in the Corpus Hippocraticum. In many sections of this work reference is made to diseases of the ear, nose, larynx, head and neck. It is difficult no to be impressed by the fact that many of the diagnoses and therapies are not very dissimilar to contemporary approaches. The notion that Hippocrates, Father of Medicine, gave meaning to otorhinolaryngology is also discussed here. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. [Hygiene in otorhinolaryngology: Requirements and reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, E; Heudorf, U

    2015-12-01

    Considering the physiological contamination of skin and mucous membranes in the ear, nose, and throat region by facultative pathogen microorganisms, as well as the increase in multidrug resistant organisms (MDRO), it is mandatory that hygienic procedures be observed in ENT institutions, in order to prevent transmission of bacteria and infections in patients. General guidelines for hygiene in otorhinolaryngology are presented based on the recommendations published by the German Commission on Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO). These encompass hand hygiene, surface disinfection, and reprocessing of medical devices. The correct reprocessing of the various components of ENT treatment units (including endoscopes, water bearing systems) is reported. Although law requires and KRINKO recommends that manufacturers of medical devices publish instructions for reprocessing their products, these reprocessing recommendations are often insufficient. Manufacturers should thus be called upon to improve their recommendations. In this paper, the requirements for handling of ENT treatment units are compared with the observations made by the Public Health Department in 7 ENT clinics and 32 ENT practices in Frankfurt/Main, Germany, in 2014.

  16. Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  17. Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasheed, Shabana; Teo, Harvey James Eu Leong; Littooij, Annemieke Simone

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of pediatric patients involves many diverse modalities, including radiography, ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic and angiographic studies. It is therefore important to be aware of potential pitfalls that may be related to these modalities

  18. Quality of life questionnaires in otorhinolaryngology; a systematic overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenraads, Simone P C; Aarts, Mark C J; vd Veen, EL; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of quality of life (QOL) as an endpoint and the use of validated QOL questionnaires has increased over time. OBJECTIVE OF OVERVIEW: To evaluate health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) measurement instruments used in patients in otorhinolaryngology (ORL). We aim to

  19. An Audit of Otorhinolaryngological Practice in a Tertiary Institution in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital (NDUTH) is a young tertiary hospital with recently established department in various specialties. In spite of this it caters for the health needs of a lot of the patients in Bayelsa state and its environs. The aim of this study therefore is to audit the otorhinolaryngological ...

  20. An audit of endoscopic otorhinolaryngological practice in Jos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endoscopic otorhinolaryngological procedure is quicker, safer and cheaper than open surgery because of its less invasive nature. It is constantly being practiced in the developed nations and the Middle East. The indications abound in our environment. However, very few hospitals have the facilities for these ...

  1. Antimicrobial prophylaxis related to otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Lopez, Gladys; Morejon Garcia, Moises; Alvarez Cespedes, Belkis

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Antimicrobial prophylaxis decreases the surgical infections, but its indiscriminate use to favors the increment of infection rates and the bacterial resistance is much more probable in presence of antibiotics. The aim of present research was to evaluate the results of antibiotic prophylaxis in the otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery. METHODS. A retrospective-descriptive research was made on the prophylactic use of antibiotics in this type of surgery in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the ''Comandant Manuel Fajardo'' during 6 years (2001-2006). Sample included 661 patients and the following variables were studied: sex, age and therapeutic response criteria (satisfactory and non-satisfactory). According to the intervention complexity oral antibiotic or parenteral prophylaxis was administered carrying out a surgical hound site culture. RESULTS. There was a predominance of male sex (54,1%) and the 31 and 62 age group. The 41,90% of patients operated on required antibiotic prophylaxis. The was a 7,9% of surgical wound infections. The more frequent microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter and Escherichia. In head and neck oncology surgeries infection average was high (42,3%). Torpid course was due to concurrence of infection risk factors. There were neither adverse events nor severe complications. CONCLUSIONS. In Otorhinolaryngology, antimicrobial prophylaxis works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not in the Oncology surgeries. (author)

  2. Frequency of otorhinolaryngologies' manifestations in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

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    Sousa, Renato Telles de

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The tuberculosis continues being a world problem and in the last years had an increase in his incidence mainly by the growing number of patients with HIV. The tuberculosis has like an etiologic agent the Mycobacterium tuberculosis that possesses a period of latency generally prolonged between the initial infection and the illness. That illness can affect diverse organs and systems. M Method: This study is descriptive, transversal and prospective. Within, patients diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis by the service of pneumologia of the outpatient clinic Araújo Lima of the Federal University of the Amazon (UFAM, in Manaus, between the period of July of 2005 and May of 2006 were submitted to otorhinolaryngological exam in search of manifestations of the illness. Objectives: The main objective of the study was estimate the predominance of otorhinolaryngological manifestations in patients with tuberculosis and to describe the frequencies of the different manifestations. Results: They were analyzed 15 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis confirmed by the baciloscopia, being 7 of the female sex and 8 of the male sex. The majority of the patients were young adults between the third and fourth decade of life (46,7%. Only one of the patients had co-infection with the HIV virus. Conclusion: The otorhinolaryngological affection by the tuberculosis was observed in 2 patients corresponding to 13.33% of the sample, being a patient with tubercular medium otitis and a patient with linfoadenopatia cervical.

  3. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the I.P. Pavlov Saint-Peterburg First State Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpishchenko, S A

    This article is designed to report the results of the analysis ofacademic, scientific, and clinical activities of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the I.P. Pavlov Saint-Peterburg First State Medical University.

  4. The most common otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of granulomatous diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshiki, Rosana Emiko

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Granulomatous diseases result from immunopathologic processes in which there is a failure in the fagocitosis of intracellular organisms. They can cause oral, nasal and pharyngeal mucosa ulcers, vocal cords lesions, otorrhoea and oropharyngeal vegetant lesions. Objective: Describing the most frequent otorhinolaryngologic manifestations in common granulomatous diseases: hanseniasis, paracoccidioidomycosis, leishmaniasis. Method: A retrospective study has been carried out from records of patients diagnosed with the abovementioned diseases between January 1, 2005 and October 31, 2007 in an infectology ambulatory of a tertiary hospital. Results: 142 patients were evaluated; 93 with leishmaniasis, 39 with paracoccidioidomycosis and 10 with hanseniasis. In 93 cases of leishmaniasis, 16 (17.2% had mucosal affection, and the most common signs were septum perforation and nasal mucosal ulcers, both with 8 cases. In paracoccidioidomycosis, oropharyngeal ulcer was the most frequent, with 15 cases (38,4%. Conclusion: Head and neck signs and symptoms are common in patients with leishmaniasis and paracoccidioidomycosis. Nasal manifestations prevail in leishmaniasis and oropharyngeal ones in paracoccidioidomycosis.

  5. ANALYSIS OF OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, ORTHOPEDICS AND THORACIC SURGERY JOURNALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Wilma Terezinha Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    To perform an extensive analysis of journals in Medicine III - CAPES, and specifically those in the areas of Otorhinolaryngology, Orthopedics and Traumatology and Chest Surgery. An active search for the impact factors in the Journal Citation Reports, Scimago, their indexation in Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus and Google Scholar, and their stratification in WebQualis was done. Forty-four journals with measured impact factors ranging from 3.006 to 0.128 were detected in the area of Otorhinolaryngology; however, only 26 of them (60%) had a Qualis measured by CAPES; in the stratification, no journal was detected in A1, three were A2 and nine B1. Three journals were located for Chest Surgery, with only one of them having a measured Qualis (A2) with a mean of 3.61. Sixty-seven journals were detected for Orthopedics and Traumatology, with an impact factor ranging from 4.699 to 0.156; Qualis was measured in only 38 of them (60%); there were three journal stratified as A1, seven as A2 and 25 as B1. The search for journals of higher impact induces authors to not publish in journals related to their area and facing more difficulties than investigators from other areas. Realizar análise ampla dos periódicos da Medicina III - CAPES e, especificamente, os pertencentes à Otorrinolaringologia, Ortopedia e Traumatologia, e Cirurgia Torácica. Busca ativa do fator de impacto dos periódicos das áreas citadas no Journal Citation Report e Scimago, sua indexação no Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus, Google Scholar e sua estratificação no WebQualis. Para a Otorrinolaringologia foram encontrados 44 periódicos, cujo fator de impacto variou de 3.006 a 0.128; entretanto, apenas 26 deles (60%) tinham Qualis medido pela CAPES; nas estratificações encontrou-se nenhuma revista em A1, três em A2 e nove em B1. Para a Cirurgia Torácica foram localizados três periódicos, sendo que apenas um tinha Qualis medido (A2) com média de 3.61. Os resultados da busca para a Ortopedia e Traumatologia permitiu

  6. Quality of life questionnaires in otorhinolaryngology: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenraads, S P C; Aarts, M C J; van der Veen, E L; Grolman, W; Stegeman, I

    2016-12-01

    The importance of quality of life (QOL) as an endpoint and the use of validated QOL questionnaires have increased over time. To evaluate health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) measurement instruments used in patients in otorhinolaryngology (ORL). We aimed to establish the use of QOL questionnaires in ORL over a period of time, establish the use of QOL questionnaires within different domains and determine the use of validated QOL questionnaires. We performed a comprehensive search in PubMed up to 1 January 2014. Articles were included that measured HR-QOL questionnaires in clinical practice in children, adolescents or adults in 42 journals of ORL. Multiple unique QOL questionnaires, organised according to domain, time and survey of validation, were extracted from reported articles. Of 2442 articles, we utilised 1196 publications with a total of 2103 QOL questionnaires regarding ORL. We evaluated a variety of 363 unique QOL questionnaires in which 60% (n = 220) QOL questionnaires had been validated. We found a continuing increase in the amount of articles which used QOL questionnaires since the beginning of the 20th century, while the percentage of validated QOL questionnaires remained the same (76%). Most QOL questionnaires were used in the domains oncology (35%), otology (21%) and rhinology (20%). The domain otology had the largest amount of unique QOL questionnaires (n = 122). We identified and evaluated all unique HR-QOL questionnaires utilised in patients in ORL. Recently, the use of validated and non-validated HR-QOL questionnaires has increased within all domains of ORL. The assessment of QOL has become an important outcome measure in clinical practice, in medical research and for healthcare organisations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-12-13

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  8. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  9. Opinions of Otorhinolaryngology Residents about Their Education Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokuzlar, Uğur; Miman, Murat Cem; Denizoğlu, İsmail İlter; Eğrilmez, Murat

    2015-09-01

    Our study was planned to get the views of residents about the Otorhinolaryngology (ORL) education process and to enlighten the studies to make this process more effective. A questionnaire was sent to the residents who were still in the residency program in all education clinics via "Google Drive". Seventy-four of 354 residents responded and the answers were evaluated electronically. Fifty residents (67.56%) gave an affirmative answer to the question about the use of "Resident Log Book" and no difference was seen among the clinics. While 9 residents (12.16%) were reporting that they did not read any scientific papers, 43 (58.1%) reported they read less than three per month. Forty-one residents thougt that they were having a good and sufficient education. Seventeen residents (51.51%) who thought they were not having a sufficient education reported that the education period should be longer. When they were wanted to evaluate the education process, while 66 of them (89.18%) said "Exhausting", 52 (70.27%) said "Stressful", it was seen that the ones who said "Instructive" and "Rewarding" were 26 (35.13%) and 17 (22.97%) respectively. Further, 43 of 48 residents (89.58%) who were over the third year of their residency program indicated that they were unable to perform at least one procedure listed in the questionnaire after finishing their education. This study is important because it is the first study about the opinion of ORL residents and will help determine the current status in Turkey. This study will be useful for the preparation of educational programs and guides in the future.

  10. Pediatric MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric MS Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Support Pediatric Providers ... system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS In 2018 the U.S. Food and Drug ...

  11. [Analysis of the otorhinolaryngological doctoral theses submitted in Spain between 1976 and 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Juan Ignacio; Prim, María Pilar

    2008-01-01

    The importance of otorhinolaryngology as a separate branch of medicine has grown in the last decades. The objective of this work is to analyze the doctoral theses in ENT presented in Spain between 1976 and 2005. The TESEO database was searched for theses on otorhinolaryngology produced in Spain between 1976 and 2005. The search criteria used were the terms "Otorhinolaryngology," "Ear, nose, and throat surgery," "Hearing physiology," "Vestibular physiology," "Hearing physics," and "Bioacoustics". 468 theses were found (15.6 theses/year). Of these, 343 (73.6 %) were submitted by otorhinolaryngologists. The Universities of Valencia (Estudi General) (49), Complutense of Madrid (42), Salamanca (39), Barcelona (35), and Autònoma of Barcelona (31) accounted for most of the theses. The name of the supervisor was listed in 376 of the 468 theses (80.4 %); 286 of them had only 1 supervisor (76.1 %) and 90 had 2 (23.9 %). The most frequent topics were otology and audiology (35.1 %). Otorhinolaryngology in Spain has produced a similar number of theses as other areas of knowledge evaluated. The supervision of theses has tended to be shared in the most recent years studied. The number of theses submitted each year did not have only academic influences but also non-academic reasons.

  12. A re-appraisal of publication rates of scientific papers presented at the Otorhinolaryngology Research Society meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A S; Krishnan, M; Williams, S P; Mamais, C; Sweed, A; Bhat, J; Somashekar, S; Leong, S C

    2016-12-01

    To review the rate of publication of papers in peer-reviewed journals after oral presentations at the Otorhinolaryngology Research Society meetings between 1996 and 2013 and to compare trends with the previous review (1979-1995). Literature review. Merseyside ENT Research Collaborative. The abstracts of presentations at Otorhinolaryngology Research Society meetings are published in Clinical Otolaryngology. A structured search of PubMed was undertaken to identify published Otorhinolaryngology Research Society presentations. Publication rates. A total of 460 abstracts were identified. The interobserver reliability among reviewers was 98%. Of the total, 259 (56.3%) abstracts were published in peer-reviewed journals. The average time from Otorhinolaryngology Research Society presentation to publication was 27.7 months (median 23), which was not significantly different from the previous review. Publication by subspeciality was as follows: head and neck (45.6%), otology (30.5%), rhinology (22%) and others (1.9%). Most published Otorhinolaryngology Research Society presentations were published in Clinical Otolaryngology (22.4%), followed by the Journal of Laryngology and Otology (8.1%) and the Laryngoscope (7.3%). Clinical research was the most common category of abstracts being presented at Otorhinolaryngology Research Society meetings, followed by laboratory-based research. Over half (56.5%) of laboratory research presented were head and neck themed, while otology and rhinology predominated clinical research presentations. Over half (52.1%) of Otorhinolaryngology Research Society abstracts originated from units in the North of England. Bristol presented the most abstracts (30.1%), followed by Newcastle (25.1%). The publication rate of Otorhinolaryngology Research Society presentations remains high and many are subsequently published in high-impact factor otolaryngology journals. More Otorhinolaryngology Research Society presentations are now published in American and

  13. [Short introduction to the history of otorhinolaryngology and craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudry, Albert

    2015-01-01

    OHNS is a medical specialty born at the end of the 19th century. It is the congruence of otology and laryngology, rapidly associated with rhinology. It went through three chronological steps: construction in the second part of the 19th century, consolidation in the first part of 20th century and extension in the second part of the 20th and beginning of the 21st century. Scientifically, OHNS was set out into five partially layered phases: bedside teaching, introduction of anatomopathology, invention of clinic experiments, expansion of surgery, and use of highly technological advances. The increase of knowledge became progressively exponential due to concomitant progress. It lead to a renewal of the subdivision of the specialty into otology, rhinology, laryngology, head and neck surgery, pediatric OHNS, otoneurology, facioplastic surgery, and phoniatry in the last decades of the 20th century.

  14. Division of tongue tie: review of practice through a tertiary paediatric otorhinolaryngology service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, R W

    2012-10-01

    Recent NICE guidance declared that evidence regarding surgical division of tongue tie was adequate to support the use of the procedure, provided that normal arrangements are in place for consent, audit and clinical governance. This work aimed to carry out a retrospective review of those patients who have previously undergone tongue tie division through a tertiary paediatric otorhinolaryngology service. We further aimed to identify the referral patterns, indications for, and outcomes following, division.

  15. Using Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic to improve quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leijen-Zeelenberg, Janneke E; Brunings, Jan Wouter; Houkes, Inge; van Raak, Arno J A; Ruwaard, Dirk; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Kremer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Although Lean Thinking has led to considerable improvement in a variety of healthcare settings, its effects on otorhinolaryngology remain underexposed. This study reports on how the implementation of Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic has affected patient and provider satisfaction, waste reduction, and organizational culture. Prospective before-and-after design. The 18-month prospective before-and-after design used mixed methods for data collection and analysis. A survey was conducted to measure satisfaction among patients and providers. Semistructured interviews were conducted to evaluate the effect of Lean Thinking on waste and organizational culture. During the project, 69 issues were posted on the Lean board. Improvements were made on 36 inefficiency issues, not all concerning a specific type of waste. Employees reported considerable improvement in transportation, motion, and waiting. Patient satisfaction was high both at baseline and follow-up and did not change significantly. The effects on provider satisfaction were slight; satisfaction with autonomy and participation decreased significantly, but satisfaction with communication increased significantly. The implementation of Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic reduced waste and increased provider satisfaction with communication. Although patient satisfaction did not change significantly, it cannot be concluded that the intervention had no effect on perceived quality of care. Other approaches to measure patients' perceptions should be considered. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Benefits, pitfalls and risks of phytotherapy in clinical practice in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, O; Werner, A; Laccourreye, L; Bonfils, P

    2017-04-01

    To elucidate the benefits, pitfalls and risks of phytotherapy in the clinical practice of otorhinolaryngology. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched using the following keywords: phytotherapy, phytomedicine, herbs, otology, rhinology, laryngology, otitis, rhinitis, laryngitis and otorhinolaryngology. Seventy-two articles (18 prospective randomized studies, 4 Cochrane analyses, 4 meta-analysis and 15 reviews of the literature) devoted to clinical studies were analyzed. Articles devoted to in vitro or animal studies, biochemical analyses or case reports (including fewer than 10 patients) and articles dealing with honey, aromatherapy or minerals were excluded. Per os ginkgo biloba has no indications in tinnitus, presbycusis or anosmia following viral rhinitis. Traditional Asian medicine has no proven benefit in sudden deafness or laryngeal papillomatosis. Per os mistletoe extracts associated to conventional treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma does not increase 5-year survival. Extracts of various herbs, notably echinacea, eucalyptus, petasites hybridus, pelargonium sidoides, rosemary, spirulina and thyme, show superiority over placebo for rhinosinusitis and allergic rhinitis, as does gingko biloba for selected vertigo. There have been encouraging preliminary results for intratumoral injection of mistletoe in head and neck carcinoma and acupoint herbal patching for allergic rhinitis. Herb intake should be screened for in case of certain unexplained symptoms such as epistaxis, headache or dizziness, or signs suggesting allergy. Phytotherapy should be interrupted ahead of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Scientific proof of the benefit of phytotherapy in otorhinolaryngology remains to be established but, given its widespread use and the reported data, knowledge of this form of treatment needs to be developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists Pediatric Specialists Article Body ​Your pediatrician may refer your child to a pediatric specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Pediatric specialists ...

  18. The potential of eHealth in otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery: patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderried, Martin; Ernst, C; Holderried, F; Rieger, M; Blumenstock, G; Tropitzsch, A

    2017-07-01

    The use of modern information and communication technologies (ICT) in daily life has significantly increased during the last several years. These essential online technologies have also found their way into the healthcare system. The use of modern ICT for health reasons can be summarized by the term 'eHealth'. Despite the potential importance of eHealth in the field of otorhinolaryngology (ORL), there is little understanding of patients' attitudes towards the deeper integration of these technologies into intersectoral care. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of patients' attitudes towards the use of modern ICT for intersectoral communication and information transfer in the field of ORL. Therefore, a structured interview was developed by an interdisciplinary team of otorhinolaryngologists, public health researchers, and information technology (IT) specialists. Overall, 211 ORL patients were interviewed at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tuebingen University Hospital, Germany, and 203 of these patients completed the interview. This study revealed ORL patients' perspectives on the potential of eHealth, especially for appointment scheduling, appointment reminders, and intersectoral communication of personal medical information. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that data security and the impacts of eHealth on the physician-patient relationship and on treatment quality warrant special attention in future research.

  19. Pediatric Sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Sinusitis Pediatric Sinusitis Patient Health Information News media interested in ... sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to diagnose because symptoms of ...

  20. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  1. High-Level Disinfection of Otorhinolaryngology Clinical Instruments: An Evaluation of the Efficacy and Cost-effectiveness of Instrument Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalamanchi, Pratyusha; Yu, Jason; Chandler, Laura; Mirza, Natasha

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Despite increasing interest in individual instrument storage, risk of bacterial cross-contamination of otorhinolaryngology clinic instruments has not been assessed. This study is the first to determine the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of standard high-level disinfection and clinic instrument storage. Methods To assess for cross-contamination, surveillance cultures of otorhinolaryngology clinic instruments subject to standard high-level disinfection and storage were obtained at the start and end of the outpatient clinical workday. Rate of microorganism recovery was compared with cultures of instruments stored in individual peel packs and control cultures of contaminated instruments. Based on historical clinic data, the direct allocation method of cost accounting was used to determine aggregate raw material cost and additional labor hours required to process and restock peel-packed instruments. Results Among 150 cultures of standard high-level disinfected and co-located clinic instruments, 3 positive bacterial cultures occurred; 100% of control cultures were positive for bacterial species ( P cost of individual semicritical instrument storage at $97,852.50 per year. Discussion With in vitro inoculation of >200 otorhinolaryngology clinic instruments, this study demonstrates that standard high-level disinfection and storage are equally efficacious to more time-consuming and expensive individual instrument storage protocols, such as peel packing, with regard to bacterial contamination. Implications for Practice Standard high-level disinfection and storage are equally effective to labor-intensive and costly individual instrument storage protocols.

  2. The impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome on otorhinolaryngological services at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlantis, Alexander C; Tsang, Raymond K Y; Wong, Duncan K K; Woo, John K S; van Hasselt, C Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to describe the impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on the services of the division of otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery at an academic tertiary referral hospital in Hong Kong. Descriptive. Records of general and subspecialty outpatient attendance, ward admissions, ward bed occupancy, and elective and emergency surgery were obtained for the period since the SARS outbreak and for an equivalent period before the outbreak. The changes in these parameters were determined against the background of new SARS cases. Since the outbreak of SARS in March 2003, the weekly outpatient clinic attendance has declined by 59%, the number of operations performed by 79%, the average ward bed occupancy rate by 79% and the daily admission rate by 84%. A dramatic increase of 300% in the number of patients defaulting on their outpatient appointments was recorded. The substantial decrease in otorhinolaryngological services at an academic tertiary referral hospital in Hong Kong has been multifaceted. The decrease in attendance at the outpatient clinics reflects the increased number of patients defaulting on their appointments. Nonessential elective surgery was suspended soon after the outbreak, accounting for the decrease in the number of surgical procedures performed and partially for the decrease in ward bed occupancy and ward admissions. The temporary closure of the accident and emergency department contributed to the decrease in ward admissions and emergency surgical procedures. The reduced service offered by the hospital is having an impact on the quality of care available to patients with non-life-threatening otorhinolaryngological conditions.

  3. Guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology (SFORL). Epistaxis and high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, J; Prulière Escabasse, V; Bequignon, E; Vérillaud, B; Robard, L; Crampette, L; Malard, O

    2017-02-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société Française d'Oto-Rhino-Laryngologie et de Chirurgie de la Face et du Cou: SFORL) on epistaxis in high blood pressure. A multidisciplinary work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, based on the articles retrieved and the group members' individual experience. They were then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The final version was established in a coordination meeting. The guidelines were graded as A, B, C or expert opinion, by decreasing level of evidence. It is recommended to measure the blood pressure of patients in acute-phase epistaxis (Grade A); to control high blood pressure medically in the acute phase of bleeding, to reduce its duration; to monitor blood pressure at the waning of nosebleed; and to control high blood pressure medically in the waning phase to reduce the risk of recurrence. In case of persistent high blood pressure on waning of severe epistaxis, it is recommended to prescribe cardiovascular evaluation to screen for underlying hypertensive disease (Grade B). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Treatment of otorhinolaryngologic diseases of deficient heat type with Professor XIE Qiang's Tihu Guanding needling method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Xie, Qiange; Huang, Bing-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Professor XIE Qiang's Tihu Guanding needling method, a kind of acupuncture method which takes acupoints of the Conception Vessel as the primary and acupoints of the Governor Vessel as the secondary. Acupoints Lianquan (CV 23), Tiantu (CV 22), Qihai (CV 6), Zhongwan (CV 12), Baihui (GV 20) and Dazhui (GV 14) are adopted as the basic ones. Other points can be added according to various symptoms, for instance, Yingxiang (LI 20) and Yintang (GV 29) for rhinopathy, Tinggong (SI 19) and Yifeng (TE 17) for otopathy, Yan'an (Professor XIE's experience) and Shanglianquan (EX-HN 21) for pharyngopathy and Kaiyin 1 (Professor XIE's experience) and Kaiyin 2 (Professor XIE's experience) for laryngopathy. During the needle retention, rotation manipulation should be done every 5 min at Lianquan (CV 23). And the patient should be told to put the tip of one's tongue at the the palate as well as to do deep breathing to communicate the Conception Vessel and the Governor Vessel. Moxibustion is adopted at Yongquan (KI 1) to induce the up floating fire to mingmen (where the primary yang is stored). The therapeutic effect on treatment of persistent otorhinolaryngologic diseases with the above mentioned method is approve to be good.

  5. Application of flexible endoscopy-based biopsy in the diagnosis of tumour pathologies in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Carlos; Olalde, Manuel; Larruskain, Ekhiñe; Álvarez, Leire; Altuna, Xabier

    Interventional endoscopy allows us to act on the pathology of the patient with minimal discomfort, low costs and high efficiency. We assessed the validity of flexible endoscopic biopsies in our hospital, in lesions suspected of malignancy in the rhino-pharyngo-laryngeal space. Retrospective study of patients with a pathology suspected of malignancy assessed between 2006-2016 in our centre. We evaluated the effectiveness, the tolerance and the number of complications. We calculated the cost reduction in comparison with direct laryngoscopy in the operating room. We compared our sample with others of similar characteristics described in the literature. Thirty patients were studied with a flexible endoscopic biopsy during that period. Nineteen patients obtained positive results which allowed them to start treatment for their pathology. Seven cases had no evidence of malignancy and required another biopsy under general anaesthesia, which confirmed the carcinoma diagnosis. Two samples ruled out malignancy which was confirmed by laryngeal microsurgery. One case showed inflammation and the lesion was cured after antibiotherapy. It was impossible to collect the sample in one case. Thus, we obtained sensitivity levels of 73% with a specificity of 100%. There were no complications. The cost reduction in our sample was above 80%. Flexible endoscopic biopsy has advantages over direct laryngoscopy that are relevant in the diagnosis of oncological pathology in otorhinolaryngology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation and Customization of WHO Safety Checklist for Patient Safety in Otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabholkar, Yogesh; Velankar, Haritosh; Suryanarayan, Sneha; Dabholkar, Twinkle Y; Saberwal, Akanksha A; Verma, Bhavika

    2018-03-01

    The WHO has designed a safe surgery checklist to enhance communication and awareness of patient safety during surgery and to minimise complications. WHO recommends that the check-list be evaluated and customised by end users as a tool to promote safe surgery. The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of WHO safety checklist on patient safety awareness in otorhinolaryngology and to customise it for the speciality. A prospective structured questionnaire based study was done in ENT operating room for duration of 1 month each for cases, before and after implementation of safe surgery checklist. The feedback from respondents (surgeons, nurses and anaesthetists) was used to arrive at a customised checklist for otolaryngology as per WHO guidelines. The checklist significantly improved team member's awareness of patient's identity (from 17 to 86%) and each other's identity and roles (from 46 to 94%) and improved team communication (from 73 to 92%) in operation theatre. There was a significant improvement in preoperative check of equipment and critical events were discussed more frequently. The checklist could be effectively customised to suit otolaryngology needs as per WHO guidelines. The modified checklist needs to be validated by otolaryngology associations. We conclude from our study that the WHO Surgical safety check-list has a favourable impact on patient safety awareness, team-work and communication of operating team and can be customised for otolaryngology setting.

  7. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Patient Resources Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Pediatric Stroke » Introduction Introduction What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Introduction Types of Stroke Diagnosis and Treatment ...

  8. Myocarditis - pediatric

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007307.htm Myocarditis - pediatric To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in ...

  9. Postoperative otorhinolaryngologic complications in transnasal endoscopic surgery to access the skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Landini Lutaif Dolci

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The large increase in the number of transnasal endoscopic skull base surgeries is a consequence of greater knowledge of the anatomic region, the development of specific materials and instruments, and especially the use of the nasoseptal flap as a barrier between the sinus tract (contaminated cavity and the subarachnoid space (sterile area, reducing the high risk of contamination. Objective: To assess the otorhinolaryngologic complications in patients undergoing endoscopic surgery of the skull base, in which a nasoseptal flap was used. Methods: This was a retrospective study that included patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery with creation of a nasoseptal flap, assessing for the presence of the following post-surgical complications: cerebrospinal fluid leak, meningitis, mucocele formation, nasal synechia, septal perforation (prior to posterior septectomy, internal nasal valve failure, epistaxis, and olfactory alterations. Results: The study assessed 41 patients undergoing surgery. Of these, 35 had pituitary adenomas (macro- or micro-adenomas; sellar and suprasellar extension, three had meningiomas (two tuberculum sellae and one olfactory groove, two had craniopharyngiomas, and one had an intracranial abscess. The complications were cerebrospinal fluid leak (three patients; 7.3%, meningitis (three patients; 7.3%, nasal fossa synechia (eight patients; 19.5%, internal nasal valve failure (six patients; 14.6%, and complaints of worsening of the sense of smell (16 patients; 39%. The olfactory test showed anosmia or hyposmia in ten patients (24.3%. No patient had mucocele, epistaxis, or septal perforation. Conclusion: The use of the nasoseptal flap has revolutionized endoscopic skull base surgery, making the procedures more effective and with lower morbidity compared to the traditional route. However, although mainly transient nasal morbidities were observed, in some cases, permanent hyposmia and anosmia resulted

  10. Comparative study on cases of vertigo and dizziness in the emergency room and otorhinolaryngological clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Toshiya; Kawashima, Kayoko; Hashimoto, Seiko; Imai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    We recently studied the characteristics of vertigo and dizziness in 197 patients who first visited the emergency room (ER group) and in 288 patients who first visited the otorhinolaryngological clinic of Minoh City Hospital (ENT group) between January 1 and December 31 of 2009. The ER group can be regarded as representing the hyperacute phase and the ENT group as representing the acute to chronic phase. These two groups were completely distinct. We also subdivided these groups into the high risk subgroup (H subgroup) for cases with the underlying diseases of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease and hyperlipidemia, and the normal subgroup (N subgroup).Comparison of the two groups showed that, in the ER group, a significantly larger numbers of patients had symptoms of peripheral vestibular origin except for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and Meniere's disease, and a significantly larger number of patients had symptoms of unknown origin in the ENT group. Half of this group may be accounted for by patients with symptoms of peripheral vestibular origin except for BPPV and Meniere's disease in the ER group. In 8 out of 158 patients of the ER group and 1 out of 122 patients of the ENT group, cerebral lesions were not found on CT images but were found with MRI. Careful investigation is necessary in the patients with normal CT findings. Central vestibular lesions were found in 7 out of 197 patients (3.5%) of the ER group and 5 out of 288 patients (1.7%) of the ENT group. The incidence of central lesions tended to be higher in the ER group than in the ENT group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of central lesion among the H and N subgroups of both groups. Careful investigation of the central vestibular lesion is also necessary in the N subgroup. (author)

  11. [Peer teaching and peer assessment are appropriate tools in medical education in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, M; Linke, J; Zahnert, T; Neudert, M

    2014-06-01

    The use of student tutors (peers) is an accepted method in medical education. In 2011, final year students of the otorhinolaryngology (ORL) department of the University Hospital in Dresden were appointed as peers for the clinical ORL examination. They assisted in the instruction of the clinical ORL examination (peer teaching, PT) and served as examiners (peer assessment, PA) in the final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The effect on the quality of education and examination was examined. 248 medical students (5(th) year) were divided in 2 groups. They were trained and finally examined in the standardized clinical ORL examination by peers and/or physicians. Group I (n=118) was exclusively trained and examined by physicians and group II (n=130) by peers and physicians. The results of the OSCE were stratified for the 2 groups and in group II for the subgroups according to the instructors' and examiners' qualification (peer or physician). The students evaluated the internship and the instructors' and examiners' quality with a validated questionnaire. In the OSCE, group I scored in the mean 59.9±4.9 points (max. 65). In group II the mean score was 58.3±4.3 points examined by the peers and 59.5±4.8 points for same performance assessed by the physicians. There were no statistical significant differences in the examination results when stratified for the instructors' and examiners' qualification. The evaluation results were consistently positive and identical when compared to the previous year without use of PT and PA and between the 2 groups and subgroups. When using a standardized clinical examination routine peers can be used for PT and PA to appropriate tools in student's medical education without any decrease in the teaching and examination quality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-07-01

    The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests.

  13. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  14. Pediatric Dentistese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Asokan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful practice of pediatric dentistry depends on the establishment of a good relationship between the dentist and the child. Such a relationship is possible only through effective communication. Pediatric dentistry includes both an art and a science component. The focus has been mostly on the technical aspects of our science, and the soft skills we need to develop are often forgotten or neglected. This paper throws light on the communication skills we need to imbibe to be a successful pediatric dentist. A new terminology “Pediatric Dentistese” has been coined similar to motherese, parentese, or baby talk. Since baby talk cannot be applied to all age groups of children, pediatric dentistese has been defined as “the proactive development-based individualized communication between the pediatric dentist and the child which helps to build trust, allay fear, and treat the child effectively and efficiently.”

  15. Structures of non-cellular tissues of the body and their importance in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Shatokhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present  the  results of our studies  in various pathological   conditions   in  otorhinolaryngology performed  with  a diagnostic  technology  of functional morphology  of non-cellular tissue structures  (mouth  fluid, surgical wound  exudation, blood  serum, and  others. With the  use of methods of cuniform and  marginal dehydration of biological fluids, the possibility of developing essentially novel criteria was shown, such as:• prediction  of complicated  course of post-operative wound  healing in subjects with a lamellar morphotype in the  wound  exudation  resulting from cholesterol residues due to massive cell death;• prediction  of a polypous  rhinosinusitis  relapse in subjects with an increase in the proliferation marker, anisotropic  parallels lines in the  dehydrated  serum  obtained from the  blood  taken from the inferior nasal turbinate;• diagnostics   of  the  middle  ear  cholesteatoma in children by combination of cuniform and marginal  dehydration of the  mouth  fluid. The singularity of the  technique  is based  on triple sampling  of the  fluid:  first sample  was  taken immediately  after awakening, the  second  one, after a few minutes  of active swallowing movements  and  the  third one,  after trans-tympanicair pumping.  Detection  of the  structural  signs of congestive effusion and the lamellar morphotype as a destruction marker in the third sample suggested the presence  of cholesteatoma;• assessment  of  treatment  efficacy  in  patients with chronic tonsillitis and of the indications to tonsillectomy in patients  with persisting pathological  characteristics   of  the  exudation   from the palatal tonsil lacunes throughout the whole course of conservative treatment;• determination of the grade of activity / absence of activity of laryngeal cancer by identification of a basic spherolith with various degrees  of anisotropy

  16. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  17. Characteristics and analysis of scientific articles submitted to the European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, O; Bonfils, P; Denoyelle, F; Garrel, R; Jankowski, R; Karkas, A; Makeieff, M; Righini, C; Vincent, C; Martin, C

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate characteristics, suggested modifications and reasons for rejection in scientific articles submitted for publication in the European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases. A prospective study analyzed the flaws noted by reviewers in 52 scientific articles submitted to the European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases between August 31, 2014 and February 28, 2015. Fifteen flaws concerning content and 7 concerning form were identified. In more than 25% of submissions, major flaws were noted: purely descriptive paper; lack of contribution to existing state of knowledge; failure to define a clear study objective and/or analyze the impact of major variables; poorly structured Materials and methods section, lacking description of study population, objective and/or variables; lack of or inappropriate statistical analysis; Introduction verbose and/or misrepresenting the literature; excessively heterogeneous and/or poorly described study population; imprecise discussion, straying from the point, overstating the significance of results and/or introducing new results not mentioned in the Results section; description of the study population placed in the Results section instead of under Materials and methods; serious mistakes of syntax, spelling and/or tense; and failure to follow the Instructions to Authors. After review, 21.1% of articles were published, 65.3% rejected and 13.4% non-resubmitted within 3 months of review. On univariate analysis, the only variable increasing the percentage of articles accepted was the topic not being devoted to head and neck surgery (P=0.03). These results document the excessive flaw rate still to be found in manuscripts and demonstrate the continuing need for authors to master and implement the rules of scientific medical writing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) works with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other research activities.

  19. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  20. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  1. Depressive symptoms and workplace-violence-related risk factors among otorhinolaryngology nurses and physicians in Northern China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huiying; Zhao, Xiaowen; Yang, Haicheng; Sun, Peihang; Li, Ying; Jiang, Kexin; Li, Peng; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Ming; Qiao, Hong; Wu, Qunhong

    2018-01-27

    Workplace violence is relatively frequent among medical professionals who work in otorhinolaryngology units. This phenomenon reduces the quality of provided medical care and increases the incidence of depressive symptoms among physicians and nurses, seriously affecting their job satisfaction and work efficiency with a negative attitude towards providing treatment. Few existing studies have assessed workplace-violence-related factors associated with depressive symptoms among otorhinolaryngology physicians and nurses. We conducted a cross-sectional study in grade A tertiary hospitals of Heilongjiang province in Northern China, to evaluate the occurrence and level of depressive symptoms among otorhinolaryngology physicians and nurses and to analyse the relationship between them and workplace-violence-related risk factors and demographic variables. Of all our participating professionals, (379 otorhinolaryngologists and 273 nurses), 57.2% were found to have depressive symptoms, whereas, of the respondents who had suffered from physical violence, 71.25% had depressive symptoms. Professionals with less than 1 year of experience, as well as professionals who more frequently worked alone, were more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms than their colleagues. This research addresses an emerging issue of clinical practice, and its results differ from those of previous studies; specifically, it indicates that the frequency of depressive symptoms among otorhinolaryngology physicians and nurses may be influenced by physical violence, the number of coworkers they have for more than half of their working hours and other workplace-violence-related factors. To reduce the depressive symptoms caused by workplace violence and improve the quality of medical services, medical institutions should implement effective measures to prevent the occurrence of physical violence, strengthen team cooperation ability and increase peer support. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless

  2. [Acute sensorineural hearing loss at the Otorhinolaryngology Department of the General Hospital in Subotica 1991-1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, N

    1999-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is an acute hearing loss of a perceptive type, of unknown etiology, in most cases one-sided, or, a every sudden sensorineural deafness that occurs in the period of three days or less. Modern scientific literature points to three possible etiological factors: viral cochleitis, vascular lesion of the labyrinth and unrecognized rupture of the membranous labyrinth. The therapy for this disease is extremely various. There are dozens of reported different (or similar) healing protocols, including vasodilators, Hydroxyethyl starch, low molecular dextran, diuretics, defibrinogenation, fibrmolytic therapy, steroids, prostacyclin, oxygen therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, vitamins, etc. The aim of the study was to recapitulate in brief modern views of etiology and therapy of the sudden sensorineural hearing loss, to analyze cases of this illness within the period of 1991-1996 in our Otorhinolaryngology Department and to compare these data with the same or similar data of other authors. In this study, medical records of patients admitted in the period of 1991-1996 in the Otorhinolaryngology Department of the Health Center in Subotica with a diagnosis of sudden sensorineural hearing loss were used. There were 53 patients with this diagnosis. All patients were treated in the hospital with infusions of rheoactive drugs. During the diagnostic procedure, all patients underwent a complete clinical otorhinolaryngologic examination, detailed anamnesis was taken, acoustic impedance tests (tympanometry) and tonal liminal audiometry were performed. Routine blood test was made (including complete blood picture, sedimentation rate, blood sugar) and a complete urine examination. Sometimes we demanded x-ray of the temporal bones (Schnller and Stenwers). A short increment sensitivity index (SISI) test and Carhart test were also made, if necessary. Function of the vestibular system was tested in cases when the vestibular symptoms were more strongly expressed

  3. Pediatric AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.B.; Haller, J.O.; Kramer, J.; Hotson, G.C.; Loh, J.P.; Schlusselberg, D.; Inglese, C.M.; Jacobs, J.; Rose, A.L.; Menez-Bautista, R.; Fikrig, S.

    1988-01-01

    A group of 23 pediatric patients seropositive for HIV antibody were studied by computed tomography and evaluated neurodevelopmentally. Significant neurodevelopmental delays were found in over 95% of the patients studied. CT findings in six patients were normal and thirteen of 23 (57%) had prominence of the CSF spaces. Less frequent findings included calcifications in the basal ganglia and white matter. Cerebral mass lesions included one case of lymphoma and one case of hemorrhage. The CT findings in the pediatric age group differs from the adult population in that that contrast enhancing inflammatory mass lesions are uncommon. (orig.)

  4. There is a Need to Request Cervical Spine Routine Radiographs for Patients with Down's Syndrome Before Carrying out Otorhinolaryngologic Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpak, Andrea Marçal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Down's Syndrome (DS is a genetic syndrome characterized by several changes and the Atlanto-axial Instability is critical for the otorhinolaryngologist. Objective: Check the prevalence of atlanto-axial instability in patients with Down's Syndrome who undergo service follow-up in the Clinical Hospital of the UFPR [Federal University of Paraná] and review the need to carry out routine cervical radiography in the patients with prescription to otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Method: Prospective study of patients with the syndrome who undergo CH/UFPR's follow up, through questionnaire and cervical X-ray. Results: No case of IAA was found in the population studied. Discussion: we consider there's a high frequency of AAI in patients with DS, and for all patients who will take part in sports activities that involve motion of the region, or who are submitted to surgeries, an investigation with clinical and radiological exam is recommended. However, as the incidence has many variable findings we question the real validity of this research for all patients, even the asymptomatic ones. Conclusion: In spite of a DS's peculiar change, there are no evidences of the need to research the AAI as a routine in asymptomatic patients and the symptomatology should guide the investigation. But more studies are required to evaluate the importance of the radiological exams in such cases.

  5. Guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology (SFORL) (short version). Specific treatment of epistaxis in Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robard, L; Michel, J; Prulière Escabasse, V; Bequignon, E; Vérillaud, B; Malard, O; Crampette, L

    2017-02-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société Française d'Oto-Rhino-Laryngologie et de Chirurgie de la Face et du Cou: SFORL) concerning specific treatment of epistaxis in Rendu-Osler-Weber disease. A multidisciplinary work-group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, based on the articles retrieved and the group members' individual experience. They were then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The final version was established in a coordination meeting. The guidelines were graded as A, B, C or expert opinion, by decreasing level of evidence. Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is diagnosed from the presence of at least three of Curaçao's four criteria. In acute epistaxis, bidigital compression is recommended. Embolization is reserved for resistant epistaxis. Non-resorbable nasal packing and cauterization are contraindicated. Patient education is essential. Telangiectasia of the nasal mucosa can be treated by various local means. In the event of insufficient control, systemic administration of tranexamic acid is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology (SFORL). Managing epistaxis under coagulation disorder due to antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escabasse, V; Bequignon, E; Vérillaud, B; Robard, L; Michel, J; Malard, O; Crampette, L

    2017-05-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology concerning the management of epistaxis during antithrombotic therapy. A review of the literature was performed by a multidisciplinary work group. Guidelines were drafted, then re-edited by a reading group independent of the work group to produce the final text. The proposed recommendations were graded A, B, C or expert opinion, on decreasing levels of evidence. Before any decision to modify antithrombotic treatment, it is recommended to screen for overdose and assess the risk of thrombosis. In stented patients, dual antiplatelet therapy must be maintained during the month following stenting and, if possible, for 3 months. In epistaxis with antivitamin K (AVK) overdose controlled by packing, corrective measures are based on the International Normalized Ratio (INR). In uncontrolled epistaxis, it is recommended to stop AVK, administer antidotes and regularly monitor INR. In case of intravascular embolization, it is not recommended to alter anticoagulant treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to define childhood vasculitis and to highlight new causative factors and treatment modalities under the guidance of recently published studies. Childhood vasculitis is difficult to diagnose because of the wide variation in the symptoms and signs. New nomenclature and classification criteria were proposed for the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the genetic susceptibility to pediatric vasculitis as it was in other diseases. Various radiological techniques provide great opportunities in establishing the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Mild central nervous system disease can accompany Henoch-Schonlein purpura and can go unnoticed. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare in children. Increased severity of the disease, subglottic stenosis, and renal disease are described more frequently among children. Biological therapies are used with success in children as in adults. Future studies, whose aims are to evaluate treatment responses, prognosis and to design guidelines for activity, and damage index of vasculitis for children are required. Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the most frequent vasculitides of children. Experience from adult studies for treatment and prognosis are usually used because of low incidence of other vasculitides in children. Multicenter studies of pediatric vasculitis should be conducted to detail treatment responses and prognosis in children.

  8. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvaterra, Elena; Giorda, Roberto; Bassi, Maria T

    2012-01-01

    Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking such as ......Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking...... such as decision making, privacy protection, minor recontact, and research withdrawal by focusing on theoretical or empirical perspectives. Our research attempted to analyze such issues in a comprehensive manner by exploring practices, rules, and researcher opinions regarding proxy consent, minor assent, specimens...

  10. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  12. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  17. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  18. Pediatric fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is currently defined as chronic widespread pain (CWP with allodynia or hyperalgesia to pressure pain. It is classified as one of the large group of soft-tissue pain syndromes. Pain is the cardinal symptom of FM; however, most patients also experience additional symptoms such as debilitating fatigue, disrupted or non-restorative sleep, functional bowel disturbances, and a variety of neuropsychiatric problems, including cognitive dysfunction, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, although it is currently believed to be the result of a central nervous system (CNS malfunction that increases pain transmission and perception. FMS usually involves females, and in these patients it often makes its first appearance during menopause. But it is often diagnosed both in young as well as elderly individuals. Pediatric FMS is a frustrating condition affecting children and adolescents at a crucial stage of their physical and emotional development. Pediatric FMS is an important differential diagnosis to be considered in the evaluation of children suffering from widespread musculoskeletal pain, and must be differentiated from a spectrum of inflammatory joint disorders such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, etc. The management of pediatric FMS is centered on the issues of education, behavioral and cognitive change (with a strong emphasis on physical exercise, and a relatively minor role for pharmacological treatment with medications such as muscle relaxants, analgesics and tricyclic agents.

  19. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAPD AAPD Publications Advertising Brochures Journals & Publications Full Journal Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Oral ...

  20. Statistical Observations of The Patients With Vertigo in The Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Department of The Ryukyu University Hospital in 1980

    OpenAIRE

    勢理客, 友子; 名嘉嶺, 苗子; 喜友名, 千佳子; 又吉, 重光; 野田, 寛; Serikyaku, Tomoko; Nakamine, Naeko; Kiyuna, Chikako; Matayoshi, Shigemitsu; Noda, Yutaka; 琉球大学医学部附属病院耳鼻咽喉科

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analyses were presented, regarding to the 69 patients with vertigo in the Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Department of the Ryukyus University Hospital, and the following features were observed : 1. We had monthly 7.7 patients with vertigo on an average, which were increased in comparison with average 4.9 patients a month in 1979. 2. Many of the patients were presented in the third to the fifth decade of age in both sex, and the female patients were 2.5 times more than the male. 3. The p...

  1. Pediatric fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, Dan

    2009-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is an idiopathic chronic pain syndrome defined by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain and generalized tender points. The syndrome is associated with a constellation of symptoms, including fatigue, nonrefreshing sleep, irritable bowel, and more. Central nervous system sensitization is a major pathophysiologic aspect of fibromyalgia; in addition, various external stimuli such as trauma and stress may contribute to development of the syndrome. Fibromyalgia is most common in midlife, but may be seen at any age. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, etiology, management, and outcome of pediatric fibromyalgia.

  2. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  3. Pediatric neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, A.S.; Solano, M.; Schelling, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this article, some of the common and not-so-common neuropediatric disorders were discussed. As in the full-grown animal, abnormalities of the CNS in the pediatric animal patient may be classified according to the type of insult present (eg, malformation, injury, neoplasia, inflammation, or degeneration). To recognize the imaging manifestations of such disorders, an appreciation of normal anatomy, the pathological response of nervous system tissue to insult, and the principles of image interpretation is required. These fundamentals may then be applied to any CNS disease, regardless of frequency and to any animal patient, regardless of age

  4. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  5. Mortality pattern in otorhinolaryngology ward: A 5 years retrospective study at an urban tertiary health care center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Kumar, Satish; Chandra Sharma, Naresh; Kumar, Badal

    2017-10-01

    To recognize deaths in the otorhinolaryngology indoor wards, determine the reason behind the mortalities and recommend modifications for betterment of patient care and surgical outcomes. Data was collected from the mortality register, operation theatre registers, ward registers and case notes of patients declared dead at an urban tertiary health care center in India for a period of 5 years; from January 2012 to December 2016. The data included date of admission, age, sex, educational status, residence, and clinical diagnosis, course of hospital stay and medical cause of death. Data acquired was reviewed and statistically interpreted and presented in graphical and descriptive formats. 6157 admissions were made in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) ward in the 5 year period which included 3969 males and 2188 female patients. 58 deaths were recorded during this period which gives overall death per admission crude mortality rate of 9.42% at an average of about 12 (11.60) deaths per year. The major causes of death were malignancy and septicemia. The significance of health education, aggressive healthcare campaigns, enhancement of healthcare services and wide accessibility of healthcare services to remote areas has been emphasized. Role of structured study and protocols in the management of serious cases is highlighted along with the need for prompt referral and better interdepartmental cooperation. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nicole Shu-Wen; Choi, Jessy; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric uveitis differs from adult-onset uveitis and is a topic of special interest because of its diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Children with uveitis are often asymptomatic and the uveitis is often chronic, persistent, recurrent, and resistant to conventional treatment. Anterior uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in children; the prevalence of intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis varies geographically and among ethnic groups. Regarding etiology, most cases of pediatric uveitis are idiopathic but can be due to systemic inflammatory disorders, infections, or a manifestation of masquerade syndrome. Ocular complications include cataracts, hypotony or glaucoma, band keratopathy, synechiae formation, macular edema, optic disc edema, choroidal neovascular membranes, and retinal detachment. These complications are often severe, leading to irreversible structural damage and significant visual disability due to delayed presentation and diagnosis, persistent chronic inflammation from suboptimal treatment, topical and systemic corticosteroid dependence, and delayed initiation of systemic disease‒modifying agents. Treatment for noninfectious uveitis is a stepwise approach starting with corticosteroids. Immunomodulatory therapy should be initiated in cases where quiescence cannot be achieved without steroid dependence. Patients should be monitored regularly for complications of uveitis along with systemic and ocular adverse effects from treatments. The goals are to achieve steroid-free durable remission, to reduce the risk of sight-threatening complications from the uncontrolled ocular inflammation, and to avoid the impact of lifelong burden of visual loss on the child and their family. Multidisciplinary management will ensure holistic care of affected children and improve the support for their families. Copyright 2018 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  7. [Headache: Otorhinolaryngological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, O

    2016-01-01

    Headache is the main symptom in a wide variety of diseases of which ear, nose and throat (ENT) entities are only a small fraction but are not reflected in the number of patients. Comprehensive knowledge of the clinical signs of the most common primary headaches, e. g. migraine, is therefore essential for the ENT specialist because the few patients with secondary headache from ENT-related causes must be identified. Reasons for confusing primary headache with e. g. sinusitis are mostly symptoms mediated by the trigeminal nerve, such as nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea because branches of the trigeminal nerve also innervate the meninges. The ENT-specific origin of headaches is characterized by clinical findings of physical organ disease; therefore, from an ENT perspective imaging should be part of the diagnostic procedure as normal imaging findings are indicative of primary headache, which would not normally be treated by an ENT specialist.

  8. Halitosis in Otorhinolaryngology Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan Gokdogan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Halitosis is a common and devastating condition, which may affect up to 1/3 of the population. It can be classified either as genuine halitosis, pseudohalitosis, or halitophobia. Genuine halitosis is more common and usually related to an organic pathology such as periodontitis. Malodour molecules such as sulfur compounds that arise from bacterial interactions generate the basis of oral malodour. Pathologies of the tongue, poor oral hygiene, deep caries, cryptic tonsillary hypertrophia, and postnasal drainage are also associated with halitosis. Gastro-esophageal pathologies and systemic problems are accepted as extra-oral sources of halitosis. There are various methods for the diagnosis of halitosis including objective and subjective methods. General oral hygiene recommendations and specific interventions for the related etiological factors have to be addressed in order to achieve satisfactory results after the treatment. Clinicians have to be aware of these aspects regarding this unfavorable condition to achieve the best results.

  9. Regenerative medicine in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormald, J C R; Fishman, J M; Juniat, S; Tolley, N; Birchall, M A

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering using biocompatible scaffolds, with or without cells, can permit surgeons to restore structure and function following tissue resection or in cases of congenital abnormality. Tracheal regeneration has emerged as a spearhead application of these technologies, whilst regenerative therapies are now being developed to treat most other diseases within otolaryngology. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Ovid Medline and Ovid Embase, from database inception to 15 November 2014. A total of 561 papers matched the search criteria, with 76 fulfilling inclusion criteria. Articles were predominantly pre-clinical animal studies, reflecting the current status of research in this field. Several key human research articles were identified and discussed. The main issues facing research in regenerative surgery are translation of animal model work into human models, increasing stem cell availability so it can be used to further research, and development of better facilities to enable implementation of these advances.

  10. Imaging methods in otorhinolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.W.; Mees, K.; Vogl, T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is the work of an otorhinolaryngologist and two radiologists, who combined their experience and efforts in order to solve a great variety and number of problems encountered in practical work, taking into account the latest technical potentials and the practical feasibility, which is determined by the equipment available. Every chapter presents the full range of diagnostic methods applicable, starting with the suitable plain radiography methods and proceeding to the various tomographic scanning methods, including conventional tomography. Every technique is assessed in terms of diagnostic value and drawbacks. (orig./MG) With 778 figs [de

  11. What Is a Pediatric Rheumatologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Rheumatologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... a pediatric rheumatologist. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Rheumatologists Have? Pediatric rheumatologists are medical doctors who ...

  12. Sedation in Pediatric Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seak Hee Oh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD has become an established diagnostic and therapeutic modality in pediatric gastroenterology. Effective sedation strategies have been adopted to improve patient tolerance during pediatric EGD. For children, safety is a fundamental consideration during this procedure as they are at a higher risk of severe adverse events from procedural sedation compared to adults. Therefore, a detailed risk evaluation is required prior to the procedure, and practitioners should be aware of the benefits and risks associated with sedation regimens during pediatric EGD. In addition, pediatric advanced life support by endoscopists or immediate intervention by anesthesiologists should be available in the event that severe adverse events occur during pediatric EGD.

  13. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  14. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  15. Pediatric Voiding Cystourethrogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scan for mobile link. Children's (Pediatric) Voiding Cystourethrogram A children’s (pediatric) voiding cystourethrogram uses fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray – to examine a child’s bladder ...

  16. Pediatric MATCH Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infographic explaining NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH, a cancer treatment clinical trial for children and adolescents, from 1 to 21 years of age, that is testing the use of precision medicine for pediatric cancers.

  17. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  18. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  19. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join Now International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development ... nurses in the art and science of pediatric endocrinology nursing. Learn More Text1 2018 PENS Call for ...

  20. National Pediatric Program Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The book of the National Pediatric Program Update, issued by the Argentina Society of Pediatrics, describes important issues, including: effective treatment of addictions (drugs); defects of the neural tube; and the use of radiation imaging in diagnosis. [es

  1. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies. Results : Lymphomas were the most common malignant lesions seen followed by rhabdomyosarcomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and others like thyroid carcinomas and eosinophilic granulomas. In the neck, the commonest cause of primary malignant disease was lymphoma; however, the most frequent lesion was reactive lymphadenitis. In the sinonasal region, the commonest malignancy was rhabdomyosarcoma, which often had extension to the orbit and the face. Recurrent epistaxis was found universally in the malignant cases of this region. In the facial region, disfiguring swelling with proptosis was mainly caused by rhabdomyosarcoma. The only case of tonsillar malignancy was due to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The duration of disease was less than 1 year. Conclusion : The most common manifestation of the malignant lesions in the pediatric age group was with a history of an enlarging, painless neck swelling. Still, an insignificant lump in the neck or recurrent bleeding from nose may be the manifestation of an underlying cancer.

  2. Pediatric portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Clarissa Barbon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Pediatric portal hypertension management is a team approach between the patient, the patient's family, the primary caregiver, and specialty providers. Evidence-based practice guidelines have not been established in pediatrics. This article serves as a review for the primary care NP in the management of pediatric portal hypertension, discussing the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of pediatric portal hypertension, diagnostic tests, and treatment and management options. PMID:28406835

  3. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed

  4. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  5. Pediatric neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric neurocritical care is an emerging multidisciplinary field of medicine and a new frontier in pediatric critical care and pediatric neurology. Central to pediatric neurocritical care is the goal of improving outcomes in critically ill pediatric patients with neurological illness or injury and limiting secondary brain injury through optimal critical care delivery and the support of brain function. There is a pressing need for evidence based guidelines in pediatric neurocritical care, notably in pediatric traumatic brain injury and pediatric stroke. These diseases have distinct clinical and pathophysiological features that distinguish them from their adult counterparts and prevent the direct translation of the adult experience to pediatric patients. Increased attention is also being paid to the broader application of neuromonitoring and neuroprotective strategies in the pediatric intensive care unit, in both primary neurological and primary non-neurological disease states. Although much can be learned from the adult experience, there are important differences in the critically ill pediatric population and in the circumstances that surround the emergence of neurocritical care in pediatrics.

  6. Radiodiagnosis in pediatrics today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanova, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    The fields of radiodiagnosis application in pediatrics are considered. The improvement of roentgenologic methods and application of various contrast proparations enable to study and precisely differentiate congenital and acquired diseases. The scope of roentgenology application in pediatrics extends due to differentiation of pediatric specialities. New methods of investigation with decreasing radiation exposure to minimal are realized [ru

  7. Profilaxis antimicrobiana en cirugía mayor electiva otorrinolaringológica Antimicrobial prophylaxis related to otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Pérez López

    2010-06-01

    results of antibiotic prophylaxis in the otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery. METHODS. A retrospective-descriptive research was made on the prophylactic use of antibiotics in this type of surgery in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the "Comandant Manuel Fajardo" during 6 years (2001-2006. Sample included 661 patients and the following variables were studied: sex, age and therapeutic response criteria (satisfactory and non-satisfactory. According to the intervention complexity oral antibiotic or parenteral prophylaxis was administered carrying out a surgical hound site culture. RESULTS. There was a predominance of male sex (54,1% and the 31 and 62 age group. The 41,90% of patients operated on required antibiotic prophylaxis. The was a 7,9% of surgical wound infections. The more frequent microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter and Escherichia. In head and neck oncology surgeries infection average was high (42,3%. Torpid course was due to concurrence of infection risk factors. There were neither adverse events nor severe complications. CONCLUSIONS. In Otorhinolaryngology, antimicrobial prophylaxis works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not in the Oncology surgeries.

  8. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Superselective microcoil embolization in severe intractable epistaxis: an analysis of 12 consecutive cases from an otorhinolaryngologic and an interventional neuroradiologic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, D U; Remmert, S; Brassel, F; Schlunz-Hendann, M; Meila, D

    2015-11-01

    From 2006 to 2013, 12 patients with severe epistaxis refractory to prior conservative and surgical therapy were treated by superselective embolization of nasal arteries. Supersoft platinum microcoils with smallest diameters were used as the sole embolic agent in all cases. Coils were applied far distally in a stretched position for obtaining ideal target vessel superselectivity. The objective of this study is to evaluate efficacy and complications of superselective coil embolization for treatment of severe intractable epistaxis and to discuss results from an otorhinolaryngologic and an interventional neuroradiologic point of view. Retrospectively, all epistaxis inpatients between 2006 and 2013 were identified and subdivided by form of treatment: conservative, surgical and interventional therapy. Medical records of interventionally treated patients were reviewed for demographics, medical history, risk factors, clinical data, complications and short-term success, and patients were followed up for long-term success. Mean follow-up was 37 months. In 12 patients, 14 embolizations were carried out, with short-term success in 9 patients (75%), while early post-interventional rebleeding occurred in 3 patients (25%). Of 9 patients with short-term success, 1 died during stay, 1 was lost to follow-up and 1 had minor re-bleeding after 30 months. Six patients had short-term and long-term success. Before the first embolization, 3 ± 1 conservative and/or surgical procedures had been undertaken. Length of stay was 12.8 ± 3.6 days. 8 patients (67%) received red cell concentrates. Most frequent complications were mucosal damage and nasal pain, but these were related to repeated packing and surgery. Typical embolic complications as neurological or visual impairment or soft tissue necrosis were not observed in any patient. From the otorhinolaryngologic point of view, surgery is the treatment of choice in severe refractory epistaxis, but in case of repeated failure, superselective

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  11. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... children, and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Gastroenterologists Have? Pediatric gastroenterologists are medical doctors who ...

  12. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Endocrinologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... the teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Endocrinologists Have? Pediatric endocrinologists are medical doctors who ...

  13. What Is a Pediatric Geneticist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Geneticist? Page Content Article Body Fortunately, most children ... with similar problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Geneticists Have? Pediatric geneticists are medical doctors who ...

  14. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ Handout for Patients and Families What Is Pediatric Palliative Care? Pediatric Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is ... life for both the child and the family. Pediatric palliative care is provided by a team of ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  16. What Is a Pediatric Urologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Urologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... treat your child. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Urologists Have? Pediatric urologists are medical doctors who ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  18. Intractable depression successfully treated with a combination of autogenic training and high-dose antidepressant in department of otorhinolaryngology: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Murakami, Masato; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2009-08-14

    Patients suffering from ear discomfort are commonly encountered in the department of otolaryngology. If various clinical examinations do not reveal any objective findings, then the patients are referred to the department of internal medicine or psychiatry. Psychotherapy is recommended in some cases. This paper describes the successful administration of autogenic training in a patient suffering from ear discomfort due to major depression. We present a case of intractable depression that was successfully treated with a combination of psychotherapy, administered by a clinical psychologist, and high-dose antidepressant. The patient was a 36-year-old female with hearing discomfort in her left ear. In 2003, she experienced insomnia and an appetite loss, and her condition was diagnosed as major depression along with an avoidant personality disorder. Her depression has not been improved with antidepressant treatment for 3 years in department of psychosomatic medicine. She was referred to our department because of ear discomfort in her left ear. There was no abnormality in her physical examinations. She wanted to be treated in department of otorhinolaryngology. We increased the dose of fluvoxamine maleate up to 200 mg/day, and introduced cognitive therapy and autogenic training by a clinical psychologist. Eventually, her depressive state as well as the hearing complaint was markedly alleviated. Autogenic training can be a viable and acceptable treatment option for patients who fail to respond to other therapies. This case emphasizes the importance of autogenic training as a method to control physical symptom of depression.

  19. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in Menière's disease. Guidelines of the French Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevoux, J; Franco-Vidal, V; Bouccara, D; Parietti-Winkler, C; Uziel, A; Chays, A; Dubernard, X; Couloigner, V; Darrouzet, V; Mom, T

    2017-12-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société française d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et de chirurgie de la face et du cou: SFORL) for diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in Menière's disease. A work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The guidelines were graded according to the literature analysis and recommendations grading guide published by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Evaluation in Health (January 2000). Menière's disease is diagnosed in the presence of the association of four classical clinical items and after eliminating differential diagnoses on MRI. In case of partial presentation, objective audiovestibular tests are recommended. Therapy comprises medical treatment and surgery, either conservative or sacrificing vestibular function. Medical treatment is based on lifestyle improvement, betahistine, diuretics or transtympanic injection of corticosteroids or gentamicin. The main surgical treatments, in order of increasing aggressiveness, are endolymphatic sac surgery, vestibular neurotomy and labyrinthectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Advances in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard K; Best, Jed M

    2011-07-01

    This article addresses advances in 4 key areas related to pediatric dentistry: (1) caries detection tools, (2) early interventions to arrest disease progression, (3) caries-risk assessment tools, and (4) trends in pediatric procedures and dental materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  2. Pediatric oncologic endosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Goedecke, Jan; Muensterer, Oliver J

    2017-08-01

    Despite increasing popularity of minimal-invasive techniques in the pediatric population, their use in diagnosis and management of pediatric malignancy is still debated. Moreover, there is limited evidence to clarify this controversy due to low incidence of each individual type of pediatric tumor, huge diversity of the disease entity, heterogeneity of surgical technique, and lack of well-designed studies on pediatric oncologic minimal-invasive surgery. However, a rapid development of medical instruments and technologies accelerated the current trend toward less invasive surgery, including oncologic endosurgery. The aim of this article is to review current literatures about the application of the minimal-invasive approach for pediatric tumors and to give an overview of the current status, indications, individual techniques, and future perspectives.

  3. Social pediatrics: weaving horizontal and vertical threads through pediatric residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Levy, Rebecca; Atkinson, Adelle; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Shouldice, Michelle

    2017-01-13

    Social pediatrics teaches pediatric residents how to understand disease within their patients' social, environmental and political contexts. It's an essential component of pediatric residency training; however there is very little literature that addresses how such a broad-ranging topic can be taught effectively. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize social pediatric education in our pediatric residency training in order to identify strengths and gaps. A social pediatrics curriculum map was developed, attending to 3 different dimensions: (1) the intended curriculum as prescribed by the Objectives of Training for Pediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), (2) the formal curriculum defined by rotation-specific learning objectives, and (3) the informal/hidden curriculum as reflected in resident and teacher experiences and perceptions. Forty-one social pediatric learning objectives were extracted from the RCPSC Objectives of Training for Pediatrics, most were listed in the Medical Expert (51%) and Health Advocate competencies (24%). Almost all RCPSC social pediatric learning objectives were identified in more than one rotation and/or seminar. Adolescent Medicine (29.2%), Pediatric Ambulatory Medicine (26.2%) and Developmental Pediatrics (25%) listed the highest proportion of social pediatric learning objectives. Four (10%) RCPSC social pediatric objectives were not explicitly named within learning objectives of the formal curriculum. The informal curriculum revealed that both teachers and residents viewed social pediatrics as integral to all clinical encounters. Perceived barriers to teaching and learning of social pediatrics included time constraints, particularly in a tertiary care environment, and the value of social pediatrics relative to medical expert knowledge. Despite the lack of an explicit thematic presentation of social pediatric learning objectives by the Royal College and residency training program

  4. Prevalence of broncopulmonary and otorhinolaryngologic symptoms in children under investigation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: retrospective analysis Prevalência de achados broncopulmonares e otorrinolaringológicos em crianças sob investigação de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico: análise retrospectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common ailment in children, adding up to the evidence that gastroesophageal reflux is an important cofactor in upper airway disorders, especially in the pediatric population. It is very common for it to impact the upper and lower airways. Our goal was to assess the presence of otorhinolaryngological symptoms in children aged between one and twelve years in whom gastroesophageal reflux is suspected. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We assessed data from the charts of patients up to 12 years of age submitted to 24 hour pH measuring of one of two channels, placed at 2 and 5 cm from the LEE in order to confirm the diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. RESULTS: We studied 143 charts from children who underwent 24 hour pH measuring to investigate GERD; however, only 65 were included. The most prevalent symptoms in the children were bronchopulmonary, found in 89.2%, of sinonasal symptoms (72.3%, otologic (46.1% and repetition UAW infections (44.6%. When we compared the presence of each group of symptoms of the results from the pH measuring, no significant differences were found between the symptoms and the pH measuring results. CONCLUSION: GERD can manifest in different ways and otorhinolaryngological symptoms are frequent in children.A Doença do Refluxo Gastroesofágico (DRGE é uma afecção comum na infância, aumentando as evidências de que o refluxo gastroesofágico seja um cofator importante que contribui para as desordens de vias aéreas, principalmente na população pediátrica. É muito comum serem observadas manifestações em vias aéreas superiores e inferiores. Nosso objetivo é avaliar a presença de sintomas otorrinolaringológicos em crianças com idade de um a 12 anos e suspeita de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico. MATERIAIS E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados dados de prontuários de pacientes de até 12 anos submetidos à pHmetria de 24 horas de um ou dois canais, locados a 2 e 5 cm do EEI para

  5. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  6. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  7. Pediatric emergence delirium: Canadian Pediatric Anesthesiologists' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H David; Mervitz, Deborah; Cravero, Joseph P

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric emergence agitation/delirium (ED) is a cluster of behaviors seen in the early postanesthetic period with negative emotional consequences for families and increased utilization of healthcare resources. Many studies have looked at identifying risk factors for ED and at pharmacologic regimens to prevent ED. There are few published reports on treatment options and efficacy for established ED episodes, and essentially no data concerning current practice in the treatment of ED. We sought to elicit the experience and opinions of Canadian Pediatric Anesthesiologists on the incidence of ED in their practice, definitions and diagnostic criteria, preventative strategies, treatments, and their perceived efficacy. A web-based survey was sent to pediatric anesthesiologists working at academic health science centers across Canada. The participants were selected based on being members of the Canadian Pediatric Anesthesia Society (CPAS), which represents the subspecialty in Canada. All members of CPAS who had e-mail contact information available in the membership database were invited to participate. A total of 209 members out of the total of 211 fulfilled these criteria and were included in the study population. The response rate was 51% (106/209). Of respondents, 42% felt that ED was a significant problem at their institutions, with 45% giving medication before or during anesthesia to prevent the development of ED. Propofol was the most common medication given to prevent ED (68%) and to treat ED (42%). Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) was considered by 38% of respondents as a technique used to prevent ED. Medications used for treatment included propofol (42%), midazolam (31%), fentanyl (10%), morphine (7%), and dexmedetomidine (5%), with 87% of respondents rating effectiveness of treatment as 'usually works quickly with one dose'. We present information on current practice patterns with respect to prophylaxis and treatment of ED among a specialized group of pediatric

  8. Manifestações otorrinolaringológicas nas doenças reumáticas auto-imunes Otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bergamim Pereira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available As manifestações otorrinolaringológicas nas doenças reumáticas representam um desafio diagnóstico para o reumatologista, o otorrinolaringologista e o médico generalista. Comumente, sintomas otorrinolaringológicos representam um sinal inicial de uma doença assintomática ou uma desordem auto-imune não diagnosticada, que freqüentemente exige um imediato e agressivo tratamento imunossupressor. Distúrbios auditivos podem ser vistos em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES, granulomatose de Wegener (GW, policondrite recidivante (PR, poliarterite nodosa, síndrome de Cogan, síndrome de Sjögren e menos freqüentemente na síndrome de Churg-Strauss e doença de Behçet. O nariz e seios paranasais são variavelmente afetados durante o curso da GW, síndrome de Churg-Strauss, PR e sarcoidose. Ulcerações mucosas recorrentes são comuns no LES e doença de Behçet. Xerostomia é uma manifestação comum da síndrome de Sjögren primária e secundária; aumento da glândula salivar pode ser visto nesses pacientes, assim como nos pacientes com sarcoidose. A articulação cricoaritenóide pode ser envolvida durante o curso da artrite reumatóide, espondilite anquilosante e gota; alterações osteoartríticas também têm sido descritas. Disfunção do nervo trigeminal pode ocorrer em pacientes com síndrome de Sjögren, esclerose sistêmica, LES e doença mista do tecido conjuntivo. Paralisia facial periférica tem sido descrita como complicação do curso da síndrome de Sjögren e sarcoidose.Otorhinolaryngologics manifestations of rheumatologic disorders represent a diagnostic challenge for the rheumatologist, the otorhinolaryngologist, and the general practicioner. Not uncommonly otorhinolaryngologics symptoms represent the initial sign of an otherwise asymptomatic or even undiagnosed autoimmune disorder which often calls for prompt and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment. Hearing disturbances may be seen in patients with

  9. Prevalência de portadores de DTM em pacientes avaliados no setor de otorrinolaringologia Prevalence of patients harboring temporomandibular disorders in an otorhinolaryngology departament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Magalhães Silveira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A interação entre disfunção temporomandibular e otalgia é, mesmo nos dias atuais, motivo para especulações e hipóteses. Vários pesquisadores sugerem causas, conseqüências e supostos tratamentos. OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência de pacientes portadores de DTM em um serviço de otorrinolaringologia. TIPO DE ESTUDO: Este é um estudo epidemiológico do tipo descritivo com amostra transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 221 pacientes do Serviço de Otorrinolaringologia do Hospital da Cidade, em Passo Fundo, Rio Grande do Sul, durante um período de dois meses. Para captação e interpretação dos dados, bem como verificação da disfunção temporomandibular, foi utilizado um questionário auto-aplicado previamente validado. RESULTADO: Após coleta e interpretação dos dados de 221 pacientes, os resultados obtidos foram: 48 pacientes (21.72% considerados como necessitando de tratamento para DTM (índice de DTM moderada e severa, dos quais 35 pertenciam ao gênero feminino (72.9% e 13 ao masculino (21.1%. Apenas 15 indivíduos do total (7.24% estavam totalmente livres de sintomas de DTM. Quanto aos demais, apresentaram: dor de cabeça (33,5%, dor no pescoço e ombro (28,5%, dor na região do ouvido (29% e ruídos articulares (25%. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência de DTM foi de 21.72% sendo significantemente maior no gênero feminino (p: 0.0001; e as prevalências, em relação aos índices, foram: DTM ausente 37.56%; DTM leve 40.72%; DTM moderada 19%, e DTM severa 2.72%.The interaction between Temporomandibular disorders (TMD and otalgia is, even nowadays, a reason for speculation and hypotheses raising. Several researchers suggest causes, consequences and alleged treatments. STUDY DESIGN: This is an epidemiological, sectional cohort study of prevalence. AIM: The study demonstrates the prevalence of patients harboring TMDs in an otorhinolaryngology department. MATERIAL AND METHODOS: During a two-month period, 221 patients from the

  10. Putting Research Findings into Clinical Practice; Feasibility of integrated evidence-based care pathways in otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Bhargava

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A perception exists that clinicians in Oman are reluctant to adopt evidence-based practice (EBP. This pilot study was undertaken to study the feasibility of using EBP pathways at the point of care in otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery. The ultimate aim was to facilitate EBP with the probability of developing a new system for implementing research findings/translational research at the clinical point of care. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective questionnaire pilot survey of clinicians at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH, Oman, a tertiary care medical centre, was undertaken. Respondents included 135 physicians and surgeons with between 3 months and 25 years of clinical experience and included personnel ranging from interns to senior consultants, in areas ranging from primary care to specialist care. Results: Of those polled, 90% (95% confidence interval (CI 85–95% either strongly agreed or agreed that evidence-based practice protocols (EBPP could help in decision making. A total of 87.4% of participants (95% CI 81.8–93% either strongly agreed or agreed that EBPPs can improve clinical outcomes; 91.8% of participants (95% CI 87.2–96.4% would use and apply EBPP in day-to-day care if they were available at the point of care and embedded in the hospital information system. Conclusions: The perception that clinicians at SQUH are reluctant to adopt EBP is incorrect. The introduction of EBP pathways is very feasible at the primary care level. Institutional support for embedding EBP in hospital information systems is needed as well as further outcome research to assess the improvement in quality of care.

  11. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to ...

  13. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and Bowel Why is it important to begin urologic care in infancy and ...

  14. Pediatric Nephrolithiasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Tayaba; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of pediatric nephrolithiasis is on the rise. The composition of kidney stones in children is different than in adults, as most stones in children have a composition of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate mixed with a small amount of uric acid. The symptoms of pediatric nephrolithiasis are nonspecific. Computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for diagnosis; however, because of radiation exposure associated with a CT scan, ultrasonography is also an accepted modality for the diagnosis. Extensive metabolic evaluation is important to rule out an underlying metabolic disorder. Urinary decompression, medical expulsion therapy, and surgical interventions such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are some of the options available for treating pediatric nephrolithiasis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(6):e242-e244.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging techniques. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine refers to imaging examinations done in babies, young children and teenagers. Nuclear ... nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is made by passing x-rays ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... child is taking as well as vitamins and herbal supplements and if he or she has any ... What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? What are some common uses of the procedure? How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? What does the equipment look like? How is ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

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    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ...

  5. Causes of Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inherited metabolic or congenital muscle disorder such as Noonan syndrome, Pompe disease, fatty acid oxidation defect or Barth ... where a specific chromosome is deleted or duplicated. Noonan syndrome is the most common form associated with pediatric ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ... About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of ...

  7. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  8. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  9. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  10. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  11. Do pediatric gastroenterology doctors address pediatric obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Suruchi; Yee, Caitlin; Diez, Bernadette; Nguyen, Nicholas; Sheridan, Michael J; Tufano, Mark; Sikka, Natalie; Townsend, Stacie; Hourigan, Suchitra

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess how often obesity is acknowledged at pediatric gastroenterology outpatient visits. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed to identify obese children seen at a gastroenterology subspecialty clinic over a 1-year period of time; 132 children were identified. Demographics, obesity comorbidities, reasons for referral, diagnosis of obesity, and a plan to address obesity were abstracted. Chi-square or Fisher?s exact tests were used to examine statistical associatio...

  12. Simulation in pediatric anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, James J; Honkanen, Anita; Murray, David J

    2012-10-01

    Simulation-based training, research and quality initiatives are expanding in pediatric anesthesiology just as in other medical specialties. Various modalities are available, from task trainers to standardized patients, and from computer-based simulations to mannequins. Computer-controlled mannequins can simulate pediatric vital signs with reasonable reliability; however the fidelity of skin temperature and color change, airway reflexes and breath and heart sounds remains rudimentary. Current pediatric mannequins are utilized in simulation centers, throughout hospitals in-situ, at national meetings for continuing medical education and in research into individual and team performance. Ongoing efforts by pediatric anesthesiologists dedicated to using simulation to improve patient care and educational delivery will result in further dissemination of this technology. Health care professionals who provide complex, subspecialty care to children require a curriculum supported by an active learning environment where skills directly relevant to pediatric care can be developed. The approach is not only the most effective method to educate adult learners, but meets calls for education reform and offers the potential to guide efforts toward evaluating competence. Simulation addresses patient safety imperatives by providing a method for trainees to develop skills and experience in various management strategies, without risk to the health and life of a child. A curriculum that provides pediatric anesthesiologists with the range of skills required in clinical practice settings must include a relatively broad range of task-training devises and electromechanical mannequins. Challenges remain in defining the best integration of this modality into training and clinical practice to meet the needs of pediatric patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. A summative, Objective, Structured, Clinical Examination in ENT used to assess postgraduate doctors after one year of ENT training, as part of the Diploma of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake-Lee, A B; Skinner, D; Hawthorne, M; Clarke, R

    2009-10-01

    'High stakes' postgraduate medical examinations should conform to current educational standards. In the UK and Ireland, national assessments in surgery are devised and managed through the examination structure of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons. Their efforts are not reported in the medical education literature. In the current paper, we aim to clarify this process. To replace the clinical section of the Diploma of Otorhinolaryngology with an Objective, Structured, Clinical Examination, and to set the level of the assessment at one year of postgraduate training in the specialty. After 'blueprinting' against the whole curriculum, an Objective, Structured, Clinical Examination comprising 25 stations was divided into six clinical stations and 19 other stations exploring written case histories, instruments, test results, written communication skills and interpretation skills. The pass mark was set using a modified borderline method and other methods, and statistical analysis of the results was performed. The results of nine examinations between May 2004 and May 2008 are presented. The pass mark varied between 68 and 82 per cent. Internal consistency was good, with a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.99 for all examinations and split-half statistics varying from 0.96 to 0.99. Different standard settings gave similar pass marks. We have developed a summative, Objective, Structured, Clinical Examination for doctors training in otorhinolaryngology, reported herein. The objectives and standards of setting a high quality assessment were met.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  16. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. top of page This page was reviewed on ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks The risk of serious allergic reaction to ... Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... A child being prepared for a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  6. Pediatric psoriasis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanette B Silverberg

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanette B SilverbergPediatric and Adolescent Dermatology, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Pediatric psoriasis consists broadly of 3 age groups of psoriatic patients: infantile psoriasis, a self-limited disease of infancy, psoriasis with early onset, and pediatric psoriasis with psoriatic arthritis. About one-quarter of psoriasis cases begin before the age of 18 years. A variety of clinical psoriasis types are seen in childhood, including plaque-type, guttate, erythrodermic, napkin, and nail-based disease. Like all forms of auto-immunity, susceptibility is likely genetic, but environmental triggers are required to initiate disease activity. The most common trigger of childhood is an upper respiratory tract infection. Once disease has occurred, treatment is determined based on severity and presence of joint involvement. Topical therapies, including corticosteroids and calcipotriene, are the therapies of choice in the initial care of pediatric patients. Ultraviolet light, acitretin and cyclosporine can clear skin symptoms, while methotrexate and etanercept can clear both cutaneous and joint disease. Concern for psychological development is required when choosing psoriatic therapies. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric psoriasis and a rational approach to therapeutics. Keywords: psoriasis, autoimmunity, Streptococcus, etanercept, calcipotriene, topical corticosteroids

  7. Cognitive Style and Mobile E-Learning in Emergent Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Disorders for Millennial Undergraduate Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Chao, Yi-Ping; Huang, Chung-Guei; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Kang, Chung-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2018-02-13

    Electronic learning (e-learning) through mobile technology represents a novel way to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders to undergraduate medical students. Whether a cognitive style of education combined with learning modules can impact learning outcomes and satisfaction in millennial medical students is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cognitive styles and learning modules using mobile e-learning on knowledge gain, competence gain, and satisfaction for emergent ORL-HNS disorders. This randomized controlled trial included 60 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS at an academic teaching hospital. The cognitive style of the participants was assessed using the group embedded figures test. The students were randomly assigned (1:1) to a novel interactive multimedia (IM) group and conventional Microsoft PowerPoint show (PPS) group matched by age, sex, and cognitive style. The content for the gamified IM module was derived from and corresponded to the textbook-based learning material of the PPS module (video lectures). The participants were unblinded and used fully automated courseware containing the IM or PPS module on a 7-inch tablet for 100 min. Knowledge and competence were assessed using multiple-choice questions and multimedia situation tests, respectively. Each participant also rated their global satisfaction. All of the participants (median age 23 years, range 22-26 years; 36 males and 24 females) received the intended intervention after randomization. Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median 50%, interquartile range [IQR]=17%-80%, Plearning modules (IM or PPS) had significant effects on both knowledge gain (both adjusted Plearning is an effective modality to improve knowledge of emergent ORL-HNS in millennial undergraduate medical students. Our findings suggest the necessity of developing various modules for undergraduate medical students with

  8. PET imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulkin, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    High-quality PET imaging of pediatric patients is challenging and requires attention to issues commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric nuclear medicine, but uncommon to the imaging of adult patients. These include intravenous access, fasting, sedation, consent, and clearance of activity from the urinary tract. This paper discusses some technical differences involved in pediatric PET to enhance the quality of scans and assure the safety and comfort of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  9. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  13. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  14. Sleeping beauties in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Sleeping beauties (SBs) in science have been known for few decades; however, it seems that only recently have they become popular. An SB is a publication that "sleeps" for a long time and then almost suddenly awakes and becomes highly cited. SBs present interesting findings in science. Pediatrics research literature has not yet been analyzed for their presence, and 5 pediatrics SBs were discovered in this research. Their prevalence was approximately 0.011%. Some environments or periods are more "SB fertile" than others: 3 of 5 SBs were published in the journal Pediatrics, 4 originated from the United States, and 4 were published in the period from 1992 to 1993. No institutions or authors published more than 1 SB.

  15. Pediatric nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Hannon, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology methods have had less impact upon pediatric cardiology than upon adult cardiology. Most pediatric heart disease results from congenital malformations of the heart and great vessels, which is usually discovered in infancy, and is most often treated definitively in infancy or early childhood. Unfortunately, nuclear medicine techniques are limited in their spatial resolution - structures that overlie each other are separated with difficulty. As a result, nuclear cardiology is usually of limited value in the anatomic characterization of the congenital heart abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been useful in the detection and quantification of the pathophysiologic consequences of many congenital cardiac malformations. The authors review application of nuclear medicine in pediatric cardiology, and attempt to assess each in terms of its clinical utility

  16. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  17. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  18. Risk in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil; Waterhouse, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Risk in pediatric anesthesia can be conveniently classified as minor or major. Major morbidity includes cardiac arrest, brain damage and death. Minor morbidity can be assessed by clinical audits with small patient samples. Major morbidity is rare. It is best assessed by very large clinical studies and by review of closed malpractice claims. Both minor and major morbidity occur most commonly in infants and children under three, especially those with severe co-morbidities. Knowledge of risk profiles in pediatric anesthesia is a starting point for the reduction of risk. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Contact Dermatitis in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Janice L; Perez, Caroline; Jacob, Sharon E

    2016-08-01

    Contact dermatitis is an umbrella term that describes the skin's reaction to contacted noxious or allergenic substances. The two main categories of contact dermatitis are irritant type and allergic type. This review discusses the signs, symptoms, causes, and complications of contact dermatitis. It addresses the testing, treatment, and prevention of contact dermatitis. Proper management of contact dermatitis includes avoidance measures for susceptible children. Implementation of a nickel directive (regulating the use of nickel in jewelry and other products that come into contact with the skin) could further reduce exposure to the most common allergens in the pediatric population. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e287-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Attention for pediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2005-01-01

    Radiological interventions possess wide utilization in the diagnosis and treatment for pediatric patients. Pediatric interventional radiology is an important branch of interventional radiology and also an important branch of pediatric radiology. Pediatric interventional radiology has grown substantially over the last 30 years, radiologists closely cooperation with surgeons and other physicians providing a new horizon in the management of pediatric diseases in western countries. It includes pediatric cardiac interventional radiology, pediatric neuro-interventional radiology, pediatric vascular interventional radiology, pediatric nonvascular interventional radiology, pediatric tumor interventional radiology and others. In the United States, every children hospital which owns two hundred beds has to have special trained interventional radiologists in radiologic department installing with advanced digital subtraction angiographic equipment. Interventional therapeutic procedures and diagnostic angiography have been proceeding more and more for the congenital and acquired diseases of children. The promising results give use uprising and interventional therapy as an alternative or a replacement or supplement to surgical operation. Pediatric interventional radiology is rather underdeveloped in China with a few special pediatric interventional radiologist, lack of digital subtraction angiography equipment. Pediatric radiologists have no enough field for interventional procedures such as pediatric neuro-interventional radiology and pediatric vascular interventional radiology. In the contrary adult interventional radiologists do have better interventional jobs in China and Pediatric cardiologists also share the same trend. They perform angiocardiography for congenital heart diseases and treat congenital heart disease with interventional procedures including balloon dilation of valves and vessels, coil embolization of collaterals, patent ducts and other arterial fistulae

  1. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician ... such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology procedures, visit the Image Gently ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ...

  4. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  5. PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMLOGY AND STRABISMUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pediatric Refractive Errors in Lautech Teaching Hospital Eye. Clinic ... carry on into adulthood and become a problem later in life such as ... Children with refractive errors but without associated organic ..... for which elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a primary risk factor. .... Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

  6. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both imaging exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  10. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and converts it into an image. The gamma camera itself does not emit any ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear ... (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Videos related ...

  12. Pediatric Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Pediatric Low Vision What is Low Vision? Partial vision loss that cannot be corrected causes ... and play. What are the signs of Low Vision? Some signs of low vision include difficulty recognizing ...

  13. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. ... Nonconventionalmesocaval prosthetic shunt interposition in refractory case with portal hypertension in a 10-kg female infant · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  14. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology procedures, visit the Image Gently ...

  16. Pitfalls in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelkemier, Dawn R.; Taylor, George A.

    2015-01-01

    This essay depicts some of the diagnostic errors identified in a large academic pediatric imaging department during a 13-year period. Our aim is to illustrate potential situations in which errors are more likely to occur and more likely to cause harm, and to share our difficult cases so other radiologists might learn without having to experience those situations themselves. (orig.)

  17. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  18. American Academy of Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Early Career Pediatric Trainees Medical Students International HealthyChildren.org Become a Member Sign In Professional Resources Practice Transformation Economics of Healthcare Managing Your ...

  19. Nigerian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... should be adjuncts to the text and not repeat materials already presented. Only recognized standard abbreviation and S.I. units should be used throughout the manuscript. Articles should be sent to: The Editor. Dr B. C. Ezeanolue, Department of Otolaryngology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital,

  20. Mobile Technology in E-Learning for Undergraduate Medical Education on Emergent Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Disorders: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chao, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Ming-Shao; Hsin, Li-Jen; Kang, Chung-Jan; Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Guei; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Chuang, Cheng-Keng

    2018-03-08

    The use of mobile technology in e-learning (M-TEL) can add new levels of experience and significantly increase the attractiveness of e-learning in medical education. Whether an innovative interactive e-learning multimedia (IM) module or a conventional PowerPoint show (PPS) module using M-TEL to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders is feasible and efficient in undergraduate medical students is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of a novel IM module with a conventional PPS module using M-TEL for emergent ORL-HNS disorders with regard to learning outcomes, satisfaction, and learning experience. This pilot study was conducted at an academic teaching hospital and included 24 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS. The cognitive style was determined using the Group Embedded Figures Test. The participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of the two groups matched by age, sex, and cognitive style: the IM group and the PPS group. During the 100-min learning period, the participants were unblinded to use the IM or PPS courseware on a 7-inch tablet. Pretests and posttests using multiple-choice questions to evaluate knowledge and multimedia situational tests to evaluate competence were administered. Participants evaluated their satisfaction and learning experience by the AttrakDiff2 questionnaire, and provided feedback about the modules. Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median of percentage change 71, 95% CI 1-100, Plearning. Although there was no significant difference in knowledge gain between the two groups (median of difference of percentage change 24, 95% CI -75 to 36; P=.55), competence gain was significantly lower in the IM group compared with the PPS group (median of difference of percentage change -41, 95% CI -67 to -20; P=.008). However, the IM group had significantly higher scores of satisfaction (difference 2, 95% CI 2-4; P=.01), pragmatic quality

  1. Cognitive Style and Mobile E-Learning in Emergent Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Disorders for Millennial Undergraduate Medical Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yi-Ping; Huang, Chung-Guei; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Wang, Shu-Ling; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Kang, Chung-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Background Electronic learning (e-learning) through mobile technology represents a novel way to teach emergent otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) disorders to undergraduate medical students. Whether a cognitive style of education combined with learning modules can impact learning outcomes and satisfaction in millennial medical students is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cognitive styles and learning modules using mobile e-learning on knowledge gain, competence gain, and satisfaction for emergent ORL-HNS disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 60 undergraduate medical students who were novices in ORL-HNS at an academic teaching hospital. The cognitive style of the participants was assessed using the group embedded figures test. The students were randomly assigned (1:1) to a novel interactive multimedia (IM) group and conventional Microsoft PowerPoint show (PPS) group matched by age, sex, and cognitive style. The content for the gamified IM module was derived from and corresponded to the textbook-based learning material of the PPS module (video lectures). The participants were unblinded and used fully automated courseware containing the IM or PPS module on a 7-inch tablet for 100 min. Knowledge and competence were assessed using multiple-choice questions and multimedia situation tests, respectively. Each participant also rated their global satisfaction. Results All of the participants (median age 23 years, range 22-26 years; 36 males and 24 females) received the intended intervention after randomization. Overall, the participants had significant gains in knowledge (median 50%, interquartile range [IQR]=17%-80%, P<.001) and competence (median 13%, IQR=0%-33%, P=.006). There were no significant differences in knowledge gain (40%, IQR=13%-76% vs 60%, IQR=20%-100%, P=.42) and competence gain (0%, IQR= −21% to 38% vs 25%, IQR=0%-33%, P=.16) between the IM and PPS groups. However, the IM group had

  2. Pediatric digital chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, R D; Cohen, M; Broderick, N J; Conces, D J

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  3. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  4. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Telemedicine: Pediatric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bryan L.; Hall, R. W.

    2017-01-01

    Telemedicine is a technological tool that is improving the health of children around the world. This report chronicles the use of telemedicine by pediatricians and pediatric medical and surgical specialists to deliver inpatient and outpatient care, educate physicians and patients, and conduct medical research. It also describes the importance of telemedicine in responding to emergencies and disasters and providing access to pediatric care to remote and underserved populations. Barriers to telemedicine expansion are explained, such as legal issues, inadequate payment for services, technology costs and sustainability, and the lack of technology infrastructure on a national scale. Although certain challenges have constrained more widespread implementation, telemedicine’s current use bears testimony to its effectiveness and potential. Telemedicine’s widespread adoption will be influenced by the implementation of key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, technological advances, and growing patient demand for virtual visits. PMID:26122813

  6. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  7. ANALGESICS ANTIPYRETICS IN PEDIATRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Zaitseva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers one of the most critical issues in the pediatrics: the problem of children's hyperthermia. The article features the fever pathogenesis and 'points of application' for antipyretics, the data on efficiency and side effects of this group of medications, as well as indications to reduce heightened body temperature of children. The author demonstrates her own experience: an application of an antipyretic — ibuprofen.Key words: fever, antipyretics, medications of choice, medical indications, children.

  8. Acitretin in pediatric dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjyot Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acitretin, a synthetic retinoid and the active metabolite of etretinate has been increasingly used over the past two decades. It has proved effective in the treatment of many conditions associated with hyperkeratosis and dyskeratosis. A Google scholar search for the use of acitretin in pediatric dermatoses was done using the words “pediatric dermatoses,” “acitretin,” “etretinate,” “systemic retinoids,” “psoriasis,” “pityriasis rubra pilaris,” “ichthyoses,” “disorders of keratinization,” “Darier's disease,” “palmoplantar keratoderma,” “verrucae,” “lichen planus,” “lupus erythematosus,” and “lichen sclerosus.” All the articles were retrieved and classified into review articles, studies, double-blinded trials, and case reports. The final data were then analyzed and presented in a narrative fashion. It has been found that acitretin is useful in a number of pediatric dermatoses. It is preferred over other drugs in pustular psoriasis. Good results can be obtained in various disorders of keratinization, and it may even prove life-saving in conditions like harlequin ichthyosis. However, long-term maintenance therapy is required and exacerbations are known on discontinuing the drug. It can also be used as alternative therapy for many other pediatric dermatoses where the primary treatment has failed. Acitretin should be used even in children for the proper indications. However, proper clinical and laboratory surveillance has to be maintained in patients on long-term acitretin.

  9. Pediatric esophagopleural fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yun; Ren, Yuqian; Shan, Yijun; Chen, Rongxin; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yucai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Esophagopleural fistula (EPF) is rarely reported in children with a high misdiagnosis rate. This study aimed to reveal the clinical manifestations and managements of EPF in children. Two pediatric cases of EPF in our hospital were reported. A bibliographic search was performed on the PubMed, WANFANG, and CNKI databases for EPF-related reports published between January 1980 and May 2016. The pathogeny, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatments, and prognosis of EPF patients were ...

  10. What Is a Pediatric Allergist / Immunologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Allergist/Immunologist? Page Content Article Body If your ... immune system problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Allergists/Immunologists Have? Pediatric allergists/immunologists are medical ...

  11. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... the teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists ...

  12. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  13. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... in the PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists ...

  14. Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragasso, Tiziana; Ricci, Zaccaria; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2018-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in children is a serious condition with an important impact on morbidity and mortality. Onset can be insidious and it is frequently unrecognized in the early phase when the therapeutic opportunities are theoretically more effective. The present review focuses on the most recent epidemiology studies and the progress in pediatric AKI (pAKI) research. Standardization of definition (presented in the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) and novel biomarkers have been developed to help clinicians recognize kidney injury in a timely manner, both in adult and pediatric populations. Strengths and weaknesses of these diagnostic tools are discussed and the clinical scoring system (Renal Angina Index), which aims to provide a rational context for biomarker utilization, is also presented. Even if effective treatments are not currently available for established AKI, specific preventive approaches and some promising pharmacological treatments will be detailed. Renal replacement therapy is currently considered the most effective way to manage fluid balance when severe AKI occurs. Key Messages: Great efforts in pAKI research have today led to new strategies for early AKI detection and prevention strategies. Further studies have to be conducted in the next future in order to definitely improve the outcomes of pediatric patients experiencing this deadly syndrome. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  17. Pediatric Melanoma and Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Importance—Pediatric melanoma occurs, albeit rarely. Should patients be treated by today’s medical standards, or be subjected to medically unnecessary clinical studies? Observations—We identified international, industry-sponsored pediatric melanoma studies triggered by regulatory demands in www.clinicaltrials.gov and further pediatric melanoma studies demanded by European Union pediatric investigation plans. We retrieved related regulatory documents from the internet. We analyzed these studies for rationale and medical beneficence on the basis of physiology, pediatric clinical pharmacology and rationale. Regulatory authorities define children by chronological age, not physiologically. Newborns’ organs are immature but they develop and mature rapidly. Separate proof of efficacy in underage patients is justified formally/regulatorily but lacks medical sense. Children—especially post-puberty—and adults vis-a-vis medications are physiologically very similar. Two adolescent melanoma studies were terminated in 2016 because of waning recruitment, while five studies in pediatric melanoma and other solid tumors, triggered by European Union pediatric investigation plans, continue recruiting worldwide. Conclusions and Relevance—Regulatory-demanded pediatric melanoma studies are medically superfluous. Melanoma patients of all ages should be treated with effective combination treatment. Babies need special attention. Children need dose-finding and pharmacokinetic studies but adolescents metabolize and respond to drugs similarly to adults. Institutional Review Boards/ethics committees should suspend ongoing questionable pediatric melanoma studies and reject newly submitted questionable studies.

  18. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies

  19. Pediatric imaging. Rapid fire questions and answers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quattromani, F.; Lampe, R. (eds.) [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, Lubbock, TX (United States); Handal, G.A. [Texas Tech Univ. Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The book contains the following contributions: Airway, head, neck; allergy, immunology rheumatology; pediatric cardiac imaging; child abuse; chromosomal abnormalities; conscious sedation; contrast agents and radiation protection; pediatric gastrointestinal imaging; genetic disorders in infants and children; pediatric genitourinary imaging; pediatric hematology, oncology imaging; pediatric intenrventional radiology; metabolic and vitamin disorders; muscoskeletal disorders (osteoradiology); neonatology imaging; pediatric neuroimaging; imaging of the respiratory tract in infants and children; vascular anomalies.

  20. Position paper of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and the German Society of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology – Current state of clinical and endoscopic diagnostics, evaluation, and therapy of swallowing disorders in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Christoph; Herrmann, Ingo F.; Rohrbach, Saskia; Schwemmle, Cornelia; Nawka, Tadeus

    2015-01-01

    Swallowing disorders are frequent. The main concern is mortality due to aspiration-induced pneumonia and malnutrition. In addition, quality of life is severely affected. The demographic trend indicates an increase of dysphagia in the future. Neurodegenerative diseases, tumors of the digestive tract, and sequelae of tumor treatment in the head and neck region are the main pathologic entities. Predominantly ENT physicians and phoniatricians are asked for diagnostics and therapy, and will coordinate the interdisciplinary treatment according to the endoscopic findings. A differentiated approach in history, diagnostics, and symptom-oriented treatment is necessary for these mostly complex disorders. Integration of non-medical staff such as speech therapists, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in planning and executing an effective therapy expands and completes the patient-oriented care. Conservative treatment by these therapists is an important pillar in the treatment. Parts of the specific diagnostics can be taken over in close cooperation. In particular, an interdisciplinary cooperation with the staff of intensive care medicine is essential. The diagnostic procedures of specific endoscopy as described in this position paper are part of the primary and fundamental tasks of ENT specialists and phoniatrists. Endoscopy is a medical service that is basically not delegable. Consequently, substitution of the physician is excluded. PMID:26770277

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about radiation dose. There always is a risk of complications from general anesthesia or sedation. Every measure will be taken to ... in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  2. Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 32 of 32 ... Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home > Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 32 of 32 Items ...

  3. Psychosocial Issues in Pediatric Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology, a relatively new discipline, is a multidisciplinary application of the behavioral and social sciences, and pediatric psychosocial oncology is an emerging subspecialty within the domain of psychosocial oncology. This review presents a brief overview of some of the major clinical issues surrounding pediatric psychosocial oncology. PMID:23049457

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  5. Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughns, Janelle D; Conklin, Laurie S; Long, Ying; Zheng, Panli; Faruque, Fahim; Green, Dionna J; van den Anker, John N; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2018-05-01

    There is a lack of dosing guidelines for use in obese children. Moreover, the impact of obesity on drug safety and clinical outcomes is poorly defined. The paucity of information needed for the safe and effective use of drugs in obese patients remains a problem, even after drug approval. To assess the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development, the pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 were reviewed for obesity studies. FDA labels were also reviewed for statements addressing obesity in pediatric patients. Forty-five drugs studied in pediatric patients under the FDA Amendments Act were found to have statements and key words in the medical and clinical pharmacology reviews and labels related to obesity. Forty-four products were identified similarly with pediatric studies under FDASIA. Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only 4 labels. We conclude that there is little information presently available to provide guidance related to dosing in obese pediatric patients. Moving forward, regulators, clinicians, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider situations in drug development in which the inclusion of obese patients in pediatric trials is necessary to facilitate the safe and effective use of new drug products in the obese pediatric population. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Pediatric ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, David A; Everett, Lucinda L

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric patients often undergo anesthesia for ambulatory procedures. This article discusses several common preoperative dilemmas, including whether to postpone anesthesia when a child has an upper respiratory infection, whether to test young women for pregnancy, which children require overnight admission for apnea monitoring, and the effectiveness of nonpharmacological techniques for reducing anxiety. Medication issues covered include the risks of anesthetic agents in children with undiagnosed weakness, the use of remifentanil for tracheal intubation, and perioperative dosing of rectal acetaminophen. The relative merits of caudal and dorsal penile nerve block for pain after circumcision are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  8. MIDAZOLAM IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Aleksandrov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present overview is dedicated to the issue of the unpleasant emotions among the patients of the pediatric in patient departments. Among the children, the admission to the in patient department is accompanied with the relative effects predominance of the adrenal link of the sympathoadrenal system, which may lead to their depletion against the background of the rapid decrease of their reserves if accompanied with the excessive emotional and psychic or attached painful loads. The authors give recommendations as to the use of the benzodiazepines among children, who are frightened about the treatment and diagnostic manipulations to come.Key words: children, stress, sedation, benzodiazepines.

  9. Pediatric obesity: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greydanus, Donald E; Agana, Marisha; Kamboj, Manmohan K; Shebrain, Saad; Soares, Neelkamal; Eke, Ransome; Patel, Dilip R

    2018-04-01

    This discussion reflects on concepts of obesity in children and adolescents in the early 21st century. It includes reflections on its history, definition, epidemiology, diagnostic perspectives, psychosocial considerations, musculoskeletal complications, endocrine complications and principles of management. In addition to emphasis on diet and exercise, research and clinical applications in the second decade of the 21 st century emphasize the increasing use of pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery for adolescent and adult populations with critical problems of overweight and obesity. We conclude with a discussion of future directions in pediatric obesity management. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incarcerated Pediatric Hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhai, Sophia A; Glenn, Ian C; Ponsky, Todd A

    2017-02-01

    Indirect inguinal hernias are the most commonly incarcerated hernias in children, with a higher incidence in low birth weight and premature infants. Contralateral groin exploration to evaluate for a patent processus vaginalis or subclinical hernia is controversial, given that most never progress to clinical hernias. Most indirect inguinal hernias can be reduced nonoperatively. It is recommended to repair them in a timely fashion, even in premature infants. Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair is considered a safe and effective alternative to conventional open herniorrhaphy. Other incarcerated pediatric hernias are extremely rare and may be managed effectively with laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prognostic factors of successful tympanoplasty in pediatric patients: a cohort study

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    Boronat-Echeverría Nuria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tympanoplasty in children is a current and controversial theme. The success of tympanoplasty traditionally has been measured only by the post-operative integrity of the graft. Yet, there are other variables that may be used to determine success. The objectives of the present work were to analyze which factors are predictive of successful tympanoplasty in pediatric patients and to construct and validate a prognostic index that could be used as a tool to predict the success of tympanoplasty in children. Methods Setting. Department of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, tertiary-care hospital, Mexico City. Patients. Forty-eight patients, who were older that five years of age, had persistent perforation of the tympanic membrane, and had undergone tympanoplasty (January 2005–June 2008, were followed for a year. Main Outcome Measures. The factors tested for their value as predictors were the following: age at time of surgery, state of contralateral ear, previous adenoidectomy, cause of perforation, size of perforation, infection at the time of surgery, state of mucosa, age at first occurrence of perforation, presence of craniofacial dysmorphia, and surgical technique. These factors were compared with the criterion, success, which was defined as attaining three positive outcomes: 1 integrity of the implant or membrane; 2 minimum of 10-dB gain in the auditory threshold or, in the case of normal hearing, conservation of same; and 3 air-filled space in the middle ear. The best model was obtained through logistic regression analysis; the model was validated. Results The most balanced prediction model was that in which the three success criteria were included, with age, surgical technique, and infection at surgery being excluded as variables. The additional 12 pediatric cases used in the validation had a probability of success >0.425 (best cut-off level; two patients (17% had poor evolution. Conclusions This is the first study that

  12. 78 FR 48438 - Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...] Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... of Subcommittee: Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee. General Function... pediatric ethical issues. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on September 9, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 5:30...

  13. Pediatric endocrine surgery development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan I. Dedov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Department of pediatric surgery at the Endocrinology Research Centre has been around for nearly two years. During operation, surgical treatment has received more than 500 patients with various endocrine disorders. The article discusses modern diagnostic approaches and surgical options for diseases included in the new direction of pediatric surgery – endocrine surgery in children. There are discussions about options for radical treatment of Graves disease in children, positive and negative aspects of surgical and radioactive iodine treatment. Is own stats of postoperative hyperparathyroidism. Is proposed to optimize the algorithm of actions in identifying thyroid nodules in children. In primary hyperparathyroidism, the emphasis is on the complexity of the postoperative management of patients related to the feature of children’s age in determining the severity of the reactions on the water-electrolyte disorders. Separately reviewed the literature of the adrenal glands diseases in children, demonstrating their own clinical cases which required surgical intervention. The authors describe the possibilities of modern neurosurgical equipment in the Endocrinology Research Centre in operations on the pituitary gland in children. Patients of different age groups performed transnasal transsphenoidal removal of tumors of the chiasm-sellar region using endoscopic assistance. The article also cited research data of pancreas diseases and their surgical treatment. Much attention is paid to the gender section of endocrine surgery in children. Discusses the tactics in disorders of sex development, gonadal tumors in children, diseases of the breast. In conclusion outlines the prospects for the development of endocrine surgery in children.

  14. Pediatric contact dermatitis

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    Sharma Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD in children, until recently, was considered rare. ACD was considered as a disorder of the adult population and children were thought to be spared due to a lack of exposure to potential allergens and an immature immune system. Prevalence of ACD to even the most common allergens in children, like poison ivy and parthenium, is relatively rare as compared to adults. However, there is now growing evidence of contact sensitization of the pediatric population, and it begins right from early childhood, including 1-week-old neonates. Vaccinations, piercing, topical medicaments and cosmetics in younger patients are potential exposures for sensitization. Nickel is the most common sensitizer in almost all studies pertaining to pediatric contact dermatitis. Other common allergens reported are cobalt, fragrance mix, rubber, lanolin, thiomersol, neomycin, gold, mercapto mix, balsum of Peru and colophony. Different factors like age, sex, atopy, social and cultural practices, habit of parents and caregivers and geographic changes affect the patterns of ACD and their variable clinical presentation. Patch testing should be considered not only in children with lesions of a morphology suggestive of ACD, but in any child with dermatitis that is difficult to control.

  15. Pharmacology of pediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushay, H M; Notterman, D A

    1997-02-01

    The resuscitation of children from cardiac arrest and shock remains a challenging goal. The pharmacologic principles underlying current recommendations for intervention in pediatric cardiac arrest have been reviewed. Current research efforts, points of controversy, and accepted practices that may not be most efficacious have been described. Epinephrine remains the most effective resuscitation adjunct. High-dose epinephrine is tolerated better in children than in adults, but its efficacy has not received full analysis. The preponderance of data continues to point toward the ineffectiveness and possible deleterious effects of overzealous sodium bicarbonate use. Calcium chloride is useful in the treatment of ionized hypocalcemia but may harm cells that have experienced asphyxial damage. Atropine is an effective agent for alleviating bradycardia induced by increased vagal tone, but because most bradycardia in children is caused by hypoxia, improved oxygenation is the intervention of choice. Adenosine is an effective and generally well-tolerated agent for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. Lidocaine is the drug of choice for ventricular dysrhythmias, and bretylium, still relatively unexplored, is in reserve. Many pediatricians use dopamine for shock in the postresuscitative period, but epinephrine is superior. Most animal research on cardiac arrest is based on models with ventricular fibrillation that probably are not reflective of cardiac arrest situations most often seen in pediatrics.

  16. Pediatric spinal infections

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    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  17. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. PET applications in pediatrics

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    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  19. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiu Ariganjoye MD, MBA, FAAP, FAIHQ, CPE, CHCQM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH-D is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, breast, infectious diseases (viral, tuberculosis, and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D are people with darker skin pigmentation, use of sunscreen, insufficient ultraviolet B exposure, prematurity, living in northern latitudes, malnutrition, obesity, exclusive breastfeeding, low maternal vitamin D level, certain medications, drinking unfortified cow’s milk, liver failure, chronic renal insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. This review highlights and summarizes the molecular perspectives of vitamin D deficiency and its potential adverse health outcomes in pediatric age groups. The recommended treatment regimen is beyond the scope of this review.

  20. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkovitz, Larry A.; Sparke, Paul; Henwood, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. (orig.)

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  2. Commentary: Pediatric Epilepsy: A Good Fit for Pediatric Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani; Smith, Gigi

    2011-01-01

    While there are an abundance of pediatric neuropsychologists working with youth with epilepsy (YWE), other subspecialty psychologists have played minimal roles in clinical and research endeavors in pediatric epilepsy. Thus, the purpose of this commentary was to describe (a) the needs of YWE due to the intermittent nature of seizures and difficulties with disease management, (b) increased risk for psychosocial comorbidities, (c) limited access to care, and (d) provide recommendations for how pediatric psychologists can become involved in the clinical care and research activities for YWE. PMID:21148174

  3. Seminar Pediatrics. Medical and Technical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montivero, M.; Nespral, D.O.; Alak, Maria del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine has organized the 'Seminar Pediatrics - Medical and Technical Applications', held in Buenos Aires in May 2012, in order to collaborate with the scientific growth of nuclear medicine in pediatrics. The main topics covered were: management of pediatric patients and medical application in childhood, dosimetry in pediatric nuclear medicine, scope of radioisotope - studies in nephrourological pathologies, PET in pediatrics, among others.

  4. MRI imaging in pediatric appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Riley

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male presents with two days of abdominal pain and emesis. Computed tomography was concerning for obstruction or reactive ileus with an apparent transition point in the right lower quadrant, possibly due to Crohn's. Magnetic resonance imaging was concerning for perforated appendicitis. As demonstrated by this case MRI can be as sensitive as CT in detecting pediatric appendicitis [2]. We recommend using MRI instead of CT to diagnose appendicitis to avoid ionizing radiation and increased cancer risk in the pediatric population. Keywords: Computer tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Pediatric appendicitis

  5. Pediatric neuropsychology: toward subspecialty designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ida Sue; Wills, Karen; Rey-Casserly, Celiane; Armstrong, Kira; Westerveld, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Clinical neuropsychology is a rapidly expanding field of study in the psychological sciences whose practitioners are expert in the assessment, treatment, and research of individuals with known or suspected central nervous system disease or disorder. Pediatric neuropsychology has emerged as a distinct subspecialty area with related education, training, and clinical expertise for a growing number of neuropsychologists. This paper details the numerous steps taken by two affiliated organizations, the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology and its membership organization, the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, in the interest of the larger pediatric neuropsychology community and in pediatric neuropsychology subspecialty development.

  6. Pediatric trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurson, Conor; Browne, Katherine; Callender, Orla; O'Donnell, Turlough; O'Neill, Anthony; Moore, David P; Fogarty, Esmond E; Dowling, Francis E

    2007-01-01

    The recreational use of trampolines has increased dramatically during the last 10 years. There has been a striking increase in the number of children presenting to fracture clinics with injuries associated with trampoline use. This increase in trampoline injuries has been reported in North America, but there has been a paucity of research in this area in Europe. We prospectively recorded details of patients presenting to our institution, Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin (Dublin, Ireland), during the busy summer months of June, July, and August 2005. Details recorded included type and mechanism of injury, the mode of referral, treatment, inpatient days, outpatient visits, specific details relating to trampoline safety, and an analysis of the cost of medical care. There were 101 patients treated for trampoline-related injuries in 3 months from June to August 2005. This represented 1.5% of the total attendances to the emergency department. The average age was 8.5 years (range, 1.4-17.4 years). There were 55 fractures, 38 soft tissue injuries, 5 head injuries, and 5 neck injuries, with an average Pediatric Trauma Score of 11.4. Fifty seven percent (58/101) of patients were on the trampoline with at least 1 other person. Twenty patients (19.8%) were admitted to hospital requiring 71 inpatient days. Twelve patients were treated in theatre. There were 163 fracture clinic visits, 212 x-rays, and 2 magnetic resonance imaging scans. Trampolines are a high-risk activity with the potential for significant orthopaedic injury. In Ireland, we have recently seen a dramatic increase in pediatric trampoline-related injuries mirroring the trend in the United States during the last 10 to 15 years. We found that more than 1 individual on a trampoline is a major risk factor for injury, where the lightest person is 14 times more likely to be injured than the heavier. The lighter person also has a greater chance of being injured with smaller numbers on the trampoline. We reiterate

  7. Pediatric Headache: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Raquel; DiSabella, Marc T

    2017-03-01

    Headache represents the most common neurologic disorder in the general population including children and is increasingly being recognized as a major source of morbidity in youth related to missed school days and activities. In this article, we take a holistic approach to the child presenting with headache with a focus on the detailed headache history, physical and neurologic examinations, and diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Clinical presentations and classification schema of multiple primary and secondary headache types in children are discussed using the International Headache Criteria (IHCD-3) as a guide, and a summary provided of the various treatment modalities employed for pediatric headache including lifestyle modifications, behavioral techniques, and abortive and preventive medications. Copyright © 2017 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pediatric thoracic CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Donald P.; Herlong, J. Rene

    2005-01-01

    One of the principal benefits of contemporary multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has been the ability to obtain high-data sets for evaluation of the cardiovascular system. The benefits of the greater number of detector rows and submillimeter image thicknesses were quickly recognized and are especially advantageous in children. For example, since imaging is performed so quickly, issues with motion are minimized. This is a substantial benefit of CTA compared with MR imaging, the traditional noninvasive cross sectional modality for pediatric cardiovascular imaging. This, together with faster and more powerful computers, including improved transfer and storage capabilities, offers improved depiction of the heart, great vessels, other vasculature and adjacent intrathoracic structures in a fashion that is well accepted by clinical colleagues. In order to be successful, however, one must have an understanding of the technology and often unique technical considerations in infants and children. With this familiarity, excellent cardiovascular examinations can be performed even in the most challenging case. (orig.)

  9. Pediatric nuclear oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howman Giles, R.; Bernard, E.; Uren, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays an important and increasing role in the management of childhood malignancy. This is particularly true in the solid tumours of childhood. It is also helpful in the management of the complications of cancer treatment such as the infections which often accompany immune suppression in oncology patients. Scintigraphy is a complementary investigation to other radiological techniques and adds the functional dimension to anatomical investigations such as CT, MRI and ultrasound. In selected malignancies radionuclides are also used in treatment. This review discusses the technical considerations relating to children and the specific techniques relating to pediatric oncology. Specific tumours and the various applications of radionuclides are discussed in particular lymphoma, primary bone tumours, soft tissue sarcomas, neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumour, brain tumours and leukemia. Uncommon tumours are also discussed and how radionuclides are useful in the investigation of various complications which occur in oncology patients

  10. [Novelties 2016 in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer Fumeaux, Céline J; Fletgen Richard, Carole; Goncalves Pereira Pinto, Diana; Stadelmann, Corinne; Avignon, Valérie; Vial, Yvan; Tolsa, Jean-François; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle; Armengaud, Jean-Baptiste; Castaneda, Monica; Coti-Bertrand, Pauline; Deppen, Alain; Duvoisin, Gilles; Gebhard, Sandra; Holzer, Laurent; Lier, Françoise; Monney Chaubert, Carole; Pauchard, Jean-Yves; Typaldou, Sofia Anna; Hofer, Michaël

    2017-01-11

    Nutrition is central in pediatric care : essential for growth and development, it plays also a role in the prevention of many diseases.Even if breastfeeding is highly recommended, its implementation may be difficult in particular for premature and ill newborns. The creation of a specific unit for breastfeeding support in neonatology allows to help mothers willing to nurse and to improve the rate of breastfeeding for these vulnerable infants.Eating disorders represent an important challenge for patient care. Early detection and rapid management of anorexia is essential for the prognosis. This article describes the challenges and the practical process underlying the development of a practical guideline to manage children and adolescents hospitalized for anorexia.

  11. Moral Hazard in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnquell, Donald; Michaelson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    "Moral hazard" is a term familiar in economics and business ethics that illuminates why rational parties sometimes choose decisions with bad moral outcomes without necessarily intending to behave selfishly or immorally. The term is not generally used in medical ethics. Decision makers such as parents and physicians generally do not use the concept or the word in evaluating ethical dilemmas. They may not even be aware of the precise nature of the moral hazard problem they are experiencing, beyond a general concern for the patient's seemingly excessive burden. This article brings the language and logic of moral hazard to pediatrics. The concept reminds us that decision makers in this context are often not the primary party affected by their decisions. It appraises the full scope of risk at issue when decision makers decide on behalf of others and leads us to separate, respect, and prioritize the interests of affected parties.

  12. Pediatric oncology in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, B; Anzic, J

    1996-01-01

    Slovenia, a new country and formerly a part of Yugoslavia, has had its Childrens Hospital in Ljubljana since 1865. This became a part of the University Hospital in 1945, and in the early 1960s the Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology was established. The Oncological Institute of Slovenia was established in 1938 and has developed into a modern facility for comprehensive cancer care, research, and teaching. In close cooperation, established in the 1960s, a team from these two institutions takes care of the approximately 60 children per year who develop cancer in Slovenia. Consisting of pediatricians, radiation oncologists, pathologists, cytologists, surgeons, and other ad hoc specialists, the team meets at least twice weekly to plan treatment, follow the patients, discuss the results, and teach. All patients are subject to regular follow-up indefinitely. A separate team has been formed to study the late effects of cancer treatment on survivors, who by now are mostly adults.

  13. Pediatric chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzutzky, Arturo; Stern, Sara; Reiff, Andreas; Zurakowski, David; Steinberg, Evan A; Dedeoglu, Fatma; Sundel, Robert P

    2012-11-01

    Little information is available concerning the natural history and optimal treatment of chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO). We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical characteristics and treatment responses of a large cohort of pediatric CNO patients. Children diagnosed with CNO at 3 tertiary care centers in the United States between 1985 and 2009 were identified. Their charts were reviewed, and clinical, laboratory, histopathologic, and radiologic data were extracted. Seventy children with CNO (67% female patients) were identified. Median age at onset was 9.6 years (range 3-17), and median follow-up was 1.8 years (range 0-13). Half of the patients had comorbid autoimmune diseases, and 49% had a family history of autoimmunity. Patients with comorbid autoimmune diseases had more bone lesions (P coexisting autoimmunity was a risk factor for multifocal involvement and treatment with immunosuppressive agents. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics were more likely to lead to clinical improvement than NSAIDs.

  14. Iopamidol in pediatric angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strife, J.L.; Kirks, D.R.; Bisset, G.S. III; Hannon, D.; Schwartz, D.

    1987-01-01

    Iopamidol (ISOVUE-370) has been used extensively in adult angiocardiography, but clinical trials in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease are limited. The authors study group comprised 25 children referred for elective cardiac catheterization and cineangiocardiography. Patients were aged 3 months to 15 years (mean, 2 years) and weighted 14-62 kg (mean, 17 kg). Depending on the congenital heart lesion, the total amount of contrast agent injected ranged from 1 to 5 ml/kg. The potential benefits of iopamidol include fewer minor side effects, decreased movement or reaction of the child, and fewer direct effects of contrast agent on biochemical changes, compared with published results of using ionic contrast media. In addition, there were fewer electrocardiographic changes during iopamidol injection, and less change in the end-diastolic pressures after injection compared to results obtained with ionic contrast media. Visual rating of the cineangiograms revealed that all were of diagnostic quality, and 75% were rated as showing ''superior opacification.''

  15. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  16. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wear during the procedure. Metal objects including jewelry, eyeglasses, hearing aids, non-permanent retainers and hairpins may ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) ... uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, ...

  20. Cardiomyopathy in the pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a group of myocardial diseases with complex taxonomies. Cardiomyopathy can occur in children at any age, and it is a common cause of heart failure and heart transplantation in children. The incidence of pediatric cardiomyopathy is increasing with time. They may be associated with variable comorbidities, which are most often arrhythmia, heart failure, and sudden death. Medical imaging technologies, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear cardiology, are helpful in reaching a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless, endomyocardial biopsy is the final diagnostic method of diagnosis. Patients warrant surgical operations, such as palliative operations, bridging operations, ventricular septal maneuvers, and heart transplantation, if pharmaceutical therapies are ineffective. Individual therapeutic regimens due to pediatric characteristics, genetic factors, and pathogenesis may improve the effects of treatment and patients' survival. Key Words: cardiomyopathy, classification, pediatrics

  1. Radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, O.; Ruth, C.; Samanek, M.

    1990-01-01

    The use of radionuclide methods in pediatric cardiology is discussed for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial function and perfusion, regional lung perfusion and ventilation, and for measuring central and peripheral hemodynamics. (H.W.). 16 refs

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and may add approximately 15 minutes to the total exam time. top of page What will my ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  4. Childhood obesity for pediatric gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S; Barlow, Sarah E; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scans that are not clearly needed. Another strategy is to consider other tests, such as MRI ... for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's "Image Gently" Campaign top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  13. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  17. New Horizons in Pediatric Psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sarah; Rathore, Vijaylaxmi; Khan, Shahida

    2016-12-01

    Preclinical Research Recent advances in pediatric psychopharmacology have been rather uneven. Increased use of psychotropic drugs among the pediatric population has raised concerns regarding their inappropriate use and safety. While clinical trials have been conducted on various pediatric psychopharmacological drugs, there has been an insignificant amount of importance to innovation in holistic treatment. A rational approach toward elucidating the various challenges would be contingent on the convergence of the development of novel efficacious psychotropic drugs with concrete conceptual frameworks and guidelines fostering enhanced outcomes. A research infrastructure concerning the relevance of the clinician's perspective, combining drugs with alternative therapies, the need for pediatric specific formulations and relevance of these in developing countries provides a basis on which innovative treatment/development can be constructed. The current commentary highlights these comprehensive and targeted treatment guidelines as aspects necessary for building the future of the field. Drug Dev Res 77 : 474-478, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Burnout Syndrome in Pediatric Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Youbi, Reem A.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics.Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabi...

  19. What is a pediatric tumor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaume Mora1,21Department of Oncology, 2Developmental Tumor Biology Laboratory, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Fundacio Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Working together with medical oncologists, the question of whether a Ewing sarcoma in a 25-year-old is a pediatric tumor comes up repeatedly. Like Ewing's, some tumors present characteristically at ages that cross over what has been set as the definition of pediatrics (15 years, 18 years, or 21 years?. Pediatric oncology textbooks, surprisingly, do not address the subject of defining a pediatric tumor. They all begin with an epidemiology chapter defining the types of tumors appearing at distinct stages of childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Describing the epidemiology of tumors in relation to age, it becomes clear that the disease is related to the phenomenon of aging. The question, however, remains: is there a biological definition of what pediatric age is? And if so, will tumors occurring during this period of life have anything to do with such biological definition? With the aim of finding an objective definition, the fundamental concepts of what defines "pediatrics" was reviewed and then the major features of tumors arising during development were analyzed. The tumors were explored from the perspective of a host immersed in the normal process of growth and development. This physiological process, from pluripotential and undifferentiated cells, makes possible the differentiation, maturation, organization, and function of tissues, organs, and apparatus. A biological definition of pediatric tumors and the infancy–childhood–puberty classification of developmental tumors according to the infancy–childhood–puberty model of normal human development are proposed.Keywords: growth and development, pediatric tumor, infant, childhood and adolescence, pubertal tumors

  20. Pediatric Obesity: Etiology and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews factors that contribute to excessive weight gain in children and outlines current knowledge regarding approaches for treating pediatric obesity. Virtually all of the known genetic causes of obesity primarily increase energy intake. Genes regulating the leptin signaling pathway are particularly important for human energy homeostasis. Obesity is a chronic disorder that requires long-term strategies for management. The foundation for all treatments for pediatric obesity remain...

  1. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  2. Pediatric Pulmonary Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Barbour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 6-year-old previously healthy male presented to the emergency department with three days of left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Family endorsed one week of fevers, cough productive of yellow sputum, and non-bilious, non-bloody emesis. He denied shortness of breath and chest pain. On exam, the patient was febrile with otherwise normal vital signs. He had diffuse tenderness to his abdomen but clear lungs. Laboratory studies revealed leukocytosis to 25,000/mm3 with a left shift. Significant findings: Upright posterior-anterior plain chest films show a left lower lobe consolidation with an air-fluid level and a single septation consistent with a pulmonary abscess (white arrows. A small left pleural effusion was also present, seen as blunting of the left costophrenic angle and obscuration of the left hemidiaphragm (black arrows. Discussion: Pediatric pulmonary abscesses are rare, most commonly caused by aspiration, and the majority consequently arise in dependent portions of the lung.1 The most common pathogens in children are Streptococcus pneumoniaeand Staphylococcus aureus.1 Immunocompromised patients and those with existing pulmonary disease more commonly contract Pseudomonas aeruginosaor Bacteroides, and fungal pathogens are possible.1 Common symptoms include tachypnea, fever, and cough. Imaging is necessary to distinguish pulmonary abscesses from pneumonia, empyema, pneumatocele, and other etiologies. Plain film radiography may miss up to 18% of pulmonary abscesses yet is often the first modality to visualize an intrathoracic abnormality.2 If seen, pulmonary abscesses most often appear as consolidations with air-fluid levels. Generally, pulmonary abscesses are round with irregular, thick walls, whereas empyemas are elliptical with smooth, thin walls.3 However, these characteristics cannot definitively distinguish these processes.2 Advantages of plain films include being low cost and easily obtained. Computed

  3. Pediatric mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinfurth, J M; Koltai, P J

    1998-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, a revolution in the management of facial fractures has taken place. Refinements in biocompatible materials of great delicacy and strength along with advances in our understanding of biomechanics of the face, have rendered complex injuries consistently amenable to accurate 3-dimensional reconstruction. Furthermore, with the availability of education in the techniques of internal rigid fixation, these advanced techniques have become routine practice in adults. However, the suitability of rigid internal fixation for children remains controversial. There are many concerns about the effect of implanted hardware in the mandible of a growing child. In addition, some evidence suggests that the elevation of functional matrix off of bone may result in alterations in development. The goal is to restore the underlying bony architecture to its pre-injury position in a stable fashion, with a minimal of aesthetic and functional impairment. However, in children the treatment of bony injuries is most easily accomplished by techniques that may adversely effect craniofacial development. While it is not entirely possible to resolve this dilemma, there exists an extensive body of experimental and clinical information on the appropriate management of pediatric mandibular fractures which can be used to formulate a rational treatment plan for most cases. This paper presents an overview of the contemporary understanding and application of these treatment principles.

  4. Aromatase inhibitors in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, Jan M; Hero, Matti; Nunez, Susan B

    2011-10-25

    Aromatase, an enzyme located in the endoplasmic reticulum of estrogen-producing cells, catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many tissues. The clinical features of patients with defects in CYP19A1, the gene encoding aromatase, have revealed a major role for this enzyme in epiphyseal plate closure, which has promoted interest in the use of inhibitors of aromatase to improve adult height. The availability of the selective aromatase inhibitors letrozole and anastrozole--currently approved as adjuvant therapy for breast cancer--have stimulated off-label use of aromatase inhibitors in pediatrics for the following conditions: hyperestrogenism, such as aromatase excess syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, McCune-Albright syndrome and functional follicular ovarian cysts; hyperandrogenism, for example, testotoxicosis (also known as familial male-limited precocious puberty) and congenital adrenal hyperplasia; pubertal gynecomastia; and short stature and/or pubertal delay in boys. Current data suggest that aromatase inhibitors are probably effective in the treatment of patients with aromatase excess syndrome or testotoxicosis, partially effective in Peutz-Jeghers and McCune-Albright syndrome, but probably ineffective in gynecomastia. Insufficient data are available in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia or functional ovarian cysts. Although aromatase inhibitors appear effective in increasing adult height of boys with short stature and/or pubertal delay, safety concerns, including vertebral deformities, a decrease in serum HDL cholesterol levels and increase of erythrocytosis, are reasons for caution.

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thanks 3-months free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  6. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving from Pediatric to Adult Care Introduction Teen and young adult years are a critical time for major life changes. An ... for youth who have OI is moving from pediatric care into the adult care system. Children’s hospitals ...

  7. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  8. Kerala Pioneering Pediatric Surgery in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric surgeons of Kerala are very proud to have led the development of superspeciality in any branch of medicine in Kerala and also superspeciality of Pediatric surgery in whole of India. Late Prof. Raman Nair returned in 1954 after training under Dr. Everett Koop in US. Same year, in his far-sighted vision for future development of the speciality, he moved to SATH, Medical College, Trivandrum and started Pediatric surgery as a speciality attached to Paediatrics department; this was the beginning of Pediatric surgery in India. He opted for Pediatric surgery as a full time job and did not do any general surgery work in adults. He was the first full time Pediatric surgeon of India; during the next few years, 2 surgeons, one in Calcutta, Prof. UC Chakraboty and Prof. D Anjaneyulu in Hyderabad started working as full time Pediatric surgeons. In Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai, Pediatric surgery developed much later and then all over the country.

  9. Pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: perspectives from academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiglow, Brittany G; Resneck, Jack S; Lucky, Anne W; Sidbury, Robert; Yan, Albert C; Resnick, Steven D; Antaya, Richard J

    2008-12-01

    The pediatric dermatology workforce has not been systematically evaluated since recent changes in board certification requirements. To quantify and characterize the workforce of academic pediatric dermatologists and examine issues related to training, hiring, and retention. Dermatology chairpersons and residency directors in the United States and Canada completed a 30-question survey. Eighty of 132 programs (61%) responded to the survey. More than two thirds of programs (56/80) employed a pediatric dermatologist, and 34 programs were recruiting a pediatric dermatologist. The number of residents that pursue careers in pediatric dermatology is significantly associated with the number of pediatric dermatologists on faculty at their institution. Self-reported data, which may have been reflected by recall bias, and 61% response rate. At a majority of academic centers, the current pool of pediatric dermatology faculty is neither adequate to meet academic nor clinical demands. Methods to increase exposure to pediatric dermatology among medical students and residents must be sought.

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  11. Management of Pediatric Mandibular Fracture Using Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... The pediatric patient is a challenge to manage and ... and osteosynthesis of the pediatric fracture with titanium ... impression material and surgical model prepared with ... circum-mandibular wire were removed under local.

  12. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Explore career opportunities in pediatric hematology/oncology Visit the ASPHO Career Center. Learn More Join ... Privacy Policy » © The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

  13. Is OSCE successful in pediatrics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Imani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Zahedan implemented the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE in the final Examination during the 2003–2004 academic year. Simultaneously, the pediatric department initiated faculty and student training, and instituted the OSCE as an assessment instrument during the pediatric clerkship in year 5. The study set out to explore student acceptance of the OSCE as part of an evaluation of the Pediatric clerkship.Purpose: This study implemented to evaluate a new method of assessment in medical education in pediatrics.Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was completed by successive groups of students immediately after the OSCE at the end of each clerkship rotation. Main outcome measures were student perception of examination attributes, which included the quality of instructions and organization, the quality of performance, authenticity and transparency of the process, and usefulness of the OSCE as an assessment instrument compared to other methods.Results: There was overwhelming acceptance of the OSCE in Pediatric with respect to the comprehensiveness (90%, transparency (87%, fairness (57% and authenticity of the required tasks (58–78%. However, students felt that it was a strong anxiety-producing experience. And concerns were expressed regarding the ambiguity of some questions and inadequacy of time for expected tasks.Conclusion: Student feedback was invaluable in influencing faculty teaching, curriculum direction and appreciation of student opinion. Further psychometric evaluation will strengthen the development of the OSCE.Key words: OSCE, COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT

  14. Pediatric interventional radiology: vascular interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. (author)

  15. Environmental pediatrics: an emerging issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Patricia M; Matus, M Soledad; Araya, Gabriela I; Paris, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    To review the most relevant articles regarding environmental pediatrics, its potential effects on health, and especially its advances in prevention. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed and SciELO databases. Articles from 1990 to 2010 were reviewed, in addition to book chapters related to environmental pediatrics. There is a significant variety of factors that make children highly vulnerable to environmental hazard exposure, which are mainly associated with children's comparatively greater consumption of water, food, and air in relation to body weight. According to the World Health Organization, every year more than 3 million children under the age of 5 die because of environment-related conditions. Approximately 30 to 40% of pediatric diseases are related to environmental factors. Children are constantly exposed to various environmental health hazards, among which the following stand out: contaminated water, lack of adequate sanitation facilities, air pollution, disease vectors, chemical hazards, injuries, and accidents. Nowadays, pediatricians are challenged to address environmental pediatrics health care needs. The pediatric health history needs to be more comprehensive by adding pointed questions to help identify potential environmental risks. Awareness and understanding of the noxious effects of various environmental conditions and knowledge of the related prevention measures will result in timely and adequate interventions that will improve our children's health and development.

  16. Pediatric oncologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietz, Hallie A.

    1997-01-01

    Oncologic emergencies arise in three ways: disease or therapy induced cytopenias; a space occupying lesion causing pressure on or obstruction of surrounding tissues; or leukemia or tumors creating life-threatening metabolic or hormonal problems. Knowledge of presenting signs and symptoms of these emergencies are essential in pediatric oncologic nursing. Neutropenia opens the door for all manner of infections, but the most life threatening is septicemia progressing to shock. A variety of organisms can cause septic shock in the neutropenic patient, but episodes are most often due to gram-negative organisms and the endotoxins they release. Shock, while still compensated, may present with a elevated or subnormal temperature, flushed, warm, dry skin, widening pulse pressure, tachycardia, tachypnoea and irritability, but without medical intervention will progress to hypo tension, cool, clammy extremities, decreased urinary out- put, and eventually to bradycardia and cardiogenic shock. Another emergency in the cytopenia category is bleeding as a result of thrombocytopenia. Of greatest concern is intracranial hemorrhage that may occur at platelet counts of less than 5,000/mm3. Space-occupying lesions of the chest may produce superior vena cava syndrome (SVGS), pleural and pericardial effusions, and cardiac tamponade. SVGS is most often caused by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and presents as cough, hoarseness, dyspnea, orthopnea and chest pain. Signs include swelling, plethora, cyanosis, edema of conjunctiva and wheezing. Pleural and pericardial effusions present with respiratory or cardiac distress as does cardiac tamponade. Abdominal emergencies arise because of inflammation, mechanical obstruction, hemorrhage (often from steroid induced ulcers), and perforation. Pain is the most common presenting symptom, although vital sign alterations, fever, blood in vomitus or stool, abdominal distension and cessation of flatus are also important components of the acute abdomen

  17. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Egypt J Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2008; 6(2): 51-56. 51. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma. Review of Ain Shams Pediatric Hospital Chest Clinic Data. Cairo, Egypt 1995-2004. INTRODUCTION. Bronchial asthma is a major worldwide health problem, which has received increased attention in.

  18. Quality of evidence-based pediatric guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boluyt, Nicole; Lincke, Carsten R.; Offringa, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To identify evidence-based pediatric guidelines and to assess their quality. Methods. We searched Medline, Embase, and relevant Web sites of guideline development programs and national pediatric societies to identify evidence-based pediatric guidelines. A list with titles of identified

  19. Dexmedetomidine in the pediatric population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plambech, Morten; Afshari, A

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 agonist approved only for sedation in adult intensive care patients, is increasingly used off-label in- and outside Europe in the pediatric setting for various indications such as to prevent agitation, as premedication in the form of intranasal, buccal and oral solution...... of sedation of children. In this paper, we assess 51 minor trials in the form of 44 randomized controlled trials and 7 prospective observational studies in an attempt to update the available evidence on dexmedetomidine use in pediatrics. Furthermore, we discuss its potential indications, benefits and adverse....... Based on the best current evidence dexmedetomidine is found suitable and safe for various indications. However, in order to discover its full potential, indications, dosing and safety profile for various ages and procedures, it should urgently be examined by conducting good quality pediatric trials...

  20. Pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA is an evolving field in pediatric emergency medicine. As new drugs breach the boundaries of anesthesia in the Pediatric Emergency Department, parents, patients, and physicians are finding new and more satisfactory methods of sedation. Short acting, rapid onset agents with little or no lingering effects and improved safety profiles are replacing archaic regimens. This article discusses the warning signs and areas of a patient′s medical history that are particularly pertinent to procedural sedation and the drugs used. The necessary equipment is detailed to provide the groundwork for implementing safe sedation in children. It is important for practitioners to familiarize themselves with a select few of the PSA drugs, rather than the entire list of sedatives. Those agents most relevant to PSA in the pediatric emergency department are presented.

  1. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  2. Pediatric health, medicine, and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Wainwright

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Claire E Wainwright1,21Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane and Queensland, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaThe idea of children as small adults with health care needs that can be managed by extrapolation from adult studies has now largely been abandoned. We now recognize that adult health and disease are closely linked to childhood factors and the critical and ethical importance of clinical research in pediatrics is increasingly being recognized.  While funding and output from pediatric clinical research continues to lag behind health research in adults, particularly in the area of therapeutics, the last decade has thankfully seen a dramatic increase in the number of pediatric studies and particularly randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs. Since the 1997 Food and Drug Administration (FDA Modernization Act in the United States (US and the subsequent changes in drug registration regulatory systems in the US and Europe, there has been a huge increase in the number of pediatric studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. In the United Kingdom, the Medicine for Children’s Research Network was established in 2005 to address the lack of clinical studies in pediatrics. Over the first five years they reported an exciting increase in the number of high quality clinical studies and on their website they have a current portfolio of over 200 pediatric studies, half of which are RCTs and half are sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Other countries particularly across Europe are also establishing similar programs. 

  3. Pediatric epilepsy: The Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Pradnya; Udani, Vrajesh

    2011-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common clinical entity in neurology clinics. The understanding of the genetics of epilepsy has undergone a sea change prompting re-classification by the International league against epilepsy recently. The prevalence rates of epilepsy in India are similar to those of developed nations. However, the large treatment gap is a major challenge to our public health system. Perinatal injuries are a major causative factor in pediatric group. We have discussed a few common etiologies such as neurocysticercosis and newer genetic epilepsy syndromes. We have also briefly touched upon the Indian experience in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

  4. [Crisis management in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mamoru; Otsuka, Yoji; Taga, Naoyuki; Sato, Yuki; Iwai, Hidetaka; Okada, Osamu

    2009-05-01

    We describe the risk management of pediatric anesthesia. The most important risk management of pediatric anesthesia is airway and temperature management. Neonates and infants easily become hypoxic due to their insufficient functional residual capacity. Therefore airway management is most important not only during induction of anesthesia but also during maintenance of anesthesia and extubation. The management of patients' temperature, including control of room temperature should be taken into consideration. In addition, careful attention should be paid not to introduce air bubbles in any lines, especially in patients with congenital heart diseases.

  5. The Future of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Jeff; Emerick, Jill; Saxena, Harshita

    2016-03-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a steady increase in obesity over the last 30 years. The greatest increase was seen in 15 to 19 year olds, whose obesity prevalence almost doubled from 10.5% to 19.4%. The solution to pediatric obesity requires a multidisciplinary approach addressing cultural norms, technologic advances, and family engagement. Future treatment strategies to combat the obesity epidemic will have to extend beyond the health care provider's office. Behavior modification remains the key component to pediatric obesity prevention and treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Delirium in Pediatric Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anita K; Bell, Michael J; Traube, Chani

    2017-10-01

    Delirium occurs frequently in the critically ill child. It is a syndrome characterized by an acute onset and fluctuating course, with behaviors that reflect a disturbance in awareness and cognition. Delirium represents global cerebral dysfunction due to the direct physiologic effects of an underlying medical illness or its treatment. Pediatric delirium is strongly associated with poor outcomes, including increased mortality, prolonged intensive care unit length of stay, longer time on mechanical ventilation, and increased cost of care. With heightened awareness, the pediatric intensivist can detect, treat, and prevent delirium in at-risk children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Innovation in pediatric surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew S; Wulkan, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric surgical training in the United States remained basically unchanged from the model developed by Ladd and Gross in the 1930s until recently. Standardized curriculum and novel evaluation methods are now being implemented. Pediatric Surgical education is currently undergoing a transition to competency-based evaluation and promotion. Unfortunately, there is little data on the efficacy of these changes. This presents an opportunity for further study of how we conduct training, and how we evaluate and promote our trainees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extrapulmonary involvement in pediatric tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Andres, Mariaem M; Tatco, Vincent R; Lim, Cielo Consuelo Q; Concepcion, Nathan David P

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis in childhood is clinically challenging, but it is a preventable and treatable disease. Risk factors depend on age and immunity status. The most common form of pediatric tuberculosis is pulmonary disease, which comprises more than half of the cases. Other forms make up the extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves infection of the lymph nodes, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, hepatobiliary tree, and renal and musculoskeletal systems. Knowledge of the imaging characteristics of pediatric tuberculosis provides clues to diagnosis. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common sites for extrapulmonary tuberculous involvement in children.

  9. Integration of Pediatric Mental Health in General Pediatrics in Eritrea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of mental health needs of America's youth, with 1 ... health services to children and adolescents in the primary ... Conclusion: The establishment of the Pediatric residency with a dedicated curriculum to address mental health ... However, there are few young patients being evaluated ... mental health care without stigma.

  10. Pediatric AIDS | Khazbak | Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-03-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency situations, basic life support is most important. However, emergencies in young children mostly involve breathing. Therefore, physicians who treat pediatric dental patients should learn PALS. It is necessary for the physician to regularly renew training every two years to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations. In order to manage emergency situations in the pediatric dental clinic, respiratory support is most important. Therefore, mastering professional PALS, which includes respiratory care and core cases, particularly upper airway obstruction and respiratory depression caused by a respiratory control problem, would be highly desirable for a physician who treats pediatric dental patients. Regular training and renewal training every two years is absolutely necessary to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations.

  12. Management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment: definition and assessment. Guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology- Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binczak, M; Navez, M; Perrichon, C; Blanchard, D; Bollet, M; Calmels, P; Couturaud, C; Dreyer, C; Espitalier, F; Testelin, S; Albert, S; Morinière, S

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Oto-Rhino-Laryngology- Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société Française d'Oto-rhino-Laryngologie et de Chirurgie de la Face et du Cou [SFORL]) for the management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment, and in particular the instruments needed for the definition and initial assessment of the various types of pain. A multidisciplinary work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, based on the articles retrieved and the group members' individual experience. They were then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The final version was established in a coordination meeting. The guidelines were graded as A, B, C or expert opinion, by decreasing level of evidence. The priority is to eliminate tumoral recurrence when pain reappears or changes following head-and-neck cancer treatment. Neuropathic pain screening instruments and pain assessment scales should be used to assess pain intensity and treatment efficacy. Functional rehabilitation sessions should be prescribed to reduce musculoskeletal pain and prevent ankylosis and postural disorder. Psychotherapy and mind-body therapy, when available, should be provided in case of chronic pain. In case of recalcitrant complex pain, referral should be made to a multidisciplinary pain structure. The management of somatic pain induced by head-and-neck cancer treatment above all requires identifying and assessing the intensity of the various types of pain involved, their functional impact and their emotional component. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric glaucoma: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchini G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Marchini, Marco Toscani, Francesca Chemello Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy Abstract: “Childhood glaucoma” is a heterogeneous group of severe pediatric conditions often associated with significant visual loss and characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP and optic-disk cupping. Successful IOP control is crucial but challenging and most often achieved surgically, with medical therapy playing a supportive role. There are many classifications of childhood glaucoma, but they can simply be divided into primary, in which a developmental abnormality of the anterior chamber angle only exists, and secondary, in which aqueous outflow is reduced due to independent mechanisms that secondarily impair the function of the filtration angle. The worldwide prevalence of childhood blindness ranges from 0.03% in high-income countries to 0.12% in undeveloped countries. The majority of cases do not have an identified genetic mutation and, where the mutation is known, the genes often account for only a small proportion of cases. Several pathogenetic mechanisms are known to contribute to the development of childhood glaucoma. Whatever the cause, it results in a reduced aqueous outflow at the level of the trabecular meshwork. Age of onset and magnitude of the elevated IOP largely determine the clinical manifestation the high variability of clinical manifestations. Glaucoma from any cause in a neonate and infant is characterized by the classic triad of epiphora, photophobia, and blepharospasm, and could be associated with eye enlargement (buphthalmos and Haab striae. The eye examination, usually performed under general anesthesia, includes: tonometry, anterior-segment examination, gonioscopy, corneal diameter and axial length measurement, dilated fundoscopy with optic-nerve-head evaluation. Medical therapy, considering the high frequency of side effects, is generally used as

  14. Pediatric sexology and hermaphroditism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, J

    1985-01-01

    Lacking an empirically based theory of erotosexual development and health in childhood, pediatrics too easily falls back on reductionistic hypotheses of the nature versus nurture type. A new, three-term paradigm, namely, nature/critical-period/nurture, is needed to explain, for example, the phenomenology of hermaphroditism, and the differentiation of gender-identity/role (G-I/R) in individual cases. In 30 young women with a history of the early-treated, 46,XX congenital virilizing adrenal hyperplasia (CVAH) syndrome, 37% (N = 11) had a history of bisexual imagery or practice, as compared with 7% in the control patients (chi 2 = 17.7; p less than .001); and 5 of these 11 rated themselves as exclusively or predominantly lesbian. In Kinsey's sample, 15% of females reported homoerotic imagery by age 20, and 2 out of 3 of them also had homoerotic partner contact. The CVAH finding may be a function of prenatal and/or neonatal brain androgenization, but other variables, such as the history of juvenile erotosexual rehearsal play, cannot be ruled out. Among adolescents with a history of hermaphroditism, sex-reassignment applications are honored predominantly if they are made by 46,XY hermaphrodites assigned neonatally as girls and with nonfeminizing hormonal puberty, as medical and folk traditions both favor approval of such applicants more than others. Parthenogenic whiptail lizards that alternately simulate the male and female mating behavior of related diecious species provide an animal model that demonstrates the existence of both male and female sexual schemas in the same brain. In human beings, the irreducible sex differences are that males impregnate, and females menstruate, gestate, and lactate. Otherwise, sexual dimorphism that is programmed into the brain under the influence of prenatal hormones appears to be not sex-irreducible, but sex-shared and threshold-dimorphic. A complete theory of the differentiation of all the constituents of masculinity or femininity of

  15. Phantom Limb Pain in Pediatric Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DeMoss

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain (PLP is a prevalent problem for children and adolescents undergoing amputation due to cancer treatment. The symptoms are wide ranging from sharp to tingling. PLP in children typically lasts for a few minutes but can be almost constant and can be highly distressing. This focused review describes the characteristics, epidemiology, mechanisms, and evidence-based treatment of PLP in pediatric populations, focusing on pediatric cancer. In pediatric oncology, the administration of chemotherapy is a risk factor that potentially sensitizes the nervous system and predisposes pediatric cancer patients to develop PLP after amputation. Gabapentin, tricyclic antidepressants, opiates, nerve blocks, and epidural catheters have shown mixed success in adults and case reports document potential utility in pediatric patients. Non-pharmacologic treatments, such as mirror therapy, psychotherapy, and acupuncture have also been used in pediatric PLP with success. Prospective controlled trials are necessary to advance care for pediatric patients with PLP.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  19. Medication errors in pediatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishoej, Rikke Mie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe medication errors (MEs) in hospitalized children reported to the national mandatory reporting and learning system, the Danish Patient Safety Database (DPSD). MEs were extracted from DPSD from the 5-year period of 2010–2014. We included reports from public hospitals on pati...... safety in pediatric inpatients.(Table presented.)...

  20. The Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika

    2015-01-01

    examination with a pencil light at age 5 weeks, whereas newborn red reflex examination using a handheld ophthalmoscope is routine protocol in Swedish maternity wards. Data regarding age of referral were derived from the Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE). All children operated on before 1 year of age...

  1. Management of pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Dan; Levine, Arie; Escher, Johanna C

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) shares many features with adult-onset disease but there are some unique considerations; therefore, therapeutic approaches have to be adapted to these particular needs. We aimed to formulate guidelines for managing UC in children based on a systematic review (SR...

  2. Pediatric nephrology practice in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Akl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of pediatric nephrology in a developing country such as Jordan is governed by social, cultural, and economic issues. The prevalence of consanguinity contributes to the emergence of rare heredofamilial disorders and congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract. Epigenetic factors modify underlying genetic defect predisposing to symptomatic crystalluria. Future research should be directed at prevention.

  3. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  4. Presentation of suspected pediatric uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad Usman; Raza, Syed Hamid; Goyal, Sudeshna; Cleary, Gavin; Newman, William David; Chandna, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Presentation of suspected pediatric uveitis: Pediatric uveitis is usually managed in specialized ophthalmic centers in the UK. Meaningful data acquisition in these clinics may be helpful in clinical governance, and healthcare planning in a specialty that is gradually changing due to changes in treatment choices. Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data in the Liverpool pediatric uveitis database was performed. Analysis of our data, based on 147 patients, with a mean age of 10 years, indicated a female to male ratio of 2:1. 99% of patients were Caucasian. Our data indicates 86% of all patients attending the uveitis clinic were diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, followed by intermediate uveitis 5% and idiopathic uveitis 4%. 46% of patients required treatment. Systemic treatment included methotrexate (34%), prednisolone (14%), etanercept (6%), ciclosporin (6%), mycophenolate (3%), and infliximab (1%). Severe visual loss (defined by counting fingers or below vision) was seen in 10 eyes despite appropriately treated chronic uveitis. Our data shows uveitis-related ocular morbidity in a predominantly pediatric Caucasian population. Patients with severe and chronic uveitis may experience significant uveitis-related complications and subsequent visual loss despite aggressive treatment.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  6. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 500 Welcome Bonus for AAPD Members! Pediatric Dentist Toolkit Now Available! AAPD Coding and Insurance Manual 2018 Updates Looking to Find a Job? Looking to Fill a Position? Try the New AAPD Career Center Download the AAPD Reference Manual App Today! ...

  7. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, Tim; Bongers, Bart C; van Brussel, Marco; Haapala, Eero A; Hulzebos, Erik Hj

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic fitness is an important determinant of overall health. Higher aerobic fitness has been associated with many health benefits. Because myocardial ischemia is rare in children, indications for exercise testing differ in children compared to adults. Pediatric exercise testing is imperative to

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  10. Diagnostic Criteria for Pediatric MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago review the diagnostic criteria for pediatric multiple sclerosis, the differential diagnosis, the 2010 McDonald criteria, and Callen criteria.

  11. Biomarkers of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Russell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Need for Novel Biomarkers: Brain tumors are the leading cause of death by solid tumors in children. Although improvements have been made in their radiological detection and treatment, our capacity to promptly diagnose pediatric brain tumors in their early stages remains limited. This contrasts several other cancers where serum biomarkers such as CA 19-9 and CA 125 facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Aim: The aim of this article is to review the latest literature and highlight biomarkers which may be of clinical use in the common types of primary pediatric brain tumor. Methods: A PubMed search was performed to identify studies reporting biomarkers in the bodily fluids of pediatric patients with brain tumors. Details regarding the sample type (serum, cerebrospinal fluid or urine, biomarkers analyzed, methodology, tumor type and statistical significance were recorded. Results: A total of 12 manuscripts reporting 19 biomarkers in 367 patients vs. 397 controls were identified in the literature. Of the 19 biomarkers identified, 12 were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, 2 from serum, 3 from urine, and 2 from multiple bodily fluids. All but one study reported statistically significant differences in biomarker expression between patient and control groups.Conclusions: This review identifies a panel of novel biomarkers for pediatric brain tumors. It provides a platform for the further studies necessary to validate these biomarkers and, in addition, highlights several techniques through which new biomarkers can be discovered.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... or better than those obtained by CT scanning. Working together, your primary care physician or ... Safety in Pediatric Imaging's "Image Gently" Campaign top of ...

  16. Pathophysiology of pediatric fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Benninga, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric fecal incontinence in 4 main categories: (1) Functional fecal retention, the withholding of feces because of fear of painful defecation, results in constipation and overflow soiling. Treatment includes dietary changes, use of laxatives,

  17. Handbook of pediatric HIV care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Read, Jennifer S; Zeichner, Steven L. (Steven Leonard)

    2006-01-01

    ... and guidelines necessary for effective management of infected children. Dr. Stephen L. Zeichner received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Chicago. He trained in pediatrics and infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. An investigator in the HIV and AIDS Malignancy Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, and an adjunc...

  18. Pediatric hospitalists and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) is moving toward becoming an American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) subspecialty, roughly a decade after its formal inception in 2003. Education has played a central role as the field has evolved. Hospitalists are needed to educate trainees, medical students, residents, fellows, and nurse practitioner and physician assistant students in inpatient pediatric practice. Continuous professional development is needed for hospitalists currently in practice to augment clinical skills, such as providing sedation and placing peripherally inserted central catheter lines, and nonclinical skills in areas such as quality improvement methodology, hospital administration, and health service research. To address the educational needs of the current and future state of PHM, additional training is now needed beyond residency training. Fellowship training will be essential to continue to advance the field of PHM as well as to petition the ABP for specialty accreditation. Training in using adult educational theory, curriculum, and assessment design are critical for pediatric hospitalists choosing to advance their careers as clinician-educators. Several venues are available for gaining advanced knowledge and skill as an educator. PHM clinician-educators are advancing the field of pediatric education as well as their own academic careers by virtue of the scholarly approach they have taken to designing and implementing curricula for unique PHM teaching situations. PHM educators are changing the educational paradigm to address challenges to traditional education strategies posed by duty hour restrictions and the increasing drive to shorten the duration of the hospitalization. By embracing learning with technology, such as simulation and e-learning with mobile devices, PHM educators can address these challenges as well as respond to learning preferences of millennial learners. The future for PHM education is bright. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-01-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency ...

  1. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  2. Social Media in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Sarah T; Sanders, James O; Cook, Peter C; O'Malley, Natasha T

    Internet searches and social media utilization in health care has exploded over the past 5 years, and patients utilize it to gain information on their health conditions and physicians. Social media has the potential to serve as a means for education, communication, and marketing in all health care specialties. Physicians are sometimes reluctant to engage because of concerns of privacy, litigation, and lack of experience with this modality. Many surgical subspecialties have capitalized on social media but no study to date has examined the specific footprint of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons in this realm. We aim to quantify the utilization of individual social media platforms by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, and identify any differences between private and hospital-based physicians, but also regional differences. Using the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Member Directory, each active member's social media presence was reviewed through an Internet search. Members were stratified on the basis of practice model and geographic location. Individual Internet searches, social media sites, and number of publications were reviewed for social media presence. Of 987 Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America members, 95% had a professional webpage, 14.8% a professional Facebook page, 2.2% a professional Twitter page, 36.8% a LinkedIn profile, 25.8% a ResearchGate profile, 33% at least 1 YouTube. Hospital-based physicians had a lower mean level of utilization of social media compared with their private practice peers, and a higher incidence of Pubmed publications. Private practice physicians had double the social media utilization. Regional differences reveal that practicing Pediatric Orthopaedists in the Northeast had increased utilization of ResearchGate and LinkedIn and the West had the lowest mean social media utilization levels. The rapid expansion of social media usage by patients and their family members is an undeniable force affecting the health

  3. Mechanical circulatory support in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Robert J; Miletic, Kyle G; Schraufnagel, Dean P; Vargo, Patrick R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Stewart, Robert D; Moazami, Nader

    2016-05-01

    End-stage heart failure affects thousands of children yearly and mechanical circulatory support is used at many points in their care. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supports both the failing heart and lungs, which has led to its use as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation as well as in post-operative cardiogenic shock. Continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have replaced pulsatile-flow devices in adults and early studies have shown promising results in children. The Berlin paracorporeal pulsatile VAD recently gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval and remains the only VAD approved in pediatrics. Failing univentricular hearts and other congenitally corrected lesions are new areas for mechanical support. Finding novel uses, improving durability, and minimizing complications are areas of growth in pediatric mechanical circulatory support.

  4. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children’s environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. PMID:25836737

  5. Virtual Reality in Pediatric Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas D; Riva, Giuseppe; Parsons, Sarah; Mantovani, Fabrizia; Newbutt, Nigel; Lin, Lin; Venturini, Eva; Hall, Trevor

    2017-11-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technologies allow for controlled simulations of affectively engaging background narratives. These virtual environments offer promise for enhancing emotionally relevant experiences and social interactions. Within this context, VR can allow instructors, therapists, neuropsychologists, and service providers to offer safe, repeatable, and diversifiable interventions that can benefit assessments and learning in both typically developing children and children with disabilities. Research has also pointed to VR's capacity to reduce children's experience of aversive stimuli and reduce anxiety levels. Although there are a number of purported advantages of VR technologies, challenges have emerged. One challenge for this field of study is the lack of consensus on how to do trials. A related issue is the need for establishing the psychometric properties of VR assessments and interventions. This review investigates the advantages and challenges inherent in the application of VR technologies to pediatric assessments and interventions. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. An overview of pediatric dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, Jane E; Kikano, George E

    2009-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing or dysphagia can be present in children and adults alike. Pediatric dysphagias have long been recognized in the literature. Certain groups of infants with specific developmental and/or medical conditions have been identified as being at high risk for developing dysphagia. Still others may present with a swallowing or feeding problem as their primary symptom. Left untreated, these problems in infants and children can lead to failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonias, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or the inability to establish and maintain proper nutrition and hydration. Awareness of the prevalence of pediatric dysphagia in today's population and the signs and symptoms of this condition aids in its treatment. Early detection of dysphagia in infants and children is important to prevent or minimize complications. This article provides a review of symptoms, etiologies, and resources available regarding management of this condition to help the primary care physician and the families of young children and infants in its management.

  7. Gender and Sexuality in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merens, Teri A

    2016-05-01

    The terms gender and sexuality, once rarely discussed in a public forum, are now dominant topics of conversation on social media, in all forms of entertainment, politics, law, and medicine. The pediatric primary care physician, like all people and institutions involved in the delivery of health care, must be diligent about providing compassionate and competent care to patients and families contending with gender issues. The complex variety of obstacles these patients may face require a well-informed, sensitive clinician who can offer sound medical advice and appropriate referral. This article guides pediatricians through some of the challenges related to gender identity so they can assist their patients in navigating through any difficulties. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e158-e161.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özçakar Levent

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined.

  9. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  10. Inventory of pediatric neurology "manpower" in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Daniel L; Humphreys, Peter

    2005-08-01

    To review the demographics and workload characteristics of pediatric neurology in Canada. A standardized survey questionnaire was mailed out to practicing pediatric neurologists in Canada in 2001. Variables examined were age, gender, hours on call, regular hours worked per week, type of practice and projected changes in practice over next five to ten years. Results were compared to the 1994 Pediatric Neurology Manpower Survey which had used the same survey instrument. Fifty-six (70%) pediatric neurologists practicing in Canada returned the survey. As was the case in 1994, no significant differences in workload were found based on age or gender. The average age of the practicing pediatric neurologist in 2001 was 51 years compared to 45 years in 1994. The proportion of physicians over 55 years in 2001 was 35% compared to 25% in 1994. Pediatric neurology in Canada is an aging specialty needing a significant recruitment of new members

  11. Imaging in the diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colleran, Gabrielle C.; Callahan, Michael J.; Paltiel, Harriet J.; Chow, Jeanne S.; Nelson, Caleb P.; Cilento, Bartley G.; Baum, Michelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric urolithiasis is an important and increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric morbidity and hospital admission. Ultrasound (US) is the recommended primary imaging modality for suspected urolithiasis in children. There is, however, widespread use of CT as a first-line study for abdominal pain in many institutions involved in pediatric care. The objective of this review is to outline state-of-the-art imaging modalities and methods for diagnosing urolithiasis in children. The pediatric radiologist plays a key role in ensuring that the appropriate imaging modality is performed in the setting of suspected pediatric urolithiasis. Our proposed imaging algorithm starts with US, and describes the optimal technique and indications for the use of CT. We emphasize the importance of improved communication with a greater collaborative approach between pediatric and general radiology departments so children undergo the appropriate imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  12. Imaging in the diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleran, Gabrielle C.; Callahan, Michael J.; Paltiel, Harriet J.; Chow, Jeanne S. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Nelson, Caleb P.; Cilento, Bartley G. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Baum, Michelle A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Pediatric urolithiasis is an important and increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric morbidity and hospital admission. Ultrasound (US) is the recommended primary imaging modality for suspected urolithiasis in children. There is, however, widespread use of CT as a first-line study for abdominal pain in many institutions involved in pediatric care. The objective of this review is to outline state-of-the-art imaging modalities and methods for diagnosing urolithiasis in children. The pediatric radiologist plays a key role in ensuring that the appropriate imaging modality is performed in the setting of suspected pediatric urolithiasis. Our proposed imaging algorithm starts with US, and describes the optimal technique and indications for the use of CT. We emphasize the importance of improved communication with a greater collaborative approach between pediatric and general radiology departments so children undergo the appropriate imaging evaluation. (orig.)

  13. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  14. Helicopter overtriage in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Maria; Goldstein, Seth D; Salazar, Jose; Aboagye, Jonathan; Stewart, Dylan; Efron, David; Abdullah, Fizan; Haut, Elliot R

    2014-11-01

    Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) have been designed to provide faster access to trauma center care in cases of life-threatening injury. However, the ideal recipient population is not fully characterized, and indications for helicopter transport in pediatric trauma vary dramatically by county, state, and region. Overtriage, or unnecessary utilization, can lead to additional patient risk and expense. In this study we perform a nationwide descriptive analysis of HEMS for pediatric trauma and assess the incidence of overtriage in this group. We reviewed records from the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (2008-11) and included patients less than 16 years of age who were transferred from the scene of injury to a trauma center via HEMS. Overtriage was defined as patients meeting all of the following criteria: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, absence of hypotension, an Injury Severity Score (ISS) less than 9, no need for procedure or critical care, and a hospital length of stay of less than 24 hours. A total of 19,725 patients were identified with a mean age of 10.5 years. The majority of injuries were blunt (95.6%) and resulted from motor vehicle crashes (48%) and falls (15%). HEMS transported patients were predominately normotensive (96%), had a GCS of 15 (67%), and presented with minor injuries (ISS<9, 41%). Overall, 28 % of patients stayed in the hospital for less than 24 hours, and the incidence of overtriage was 17%. Helicopter overtriage is prevalent among pediatric trauma patients nationwide. The ideal model to predict need for HEMS must consider clinical outcomes in the context of judicious resource utilization. The development of guidelines for HEMS use in pediatric trauma could potentially limit unnecessary transfers while still identifying children who require trauma center care in a timely fashion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Too many pediatric trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnival, R A; Street, K A; Schunk, J E

    1999-05-01

    Recent reports note a dramatic increase in the number of pediatric trampoline injuries (PTI) during the past several years. In 1996, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that 83 000 patients received treatment for trampoline injuries in US hospital emergency departments (EDs), and that approximately 75% of these patients were trampolines accounted for 99% of PTI. Most injuries (66%) occurred on the trampoline, 28% resulted from falls off, and 4% from imaginative mechanisms. One hundred eleven patients (15%) suffered severe injury (1990 Abbreviated Injury Scale value >/=3), usually of an extremity (89 out of 111). Fractures occurred in 324 patients (45%). Spinal injuries were common (12%), including 7 patients with cervical or thoracic fractures, and 1 with C7 paraplegia. Fractures were more frequently associated with falls off the trampoline, whereas spinal injuries more frequently occurred on the trampoline. Eighty patients (11%) required prehospital medical transport to our ED, 584 (80%) had ED radiographs, and 382 (53%) required pediatric surgical subspecialty involvement. Seventeen percent of PTI patients (125 out of 727) were admitted to the hospital, including 9 to the pediatric intensive care unit; 99 (14%) required one or more operations. Mean hospital stay was 2 days (range, 1-63 days); 24 stays (19%) were for >/=3 days. We estimate that the hospital charges for the acute medical care of PTI study patients at our institution totaled approximately $700 000. PTI are dramatically increasing in number, and result in considerable childhood morbidity. Most PTI occur on privately owned trampolines. Few, if any, safety recommendations for the trampoline are followed. We support recommendations for a ban on the recreational, school, and competitive pediatric use of trampolines.

  16. [Pediatric preparations of blood products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulat, C

    2017-09-01

    The transfusion in pediatrics may require specific preparations to adapt to the various characteristics from preterm neonates to big child: weight, immaturity, immune system, blood volume, long and short-term prognosis, and to meet the needs of pathologies related to the perinatal period. The knowledge of the process for preparation, conservation and administration of these particular products shall permit a transfusion in safe conditions by supporting the prescribers in a personalized blood management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Preface [to: Practical Pediatric Dermatology: Controversies in Diagnosis and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Oranje (Arnold); N. Al-Mutairi (Nawaf); T. Shwayder (Tor)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractPediatric dermatology is a young field that combines dermatologic and pediatric skills and expertises. Knowledge of dermatology and pediatrics is necessary for optimal care of children with skin diseases. A multidisciplinary approach in which there is cooperation between

  18. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity ... self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, and ...

  19. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric ... of self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, ...

  20. Pediatric renal transplant practices in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sidharth Kumar; Sinha, Rajiv; Rohatgi, Smriti; Kher, Vijay; Iyengar, Arpana; Bagga, Arvind

    2017-05-01

    Limited access to tertiary-level health care, limited trained pediatric nephrologists and transplant physicians, lack of facilities for dialysis, lack of an effective deceased donor program, non-affordability, and non-adherence to immunosuppressant drugs poses a major challenge to universal availability of pediatric transplantation in developing countries. We present the results of a survey which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first such published attempt at understanding the current state of pediatric renal transplantation in India. A designed questionnaire formulated by a group of pediatric nephrologists with the aim of understanding the current practice of pediatric renal transplantation was circulated to all adult and pediatric nephrologists of the country. Of 26 adult nephrologists who responded, 16 (61.5%) were involved in pediatric transplantation, and 10 of 15 (66.6%) pediatric nephrologists were involved in pediatric transplantation. Most of the centers doing transplants were private/trust institution with only three government institutions undertaking it. Induction therapy was varied among pediatric and adult nephrologists. There were only a few centers (n=5) in the country routinely doing >5 transplants per year. Preemptive transplants and protocol biopsies were a rarity. The results demonstrate lower incidence of undertaking pediatric transplants in children below 6 years, paucity of active cadaveric programs and lack of availability of trained pediatric nephrologists and staff. In contrast to these dissimilarities, the immunosuppressant use seems to be quite similar to Western registry data with majority favoring induction agent and triple immunosuppressant (steroid, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus) for maintenance. The survey also identifies major concerns in availability of this service to all regions of India as well as to all economic segments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Introduction-Pediatric epilepsy surgery techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenhag, Bertil; Cukiert, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    This supplement includes the proceedings from the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Techniques Meeting held in Gothenburg (July 4-5, 2014), which focused on presentations and discussions regarding specific surgical technical issues in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Pediatric epilepsy neurosurgeons from all over the world were present and active in very fruitful and live presentations and discussions. These articles represent a synopsis of the areas and subjects dealt with there. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  3. History of pediatric cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Saxena

    2015-01-01

    In India, the discipline of cardiology started in the late 1950s and at that time pediatric cardiology was practiced as a part of cardiology specialty. This article traces the history of pediatric cardiology in India. Dr. S. Padmawati and Dr. Kamala Vytilingam underwent training in pediatric cardiology at international centers in the early 1950s and early 1960s. Dr. N. Gopinath successfully closed a ventricular septal defect using a pump oxygenator at Christian Medical College, Vellore. Open ...

  4. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Travis; Xu,Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Travis M Nelson, Zheng Xu Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases th...

  5. Pediatric anesthesia in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2007-06-01

    To highlight the problems faced in developing countries where healthcare resources are limited, with particular emphasis on pediatric anesthesia. The fact that very few publications address pediatric anesthesia in the developing world is not surprising given that most anesthetics are provided by nonphysicians, nurses or unqualified personnel. In compiling this article information is drawn from pediatric surgical, anesthetic and related texts. In a recent survey more than 80% of anesthesia providers in a poor country acknowledged that with the limited resources available they could not provide basic anesthesia for children less than 5 years. Although many publications could be regarded as anecdotal, the similarities to this survey suggest that the lack of facilities is more generalized than we would like to believe. The real risk of anesthesia in comparison to other major health risks such as human immunodeficiency virus, malaria, tuberculosis and trauma remains undetermined. The critical shortage of manpower remains a barrier to progress. Despite erratic electrical supplies, inconsistent oxygen delivery, paucity of drugs or equipment and on occasion even lack of running water, many provide life-saving anesthesia. Perioperative morbidity and mortality is, however, understandably high by developed world standards.

  6. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Our Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Aygen; Sayar, Ersin; Dinçhan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoğlu, İbrahim; Erbiş, Halil; Aydınlı, Bülent; Artan, Reha

    2016-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate our liver transplant pediatric patients and to report our experience in the complications and the long-term follow-up results. Patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years, who had liver transplantation in the organ transplantation center of our university hospital between 1997 and 2016, were included in the study. The age, sex, indications for the liver transplantation, complications after the transplantation, and long-term follow-up findings were retrospectively evaluated. The obtained results were analyzed with statistical methods. In our organ transplantation center, 62 pediatric liver transplantations were carried out since 1997. The mean age of our patients was 7.3 years (6.5 months-17 years). The 4 most common reasons for liver transplantation were: Wilson's disease (n=10; 16.3%), biliary atresia (n=9; 14.5%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (n=8; 12.9%), and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n=7; 11.3%). The mortality rate after transplantation was 19.6% (12 of the total 62 patients). The observed acute and chronic rejection rates were 34% and 4.9%, respectively. Thrombosis (9.6%) was observed in the hepatic artery (4.8%) and portal vein (4.8%). Bile leakage and biliary stricture rates were 31% and 11%, respectively. 1-year and 5-year survival rates of our patients were 87% and 84%, respectively. The morbidity and mortality rates in our organ transplantation center, regarding pediatric liver transplantations, are consistent with the literature.

  7. Spectrum of pediatric neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, Timothy E; Northrop, Jennifer L; Hutton, George J; Ross, Benjamin; Schiffman, Jade S; Hunter, Jill V

    2008-11-01

    Our goal was to describe the spectrum of clinical phenotypes, laboratory and imaging features, and treatment in pediatric patients with neuromyelitis optica. The study consisted of a retrospective chart review of patients followed in a pediatric multiple sclerosis center with a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. Nine patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders were included, all of whom were female. There were 4 black children, 2 Latin American children, 2 white children, and 1 child of mixed Latin American/white heritage. Median age at initial attack was 14 years (range: 1.9-16 years). Median disease duration was 4 years (range: 0.6-9 years). Tests for neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G were positive for 7 patients. Eight patients had transverse myelitis and optic neuritis, and 1 patient had longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis without optic neuritis but had a positive neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G antibody titer. Cerebral involvement on MRI was found in all subjects, 5 of whom were symptomatic with encephalopathy, seizures, hemiparesis, aphasia, vomiting, or hiccups. Immunosuppressive therapy reduced attack frequency and progression of disability. Pediatric neuromyelitis optica has a diverse clinical presentation and may be difficult to distinguish from multiple sclerosis in the early stages of the disease. The recognition of the broad spectrum of this disease to include signs and symptoms of brain involvement is aided by the availability of a serum biomarker: neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G. Early diagnosis and immunosuppresive treatment may help to slow the accumulation of severe disability.

  8. Pediatric multiple sclerosis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A. Peña

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Venezuelan pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. METHODS: Database records from the National Program for MS were searched for patients with an established diagnosis of MS whose first symptoms appeared before age 18. RESULTS: The national database held records of 1.710 patients; 3.8% had onset of the first symptoms before age 18. 46.7% were boys, yielding an F:M ratio of 1.13:1. Many children had a disease onset characterized by motor impairment (30.7%, brainstem/cerebellum and spinal cord affectation (27.6%, headache (26%. Less frequent symptoms were sensory symptoms (8% and optic neuritis (7%. DISCUSSION: Pediatric MS patients in Venezuela represent a significant proportion of all MS cases. The clinical pattern is characterized by motor symptoms at onset, and predominantly monosymptomatic presentation with a relapsing-remitting pattern. This is the first systematic attempt to estimate the prevalence of pediatric MS in Venezuela.

  9. Pediatric melanoma: incidence, treatment, and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyed FK

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Faiez K Saiyed,1 Emma C Hamilton,1 Mary T Austin,1,2 1Department of Pediatric Surgery, McGovern Medical School, 2Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review is to outline recent advancements in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric melanoma. Despite the recent decline in incidence, it continues to be the deadliest form of skin cancer in children and adolescents. Pediatric melanoma presents differently from adult melanoma; thus, the traditional asymmetry, border irregularity, color variegation, diameter >6 mm, and evolution (ABCDE criteria have been modified to include features unique to pediatric melanoma (amelanotic, bleeding/bump, color uniformity, de novo/any diameter, evolution of mole. Surgical and medical management of pediatric melanoma continues to derive guidelines from adult melanoma treatment. However, more drug trials are being conducted to determine the specific impact of drug combinations on pediatric patients. Alongside medical and surgical treatment, prevention is a central component of battling the incidence, as ultraviolet (UV-related mutations play a central role in the vast majority of pediatric melanoma cases. Aggressive prevention measures targeting sun safety and tanning bed usage have shown positive sun-safety behavior trends, as well as the potential to decrease melanomas that manifest later in life. As research into the field of pediatric melanoma continues to expand, a prevention paradigm needs to continue on a community-wide level. Keywords: melanoma, pediatric, adolescent, childhood

  10. In vivo diagnostic nuclear medicine. Pediatric experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, W.A.; Hendee, W.R.; Gilday, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic tests in children is increasing and interest in these is evidenced by the addition of scientific sessions devoted to pediatric medicine at annual meetings of The Society of Nuclear Medicine and by the increase in the literature on pediatric dosimetry. Data presented in this paper describe the actual pediatric nuclear medicine experience from 26 nationally representative U.S. hospitals and provide an overview of the pediatric procedures being performed the types of radiopharmaceuticals being used, and the activity levels being administered

  11. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Debbie S; Kirkendall, Eric S; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. New frontiers in pediatric Allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talano, J M; Pulsipher, M A; Symons, H J; Militano, O; Shereck, E B; Giller, R H; Hancock, L; Morris, E; Cairo, M S

    2014-09-01

    The inaugural meeting of 'New Frontiers in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation' organized by the Pediatric Blood and Transplant Consortium (PBMTC) was held at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Annual Meeting. This meeting provided an international platform for physicians and investigators active in the research and utilization of pediatric Allo-SCT in children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant disease (NMD), to share information and develop future collaborative strategies. The primary objectives of the conference included: (1) to present advances in Allo-SCT in pediatric ALL and novel pre and post-transplant immunotherapy; (2) to highlight new strategies in alternative allogeneic stem cell donor sources for children and adolescents with non-malignant hematological disorders; (3) to discuss timing of immune reconstitution after Allo-SCT and methods of facilitating more rapid recovery of immunity; (4) to identify strategies of utilizing Allo-SCT in pediatric myeloproliferative disorders; (5) to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to hematological complications post pediatric Allo-SCT; (6) to enhance the understanding of new novel cellular therapeutic approaches to pediatric malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders; and (7) to discuss optimizing drug therapy in pediatric recipients of Allo-SCT. This paper will provide a brief overview of the conference.

  13. Estudo de 26 casos de Paracoccidioidomicose avaliados no Serviço de Otorrinolaringologia da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ A study of 26 cases of Paracoccidioidomycosis evaluated at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ Otorhinolaryngology Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco X. Palheta-Neto

    2003-10-01

    microscope is similar to a ship rudder's wheel. Cases of PCM are restricted to the American continent and the disease affects mostly male individuals, with no marked tendency to affect any race in particular. Clinical symptoms are varied. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a thorough epidemiological analysis of 26 cases of PCM evaluated at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ Otorhinolaryngology (ENT Sector. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical retrospective. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A retrospective study was carried out on 26 medical charts of patients with otorhinolaryngological manifestations of PCM who were attended to from October 1998 to September 2001. Aspects taken into account: sex, age, occupation, number of years of schooling, smoking and drinking habits, main complaints, parts of the body presenting most lesions, the presence of co-infection, complementary examinations done, prescribed treatment. RESULTS: 23 patients (88.5% were male and 3 (11,5% were female, their ages ranging from 32 to 72. 11 patients (42.3% were farm workers and 21 (80.8% were heavy smokers and/or drinkers. The most affected parts were the epiglottis and the lateral nasal wall. Sulphonamide derivatives were used to treat 14 patients (53.9% and imidazoles were used for 12 cases (46.1%. DISCUSSION: Pulmonary lesions may be mistaken for tuberculosis due to clinical and radiological similarities. Malnutrition may lead to clinical conditions of extreme gravity. CONCLUSION: The detailed medical histories of PCM carriers reveal important aspects such us the patients' origins and personal habits. Interdisciplinary actions, especially involving doctors and dentists, contribute to an early diagnosis and adequate treatment and follow-up of patients.

  14. Hipertransaminasemia en Pediatría Hypertransaminasemia in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    D. González Jiménez; P.M. Santos Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    La hipertransaminasemia es un motivo frecuente de consulta en Pediatría, en algunas ocasiones aparecerá en el contexto del estudio de una enfermedad hepática, pero principalmente la encontraremos como hallazgo casual tras realizar una analítica por cualquier otro motivo.  La mayoría de los pacientes con elevación de las transaminasas podrán ser manejados de forma ambulatoria. Sin embargo, puede ser la forma de presentación de una enfermedad hepática grave por lo que no debemos olvidar los sig...

  15. Pulmonary parenchymal changes in the pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the pediatric chest radiograph for parenchymal pathology is similar to that of the adult. This chapter focuses primarily on the radiographic changes of certain entities presenting to the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU), including airway diseases, pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage, and lung trauma, as well as problems related to general anesthesia and surgery

  16. Skill qualifications in pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaka, Tadashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Nio, Masaki; Segawa, Osamu; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Terakura, Hirotsugu; Take, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryuichiro; Yagi, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    In 2006, The Japanese Society of Pediatric Endoscopic Surgeons devised a plan to develop a pediatric endoscopic surgical skill qualification (ESSQ) system. This system is controlled by The Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery. The standard requirement for skills qualification is the ability of each applicant to complete common types of laparoscopic surgery. The main goal of the system is to decrease complications of laparoscopic surgery by evaluating the surgical skills of each applicant and subsequently certify surgeons with adequate skills to perform laparoscopic operations safely. A committee of pediatric ESSQ created a checklist to assess the applicant's laparoscopic surgical skills. Skills are assessed in a double-blinded fashion by evaluating an unedited video recording of a fundoplication for pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. The initial pediatric ESSQ system was started in 2008. In 2008 and 2009, respectively, 9 out of 17 (53%) and 6 out of 12 (50%) applicants were certified as expert pediatric laparoscopic surgeons. Our ultimate goal is to provide safe and appropriate pediatric minimally invasive procedures and to avoid severe complications. To prove the predictive validity of this system, a survey of the outcomes of operations performed by certified pediatric surgeons is required.

  17. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  18. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  19. Optimization of electronic prescribing in pediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B.

    2014-01-01

    Improving pediatric patient safety by preventing medication errors that may result in adverse drug events and consequent healthcare expenditure,is a worldwide challenge to healthcare. In pediatrics, reported medication error rates in general, and prescribing error rates in particular, vary between

  20. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course o...

  1. New directions in pediatric digital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.D.; Adams, R.B.; Blackham, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter the authors describe several simple experiments performed utilizing digital equipment which apply to clinical situations in pediatrics and which suggest future directions for research in digital imaging. They also discuss experimental systems which they believe will overcome certain limitations of current equipment and might be applicable to pediatric digital imaging in the future

  2. Pandemic Influenza Pediatric Office Plan Template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    This is a planning tool developed by pediatric stakeholders that is intended to assist pediatric medical offices that have no pandemic influenza plan in place, but may experience an increase in patient calls/visits or workload due to pandemic influenza.

  3. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  4. Peripheral doses from pediatric IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Maserang, Beth; Wood, Roy; Mansur, David

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral dose (PD) data exist for conventional fields (≥10 cm) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery to standard adult-sized phantoms. Pediatric peripheral dose reports are limited to conventional therapy and are model based. Our goal was to ascertain whether data acquired from full phantom studies and/or pediatric models, with IMRT treatment times, could predict Organ at Risk (OAR) dose for pediatric IMRT. As monitor units (MUs) are greater for IMRT, it is expected IMRT PD will be higher; potentially compounded by decreased patient size (absorption). Baseline slab phantom peripheral dose measurements were conducted for very small field sizes (from 2 to 10 cm). Data were collected at distances ranging from 5 to 72 cm away from the field edges. Collimation was either with the collimating jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC) oriented either perpendicular or along the peripheral dose measurement plane. For the clinical tests, five patients with intracranial or base of skull lesions were chosen. IMRT and conventional three-dimensional (3D) plans for the same patient/target/dose (180 cGy), were optimized without limitation to the number of fields or wedge use. Six MV, 120-leaf MLC Varian axial beams were used. A phantom mimicking a 3-year-old was configured per Center for Disease Control data. Micro (0.125 cc) and cylindrical (0.6 cc) ionization chambers were appropriated for the thyroid, breast, ovaries, and testes. The PD was recorded by electrometers set to the 10 -10 scale. Each system set was uniquely calibrated. For the slab phantom studies, close peripheral points were found to have a higher dose for low energy and larger field size and when MLC was not deployed. For points more distant from the field edge, the PD was higher for high-energy beams. MLC orientation was found to be inconsequential for the small fields tested. The thyroid dose was lower for IMRT delivery than that predicted for conventional (ratio of IMRT/cnventional ranged from

  5. Pediatric palliative care and pediatric medical ethics: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Nathanson, Pamela G

    2014-02-01

    The fields of pediatric palliative care (PPC) and pediatric medical ethics (PME) overlap substantially, owing to a variety of historical, cultural, and social factors. This entwined relationship provides opportunities for leveraging the strong communication skills of both sets of providers, as well as the potential for resource sharing and research collaboration. At the same time, the personal and professional relationships between PPC and PME present challenges, including potential conflict with colleagues, perceived or actual bias toward a palliative care perspective in resolving ethical problems, potential delay or underuse of PME services, and a potential undervaluing of the medical expertise required for PPC consultation. We recommend that these challenges be managed by: (1) clearly defining and communicating clinical roles of PPC and PME staff, (2) developing questions that may prompt PPC and PME teams to request consultation from the other service, (3) developing explicit recusal criteria for PPC providers who also provide PME consultation, (4) ensuring that PPC and PME services remain organizationally distinct, and (5) developing well-defined and broad scopes of practice. Overall, the rich relationship between PPC and PME offers substantial opportunities to better serve patients and families facing difficult decisions.

  6. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ran D

    2002-01-01

    Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice. PMID:12460456

  7. Hypnosis in pediatrics: applications at a pediatric pulmonary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbar Ran D

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the utility of hypnosis for patients who presented to a Pediatric Pulmonary Center over a 30 month period. Methods Hypnotherapy was offered to 303 patients from May 1, 1998 – October 31, 2000. Patients offered hypnotherapy included those thought to have pulmonary symptoms due to psychological issues, discomfort due to medications, or fear of procedures. Improvement in symptoms following hypnosis was observed by the pulmonologist for most patients with habit cough and conversion reaction. Improvement of other conditions for which hypnosis was used was gauged based on patients' subjective evaluations. Results Hypnotherapy was associated with improvement in 80% of patients with persistent asthma, chest pain/pressure, habit cough, hyperventilation, shortness of breath, sighing, and vocal cord dysfunction. When improvement was reported, in some cases symptoms resolved immediately after hypnotherapy was first employed. For the others improvement was achieved after hypnosis was used for a few weeks. No patients' symptoms worsened and no new symptoms emerged following hypnotherapy. Conclusions Patients described in this report were unlikely to have achieved rapid improvement in their symptoms without the use of hypnotherapy. Therefore, hypnotherapy can be an important complementary therapy for patients in a pediatric practice.

  8. Should Pediatric Euthanasia be Legalized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Marije; Kaczor, Christopher; Battin, Margaret P; Maeckelberghe, Els; Lantos, John D; Verhagen, Eduard

    2018-02-01

    Voluntary active euthanasia for adults at their explicit request has been legal in Belgium and the Netherlands since 2002. In those countries, acceptance of the practice for adults has been followed by acceptance of the practice for children. Opponents of euthanasia see this as a dangerous slippery slope. Proponents argue that euthanasia is sometimes ethically appropriate for minors and that, with proper safeguards, it should be legally available in appropriate circumstances for patients at any age. In this Ethics Rounds, we asked philosophers from the United States and the Netherlands, and a Dutch pediatrician, to discuss the ethics of legalizing euthanasia for children. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Christopher C; Walker, Clark M; Spence, David D

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biological substances that allow injured muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bone to heal more quickly. They are found naturally in the body; at higher concentrations they can aid in the healing process. These substances include autograft bone, allograft bone, demineralized bone matrix, bone morphogenic proteins, growth factors, stem cells, plasma-rich protein, and ceramic grafts. Their use in sports medicine has exploded in efforts to increase graft incorporation, stimulate healing, and get athletes back to sport with problems including anterior cruciate ligament ruptures, tendon ruptures, cartilage injuries, and fractures. This article reviews orthobiologics and their applications in pediatric sports medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Burden of pediatric hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada Hassan; Kamal, Naglaa Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major health burden infecting 170-210 million people worldwide. Additional 3-4 millions are newly-infected annually. Prevalence of pediatric infection varies from 0.05%-0.36% in the United States and Europe; up to 1.8%-5.8% in some developing countries. The highest prevalence occurs in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Amazon basin and Mongolia. HCV has been present in some populations for several centuries, notably genotypes 1 and 2 in West Africa. Parenteral anti-schis...

  11. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, Ezra A.; Orbach, Darren B.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  12. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Ezra A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Orbach, Darren B. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Neurointerventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  13. Defining Service and Education in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Debra; Gagne, Josh; Kesselheim, Jennifer C

    2017-11-01

    Program directors (PDs) and trainees are often queried regarding the balance of service and education during pediatric residency training. We aimed to use qualitative methods to learn how pediatric residents and PDs define service and education and to identify activities that exemplify these concepts. Focus groups of pediatric residents and PDs were performed and the data qualitatively analyzed. Thematic analysis revealed 4 themes from focus group data: (1) misalignment of the perceived definition of service; (2) agreement about the definition of education; (3) overlapping perceptions of the value of service to training; and (4) additional suggestions for improved integration of education and service. Pediatric residents hold positive definitions of service and believe that service adds value to their education. Importantly, the discovery of heterogeneous definitions of service between pediatric residents and PDs warrants further investigation and may have ramifications for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and those responsible for residency curricula.

  14. Nigerian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  15. The attitude of medical students towards otorhinolaryngology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy-eight (50%) students found otolaryngology interesting as a course with 8 (5.5%) students opting to specialize in it comprising 2 (1.3%) as second career choice and 6 (4.2%) as third career choice while 49 (31.6%) were still undecided. One hundred and nineteen (76.3%) students agreed their postings were ...

  16. Otorhinolaryngology Services at Muhimbili National Hospital and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epistaxis is the commonest ear, nose and throat emergency. It's mostly self-limited but it may be severe such that medical attention is sought and in such cases it may be life threatening. There is paucity of data on the prevalence and management options for epistaxis in Tanzania and at Muhimbili National ...

  17. Nasal Myiasis in Hinduism and Contemporary Otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmia, Anand N; Zimmermann, Terence M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Shane Tubbs, R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2017-08-01

    Various case reports on nasal myiasis written during the 1990s and 2000s state that nasal myiasis, which is known as peenash among South Asian natives, is a form of divine punishment in Hindu mythology, but do not provide citations from Hindu scriptures that would suggest this interpretation. This paper aims to discuss the phenomenon of peenash in a historical context by examining medical literature written during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to identify Hindu texts contributing to the belief of some Hindus that nasal myiasis is a form of divine punishment, and to provide an overview of contemporary treatment for and management of nasal myiasis.

  18. OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGICAL DISEASES MASQUERADING AS ORBITAL TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmistha Behera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The close proximity of the orbit and the paranasal sinuses, both of which share more than two-thirds of common walls makes the orbit too susceptible to infections spreading from the paranasal sinuses. In any case of proptosis indicating an orbital tumour, extension from a PNS lesion should be ruled out. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was a retrospective descriptive study. Data taken from the patient's medical record during the period of July 2014- June 2017. A total of 32 cases of proptosis were studied all of which were secondary to paranasal sinus pathology. These cases were subject to routine clinical examination and investigations including CT and MRI scan. Histopathological diagnosis was obtained by biopsy in appropriate cases. RESULTS Out of 32 patients, males were 68.75% (n=22 and females were 31.25% (n=10. The largest age group are in the age range 41-50 years (31.25%, n=10 and in age group 0-10 years (31.25%. Out of the whole, 13 (40.6% of them were due to sinusitis, 6 (18.75% due to sinonasal malignancy, all of which were histopathologically confirmed to be squamous cell carcinoma of maxillary sinus, 6 (18.75% cases were of mucoceles from frontoethmoidal origin, 4 (12.50% cases were of fibrous dysplasia of maxillary sinus, 2 (6.25% case was of schwannoma of frontal sinus origin and 1 (3.12% case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis of maxillary sinus. In our study, proptosis was commonest presenting complaint in all 32 patients followed by nasal obstruction (62.5%, reduced vision (25%, facial asymmetry (25%, redness of eye (18.75% and double vision (12.50%. Out of all investigative modalities, biopsy was found to be the most accurate followed by CT scan brain, PNS and orbit. CONCLUSION Due to close proximity, nasal and PNS diseases through bone erosion or preformed pathways can invade the orbit and cause proptosis. Longstanding optic nerve compression by orbital encroachment of PNS lesion can lead to blindness due to optic atrophy. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent grave consequences as blindness.

  19. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  20. How Do US Pediatric Residency Programs Teach and Evaluate Community Pediatrics and Advocacy Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Cara; Hoffman, Benjamin D; Moon, Rachel Y

    2017-07-01

    In 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education updated requirements for training in community pediatrics and advocacy in pediatric residency programs. In light of this update, the aim of this study was to better understand how community pediatrics is being taught and evaluated in pediatric residency programs in the United States. Cross-sectional exploratory study using a Web-based survey of pediatric residency program directors in September 2014. Questions focused on teaching and evaluation of 10 community pediatrics competencies. Of 85 programs (43% response rate), 30% offered a separate training track and/or 6-block individualized curriculum in community pediatrics or advocacy. More than 75% required all residents to learn 7 of 10 competencies queried. Respondents in urban settings were more likely to teach care of special populations (P = .02) and public speaking (P pediatrics and advocacy teaching among responding US pediatric residency programs. Although respondents reported a variety of teaching and evaluation methods, there were few statistically significant differences between programs. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunotherapy Targets in Pediatric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal, E-mail: rimas.orentas@nih.gov, E-mail: mackallc@mail.nih.gov [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-01-30

    Immunotherapy for cancer has shown increasing success and there is ample evidence to expect that progress gleaned in immune targeting of adult cancers can be translated to pediatric oncology. This manuscript reviews principles that guide selection of targets for immunotherapy of cancer, emphasizing the similarities and distinctions between oncogene-inhibition targets and immune targets. It follows with a detailed review of molecules expressed by pediatric tumors that are already under study as immune targets or are good candidates for future studies of immune targeting. Distinctions are made between cell surface antigens that can be targeted in an MHC independent manner using antibodies, antibody derivatives, or chimeric antigen receptors versus intracellular antigens which must be targeted with MHC restricted T cell therapies. Among the most advanced immune targets for childhood cancer are CD19 and CD22 on hematologic malignancies, GD2 on solid tumors, and NY-ESO-1 expressed by a majority of synovial sarcomas, but several other molecules reviewed here also have properties which suggest that they too could serve as effective targets for immunotherapy of childhood cancer.

  2. Burnout Syndrome in Pediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem A. Al-Youbi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics.Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia was conducted utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory in addition to questions regarding work-related and lifestyle-related factors.Results: One hundred and thirty pediatricians (55% females were included with age ranging between 25 and 45 years (mean: 30. Most (46% were consultants and 54% practiced in a university based setting. Burnout scores were abnormal in 107 (82% and in 45 (34% the syndrome was severe. Males were more likely to reach a severe burnout category compared to females (40% vs. 31%; p=0.012. Academic pediatricians working in a university setting were much more likely to experience severe burnout compared to their counterparts working in other hospitals (50% vs. 19%; p=0.0005. Consultants were also more likely to experience severe burnout compared to residents and assistants (46% vs. 27%; p=0.03.Conclusion: At least one third of practicing pediatricians suffer from burnout syndrome. Specific strategies should be developed and implemented to limit and prevent professional burnout.

  3. Burnout syndrome in pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Youbi, Reem A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2013-07-01

    Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics. A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia was conducted utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory in addition to questions regarding work-related and lifestyle-related factors. One hundred and thirty pediatricians (55% females) were included with age ranging between 25 and 45 years (mean: 30). Most (46%) were consultants and 54% practiced in a university based setting. Burnout scores were abnormal in 107 (82%) and in 45 (34%) the syndrome was severe. Males were more likely to reach a severe burnout category compared to females (40% vs. 31%; p=0.012). Academic pediatricians working in a university setting were much more likely to experience severe burnout compared to their counterparts working in other hospitals (50% vs. 19%; p=0.0005). Consultants were also more likely to experience severe burnout compared to residents and assistants (46% vs. 27%; p=0.03). At least one third of practicing pediatricians suffer from burnout syndrome. Specific strategies should be developed and implemented to limit and prevent professional burnout.

  4. Immunotherapy Targets in Pediatric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy for cancer has shown increasing success and there is ample evidence to expect that progress gleaned in immune targeting of adult cancers can be translated to pediatric oncology. This manuscript reviews principles that guide selection of targets for immunotherapy of cancer, emphasizing the similarities and distinctions between oncogene-inhibition targets and immune targets. It follows with a detailed review of molecules expressed by pediatric tumors that are already under study as immune targets or are good candidates for future studies of immune targeting. Distinctions are made between cell surface antigens that can be targeted in an MHC independent manner using antibodies, antibody derivatives, or chimeric antigen receptors versus intracellular antigens which must be targeted with MHC restricted T cell therapies. Among the most advanced immune targets for childhood cancer are CD19 and CD22 on hematologic malignancies, GD2 on solid tumors, and NY-ESO-1 expressed by a majority of synovial sarcomas, but several other molecules reviewed here also have properties which suggest that they too could serve as effective targets for immunotherapy of childhood cancer.

  5. [Management of pediatric status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas L, Carmen Paz; Varela E, Ximena; Kleinsteuber S, Karin; Cortés Z, Rocío; Avaria B, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Status Epilepticus (SE) is an emergency situation with high morbidity and mortality that requires early and aggressive management. The minimum time criterion to define SE was reduced from 30 to 5 minutes, defined as continuous seizure activity or rapidly recurrent seizures without resumption of consciousness for more than 5 minutes. This definition considers that seizures that persist for > 5 minutes are likely to do so for more than 30 min. Those that persist for more than 30 minutes are more difficult to treat. Refractory SE is the condition that extends beyond 60-120 minutes and requires anesthetic management. Super-refractory SE is the state of no response to anesthetic management or relapse during withdrawal of these drugs. The aim of this review is to provide and update on convulsive SE concepts, pathophysiology, etiology, available antiepileptic treatment and propose a rational management scheme. A literature search of articles published between January 1993 and January 2013, focused on pediatric population was performed. The evidence about management in children is limited, mostly corresponds to case series of patients grouped by diagnosis, mainly adults. These publications show treatment alternatives such as immunotherapy, ketogenic diet, surgery and hypothermia. A 35% mortality, 26% of neurological sequelae and 35% of recovery to baseline condition is described on patient’s evolution.

  6. Pediatric and neonatal cardiovascular pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Hoover, Suzan R

    2003-01-01

    Advances in cardiology, surgical techniques, postoperative care, and medications have improved the chances of long-term survival of the neonatal and pediatric patient with complex congenital cardiac anomalies. Rather than undergoing palliative repair, these children are now frequently taken to the operating room for complete repair. As complete repair becomes the norm, collaborative management and a thorough understanding of the pre and postoperative medications used become essential to the care of these patients. The nurse's ability to understand preop, postop, and management medications is enhanced by an understanding of the principles of cardiac anatomy and physiology, as well as developmental changes in cardiac function. All of these are reviewed. In addition, since the safe and effective administration of these drugs depends on the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse's thorough knowledge of these medications and their effects on the cardiovascular system, a brief review of these medications is presented. While new technology and techniques are improving survival rates for children with congenital heart anomalies, it is the postoperative care that these children receive that enhances the patient's survival even more.

  7. Pediatric Obesity: Looking into Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Malavolti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of pediatric obesity continues to rise worldwide. Increasing the number of health care practitioners as well as pediatricians with expertise in obesity treatment is necessary. Because many obese patients suffer obesity-associated cardiovascular, metabolic and other health complications that could increase the severity of obesity, it is fundamental not only to identify the child prone to obesity as early as possible, but to recognize, treat and monitor obesity-related diseases during adolescence. This short review outlines the treatment of pediatric obesity that may have applications in the primary care setting. It examines current information on eating behavior, sedentary behavior, and details studies of multidisciplinary, behavior-based, obesity treatment programs. We also report the less common and more aggressive forms of treatment, such as medication and bariatric surgery. We emphasize that health care providers have the potential to improve outcomes by performing early identification, helping families create the best possible home environment, and by providing structured guidance to obese children and their families.

  8. Trichoscopy in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Malakar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Approach to trichology in the pediatric age group is based on the clinical expertise of the dermatologist and investigative techniques. Currently, the trichoscope is an indispensible, noninvasive tool in the diagnosis of trichological disorders. It not only highlights the subtle tricoscopic points invisible to the naked eye but also serves as a prognostic and monitoring tool in therapeutic management. Trichoscopy goes a long way in improving the diagnostic and clinical acumen of the physician. In the pediatric age group, trichoscopy deals with pattern analysis ranging from hair shaft patterns to follicular, perifollicular, and interfollicular patterns. It not only describes the key trichoscopic features of noncicatricial alopecias, cicatricial alopecias, and genetic hair shaft defects but also helps to delineate various trichological mimics from each other. For compiling data, all trichology cases presenting to a tertiary care center were examined and photographed with a Fotofinder, DermLite Foto II Pro, and DermLite DL 3N. All trichological data were analyzed, and interpretations were based on the literature available.

  9. Retrospective Survey of Biopsied Oral Lesions in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Lin Wang

    2009-11-01

    Conclusion: The mucous extravasation phenomenon, odontoma, or dentigerous cyst was the most common inflammatory and reactive, neoplastic, or cystic lesion, respectively, in pediatric patients. The relatively high incidence of inflammatory and reactive lesions in pediatric patients implies the importance of stringent oral hygiene in children. Most oral neoplastic lesions in pediatric patients are benign, and malignant oral tumors rarely occur in pediatric patients.

  10. Pharmacotherapy in the Management of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aaron S; Fox, Claudia K

    2017-08-01

    This review provides a rationale for the use of pharmacotherapy in pediatric weight management, summarizes results of some of the key pediatric clinical trials of approved and "off-label" obesity medications, introduces new options in the pediatric pipeline, and offers a glimpse into the future of pediatric obesity medicine. Despite the need for adjunctive treatments to enhance the outcomes of lifestyle modification therapy among youth with obesity, none of the obesity medications evaluated to date have been shown to meaningfully reduce BMI or cardiometabolic risk factors. Promising medications recently approved for the treatment of obesity in adults will soon be tested in pediatric trials, offering hope that new therapeutic options will soon be available. As new medications are approved to treat pediatric obesity, it will be important to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combination pharmacotherapy and investigate predictors of response. Application of precision medicine approaches to the field of pediatric obesity management will improve the long-term outlook for the tens of millions of youth afflicted with this serious and recalcitrant disease.

  11. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. [Pediatric history in Pisa and the birth of world pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnetani, I; Farnetani, F

    2009-10-01

    The University of Pisa was the first in the world to nominate a professor of pediatirics. It was Gaetano Palloni who was nominated professor of ''children diseases'' on April 8(th), 1802 and was assigned to one of the two branch offices of the Pisan University, the one in Florence. He was assigned to ''Ospedale degli Innocenti'' where he taught and also supervised the clinical part. In 1923, he was nominated director of the Gennaro Fiore paediatric clinic and stayed there until 1952 when Augusto Gentili took over. In half a century there were only two professors and this didactic continuity made it possible for Pisa to become one of the greatest Italian pediatric schools.

  13. How do pediatric anesthesiologists define intraoperative hypotension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiu, Olubukola O; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Morris, Michelle; Chimbira, Wilson T; Malviya, Shobha; Reynolds, Paul I; Tremper, Kevin K

    2009-11-01

    Although blood pressure (BP) monitoring is a recommended standard of care by the ASA, and pediatric anesthesiologists routinely monitor the BP of their patients and when appropriate treat deviations from 'normal', there is no robust definition of hypotension in any of the pediatric anesthesia texts or journals. Consequently, what constitutes hypotension in pediatric anesthesia is currently unknown. We designed a questionnaire-based survey of pediatric anesthesiologists to determine the BP ranges and thresholds used to define intraoperative hypotension (IOH). Members of the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) and the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists (APA) of Great Britain and Ireland were contacted through e-mail to participate in this survey. We asked a few demographic questions and five questions about specific definitions of hypotension for different age groups of patients undergoing inguinal herniorraphy, a common pediatric surgical procedure. The overall response rate was 56% (483/860), of which 76% were SPA members. Majority of the respondents (72%) work in academic institutions, while 8.9% work in institutions with fewer than 1000 annual pediatric surgical caseload. About 76% of respondents indicated that a 20-30% reduction in baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) indicates significant hypotension in children under anesthesia. Most responders (86.7%) indicated that they use mean arterial pressure or SBP (72%) to define IOH. The mean SBP values for hypotension quoted by SPA members was about 5-7% lower across all pediatric age groups compared to values quoted by APA members (P = 0.001 for all age groups). There is great variability in the BP parameters used and the threshold used for defining and treating IOH among pediatric anesthesiologists. The majority of respondents considered a 20-30% reduction from baseline in SBP as indicative of significant hypotension. Lack of a consensus definition for a common clinical condition like IOH could have

  14. Cell therapy for pediatric disorders of glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albuquerque Osório, Maria Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The childhood disorders of glia comprise a group of diseases that include the pediatric leukodystrophies and lysosomal storage disorders, cerebral palsies and perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathies, and selected neurodevelopmental disorders of glial origin. Essentially, all of these disorders...... (GPCs) and their derivatives, the glial disorders may be uniquely attractive targets for cell-based therapeutic strategies, and the pediatric disorders especially so. As a result, GPCs, which can distribute throughout the neuraxis and give rise to new astrocytes and myelinogenic oligodendrocytes, have...... become of great interest as candidates for the therapeutic restoration of normal glial architecture and function, as well as new myelin, to the pediatric brain....

  15. Pediatric burn rehabilitation: Philosophy and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Ohgi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a huge public health issue for children throughout the world, with the majority occurring in developing countries. Burn injuries can leave a pediatric patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of pediatric burn treatment. The aim of this article was to review the literature on pediatric burn rehabilitation from the Medline, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases. An attempt has been made to present the basic aspects of burn rehabilitation, provide practical information, and discuss the goals and conceptualization of rehabilitation as well as the development of rehabilitation philosophy and strategies.

  16. Pediatric Cushing′s disease: Management Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O Savage

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing′s disease (CD, caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary corticotroph adenoma, is the commonest cause of Cushing syndrome in children over 5 years of age. It is rare in the pediatric age range and presents difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Key presenting features include weight gain, growth failure and change in facial appearance. Most pediatric endocrinologists have limited experience managing children or adolescents with CD and thus benefit from close consultation with adult colleagues. We describe a diagnostic protocol which broadly follows the model for adult patients. Treatment strategies are examined and appraised. The management of pediatric CD patients after cure is also discussed.

  17. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using 18 FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  18. Pediatric Academic Productivity: Pediatric Benchmarks for the h- and g-Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudy, Megan M; Rowe, Tashi L; Dover, George J; Cheng, Tina L

    2016-02-01

    To describe h- and g-indices benchmarks in pediatric subspecialties and general academic pediatrics. Academic productivity is measured increasingly through bibliometrics that derive a statistical enumeration of academic output and impact. The h- and g-indices incorporate the number of publications and citations. Benchmarks for pediatrics have not been reported. Thirty programs were selected randomly from pediatric residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The h- and g-indices of department chairs were calculated. For general academic pediatrics, pediatric gastroenterology, and pediatric nephrology, a random sample of 30 programs with fellowships were selected. Within each program, an MD faculty member from each academic rank was selected randomly. Google Scholar via Harzing's Publish or Perish was used to calculate the h-index, g-index, and total manuscripts. Only peer-reviewed and English language publications were included. For Chairs, calculations from Google Scholar were compared with Scopus. For all specialties, the mean h- and g-indices significantly increased with academic rank (all P calculation using different bibliographic databases only differed by ±1. Mean h-indices increased with academic rank and were not significantly different across the pediatric specialties. Benchmarks for h- and g-indices in pediatrics are provided and may be one measure of academic productivity and impact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric Obstructive Uropathy: Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C. M. C.; Scheinman, J. I.; Roth, K. S.

    2005-01-01

    As the powerful tools of molecular biology continue to delineate new concepts of pathogenesis of diseases, new molecular-level therapeutic modalities are certain to emerge. In order to design and execute clinical trials to evaluate outcomes of these new treatment modalities, we will soon need a new supply of investigators with training and experience in clinical research. The slowly-progressive nature of chronic pediatric kidney disease often results in diagnosis being made at a time remote from initial result, and the inherently slow rate of progression makes changes difficult to measure. Thus, development of molecular markers for both diagnosis and rate of progression will be critical to studies of new therapeutic modalities. We will review general aspects of clinical trials and will use current and past studies as examples to illustrate specific points, especially as these apply to chronic kidney disease associated with obstructive uropathy in children. (author)

  20. Pediatric lower extremity mower injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sean M; Elwood, Eric T

    2011-09-01

    Lawn mower injuries in children represent an unfortunate common problem to the plastic reconstructive surgeon. There are approximately 68,000 per year reported in the United States. Compounding this problem is the fact that a standard treatment algorithm does not exist. This study follows a series of 7 pediatric patients treated for lower extremity mower injuries by a single plastic surgeon. The extent of soft tissue injury varied. All patients were treated with negative pressure wound therapy as a bridge to definitive closure. Of the 7 patients, 4 required skin grafts, 1 required primary closure, 1 underwent a lower extremity amputation secondary to wounds, and 1 was repaired using a cross-leg flap. Function limitations were minimal for all of our patients after reconstruction. Our basic treatment algorithm is presented with initial debridement followed by the simplest method possible for wound closure using negative pressure wound therapy, if necessary.

  1. Compassion Fatigue in Pediatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jill; Polivka, Barbara; Smoot, Elizabeth Ann; Owens, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Compassion fatigue in nursing has been shown to impact the quality of patient care and employee satisfaction and engagement. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and severity of compassion fatigue among pediatric nurses and variations in prevalence based on respondent demographics using a cross-sectional survey design. Nurses under 40 years of age, with 6-10 years of experience and/or working in a medical-surgical unit had significantly lower compassion satisfaction and higher levels of burnout. Secondary traumatic stress from caring for children with severe illness or injury or end of life was a key contributor to compassion fatigue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging of pediatric pituitary endocrinopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    Accurate investigation of the hypothalamic-pituitary area is required in pediatric patients for diagnosis of endocrine-related disorders. These disorders include hypopituitarism, growth failure, diencephalic syndrome, delayed puberty, precocious puberty, diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion, and hyperpituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to visualize hypothalamic-pituitary axis and associated endocrinopathies. Neuroimaging can be normal or disclose abnormalities related to pituitary-hypothalamic axis like (i) congenital and developmental malformations; (ii) tumors; (iii) cystic lesions; and (iv) infectious and inflammatory conditions. Classical midline anomalies like septo-optic dysplasias or corpus callosum agenesis are commonly associated with pituitary endocrinopathies and also need careful evaluation. In this radiological review, we will discuss neuroendocrine disorders related to hypothalamic pituitary-axis. PMID:23087850

  3. Challenges in pediatric endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed endothelial keratoplasty (EK in three eyes of two siblings (2.5 years, male and 3.5 years, female with congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED and report the intraoperative and postoperative difficulties. Repeated iris prolapse, apprehension of crystalline lens touch due to positive vitreous pressure, and need for frequent air injections to attach the graft were intraoperative challenges in all three eyes. These were addressed by use of Sheet′s glide instead of Busin′s glide during graft insertion and suturing of main and side ports before air injection. One eye had graft dislocation on second postoperative day due to eye rubbing by the child. Graft was repositioned with air and a venting incision was created. Postoperative examination required repeated general anesthesia. Corneal edema resolved completely in all three eyes. Present case series highlights the possible intraoperative and postoperative challenges and their solutions in pediatric EK for CHED.

  4. The Pediatric Cancer Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, James R; Wilson, Richard K; Zhang, Jinghui; Mardis, Elaine R; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ding, Li; Ley, Timothy J; Evans, William E

    2013-01-01

    The St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital–Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project (PCGP) is participating in the international effort to identify somatic mutations that drive cancer. These cancer genome sequencing efforts will not only yield an unparalleled view of the altered signaling pathways in cancer but should also identify new targets against which novel therapeutics can be developed. Although these projects are still deep in the phase of generating primary DNA sequence data, important results are emerging and valuable community resources are being generated that should catalyze future cancer research. We describe here the rationale for conducting the PCGP, present some of the early results of this project and discuss the major lessons learned and how these will affect the application of genomic sequencing in the clinic. PMID:22641210

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  6. Pediatric considerations in craniofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bernadette L

    2014-08-01

    In many respects, craniofacial trauma in children is akin to that in adults. The appearance of fractures and associated injuries is frequently similar. However, the frequencies of different types of fractures and patterns of injury in younger children vary depending on the age of the child. In addition, there are unique aspects that must be considered when imaging the posttraumatic pediatric face. Some of these are based on normal growth and development of the skull base and craniofacial structures, and others on the varying etiologies and mechanisms of craniofacial injury in children, such as injuries related to toppled furniture, nonaccidental trauma, all-terrain vehicle accidents, and impalement injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric brain tumors; Kindliche Hirntumoren

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    Reith, W.; Bodea, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muehl-Benninghaus, R.

    2017-09-15

    Brain tumors differ between children and adults both in histology and localization. Malignant gliomas and meningiomas predominate in adults while medulloblastomas and low-grade astrocytomas are the most frequent brain tumors in children. More than one half (50-70%) of pediatric brain tumors have an infratentorial location but only approximately 30% in adults. Brain tumors can be recognized in sonography, cranial computed tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by their space-consuming character and by their divergent density and intensity in comparison to normal brain parenchyma. They can grow extrusively, even infiltrate the parenchyma or originate from it. Besides clinical symptoms and diagnostics this article describes the most common pediatric brain tumors, i.e. astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, brainstem glioma, craniopharyngioma, neurofibromatosis and ganglioglioma. The most important imaging criteria are outlined. (orig.) [German] Sowohl Histologie als auch Lokalisation von Hirntumoren unterscheiden sich bei Kindern und Erwachsenen. Waehrend maligne Gliome und Meningeome bei Erwachsenen vorherrschen, kommen bei Kindern ueberwiegend Medulloblastome und niedriggradige Astrozytome vor. Mehr als die Haelfte (50-70 %) aller kindlichen Hirntumoren sind infratentoriell lokalisiert, dagegen sind es bei Erwachsenen nur etwa 30 %. Im Ultraschall, in der kranialen CT (CCT) oder MRT koennen Hirntumoren durch ihren raumfordernden Charakter und ihrer zum normalen Parenchym abweichenden Dichte oder Signalintensitaet erkannt werden. Sie koennen verdraengend wachsen, z. T. auch das Parenchym infiltrieren oder von diesem ausgehen. Neben der klinischen Symptomatik und Diagnostik werden im vorliegenden Artikel die haeufigsten kindlichen Hirntumoren, das Astrozytom, Medulloblastom, Hirnstammgliom, Kraniopharyngeom, die Neurofibromatose und das Gangliogliom beschrieben. Die wichtigsten bildgebende Kriterien werden dargestellt. (orig.)

  8. Malignant renal tumors in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, C.; Torterolo, J.; Irigoyen, B.; Bel, M.; Elias, E.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Professionals who work in pediatric oncology, we see childhood cancer as a common disease, but in fact constitutes about 2% of all cancers diagnosed worldwide. Wilms tumor accounts for 6% of all childhood tumors and presentation bilateral accounts for 4-6% of all Wilms tumors diagnosed. Theoretical Framework: In the period between the year 1994-2003 period were attended in the Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Center, a total of 29 cases of malignant renal tumors, corresponding to 86% (25 cases) to Wilms tumor or nephroblastoma tumor. The Wilms is of embryonic origin, capable of metastatic spread, (85% lungs 15% liver). Very sensitive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which confers high cure rates (85%); having a multidisciplinary treatment model, combining surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. The role of nursing in comprehensive cancer care child is essential in the prevention and early detection of side effects or complications. Case report: S.D. currently 10 years old. In 10/1994, at 8 months of age, was diagnosed with bilateral Wilms tumor. On admission her weight was 8200gr with abdominal circumference 50cm. Conducted pre-operative MDT and 02/1995 nephrectomy of the left kidney and right kidney lumpectomy (tumor nodule 420gr. and a 250gr.). MDT begins in 03/1995 01/1996 ending. 09/2003 with abdominal pain and vomiting, and kidney failure. 10/2003 lumpectomy biopsy (sclerotic nodule associated with maturation nephroblastoma). Currently severe renal insufficiency plan enters dialysis. Nursing process: Objectives: 1) To prepare the child and family to the side effects and possible complications of chemotherapy and / or radiotherapy 2) Prevent and minimize related complications tumor and / or treatment. Care Plan comprises four stages: A) rating and customer income. B) Implement care chemotherapy C) post-operative Care D) Implement radiation care

  9. Pediatric hydrocephalus outcomes: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinchon Matthieu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The outcome of pediatric hydrocephalus, including surgical complications, neurological sequelae and academic achievement, has been the matter of many studies. However, much uncertainty remains, regarding the very long-term and social outcome, and the determinants of complications and clinical outcome. In this paper, we review the different facets of outcome, including surgical outcome (shunt failure, infection and independence, and complications of endoscopy, clinical outcome (neurological, sensory, cognitive sequels, epilepsy, schooling and social integration. We then provide a brief review of the English-language literature and highlighting selected studies that provide information on the outcome and sequelae of pediatric hydrocephalus, and the impact of predictive variables on outcome. Mortality caused by hydrocephalus and its treatments is between 0 and 3%, depending on the duration of follow-up. Shunt event-free survival (EFS is about 70% at one year and 40% at ten years. The EFS after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV appears better but likely benefits from selection bias and long-term figures are not available. Shunt infection affects between 5 and 8% of surgeries, and 15 to 30% of patients according to the duration of follow-up. Shunt independence can be achieved in 3 to 9% of patients, but the definition of this varies. Broad variations in the prevalence of cognitive sequelae, affecting 12 to 50% of children, and difficulties at school, affecting between 20 and 60%, attest of disparities among studies in their clinical evaluation. Epilepsy, affecting 6 to 30% of patients, has a serious impact on outcome. In adulthood, social integration is poor in a substantial number of patients but data are sparse. Few controlled prospective studies exist regarding hydrocephalus outcomes; in their absence, largely retrospective studies must be used to evaluate the long-term consequences of hydrocephalus and its treatments. This review

  10. Psoriasis in the pediatric population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vindas Calderon, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    A scientific and updated bibliographic review is realized for handling and care of a pediatric patient with psoriasis disease. Health personnel related with this pathology must to know the different perspectives and angles of psoriasis, as well as clinical criteria, therapeutic and emotional in the treatment of patients. The incidence of psoriasis is recognized globally. Ethnic groups have developed with most frequently this disorder. The different clinical faces of psoriasis are studied. The morphological and topographical manifestations have presented a variety very similar to that of adults, and have made for the doctor difficult to make the diagnostic. Clinical studies that were realized in the last years, have reported etiological and pathogenic evidence, both genetic and immunological of this illness. Children with psoriasis usually have presented a mild illness, where psoriasis type plaque has been the predominant variant. Psoriasis in the population has required a special attention in triggers or aggravating factors of this disease such as infections, exposure to snuff, obesity, stress and interactions with other drugs. The discovery and use of new drugs have led to different etiological factors for the handling of psoriasis; so it is important to know the function, availability and adverse effects that can to cause new therapies. Treatments must to include the provision of a safe and effective therapy for the maintenance for free long periods of lesions, reducing the severity of the disease, and inhibiting structural damage of joints. The topical treatment has been the therapy of first choice in mild psoriasis and localized. An interrogatory is recommended to decide objectively a systemic treatment, because the infant population has been a sensitive group of possible adverse effects. Methotrexate has been the treatment of choice for psoriasis related to arthropathy both adults and children. Phototherapy, including UVB, PUVA light and excimer laser is

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,186 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,893 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  13. [Flomoxef in the pediatric surgical field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, J; Shimizu, Y; Hashimoto, T; Nakamura, T; Otobe, Y; Minami, M

    1991-11-01

    Basic and clinical studies of flomoxef (6315-S, FMOX) were performed in the pediatric surgical field. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1. FMOX was administered to 7 pediatric patients with biliary atresia (FMOX 20 mg/kg, i.v.d.). Peak biliary levels of FMOX were obtained at 1 hour after finishing administration by drip infusion, and were higher than those in blood 1 hours after finishing administration by drip infusion. 2. Urinary excretion was excellent, and urinary recovery rates were 57.8-97.8%. 3. FMOX was administered to 5 patients in the pediatric surgical field. One case was phlegmon, and other 4 cases were premature babies for postoperative prophylactic use. Clinical results were excellent in 1 case, good in 4 cases, with an overall efficacy rate of 100%. No clinical and laboratory side effects due to the administration FMOX were observed. It was concluded that FMOX was a safe and effective antibiotic in the pediatric surgical field.

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,001 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  15. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... in mind. They may have toys, videos, and reading materials for young people available. Pediatric sports medicine ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,752 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  17. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature

  18. Approaching Pediatric Cancers through a Global Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the incidence of pediatric cancer is relatively constant worldwide, strengthening population-based registries to collect data on the extent of disease at diagnosis would be helpful in determining if late diagnosis may explain difference in outcome globally.

  19. Are rates of pediatric bipolar disorder increasing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2014-01-01

    Studies from the USA suggest that rates of pediatric bipolar disorder have increased since the mid-90s, but no study outside the USA has been published on the rates of pediatric bipolar disorder. Further, it is unclear whether an increase in rates reflects a true increase in the illness or more...... diagnostic attention. Using nationwide registers of all inpatients and outpatients contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark, we investigated (1) gender-specific rates of incident pediatric mania/bipolar disorder during a period from 1995 to 2012, (2) whether age and other characteristics...... for pediatric mania/bipolar disorder changed during the calendar period (1995 to 2003 versus 2004 to 2012), and (3) whether the diagnosis is more often made at first psychiatric contact in recent time compared to earlier according to gender. Totally, 346 patients got a main diagnosis of a manic episode (F30...

  20. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    -acting beta-agonists as complementary treatment to inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma management because they provide bronchodilation and bronchoprotection without development of tolerance, and complement the antiinflammatory activity unchecked by steroids. In addition, the Cys-LTRA montelukast has...

  1. Pediatric Expression of Mast Cell Activation Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Carter, Melody; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard

    2018-01-01

    , anaphylaxis, mastocytosis, and other conditions where MC activation is contributing to the pathogenesis. This article focuses on clinical presentations, challenges, and controversies in pediatric mastocytosis and gives an overview of current knowledge and areas in need of further research....

  2. Pediatric urinary incontinence: Classification, evaluation, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.J. Schaeffer

    tinuous incontinence refers to constant leakage of urine and can occur even in .... evaluation of pediatric urinary incontinence and guide which tests, if any, should ..... ments taken during bladder filling and storage include the maximal bladder ...

  3. Pediatric uveitis: new and future treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Preema J.; Alexander, Janet L.; Sen, H. Nida

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Pediatric uveitis is relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5–10% of all patients with uveitis. However, owing to high prevalence of complications and devastating outcomes, its lifetime burden can be significant. Recent findings Immunomodulatory therapy has been associated with better outcomes in noninfectious pediatric uveitis. However, effective treatments are limited by medication-related complications, including multiorgan toxicities and systemic side effects. Summary We review the current therapies available to treat pediatric uveitis, discuss novel and future therapies, and provide clinical recommendations utilizing these new agents. The consideration for treatment regimens in noninfectious pediatric uveitis is multifactorial. Understanding past, present, and future technology will aid in treatment of a complex and refractory disease. PMID:23872814

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,826 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 26,045 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: ...

  7. Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 13, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Practical techniques for pediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, C.R.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.; Kirks, D.R.; Kaufman, R.A.; Berger, P.E.; Kuhn, J.P.; Siegel, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Donald Kirks has assembled this section on Practical Techniques for Pediatric Computed Tomography. The material is based on a presentation in the Special Interest session at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Society for Pediatric Radiology in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA in 1982. Meticulous attention to detail and technique is required to ensure an optimal CT examination. CT techniques specifically applicable to infants and children have not been disseminated in the radiology literature and in this respect it may rightly be observed that ''the child is not a small adult''. What follows is a ''cookbook'' prepared by seven participants and it is printed in Pediatric Radiology, in outline form, as a statement of individual preferences for pediatric CT techniques. This outline gives concise explanation of techniques and permits prompt dissemination of information. (orig.)

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,864 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License ... 4:24 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License ... 5:21 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,850 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the Western Reserve 12,073 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 64,137 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  19. Pediatric radiation dose management in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neitzel, U.

    2004-01-01

    Direct digital radiography (DR) systems based on flat-panel detectors offer improved dose management in pediatric radiography. Integration of X-ray generation and detection in one computer-controlled system provides better control and monitoring

  20. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Myocarditis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ju Hsiao

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Pediatric myocarditis presents primarily with gastrointestinal symptoms in Taiwan. Careful check of heart rhythm may provide a useful objective marker of myocarditis. The predictors of a poor prognosis were gastrointestinal symptoms, hepatomegaly, and hypotension.

  1. Pediatric Inpatient Nurses' Perceptions of Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jenifer L; Portwood, Sharon G; Warren-Findlow, Jan; Brunner Huber, Larissa R

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of child maltreatment among inpatient pediatric nurses. A cross-sectional survey was used to obtain responses to an online survey designed to examine perceptions of child maltreatment from inpatient pediatric nurses. Many nurses surveyed (41.25%) indicated that they had not received adequate training or had never received training on child maltreatment identification and many (40%) also indicated they were not familiar with the applicable reporting laws. Due to the serious immediate and long term effects of child maltreatment, it is imperative that pediatric inpatient nurses have adequate training on how to identify potential abuse and neglect cases, as well as legal reporting requirements, since they are in a unique position to identify potential cases of maltreatment. There is a continuing need for training on child maltreatment identification and reporting laws for inpatient pediatric nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 12:07 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,703 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  3. Pediatric Gastroenterology in Cuba: Evolution and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Guillot, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    INTRODUCTION The professional practice of pediatric gastroenterology arose in Cuba as an expression of the specialty's development internationally and Cuba's new strategies in public health, and in response to national needs for health care expertise in digestive diseases of infants, older children and adolescents. OBJECTIVES Describe the history of pediatric gastroenterology's development in Cuba since its inception at the National Gastroenterology Institute in the early 1970s, its contributions, and efforts to extend it to pediatric hospitals throughout Cuba. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION This is a historical review based on document analysis. Institutional sources from the National Gastroenterology Institute and Ministry of Public Health were reviewed, as well as international and national literature on the history of pediatric gastroenterology and unpublished texts since its emergence in 1972. DEVELOPMENT Although pediatric gastroenterology has not been formally recognized as a medical specialty in Cuba, there have been important achievements in establishing a network of specialized health care services for digestive diseases of children and adolescents. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and other auxiliary diagnostic modalities have been introduced for children and play a major role in clinical trials and research. This article describes the international context that promoted the specialty's development in Cuba. Reference is made to specialized training from its initial stages in 1972, its consolidation as an emerging discipline in Cuban medicine, and its diffusion in Latin American and Caribbean countries. Professional development and specialized training to meet health human resource needs in pediatric hospitals are described, as well as Cuban participation in the Latin American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. National and international milestones, publications, awards and recognitions that indicate advances despite difficulties are also

  4. MRI tracheomalacia (TM) assessment in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, P.; Wielopolski, P.; Lever, S.

    Purpose: TM is an excessive narrowing of the intrathoracic part of the trachea. TM is a common congenital pediatric anomaly, but it’s often not recognized due to its unspecific clinical presentation. The aims of our study are: 1) to develop cine-MRI sequences to visualize central airways in static...... in pediatric population and allows avoiding radiation exposure and bronchoscopy for the evaluation of central airway dimensions....

  5. Pediatric phantoms for use in dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Hwang, J.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-01-01

    Estimating absorbed doses to children from external and internal radiation sources has become important to the nuclear industry and pediatric nuclear medicine. The Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section at ORNL has recently completed the design of mathematical representations of children of ages newborn, 1 year, and 5 years old. These mathematical representations will be referred to as pediatric phantoms. Using these phantoms, relevant energy deposition data have been developed which establish a meaningful model for use in estimating radiation dose to children

  6. Pediatric brain tumors of neuroepithelial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Politi, M.; Bergmann, M.; Pekrun, A.; Juergens, K.U.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors of neuroepithelial tissue represent the largest group of pediatric brain tumors by far and has therefore been divided into several discrete tumor subtypes each corresponding to a specific component of the neuropil. The neuropil contains several subtypes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and modified ependymal cells that form the choroid plexus. This review discusses the imaging aspects of the most common pediatric tumors of neuroepithelial tissue. (orig.) [de

  7. Citation classics in pediatrics: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhapola, Viswas; Tiwari, Soumya; Deepthi, Bobbity; Kanwal, Sandeep Kumar

    2018-03-06

    Citation analysis provides insights into the history and developmental trajectory of scientific fields. Our objective was to perform an analysis of citation classics in the journals of pediatric specialty and to examine their characteristics. Initially, all the journals listed under the category of pediatrics (n = 120) were identified using Journal Citation Reports. Web of science database was then searched (1950-2016) to select the top-100 cited articles in the above identified pediatric journals. The top-100 cited article were categorized according the study design, sub-specialty, country, institutional affiliation, and language. The top-100 articles were published in 18 different journals, with Pediatrics having the highest numbers (n = 40), followed by The Journal of Pediatrics (n = 17). The majority (n = 62) of classics were published after 1990. The most cited article had citation count of 3516 and the least cited had a citation count of 593. The USA (n = 71) was the most commonly represented country, and 60 institutions contributed to 100 articles. Fifteen authors contributed to more than one classic as first or second author. Observational study (n = 55) was the commonest study design across all decades, followed by reviews (n = 12), scale development studies (n = 11), and guidelines (n = 11). Among the pediatric sub-specialties, growth and development articles were highly cited (n = 24), followed by pediatric psychiatry and behavior (n = 21), endocrinology (n = 15), and neonatology (n = 12). The top-100 cited articles in pediatrics identify the impactful authors, journals, institutes, and countries. Observational study design was predominant-implying that inclusion among citation classics is not related to soundness of study design.

  8. TRANSFER FROM PEDIATRIC TO ADULT ENDOCRINOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marybeth R; Robbins, Brett W; Augustine, Marilyn; Doyle, Jackie; Mack-Fogg, Jean; Jones, Heather; White, Patience H

    2017-07-01

    Adult and pediatric endocrinologists share responsibility for the transition of youth with type 1 diabetes from pediatric to adult healthcare. This study aimed to increase successful transfers to adult care in subspecialty practices by establishing a systematic health care transition (HCT) process. Providers from the adult and pediatric endocrinology divisions at the University of Rochester Medical Center met monthly to customize and integrate the Six Core Elements (6CEs) of HCT into clinical workflows. Young adult patients with type 1 diabetes having an outpatient visit during a 34-month pre-post intervention period were eligible (N = 371). Retrospective chart review was performed on patients receiving referrals to adult endocrinology (n = 75) to obtain (1) the proportion of patients explicitly tracked during transfer from the pediatric to adult endocrinology practice, (2) the providers' documentation of the use of the 6CEs, and (3) the patients' diabetes control and healthcare utilization during the transition period. The percent of eligible patients with type 1 diabetes who were explicitly tracked in their transfer more than doubled compared to baseline (11% vs. 27% of eligible patients; P<.01). Pediatric providers started to use transition readiness assessments and create medical summaries, and adult providers increased closed-loop communication with pediatric providers after a patient's first adult visit. Glycemic control and healthcare utilization remained stable. Successful implementation of the 6CEs into pediatric and adult subspecialty practices can result in improvements of planned transfers of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes to adult subspecialty providers. 6CEs = six core elements; AYA = adolescent and young adult; DKA = diabetic ketoacidosis; ED = emergency department; HbA1c = hemoglobin A1c; HCT = health care transition.

  9. Beyond Survival - Cognition after Pediatric Brain Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Tonning Olsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Brain Tumor (PBT) survivors suffer from cognitive sequelae, especially within the areas of cognitive tempo, attention, executive function and memory. The cognitive difficulties are often accentuated over the years, but knowledge about the long term trajectory is still scarce. Aim: The aim of this thesis was to examine cognitive sequelae after Pediatric Brain Tumor (PBT); risk factors, common difficulties, development and neuroimaging correlates. Methods: In study...

  10. Radiation dose reduction in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.E.; Hill, E.P.; Harpen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between image noise and radiation dose was investigated in computed tomography (CT) images of a pediatric abdomen phantom. A protocol which provided a minimum absorbed dose consistent with acceptable image noise criteria was determined for a fourth generation CT scanner. It was found that pediatric abdominal CT scans could maintain diagnostic quality with at least a 50% reduction in dose from the manufacturers' suggested protocol. (orig.)

  11. Teaching Pediatric Nursing Concepts to Non-Pediatric Nurses Using an Advance Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Non-pediatric nurses in rural areas often care for children in adult units, emergency departments, and procedural areas. A half-day program about pediatric nursing using constructivist teaching strategies including an advance organizer, case studies, and simulation was offered at a community hospital in Western North Carolina. Nurses reported a…

  12. The US pediatric nephrology workforce: a report commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, William A; Meyers, Kevin E; Kirkwood, Suzanne J; Ruch-Ross, Holly S; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    The US pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. This report describes clinical and nonclinical activities, motivations and disincentives to a career in pediatric nephrology, future workforce needs, trainee recruitment, and possible explanations for personnel shortages. An e-mail survey was sent in 2013 to all identified US-trained or -practicing pediatric nephrologists. Of 504 respondents, 51% are men, 66% are US graduates, and 73% work in an academic setting. About 20% of trained pediatric nephrologists no longer practice pediatric nephrology. Among the 384 respondents practicing pediatric nephrology full or part-time in the United States, the mean work week was 56.1±14.3 hours, with time divided between patient care (59%), administration (13%), teaching (10%), clinical research (9%), basic research (6%), and other medical activities (3%). Most (>85%) care for dialysis and transplantation patients. The median number of weeks annually on call is 16, and 29% work with one or no partner. One-third of US pediatric nephrologists (n=126) plan to reduce or stop clinical nephrology practice in the next 5 years, and 53% plan to fully or partially retire. Almost half the division chiefs (47%) report inadequate physician staffing. Ongoing efforts to monitor and address pediatric nephrology workforce issues are needed. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Recommended Curriculum for Training in Pediatric Transplant Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Allen, Upton; Englund, Janet; Herold, Betsy; Hoffman, Jill; Green, Michael; Gantt, Soren; Kumar, Deepali; Michaels, Marian G

    2015-03-01

    A working group representing the American Society of Transplantation, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and International Pediatric Transplant Association has developed a collaborative effort to identify and develop core knowledge in pediatric transplant infectious diseases. Guidance for patient care environments for training and core competencies is included to help facilitate training directed at improving the experience for pediatric infectious diseases trainees and practitioners in the area of pediatric transplant infectious diseases. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Burden of pediatric hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada Hassan; Kamal, Naglaa Mohamed

    2013-11-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major health burden infecting 170-210 million people worldwide. Additional 3-4 millions are newly-infected annually. Prevalence of pediatric infection varies from 0.05%-0.36% in the United States and Europe; up to 1.8%-5.8% in some developing countries. The highest prevalence occurs in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Amazon basin and Mongolia. HCV has been present in some populations for several centuries, notably genotypes 1 and 2 in West Africa. Parenteral anti-schistosomal therapy practiced in the 1960s until the early 1980s had spread HCV infection throughout Egypt. Parenteral acquisition of HCV remains a major route for infection among Egyptian children. Insufficient screening of transfusions, unsterilized injection equipment and re-used needles and syringes continue to be major routes of HCV transmission in developing countries, whereas vertical transmission and adolescent high-risk behaviors (e.g., injection drug abuse) are the major routes in developed countries. The risk of vertical transmission from an infected mother to her unborn/newborn infant is approximately 5%. Early stages of HCV infection in children do not lead to marked impairment in the quality of life nor to cognitive, behavioral or emotional dysfunction; however, caregiver stress and family system strain may occur. HCV slowly progresses to serious complications as cirrhosis (1%-2%) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) especially in the presence of risk factors as hemolytic anemias, obesity, treated malignancy, and concomitant human immune deficiency and/or hepatitis B virus co-infection. HCV vaccine remains elusive to date. Understanding the immune mechanisms in patients who successfully cleared the infection is essential for vaccine development. The pediatric standard of care treatment consists of pegylated interferon-α 2a or b plus ribavirin for 24-48 wk. The new oral direct acting antivirals, approved for adults, need further evaluation in children. Sustained

  15. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE OF THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENT ABOUT NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KADIAVAR

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high leve of skill & knowledge is required in circumstances of cardiopulmonary resucitation which represents the most urgent clinical situations. The difficulties for pediatric residents who are fronted with the most cases of pediatric & neonatal resucitation are due to different causes of cardiorespiratory arrest in camparison to adults. This study aimed to assess the knowledge & their personal attitude toward the neonatal & pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitatin. Methods: By cross - sectional multicenter study between the pediatric residents who were studied in the teaching hospitals in Tehran (1378-90. Data were gathered among 140 residents by self-completed questionnaires which were included three parts as. demographic information assessment of their attitude by summation of score via ranking list questions and total score from assessment to their knowledge by different scenarios which were formatted in the multiple choice questions. Results: 35.7% of the residents studied in the first year of residency 35.0% in the second year and the remainder (29/3% in the third year More than 90% of them considered their knowledge about neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation low & less than average. Net only 80% of the residents self - assessed their actual ability about this issue low but also declaired the insufficient education during the medical training. The total score of knowledge assessment was 14.7 + 1_0.54 from 30 without any significant relations among the residents in different hospitals or various levels of pediatric residency. (P value= 0.1 , 0.7 There was not significant correlation between the total score from their attitude & their knowledge. Conclusion: Pediatric residents as the key personnel in the management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the neonates and children should have enough knowledge and skills about this topic. This survey demonstrates a low level of the pediatric & neonatal

  16. Toward creating family-friendly work environments in pediatrics: baseline data from pediatric department chairs and pediatric program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Burke, Ann E; Sheppard, Kate; Pallant, Adam; Stapleton, F Bruder; Stanton, Bonita

    2007-03-01

    The objective was to determine baseline characteristics of pediatric residency training programs and academic departments in regard to family-friendly work environments as outlined in the Report of the Task Force on Women in Pediatrics. We conducted Web-based anonymous surveys of 147 pediatric department chairs and 203 pediatric program directors. The chair's questionnaire asked about child care, lactation facilities, family leave policies, work-life balance, and tenure and promotion policies. The program director's questionnaire asked about family leave, parenting, work-life balance, and perceptions of "family-friendliness." The response rate was 52% for program directors and 51% for chairs. Nearly 60% of chairs reported some access to child care or provided assistance locating child care; however, in half of these departments, demand almost always exceeded supply. Lactation facilities were available to breastfeeding faculty in 74% of departments, although only 57% provided access to breast pumps. A total of 78% of chairs and 90% of program directors reported written maternity leave policies with slightly fewer reporting paternity leave policies. The majority (83%) of chairs reported availability of part-time employment, whereas only 27% of program directors offered part-time residency options. Most departments offered some flexibility in promotion and tenure. Although progress has been made, change still is needed in many areas in pediatric departments and training programs, including better accessibility to quality child care; improved lactation facilities for breastfeeding mothers; clear, written parental leave policies; and flexible work schedules to accommodate changing demands of family life.

  17. Management of pediatric splenic injuries in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lindsay A; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2012-03-01

    Nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injuries has become the standard of care in hemodynamically stable children. This study compares the management of these injuries between pediatric and nonpediatric hospitals in Canada. Data were obtained from the Canadian Institute of Health Information trauma database on all patients aged 2 to 16 years, admitted to a Canadian hospital with a diagnosis of splenic injury between May 2002 and April 2004. Variables included age, sex, associated major injuries, splenic procedures, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, blood transfusions, and length of stay. Hospitals were coded as pediatric or nonpediatric. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine associations between hospital type and outcomes. Of 1284 cases, 654 were managed at pediatric hospitals and 630 at nonpediatric centers. Patients at pediatric centers tended to be younger and more likely to have associated major injuries. Controlling for covariates, including associated major injuries, patients managed at pediatric centers were less likely to undergo splenectomy compared with those managed at nonpediatric centers (odds ratio [OR], 0.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.4). The risk of receiving blood products, admission to the ICU, and staying in hospital for more than 5 days was associated only with having associated major injuries. Even in the presence of other major injuries, successful NOM of blunt splenic injuries occurs more frequently in pediatric hospitals in Canada. This has policy relevance regarding education of adult surgeons about the appropriateness of NOM in children and developing guidelines on appropriate regional triaging of pediatric patients with splenic injury in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacological management of obesity in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Cassie L; Harris, John Brock; Harris, Kira B

    2015-02-01

    To review current evidence of pharmacological options for managing pediatric obesity and provide potential areas for future research. A MEDLINE search (1966 to October 2014) was conducted using the following keywords: exenatide, liraglutide, lorcaserin, metformin, obesity, orlistat, pediatric, phentermine, pramlintide, topiramate, weight loss, and zonisamide. Identified articles were evaluated for inclusion, with priority given to randomized controlled trials with orlistat, metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, topiramate, and zonisamide in human subjects and articles written in English. References were also reviewed for additional trials. Whereas lifestyle modification is considered first-line therapy for obese pediatric patients, severe obesity may benefit from pharmacotherapy. Orlistat is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication for pediatric obesity and reduced body mass index (BMI) by 0.5 to 4 kg/m(2), but gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects may limit use. Metformin has demonstrated BMI reductions of 0.17 to 1.8 kg/m(2), with mild GI adverse effects usually managed with dose titration. Exenatide reduced BMI by 1.1 to 1.7 kg/m(2) and was well-tolerated with mostly transient or mild GI adverse effects. Topiramate and zonisamide reduced weight when used in the treatment of epilepsy. Future studies should examine efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in addition to lifestyle modifications for pediatric obesity. Lifestyle interventions remain the treatment of choice in pediatric obesity, but concomitant pharmacotherapy may be beneficial in some patients. Orlistat should be considered as second-line therapy for pediatric obesity. Evidence suggests that other diabetes and antiepileptic medications may also provide weight-loss benefits, but safety should be further evaluated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Medical genetic issues in clinical of pediatric neurology practice:a history of pediatrics in Peking University First Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi-ru

    2006-02-18

    The Department of Pediatrics of Peking University First Hospital has a long term of outstanding history. It was established about 60 years ago. After the division of pediatric neurology (DPN) had been established in 1960s, it had been assigned to cover genetic disorders. During the recent 20 years, efforts have been put on three aspects: (1) Pediatric neurology clinical service and education; (2) research studies of childhood epilepsies and pediatric neurogenetic disorders; and (3) development of a strong DPN team to establish a comprehensive pediatric neurological program. In this paper, we reviewed the history of the pediatric neurology division in our department, our clinical and research work and achievements for neurogenetic diseases.

  20. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  1. [Visceral leishmaniasis. Pediatric case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomila H, Andrés; Vanzo, Carolina; Garnero, Analía; Peruzzo, Luisina; Badalotti, Mónica

    2017-08-01

    La leishmaniasis es una enfermedad causada por parásitos obligados intracelulares pertenecientes al género Leishmania y que reconoce tres formas clínicas principales: cutánea, visceral y mucocutánea. Es una patología del grupo de las "enfermedades desatendidas". Es la única enfermedad tropical transmitida a través de vectores que se ha mantenido endémica por décadas en el sur de Europa. La leishmaniasis visceral representa la forma más grave. Se caracteriza por fiebre, pérdida de peso, anemia y hepatoesplenomegalia. Su período de incubación oscila entre 2 semanas y 18 meses. La leishmaniasis se considera una enfermedad reemergente a nivel mundial. Algunos de los factores que favorecen esta situación son los cambios en las condiciones climáticas, migraciones y urbanizaciones deficitarias en saneamiento ambiental. Se presenta el caso de un niño europeo que estaba vacacionando en Córdoba y fue derivado a nuestro Hospital por fiebre y pancitopenia, lo que generó un abordaje multidisciplinario con resolución clínica favorable. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  2. Diagnostic errors in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, George A.; Voss, Stephan D.; Melvin, Patrice R.; Graham, Dionne A.

    2011-01-01

    Little information is known about the frequency, types and causes of diagnostic errors in imaging children. Our goals were to describe the patterns and potential etiologies of diagnostic error in our subspecialty. We reviewed 265 cases with clinically significant diagnostic errors identified during a 10-year period. Errors were defined as a diagnosis that was delayed, wrong or missed; they were classified as perceptual, cognitive, system-related or unavoidable; and they were evaluated by imaging modality and level of training of the physician involved. We identified 484 specific errors in the 265 cases reviewed (mean:1.8 errors/case). Most discrepancies involved staff (45.5%). Two hundred fifty-eight individual cognitive errors were identified in 151 cases (mean = 1.7 errors/case). Of these, 83 cases (55%) had additional perceptual or system-related errors. One hundred sixty-five perceptual errors were identified in 165 cases. Of these, 68 cases (41%) also had cognitive or system-related errors. Fifty-four system-related errors were identified in 46 cases (mean = 1.2 errors/case) of which all were multi-factorial. Seven cases were unavoidable. Our study defines a taxonomy of diagnostic errors in a large academic pediatric radiology practice and suggests that most are multi-factorial in etiology. Further study is needed to define effective strategies for improvement. (orig.)

  3. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neural correlates of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Amanda S; Martin, Laura E; Savage, Cary R

    2011-06-01

    Childhood obesity rates have increased over the last 40 years and have a detrimental impact on public health. While the causes of the obesity epidemic are complex, obesity ultimately arises from chronic imbalances between energy intake and expenditure. An emerging area of research in obesity has focused on the role of the brain in evaluating the rewarding properties of food and making decisions about what and how much to eat. This article reviews recent scientific literature regarding the brain's role in pediatric food motivation and childhood obesity. The article will begin by reviewing some of the recent literature discussing challenges associated with neuroimaging in children and the relevant developmental brain changes that occur in childhood and adolescence. The article will then review studies regarding neural mechanisms of food motivation and the ability to delay gratification in children and how these responses differ in obese compared to healthy weight children. Increasing our understanding about how brain function and behavior may differ in children will inform future research, obesity prevention, and interventions targeting childhood obesity. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Pediatric mumps with laryngeal edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yujiro; Oi, Yasufumi; Matsuoka, Ryo; Daimon, Yumi; Ito, Asami; Kubota, Wataru; Konishi, Kyoko; Onguchi, Toshimi; Sato, Akihiro; Yamashita, Yukio; Ishihara, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Mumps virus infection primarily affects the salivary glands and may incur various complications. Laryngeal edema is such a rare complication that few adult cases have been reported. We report the first known pediatric patient with mumps with laryngeal edema. An 8-year-old boy developed dyspnea after a rapidly progressive swelling of his face and neck. Laryngoscopy revealed edematous changes in the supraglottic and subglottic regions, and computed tomography confirmed significant laryngeal edema in addition to swelling of the cervical soft tissue and the salivary glands. Laboratory findings revealed a high serum amylase level and confirmed the diagnosis of mumps. Intravenous steroid administration alleviated the dyspnea, although the patient required temporary tracheal intubation to maintain airway patency. He did not need tracheotomy and did not experience any other complications. Laryngeal edema must be regarded as a rare, potentially life-threatening complication of mumps. When mumps is diagnosed with significant swelling of the neck, an emergency airway should be established to prevent airway obstruction.

  6. Radiation protection in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendel, H.; Stieve, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the high growth rate of cell systems in phases of radiation exposure radiological investigations on children should not be considered unless there is a strong indication. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has worked out recommendations on radiation protection which have been published as an NCRP report. This report is most important even outside the USA. The present translation is aimed to contribute to better understanding of the bases and aims of radiation protection during radiological investigations on children. It addresses not only those physicians who carry out radiological investigations on children themselves but also all physicians requiring such investigations. For these physicians, but also for parents who are worried about the radiation risk to their children the report should be a useful source of information and decision aid ensuring, on the one hand, that necessary radiological investigations are not shunned for unjustified fear of radiation and that, on the other hand, all unnecessary exposure of children to radiation is avoided. Thus, it is to be hoped, the quality of pediatric radiological diagnostics will be improved. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Neuroinflammation in Ischemic Pediatric Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlin, Maja

    2017-08-01

    Over the last decades, the importance of inflammatory processes in pediatric stroke have become increasingly evident. Ischemia launches a cascade of events: activation and inhibition of inflammation by a large network of cytokines, adhesion and small molecules, protease, and chemokines. There are major differences in the neonatal brain compared to adult brain, but developmental trajectories of the process during childhood are not yet well known. In neonatal stroke ischemia is the leading pathophysiology, but infectious and inflammatory processes have a significant input into the course and degree of tissue damage. In childhood, beside inflammation lanced by ischemia itself, the event of ischemia might be provoked by an underlying inflammatory pathophysiology: transient focal arteriopathy, dissection, sickle cell anemia, Moyamoya and more generalized in meningitides, generalized vasculitis or genetic arteriopathies (as in ADA2). Focal inflammatory reactions tend to be located in the distal part of the carotid artery or the proximal medial arteries, but generalized processes rather tend to affect the small arteries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Cerebrovascular disease in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotta Newra Tellechea

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rare in childhood, stroke may have a serious impact when it happens in this stage of life. Also, it may be the first sign of a systemic disease. We report 12 cases of patients with stroke treated in the Neuropediatrics Unit of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA from March 1997 to March 2000. All patients, from term infants to 12-year-old children hospitalized in the Pediatrics Unit of HCPA, had clinical suspicion of stroke, which was later confirmed by radiological studies. Patient follow up ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean = 3.4 years. Presenting symptoms were hemiparesis in 9 patients, seizures in 7, deviation of labial commissure in 3, and loss of consciousness in 1. The increase in the number of cases of childhood stroke identified and later confirmed by noninvasive methods had helped in the determination of different ethiologies of stroke: the most frequent being hematologic, cardiac and genetic diseases. However, our study included 6 newborns with stroke whose ethiology was not identified. Seven children with seizures received phenobarbital. Six term infants had neonatal seizures secondary to stroke and restricted to the first 72 hours of life.

  9. Trends in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Botre, Abhijit; Udani, Vrajesh

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery has become an accepted treatment for drug resistant epilepsy in infants and children. It has gained ground in India over the last decade. Certain epilepsy surgically remediable syndromes have been delineated and should be offered surgery earlier rather than later, especially if cognitive/behavioral development is being compromised. Advances in imaging, particularly in MRI has helped identify surgical candidates. Pre-surgical evaluation includes clinical assessment, structural and functional imaging, inter-ictal EEG, simultaneous video -EEG, with analysis of seizure semiology and ictal EEG and other optional investigations like neuropsychology and other newer imaging techniques. If data are concordant resective surgery is offered, keeping in mind preservation of eloquent cortical areas subserving motor, language and visual functions. In case of discordant data or non-lesional MRI, invasive EEG maybe useful using a two-stage approach. With multi-focal / generalized disease, palliative surgery like corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation maybe useful. A good outcome is seen in about 2/3rd of patients undergoing resective surgery with a low morbidity and mortality. This review outlines important learning aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery for the general pediatrician.

  10. Interventional radiology in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffer, Fredric A.

    2005-01-01

    There are many radiological interventions necessary for pediatric oncology patients, some of which may be covered in other articles in this publication. I will discuss a number of interventions including percutaneous biopsy for solid tumor and hematological malignancy diagnosis or recurrence, for the diagnosis of graft versus host disease after stem cell or bone marrow transplantation, and for the diagnosis of complications of immunosuppression such as invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. In the past, tumor localization techniques have been necessary to biopsy or resect small lesions. However improved guidance techniques have allowed for more precise biopsy and the use of thermal ablation instead of excision for local tumor control. A percutaneously placed radio frequency, microwave, laser or cryogen probe can ablate the primary and metastatic tumors of the liver, lung, bone, kidney and other structures in children. This is an alternative treatment for the local control of tumors that may not be amenable to surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. I will also describe how chemoembolization can be used to treat primary or metastatic tumors of the liver that have failed other therapies. This treatment delivers chemotherapy in the hepatic artery infused with emboli to increase the dwell time and concentration of the agents

  11. Pediatric sciatic neuropathies due to unusual vascular causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srinivasan, Jayashri; Escolar, Diane; Ryan, Monique; Darras, Basil; Jones, H. Royden

    Four cases of pediatric sciatic neuropathies due to unusual vascular mechanisms are reported. Pediatric sciatic neuropathies were seen after umbilical artery catheterization, embolization of arteriovenous malformation, meningococcemia, and hypereosinophilic vasculitis. Electrophysiologic studies

  12. Brain Imaging in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P.; O'Neill, Joseph; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroimaging findings support the frontal-striatal-thalamic model of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder. Glutamate is also implicated in the pathological finding of the disease. Implications for pediatric OCD treatments are discussed.

  13. Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric supportive care includes managing issues from the cancer diagnosis, through treatment, and into adult survivorship. Get detailed information addressing pediatric supportive care including psychologic, family, and end-of-life concerns in this clinician summary.

  14. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  15. Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric supportive care is an important aspect of cancer care as children and adolescents face unique challenges compared to adult patients. Learn more about supportive care for pediatric patients during and after treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  16. Mentorship Programs for Faculty Development in Academic General Pediatric Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Takagishi

    2011-01-01

    Discussion. General pediatric division chiefs acknowledge the benefits of mentoring relationships, and some have programs in place. Many need tools to create them. Pediatric societies could facilitate this critical area of professional development.

  17. Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The): Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The): Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The): Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Recurrence and complications of pediatric inguinal hernia repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications of inguinal hernia repair in pediatric patients ... surgery. Patients and methods This retrospective study was ... Bilateral inguinal hernia was observed ..... single-blind comparison of laparoscopic versus open repair of pediatric.

  19. Adolescent alcohol intoxication in the dutch hospital Departments of Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.J. van; Lely, N. van der; Pereira, R.R.; Dalen, W.E. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the number and characteristics of adolescent alcohol intoxication cases in hospital Departments of Pediatrics. The study also analyzes drinking patterns and intoxication characteristics. Method: Data were collected using the Dutch Pediatric

  20. Predictors of pediatric surgeons' career satisfaction: a national survey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pediatric surgeons were satisfied with professional career. (77%), and 88% would chose the same ... exists between expectations and real income. Ann Pediatr .... single institution employment (no extra job) (P= 0.015432) are factors related to ...