WorldWideScience

Sample records for patients successfully screened

  1. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie Mia Katrine; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...

  2. Cervical screening in Denmark - a success followed by stagnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Berit; Christensen, Jette

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite an intensive screening activity, the incidence of cervical cancer in Denmark has remained stable for the last 15 years, while regional differences have increased. To search for explanations, we investigated possible weaknesses in the screening program. MATERIAL AND METHODS......: Data on the screen-targeted women were retrieved from Statistics Denmark. Data on screening activity were retrieved from the annual reports from 2009 to 2015 on quality of cervical screening. Coverage was calculated as proportion of screen-targeted women with at least one cytology sample within...... recommended time intervals. Insufficient follow-up was calculated as proportion of abnormal and unsatisfactory samples not followed up within recommended time intervals. Diagnostic distribution was calculated for samples with a satisfactory cytology diagnosis. RESULTS: Coverage remained stable at 75...

  3. Adenoma detection in patients undergoing a comprehensive colonoscopy screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, Gottumukkala S; Vadyala, Vikram; Slack, Rebecca; Krishna, Somashekar G; Ross, William A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bresalier, Robert S; Hawk, Ernest; Stroehlein, John R

    2013-01-01

    Measures shown to improve the adenoma detection during colonoscopy (excellent bowel preparation, cecal intubation, cap fitted colonoscope to examine behind folds, patient position change to optimize colon distention, trained endoscopy team focusing on detection of subtle flat lesions, and incorporation of optimum endoscopic examination with adequate withdrawal time) are applicable to clinical practice and, if incorporated are projected to facilitate comprehensive colonoscopy screening program for colon cancer prevention. To determine adenoma and serrated polyp detection rate under conditions designed to optimize quality parameters for comprehensive screening colonoscopy. Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a comprehensive colon cancer screening program designed to optimize quality parameters. Academic medical center. Three hundred and forty-three patients between the ages of 50 years and 75 years who underwent first screening colonoscopy between 2009 and 2011 among 535 consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy. Comprehensive colonoscopy screening program was utilized to screen all patients. Cecal intubation was successful in 98.8% of patients. The Boston Bowel Preparation Scale for quality of colonoscopy was 8.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]; 8.94, 9.00). The rate of adenoma detection was 60% and serrated lesion (defined as serrated adenomas or hyperplastic polyps proximal to the splenic flexure) detection was 23%. The rate of precancerous lesion detection (adenomas and serrated lesions) was 66%. The mean number of adenomas per screening procedure was 1.4 (1.2, 1.6) and the mean number of precancerous lesions (adenomas or serrated lesions) per screening procedure was 1.6 (1.4, 1.8). Retrospective study and single endoscopist experience. A comprehensive colonoscopy screening program results in high-quality screening with high detection of adenomas, advanced adenomas, serrated adenomas, and multiple adenomas

  4. Patient-initiated breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcote, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the results of a breast cancer screening program sponsored by organizations at workplace or community locations. A comprehensive mobile breast cancer screening program, including education, breast physical examination, and mammography, was provided to 89 local organizations at $50.00 per examination over an 18-month period. The examination was patient initiated, following the ACS screening guidelines. Estimates of eligible women were provided by each organization. A total of 5,030 women at 89 organizations were screened for breast cancer. Approximately 25,727 women were eligible

  5. Fragment-based screening by protein crystallography: successes and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingaryan, Zorik; Yin, Zhou; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-10-08

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) concerns the screening of low-molecular weight compounds against macromolecular targets of clinical relevance. These compounds act as starting points for the development of drugs. FBDD has evolved and grown in popularity over the past 15 years. In this paper, the rationale and technology behind the use of X-ray crystallography in fragment based screening (FBS) will be described, including fragment library design and use of synchrotron radiation and robotics for high-throughput X-ray data collection. Some recent uses of crystallography in FBS will be described in detail, including interrogation of the drug targets β-secretase, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, phosphodiesterase 4A and Hsp90. These examples provide illustrations of projects where crystallography is straightforward or difficult, and where other screening methods can help overcome the limitations of crystallography necessitated by diffraction quality.

  6. Fragment-Based Screening by Protein Crystallography: Successes and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Oakley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD concerns the screening of low-molecular weight compounds against macromolecular targets of clinical relevance. These compounds act as starting points for the development of drugs. FBDD has evolved and grown in popularity over the past 15 years. In this paper, the rationale and technology behind the use of X-ray crystallography in fragment based screening (FBS will be described, including fragment library design and use of synchrotron radiation and robotics for high-throughput X-ray data collection. Some recent uses of crystallography in FBS will be described in detail, including interrogation of the drug targets β-secretase, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, phosphodiesterase 4A and Hsp90. These examples provide illustrations of projects where crystallography is straightforward or difficult, and where other screening methods can help overcome the limitations of crystallography necessitated by diffraction quality.

  7. Cancer screening in patients infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Keith; Dubrow, Robert; Silverberg, Michael; Crothers, Kristina; Braithwaite, Scott; Justice, Amy

    2011-09-01

    Non-AIDS-defining cancers are a rising health concern among HIV-infected patients. Cancer screening is now an important component of health maintenance in HIV clinical practice. The decision to screen an HIV-infected patient for cancer should include an assessment of individualized risk for the particular cancer, life expectancy, and the harms and benefits associated with the screening test and its potential outcome. HIV-infected patients are at enhanced risk of several cancers compared to the general population; anal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and lung cancer all have good evidence demonstrating an enhanced risk in HIV-infected persons. A number of cancer screening interventions have shown benefit for specific cancers in the general population, but data on the application of these tests to HIV-infected persons are limited. Here we review the epidemiology and background literature relating to cancer screening interventions in HIV-infected persons. We then use these data to inform a conceptual model for evaluating HIV-infected patients for cancer screening.

  8. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrrum, Stephanie; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice...... is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. DESIGN: Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during...... May and October 2014, before and after a performance feedback intervention in August 2014. The outcomes of interest were overall tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultations and provider adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care and the World Health Organizations' guidelines...

  9. Interest in screening examinations among cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humeniuk Ewa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the influence of socio-demographic variables on attendance rate at screening examinations in cancer patients. Material and methods. The research group comprised of 100 cancer patients. The method applied in the research was a diagnostic survey. The research instrument was the authors‘ own questionnaire specially compiled to measure cancer patients‘ interest in screening examinations. The research material was analysed with the statistical packet STATISTICA 12 and Microsoft Office Excel software. Significance level was assumed at p<0.05 to determine statistically significant differences and dependencies. A Chi2 test was used in the research. Results. The surveyed patients mostly did not participate in screening examinations aimed at diagnosing cancer (66%. Their Age (p=0.05, gender (p=0.003 and place of residence (p=0.04 determined their participation rate in screening tests. The patients‘ marital status (p=0.47, education (p=0.85 and economic status (p=0.13 did not affect their willingness to attend screening examinations. Conclusions. The process of cancer incidence and death rate limitation requires greater participation of the population in prevention programmes.

  10. Screening for Cushing's syndrome in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozay Tiryakioglu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of Cushing's syndrome (CS in obese patients devoid of specific clinical symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. METHODS: A total of 150 obese patients (129 female, 21 male; mean age 44.41 ± 13.34 yr; mean BMI 35.76 ± 7.13 were included in the study. As a first screening step, we measured 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC. An overnight 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test was also performed on all patients. Urinary free cortisol levels above 100 μg/24 h were considered to be abnormal. Suppression of serum cortisol 100 μg/24 h were recorded in 37 patients (24%. Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed in 14 of the 150 patients (9.33%. Etiologic reasons for Cushing's syndrome were pituitary microadenoma (9 patients, adrenocortical adenoma (3 patients, and adrenocortical carcinoma (1 patient. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion (9.33% of patients with simple obesity were found to have Cushing's syndrome. These findings argue that obese patients should be routinely screened for Cushing's syndrome.

  11. Depression Screening and Patient Outcomes in Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Milette, Katherine; Coyne, James C.; Stefanek, Michael E.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Arthurs, Erin; Leavens, Allison; Palmer, Steven C.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Thombs, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several practice guidelines recommend screening for depression in cancer care, but no systematic reviews have examined whether there is evidence that depression screening benefits cancer patients. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in cancer

  12. Determinants of successful implementation of population-based cancer screening programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Törnberg, Sven; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    consider when planning, implementing and running population based cancer screening programmes. The list is general and is applicable to breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening. It is based on evidence presented in the three European Union guidelines on quality assurance in cancer screening...... and diagnosis, supplemented with other literature and expert experience presented at a European Science Advisory Network for Health workshop. The implementation of a cancer screening programme should be divided into the following seven phases: (1) before planning, (2) planning, (3) feasibility testing, (4......) piloting or trial implementation, (5) scaling up from pilot to service, (6) running of full-scale programme, and (7) sustainability. For each phase, a substantial number of specified conditions have to be met. Successful implementation of a cancer screening programme requires societal acceptance and local...

  13. A Nutrition Screening Form for Female Infertility Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Susie

    2014-12-01

    A Nutrition Screening Form (NSF) was designed to identify lifestyle risk factors that negatively impact fertility and to provide a descriptive profile of 300 female infertility patients in a private urban infertility clinic. The NSF was mailed to all new patients prior to the initial physician's visit and self-reported data were assessed using specific criteria to determine if a nutrition referral was warranted. This observational study revealed that 43% of the women had a body mass index (BMI) nutrition-related lifestyle factors that may negatively impact fertility and identified weight, BMI, diet, exercise, and stress as modifiable risk factors deserving future research. NSF information can help increase awareness among health professionals and patients about the important link between nutrition, fertility, and successful reproductive outcomes.

  14. Implementing Delirium Screening in the Intensive Care Unit: Secrets to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Nathan E.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Han, Jin Ho; Boehm, Leanne; Pun, Brenda T.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review delirium screening tools available for use in the adult and pediatric ICU, review evidence-based delirium screening implementation and to discuss common pitfalls encountered during delirium screening in the ICU. Data Sources Review of delirium screening literature and expert opinion. Results Over the past decade, tools specifically designed for use in critically ill adults and children have been developed and validated. Delirium screening has been effectively implemented across many ICUs settings. Keys to effective implementation include addressing barriers to routine screening, multi-faceted training such as lectures, case-based scenarios, one-on-one teaching and real-time feedback of delirium screening and interdisciplinary communication through discussion of a patient’s delirium status during bedside rounds and through documentation systems. If delirium is present clinicians should search for reversible or treatable causes since it is often multifactorial. Conclusion Implementation of effective delirium screening is feasible but requires attention to implementation methods, including a change in the current ICU culture that believes delirium is inevitable or a normal part of a critical illness, to a future culture that views delirium as a dangerous syndrome which portends poor clinical outcomes and which is potentially modifiable depending on the individual patients circumstances. PMID:23896832

  15. Developmental stages of developmental screening: steps to implementation of a successful program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Martin, Jennifer A; Dunkle, Margaret; Earls, Marian; Fliedner, Dane; Landes, Cynthia

    2005-11-01

    Through the use of 2-stage screening strategies, research studies have shown that autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities can now be detected reliably and with greater validity and in children as young as 18 months of age. Screening and diagnostic practices in the medical and educational arena lag far behind clinical research, however, with the average patient age at time of diagnosis being 3 to 6 years.We discuss the challenges of instituting universal developmental screening as part of pediatric care and present 2 models of existing or planned programs of early screening for autism spectrum disorder and developmental disability (1 in a community-based setting and 1 in a pediatric setting), and discuss the pros and cons of the different strategies.

  16. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography protein-recovery screening is predictive of crystallographic structure success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Nakazawa Hewitt, Stephen; Napuli, Alberto; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the methods used for high-throughput cloning and protein-expression screening of SSGCID hexahistidine recombinant proteins is provided. It is demonstrated that screening for recombinant proteins that are highly recoverable from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography improves the likelihood that a protein will produce a structure. The recombinant expression of soluble proteins in Escherichia coli continues to be a major bottleneck in structural genomics. The establishment of reliable protocols for the performance of small-scale expression and solubility testing is an essential component of structural genomic pipelines. The SSGCID Protein Production Group at the University of Washington (UW-PPG) has developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol for the measurement of protein recovery from immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) which predicts successful purification of hexahistidine-tagged proteins. The protocol is based on manual transfer of samples using multichannel pipettors and 96-well plates and does not depend on the use of robotic platforms. This protocol has been applied to evaluate the expression and solubility of more than 4000 proteins expressed in E. coli. The UW-PPG also screens large-scale preparations for recovery from IMAC prior to purification. Analysis of these results show that our low-cost non-automated approach is a reliable method for the HTS demands typical of large structural genomic projects. This paper provides a detailed description of these protocols and statistical analysis of the SSGCID screening results. The results demonstrate that screening for proteins that yield high recovery after IMAC, both after small-scale and large-scale expression, improves the selection of proteins that can be successfully purified and will yield a crystal structure

  17. Display methods of electronic patient record screens: patient privacy concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Yukari; Ota, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    To provide adequate care, medical professionals have to collect not only medical information but also information that may be related to private aspects of the patient's life. With patients' increasing awareness of information privacy, healthcare providers have to pay attention to the patients' right of privacy. This study aimed to clarify the requirements of the display method of electronic patient record (EPR) screens in consideration of both patients' information privacy concerns and health professionals' information needs. For this purpose, semi-structured group interviews were conducted of 78 medical professionals. They pointed out that partial concealment of information to meet patients' requests for privacy could result in challenges in (1) safety in healthcare, (2) information sharing, (3) collaboration, (4) hospital management, and (5) communication. They believed that EPRs should (1) meet the requirements of the therapeutic process, (2) have restricted access, (3) provide convenient access to necessary information, and (4) facilitate interprofessional collaboration. This study provides direction for the development of display methods that balance the sharing of vital information and protection of patient privacy.

  18. Assessing the potential success of cystic fibrosis carrier screening: lessons learned from Tay-Sachs disease and beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, A-M; Watts, C; Porter, K; Burke, W

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors involved in the success of 2 well-established population-based carrier screening programs - Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) in Ashkenazi Jews and beta-thalassemia in Sardinia and Cyprus - and to assess the potential for success of a population-based cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier screening strategy using these factors. We performed a literature review and key informant interviews. Factors involved in the success of TSD and beta-thalassemia carrier screening programs include disease characteristics (well-defined population at risk, severe disease with predictable course, availability of effective treatment), test characteristics (high sensitivity, straightforward interpretation of results), and community characteristics (involvement of community, support of families and advocacy groups, consensus in favor of avoiding affected births). Current CF screening strategies include few of the factors listed above. Unlike TSD and beta-thalassemia, the purpose of current CF carrier screening strategies is informed reproductive decision-making, without an explicit goal of reducing disease incidence. When compared to TSD and beta-thalassemia, CF is a less favorable candidate for population-based carrier screening. Because of its different purpose, CF carrier screening will require different measures of success than those used for TSD and beta-thalassemia carrier screening, and a consensus on the value or success of CF carrier screening may be difficult to achieve.

  19. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed.We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other.Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  20. in Critically Ill Patients: Success and Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrate anticoagulation has risen in interest so it is now a real alternative to heparin in the ICUs practice. Citrate provides a regional anticoagulation virtually restricted to extracorporeal circuit, where it acts by chelating ionized calcium. This issue is particularly true in patients ongoing CRRT, when the “continuous” systemic anticoagulation treatment is per se a relevant risk of bleeding. When compared with heparin most of studies with citrate reported a longer circuit survival, a lower rate of bleeding complications, and transfused packed red cell requirements. As anticoagulant for CRRT, the infusion of citrate is prolonged and it could potentially have some adverse effects. When citrate is metabolized to bicarbonate, metabolic alkalosis may occur, or for impaired metabolism citrate accumulation leads to acidosis. However, large studies with dedicated machines have indeed demonstrated that citrate anticoagulation is well tolerated, safe, and an easy to handle even in septic shock critically ill patients.

  1. Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in Orthopedic Patients: A Comparison of Three Screening Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Sheila; Madden, Kim; Dosanjh, Sonia; Petrisor, Brad; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Bhandari, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Accurately identifying victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) can be a challenge for clinicians and clinical researchers. Multiple instruments have been developed and validated to identify IPV in patients presenting to health care practitioners, including the Woman Abuse Screening Tool (WAST) and the Partner Violence Screen (PVS). The purpose…

  2. Considering culture in physician-- patient communication during colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Gao; Burke, Nancy; Somkin, Carol P; Pasick, Rena

    2009-06-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in both incidence and stage detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that cultural practices (i.e., communication norms and expectations) influence patients' and their physicians' understanding and talk about CRC screening. We examined 44 videotaped observations of clinic visits that included a CRC screening recommendation and transcripts from semistructured interviews that doctors and patients separately completed following the visit. We found that interpersonal relationship themes such as power distance, trust, directness/ indirectness, and an ability to listen, as well as personal health beliefs, emerged as affecting patients' definitions of provider-patient effective communication. In addition, we found that in discordant physician-patient interactions (when each is from a different ethnic group), physicians did not solicit or address cultural barriers to CRC screening and patients did not volunteer culture-related concerns regarding CRC screening.

  3. Successive 1-Month Weight Increments in Infancy Can Be Used to Screen for Faltering Linear Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Adelheid W; Borghi, Elaine; de Onis, Mercedes; Frongillo, Edward A; Victora, Cesar G; Dewey, Kathryn G; Lartey, Anna; Bhandari, Nita; Baerug, Anne; Garza, Cutberto

    2015-12-01

    Linear growth faltering in the first 2 y contributes greatly to a high stunting burden, and prevention is hampered by the limited capacity in primary health care for timely screening and intervention. This study aimed to determine an approach to predicting long-term stunting from consecutive 1-mo weight increments in the first year of life. By using the reference sample of the WHO velocity standards, the analysis explored patterns of consecutive monthly weight increments among healthy infants. Four candidate screening thresholds of successive increments that could predict stunting were considered, and one was selected for further testing. The selected threshold was applied in a cohort of Bangladeshi infants to assess its predictive value for stunting at ages 12 and 24 mo. Between birth and age 12 mo, 72.6% of infants in the WHO sample tracked within 1 SD of their weight and length. The selected screening criterion ("event") was 2 consecutive monthly increments below the 15th percentile. Bangladeshi infants were born relatively small and, on average, tracked downward from approximately age 6 to strategy is effective, the estimated preventable proportion in the group who experienced the event would be 34% at 12 mo and 24% at 24 mo. This analysis offers an approach for frontline workers to identify children at risk of stunting, allowing for timely initiation of preventive measures. It opens avenues for further investigation into evidence-informed application of the WHO growth velocity standards. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Rare successful pregnancy in a patient with Swyer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Jyoti; Ogutu, David; Ah-Moye, Michael

    2016-10-01

    To report a rare successful pregnancy after fertility treatment in a patient with Swyer syndrome. Case report. Herts & Essex Fertility Centre, Cheshunt, UK. A 36-year-old patient with 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis. 31 year old husband with normal sperm analysis. Chromosomal analysis, Saline infusion sonography, Pipelle endometrial scratch, ICSI using donor eggs, Embryo Transfer, and Caesarean delivery. Successful pregnancy and live birth. Successful treatment with donor eggs, pregnancy, and delivery. A patient with 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis in a specially tailored fertility program, can maintain a normal pregnancy and delivery.

  5. Depression screening using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 administered on a touch screen computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, Jesse R; Berry, Donna L; Wolpin, Seth; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Bush, Nigel; Halpenny, Barbara; Lober, William B; McCorkle, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    To (1) evaluate the feasibility of touch screen depression screening in cancer patients using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), (2) evaluate the construct validity of the PHQ-9 using the touch screen modality, and (3) examine the prevalence and severity of depression using this screening modality. The PHQ-9 was placed in a web-based survey within a study of the clinical impact of computerized symptom and quality of life screening. Patients in medical oncology, radiation oncology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) clinics used the program on a touch screen computer in waiting rooms prior to therapy (T1) and during therapy (T2). Responses of depressed mood or anhedonia (PHQ-2 cardinal depression symptoms) triggered additional items. PHQ-9 scores were provided to the oncology team in real time. Among 342 patients enrolled, 33 (9.6%) at T1 and 69 (20.2%) at T2 triggered the full PHQ-9 by endorsing at least one cardinal symptom. Feasibility was high, with at least 97% completing the PHQ-2 and at least 96% completing the PHQ-9 when triggered and a mean completion time of about 2 min. The PHQ-9 had good construct validity. Medical oncology patients had the highest percent of positive screens (12.9%) at T1, while HSCT patients had the highest percent (30.5%) at T2. Using this method, 21 (6.1%) at T1 and 54 (15.8%) at T2 of the total sample had moderate to severe depression. The PHQ-9 administered on a touch screen computer is feasible and provides valid depression data in a diverse cancer population. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Screening for distress in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassi, Luigi; Johansen, Christoffer; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    Routine screening for distress is internationally recommended as a necessary standard for good cancer care, given its high prevalence and negative consequences on quality of life. The objective of the current study was to contribute to the Italian validation of the Distress Thermometer (DT...

  7. Considering Culture in Physician– Patient Communication During Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Burke, Nancy; Somkin, Carol P.; Pasick, Rena

    2010-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in both incidence and stage detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that cultural practices (i.e., communication norms and expectations) influence patients’ and their physicians’ understanding and talk about CRC screening. We examined 44 videotaped observations of clinic visits that included a CRC screening recommendation and transcripts from semistructured interviews that doctors and patients separately completed following the visit. We found that interpersonal relationship themes such as power distance, trust, directness/indirectness, and an ability to listen, as well as personal health beliefs, emerged as affecting patients’ definitions of provider–patient effective communication. In addition, we found that in discordant physician–patient interactions (when each is from a different ethnic group), physicians did not solicit or address cultural barriers to CRC screening and patients did not volunteer culture-related concerns regarding CRC screening. PMID:19363141

  8. Is screening effective in detecting untreated psychiatric disorders among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmer, Steven C.; Taggi, Alison; DeMichele, Angela; Coyne, James C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key purpose of routine distress screening is to ensure that cancer patients receive appropriate mental health care. Most studies validating screening instruments overestimate the effectiveness of screening by not differentiating between patients with untreated disorders and patients

  9. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  10. Rare successful pregnancy in a patient with Swyer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Taneja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report a rare successful pregnancy after fertility treatment in a patient with Swyer syndrome. Design: Case report. Setting: Herts & Essex Fertility Centre, Cheshunt, UK. Patient(s: A 36-year-old patient with 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis. 31 year old husband with normal sperm analysis. Intervention(s: Chromosomal analysis, Saline infusion sonography, Pipelle endometrial scratch, ICSI using donor eggs, Embryo Transfer, and Caesarean delivery. Main Outcome Measure(s: Successful pregnancy and live birth. Result(s: Successful treatment with donor eggs, pregnancy, and delivery. Conclusion(s: A patient with 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis in a specially tailored fertility program, can maintain a normal pregnancy and delivery. Keywords: Swyer syndrome, XY female, Gonadal dysgenesis, Primary amenorrhoea and HRT, Pregnancy in Swyer syndrome

  11. Physician-patient discussions of controversial cancer screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A S; Shridharani, K V; Lou, W; Bernstein, J; Horowitz, C R

    2001-02-01

    Screening mammography for younger women and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement have controversial benefits and known potential adverse consequences. While providing informed consent and eliciting patient preference have been advocated for these tests, little is known about how often these discussions take place or about barriers to these discussions. We administered a survey to medical house staff and attending physicians practicing primary care. The survey examined physicians' likelihood of discussing screening mammography and PSA testing, and factors influencing the frequency and quality of these discussions. For the three scenarios, 16% to 34% of physicians stated that they do not discuss the screening tests. The likelihood of having a discussion was significantly associated with house staff physicians' belief that PSA screening is advantageous; house staff and attending physicians' intention to order a PSA test, and attending physicians' intention to order a mammogram; and a controversial indication for screening. The most commonly identified barriers to discussions were lack of time, the complexity of the topic, and a language barrier. Physicians report they often do not discuss cancer screening tests with their patients. Our finding that physicians' beliefs and intention to order the tests, and extraneous factors such as time constraints and a language barrier, are associated with discussions indicates that some patients may be inappropriately denied the opportunity to choose whether to screen for breast and prostate cancer.

  12. Physician–Patient Discussions of Controversial Cancer Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Andrew S.; Shridharani, Kanan V.; Lou, Wendy; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening mammography for younger women and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement have controversial benefits and known potential adverse consequences. While providing informed consent and eliciting patient preference have been advocated for these tests, little is known about how often these discussions take place or about barriers to these discussions. Methods We administered a survey to medical house staff and attending physicians practicing primary care. The survey examined physicians’ likelihood of discussing screening mammography and PSA testing, and factors influencing the frequency and quality of these discussions. Results For the three scenarios, 16% to 34% of physicians stated that they do not discuss the screening tests. The likelihood of having a discussion was significantly associated with house staff physicians’ belief that PSA screening is advantageous; house staff and attending physicians’ intention to order a PSA test, and attending physicians’ intention to order a mammogram; and a controversial indication for screening. The most commonly identified barriers to discussions were lack of time, the complexity of the topic, and a language barrier. Conclusions Physicians report they often do not discuss cancer screening tests with their patients. Our finding that physicians’ beliefs and intention to order the tests, and extraneous factors such as time constraints and a language barrier, are associated with discussions indicates that some patients may be inappropriately denied the opportunity to choose whether to screen for breast and prostate cancer. PMID:11165455

  13. Factors associated with successful decannulation in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nozomi; Takano, Kenichi; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Kurose, Maokoto; Himi, Tetsuo

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the outcome of pediatric tracheostomy and identify predictive factors for successful decannulation. We performed a retrospective chart review of a series of 42 consecutive patients of less than 24 months of age who underwent a tracheostomy between 2012 and 2015. Successful decannulation was achieved in 11 patients (26%). Thirty-one patients (74%) remained tracheostomy-dependent. Of the 11 patients who were successfully decannulated, 10 (91%) had only structural disorders and nine (82%) were able to walk unassisted; importantly, nine (82%) were able to swallow following decannulation. In contrast, of the 31 patients who did not tolerate decannulation, 21 (68%) had functional disorders and 18 (58%) were unable to walk unassisted; 20 (65%) of the tracheostomy-dependent patients were unable to swallow after undergoing surgery. Following pediatric tracheostomy procedures, patients with solely structural disorders were significantly more likely to be successfully decannulated compared to patients with functional disorders. Furthermore, the capacity to walk unassisted and swallow after surgery is associated with positive outcomes for decannulation. Our results suggest that an objective evaluation of the ability to walk unassisted, and to ingest food, may be useful for predicting the outcome and effects of tracheostomy procedures and decannulation in children.

  14. Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient and social work factors related to successful placement of long-term psychiatric in-patients from a specialist psychiatric hospital in South Africa. ... away; a low frequency of behavioural problems (especially of cannabis abuse, verbal or physical aggression, uncontrolled sexual activity), and agitation or restlessness.

  15. Patient-provider language concordance and colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Amy; McIntosh, Nathalie; Cabral, Howard; Kazis, Lewis E

    2011-02-01

    Patient-provider language barriers may play a role in health-care disparities, including obtaining colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Professional interpreters and language-concordant providers may mitigate these disparities. DESIGN, SUBJECTS, AND MAIN MEASURES: We performed a retrospective cohort study of individuals age 50 years and older who were categorized as English-Concordant (spoke English at home, n = 21,594); Other Language-Concordant (did not speak English at home but someone at their provider's office spoke their language, n = 1,463); or Other Language-Discordant (did not speak English at home and no one at their provider's spoke their language, n = 240). Multivariate logistic regression assessed the association of language concordance with colorectal cancer screening. Compared to English speakers, non-English speakers had lower use of colorectal cancer screening (30.7% vs 50.8%; OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51-0.76). Compared to the English-Concordant group, the Language-Discordant group had similar screening (adjusted OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.58-1.21), while the Language-Concordant group had lower screening (adjusted OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.46-0.71). Rates of CRC screening are lower in individuals who do not speak English at home compared to those who do. However, the Language-Discordant cohort had similar rates to those with English concordance, while the Language-Concordant cohort had lower rates of CRC screening. This may be due to unmeasured differences among the cohorts in patient, provider, and health care system characteristics. These results suggest that providers should especially promote the importance of CRC screening to non-English speaking patients, but that language barriers do not fully account for CRC screening rate disparities in these populations.

  16. Universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome: Assessment of the perspectives of patients with colorectal cancer regarding benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jessica Ezzell; Zepp, Jamilyn M; Gilmore, Mari J; Davis, James V; Esterberg, Elizabeth J; Muessig, Kristin R; Peterson, Susan K; Syngal, Sapna; Acheson, Louise S; Wiesner, Georgia L; Reiss, Jacob A; Goddard, Katrina A B

    2015-09-15

    Universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), has been recommended among all patients newly diagnosed with CRC. However, there is limited literature regarding patient perspectives of tumor screening for Lynch syndrome among patients with CRC who are not selected for screening based on family history criteria. A total of 145 patients aged 39 to 87 years were administered surveys assessing perceived risk, patient perspectives, and potential benefits of and barriers to tumor screening for Lynch syndrome. Associations between patient-specific and cancer-specific factors and survey responses were analyzed. The majority of participants perceived their risk of developing Lynch syndrome as being low, with 9 participants (6.2%) anticipating an abnormal screening result. However, most participants endorsed the potential benefits of screening for themselves and their families, with 84.8% endorsing ≥6 benefits and 50.3% endorsing all 8 benefits. Participants also endorsed few potential barriers to screening, with 89.4% endorsing ≤4 of 9 potential barriers. A common barrier was worry about the cost of additional testing and surveillance, which was endorsed by 54.5% of participants. The level of distress associated with tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, which was very low, was not associated with age or CRC stage. The results of the current study indicate that patients with CRC overall have a positive attitude toward tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, endorse the benefits of screening, and experience low levels of distress. These findings provide insight into patient attitudes toward tumor screening for Lynch syndrome among unselected patients with CRC to inform educational approaches that assist in patient decision-making and guide the successful implementation of screening programs. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  17. Analysis of previous screening examinations for patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Cha, Joo Hee; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Young Ho; Hwang, Ki Tae; Ryu, Dae Sik; Kwak, Jin Ho; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to improve the quality of subsequent screening by reviewing the previous screening of breast cancer patients. Twenty-four breast cancer patients who underwent previous screening were enrolled. All 24 took mammograms and 15 patients also took sonograms. We reviewed the screening retrospectively according to the BI-RADS criteria and we categorized the results into false negative, true negative, true positive and occult cancers. We also categorized the causes of false negative cancers into misperception, misinterpretation and technical factors and then we analyzed the attributing factors. Review of the previous screening revealed 66.7% (16/24) false negative, 25.0% (6/24) true negative, and 8.3% (2/24) true positive cancers. False negative cancers were caused by the mammogram in 56.3% (9/16) and by the sonogram in 43.7% (7/16). For the false negative cases, all of misperception were related with mammograms and this was attributed to dense breast, a lesion located at the edge of glandular tissue or the image, and findings seen on one view only. Almost all misinterpretations were related with sonograms and attributed to loose application of the final assessment. To improve the quality of breast screening, it is essential to overcome the main causes of false negative examinations, including misperception and misinterpretation. We need systematic education and strict application of final assessment categories of BI-RADS. For effective communication among physicians, it is also necessary to properly educate them about BI-RADS

  18. Anatomical success in patients after retinectomy for complex retinal detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, A.; Ishaq, M.; Islam, Q.U.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of primary and redo retinectomy in eyes with complex retinal detachment. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology Rawalpindi from Jan 2012 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: Fifty eight eyes (patients) underwent relaxing retinectomies for complex retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy or intrinsic retinal shortening. Operative technique included pars plana vitrectomy, proliferative vitreoretinopathy management, use of intraoperative perfluorocarbon liquid, retinectomy, endolaser and intraocular temponade. The main outcome was anatomic success, defined as complete retinal reattachment at four months follow up. Eighteen eyes out of the same primary group underwent second retinectomy because of anatomical failure. Results: Mean age of study population was 53.78 ± 15.11 years, 56.9% of patients were male(s). Anatomic success rate after 1st retinectomy was achieved in 68.96% (40 eyes out of 58). In eighteen eyes that underwent 2nd retinectomy, anatomic success rate was 72.22% (13 eyes out of 18). Overall success rate was 91.3% (53 eyes out of 58) in our study. Conclusions: Relaxing retinectomies for retinal shortening can improve the anatomical success rate in patients with complex RD. (author)

  19. Postpartum Patient Teaching Success: Implications from Nursing and Patient Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    A recent examination of postpartum patient satisfaction scores in an inner-city hospital revealed decreased satisfaction of discharge teaching practices. Guided by Knowles' model of andragogy and Donabedian's model of structure-process-outcome, the purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of how the structure and process of discharge…

  20. Determinants of successful chronic hepatitis C case finding among patients receiving opioid maintenance treatment in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Oliver; Seidenberg, André; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Injection drug users are at high risk for chronic hepatitis C virus infection (CHC). Opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) offers a unique opportunity to screen for CHC. This study proposed the hypothesis that a general practitioner (GP) with special interest in addiction medicine can achieve CHC screening rates comparable to specialized centres and aimed to investigate determinants for a successful CHC case finding in a primary care setting. Retrospective medical record analysis of 387 patients who received opioid maintenance therapy between 1 January 2002 and 31 May 2008 in a general practice in Zurich, Switzerland. Successful CHC assessment was defined as performance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology with consecutive polymerase chain reaction-based RNA and genotype recordings. The association between screening success and patient characteristics was assessed using multiple logistic regression. findings: Median (interquartile range) age and duration of OMT of the 387 (268 males) patients was 38.5 (33.6-44.5) years and 34 (11.3-68.0) months, respectively. Fourteen patients (3.6%) denied HCV testing and informed consent about screening was missing in 13 patients (3.4%). In 327 of 360 patients (90.8%) with informed consent a successful CHC assessment has been performed. Screening for HCV antibodies was positive in 136 cases (41.6%) and in 86 of them (63.2%) a CHC was present. The duration of OMT was an independent determinant of a successful CHC assessment. In addicted patients a high CHC assessment rate in a primary care setting in Switzerland is feasible and opioid substitution provides an optimal framework.

  1. Thrombophilic screening in retinal artery occlusion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Nagy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Valeria Nagy1, Lili Takacs1, Zita Steiber1, György Pfliegler2, Andras Berta11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Division of Rare Diseases, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen, HungaryBackground: Retinal artery occlusion (RAO is an ischemic vascular damage of the retina, which frequently leads to sudden, mostly irreversible loss of vision. In this study, blood thrombophilic factors as well as cardiovascular risk factors were investigated for their relevance to this pathology. Thrombophilic risk factors so far not evaluated were included in the study.Patients and methods: 28 RAO patients and 81 matched control subjects were examined. From blood samples, protein C, protein S, antithrombinopathy, and factor V (Leiden mutation (FV, factor II gene polymorphism, factor VIII C level, plasminogen activity, lipoprotein(a and fibrinogen levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and presence of anticardiolipin – antiphospholipid antibodies were investigated. Possibly relevant pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease were also registered. Statistical analysis by logistic regression was performed with 95% confidence intervals.Results: In the group of patients with RAO only the incidence of hypertension (OR: 3.33, 95% CI: 1.30–9.70, p = 0.014 as an average risk factor showed significant difference, but thrombophilic factors such as hyperfibrinogenemia (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.29–6.57, p = 0.010 and the presence of FV (Leiden mutation (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.43–10.96, p = 0.008 increased the chances of developing this disease.Conclusions: Our results support the assumption that thrombophilia may contribute to the development of RAO besides vascular damage due to the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. Further studies are needed, however, to justify the possible use of secondary prophylaxis in form of anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy.Keywords: retinal arterial occlusion, risk factors, thrombophilia

  2. Virtual screening for cytochromes p450: successes of machine learning filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Julien; Ijjaali, Ismail; Petitet, François; Michel, André; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2009-05-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are crucial targets when predicting the ADME properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) of drugs in development. Particularly, CYPs mediated drug-drug interactions are responsible for major failures in the drug design process. Accurate and robust screening filters are thus needed to predict interactions of potent compounds with CYPs as early as possible in the process. In recent years, more and more 3D structures of various CYP isoforms have been solved, opening the gate of accurate structure-based studies of interactions. Nevertheless, the ligand-based approach still remains popular. This success can be explained by the growing number of available data and the satisfying performances of existing machine learning (ML) methods. The aim of this contribution is to give an overview of the recent achievements in ML applications to CYP datasets. Particularly, popular methods such as support vector machine, decision trees, artificial neural networks, k-nearest neighbors, and partial least squares will be compared as well as the quality of the datasets and the descriptors used. Consensus of different methods will also be discussed. Often reaching 90% of accuracy, the models will be analyzed to highlight the key descriptors permitting the good prediction of CYPs binding.

  3. Screening of the frail patient in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    to detect frailty in patients. ≥. 65. years by their ability to identify the risk of adverse outcomes. Methods: An extensive medical literature search of Embase and PubMed was conducted, to identify studies using frailty screening scales in the emergency department. Data was subsequently extracted...... and evaluated from the results of the included studies. Results: Four studies met the exact inclusion criteria. Four different frailty screening scales: Clinical Frailty Scale, Deficit Accumulation Index, Identification of Seniors At Risk and The Study of Osteoporotic Fracture frailty index used...... emergency department visit. Frailty does however not predict increased risk of 30. day emergency department revisit. Further research highlighting the value of screening for frailty level in elderly emergency department patients is needed. Learning points: Although frail elders in need of further geriatric...

  4. Limited success in patients treated with transanal haemorrhoidal dearterialisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Søren; Lund, Henrik Hemmert; Schulze, Svend

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Transanal haemorrhoidal dearterialisation (THD) is a novel non-excisional technique based on suture closure of the haemorrhoidal arterial flow feeding the haemorrhoidal plexus. The primary objective of this study was to report the first Danish experience with THD. METHODS: The study......-operatively. Additionally, a structured telephone interview was conducted within two years after the THD operation. RESULTS: During the study period (from January 2011 to January 2013), 93 patients underwent a THD procedure. Twenty patients were exluded from the study which left 73 patients for analysis. Treatment success...

  5. Successful selective arterial thrombolysis in patient with acute abdominal thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Tsekov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports successful thrombolysis conducted in 64 years old woman admitted to the clinic with clinical and angiographic data for acute surgical abdomen caused by acute tromboembolia of arteria mesenterica superior (AMS. The therapeutic approach required to undertake lifesaving decision on i.e. surgical vs. invasive treatment in conditions of emergency. Finally, it was decided to undertake invasive treatment with successful restoration of blood flow in the related artery. The patient was discharged from the clinic with considerable clinical improvement on the fifth day of her stay. The case report includes discussion on issues relating the consequence of the diagnostic and interventional procedures in such patients, opportunities for conducting emergency thrombolysis in acute embolia of AMS and preventive measures in patients with high tromboembolic risk. Keywords: Mesenterial circulation, Abdominal thromboembolism, Arterial thrombolysis

  6. Fall risk screening protocol for older hearing clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criter, Robin E; Honaker, Julie A

    2017-10-01

    The primary purposes of this study were (1) to describe measures that may contrast audiology patients who fall from those who do not fall and (2) to evaluate the clinical performance of measures that could be easily used for fall risk screening in a mainstream audiology hearing clinic. Cross-sectional study Study sample: Thirty-six community-dwelling audiology patient participants and 27 community-dwelling non-audiology patients over 60 years of age. The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE) most accurately identified patients with a recent fall (sensitivity: 76.0%), while the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) most accurately identified patients without a recent fall (specificity: 90.9%). A combination of measures used in a protocol-including HHIE, DHI, number of medications, and the Timed Up and Go test-resulted in good, accurate identification of patients with or without a recent history of falls (92.0% sensitivity, 100% specificity). This study reports good sensitivity and excellent specificity for identifying patients with and without a recent history of falls when measures were combined into a screening protocol. Despite previously reported barriers, effective fall risk screenings may be performed in hearing clinic settings with measures often readily accessible to audiologists.

  7. Participation and successful patient recruitment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, N J; Quartero, A O; Zuithoff, A P; Numans, M E

    2001-11-01

    The demand for family physicians (FPs) to participate in research is growing. The delicate balance between research participation and the daily practice routine might explain the often-disappointing number of patients recruited. We analyzed practice and physician characteristics associated with successful patient recruitment. We used a survey to conduct this study. There was a total of 165 FPs who participated in a combined randomized clinical trial/cohort study on drug treatment of dyspepsia in the Netherlands. We surveyed FPs about personal and practice characteristics and their motivation for participation in the project. These data were then related to the number of patients recruited. Univariate associations were calculated; relevant factors were entered into a logistic model that predicted patient recruitment. Data on 128 FPs could be analyzed (80% response rate); these FPs recruited 793 patients in the cohort study (mean = 6.3 per FP) and 527 in the clinical trial (mean = 4.2 per FP). The main reasons for participation were the research topic (59%) and the participation of an academic research group in the study (63%). Many FPs felt that participation was a professional obligation (39%); the financial incentive played a minor role (15%). The number of recruited patients was only independently associated with the participation of an academic research group. Successful patient recruitment in primary care research is determined more by motivation driven by the research group than by financial incentives, the research topic, or research experience.

  8. Noninvasive molecular screening for oral precancer in Fanconi anemia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smetsers, Stephanie E.; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Wu, Thijs; Brink, Arjen; Buijze, Marijke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Soulier, Jean; Leemans, C. René; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Brakenhoff, Ruud H.

    2015-01-01

    LOH at chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 11q, and 17p are wellestablished oncogenetic aberrations in oral precancerous lesions and promising biomarkers to monitor the development of oral cancer. Noninvasive LOH screening of brushed oral cells is a preferable method for precancer detection in patients at

  9. Garlic and onion sensitization among Saudi patients screened for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... screened for garlic and onion specific IgE antibodies along with other food allergens were analyzed retrospectively at King. Khalid University Hosptial between January 2008 and April 2009. This group of patients included 73 males and 35 females with mean age 27+13.2 years. Estimation of garlic and ...

  10. Phytochemicals Screening, Total Phenol Estimation, Antioxidant Activity of Blainvillea Acmella Leaf and Stem Successive Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.; Sharma, G.N.; Shrivastava, B.; Jadhav, H.R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate antioxidant potential of different extracts of Blainvillea acmella leaf and stem. The successive extraction of individual plant part was carried out using solvents of different polarity viz. n-hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Preliminary phyto chemical screening of all the extracts was done. The present total phenolic contents were estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent method and expressed as μg/ mg of gallic acid equivalent. The antioxidant potential and reducing power of all the prepared extracts were measured against DPPH, as compared to standard ascorbic acid, and BHA respectively. The result data indicate that the phenolic contents were higher in methanolic extracts of leaf (73.67 ± 0.38 mg/ g) followed by ethyl acetate (29.08 ± 0.38 mg/ g), aqueous (21.50 ± 0.28 mg/ g), and n-Hexane (9.29 ± 0.38 mg/ g); gallic acid equivalent. The similar pattern in stem part was also observed for example methanolic extracts (41.90 ± 0.45 mg/ g), ethyl acetate (21.92 ± 0.28 mg/ g), aqueous (15.13 ± 0.18 mg/ g), and n-Hexane (3.69 ± 0.28 mg/ g). The antioxidant capacity of methanolic extract of both the part for example leaf and stem was found to be maximum, as IC50 values were 226.49 ± 0.16, 402.05 ± 1.10 respectively. The reducing power was also highest in methanol extract of both parts. The result data conclude that the higher antioxidant as well as reducing power may be due to present phenolic contents. (author)

  11. Measuring mobile patient safety information system success: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Cheng

    2008-10-01

    The Health Risk Reminders and Surveillance (HRRS) system was designed to deliver critical abnormal test results of severely ill patients from Laboratory, Radiology, and Pathology departments to physicians within 5 min using cell phone text messages. This paper explores the success of the HRRS system. This study employed an augmented version of the DeLone and McLean IS success model. Seven variables (system quality, information quality, system use, user satisfaction, mobile healthcare anxiety, impact on the individual and impact on the organization) were used to evaluate the success of the HRRS system. The interrelationships between the seven variables were hypothesized and the hypotheses were empirically tested. The results indicate that the information quality of the HRRS system is positively associated with both system use and user satisfaction. In addition, system use is positively associated with user satisfaction, which is also positively associated with mobile healthcare anxiety. Moreover, results indicate that impact on the individual is positively associated with both user satisfaction and mobile healthcare anxiety. Finally, the impact of the organization is positively associated with impact on the individual. The results of the study provide an expanded understanding of the factors that contribute to mobile patient safety information system (IS) success. Implications of the relationship between system use and physician mobile healthcare anxiety are discussed.

  12. A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of OPAC Screen Changes on Searching Behavior and Searcher Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Deborah D.; Dorsch, Josephine L.; Koenig, Melissa H.; Bangalore, Nimala S.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a longitudinal study of four sets of OPAC (online public access catalog) transaction logs that examined the effects of screen changes in helping searchers improve their search behavior. Results show that while screen changes initially had a positive impact on search behavior, they were not always sustained over time. (Author/LRW)

  13. Screens

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This Sixth volume in the series The Key Debates. Mutations and Appropriations in European Film Studies investigates the question of screens in the context both of the dematerialization due to digitalization and the multiplication of media screens. Scholars offer various infomations and theories of topics such as the archeology of screen, film and media theories, contemporary art, pragmatics of new ways of screening (from home video to street screening).

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening as a patient safety initiative: using patients' experiences to improve the quality of screening practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Kay; Knussen, Christina; Price, Lesley; Reilly, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    To explore the patient experience and acceptability of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening of inpatient admissions to acute hospital settings. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major patient safety concern internationally. Screening of patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation is becoming a routine aspect of hospital admission; however, evidence of the patient experience and acceptability of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening is limited. A mixed-methods study set in six acute care hospitals in three Scottish regions. Data collection involved postdischarge self-report survey of patients who had been screened (n = 54) and qualitative patient interviews (n = 10). Theoretical constructs derived from the Health Belief Model and Theory of Planned Behaviour used in analysis. Findings indicated that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening was broadly acceptable to patients. The experience of screening did not appear to be problematic; responses demonstrate that screening provided reassurance and generated confidence that health organisations were tackling healthcare-associated infections. Patients were less positive regarding the provision of information, the possibility of refusing a screen and the consequences of a positive test result. Furthermore, there were indications that patients wanted to be told the results of the screen and strong support for screening of hospital staff. Analysis of constructs from our theoretical frameworks provides evidence that attitudes were largely positive; responses indicate a belief in the beneficial impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening for patients and the wider community. However, it is important that health professionals continually assess the patient experience of 'routine' aspects of health care such as MRSA screening. The findings from this study suggest that

  15. Screening for secondary endocrine hypertension in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifanescu, Raluca; Carsote, Mara; Caragheorgheopol, Andra; Hortopan, Dan; Dumitrascu, Anda; Dobrescu, Mariana; Poiana, Catalina

    2013-06-01

    Secondary endocrine hypertension accounts for 5-12% of hypertension's causes. In selected patients (type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea syndrome with resistant hypertension, sudden deterioration in hypertension control), prevalence could be higher. To present etiology of endocrine secondary hypertension in a series of patients younger than 40 years at hypertension's onset. Medical records of 80 patients (39M/41F), aged 30.1 ± 8.2 years (range: 12-40 years), with maximum systolic blood pressure=190.4 ± 29.2 mm Hg, range: 145-300 mm Hg, maximum diastolic blood pressure=107.7 ± 16.9 mm Hg, range: 80-170 mm Hg) referred by cardiologists for endocrine hypertension screening were retrospectively reviewed. Cardiac and renal causes of secondary hypertension were previously excluded. In all patients, plasma catecholamines were measured by ELISA and plasma cortisol by immunochemiluminescence. Orthostatic aldosterone (ELISA) and direct renin (chemiluminescence) were measured in 48 patients. Secondary endocrine hypertension was confirmed in 16 out of 80 patients (20%). Primary hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed in 7 (4M/3F) out of 48 screened patients (14.6%). i.e. 8.75% from whole group: 5 patients with adrenal tumors (3 left/2 right), 2 patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia; all patients were hypokalemic at diagnostic (average nadir K+ levels = 2.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L); four patients were hypokalaemic on diuretic therapy (indapamidum); other 3 patients were hypokalaemic in the absence of diuretic therapy. Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed in 6 patients (7.5%): subclinical Cushing due to 4 cm right adrenal tumour - n = 1, overt ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to: macronodular adrenal hyperplasia associated with primary hyperparathyroidism - n = 1; due to adrenal carcinoma - n = 1; due to adrenal adenomas - n = 2; Cushing's disease - n = 1). Pheochromocytomas were diagnosed in 3 patients (3.75%). Primary hyperaldosteronism was the most frequent cause of secondary

  16. Adherence to, and outcomes of, a galactomannan screening protocol in high-risk hematology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harricharan, S; Biederman, K; Bombassaro, A M; Lazo-Langner, A; Elsayed, S; Fulford, A; Delport, J A; Xenocostas, A

    2018-04-01

    A twice-weekly galactomannan (gm) screening protocol was implemented in high-risk hematology inpatients. Study objectives were to determine adherence to the protocol, use of selected resources, and patient outcomes. This retrospective cohort study compared outcomes of interest before and after implementation of gm screening. Adults undergoing matched related allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia were eligible. Patients could be enrolled more than once and were evaluated as episodes. Adherence to the gm protocol was assessed in post-implementation episodes. Use of broad-spectrum antifungals (bsafs), consultations (infectious diseases, respirology), and diagnostic procedures (computed tomography imaging, bronchoalveolar lavage) were compared between phases, as were the patient outcomes of all-cause mortality and clinical success (alive and not taking a bsaf). Of 182 episodes consecutively screened, 70 per phase were enrolled. Clinical characteristics and duration of assessment were similar for the phases. Full or partial adherence to the protocol was observed in 61 post-implementation episodes (87%), with full adherence in 40 episodes (57%). More episodes in the pre-implementation phase than in the post-implementation phase involved receipt of bsafs, consultations, and diagnostics (27% vs. 7%, p = 0.02; 46% vs. 26%, p = 0.014; and 46% vs. 31%, p = 0.083 respectively). Although mortality was similar in the two phases, clinical success at the final assessment was observed in fewer pre-implementation than post-implementation episodes (79% vs. 98%, p < 0.001). Implementation of a gm screening protocol was feasible and associated with significantly fewer episodes involving receipt of bsafs and consultations, and with significantly more episodes showing clinical success.

  17. Promoting cancer screening within the patient centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaty, Mona; Wender, Richard; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    While consensus has grown that primary care is the essential access point in a high-performing health care system, the current model of primary care underperforms in both chronic disease management and prevention. The Patient Centered Medical Home model (PCMH) is at the center of efforts to reinvent primary care practice, and is regarded as the most promising approach to addressing the burden of chronic disease, improving health outcomes, and reducing health spending. However, the potential for the medical home to improve the delivery of cancer screening (and preventive services in general) has received limited attention in both conceptualization and practice. Medical home demonstrations to date have included few evidence-based preventive services in their outcome measures, and few have evaluated the effect of different payment models. Decreasing use of hospitals and emergency rooms and an emphasis on improving chronic care represent improvements in effective delivery of healthcare, but leave opportunities for reducing the burden of cancer untouched. Data confirm that what does or does not happen in the primary care setting has a substantial impact on cancer outcomes. Insofar as cancer is the leading cause of death before age 80, the PCMH model must prioritize adherence to cancer screening according to recommended guidelines, and systems, financial incentives, and reimbursements must be aligned to achieve that goal. This article explores capacities that are needed in the medical home model to facilitate the integration of cancer screening and other preventive services. These capacities include improved patient access and communication, health risk assessments, periodic preventive health exams, use of registries that store cancer risk information and screening history, ability to track and follow up on tests and referrals, feedback on performance, and payment models that reward cancer screening. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  18. Successful heart transplantation in patients with total artificial heart infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taimur, Sarah; Sullivan, Timothy; Rana, Mennakshi; Patel, Gopi; Roldan, Julie; Ashley, Kimberly; Pinney, Sean; Anyanwu, Anelechi; Huprikar, Shirish

    2018-02-01

    Data are limited on clinical outcomes in patients awaiting heart transplant (HT) with total artificial heart (TAH) infections. We retrospectively reviewed all TAH recipients at our center. TAH infection was classified as definite if a microorganism was isolated in cultures from the exit site or deep tissues around the TAH; as probable in patients without surgical or microbiologic evidence of infection but no other explanation for persistent or recurrent bloodstream infection (BSI); or possible in patients with clinical suspicion and radiographic findings suggestive of TAH infection, but without surgical intervention or microbiologic evidence. From 2012 to 2015, a total of 13 patients received a TAH, with a median age at implantation of 52 years (range: 28-60). TAH infection occurred in nine patients (seven definite, one probable, one possible) a median of 41 days after implant (range: 17-475). The majority of TAH infections were caused by Staphylococcus species. Seven of nine patients underwent HT (four had pre-HT mediastinal washout, and five had positive HT operative cultures). Three patients had an active BSI caused by the same pathogen causing TAH infection at the time of HT, with one developing a post-HT BSI with the same bacteria. No patient developed post-HT surgical site infection caused by the TAH infection pathogen. No deaths among HT recipients were attributed to infection. TAH infection is frequently associated with BSI and mediastinitis and Staphylococcus was the most common pathogen. A multimodal approach of appropriate pre- and post-HT antimicrobial therapy, surgical drainage, and heart transplantation with radical mediastinal debridement was successful in curing infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Screening of COPD patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flessenkaemper IH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ingo H Flessenkaemper,1 Robert Loddenkemper,2 Stephanie Roll,3 Kathrin Enke-Melzer,1 Henrik Wurps,2 Torsten T Bauer21Department for Vascular Medicine, 2Department of Pneumology, Helios Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany; 3Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyPurpose: Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in “men aged over 65 years who have ever smoked” is a recommended policy. To reduce the number of screenings, it may be of value to define subgroups with a higher prevalence of AAA. Since chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and AAA are associated with several common risk factors, this study investigates the prevalence of AAA in COPD patients.Patients and methods: Patients with COPD were identified via the hospital information system. Inclusion criteria were: COPD stage I–IV, ability to give full consent, and age >18 years; exclusion criteria were: patient too obese for an ultrasound check, previously diagnosed AAA, prior surgery for AAA, or ethical grounds such as concomitant advanced malignant or end-stage disease. The primary endpoint of the study was an aortic diameter measured by ultrasound of ≥30 mm. Defined secondary endpoints were evaluated on the basis of medical records and interviews.Results: Of the 1,180 identified COPD patients, 589 were included in this prospective study. In 22 patients (3.70%, the aortic diameter was ≥30 mm, representing an AAA prevalence of 6.72% among males aged >65 years. The risk of AAA increased with the following comorbidities/risk factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] 2.98, coronary heart disease (OR 2.81, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (OR 2.47, hyperlipoproteinemia (OR 2.77, AAA in the family history (OR 3.95, and COPD stage I/II versus IV (OR 1.81.Conclusion: The overall AAA prevalence of 3.7% in our group of COPD patients is similar to that of the general population aged >65

  20. Effects of screening for psychological distress on patient outcomes in cancer : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Milette, Katherine; Levis, Brooke; Syamchandra, Achyuth; Stefanek, Michael E.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Thombs, Brett D.

    Objective: Several practice guidelines recommend routine screening for psychological distress in cancer care. The objective was to evaluate the effect of screening cancer patients for psychological distress by assessing the (1) effectiveness of interventions to reduce distress among patients

  1. Self-Screening for Malnutrition Risk in Outpatient Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amindeep; Mosli, Mahmoud; Yan, Brian; Wu, Thomas; Gregor, Jamie; Chande, Nilesh; Ponich, Terry; Beaton, Melanie; Rahman, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is associated with poor outcomes. Our aim is to determine if patient self-administered malnutrition screening using the malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST) is reliable by comparing patient scores with those derived from the healthcare practitioner (HCP), the gold standard. We conducted a prospective validation study at a tertiary Canadian academic center that included 154 adult outpatients with IBD. All patients with IBD completed a self-administered nutrition screening assessment using the MUST score followed by an independent MUST assessment performed by HCPs. The main outcome measure was chance-corrected agreement (κ) of malnutrition risk categorization. For patient-administered MUST, the chance-corrected agreement κ (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 0.83 (0.74-0.92) when comparing low-risk and combined medium- and high-risk patients with HCP screening. Weighted κ analysis comparing all 3 risks groups yielded a κ (95% CI) of 0.85 (0.77-0.93) between patient and HCP screening. All patients were able to screen themselves. Overall, 96% of patients reported the MUST questionnaire as either very easy or easy to understand and to complete. Self-administered nutrition screening in outpatients with IBD is valid using the MUST screening tool and is easy to use. If adopted, this tool will increase utilization of malnutrition screening in hectic outpatient clinic settings and will help HCPs determine which patients require additional nutrition support. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  2. Noninvasive molecular screening for oral precancer in Fanconi anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Wu, Thijs; Brink, Arjen; Buijze, Marijke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Soulier, Jean; Leemans, C René; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-11-01

    LOH at chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 11q, and 17p are well-established oncogenetic aberrations in oral precancerous lesions and promising biomarkers to monitor the development of oral cancer. Noninvasive LOH screening of brushed oral cells is a preferable method for precancer detection in patients at increased risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), such as patients with Fanconi anemia. We determined the prevalence of LOH in brushed samples of the oral epithelium of 141 patients with Fanconi anemia and 144 aged subjects, and studied the association between LOH and HNSCC. LOH was present in 14 (9.9%) nontransplanted patients with Fanconi anemia, whereas LOH was not detected in a low-risk group (n = 50, >58 years, nonsmoking/nonalcohol history) and a group with somewhat increased HNSCC risk (n = 94, >58 years, heavy smoking/excessive alcohol use); Fisher exact test, P = 0.023 and P = 0.001, respectively. Most frequent genetic alteration was LOH at 9p. Age was a significant predictor of LOH (OR, 1.13, P = 0.001). Five patients with Fanconi anemia developed HNSCC during the study at a median age of 39.6 years (range, 24.8-53.7). LOH was significantly associated with HNSCC (Fisher exact test, P = 0.000). Unexpectedly, the LOH assay could not be used for transplanted patients with Fanconi anemia because donor DNA in brushed oral epithelium, most likely from donor leukocytes present in the oral cavity, disturbed the analysis. Noninvasive screening using a LOH assay on brushed samples of the oral epithelium has a promising outlook in patients with Fanconi anemia. However, assays need to be adapted in case of stem cell transplantation, because of contaminating donor DNA. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Touch-screen computerized education for patients with brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyk, M; Gaynor, S; Kelly, J; Ott, V

    1998-01-01

    The use of computer technology for patient education has increased in recent years. This article describes a study that measures the attitudes and perceptions of healthcare professionals and laypeople regarding the effectiveness of a multimedia computer, the Brain Injury Resource Center (BIRC), as an educational tool. The study focused on three major themes: (a) usefulness of the information presented, (b) effectiveness of the multimedia touch-screen computer methodology, and (c) the appropriate time for making this resource available. This prospective study, conducted in an acute care medical center, obtained healthcare professionals' evaluations using a written survey and responses from patients with brain injury and their families during interviews. The findings have yielded excellent ratings as to the ease of understanding and usefulness of the BIRC. By using sight, sound, and touch, such a multimedia learning center has the potential to simplify patient and family education.

  4. [Nutritional risk screening and nutrition assessment for gastrointestinal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yan-ping; Li, Ling-ling; He, Qing; Li, Yun; Song, Hu; Lin, Yi-jia; Peng, Jun-sheng

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the nutritional status, and provide evidence for nutritional treatment option. A total of 452 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were selected, including 156 gastric cancer,117 colon cancer, and 180 rectal cancer. The nutritional risk screening 2002(NRS2002) was applied to grade the nutritional risk. A multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to measure the patients' body composition. Albumin (Alb), prealbumin(PA), transferring(Tf), retinol binding protein(RBP), red blood cell(RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit(Hct) were measured after fasting. The rate of patients with NRS2002 score more than 3 was 70.5%(110/156) for gastric cancer, 53.8%(63/117) for colon cancer, and 46.7%(86/180) for rectal cancer. The score for impaired nutritional status more than 1 for gastric cancer was higher than that for colorectal cancer(Pgastric cancer(Pgastric cancer patients as compared to colorectal cancer patients(Pgastric cancer patients(Pgastric cancer and colon cancer(Pgastric cancer are prone to fat loss and therefore have a higher nutritional risk and malnutrition than those with colorectal cancer. Combination of body composition analysis and laboratory examination may achieve comprehensive evaluation of the nutritional status of patients, and provide the evidence of nutritional therapy by being combined with NRS2002 score.

  5. Effect of adding screening ultrasonography to screening mammography on patient recall and cancer detection rates: A retrospective study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohno, Eriko; Umemoto, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kyoko; Morishima, Isamu; Ueno, Ei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adding screening ultrasonography to screening mammography can reduce patient recall rates and increase cancer detection rates. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of mammography and ultrasonography breast screenings performed at the Total Health Evaluation Center Tsukuba, Japan, between April 2011 and March 2012. We also reviewed the modalities and results of diagnostic examinations from women with mammographic abnormalities who visited the Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital for further testing. Results: Of 11,753 women screened, cancer was diagnosed in 10 (0.22%) of the 4529 participants who underwent mammography alone, 23 (0.37%) of the 6250 participants who underwent ultrasonography alone, and 5 (0.51%) of the 974 participants who underwent mammography and ultrasonography. The recall rate due to mammographic abnormalities was 4.9% for women screened only with mammography and 2.6% for those screened with both modalities. The cancer detection rate was 0.22% for women screened only with mammography (positive predictive value, 4.5%) and 0.31% for those screened with both modalities (positive predictive value, 12.0%). Of the 211 lesions presenting as mammographic abnormalities investigated further, diagnostic ultrasonography found no abnormalities in 63 (29.9%) and benign findings in 69 (33.7%). The rest 36.4% needed mammography, cytological or histological examinations or follow-up in addition to diagnostic ultrasonography. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the recall rate in screening mammography by combining mammography and ultrasonography for breast screening

  6. Metabolic complications of endogenous Cushing: patient selection for screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh E Belaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: this study evaluates the most common associations of symptoms and complications in patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS in order to choose a potential population to be screened for CS and estimates the diagnostic accuracy of first line screening tests (cortisol, ACTH to differentiate ACTH-ectopic CS from Cushing’s disease. Materials and Methods: The clinical data of 259 patients with proven CS during 2001–2011 was analyzed. The clinical presentations of 197 patients (159 Cushing’s disease, 28 ACTH-ectopic CS and 10 cases of benign cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma were compared according to the cause of hypercortisolism. ROC-analysis was performed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the first line tests (cortisol, ACTH to suggest ACTH-ectopic CS. A threshold for the test with the highest area under the curves was chosen based on the maximum sum of the sensitivity and specificity. Results: The most frequent complaints were related to fatigue, muscle weakness, weight gain and changes in appearance (facial plethora and fullness, striae. Among the complications of CS the most frequent were being overweight or obese (71%, hypertension (63%, dislipoproteinemia (41%, low traumatic fractures (43% and steroid-induced diabetes (31%. In women, 16% were older than 50, in those who were younger amenorrhea was registered in 43%. The patients with ACTH-ectopic CS had higher rate of low traumatic fractures (p=0.04, increased serum late-night cortisol, 24 hours urinary free cortisol, morning and evening ACTH and lower levels of potassium (p<0.01 for all parameters. Plasma late-night ACTH measurements showed the highest AUC (0,811 (95% CI 0,712–0,909 to differentiate ACTH-ectopic CS from Cushing’s disease. A cut off value of 108.9 pg/ml for late-night ACTH yielded a sensitivity of 60,7% and a specificity of 79%. Conclusions: patients with a coexistence of obesity, muscle weakness, fatigue, some components of metabolic syndrome and especially

  7. Nutrition screening by MUST on the oncological patient in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paula Acevedo Souza dos; Cunha, Tamires Regina da Silva; Soares, Bruna Lucia de Mendonca; Maio, Regiane; Burgos, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy contributes to the reduction of food intake and increased weight loss due to the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms, which consequently leads to malnutrition. Objective: Identify nutritional risk through the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), in patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Method: Cross-sectional study with outpatients at the radiotherapy service of the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, during October 2014 until May 2015. Socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol use and physical activity), anthropometric variables (habitual weight, current weight and body mass index), comorbidities (hypertension and diabetes), tumor type, time since diagnosis and duration of treatment were evaluated. Nutritional risk was assessed using the MUST, which classifies patients as being at low, medium or high nutritional risk. Results: 150 patients were studied with an average age of 47.3 years, with a predominance of women (72%) and similar proportions of adults and elderly individuals. The sample mainly comprised individuals from in-state regions and inactive/retired individuals who received one to three times the minimum salary. Nutritional risk was significantly higher among elderly individuals (62.9%), among whom high risk predominated (45.7%), whereas most adults had no risk (61.2%). The most frequent tumors were gynecological (59.4%) with weight gain (33.3%), followed by tumors of the head and neck region with a high degree of weight loss (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The use of MUST led to the detection of nutritional risk in 50% of the studied patients, with a predominance of elderly individuals, the majority of whom were at high risk. Tumors of the head and neck led to weight loss, whereas gynecological tumors led to weight gain. Out-patient nutritional screening is important for the early establishment of specialized nutritional counseling. (author)

  8. Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis Should Be Screened for Clostridium difficile Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Sammy; Alper, Theodore; Sernas, Ernesto; Pruthi, Paridhima; Alper, Mikhail A; Sundaram, Vinay

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important public health problem in hospitalized patients. Patients with cirrhosis are particularly at risk of increased associated morbidity, mortality, and healthcare utilization from CDI. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacoeconomic impact of CDI screening on hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. A Markov model was used to compare costs and outcomes of two strategies for the screening of CDI. The first strategy consisted of screening all patients for CDI and treating if detected (screening). In the second strategy, only patients found to have symptomatic CDI were treated (no screening). The probability of underlying CDI prevalence, symptomatic CDI infection, and likelihood of recurrent infection were varied in a sensitivity analysis. The costs of antibiotics and hospitalization were also assessed. Differences in outcome were expressed in ratio of the total costs associated with screening to the total costs associated without screening. The results of our model showed that screening for CDI was consistently associated with improved healthcare outcomes and decreased healthcare utilization across all variables in the one- and two-way sensitivity analyses. Using baseline assumptions, the costs associated with the no screening strategy were 3.54 times that of the screening strategy. Moreover, the mortality for symptomatic CDI was lower in the screening strategy than the no screening strategy. The screening strategy results in less healthcare utilization and improved clinical outcomes. Screening for CDI measures favorably.

  9. Importance of early nutritional screening in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Cecilia; Colatruglio, Silvia; Sironi, Alessandro; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosalba

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between nutritional status, disease stage and quality of life (QoL) in 100 patients recently diagnosed with gastric carcinoma. The patients' nutritional status was investigated with anthropometric, biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables; and we also evaluated the nutritional risk with the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Oncological staging was standard. QoL was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy questionnaire. The statistical correlation between nutritional risk score (NRS) and oncological characteristics or QoL was evaluated using both univariable and multivariable analyses. Weight loss and reduction of food intake were the most frequent pathological nutritional indicators, while biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables were in the normal range. According to NRS, thirty-six patients were malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Patients with NRS ≥ 3 presented a significantly greater percentage of stage IV gastric cancer and pathological values of C-reactive protein, while no correlation was found with the site of tumour. NRS was negatively associated with QoL (P gastric cancer malnutrition is frequent at diagnosis and this is likely due to reduction in food intake. Moreover, NRS is directly correlated with tumour stage and inversely correlated with QoL, which makes it a useful tool to identify patients in need of an early nutritional intervention during oncological treatments.

  10. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nato, Alejandro Q. Jr.

    2003-03-01

    endeavor of utilizing these prior probability models as pre-genetic test screening tools has huge potential to minimize the expenses of relatives of BC patients who want to undergo genetic testing, as well as, to reduce unnecessary tests performed in genetic screening laboratories. The success of BRCA1 genetic testing depends on the collaboration among scientists, medical practitioners and professionals in related institutions nationwide. (Author)

  11. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nato, Jr, Alejandro Q

    2003-03-01

    pioneering endeavor of utilizing these prior probability models as pre-genetic test screening tools has huge potential to minimize the expenses of relatives of BC patients who want to undergo genetic testing, as well as, to reduce unnecessary tests performed in genetic screening laboratories. The success of BRCA1 genetic testing depends on the collaboration among scientists, medical practitioners and professionals in related institutions nationwide. (Author)

  12. Patient understanding of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines: need for development of patient decision aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Summer V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to examine patients’ understanding of the revised screening mammogram guidelines released by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF in 2009 addressing age at initiation and frequency of screening mammography. Methods Patients from the Departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Obstetrics and Gynecology (n = 150 at a tertiary care medical center in the United States completed a survey regarding their understanding of the revised USPSTF guidelines following their release, within four to six months of their scheduled mammogram (March 2010 to May 2010. Results Of the patients surveyed, 97/147 (67% indicated increased confusion regarding the age and frequency of screening mammography, 61/148 (41% reported increased anxiety about mammograms, and 58/146 (40% reported anxiety about their own health status following the release of the revised screening guidelines. Most of the patients surveyed, 111/148 (75%, did not expect to change their timing or frequency of screening mammograms in the future. Conclusion Results from this survey suggested increased confusion and possibly an increase in patients’ anxiety related to screening mammography and their own health status following the release of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines to the public and subsequent media portrayal of the revised guidelines. Although the study did not specifically address causality for these findings, the results highlight the need for improvements in the communication of guidelines to patients and the public. Development of shared decision-making tools and outcomes should be considered to address the communication challenge.

  13. Direct mailing was a successful recruitment strategy for a lung-cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Lisa B; Jackson, Sharon A; Chen, Michael Y

    2007-08-01

    To analyze advertising, recruitment methods, and study participant demographics for the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) site at Wake Forest University School of Medicine to define efficient ways to recruit participants for general clinical trials. Recruitment method data, demographics, geographic location, and date of enrollment were collected from all 1,112 NLST participants. Marketing data and financial records were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of each recruitment method. The total amount spent on advertising was $144,668, with the cost of enrollment per participant averaging $130. For black participants, the recruitment cost per person was $406, whereas for white and other race participants, the cost was $122 (PTV ads cost $382 per participant. Direct mailing to a targeted group was the most efficient way to recruit participants. Printed advertising methods, that is, newspaper ads and brochures, were quite effective, whereas television ads were expensive. Appropriate minority recruitment needs sufficient attention and resources to ensure census groups are adequately represented.

  14. Reliability of Patient-Led Screening with the Malnutrition Screening Tool: Agreement between Patient and Health Care Professional Scores in the Cancer Care Ambulatory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Alexandra; Blake, Claire; Young, Adrienne; Pelecanos, Anita; Brown, Teresa

    2018-02-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition in patients with cancer is reported as high as 60% to 80%, and malnutrition is associated with lower survival, reduced response to treatment, and poorer functional status. The Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST) is a validated tool when administered by health care professionals; however, it has not been evaluated for patient-led screening. This study aims to assess the reliability of patient-led MST screening through assessment of inter-rater reliability between patient-led and dietitian-researcher-led screening and intra-rater reliability between an initial and a repeat patient screening. This cross-sectional study included 208 adults attending ambulatory cancer care services in a metropolitan teaching hospital in Queensland, Australia, in October 2016 (n=160 inter-rater reliability; n=48 intra-rater reliability measured in a separate sample). Primary outcome measures were MST risk categories (MST 0-1: not at risk, MST ≥2: at risk) as determined by screening completed by patients and a dietitian-researcher, patient test-retest screening, and patient acceptability. Percent and chance-corrected agreement (Cohen's kappa coefficient, κ) were used to determine agreement between patient-MST and dietitian-MST (inter-rater reliability) and MST completed by patient on admission to unit (patient-MSTA) and MST completed by patient 1 to 3 hours after completion of initial MST (patient-MSTB) (intra-rater reliability). High inter-rater reliability and intra-rater reliability were observed. Agreement between patient-MST and dietitian-MST was 96%, with "almost perfect" chance-adjusted agreement (κ=0.92, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97). Agreement between repeated patient-MSTA and patient-MSTB was 94%, with "almost perfect" chance-adjusted agreement (κ=0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.00). Based on dietitian-MST, 33% (n=53) of patients were identified as being at risk for malnutrition, and 40% of these reported not seeing a dietitian. Of 156 patients who provided

  15. Oncology patient-reported claims: maximising the chance for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, H; Rofail, D; Caron, M; Emery, M-P

    2011-01-01

    To review Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) labelling claims achieved in oncology in Europe and in the United States and consider the benefits, and challenges faced. PROLabels database was searched to identify oncology products with PRO labelling approved in Europe since 1995 or in the United States since 1998. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) websites and guidance documents were reviewed. PUBMED was searched for articles on PRO claims in oncology. Among all oncology products approved, 22 were identified with PRO claims; 10 in the United States, 7 in Europe, and 5 in both. The language used in the labelling was limited to benefit (e.g. "…resulted in symptom benefits by significantly prolonging time to deterioration in cough, dyspnoea, and pain, versus placebo") and equivalence (e.g. "no statistical differences were observed between treatment groups for global QoL"). Seven products used a validated HRQoL tool; two used symptom tools; two used both; seven used single-item symptom measures (one was unknown). The following emerged as likely reasons for success: ensuring systematic PRO data collection; clear rationale for pre-specified endpoints; adequately powered trials to detect differences and clinically significant changes; adjusting for multiplicity; developing an a priori statistical analysis plan including primary and subgroup analyses, dealing with missing data, pooling multiple-site data; establishing clinical versus statistical significance; interpreting failure to detect change. End-stage patient drop-out rates and cessation of trials due to exceptional therapeutic benefit pose significant challenges to demonstrating treatment PRO improvement. PRO labelling claims demonstrate treatment impact and the trade-off between efficacy and side effects ultimately facilitating product differentiation. Reliable and valid instruments specific to the desired language, claim, and target population are required. Practical

  16. Effectiveness of relaxation techniques before diagnostic screening of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Aiger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysiological arousal was observed in cancer patients during the application of relaxation techniques prior to a diagnostic scan (PET-CT. The aim of the study is twofold: firstly, it is sought to establish whether such techniques can minimize patient arousal before diagnostic screening begins, and secondly to measure which of them are most effective. The dependent variable is electrodermal activity, recording the attentional level and emotional response, and the independent variable comprises the relaxation techniques used, namely Jacobson, breathing and visualization. The 39 patients were split into experimental groups to whom the relaxation techniques (Jacobson, breathing exercises, and visualization were applied before they went for the PET-CT. An activity-module procedure was applied to track electrodermal activity during the relaxation sessions, consisting of instructions, timeout; wait, task; relaxation and end of the recording session. The control group received no relaxation techniques before the PET-CT. Session-end results show that patients who perform relaxation techniques achieve greater attentional focus using Jacobson's technique (M = .212 and enhanced emotional containment using visualization (M = .206. It is concluded that relaxation techniques minimize the state of activation during the waiting period before a diagnostic scan.

  17. Development of a self-administered questionnaire to screen patients for cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiguchi Yasufumi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary care, it is often difficult to diagnose cervical myelopathy. However, a delay in treatment could cause irreversible aftereffects. With a brief and effective self-administered questionnaire for cervical myelopathy, cervical myelopathy may be screened more easily and oversight may be avoided. As there is presently no screening tool for cervical myelopathy, the aim of this study was to develop a self-administered questionnaire for the screening of cervical myelopathy. Methods A case-control study was performed with the following two groups at our university hospital from February 2006 to September 2008. Sixty-two patients (48 men, 14 women with cervical myelopathy who underwent operative treatment were included in the myelopathy group. In the control group, 49 patients (20 men, 29 women with symptoms that could be distinguished from those of cervical myelopathy, such as numbness, pain in the upper extremities, and manual clumsiness, were included. The underlying conditions were diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, diabetes mellitus neuropathy, cervical radiculopathy, and neuralgic amyotrophy. Twenty items for a questionnaire in this study were chosen from the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, which is a new self-administered questionnaire, as an outcome measure for patients with cervical myelopathy. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis using the chi-square test and by multiple logistic regression analysis. According to the resulting odds ratio, β-coefficients, and p value, items were chosen and assigned a score. Results Eight items were chosen by univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses and assigned a score. The Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic showed p = 0.805. The area under the receiver operation characteristic curve was 0.86. The developed questionnaire had a sensitivity of 93.5% and a

  18. Determinants of polyp Size in patients undergoing screening colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisonneuve Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-existing polyps, especially large polyps, are known to be the major source for colorectal cancer, but there is limited available information about factors that are associated with polyp size and polyp growth. We aim to determine factors associated with polyp size in different age groups. Methods Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States between 2002 and 2007 using a computer-generated endoscopic report form. Data were transmitted to and stored in a central data repository, where all asymptomatic white (n = 78352 and black (n = 4289 patients who had a polyp finding on screening colonoscopy were identified. Univariate and multivariate analysis of age, gender, performance site, race, polyp location, number of polyps, and family history as risk factors associated with the size of the largest polyp detected at colonoscopy. Results In both genders, size of the largest polyp increased progressively with age in all age groups (P P Conclusions In both genders there is a significant increase in polyp size detected during screening colonoscopy with increasing age. Important additional risk factors associated with increasing polyp size are gender, race, polyp location, and number of polyps, with polyp multiplicity being the strongest risk factor. Previous family history of bowel cancer was not a risk factor.

  19. Comprehensive Molecular Screening in Chinese Usher Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tengyang; Xu, Ke; Ren, Yanfan; Xie, Yue; Zhang, Xiaohui; Tian, Lu; Li, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) refers to a group of autosomal recessive disorders causing deafness and blindness. The objectives of this study were to determine the mutation spectrum in a cohort of Chinese patients with USH and to describe the clinical features of the patients with mutations. A total of 119 probands who were clinically diagnosed with USH were recruited for genetic analysis. All probands underwent ophthalmic examinations. A combination of molecular screening methods, including targeted next-generation sequencing, Sanger-DNA sequencing, and multiplex ligation probe amplification assay, was used to detect mutations. We found biallelic mutations in 92 probands (77.3%), monoallelic mutations in 5 patients (4.2%), and 1 hemizygous mutation in 1 patient (0.8%), resulting in an overall mutation detection rate of 78.2%. Overall, 132 distinct disease-causing mutations involving seven USH (ABHD12, CDH23, GPR98, MYO7A, PCDH15, USH1C, and USH2A) genes; 5 other retinal degeneration genes (CHM, CNGA1, EYS, PDE6B, and TULP1); and 1 nonsyndromic hearing loss gene (MYO15A) were identified, and 78 were novel. Mutations of MYOA7 were responsible for 60% of USH1 families, followed by PCDH15 (20%) and USH1C (10%). Mutations of USH2A accounted for 67.7% of USH2 families, and mutation c.8559-2A>G was the most frequent one, accounting for 19.1% of the identified USH2A alleles. Our results confirm that the mutation spectrum for each USH gene in Chinese patients differs from those of other populations. The formation of the mutation profile for the Chinese population will enable a precise genetic diagnosis for USH patients in the future.

  20. Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise.

  1. Effects of Screening for Psychological Distress on Patient Outcomes in Cancer: a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Milette, Katherine; Levis, Brooke; Syamchandra, Achyuth; Stefanek, Michael E.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Thombs, Brett D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Several practice guidelines recommend routine screening for psychological distress in cancer care. The objective was to evaluate the effect of screening cancer patients for psychological distress by assessing the (1) effectiveness of interventions to reduce distress among patients identified as distressed; and (2) effects of screening for distress on distress outcomes. Methods CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, ISI, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS databases were searched through April 6, 2011 with manual searches of 45 relevant journals, reference list review, citation tracking of included articles, and trial registry reviews through June 30, 2012. Articles in any language on cancer patients were included if they (1) compared treatment for patients with psychological distress to placebo or usual care in a randomized controlled trial (RCT); or (2) assessed the effect of screening on psychological distress in a RCT. Results There were 14 eligible RCTs for treatment of distress, and 1 RCT on the effects of screening on patient distress. Pharmacological, psychotherapy and collaborative care interventions generally reduced distress with small to moderate effects. One study investigated effects of screening for distress on psychological outcomes, and it found no improvement. Conclusion Treatment studies reported modest improvement in distress symptoms, but only a single eligible study was found on the effects of screening cancer patients for distress, and distress did not improve in screened patients versus those receiving usual care. Because of the lack of evidence of beneficial effects of screening cancer patients for distress, it is premature to recommend or mandate implementation of routine screening. PMID:23751231

  2. Prospective use of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor to screen TB co-infected with HIV patient among TB patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Plasma suPAR level of TB patients co-infected with HIV showed significantly difference from that of TB-AFB(+ patients suggested its potential to screen the TB/HIV among pulmonary TB-AFB(+ patients.

  3. Successful application of virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations against antimalarial molecular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rachide Nunes

    Full Text Available The main challenge in the control of malaria has been the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. The presence of drug-resistant Plasmodium sp. has raised the need for new antimalarial drugs. Molecular modelling techniques have been used as tools to develop new drugs. In this study, we employed virtual screening of a pyrazol derivative (Tx001 against four malaria targets: plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, falcipain-II, and PfATP6. The receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC were established for each molecular target. The AUC values obtained for plasmepsin-IV, plasmepsin-II, and falcipain-II were 0.64, 0.92, and 0.94, respectively. All docking simulations were carried out using AutoDock Vina software. The ligand Tx001 exhibited a better interaction with PfATP6 than with the reference compound (-12.2 versus -6.8 Kcal/mol. The Tx001-PfATP6 complex was submitted to molecular dynamics simulations in vacuum implemented on an NAMD program. The ligand Tx001 docked at the same binding site as thapsigargin, which is a natural inhibitor of PfATP6. Compound TX001 was evaluated in vitro with a P. falciparum strain (W2 and a human cell line (WI-26VA4. Tx001 was discovered to be active against P. falciparum (IC50 = 8.2 µM and inactive against WI-26VA4 (IC50 > 200 µM. Further ligand optimisation cycles generated new prospects for docking and biological assays.

  4. Screening for substance abuse risk in cancer patients using the Opioid Risk Tool and urine drug screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Joshua S; Owens, Justine E; Blackhall, Leslie J

    2014-07-01

    The use of opioids for management of cancer-related pain has increased significantly and has been associated with a substantial rise in rates of substance abuse and diversion. There is a paucity of data not only on the prevalence of substance abuse in cancer patients, but also for issues of drug use and diversion in family caregivers. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of risk factors for substance abuse and diversion, and abnormal urine drug screens in cancer patients receiving palliative care. A retrospective chart review was performed for patients with cancer who were seen in the University of Virginia Palliative Care Clinic during the month of September 2012. We evaluated Opioid Risk Tool variables and total scores, insurance status, and urine drug screen results. Of the 114 cancer patients seen in September 2012, the mean Opioid Risk Tool score was 3.79, with 43% of patients defined as medium to high risk. Age (16-45 years old, 23%) and a personal history of alcohol (23%) or illicit drugs (21%) were the most common risk factors identified. We obtained a urine drug screen on 40% of patients, noting abnormal findings in 45.65%. Opioids are an effective treatment for cancer-related pain, yet substantial risk for substance abuse exits in the cancer population. Screening tools, such as the Opioid Risk Tool, should be used as part of a complete patient assessment to balance risk with appropriate relief of suffering.

  5. Focused use of drug screening in overdose patients increases impact on management.

    OpenAIRE

    Erdmann, A.; Werner, D.; Hugli, O.; Yersin, B.

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Drug poisoning is a common cause for attendance in the emergency department. Several toxicology centres suggest performing urinary drug screens, even though they rarely influence patient management. STUDY OBJECTIVES: Measuring the impact on patient management, in a University Emergency Department with approximately 40 000 admissions annually, of a rapid urinary drug screening test using specifically focused indications. Drug screening was restricted to patients having a first p...

  6. Hepatitis A and B screening and vaccination rates among patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jonathan C; Ackerman, Kimberly; Strain, Sasha C; Ahmed, Syed T; de Los Santos, Mario J; Sears, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinations against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are recommended for patients with chronic liver disease (CLD), yet implementation of these recommendations is lacking. This study reviewed HAV and HBV antibody testing and vaccination status of patients with CLD. In 2008, we began using pre-printed liver order sets, which included vaccination options. We compared Scott & White liver clinic CLD patient records from 2005 (238) with patient records from 2008 (792). Screening rates for immunity and vaccination rates of those lacking immunity were calculated. In 2005, 66% of CLD patients were screened for HAV immunity. In 2008, 56% of CLD patients were screened. The HAV vaccination completion rate was 37% in 2005, while in 2008, the rate was 46%. In 2005, 66% of CLD patients were screened for HBV immunity; in 2008, 56 % CLD patients were screened. The HBV vaccination completion rate was 26% in 2005 compared with 36% in 2008. Although there was a lower percentage of screening in 2008, the overall number of patients tripled between 2005 and 2008. There was a significant increase in the total number of patients screened and vaccinated in 2008. Some physicians may have vaccinated their patients without checking for immunity. In January 2008, we implemented pre-printed order sets with checkboxes to help remind providers to order labs to screen for immunity against HAV and HBV and to order vaccinations for those who lacked immunity. The use of these sets may have aided in the increase of vaccination completion rates.

  7. Assessment of Jordanian Patient's Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Preferences towards CRC Screening: Are Jordanians Ready to Embrace CRC Screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Suha; Barakat, Husam; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Bashaireh, Ibrahim; Batiha, Abdul-Moni'm

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC is increasingly becoming a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in Jordan. However the population's level of awareness about CRC, CRC screening test preferences and willingness to embrace screening are not known. The aim of this study was to assess the level of CRC awareness and screening preferences among Jordanian patients. A survey assessing the CRC knowledge levels was distributed among patients attending outpatient gastroenterology clinics in public hospitals throughout Jordan. A total of 800 surveys were distributed and of these 713 (89.1%) were returned. Only 22% of the participants correctly judged CRC among the choices provided as the commonest cause of cancer related deaths. The majority of participants (68.3%) underestimated their risk for CRC. Only 26.8% correctly judged their life time risk while 5% overestimated their risk. Two thirds of participants (66%) were willing to pay 500 Jordanian Dinars (equivalent to 706 US$) in order to get a prompt colonoscopy if recommended by their physician, while 25.5% reported that they would rather wait for 6 months in order to get a free colonoscopy. Although the participants tended to underestimate their risk for CRC, they were mostly aware of CRC as a major cause of mortality and were willing to embrace the concept of CRC screening and bear the related financial costs. These findings about CRC awareness and propensity for screening provide a good foundation as the Jordanian health system moves forward with initiatives to promote CRC screening and prevention.

  8. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in patients with severe psoriasis with suboptimal performance of screening questionnaires.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among Psoriasis (Ps) patients attending dermatology clinics; (2) identify clinical predictors of the development of PsA; and (3) compare the performance of three PsA screening questionnaires: Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE), Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis Screening (ToPAS).

  9. Pinning down high-performance Cu-chalcogenides as thin-film solar cell absorbers: A successive screening approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Wenqing, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu [Materials Genome Institute and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Jiawei; Xi, Lili [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Peihong, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu [Materials Genome Institute and Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    Photovoltaic performances of Cu-chalcogenides solar cells are strongly correlated with the absorber fundamental properties such as optimal bandgap, desired band alignment with window material, and high photon absorption ability. According to these criteria, we carry out a successive screening for 90 Cu-chalcogenides using efficient theoretical approaches. Besides the well-recognized CuInSe{sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} materials, several novel candidates are identified to have optimal bandgaps of around 1.0–1.5 eV, spike-like band alignments with CdS window layer, sharp photon absorption edges, and high absorption coefficients. These new systems have great potential to be superior absorbers for photovolatic applications if their carrrier transport and defect properties are properly optimized.

  10. Patients' Experiences of Nurse-Led Screening for Cardiovascular Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Jannie Christina; Primdahl, Jette

    2015-01-01

    organization of screening programmes. METHODS: Three qualitative focus group interviews were carried out with 14 outpatients diagnosed with RA. The participants were stratified into groups, depending on whether they had a low-to-moderate or high ten-year risk of cardiovascular death according to the European...... screening programmes for CVD for patients with RA, it is important that the screening consultation is individualized and tailored to patients' needs and their RA. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  11. Patient and provider characteristics associated with colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening among Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Caroline A.; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Chan, Albert; Chan, John K.; McClellan, Sean R.; Chung, Sukyung; Olson, Cliff; Nimbal, Vani; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Routinely recommended screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers can significantly reduce mortality from these types of cancer, yet screening is underutilized among Asians. Surveys rely on self-report and often are underpowered for analysis by Asian ethnicities. Electronic health records include validated (as opposed to recall-based) rates of cancer screening. In this paper we seek to better understand cancer screening patterns in a population of insured Asian Americans. METHODS We calculated rates of compliance with cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening among Asians from an EHR population, and compared them to non-Hispanic whites. We performed multivariable modeling to evaluate potential predictors (at the provider- and patient- level) of screening completion among Asian patients. RESULTS Aggregation of Asian subgroups masked heterogeneity in screening rates. Asian Indians and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders had the lowest rates of screening in our sample, well below that of non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable analyses, screening completion was negatively associated with patient-physician language discordance for mammography (OR:0.81 95% CI:0.71–0.92) and colorectal cancer screening (OR:0.79 CI:0.72–0.87) and positively associated with patient-provider gender concordance for mammography (OR:1.16 CI:1.00–1.34) and cervical cancer screening (OR:1.66 CI:1.51–1.82). Additionally, patient enrollment in online health services increased mammography (OR:1.32 CI:1.20–1.46) and cervical cancer screening (OR:1.31 CI:1.24–1.37). CONCLUSIONS Language- and gender- concordant primary care providers, and culturally tailored online health resources may help improve preventive cancer screening in Asian patient populations. IMPACT This study demonstrates how use of EHR data can inform investigations of primary prevention practices within the healthcare delivery setting. PMID:25368396

  12. Patient and provider characteristics associated with colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening among Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Caroline A; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Chan, Albert; Chan, John K; McClellan, Sean R; Chung, Sukyung; Olson, Cliff; Nimbal, Vani; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2014-11-01

    Routinely recommended screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers can significantly reduce mortality from these types of cancer, yet screening is underutilized among Asians. Surveys rely on self-report and often are underpowered for analysis by Asian ethnicities. Electronic health records (EHR) include validated (as opposed to recall-based) rates of cancer screening. In this article, we seek to better understand cancer screening patterns in a population of insured Asian Americans. We calculated rates of compliance with cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening among Asians from an EHR population and compared them with non-Hispanic whites. We performed multivariable modeling to evaluate potential predictors (at the provider- and patient-level) of screening completion among Asian patients. Aggregation of Asian subgroups masked heterogeneity in screening rates. Asian Indians and native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders had the lowest rates of screening in our sample, well below that of non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable analyses, screening completion was negatively associated with patient-physician language discordance for mammography [OR, 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.71-0.92] and colorectal cancer screening (OR, 0.79; CI, 0.72-0.87) and positively associated with patient-provider gender concordance for mammography (OR, 1.16; CI, 1.00-1.34) and cervical cancer screening (OR, 1.66; CI, 1.51-1.82). In addition, patient enrollment in online health services increased mammography (OR, 1.32; CI, 1.20-1.46) and cervical cancer screening (OR, 1.31; CI, 1.24-1.37). Language- and gender-concordant primary care providers and culturally tailored online health resources may help improve preventive cancer screening in Asian patient populations. This study demonstrates how the use of EHR data can inform investigations of primary prevention practices within the healthcare delivery setting. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. A Patient with Localized Scleroderma Successfully Treated with Etretinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Ikeda, Takaharu; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2014-01-01

    There are several treatment methods for localized scleroderma, but treatment is difficult when the lesion is widely distributed. We encountered a case who was treated successfully with etretinate, a vitamin A derivative. The usefulness of this agent is discussed. PMID:25408646

  14. A Patient with Localized Scleroderma Successfully Treated with Etretinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Shima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are several treatment methods for localized scleroderma, but treatment is difficult when the lesion is widely distributed. We encountered a case who was treated successfully with etretinate, a vitamin A derivative. The usefulness of this agent is discussed.

  15. Interior design criteria for successful hospital patient rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Bilir, Seda

    1997-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and Institute of Fine Arts of Bilkent University, 1997. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1997. Includes bibliographical references leaves 94-99 In this study, the design requirements of hospital acute-care patient rooms, which support the recovery and well-being of the patients, are examined. Patients' psycho-spatial needs which may be complementary to the healing effects of the medical treatme...

  16. Development of an inter-professional screening instrument for cancer patients' education process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaartio-Rajalin, Heli; Huumonen, Tuula; Iire, Liisa; Jekunen, Antti; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Minn, Heikki; Paloniemi, Jenni; Zabalegui, Adelaida

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of an inter-professional screening instrument for cancer patients' cognitive resources, knowledge expectations and inter-professional collaboration within patient education. Four empirical datasets during 2012-2014 were analyzed in order to identify main categories, subcategories and items for inter-professional screening instrument. Our inter-professional screening instrument integrates the critical moments of cancer patient education and the knowledge expectation types obtained from patient datasets to assessment of patients' cognitive resources, knowledge expectations and comprehension; and intra; and inter-professional. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of a patient navigation program to promote colorectal cancer screening in rural Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Sally; Green, Rhonda; Ballard, Denise; Hermstad, April; Brueder, Alex; Haardörfer, Regine; Yam, Jennifer; Arriola, Kimberly J

    2013-08-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Early detection through recommended screening has been shown to have favorable treatment outcomes, yet screening rates among the medically underserved and uninsured are low, particularly for rural and minority populations. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a patient navigation program that addresses individual and systemic barriers to CRC screening for patients at rural, federally qualified community health centers. This quasi-experimental evaluation compared low-income patients at average risk for CRC (n = 809) from 4 intervention clinics and 9 comparison clinics. We abstracted medical chart data on patient demographics, CRC history and risk factors, and CRC screening referrals and examinations. Outcomes of interest were colonoscopy referral and examination during the study period and being compliant with recommended screening guidelines at the end of the study period. We conducted multilevel logistic analyses to evaluate the program's effectiveness. Patients at intervention clinics were significantly more likely than patients at comparison clinics to undergo colonoscopy screening (35% versus 7%, odds ratio = 7.9, P screening test (43% versus 11%, odds ratio = 5.9, P Screening Program, can be an effective approach to ensure that lifesaving, preventive health screenings are provided to low-income adults in a rural setting. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  18. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  19. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Having a skin exam to screen for skin cancer has not been shown to decrease your chance of dying from skin cancer. Learn about this and other tests that have been studied to detect or screen for skin cancer in this expert reviewed summary.

  20. Attitude of antenatal patients in Enugu toward HIV screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reason for declining HIV Screening was that AIDS has no known cure, followed by fear of positive result. Conclusion: The awareness and attitude of Nigeria pregnant women towards HIV Screening and uptake of the test is good. Educational level has a significant effect on the uptake and perceived benefit of the test.

  1. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach (gastric) cancer. Stomach (gastric) cancer is not common in the U.S. Learn about tests that have been studied to detect or screen for stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  2. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer screening is performed using mammogram, clinical breast exam (CBE), and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) tests. Learn about these and other tests that have been studied to detect or screen for breast cancer in this expert-reviewed and evidence-based summary.

  3. Depression screening and patient outcomes in cardiovascular care : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Whooley, Mary A.; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Mitchell, Alex J.; Zuidersma, Marij; Eze-Nliam, Chete; Lima, Bruno B.; Smith, Cheri G.; Soderlund, Karl; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2008-01-01

    Context Several practice guidelines recommend that depression be evaluated and treated in patients with cardiovascular disease, but the potential benefits of this are unclear. Objective To evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in patients with cardiovascular disease by assessing (

  4. Validation of screening tools to assess appetite among geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisah, R; Suzana, S; Lee, F S

    2012-07-01

    Poor appetite is one of the main contributing factors of poor nutritional status among elderly individuals. Recognizing the importance of assessment of appetite, a cross sectional study was conducted to determine the validity of appetite screening tools namely, the Council on Nutrition Appetite questionnaire (CNAQ) and the simplified nutritional appetite questionnaire (SNAQ) against the appetite, hunger and sensory perception questionnaire (AHSPQ), measures of nutritional status and food intake among geriatric patients at the main general hospital in Malaysia. Nutritional status was assessed using the subjective global assessment (SGA) while food intake was measured using the dietary history questionnaire (DHQ). Anthropometric parameters included weight, height, body mass index (BMI), calf circumference (CC) and mid upper arm circumference (MUAC). A total of 145 subjects aged 60 to 86 years (68.3 ± 5.8 years) with 31.7% men and 68.3% women were recruited from outpatients (35 subjects) and inpatients (110 subjects) of Kuala Lumpur Hospital of Malaysia. As assessed by SGA, most subjects were classified as mild to moderately malnourished (50.4%), followed by normal (38.6%) and severely malnourished (11.0%). A total of 79.3% and 57.2% subjects were classified as having poor appetite according to CNAQ and SNAQ, respectively. CNAQ (80.9%) had a higher sensitivity than SNAQ (69.7%) when validated against nutritional status as assessed using SGA. However, the specificity of SNAQ (62.5%) was higher than CNAQ (23.2%). Positive predictive value for CNAQ and SNAQ were 62.6% and 74.7%, respectively. Cronbach's alpha for CNAQ and SNAQ were 0.546 and 0.578, respectively. History of weight loss over the past one year (Adjusted odds ratio 2.49) (p risk factors for poor appetite among subjects. In conclusion, malnutrition and poor appetite were prevalent among the geriatric outpatients and inpatients. SNAQ was more reliable and valid as an appetite screening tool among this special

  5. The Screen-ICD trial. Screening for anxiety and cognitive therapy intervention for patients with implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Herning, Margrethe; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2016-01-01

    by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID). (3) Investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 randomisation to cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) performed by a cardiac nurse with CBT training, plus usual care or usual care alone...... of starting relevant intervention. Methods and analysis: Screen-ICD consists of 3 parts: (1) screening of all hospitalised and outpatient patients at two university hospitals using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), scores ≥8 are invited to participate. (2) Assessment of type of anxiety...

  6. In person versus computer screening for intimate partner violence among pregnant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Judy C; Dado, Diane; Schussler, Sara; Hawker, Lynn; Holland, Cynthia L; Burke, Jessica G; Cluss, Patricia A

    2012-09-01

    To compare in person versus computerized screening for intimate partner violence (IPV) in a hospital-based prenatal clinic and explore women's assessment of the screening methods. We compared patient IPV disclosures on a computerized questionnaire to audio-taped first obstetric visits with an obstetric care provider and performed semi-structured interviews with patient participants who reported experiencing IPV. Two-hundred and fifty patient participants and 52 provider participants were in the study. Ninety-one (36%) patients disclosed IPV either via computer or in person. Of those who disclosed IPV, 60 (66%) disclosed via both methods, but 31 (34%) disclosed IPV via only one of the two methods. Twenty-three women returned for interviews. They recommended using both types together. While computerized screening was felt to be non-judgmental and more anonymous, in person screening allowed for tailored questioning and more emotional connection with the provider. Computerized screening allowed disclosure without fear of immediate judgment. In person screening allows more flexibility in wording of questions regarding IPV and opportunity for interpersonal rapport. Both computerized or self-completed screening and in person screening is recommended. Providers should address IPV using non-judgmental, descriptive language, include assessments for psychological IPV, and repeat screening in person, even if no patient disclosure occurs via computer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Organizational Factors Affecting the Likelihood of Cancer Screening Among VA Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ann F; Rose, Danielle E; Farmer, Melissa; Canelo, Ismelda; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2015-12-01

    Preventive service delivery, including cancer screenings, continues to pose a challenge to quality improvement efforts. Although many studies have focused on person-level characteristics associated with screening, less is known about organizational influences on cancer screening. This study aims to understand the association between organizational factors and adherence to cancer screenings. This study employed a cross-sectional design using organizational-level, patient-level, and area-level data. Dependent variables included breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening. Organizational factors describing resource sufficiency were constructed using factor analyses from a survey of 250 Veterans Affairs primary care directors. We conducted random-effects logistic regression analyses, modeling cancer screening as a function of organizational factors, controlling for patient-level and area-level factors. Overall, 87% of the patients received mammograms, 92% received cervical and 78% had colorectal screening. Quality improvement orientation increased the odds of cervical [odds ratio (OR): 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.57] and colorectal cancer screening (OR: 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20). Authority in determining primary care components increased the odds of mammography screening (OR: 1.23; 95% CI, 1.03-1.51). Sufficiency in clinical staffing increased the odds of mammography and cervical cancer screenings. Several patient-level factors, serving as control variables, were associated with achievement of screenings. Resource sufficiency led to increased odds of screening possibly because they promote excellence in patient care by conveying organizational goals and facilitate goal achievement with resources. Complementary to patient-level factors, our findings identified organizational processes associated with better performance, which offer concrete strategies in which facilities can evaluate their capabilities to implement best practices to foster and

  8. Depression screening with patient-targeted feedback in cardiology: DEPSCREEN-INFO randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Bernd; Blankenberg, Stefan; Wegscheider, Karl; König, Hans-Helmut; Walter, Dirk; Murray, Alexandra M; Gierk, Benjamin; Kohlmann, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    International guidelines advocate depression screening in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and other chronic illnesses, but evidence is lacking. To test the differential efficacy of written patient-targeted feedback v. no written patient feedback after depression screening. Patients with CHD or hypertension from three cardiology settings were randomised and screened for depression (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01879111). Compared with the control group, where only cardiologists received written feedback, in the intervention group both cardiologists and patients received written feedback regarding depression status. Depression severity was measured 1 month (primary outcome) and 6 months after screening. The control group (n = 220) and the patient-feedback group (n = 155) did not differ in depression severity 1 month after screening. Six months after screening, the patient-feedback group showed significantly greater improvements in depression severity and was twice as likely to seek information about depression compared with the control group. Patient-targeted feedback in addition to screening has a significant but small effect on depression severity after 6 months and may encourage patients to take an active role in the self-management of depression. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  9. Breast cancer screening for severely disabled patients. Present status and future problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Kaneyuki

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the attendance rate for breast screening has been increasing in Japan. However, little is known about how to conduct effective breast cancer screening, especially for patients with mental disability. The purpose of this study was to clarify the present status of breast cancer screening for severely disabled patients. Breast screening was performed for 160 disabled patients by physical examination and ultrasound from 2002 to 2005. The patients included 158 women and two men, with an average age of 59 years old. Ten disabled patients (10/160; 6.3%) showed abnormal findings on physical examination and four (4/160; 2.5%) showed probably benign findings by ultrasound examination. Mammography (MMG) screening was performed for only 33 patients (33/160; 21%), one of whom needed further examination. One lesion was diagnosed as breast cancer (1/160; 0.63%). Breast ultrasound is useful for severely disabled patients because it is painless, easy and rapid to perform. On the other hand, it is sometimes difficult for such patients to participate in MMG screening because of their inability to adapt to the examination. Therefore, some psychological method, for example operant conditioning, will be necessary for breast screening of patients with severe mental disability. (author)

  10. In vitro patient-derived 3D mesothelioma tumor organoids facilitate patient-centric therapeutic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocchi, Andrea R; Rajan, Shiny A P; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Hall, Adam R; Skardal, Aleksander

    2018-02-13

    Variability in patient response to anti-cancer drugs is currently addressed by relating genetic mutations to chemotherapy through precision medicine. However, practical benefits of precision medicine to therapy design are less clear. Even after identification of mutations, oncologists are often left with several drug options, and for some patients there is no definitive treatment solution. There is a need for model systems to help predict personalized responses to chemotherapeutics. We have microengineered 3D tumor organoids directly from fresh tumor biopsies to provide patient-specific models with which treatment optimization can be performed before initiation of therapy. We demonstrate the initial implementation of this platform using tumor biospecimens surgically removed from two mesothelioma patients. First, we show the ability to biofabricate and maintain viable 3D tumor constructs within a tumor-on-a-chip microfluidic device. Second, we demonstrate that results of on-chip chemotherapy screening mimic those observed in subjects themselves. Finally, we demonstrate mutation-specific drug testing by considering the results of precision medicine genetic screening and confirming the effectiveness of the non-standard compound 3-deazaneplanocin A for an identified mutation. This patient-derived tumor organoid strategy is adaptable to a wide variety of cancers and may provide a framework with which to improve efforts in precision medicine oncology.

  11. Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are five types of tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer: fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy, and DNA stool test. Learn more about these and other tests in this expert-reviewed summary.

  12. Screening for microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes is incomplete in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Soren Tang; Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb; Hansen, Birtha

    2012-01-01

    screening for microalbuminuria. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 66.2 +/- 11.6 years and 58.7% were male. Only 57.2% of the patients had been screened for microalbuminuria with any method within the preceding 12 months period; of these 76.0% had normo- and 21.0% had microalbuminuria, whereas 3......INTRODUCTION: National Danish guidelines recommend screening for microalbuminuria with assessment of urinary albumin/creatinine ratio at least annually in patients with type 2 diabetes. To which extent such screening is actually performed is not known. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 2.......0% had overt proteinuria. In contrast, 97.6% of patients had had a minimum of one plasma-creatinine measurement within the past year. CONCLUSION: In Danish primary care, screening for microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes is insufficiently implemented, whereas renal function is evaluated in almost all...

  13. Screening for carcinoma in situ in the contralateral testicle in patients with testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, M G G; Lauritsen, Jakob; Almstrup, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    population-based screening programme for contralateral CIS in patients with testicular cancer showed no significant difference in the risk for metachronous GCC between a screened and an unscreened cohort. Single-site biopsy including modern immunohistochemistry does not identify all cases of CIS.......BACKGROUND: Screening programmes for contralateral carcinoma in situ (CIS) testis in patients with unilateral germ-cell cancer (GCC) have never been evaluated. We investigated the effect of screening for contralateral CIS in a large nation-wide, population-based study. PATIENTS AND METHODS...... years was 1.9% in the screened cohort and 3.1% in the unscreened cohort (P = 0.097), hazard ratio (HR) for the unscreened cohort: 1.59 (P = 0.144). Expert revision with contemporary methodology of CIS-negative biopsy samples from patients with metachronous cancer revealed CIS in 17 out of 45 (38%) cases...

  14. The relative importance of patient-reported barriers to colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Resa M; Woolf, Steven H; Cunningham, Tina D; Johnson, Robert E; Krist, Alex H; Rothemich, Stephen F; Vernon, Sally W

    2010-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are suboptimal. The most important barriers identified by patients are poorly understood. A comprehensive assessment of barriers to all recommended modalities is needed. In 2007, a questionnaire was mailed to 6100 patients, aged 50-75 years, from 12 family medicine practices in the Virginia Ambulatory Care Outcomes Research Network. People aged 65-75 years and African Americans were oversampled. Patients were asked to rate 19-21 barriers to each of four recommended tests. In 2008, responses were coded on a 5-point scale; higher scores reflected stronger barrier endorsement. The response rate was 55% (n=3357). Approximately 40% of respondents were aged >/=65 years, 30% were African-American, and 73% were adherent to screening. A clinician's failure to suggest screening and not knowing testing was necessary received the highest mean scores as barriers. Financial concerns and misconceptions were also cited. Barrier scores differed depending on whether respondents were never screened, overdue for screening, or adherent to guidelines. The top five barriers for each modality included test-specific barriers (e.g., handling stool, bowel preparation), which often outranked generic barriers to screening. Not knowing testing was necessary was a top barrier for all tests but colonoscopy. Although physician advice and awareness of the need for screening are important, barriers to screening are not homogenous across tests, and test-specific barriers warrant consideration in designing strategies to improve screening rates. Barrier scores differ by screening status, highlighting the need to address prior screening experience. Evidence that patients are more familiar with colonoscopy than with other modalities suggests an opportunity to improve screening rates by educating patients about alternative tests. 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding patient perceptions and risk for hepatitis C screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannan, S

    2017-08-01

    The specific aims were to identify specific themes and barriers to viral hepatitis C (HCV) testing and to determine if testing rates increased when patients self-identify their risk factors and were offered testing. This study was conducted at a Federally Qualified Health Centre (FQHC) in an underserved neighbourhood located in the Mountain West. This descriptive study used survey and group-level electronic health record (EHR) data. Adults 18 years and older who speak and write in English or Spanish and arrived for care at a FQHC were recruited to complete a survey. The 10-item survey assessed demographics, HCV risk, willingness to test, and reasons for not testing. Screening rates during the survey period were compared with the baseline 2014 rates using EHR data. EHR demographic, testing, and incidents of positive HCV infections data were analysed and compared with survey data. The typical participant (N=111) was female (74%), Baby Boomer (1945-1965) generation (45%), white (86%), and uninsured (54%). Top 6 self-identified risks were tattoo and/or body piercings (47.7%), Baby Boomer (36%), multiple sex partners (18%), work-related exposure (8.1%), non-injection drug use (8.1%), and injection drug use (7.2%). Only 78% of Baby Boomers identified being a Baby Boomer as a risk. Eighty-one percent of participants did not want to test. Testing did not increase during the study period (2.9 tests/wk in 2014 and 2.1 tests/wk during the survey period). Main reasons not to test were "I do not have any risk factors" (30.2%), concerned with cost (15.1%), tested in the past (15.1%), other reasons (9.3%), not feeling well (5.8%). More than one main reason was selected by 17% of the participants. Baby Boomers did not self-identify risk. Also, testing incidence did not increase when patients self-identified risk and were offered testing. Many participants did not identify risk which is a barrier to testing.Additional barriers to overcome are concerns with cost and comfort in

  16. Mechanized toxicological serum tests in screening hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallbach, J; Guder, W G

    1991-09-01

    provided by the EMIT tox test kits. As a consequence, decision limits for all three group tests in serum were lowered to near the detection limit: (table: see text) For quantitative tests the lower limits of quantification were: (table: see text) The working reagents were stable for at least 14 days at 4-8 degrees C. Calibration curves were stable over the expiration period of reconstituted original reagents (6-12 weeks), also when working reagents were prepared in aliquots from stored reconstituted reagents. Application of the newly adapted programme to serum samples of nearly two hundred patients showed it to be suitable for screening patients in which intoxication is suspected or needs to be excluded.

  17. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Azimi

    Full Text Available Does the Finneson-Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson-Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3 years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001. Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117. The patients' rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson-Cooper score. Regarding patients' surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson-Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy.

  18. Screening colonoscopy participation in Turkish colorectal cancer patients and their first degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickap, Saadettin; Arslan, Cagatay; Rama, Dorina; Yalcin, Suayib

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to research the awareness of screening colonoscopy (SC) among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and their relatives. A questionnaire form including information and behavior about colonoscopic screening for CRCs of patients and their first-degree relatives (FDRs) was prepared. A total of 406 CRC patients were enrolled into the study, with 1534 FDRs (siblings n: 1381 and parents n: 153) . Positive family history for CRC was found in 12% of the study population. Previous SC was performed in 11% of patients with CRC. Mean age of the patients whose FDRs underwent SC was lower than the patients whose FDRs did not (52 vs 57 years; peducational level and income had SC more frequently. When screening for CRC is planned, elderly subjects, those with family history for CRC, and those with low educational and lower income should be given especial attention in order that they be convinced to undergo screening for CRC.

  19. standards of diabetic care - successes and failures of a patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical care provided for adult diabetic patients in primary ... An analysis of the prevalences of obesity, ... managed elsewhere were selected for the study. ..... Levitt NS, Bradshaw D, Zwarenstein MF, Bawa AA, Maphumolo S. Audit of public sector ... sis, Meta. - embryo. Neuroen cycle; Sp implanta. Prostagla. Part 11: C.

  20. Patient with intractable delirium successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Eske; Hageman, Ida

    2014-01-01

    and in this situation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a quick and efficient treatment. In this case report of a 26-year-old man a post-operative intractable delirium persisting for three weeks was efficiently and swiftly relieved by three consecutive ECTs. The patient was discharged without need for further...

  1. Developing and Implementing a Food Insecurity Screening Initiative for Adult Patients Living With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brittany; Fitzpatrick, Sandra; Sidani, Souraya; Gucciardi, Enza

    2018-06-01

    Routine food insecurity screening is recommended in diabetes care to inform more tailored interventions that better support diabetes self-management among food-insecure patients. This pilot study explored the acceptability and feasibility of a food insecurity screening initiative within a diabetes care setting in Toronto. A systematic literature review informed the development of a food insecurity screening initiative to help health-care providers tailor diabetes management plans and better support food-insecure patients with type 2 diabetes. Interviews with 10 patients and a focus group with 15 care providers elicited feedback on the relevance and acceptance of the food insecurity screening questions and a care algorithm. Subsequently, 5 care providers at 4 sites implemented the screening initiative over 2 weeks, screening 33 patients. After implementation, 7 patients and 5 care providers were interviewed to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the screening initiative. Our findings demonstrate that patients are willing to share their experiences of food insecurity, despite the sensitivity of this topic. Screening elicited information about how patients cope with food insecurity and how this affects their ability to self-manage diabetes. Care providers found this information helpful in directing their care and support for patients. Using a standardized, respectful method of assessing food insecurity can better equip health-care providers to support food-insecure patients with diabetes self-management. Further evaluation of this initiative is needed to determine how food insecurity screening can affect patients' self-management and related health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing a screening tool for identifying patients at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: a statewide initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon Traxler, L; Martin, Monique L; Kerber, Alice S; Bellcross, Cecelia A; Crane, Barbara E; Green, Victoria; Matthews, Roland; Paris, Nancy M; Gabram, Sheryl G A

    2014-10-01

    The Georgia Breast Cancer Genomic Health Consortium is a partnership created with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to the Georgia Department of Public Health to reduce cancer disparities among high-risk minority women. The project addresses young women at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome through outreach efforts. The consortium provides education and collects surveillance data using the breast cancer genetics referral screening tool (B-RST) available at www.BreastCancerGeneScreen.org . The HBOC educational protocol was presented to 73 staff in 6 public health centers. Staff used the tool during the collection of medical history. Further family history assessments and testing for mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes were facilitated if appropriate. Data was collected from November 2012 through December 2013, including 2,159 screened women. The majority of patients identified as black/African American and were 18-49 years old. Also, 6.0 % (n = 130) had positive screens, and 60.9 % (n = 67) of the 110 patients who agreed to be contacted provided a detailed family history. A total of 47 patients (42.7 %) met National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines when family history was clarified. Fourteen (12.7 %) underwent genetic testing; 1 patient was positive for a BRCA2 mutation, and 1 patient was found to carry a variant of uncertain significance. The introduction of genomics practice within public health departments has provided access to comprehensive cancer care for uninsured individuals. The successful implementation of the B-RST into public health centers demonstrates the opportunity for integration of HBOC screening into primary care practices.

  3. Successful intrauterine treatment of a patient with cobalamin C defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich K. Trefz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cobalamin C (cblC defect is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder that affects cobalamin metabolism. Patients are treated with hydroxycobalamin to ameliorate the clinical features of early-onset disease and prevent clinical symptoms in late-onset disease. Here we describe a patient in whom prenatal maternal treatment with 30 mg/week hydroxycobalamin and 5 mg/day folic acid from week 15 of pregnancy prevented disease manifestation in a girl who is now 11 years old with normal IQ and only mild ophthalmic findings. The affected older sister received postnatal treatment only and is severely intellectually disabled with severe ophthalmic symptoms. This case highlights the potential of early, high-dose intrauterine treatment in a fetus affected by the cblC defect.

  4. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botney, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  5. Recurrent peptic ulcers in patients following successful Helicobacter pylori eradication: a multicenter study of 4940 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hiroto; Sakaki, Nobuhiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Sekine, Hitoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Uemura, Naomi; Kato, Mototsugu; Murakami, Kazunari; Kato, Chieko; Shiotani, Akiko; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Takagi, Atsushi; Aoyama, Nobuo; Haruma, Ken; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kusugami, Kazuo; Suzuki, Masayuki; Joh, Takashi; Azuma, Takeshi; Yanaka, Akinori; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawai, Takashi; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-02-01

    Although curative treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection markedly reduces the relapse of peptic ulcers, the details of the ulcers that do recur is not well characterized. The aim of this study is to describe the recurrence rate and specific features of peptic ulcers after cure of H. pylori infection. This was a multicenter study involving 4940 peptic ulcer patients who were H. pylori negative after successful eradication treatment and were followed for up to 48 months. The annual incidence of ulcer relapse in H. pylori-cured patients, background of patients with relapsed ulcers, time to relapse, ulcer size, and site of relapsed ulcers were investigated. Crude peptic ulcer recurrence rate was 3.02% (149/4940). The annual recurrence rates of gastric, duodenal and gastroduodenal ulcer were 2.3%, 1.6%, and 1.6%, respectively. Exclusion of patients who took NSAIDs led annual recurrence rates to 1.9%, 1.5% and 1.3%, respectively. The recurrence rate was significantly higher in gastric ulcer. Recurrence rates of patients who smoked, consumed alcohol, and used NSAIDs were significantly higher in those with gastric ulcer recurrence compared to duodenal ulcer recurrence (e.g. 125 of 149 [83.9%] relapsed ulcers recurred at the same or adjacent sites as the previous ulcers). Curative treatment of H. pylori infection is useful in preventing ulcer recurrence. Gastric ulcer is more likely to relapse than duodenal ulcer. Recurrent ulcer tended to recur at the site of the original ulcers.

  6. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Jeong

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT. The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6, including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72 and MCT (0.85 than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  7. Evaluation of an automated connective tissue disease screening assay in Korean patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seri; Yang, Heeyoung; Hwang, Hyunyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utilities of the automated connective tissues disease screening assay, CTD screen, in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. A total of 1093 serum samples were assayed using CTD screen and indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) methods. Among them, 162 were diagnosed with systemic rheumatic disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and mixed connective tissue disease (MCT). The remaining 931 with non-systemic rheumatic disease were assigned to the control group. The median ratios of CTD screen tests were significantly higher in the systemic rheumatic disease group than in the control group. The positive likelihood ratios of the CTD screen were higher than those of IIF in patients with total rheumatic diseases (4.1 vs. 1.6), including SLE (24.3 vs. 10.7). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC-AUCs) of the CTD screen for discriminating total rheumatic diseases, RA, SLE, and MCT from controls were 0.68, 0.56, 0.92 and 0.80, respectively. The ROC-AUCs of the combinations with IIF were significantly higher in patients with total rheumatic diseases (0.72) and MCT (0.85) than in those of the CTD screen alone. Multivariate analysis indicated that both the CTD screen and IIF were independent variables for predicting systemic rheumatic disease. CTD screen alone and in combination with IIF were a valuable diagnostic tool for predicting systemic rheumatic diseases, particularly for SLE.

  8. Thrombophilia screening--at the right time, for the right patient, with a good reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegnar, Mojca

    2010-12-01

    Thrombophilia can be identified in about half of all patients presenting with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Thrombophilia screening for various indications has increased tremendously, but whether the results of such tests help in the clinical management of patients is uncertain. Here, current recommendations for thrombophilia screening in selected groups of patients, and considerations whether other high-risk subjects should be tested are reviewed. The methods for determination of the most common thrombophilic defects (antithrombin, protein C, protein S deficiencies, Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A) associated with strong to moderate risk of VTE are described, indicating the timing and location of thrombophilia screening. Circumstances when a positive result of thrombophilia screening helps clinicians decide if adjustments of the anticoagulant regime are needed are discussed. Finally, psychological, social and ethical dilemmas associated with thrombophilia screening are indicated.

  9. Patients find success haggling as health-care costs climb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    In small but growing numbers, Americans are taking an innovative approach to controlling health-care costs: They're haggling with their doctors. Fed up with mounting health bills, consumers ae getting as much as 30% off everything from eye exams to fertility procedures just by agreeing to pay upfront. Others are holding their doctors over a barrel by waiting a few months to pay the bill. Already, a new cottage industry of middlemen who negotiate healthcare bills for patients report their haggling business is up as much as 25% in the last two years.

  10. Dental screening of medical patients for oral infections and inflammation : Consideration of risk and benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maret, Delphine; Peters, Ove A.; Vigarios, Emmanuelle; Epstein, Joel B.; van der Sluis, Lucas

    The primary purpose of preoperative dental screening of medical patients is to detect acute or chronic oral conditions that may require management prior to planned medical interventions. The aim of this communication is to discuss the background of preoperative dental screening and the link between

  11. Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Aambakk, Benedicte; Bossen, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an important prognostic factor in low back pain (LBP) that appears to be infrequent in chiropractic populations. Identification of depression in few patients would consequently implicate screening of many. It is therefore desirable to have brief screening tools for depression. The o...

  12. A household survey on screening practices of household contacts of smear positive tuberculosis patients in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, Thuy Hoang Thi; Ngoc, Sy Dinh; Viet, Nhung Nguyen; van, Hung Nguyen; Horby, Peter; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Wertheim, Heiman F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Close contacts of tuberculosis (TB) patients are at increased risk of developing tuberculosis. Although passive contact screening guidelines are incorporated in the national TB control program, currently it is unknown how frequent close contacts are screened for TB in Vietnam. This study assesses

  13. Patients with hippocampal amnesia successfully integrate gesture and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilverman, Caitlin; Clough, Sharice; Duff, Melissa C; Cook, Susan Wagner

    2018-06-19

    During conversation, people integrate information from co-speech hand gestures with information in spoken language. For example, after hearing the sentence, "A piece of the log flew up and hit Carl in the face" while viewing a gesture directed at the nose, people tend to later report that the log hit Carl in the nose (information only in gesture) rather than in the face (information in speech). The cognitive and neural mechanisms that support the integration of gesture with speech are unclear. One possibility is that the hippocampus - known for its role in relational memory and information integration - is necessary for integrating gesture and speech. To test this possibility, we examined how patients with hippocampal amnesia and healthy and brain-damaged comparison participants express information from gesture in a narrative retelling task. Participants watched videos of an experimenter telling narratives that included hand gestures that contained supplementary information. Participants were asked to retell the narratives and their spoken retellings were assessed for the presence of information from gesture. For features that had been accompanied by supplementary gesture, patients with amnesia retold fewer of these features overall and fewer retellings that matched the speech from the narrative. Yet their retellings included features that contained information that had been present uniquely in gesture in amounts that were not reliably different from comparison groups. Thus, a functioning hippocampus is not necessary for gesture-speech integration over short timescales. Providing unique information in gesture may enhance communication for individuals with declarative memory impairment, possibly via non-declarative memory mechanisms. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Barriers to Alcohol Screening Among Hypertensive Patients and the Role of Stigma: Lessons for the Implementation of Screening and Brief Interventions in European Primary Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschmidt, Franz; Manthey, Jakob; Kraus, Ludwig; Scafato, Emanuele; Gual, Antoni; Grimm, Carsten; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    1. To quantify barriers to alcohol screening among hypertensive patients reported by primary healthcare professionals. 2. To examine whether education and screening frequency measures are associated with stigma-related barriers. A web survey was conducted among 3081 primary healthcare professionals from France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. Participants were asked about perceived barriers to alcohol screening as free-text response. The replies were independently categorized by two raters. Stigma-related barriers were predicted by logistic regressions with education, knowledge on alcohol as risk factor and frequency of alcohol screening. In France and Italy, almost half of the reported barriers were stigma-related, whereas time constraints were cited most commonly in Spain and the UK. In Germany, nearly half of respondents rated the importance of alcohol screening for hypertension as low. Perception that regular screening is inappropriate or associated with too much effort, beliefs that screening is unnecessary, and insufficient knowledge of screening tools were cited as further barriers. Professional education on alcohol use was consistently rated to be poorer than the equivalent education on hypertension, and only a minority of respondents perceived alcohol as important risk factor for hypertension. Stigma-related barriers could not be significantly predicted by education, knowledge or screening frequency in most models. Overall, regular alcohol screening among hypertensive patients seems to be widely accepted, but further education (Germany) and structural support (Spain, UK) could contribute to increase screening rates. In France and Italy, screening uptake could be improved by addressing stigma. Alcohol screening among hypertensive patients was largely accepted among general practitioners from five different European countries. Reported screening barriers varied between countries and included time constraints, stigma and underrated importance of alcohol

  15. Screening For Peripheral Neuropathy In Diabetic Patients: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the United Kingdom Screening Test (UKST), a simple, ... The aim is to stimulate interest in the use of this tool for clinical research to detect ... limited by non-availability of more sophisticated quantitative diagnostic facilities. ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  16. Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral CT scans has been shown to decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer in heavy smokers. Learn more about tests to detect lung cancer and their potential benefits and harms in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Nutritional screening in hospitalized pediatric patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Fonseca Teixeira

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The studies included in this systematic review showed good performance of the nutritional screening tools in pediatrics, especially STRONGkids and STAMP. The authors emphasize the need to perform for more studies in this area. Only one tool was translated and adapted to the Brazilian pediatric population, and it is essential to carry out studies of tool adaptation and validation for this population.

  18. Screening and Recording of Patients' Alcohol‑use Habit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Alcohol is widely consumed in Ireland; more so in major urban centers. Alcohol‑related problems account for a significant number of Accident and Emergency (A and E) department presentations in Ireland. As a result, the national alcohol policy calls on doctors to be proactive in screening for and addressing ...

  19. HIV screening among newly diagnosed TB patients: a cross sectional study in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Suzanne; Mejía, Fernando; Rojas, Marlene; Seas, Carlos; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Otero, Larissa

    2018-03-20

    Since 2006, the Peruvian National TB program (NTP) recommends voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) for all tuberculosis (TB) patients. Responding to the differential burden of both diseases in Peru, TB is managed in peripheral health facilities while HIV is managed in referral centers. This study aims to determine the coverage of HIV screening among TB patients and the characteristics of persons not screened. From March 2010 to December 2011 we enrolled new smear-positive pulmonary TB adults in 34 health facilities in a district in Lima. NTP staff offered VCT to all TB patients. Patients with an HIV positive result were referred for confirmation tests and management. We interviewed patients to collect their demographic and clinical characteristics and registered if patients opted in or out of the screening. Of the 1295 enrolled TB patients, nine had a known HIV diagnosis. Of the remaining, 76.1% (979) were screened for HIV. Among the 23.9% (307) not screened, 38.4% (118) opted out of the screening. TB patients at one of the health care facilities of the higher areas of the district (OR = 3.38, CI 95% 2.17-5.28 for the highest area and OR = 2.82, CI 95% 1.78-4.49 for the high area) as well as those reporting illegal drug consumption (OR = 1.65, CI 95% 1.15-2.37) were more likely not to be screened. Twenty-four were HIV positive (1.9% of all patients 1295, or 2.4% of those screened). Of 15 patients diagnosed with HIV during the TB episode, ten were enrolled in an HIV program. The median time between the result of the HIV screening and the first consultation at the HIV program was 82 days (IQR, 32-414). The median time between the result of the HIV screening and antiretroviral initiation was 148.5 days (IQR 32-500). An acceptable proportion of TB patients were screened for HIV in Lima. Referral systems of HIV positive patients should be strengthened for timely ART initiation.

  20. Gastroscopic screening in 80 patients with pernicious anaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Stockbrügger, R W; Menon, G G; Beilby, J O; Mason, R R; Cotton, P B

    1983-01-01

    We have studied 80 patients with pernicious anaemia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (with biopsy and cytology) showed no lesion other than atrophic gastritis in 34 patients. Thirty three patients, however, had varying degrees of gastric mucosal dysplasia, which was detected more frequently by histology than by cytology. The endoscopic appearance of the mucosa was abnormal in four of the six patients with moderate dysplasia, and in all three patients with severe dysplasia. One patient was fo...

  1. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen includ...

  2. Effect of successful 131I treatment on the peripheral blood picture in hyperthyroid patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoping; He Yunnan; Hu Qingwu

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of successful 131 I therapy on the levels peripheral blood picture in hyperthyroid patients. Methods: Serum T 3 , T 4 , TSH (with ACCESS microparticle chemiluminescence immunoassay) and blood Hb, RBC, WBC and DC, Plt (with COULTER three assortments) counts were determined in 110 controls and 210 hyperthyroid patients both before and after 131 I therapy. Results: 131 I treatment of hyperthyroidism in this group of patients was very successful (P 131 I therapy. Conclusion: The application of 131 I to treat hyperthyroidism was very successful with no remarkable effect on peripheral blood picture. (authors)

  3. Outreach visits by clinical pharmacists improve screening for the metabolic syndrome among mentally ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Hansen, Per Sveistrup; Kristensen, Anne Mette Fisker

    2013-01-01

    by clinical pharmacists to support the implementation of screening of MeS at a psychiatric ward. Methods: The study was conducted at the psychiatric ward, Odense University Hospital. In 2008, clinical guidelines for systematic screening and prevention of metabolic risk were developed and implemented...... by passive dissemination (PD) followed by a period of active implementation (AI). AI contained outreach visits by clinical pharmacists on a weekly basis. Patients with affective disorder or schizophrenia were included. The study was designed as a before-and-after study, and electronic patient charts were...... pharmacists significantly improved the use of the screening sheet...

  4. Screening of 99 Danish patients with congenital heart disease for GATA4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Litu; Tümer, Zeynep; Jacobsen, Joes Ramsøe

    2006-01-01

    stenosis. We have screened 99 unrelated Danish patients with different CHD phenotypes to evaluate the prevalence of GATA4 mutations in CHD. No pathogenic mutations were found among the patients, suggesting that GATA4 mutations are relatively rare among CHD patients. Thus, the diagnostic importance of GATA4...

  5. Screening of congenital heart disease patients using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Meden; El-Segaier, Milad; Fernlund, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) are found in a significant proportion of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and some of these CNVs are associated with other developmental defects. In some syndromic patients, CHD may be the first presenting symptom, thus screening of patients...

  6. [Screening for bipolar disorder in primary care patients with psychological symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; López-Rodríguez, Juan A; Escobar-Rabadán, Francisco; Téllez-Lapeira, Juan; Mínguez, José; Párraga, Ignacio; Suárez-Hernández, Tatiana; Piñero, María José; Guzón, Marta-Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of positive results in the screening of bipolar disorder (BD) among primary care patients presenting with psychological symptoms, and to analyze their characteristics. Multicenter cross-sectional study. Nineteen Primary Care clinics in different Spanish regions. A total of 360 consecutive primary care patients aged 18 to 70, presenting with psychological symptoms. Screening for BP was performed by means of the Mood Disorders Questionnaire. Data on quality of life (EuroQol-5D) and functional impairment (Sheehan Disability Inventory) were obtained. Data on psychiatric comorbidity and data on the use of psychotropic medication were acquired by review of medical records. Of the patients screened, 11.9% were positive (95%CI: 8.8%-15.7%). Only two patients had a diagnosis of BP in their clinical records and, although more than half received treatment with antidepressants, only two received treatment with mood stabilizers. Positive screening is associated with work, social and family dysfunction, greater perceived stress and poor quality of life. BD screening in primary care patients with psychological problems leads to a striking proportion of positive results, indicating that there may be a significant prevalence of BP patients, most of them undiagnosed and untreated. Further research is needed to determine the role that Primary Care can or should assume in the screening, diagnosis and management of this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient-completed or symptom-based screening tools for endometriosis: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrey, Eric; Carter, Cathryn M; Soliman, Ahmed M; Khan, Shahnaz; DiBenedetti, Dana B; Snabes, Michael C

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate existing patient-completed screening questionnaires and/or symptom-based predictive models with respect to their potential for use as screening tools for endometriosis in adult women. Validated instruments were of particular interest. We conducted structured searches of PubMed and targeted searches of the gray literature to identify studies reporting on screening instruments used in endometriosis. Studies were screened according to inclusion and exclusion criteria that followed the PICOS (population, intervention, comparison, outcomes, study design) framework. A total of 16 studies were identified, of which 10 described measures for endometriosis in general, 2 described measures for endometriosis at specific sites, and 4 described measures for deep-infiltrating endometriosis. Only 1 study evaluated a questionnaire that was solely patient-completed. Most measures required physician, imaging, or laboratory assessments in addition to patient-completed questionnaires, and several measures relied on complex scoring. Validation for use as a screening tool in adult women with potential endometriosis was lacking in all studies, as most studies focused on diagnosis versus screening. This literature review did not identify any fully validated, symptom-based, patient-reported questionnaires for endometriosis screening in adult women.

  8. Discrete prepotential as an indicator of successful ablation in patients with coronary cusp ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Iesaka, Yoshito; Yagishita, Atsuhiko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Higuchi, Koji; Kawabata, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Koji; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Kusa, Shigeki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Hirao, Kenzo

    2013-10-01

    Although coronary cusp (CC) ventricular arrhythmia (VA) can be treated by catheter ablation, reliable indicators of successful ablation sites have not been fully identified. This study comprised 392 patients undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for outflow tract-VA at 3 institutions from January 2007 to August 2012. The successful ablation site was on the left CC or right CC in 35 (8.9%) of the 392 patients. In 9 (26%) of these 35 patients, a discrete prepotential was recognized, 5 of whom had left CC-VAs and 4 of whom had right CC-VAs. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was successful at the site of the prepotential in all 9 of these patients. The duration of the isoelectric line between the end of the discrete prepotential and the onset of the ventricular electrogram was 27±13 ms. The time from onset of the discrete prepotential at the successful ablation site on the CC to the QRS onset (activation time) was 69±20 ms (range, 50-98 ms). Pace mapping was graded as excellent at the successful ablation site in only 1 patient. No discrete prepotential was recorded in any successful right outflow tract-VA ablation case in this study. A discrete prepotential was seen in 9 (26%) of 35 patients with CC-VA. In left and right CC-VA, the site of a discrete prepotential with ≥50 ms activation time may indicate a successful ablation site.

  9. Touch screens as a tool in patient care in the IBD outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lone; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Fallingborg, Jan; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jess, Tine

    2016-09-01

    We have introduced online touch screens in the waiting room for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) for recording of symptoms before their consultation. This has made disease activity scores readily available to the physician in our newly established database, 'Gastrobio'. We wanted to validate the use of touch screens compared to paper questionnaires. A total of 54 patients with UC and 74 patients with CD were included in the study. The UC patients filled out the Short Health Scale (SHS) and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SSCAI). The CD patients filled out the SHS and Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI). Paper questionnaires and touch screen versions were used in random order and comparison between the two modalities was made by Spearman correlation test, Bland-Altman plots, and Kappa-statistics. Among the 128 patients, the two SHS scores (SHS touch versus SHS paper) were found to be highly correlated (Spearman correlation; 0.92 for UC and 0.92 for CD). Also, on average, Bland-Altman plots demonstrated a difference close to zero between the two modalities. Agreement between paper version and touch screen version of SCCAI and HBI scores was also high (Kappa-statistics; 78% raw and 98% weighted for SCCAI; 65% raw and 97% weighted for HBI). It is feasible to introduce touch screens in the outpatient clinic and to have patients record their symptoms before the consultation. However, the study may not be representative for elderly patients.

  10. Screening of patients with diabetes mellitus for tuberculosis in community health settings in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Innes, Anh; Xu, Lin; Li, Ling; Chen, Jinou; Hou, Jinglong; Mi, Fengling; Kang, Wanli; Harries, Anthony D

    2015-08-01

    To assess the feasibility and results of screening of patients with DM for TB in routine community health services in China. Agreement on how to screen patients with DM for TB and monitor and record the results was obtained at a stakeholders meeting. Subsequent training was carried out for staff at 10 community health centres, with activities implemented from June 2013 to April 2014. Patients with DM were screened for TB at each clinical visit using a symptom-based enquiry, and those positive to any symptom were referred to the TB clinic for TB investigation. A total of 2942 patients with DM visited these ten clinics. All patients received at least one screening for TB. Two patients were identified as already known to have TB. In total, 278 (9.5% of those screened) who had positive TB symptoms were referred for TB investigations and 209 arrived at the TB centre or underwent a chest radiograph for TB investigation. One patient (0.5% of those investigated) was newly diagnosed with active TB and was started on anti-TB treatment. The TB case notification rate of those screened was 102/100,000. This pilot project shows it is feasible to carry out TB screening among patients with DM in community settings, but further work is needed to better characterise patients with DM at higher risk of TB. This may require a more targeted approach focused on high-risk groups such as those with untreated DM or poorly controlled hyperglycaemia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Failure of ETV in patients with the highest ETV success scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianaris, Thomas J; Nazar, Ryan; Middlebrook, Emily; Gonda, David D; Jea, Andrew; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a surgical alternative to placing a CSF shunt in certain patients with hydrocephalus. The ETV Success Score (ETVSS) is a reliable, simple method to estimate the success of the procedure by 6 months of postoperative follow-up. The highest score is 90, estimating a 90% chance of the ETV effectively treating hydrocephalus without requiring a shunt. Treatment with ETV fails in certain patients, despite their being the theoretically best candidates for the procedure. In this study the authors attempted to identify factors that further predicted success in patients with the highest ETVSSs. METHODS A retrospective review was performed of all patients treated with ETV at 3 institutions. Demographic, radiological, and clinical data were recorded. All patients by definition were older than 1 year, had obstructive hydrocephalus, and did not have a prior shunt. Failure of ETV was defined as the need for a shunt by 1 year. The ETV was considered a success if the patient did not require another surgery (either shunt placement or a repeat endoscopic procedure) by 1 year. A statistical analysis was performed to identify factors associated with success or failure. RESULTS Fifty-nine patients met the entry criteria for the study. Eleven patients (18.6%) required further surgery by 1 year. All of these patients received a shunt. The presenting symptom of lethargy statistically correlated with success (p = 0.0126, odds ratio [OR] = 0.072). The preoperative radiological finding of transependymal flow (p = 0.0375, OR 0.158) correlated with success. A postoperative larger maximum width of the third ventricle correlated with failure (p = 0.0265). CONCLUSIONS The preoperative findings of lethargy and transependymal flow statistically correlated with success. This suggests that the best candidates for ETV are those with a relatively acute elevation of intracranial pressure. Cases without these findings may represent the failures in this

  12. Successful aging theory and the patient with chronic renal disease: application in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Candy; Toutman, Meredith Flood

    2011-01-01

    As life expectancies increase, nurses will care for more individuals with chronic conditions, one of which is chronic renal disease. Increasing diversity and complexity of older adult healthcare needs signals a need to reconceptualize perceptions of successful aging. By emphasizing health promotion and adaptation, successful aging is possible for those with chronic renal disease. This article provides an overview of theory-based strategies for fostering successful aging in the patient with chronic renal disease.

  13. Effect of Automobile Travel Time Between Patients' Homes and Ophthalmologists' Offices on Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macon, Céline; Carrier, Hélène; Janczewski, Aurélie; Verger, Pierre; Casanova, Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    The accessibility of ophthalmologists appears to influence the quality of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). The principal objective of this study was to analyze the effect of automobile travel time to the closest ophthalmologist on the time to DR screening. This historical cohort study used reimbursement databases from the principal national health insurance fund. Patients were included if they had been reimbursed at least thrice for oral antidiabetic medications in the 12 months before the study start date. Patients were followed up from January 1, 2008, for 4 years. The expected event was a DR screening by an ocular fundus examination. The automobile travel time to the nearest ophthalmologist was calculated by the distance between communes, estimated by appropriate software. A Kaplan-Meier curve and a multivariate Cox model were used to model the effect of travel time on the time until DR screening. A sensitivity analysis of travel time described the results of the Cox model. At the start of 2008, 6,573 patients living in 328 different municipalities were included. The multivariate model found that patients living 60 min or more away from an ophthalmologist had a lower instantaneous probability of DR screening than those living travel time. Increased automobile travel time for patients with diabetes to the nearest ophthalmologist was associated with a longer time to DR screening.

  14. Atypical femoral fracture in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient successfully treated with teriparatide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob; Eiken, Pia; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We report a case of a successfully healed atypical femoral fracture (AFF) following treatment with teriparatide in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). To our knowledge, no successful treatment of AFFs with teriparatide in this subpopulation has ever been described. METHODS...

  15. Viral hepatitis screening in transgender patients undergoing gender identity hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangla, Neeraj; Mamun, Rifat; Weisberg, Ilan S

    2017-11-01

    Viral hepatitis is a global health issue and can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Guidelines for viral hepatitis screening in the transgender population do not exist. Transgender patients may be at higher risk for contracting viral hepatitis due to socioeconomic and behavioral factors. The aim of this study was to measure the quality of screening, prevalence, and susceptibility of viral hepatitis, and to identify barriers to screening in transgender patients undergoing gender identity hormonal therapy. LGBTQ-friendly clinic visits from transgender patients older than 18 years in New York City from 2012 to 2015 were reviewed. Approximately 13% of patients were screened for any viral hepatitis on initial consultation. Screening rates for hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis A virus (HAV) at any point were 27, 22, and 20%. HAV screening was performed in 28% of the female to male (FtM) patients and 16% of male to female (MtF) (P0.05). Prevalence of HCV, HBV, and HIV in FtM was 0, 0, and 0.44% and that in MtF was 1.78, 0.89, and 1.78%, respectively. Percentage of patients immune to hepatitis A in FtM and MtF subgroups were 55 and 47% (P>0.05). Percentage of patients immune to HBV in FtM and MtF subgroups were 54 and 48% (P>0.05). This study indicates a significant lack of hepatitis screening in the transgender population and a concerning proportion of patients susceptible to disease.

  16. Colorectal cancer outcomes and treatment patterns in patients too young for average-risk screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Wong, Sandra L; Regenbogen, Scott E; Jomaa, Diana M; Hardiman, Karin M; Hendren, Samantha

    2016-03-15

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines recommend initiating screening at age 50 years, the percentage of cancer cases in younger patients is increasing. To the authors' knowledge, the national treatment patterns and outcomes of these patients are largely unknown. The current study was a population-based, retrospective cohort study of the nationally representative Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry for patients diagnosed with CRC from 1998 through 2011. Patients were categorized as being younger or older than the recommended screening age. Differences with regard to stage of disease at diagnosis, patterns of therapy, and disease-specific survival were compared between age groups using multinomial regression, multiple regression, Cox proportional hazards regression, and Weibull survival analysis. Of 258,024 patients with CRC, 37,847 (15%) were aged Cancer Society.

  17. Early Dysphagia Screening by Trained Nurses Reduces Pneumonia Rate in Stroke Patients: A Clinical Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Christoph; Fandler, Simon; Doppelhofer, Kathrin; Niederkorn, Kurt; Enzinger, Christian; Vetta, Christian; Trampusch, Esther; Schmidt, Reinhold; Fazekas, Franz; Gattringer, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Dysphagia is a common stroke symptom and leads to serious complications such as aspiration and pneumonia. Early dysphagia screening can reduce these complications. In many hospitals, dysphagia screening is performed by speech-language therapists who are often not available on weekends/holidays, which results in delayed dysphagia assessment. We trained the nurses of our neurological department to perform formal dysphagia screening in every acute stroke patient by using the Gugging Swallowing Screen. The impact of a 24/7 dysphagia screening (intervention) over swallowing assessment by speech-language therapists during regular working hours only was compared in two 5-month periods with time to dysphagia screening, pneumonia rate, and length of hospitalization as outcome variables. Overall, 384 patients (mean age, 72.3±13.7 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 3) were included in the study. Both groups (pre-intervention, n=198 versus post-intervention, n=186) were comparable regarding age, sex, and stroke severity. Time to dysphagia screening was significantly reduced in the intervention group (median, 7 hours; range, 1-69 hours) compared with the control group (median, 20 hours; range, 1-183; P =0.001). Patients in the intervention group had a lower rate of pneumonia (3.8% versus 11.6%; P =0.004) and also a reduced length of hospital stay (median, 8 days; range, 2-40 versus median, 9 days; range, 1-61 days; P =0.033). 24/7 dysphagia screening can be effectively performed by nurses and leads to reduced pneumonia rates. Therefore, empowering nurses to do a formal bedside screening for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients timely after admission is warranted whenever speech-language therapists are not available. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. The Effect of Screen-to-Screen Versus Face-to-Face Consultation on Doctor-Patient Communication: An Experimental Study with Simulated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tates, Kiek; Antheunis, Marjolijn L; Kanters, Saskia; Nieboer, Theodoor E; Gerritse, Maria Be

    2017-12-20

    Despite the emergence of Web-based patient-provider contact, it is still unclear how the quality of Web-based doctor-patient interactions differs from face-to-face interactions. This study aimed to examine (1) the impact of a consultation medium on doctors' and patients' communicative behavior in terms of information exchange, interpersonal relationship building, and shared decision making and (2) the mediating role of doctors' and patients' communicative behavior on satisfaction with both types of consultation medium. Doctor-patient consultations on pelvic organ prolapse were simulated, both in a face-to-face and in a screen-to-screen (video) setting. Twelve medical interns and 6 simulated patients prepared 4 different written scenarios and were randomized to perform a total of 48 consultations. Effects of the consultations were measured by questionnaires that participants filled out directly after the consultation. With respect to patient-related outcomes, satisfaction, perceived information exchange, interpersonal relationship building, and perceived shared decision making showed no significant differences between face-to-face and screen-to-screen consultations. Patients' attitude toward Web-based communication (b=-.249, P=.02 and patients' perceived time and attention (b=.271, P=.03) significantly predicted patients' perceived interpersonal relationship building. Patients' perceived shared decision making was positively related to their satisfaction with the consultation (b=.254, P=.005). Overall, patients experienced significantly greater shared decision making with a female doctor (mean 4.21, SD 0.49) than with a male doctor (mean 3.66 [SD 0.73]; b=.401, P=.009). Doctor-related outcomes showed no significant differences in satisfaction, perceived information exchange, interpersonal relationship building, and perceived shared decision making between the conditions. There was a positive relationship between perceived information exchange and doctors

  19. Informing men about prostate cancer screening: a randomized controlled trial of patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Egberts, Kristine; McKenzie, Joanne E; Risbridger, Gail; Green, Sally

    2008-04-01

    Patient education materials can assist patient decision making on prostate cancer screening. To explore the effectiveness of presenting health information on prostate cancer screening using video, internet, and written interventions on patient decision making, attitudes, knowledge, and screening interest. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 161 men aged over 45, who had never been screened for prostate cancer, were randomized to receive information on prostate cancer screening. Participants were assessed at baseline and 1-week postintervention for decisional conflict, screening interest, knowledge, anxiety, and decision-making preference. A total of 156 men were followed-up at 1-week postintervention. There was no statistical, or clinical, difference in mean change in decisional conflict scores between the 3 intervention groups (video vs internet -0.06 [95% CI -0.24 to 0.12]; video vs pamphlet 0.04 [95%CI -0.15 to 0.22]; internet vs pamphlet 0.10 [95%CI -0.09 to 0.28]). There was also no statistically significant difference in mean knowledge, anxiety, decision-making preference, and screening interest between the 3 intervention groups. Results from this study indicate that there are no clinically significant differences in decisional conflict when men are presented health information on prostate cancer screening via video, written materials, or the internet. Given the equivalence of the 3 methods, other factors need to be considered in deciding which method to use. Health professionals should provide patient health education materials via a method that is most convenient to the patient and their preferred learning style.

  20. Sensitivity and Specificity of a Five-Minute Cognitive Screening Test in Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Janette D; Gallagher, Robyn; Pressler, Susan J; McLennan, Skye N; Ski, Chantal F; Tofler, Geoffrey; Thompson, David R

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive impairment occurs in up to 80% of patients with heart failure (HF). The National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Canadian Stroke Network (CSN) recommend a 5-minute cognitive screening protocol that has yet to be psychometrically evaluated in HF populations. The aim of this study was to conduct a secondary analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of the NINDS-CSN brief cognitive screening protocol in HF patients. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was administered to 221 HF patients. The NINDS-CSN screen comprises 3 MoCA items, with lower scores indicating poorer cognitive function. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed, determining the sensitivity, specificity and appropriate cutoff scores of the NINDS-CSN screen. In an HF population aged 76 ± 12 years, 136 (62%) were characterized with cognitive impairment (MoCA area under the receiver operating characteristic curve indicated good accuracy in screening for cognitive impairment (0.88; P cognitive impairment in patients with HF. Future studies should include a neuropsychologic battery to more comprehensively examine the diagnostic accuracy of brief cognitive screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening for influenza viruses in 7804 patients with influenza-like symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuehui Li; Nan Lv; Chen Hangwe; Lanhua You; Huimin Wang

    2010-01-01

    To screen a large number of patients with influenza-like symptoms by using the gold-immunochromatographic assay kit. All patients with influenza-like symptoms visiting the outpatient department of the General Hospital of Beijing Military Region, Beijing, China between May 2009 and January 2010 were enrolled in the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected immediately after the patient visited, then a gold-immunochromatographic assay was performed for screening of influenza A and B viruses according to the kit protocol. Among the 7804 patients enrolled in this study, 202 patients were influenza virus-positive; the positive cases accounted for 2.6% of all cases detected. Among the 202 influenza virus-positive patients, 171 patients were influenza virus A-positive, 24 were influenza virus B-positive, and 7 were co-infected with influenza virus A and B. More than 57% of the virus-positive patients were younger than 30 years old. Symptoms such as fever, sore throat, nasal congestion, sneezing, runny nose, and joint pain were more frequently observed in influenza virus A-positive patients than in influenza virus B-positive and influenza virus-negative patients. The gold immunochromatographic assay kit is very useful for screening a large number of patients with influenza-like symptoms. A higher number of influenza virus A-positive patients have sore throat, nasal congestion, sneezing, runny nose, and joint pain than influenza virus B-positive and influenza virus-negative patients (Author).

  2. Factors Affecting the Success Rate of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in Paediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmat Jabrayilov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine factors affecting the success rate of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL in children. The series consisted of 41 consecutive children operated on by the same surgical team for renal calculi with PNL between June 2002 and May 2015 in our institution. A single calyx or pelvic stone was described as simple, while calculi located in more than one location (calyx and pelvis or more than one calices or staghorn stones were described as complex. The procedure was deemed successful if the patient was completely stone-free (SF or had residual fragments <4 mm. Thirty-four patients were found to be SF or had residual fragments <4 mm on the postoperative first day, thus the success rate was 82.9%. In complex stones, the success rate was significantly lower (45.5% than simple stones (96.7% (p < 0.001. The grade of hydronephrosis (Grade 0–1 vs. Grade 2–3 also had a negative impact on the success, with rates of 92.6% vs. 64.3%, respectively (p = 0.022. Previous urological procedure history on the same side yielded a success rate of 58.3%, whereas the success rate in the primary patients was 93.1% (p < 0.001. The localization of the stone (complex vs. simple, degree of hydronephrosis, and history of previous urological procedures were found to be the factors that affected the success of the paediatric PNL.

  3. Impact Exerted by Nutritional Risk Screening on Clinical Outcome of Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Wang; Hongfei Cai; Yang Li; Caiwen Chen; Youbin Cui

    2018-01-01

    Objective. Preoperative nutritional status of patients is closely associated with their recovery after the surgery. This study aims to ascertain the impact exerted by the nutritional risk screening on clinical outcome of patients with esophageal cancer. Methods. 160 patients with esophageal cancer aged over 60, having got therapy at the First Hospital of Jilin University from Jun 2016 to Feb 2017 were evaluated by adopting the NRS2002. 80 cases of patients got active therapy of nutritional su...

  4. Feasibility and utility of screening for depression and anxiety disorders in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Christopher M; Suarez, Laura; Mastromauro, Carol; Januzzi, James L; Huffman, Jeff C

    2013-07-01

    Depression and anxiety in patients with cardiac disease are common and independently associated with morbidity and mortality. We aimed to explore the use of a 3-step approach to identify inpatients with cardiac disease with depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), or panic disorder; understand the predictive value of individual screening items in identifying these disorders; and assess the relative prevalence of these disorders in this cohort. To identify depression and anxiety disorders in inpatients with cardiac disease as part of a care management trial, an iterative 3-step screening procedure was used. This included an existing 4-item (Coping Screen) tool in nursing data sets, a 5-item screen for positive Coping Screen patients (Patient Health Questionnaire-2 [PHQ-2], GAD-2, and an item about panic attacks), and a diagnostic evaluation using PHQ-9 and the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders anxiety disorder modules. Overall, 6210 inpatients received the Coping Screen, 581 completed portions of all 3 evaluation steps, and 210 received a diagnosis (143 depression, 129 GAD, 30 panic disorder). Controlling for age, sex, and the other screening items, PHQ-2 items independently predicted depression (little interest/pleasure: odds ratio [OR]=6.65, Pdepression: OR=5.24, P=0.001), GAD-2 items predicted GAD (anxious: OR=4.09, P=0.003; unable to control worrying: OR=10.46, Pdepression in this cohort, and GAD-2 was an effective screening tool; however, panic disorder was rare. These results support the use of 2-step screening for depression and GAD beginning with a 4-item scale (GAD-2 plus PHQ-2). Unique Identifier: NCT01201967. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01201967.

  5. Value of urine cytology in screening patients with prostatitis syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J. J.; Hubregtse, M. R.; Wiersma, A. M.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1993-01-01

    We reviewed the results of urine cytology examination of 206 patients with a diagnosis of prostatitis syndromes in the period 1985-1991. The urine samples showed an incidence of 20.4% for slight to moderate atypia and 6.3% for severe atypia. In these patients, cystoscopy, bladder biopsies and

  6. Screening for depression in patients with myocardial infarction by general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, K. K.; Vestergaard, M.; Sondergaard, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) is highly prevalent and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Routine screening for post-MI depression is recommended. We studied general practitioners' practice of screening for post-MI depression and analysed whether...... the screening rate varied among subgroups of MI patients with a particular high risk of depression. Design: Population-based cohort study in the Central Denmark Region. Methods: All patients with a first-time MI in 2009 received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge from hospital. The questionnaire included...... information on anxiety and depression according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), severity of the disease, and smoking habits. The responders' general practitioners received a questionnaire 1 year after the patient had been discharged from hospital. This questionnaire provided information...

  7. Screening for depression in patients with myocardial infarction by general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Vestergaard, Mogens; Christensen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    information on anxiety and depression according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), severity of the disease, and smoking habits. The responders’ general practitioners received a questionnaire 1 year after the patient had been discharged from hospital. This questionnaire provided information......Background: Depression in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) is highly prevalent and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Routine screening for post-MI depression is recommended. We studied general practitioners’ practice of screening for post-MI depression and analysed whether...... the screening rate varied among subgroups of MI patients with a particular high risk of depression. Design: Population-based cohort study in the Central Denmark Region. Methods: All patients with a first-time MI in 2009 received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge from hospital. The questionnaire included...

  8. Screening adult tuberculosis patients for diabetes mellitus in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasa, J N; Brostrom, R; Ram, S; Kumar, A M V; Seremai, J; Hauma, M; Paul, I A; Langidrik, J R

    2014-06-21

    A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the screening of adult TB patients for diabetes (DM) using glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) in Ebeye, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Of 62 patients registered between July 2010 and December 2012, 28 (45%) had DM. The only significant difference in baseline characteristics between those with and those without DM was higher age in those with DM. Two-month sputum smears and cultures were also not different between the two groups. Despite the limited sample size, this study shows that screening TB patients for DM in Ebeye is feasible and worthwhile and that it should be continued.

  9. Domestic violence screening of obstetric triage patients in a military population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorf, M A; Thagard, A; Rockswold, P D; Busch, J M; Magann, E F

    2012-10-01

    The objective was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of domestic violence in a pregnant military population presenting for emergency care, and to determine the acceptability of domestic violence screening. A prospective observational survey of patients presenting for obstetric emergency care. Women were anonymously screened for domestic violence using the Abuse Assessment Screen. A total of 499 surveys were distributed, with 26 duplicate surveys. After excluding the 12 blank surveys, a total of 461 surveys were included in the final analysis. The lifetime prevalence of domestic violence (including physical, emotional and sexual abuse) was 22.6% (95% CI=19.0 to 26.4) with 4.1% (95% CI=2.3-6.0) of women reporting physical abuse in the past year and 2.8% (95% CI=1.3-4.3) reporting abuse since becoming pregnant. The majority of women 91.8% (95% CI=88.7-94.2) were not offended by domestic violence screening and 88.8% (95% CI=82.0-88.9) felt that patients should be routinely screened. The self-reported prevalence of domestic violence in a pregnant military population presenting for emergency care was 22.6%. Most women are not offended by domestic violence screening and support routine screening.

  10. Radiographic screening of edentulous patients: sense or nonsense? A risk-benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keur, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The benefits of radiographic examination of symptomless edentulous patients are presented. Based on data from the literature, an estimate of the risk of fatal malignancy from such a procedure is provided. Because the benefits are considerable and the risks low, a recommendation for selective screening of edentulous patients is made

  11. Nutritional screening for improving professional practice for patient outcomes in hospital and primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Vali, Yasaman; Murray, Susan M; Wonderling, David; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-06-06

    Given the prevalence of under-nutrition and reports of inadequate nutritional management of patients in hospitals and the community, nutritional screening may play a role in reducing the risks of malnutrition. Screening programmes can invoke costs to health systems and patients. It is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes. To examine the effectiveness of nutritional screening in improving quality of care (professional practice) and patient outcomes compared with usual care. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June 2012 to find relevant studies. Randomised controlled studies, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies assessing the effectiveness of nutritional screening were eligible for inclusion in the review. We considered process outcomes (for example patient identification, referral to dietitian) and patient outcomes (for example mortality, change in body mass index (BMI)). Participants were adult patients aged 16 years or over. We included studies conducted in different settings, including hospitals, out-patient clinics, primary care or long term care settings. We independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included studies. Meta-analysis was considered but was not conducted due to the discrepancies between the studies. The studies were heterogeneous in their design, setting, intervention and outcomes. We analysed the data using a narrative synthesis approach. After conducting initial searches and screening the titles and abstracts of the identified literature, 77 full text papers were retrieved and read. Ultimately three studies were included. Two controlled before-after studies were conducted in hospital settings (one in the UK and one in the Netherlands) and one cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary care setting (in the USA).The study conducted in

  12. Successful external cephalic version after amnioinfusion in a patient with preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buek, John D; McVearry, Ingrid; Lim, Elaine; Landy, Helain; Afriyie-Gray, Akua

    2005-06-01

    After hospitalization subsequent to preterm premature rupture of membranes at 29 weeks, our patient was scheduled for induction of labor at 34 weeks. When the fetus was found to be breech with oligohydramnios, amnioinfusion was performed to facilitate external cephalic version, and this successful procedure enabled the patient to deliver vaginally.

  13. Feasibility and yield of screening for non-communicable diseases among treated tuberculosis patients in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A L; Marais, B J; Mitnick, C D; Garden, F L; Lecca, L; Contreras, C; Yauri, Y; Garcia, F; Marks, G B

    2018-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) poses a major challenge to low- and middle-income countries. Patients' engagement with health services for anti-tuberculosis treatment provides an opportunity for screening for NCDs and for linkage to care. We explored the feasibility and yield of screening for NCDs in patients treated for tuberculosis (TB) in Lima, Peru, as part of a study focused on chronic respiratory sequelae. A representative sample of community controls was recruited from the same geographical area. Screening entailed taking a medical history and performing ambulatory blood pressure measurement and urinalysis. A total of 177 participants with previous TB (33 with multidrug-resistant TB) and 161 community controls were evaluated. There was an almost four-fold increased prevalence of self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) in the TB group (adjusted prevalence ratio 3.66, 95%CI 1.68-8.01). Among those without self-reported DM, 3.3% had glycosuria, with a number needed to screen (NNS) of 31. The NNS to find one (new) case of hypertension or proteinuria in the TB group was respectively 24 and 5. Patient-centred care that includes pragmatic NCD screening is feasible in TB patients, and the treatment period provides a good opportunity to link patients to ongoing care.

  14. [Screening for malnutrition among hospitalized patients in a Colombian University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Viviana; Bernal, Laura; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Ruiz, Álvaro J

    2017-04-01

    On admission, 30 to 50% of hospitalized patients have some degree of malnutrition, which is associated with longer length of stay, higher rates of complications, mortality and greater costs. To determine the frequency of screening for risk of malnutrition in medical records and assess the usefulness of the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). In a cross-sectional study, we searched for malnutrition screening in medical records, and we applied the MST tool to hospitalized patients at the Internal Medicine Wards of San Ignacio University Hospital. Of 295 patients included, none had been screened for malnutrition since hospital admission. Sixty one percent were at nutritional risk, with a higher prevalence among patients with HIV (85.7%), cancer (77.5%) and pneumonia. A positive MST result was associated with a 3.2 days increase in length of hospital stay (p = 0.024). The prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized patients is high, but its screening is inadequate and it is underdiagnosed. The MST tool is simple, fast, low-cost, and has a good diagnostic performance.

  15. Ultrasound-guided lumbar puncture in pediatric patients: technical success and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David B; Shivaram, Giri; Koo, Kevin S H; Shaw, Dennis W W; Meyer, Kirby F; Monroe, Eric J

    2018-06-01

    Disadvantages of fluoroscopically guided lumbar puncture include delivery of ionizing radiation and limited resolution of incompletely ossified posterior elements. Ultrasound (US) allows visualization of critical soft tissues and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space without ionizing radiation. To determine the technical success and safety of US-guided lumbar puncture in pediatric patients. A retrospective review identified all patients referred to interventional radiology for lumbar puncture between June 2010 and June 2017. Patients who underwent lumbar puncture with fluoroscopic guidance alone were excluded. For the remaining procedures, technical success and procedural complications were assessed. Two hundred and one image-guided lumbar punctures in 161 patients were included. Eighty patients (43%) had previously failed landmark-based attempts. One hundred ninety-six (97.5%) patients underwent lumbar puncture. Five procedures (2.5%) were not attempted after US assessment, either due to a paucity of CSF or unsafe window for needle placement. Technical success was achieved in 187 (95.4%) of lumbar punctures attempted with US guidance. One hundred seventy-seven (90.3%) were technically successful with US alone (age range: 2 days-15 years, weight range: 1.9-53.1 kg) and an additional 10 (5.1%) were successful with US-guided thecal access and subsequent fluoroscopic confirmation. Three (1.5%) cases were unsuccessful with US guidance but were subsequently successful with fluoroscopic guidance. Of the 80 previously failed landmark-based lumbar punctures, 77 (96.3%) were successful with US guidance alone. There were no reported complications. US guidance is safe and effective for lumbar punctures and has specific advantages over fluoroscopy in pediatric patients.

  16. Vulnerable long-term psychiatric in- patients need screening for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as prominent medical issues in long-term care and provide guidelines for their ..... described in the literature.7,28 These patients might benefit from a renewed emphasis on ..... costs associated with marijuana comorbidity. Drug & Alcohol.

  17. The mathematics of a successful deconvolution: a quantitative assessment of mixture-based combinatorial libraries screened against two formylpeptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Radleigh G; Appel, Jon R; Giulianotti, Marc A; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Houghten, Richard A; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2013-05-30

    In the past 20 years, synthetic combinatorial methods have fundamentally advanced the ability to synthesize and screen large numbers of compounds for drug discovery and basic research. Mixture-based libraries and positional scanning deconvolution combine two approaches for the rapid identification of specific scaffolds and active ligands. Here we present a quantitative assessment of the screening of 32 positional scanning libraries in the identification of highly specific and selective ligands for two formylpeptide receptors. We also compare and contrast two mixture-based library approaches using a mathematical model to facilitate the selection of active scaffolds and libraries to be pursued for further evaluation. The flexibility demonstrated in the differently formatted mixture-based libraries allows for their screening in a wide range of assays.

  18. Opt-Out Patient Navigation to Improve Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Homeless Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Wisnivesky, Juan

    2017-09-01

    A patient navigation model was implemented to improve breast and cervical cancer screening among women who were homeless in five shelters and shelter clinics in New York City in 2014. Navigation consisted of opt-out screening to eligible women; cancer health and screening education; scheduling and following up for screening completion, obtaining, and communicating results to patients and providers; and care coordination with social services organizations. Women (n = 162, aged 21-74, 58% black) completed mammogram (88%) and Pap testing (83%) from baselines of 59% and 50%, respectively. There was no association between mental health or substance abuse and screening completion. Adjusted analysis showed a significant association between refusing/missing Pap testing and older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.20); independent predictors of mammogram included more pregnancies (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.37-0.88) and older age (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79-0.90). Opt-out patient navigation is feasible and effective and may mitigate multilevel barriers to cancer screening among women with unstable housing.

  19. A nutritional risk screening model for patients with liver cirrhosis established using discriminant analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Binghua

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo establish a nutritional risk screening model for patients with liver cirrhosis using discriminant analysis. MethodsThe clinical data of 273 patients with liver cirrhosis who were admitted to Shuguang Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from August 2015 to March 2016 were collected. Body height, body weight, upper arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, subscapular skinfold thickness, and hand grip strength were measured and recorded, and then body mass index (BMI and upper arm muscle circumference were calculated. Laboratory markers including liver function parameters, renal function parameters, and vitamins were measured. The patients were asked to complete Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST, and a self-developed nutritional risk screening pathway was used for nutritional risk classification. Observation scales of the four diagnostic methods in traditional Chinese medicine were used to collect patients′ symptoms and signs. Continuous data were expressed as mean±SD (x±s; an analysis of variance was used for comparison between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between two groups. Discriminant analysis was used for model establishment, and cross validation was used for model verification. ResultsThe nutritional risk screening pathway for patients with liver cirrhosis was used for the screening of respondents, and there were 49 patients (17.95% in non-risk group, 49 (17.95% in possible-risk group, and 175 (64.10% in risk group. The distance criterion function was used to establish the nutritional risk screening model for patients with liver cirrhosis: D1=-11.885+0.310×BMI+0150×MAC+0.005×P-Alb-0.001×Vit B12+0.103×Vit D-0.89×ascites-0.404×weakness-0.560×hypochondriac pain+0035×dysphoria with feverish sensation (note: if a patient has ascites, weakness, hypochondriac pain

  20. Tomosynthesis Impact on Breast Cancer Screening in Patients Younger Than 50 Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephen L; Shisler, Julie L

    2018-04-09

    The question of benefits versus harms of breast cancer screening for women younger than 50 years old has been the subject of debate. We investigate if the addition of tomosynthesis to mammography improves screening performance outcomes for women in this age group. Screening performance for 59,921 patients (41,542 digital mammography and 18,379 tomosynthesis) younger than 50 years old was collected from a community-based screening network from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015. Patients were offered tomosynthesis if it was available. Parameters including recall, biopsy, and cancer detection rates were compared. Mixed effects regression analysis was used to estimate rates with screening modality, age, and density as fixed effects and screening site as a random effect. Rates for patients with dense breast tissue were also evaluated. Model adjusted rates per 1000 screenings with digital mammography were compared with digital mammography plus tomosynthesis, respectively: recall rate decreased from 117 to 108 (difference, -8.3; p = 0.003); biopsy rate increased from 13.5 to 16.6 (difference, 3.1; p = 0.003); and cancer detection rate increased from 1.9 to 2.6 (difference, 0.8; p = 0.060). Model adjusted rates for patients with dense breast tissue were: recall rate decreased from 135 to 132 (difference, -3.2; p = 0.44); biopsy rate increased from 16.0 to 20.5 (difference, 4.5; p = 0.004); and cancer detection rate increased from 2.1 to 3.5 (difference, 1.3; p = 0.03). Tomosynthesis in a community setting resulted in decreased recall rates for patients younger than 50 years old. For the subgroup of women with dense breast tissue, cancer detection rates also increased.

  1. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) versus MRI in the high-risk screening setting: patient preferences and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jordana; Miller, Matthew M; Mehta, Tejas S; Fein-Zachary, Valerie; Nathanson, Audrey; Hori, Wendy; Monahan-Earley, Rita; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    Our study evaluates patient preferences toward screening CESM versus MRI. As part of a prospective study, high-risk patients had breast MRI and CESM. Patients completed an anonymous survey to evaluate preferences regarding the two modalities. 88% of participants completed the survey. 79% preferred CESM over MRI if the exams had equal sensitivity. 89% would be comfortable receiving contrast as part of an annual screening test. High-risk populations may accept CESM as a screening exam and may prefer it over screening MRI if ongoing trials demonstrate screening CESM to be clinically non-inferior MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of electronic clinical reminders to increase preventive screenings in a primary care setting: blueprint from a successful process in Kodiak, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onders, Robert; Spillane, James; Reilley, Brigg; Leston, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The Kodiak Area Native Association (KANA) provides primary health care in Kodiak, Alaska and 6 outlying villages. KANA sought to actively improve key preventive screening rates for its patients. KANA adopted an electronic health record in 2008 and deployed national clinical reminders from the Indian Health Service for 5 key preventive screenings: tobacco use, alcohol use, depression, intimate partner violence, and a comprehensive cardiovascular exam. Clinical reminders were deployed in a 5-step process: (a) establish clinical demand, (b) pilot test reminder, (c) expand reminder to all providers, (d) measure outcomes and share results, and (e) delegate clinical reminder follow-up (primarily to nurses). Data from 2007-2011 show screening rates for all 5 measures improved considerably, to levels significantly above the national average for Indian Health Service facilities. Clinical reminders have been a key part of a multistep process to improve screening for depression, tobacco cessation, intimate partner violence, alcohol use, and cardiovascular disease. If deployed correctly, reminders are valuable tools in identifying patients who are overdue for preventive health screenings.

  3. Patient selection, echocardiographic screening and treatment strategies for interventional tricuspid repair using the edge-to-edge repair technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausleiter, Jörg; Braun, Daniel; Orban, Mathias; Latib, Azeem; Lurz, Philipp; Boekstegers, Peter; von Bardeleben, Ralph Stephan; Kowalski, Marek; Hahn, Rebecca T; Maisano, Francesco; Hagl, Christian; Massberg, Steffen; Nabauer, Michael

    2018-04-24

    Severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) has long been neglected despite its well known association with mortality. While surgical mortality rates remain high in isolated tricuspid valve surgery, interventional TR repair is rapidly evolving as an alternative to cardiac surgery in selected patients at high surgical risk. Currently, interventional edge-to-edge repair is the most frequently applied technique for TR repair even though the device has not been developed for this particular indication. Due to the inherent differences in tricuspid and mitral valve anatomy and pathology, percutaneous repair of the tricuspid valve is challenging due to a variety of factors including the complexity and variability of tricuspid valve anatomy, echocardiographic visibility of the valve leaflets, and device steering to the tricuspid valve. Furthermore, it remains to be clarified which patients are suitable for a percutaneous tricuspid repair and which features predict a successful procedure. On the basis of the available experience, we describe criteria for patient selection including morphological valve features, a standardized process for echocardiographic screening, and a strategy for clip placement. These criteria will help to achieve standardization of valve assessment and the procedural approach, and to further develop interventional tricuspid valve repair using either currently available devices or dedicated tricuspid edge-to-edge repair devices in the future. In summary, this manuscript will provide guidance for patient selection and echocardiographic screening when considering edge-to-edge repair for severe TR.

  4. Successful enteral nutrition in the treatment of esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Portanova Michel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Esophagojejunal fistula is a serious complication after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. This study describes the successful conservative management in 3 gastric cancer patients with esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy using total enteral nutrition. Methods Between January 2004 to December 2008, 588 consecutive patients with a proven diagnosis of gastric cancer were taken to the operation room to try a curative treatment. Of these, 173 underwent to...

  5. Successful treatment on an out-patient basis of a patient with Down's syndrome and disseminated testicular seminoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleijfer, S.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    Due to a high incidence of undescended testicles, patients with Down's syndrome have an increased risk of testicular cancer. The treatment of these patients with the successful cisplatin-containing regimens, which are however toxic and require hospitalization, can cause several problems. We present

  6. [Screening of pulmonary hypertension in a Spanish cohort of patients with systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo Palma, María Jesús; Montero Mateos, Enrique; González León, Rocío; López Haldón, José Eduardo; Sánchez Román, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an important cause of morbimortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Evolution is worse than that of subjects with idiopathic PAH, but prognosis improves when PAH is diagnosed early. The aim of this research is to describe results of a screening program for diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) carried out in a cohort of Spanish patients with SSc. PH screening was performed by transthoracic doppler echocardiography (TTDE) in 184 patients with SSc. Patients with systolic pulmonary arterial pressure estimated by TTDE>35 mmHg were evaluated per protocol to confirm diagnosis and type of PH. PAH was diagnosed in 25 patients (13.6%). Patients with diffuse and limited SSc developed PAH in a similar degree, 9/60 (15%) vs. 16/100 (16%), with no cases among patients with SSc "sine scleroderma" or "pre-scleroderma" (P<.001). The only clinical or epidemiological data characterizing patients with PAH were older age (mean age 67 years for patients with PAH vs. 56 years for those without PAH, P=.007), limited SSc, a trend toward shorter evolution of the underlying disease (median 8 years for patients with PAH vs. 10 years for those without PAH, P=.73), and a higher frequency of positive anticentromere antibodies (16 patients [64%] with PAH vs. 70 (48,3%) without PAH, P=.19). Prevalence of PAH in SSc was high and supports the implementation of a regular screening program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Screening for carcinoma in situ of the contralateral testis in patients with germinal testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, J G; Skakkebaek, N E; von der Maase, H

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty biopsy specimens from the contralateral testis in patients with unilateral germinal testicular cancer were analysed by light microscopy for carcinoma-in-situ changes. Changes were found in 13 (5.2%) patients. One-third of patients with an atrophic contralateral testis (volume...... of cryptorchidism or both had been screened. Since the natural course of carcinoma in situ in the contralateral testis of patients with germinal testicular cancer has not been established, the patients are being re-evaluated frequently. To date two patients with carcinoma in situ have developed a second cancer....

  8. Understanding the Knowledge Gap Experienced by U.S. Safety Net Patients in Teleretinal Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba M; Hayes, Erin Moran; Fish, Allison; Daskivich, Lauren Patty; Ogunyemi, Omolola I

    2016-01-01

    Safety-net patients' socioeconomic barriers interact with limited digital and health literacies to produce a "knowledge gap" that impacts the delivery of healthcare via telehealth technologies. Six focus groups (2 African- American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screening in a U.S. urban safety-net setting. Focus groups were analyzed using a modified grounded theory methodology. Findings indicate that patients' knowledge gap is primarily produced at three points during the delivery of care: (1) exacerbation of patients' pre-existing personal barriers in the clinical setting; (2) encounters with technology during screening; and (3) lack of follow up after the visit. This knowledge gap produces confusion, potentially limiting patients' perceptions of care and their ability to manage their own care. It may be ameliorated through delivery of patient education focused on both disease pathology and specific role of telehealth technologies in disease management.

  9. Using the "customer service framework" to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Bhat, Anita; Seol, Yoon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing momentum toward patient- and family-centered care at the federal policy level, the organizational literature remains divided on its effectiveness, especially in regard to its key dimension of involving patients and families in treatment decisions and safety practices. Although some have argued for the universal adoption of patient involvement, others have questioned both the effectiveness and feasibility of patient involvement. In this article, we apply a well-established theoretical perspective, that is, the Service Quality Model (SQM) (also known as the "customer service framework") to the health care context, to reconcile the debate related to patient involvement. The application helps support the case for universal adoption of patient involvement and also question the arguments against it. A key contribution of the SQM lies in highlighting a set of fundamental service quality determinants emanating from basic consumer service needs. It also provides a simple framework for understanding how gaps between consumer expectations and management perceptions of those expectations can affect the gap between "expected" and "perceived" service quality from a consumer's perspective. Simultaneously, the SQM also outlines "management requirements" for the successful implementation of a customer service strategy. Applying the SQM to the health care context therefore, in addition to reconciling the debate on patient involvement, helps identify specific steps health care managers could take to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care. Correspondingly, the application also provides insights into strategies for the successful implementation of policy recommendations related to patient- and family-centered care in health care organizations.

  10. Screening of a clinically and biochemically diagnosed SOD patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamad-Reza Aghanoori

    2015-07-22

    Jul 22, 2015 ... The parents of this case were maternal first-cousins (mother ..... of sulfite oxidation in · perfused rat liver; interaction of sulfite oxidase with the mito- ... parental disomy of chromosome 12 in a patient with isolated · sulfite oxidase ...

  11. Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines: How Readable Are Internet-Based Patient Education Resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, David Richard; White, Michael D; D'Angelo, Michael; Prabhu, Arpan V; Kamel, Sarah; Lakhani, Paras; Sundaram, Baskaran

    2018-04-30

    Following the findings of the National Lung Screening Trial, several national societies from multiple disciplines have endorsed the use of low-dose chest CT to screen for lung cancer. Online patient education materials are an important tool to disseminate information to the general public regarding the proven health benefits of lung cancer screening. This study aims to evaluate the reading level at which these materials related to lung cancer screening are written. The four terms "pulmonary nodule," "radiation," "low-dose CT," and "lung cancer screening" were searched on Google, and the first 20 online resources for each term were downloaded, converted into plain text, and analyzed using 10 well-established readability scales. If the websites were not written specifically for patients, they were excluded. The 80 articles were written at a 12.6 ± 2.7 (mean ± SD) grade level, with grade levels ranging from 4.0 to 19.0. Of the 80 articles, 62.5% required a high school education to comprehend, and 22.6% required a college degree or higher (≥ 16th grade) to comprehend. Only 2.5% of the analyzed articles adhered to the recommendations of the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association that patient education materials be written at a 3rd- to 7th-grade reading level. Commonly visited online lung cancer screening-related patient education materials are written at a level beyond the general patient population's ability to comprehend and may be contributing to a knowledge gap that is inhibiting patients from improving their health literacy.

  12. Clinical benefit of gluten-free diet in screen-detected older celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilppula Anitta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of serologic screening for celiac disease is still debatable. Evidence suggests that the disorder remains undetected even in the older population. It remains obscure whether screening makes good or harm in subjects with long-standing gluten ingestion. We evaluated whether older subjects benefit from active detection and subsequent gluten free dietary treatment of celiac disease. Methods Thirty-five biopsy-proven patients aged over 50 years had been detected by serologic mass screening. We examined the disease history, dietary compliance, symptoms, quality of life and bone mineral density at baseline and 1-2 years after the commencement of a gluten-free diet. Symptoms were evaluated by gastrointestinal symptom rating scale and quality of life by psychological general well-being questionnaires. Small bowel biopsy, serology, laboratory parameters assessing malabsorption, and bone mineral density were investigated. Results Dietary compliance was good. The patients had initially low mean serum ferritin values indicating subclinical iron deficiency, which was restored by a gluten-free diet. Vitamin B12, vitamin D and erythrocyte folic acid levels increased significantly on diet. Celiac patients had a history of low-energy fractures more often than the background population, and the diet had a beneficial effect on bone mineral density. Alleviation in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed, even though the patients reported no or only subtle symptoms at diagnosis. Quality of life remained unchanged. Of all the cases, two thirds would have been diagnosed even without screening if the family history, fractures or concomitant autoimmune diseases had been taken carefully into account. Conclusions Screen-detected patients benefited from a gluten-free diet. We encourage a high index of suspicion and active case-finding in celiac disease as an alternative to mass screening in older patients.

  13. Two faces of patient advocacy: the current controversy in newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Cosby G

    2014-08-01

    Newborn screening programmes began in the 1960s, have traditionally been conducted without parental permission and have grown dramatically in the last decade. Whether these programmes serve patients' best interests has recently become a point of controversy. Privacy advocates, concerned that newborn screening infringes upon individual liberties, are demanding fundamental changes to these programmes. These include parental permission and limiting the research on the blood samples obtained, an agenda at odds with the viewpoints of newborn screening advocates. This essay presents the history of newborn screening in the USA, with attention to factors that have contributed to concerns about these programmes. The essay suggests that the rapid increase in the number of disorders screened for and the addition of research without either public knowledge or informed consent were critical to the development of resistance to mandatory newborn screening and research. Future newborn screening initiatives should include public education and comment to ensure continued support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Brain magnetic resonance imaging screening is not useful for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Teruya, Katsuji; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Oka, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the diagnostic usefulness of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms in detecting intracranial diseases at early stages. In this retrospective analysis, the study patients were HIV-1-infected patients who underwent brain MRI scan in clinical practice between 2001 and 2013. We excluded patients with MRI for (1) follow-up examination for prediagnosed intracranial diseases, (2) cancer staging, (3) screening mycobacterium/bacteria/fungi disease proliferation in the brain, and (4) evaluation for meningitis/encephalitis. The study patients (n=485) were classified into two groups: those who underwent brain MRI scan without any neurological symptoms/signs (asymptomatic patients, n=158) and those who underwent MRI due to such symptoms (symptomatic patients, n=327). Asymptomatic patients had lower CD4 counts than symptomatic patients (median 78 versus 241/μl). Intracranial diseases were detected in three (2%) of the asymptomatic patients [two toxoplasmosis and one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)] compared to 58 (19%) of the symptomatic patients (the χ(2) test, pHIV-associated dementia (n=17). Among symptomatic patients, intracranial diseases were common in those with slurred speech (3/6, 50%), seizure (4/10, 40%), eyesight/vision abnormality (5/16, 31%), altered mental status (8/31, 26%), and hemiplegia/numbness (13/50, 26%). For patients with CD4 count HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms is of little value.

  15. Determinants of noninvasive ventilation success or failure in morbidly obese patients in acute respiratory failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Lemyze

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure (ARF is a common life-threatening complication in morbidly obese patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS. We aimed to identify the determinants of noninvasive ventilation (NIV success or failure for this indication.We prospectively included 76 consecutive patients with BMI>40 kg/m2 diagnosed with OHS and treated by NIV for ARF in a 15-bed ICU of a tertiary hospital.NIV failed to reverse ARF in only 13 patients. Factors associated with NIV failure included pneumonia (n = 12/13, 92% vs n = 9/63, 14%; p<0.0001, high SOFA (10 vs 5; p<0.0001 and SAPS2 score (63 vs 39; p<0.0001 at admission. These patients often experienced poor outcome despite early resort to endotracheal intubation (in-hospital mortality, 92.3% vs 17.5%; p<0.001. The only factor significantly associated with successful response to NIV was idiopathic decompensation of OHS (n = 30, 48% vs n = 0, 0%; p = 0.001. In the NIV success group (n = 63, 33 patients (53% experienced a delayed response to NIV (with persistent hypercapnic acidosis during the first 6 hours.Multiple organ failure and pneumonia were the main factors associated with NIV failure and death in morbidly obese patients in hypoxemic ARF. On the opposite, NIV was constantly successful and could be safely pushed further in case of severe hypercapnic acute respiratory decompensation of OHS.

  16. Plasma Screening for Progranulin Mutations in Patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Bertram, Kelly; Formica, Alessandra; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cioffi, Sara M G; Arighi, Andrea; Scarpini, Elio; Colosimo, Carlo

    2016-05-04

    Progranulin gene (GRN) mutations are characterized by heterogeneous presentations. Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is often associated with GRN mutations, whereas association with progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSPS) is rare. Plasma progranulin levels were evaluated in 34 patients, including 19 with PSPS, 12 with CBS, and 3 with mixed signs, with the purpose to screen for the presence of causal mutations, associated with low levels. We found undetectable levels in a patient with CBS. Sequencing confirmed the presence of the Thr272fs deletion. Progranulin mutation screening is suggested in cases of CBS, even in the absence of positive family history for dementia and/or movement disorders.

  17. Performance of an automated electronic acute lung injury screening system in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Helen C; Finkel, Barbara B; Khalsa, Satjeet S; Lanken, Paul N; Prasad, Meeta; Urbani, Richard; Fuchs, Barry D

    2011-01-01

    Lung protective ventilation reduces mortality in patients with acute lung injury, but underrecognition of acute lung injury has limited its use. We recently validated an automated electronic acute lung injury surveillance system in patients with major trauma in a single intensive care unit. In this study, we assessed the system's performance as a prospective acute lung injury screening tool in a diverse population of intensive care unit patients. Patients were screened prospectively for acute lung injury over 21 wks by the automated system and by an experienced research coordinator who manually screened subjects for enrollment in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Clinical Trials Network (ARDSNet) trials. Performance of the automated system was assessed by comparing its results with the manual screening process. Discordant results were adjudicated blindly by two physician reviewers. In addition, a sensitivity analysis using a range of assumptions was conducted to better estimate the system's performance. The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, an academic medical center and ARDSNet center (1994-2006). Intubated patients in medical and surgical intensive care units. None. Of 1270 patients screened, 84 were identified with acute lung injury (incidence of 6.6%). The automated screening system had a sensitivity of 97.6% (95% confidence interval, 96.8-98.4%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% confidence interval, 96.8-98.4%). The manual screening algorithm had a sensitivity of 57.1% (95% confidence interval, 54.5-59.8%) and a specificity of 99.7% (95% confidence interval, 99.4-100%). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated a range for sensitivity of 75.0-97.6% of the automated system under varying assumptions. Under all assumptions, the automated system demonstrated higher sensitivity than and comparable specificity to the manual screening method. An automated electronic system identified patients with acute lung injury with high sensitivity and specificity in diverse

  18. Estimation of patient dose in mammography screening examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Fujii, S.; Orito, T.; Asada, Y.; Koga, S.; Horita, K.; Kido, C.

    1996-01-01

    Mammography is one of the most effective examinations for detecting breast carcinoma. Although the dose is usually much higher than that in other types of X-ray examination, that is accepted by the patient because for fears of suffering cancer. Benefit of relatively high doses derived from mammographic examinations is considered to well exceed the risk of cancer induction by radiation exposure. The purpose of this study is to investigate patient dose of mammography in Japan by questionnaire sent to 531 institutions selected from whole Japan and direct measurements carried out in 28 hospitals in Aichi Prefecture. The user's guide in mammography published by NCRP and Quality Assurance Program of American College of Radiology were used to assess the exposure and image quality of mammogram. (author)

  19. Factors affecting the success of weaning in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Teke

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Weaning failure rate was higher in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and many factors affect it. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the success of weaning in COPD patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV.Materials and methods: Totally 43 COPD patients who received IMV in intensive care unit were included. Clinical and laboratory results and Acute Physiology Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores were recorded and affecting factors on weaning success were investigated.Results: In 43 patients, 25 had successful weaning (58.1%. Patients with high APACHE II score prior to intubation was found as associated with weaning failure. High Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores before entubation and weaning are associated with weaning success. Pre-weaning anxiety, positive endotracheal aspirate culture, pulmonary arterial pressure value, enteral feeding, pre-weaning tachycardia, pre-weaning cuff leaking and FiO2 values were found to be associated with weaning failure. Pre-weaning cortisol levels were associated with weaning success. In successful weaning group, measured NIF and VT in spontaneous mode were found as higher and f/VT ratio was lower compared with unsuccessful group. T-tube during the 15th and 30th minutes of the symptoms of fatigue (sweating assets were associated with weaning failure. IMV duration and longer extubation duration of weaning, and more number of t-tube insertion attempts were found as associated with failure of weaning.Conclusions: Infection in patients with COPD, the presence of anxiety, and hemodynamic and respiratory instability significantly increases the weaning failure.

  20. Molecular HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlet, Thomas; Memmi, Meriam; Saoudin, Henia; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear acid testing is more and more used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases. This paper focuses on the use of molecular tools for HIV screening. The term 'screening' will be used under the meaning of first-line HIV molecular techniques performed on a routine basis, which excludes HIV molecular tests designed to confirm or infirm a newly discovered HIV-seropositive patient or other molecular tests performed for the follow-up of HIV-infected patients. The following items are developed successively: i) presentation of the variety of molecular tools used for molecular HIV screening, ii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of blood products, iii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of organs and tissue from human origin, iv) use of HIV molecular tools in medically assisted procreation and v) use of HIV molecular tools in neonates from HIV-infected mothers.

  1. Very early screening for sleep-disordered breathing in acute coronary syndrome in patients without acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broecke, Sandra; Jobard, Olivier; Montalescot, Gilles; Bruyneel, Marie; Ninane, Vincent; Arnulf, Isabelle; Similowski, Thomas; Attali, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is frequently associated with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Screening of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has not been previously evaluated in ACS within 72 h in intensive care settings and its management could potentially enhance patients' prognosis. This pilot study assessed the feasibility of SDB screening at the early phase of ACS. All consecutive patients admitted to the coronary care unit (CCU) for ACS without acute heart failure underwent one overnight-attended polysomnography (PSG) within 72 h after admission. A telemonitoring (TM) system was set up to remotely monitor the signals and repair faulty sensors. The 27 recordings were analyzed as respiratory polygraphy (RP) and as PSG, and the results were compared. The TM system allowed successful intervention in 48% of recordings, resulting in excellent quality PSG for 89% of cases. The prevalence of SDB [apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15/h] was 82% and mainly consisted of central SDB and periodic breathing, except three patients with OSA. Compared with PSG, RP underestimated AHI, probably due to the poor sleep efficiency, reduction of slow-wave sleep, and alteration of rapid eye movement sleep. An early SDB screening by remote-attended PSG is feasible in ACS patients shortly after admission to CCU. The TM enhanced the quality of PSG. A high prevalence of central SDB was noticed, for which the etiology remains unknown. Further large-scale studies are needed to determine whether central SDB is an incidental finding in early ACS and whether the presence and severity of SDB have a prognostic impact. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. European Union funded project on the development of a whole complement deficiency screening ELISA-A story of success and an exceptional manager: Mohamed R. Daha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würzner, Reinhard; Tedesco, Francesco; Garred, Peter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Truedsson, Lennart; Turner, Malcolm W; Sommarin, Yngve; Wieslander, Jörgen; Sim, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    A whole complement ELISA-based assay kit, primarily designed to screen for deficiencies in components of the complement system was developed during a European Union grant involving more than a dozen European scientists and a small-medium enterprise company (Wieslab, which later merged into Eurodiagnostica). The consortium was led by Prof. Mohamed R. Daha who had already guided a preceding European grant which prepared the ground for this endeavor to create a novel and sophisticated complement measurement tool. The final result of the grant was a scientific publication (Seelen et al., 2005, J. Immunol. Methods 296, 187-198) and a commercially available complement deficiency screening kit, WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen. Thereafter, the group decided to carry on with a grant, located at Innsbruck Medical University, and supported by royalties and unrestricted educational grants from Eurodiagnostica, Malmö, entitled "Search for Applications for WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen (SAW)" with the aim to look for further applications of this assay. During the latter project the group organized several scientific meetings aimed at evaluating the use of the assay as well as developing further branches of its platform. A look back over almost two decades reveals a great story of excellent research which was also commercially successful, fulfilling the aims of European Union grants. It is also a story of ageless friendship, only possible due to the vision and guidance of an exceptional manager: Moh Daha. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Do Physician Recommendations for Colorectal Cancer Screening Differ by Patient Age?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maida J Sewitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer screening is underutilized, resulting in preventable morbidity and mortality. In the present study, age-related and other disparities associated with physicians’ delivery of colorectal cancer screening recommendations were examined. The present cross-sectional study included 43 physicians and 618 of their patients, aged 50 to 80 years, without past or present colorectal cancer. Of the 285 screen-eligible patients, 45% received a recommendation. Multivariate analyses revealed that, compared with younger nonde-pressed patients, older depressed patients were less likely to receive fecal occult blood test recommendations, compared with no recommendation (OR=0.31, 95% CI 0.09 to 1.02, as well as less likely to receive colonoscopy recommendations, compared with no recommendation (OR=0.14; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.66. Comorbidity and marital status were associated with delivery of fecal occult blood test and colonoscopy recommendations, respectively, compared with no recommendation. In summary, patient age and other characteristics appeared to influence physicians’ delivery of colorectal cancer screening and choice of modality.

  4. Spectrum of patients with hypermethioninemia based on neonatal screening tests over 14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Jung Oh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The neonatal screening test for homocystinuria primarily measures methionine by using a dried blood specimen. We investigated the incidence and clinical manifestations of homocystinuria, isolated hypermethioninemia, and transient hypermethioninemia among patients with hypermethioninemia on a neonatal screening test. Methods : We performed a retrospective study of 58 patients transferred to Shoonchunhyang Hospital because of hypermethioninemia on a neonatal screening test between January 1996 and August 2009. We analyzed the level of amino acid from plasma and urine, as well as blood homocysteine. Results : Almost half of the 58 patients were identified as normal. Whereas only 3 (5.1% patients were identified as having homocystinuria, about 20.7% (12 cases of the patients had isolated hypermethioninemia. The ages of these two groups at initial detection of hypermethioninemia on plasma amino acid analysis were 50.0¡?#?2.5; days and 34.9¡?#?3.5; days, respectively. Both groups were put on diets, and they showed a normal developmental course as a result of early diagnosis and treatment. Conclusion : Hypermethioninemia without homocystinuria, referred to as isolated hypermethioninemia, was also detected. Thus, the impact of hypermethioninemia on a neonatal screening test should be carefully evaluated through analysis of amino acid levels from blood and urine, and we need to detect and treat an early stage of isolated hypermethioninemia as well as homocystinuria.

  5. Patient attitudes and preferences regarding literacy screening in ambulatory cancer care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Hahn

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Hahn1, Sofia F Garcia1, Hongyan Du2, David Cella11Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago; 2Center on Outcomes, Research and Education, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USAObjectives: To evaluate patient attitudes towards literacy screening, agreement between literacy tests, and associations between literacy, informed consent comprehension, and health-related quality of life (HRQL.Methods: Participants completed three literacy tests, read a sample consent form, and reported their HRQL, experiences, and attitudes.Results: We enrolled 97 cancer patients, of whom 66% were female, 67% were African American, and 65% were high school graduates. Sixty percent of patients with lower reading comprehension had trouble reading health information, and 31% had trouble reading everyday written material. Even patients with higher reading comprehension had trouble reading health information (29% and everyday written material (10%. Low-literacy patients were more likely to feel anxious about literacy screening. However, the majority of patients (84% would be willing to have literacy results given to providers. Comprehension of informed consent increased with higher literacy. There were no HRQL differences.Conclusions: Patients report difficulty comprehending written health information. Literacy assessment is acceptable and it is considered important for providers to be aware of their patients’ reading abilities. Patient preference data should be used to improve literacy testing strategies and measures. Enhancing detection of low literacy can facilitate interventions to reduce health disparities.Keywords: health literacy, screening, informed consent, reading, writing

  6. Patient and Clinician Perspectives on Shared Decision-making in Early Adopting Lung Cancer Screening Programs: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Koppelman, Elisa; Bolton, Rendelle; Lasser, Karen E; Borrelli, Belinda; Au, David H; Slatore, Christopher G; Clark, Jack A; Kathuria, Hasmeena

    2018-02-21

    Guidelines recommend, and Medicare requires, shared decision-making between patients and clinicians before referring individuals at high risk of lung cancer for chest CT screening. However, little is known about the extent to which shared decision-making about lung cancer screening is achieved in real-world settings. To characterize patient and clinician impressions of early experiences with communication and decision-making about lung cancer screening and perceived barriers to achieving shared decision-making. Qualitative study entailing semi-structured interviews and focus groups. We enrolled 36 clinicians who refer patients for lung cancer screening and 49 patients who had undergone lung cancer screening in the prior year. Participants were recruited from lung cancer screening programs at four hospitals (three Veterans Health Administration, one urban safety net). Using content analysis, we analyzed transcripts to characterize communication and decision-making about lung cancer screening. Our analysis focused on the recommended components of shared decision-making (information sharing, deliberation, and decision aid use) and barriers to achieving shared decision-making. Clinicians varied in the information shared with patients, and did not consistently incorporate decision aids. Clinicians believed they explained the rationale and gave some (often purposely limited) information about the trade-offs of lung cancer screening. By contrast, some patients reported receiving little information about screening or its trade-offs and did not realize the CT was intended as a screening test for lung cancer. Clinicians and patients alike did not perceive that significant deliberation typically occurred. Clinicians perceived insufficient time, competing priorities, difficulty accessing decision aids, limited patient comprehension, and anticipated patient emotions as barriers to realizing shared decision-making. Due to multiple perceived barriers, patient

  7. Effects of Aging and Domain Knowledge on Usability in Small Screen Devices for Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero Valdez, André; Ziefle, Martina; Horstmann, Andreas; Herding, Daniel; Schroeder, Ulrik

    Technology acceptance has become a key concept for the successful rollout of technical devices. Though the concept is intensively studied for nearly 20 years now, still, many open questions remain. This especially applies to technology acceptance of older users, which are known to be very sensitive to suboptimal interfaces and show considerable reservations towards the usage of new technology. Mobile small screen technology increasingly penetrates health care and medical applications. This study investigates impacts of aging, technology expertise and domain knowledge on user interaction using the example of diabetes. For this purpose user effectiveness and efficiency have been measured on a simulated small screen device and related to user characteristics, showing that age and technology expertise have a big impact on usability of the device. Furthermore, impacts of user characteristics and success during the trial on acceptance of the device were surveyed and analyzed.

  8. Evaluating screening colonoscopy quality in an uninsured urban population following patient navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Naylor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Patient navigation (PN increases screening colonoscopy completion in minority and uninsured populations. However, colonoscopy quality is under-reported in the setting of PN and quality indicators have often failed to meet benchmark standards. This study investigated screening colonoscopy quality indicators after year-one of a PN initiative targeting the medically uninsured. This was a retrospective analysis of 296 outpatient screening colonoscopies. Patients were 45 to 75 years of age with no history of bowel cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or colorectal surgery. The screening colonoscopy quality indicators: adenoma detection rate (ADR, cecal intubation rate (CIR, and bowel preparation quality were compared in 89 uninsured Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC patients who received PN and 207 University Hospital patients who received usual care. The FQHC PN and University Hospital cohorts were similar in female sex (69% vs. 70%; p = 0.861 and African American race (61% vs. 61%; p = 0.920. The FQHC PN cohort was younger (57 years vs. 60 years; p < 0.001. There was no difference in ADR (33% vs. 32%; p = 0.971 or CIR (96% vs. 95%; p = 0.900 comparing the FQHC PN and University Hospital cohorts. The FQHC PN patients had a greater likelihood of an optimal bowel preparation on multivariate logistic regression (odds ratio 4.17; 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 16.20. Uninsured FQHC patients who received PN were observed to have intra-procedure quality indicators that exceeded bench-mark standards for high-quality screening colonoscopy and were equivalent to those observed in an insured University Hospital patient population.

  9. COBRA 9121: Federal liability for patient screening and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, S A

    1988-01-01

    Health care is no longer a simple cottage industry of individual providers. Increases in competition and government regulation have transformed the old structure of health care into a fend-for-yourself marketplace dominated by multi-institutional corporations. In order to accomplish this change, health care providers have had to alter their locus of attention from the patient to the bottom line. As a result, it is not surprising to find corporate business practices interspersed among the traditional health care practices. On March 1, 1987, the federal government began an assault on a casualty of this new market oriental philosophy, patient transfers or "dumping". COBRA 9121 is an "anti-dumping" law designed to prevent hospitals from continuing this practice. The vehicle for ensuring that the statute's broad provisions are followed is a set of "sudden death" probations. For example, under COBRA, hospitals found guilty of knowing or negligent violations may be suspended or terminated from receiving all Medicare reimbursement. One way to avoid these "sudden death" probations is to understand the implications of this law.

  10. Intubation of prehospital patients with curved laryngoscope blade is more successful than with straight blade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Scott M; Haim, Eithan D; Sullivan, Alex H; Clayton, Lisa M

    2018-02-17

    Direct laryngoscopy can be performed using curved or straight blades, and providers usually choose the blade they are most comfortable with. However, curved blades are anecdotally thought of as easier to use than straight blades. We seek to compare intubation success rates of paramedics using curved versus straight blades. Design: retrospective chart review. hospital-based suburban ALS service with 20,000 annual calls. prehospital patients with any direct laryngoscopy intubation attempt over almost 9years. First attempt and overall success rates were calculated for attempts with curved and straight blades. Differences between the groups were calculated. 2299 patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy. 1865 had attempts with a curved blade, 367 had attempts with a straight blade, and 67 had attempts with both. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. First attempt success was 86% with a curved blade and 73% with a straight blade: a difference of 13% (95% CI: 9-17). Overall success was 96% with a curved blade and 81% with a straight blade: a difference of 15% (95% CI: 12-18). There was an average of 1.11 intubation attempts per patient with a curved blade and 1.13 attempts per patient with a straight blade (2% difference, 95% CI: -3-7). Our study found a significant difference in intubation success rates between laryngoscope blade types. Curved blades had higher first attempt and overall success rates when compared to straight blades. Paramedics should consider selecting a curved blade as their tool of choice to potentially improve intubation success. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What are the keys to successful adrenal venous sampling (AVS) in patients with primary aldosteronism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, William F; Stanson, Anthony W

    2009-01-01

    Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is the criterion standard to distinguish between unilateral and bilateral adrenal disease in patients with primary aldosteronism. The keys to successful AVS include appropriate patient selection, careful patient preparation, focused technical expertise, defined protocol, and accurate data interpretation. The use of AVS should be based on patient preferences, patient age, clinical comorbidities, and the clinical probability of finding an aldosterone-producing adenoma. AVS is optimally performed in the fasting state in the morning. AVS is an intricate procedure because the right adrenal vein is small and may be difficult to locate - the success rate depends on the proficiency of the angiographer. The key factors that determine the successful catheterization of both adrenal veins are experience, dedication and repetition. With experience, and focusing the expertise to 1 or 2 radiologists at a referral centre, the AVS success rate can be as high as 96%. A centre-specific, written protocol is mandatory. The protocol should be developed by an interested group of endocrinologists, radiologists and laboratory personnel. Safeguards should be in place to prevent mislabelling of the blood tubes in the radiology suite and to prevent sample mix-up in the laboratory.

  12. Myasthenia gravis and thymus: long-term follow-up screening of thymectomized and non-thymectomized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Jose Lorenzoni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thymoma screening is recommended at the onset of myasthenia gravis (MG or when patients with MG present with clinical deterioration or a progressive increase of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody. However, it is unknown if it is necessary to repeat the screening of thymoma at fixed intervals, even in the absence of MG deterioration, when the initial screening is negative. We analyzed the recurrence rate and incidence of new thymoma in a series of patients with well-controlled MG. The sample consisted of 53 patients, aged 17 to 72 years, and the follow-up varied between 75 and 472 months. The chest computerized tomography detected thymus abnormalities in eight patients at the initial screening and no abnormalities in all patients at a second screening after five years. The findings of this study support the classical opinion that screening for thymoma should be recommended only if there is clinical deterioration due to the disease.

  13. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-12-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m(2) of carboplatin and 50 mg/m(2) of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of over 12 months post-treatment the patient shows no clinical evidence of recurrent disease. This case provides evidence to encourage the use of chemotherapy in otherwise potentially undertreated haemodialysed patients.

  14. Bedside screening to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with neurological disorders: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertscher, Berit; Speyer, Renée; Palmieri, Maria; Plant, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a highly prevalent comorbidity in neurological patients and presents a serious health threat, which may le to outcomes of aspiration pneumonia ranging from hospitalization to death. Therefore, an early identification of risk followed by an accurate diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia is fundamental. This systematic review provides an update of currently available bedside screenings to identify oropharyngeal dysphagia in neurological patients. An electronic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychInfo (formerly PsychLit), and all hits from 2008 up to December 2012 were included in the review. Only studies with sufficient methodological quality were considered, after which the psychometric characteristics of the screening tools were determined. Two relevant bedside screenings were identified, with a minimum sensitivity and specificity of ≥70 and ≥60 %, respectively.

  15. Orientation of handle for successful prosthetic treatment in patients with an anatomic compromise after a maxillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumita, Yuka I; Hattori, Mariko; Elbashti, Mahmoud E; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2017-05-01

    This clinical technique provides a key procedure for successful prosthetic treatment in patients with an anatomical compromise after a maxillectomy. When making a preliminary impression, the clinician must keep the handle of the stock tray parallel to the patient's interpupillary line extraorally to maintain the correct position of the tray and to make a record of the inclination of the occlusal plane. This simple consideration during this first step of making a preliminary impression can be an important guide for both dentists and dental technicians. Information about the correct positioning of the tray and the inclination of the occlusal plane obtained by using a stock tray handle will greatly reduce the stress experienced by dentists, dental technicians, and patients during the fabrication of the prosthesis and will ultimately lead to successful prosthetic treatment in patients with anatomic compromise resulting from a maxillectomy. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Accuracy of quick and easy undernutrition screening tools--Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, and modified Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool--in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Venrooij, Lenny M. W.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Hopmans, Wendy; Borgmeijer-Hoelen, Mieke M. M. J.; de Vos, Rien; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the quick-and-easy undernutrition screening tools, ie, Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with respect to their accuracy in detecting undernutrition measured by a

  17. Negative opinions about cancer screening and contraceptive measures by female emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C; Gee, Erin M; Bock, Beth C; Becker, Bruce M; Clark, Melissa A

    2008-11-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which adult female emergency department participants viewed two women's cancer screening and two contraceptive measures negatively. The study also explored the relationship between having a negative opinion about these measures and participant demography, lack of knowledge, and lack of usage of these measures. Few women expressed negative opinions about these measures. Lack of knowledge about and lack of use of these measures were associated with having negative opinions on these cancer screening and contraceptive measures. Having any negative opinion about one cancer screening or contraceptive measure was associated with a higher risk of having any negative opinion on another measure. The results suggest that influencing opinion and knowledge about these measures might impact the success of emergency department-based cancer screening and contraceptive health programs. Editors' Strategic Implications: Emergency departments (and primary care settings) provide key opportunities for prevention. Replication is needed, but the authors present important data on knowledge, attitudes, and characteristics that might influence women's receptivity to consent to and engage in behaviors consistent with prevention, screening, and health promotion.

  18. A comparison of two tools to screen potentially inappropriate medication in internal medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, A-L; Spasojevic, S; Leszek, A; Théodoloz, M; Bonnabry, P; Fumeaux, T; Schaad, N

    2018-04-01

    Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) is an important issue for inpatient management; it has been associated with safety problems, such as increases in adverse drugs events, and with longer hospital stays and higher healthcare costs. To compare two PIM-screening tools-STOPP/START and PIM-Check-applied to internal medicine patients. A second objective was to compare the use of PIMs in readmitted and non-readmitted patients. A retrospective observational study, in the general internal medicine ward of a Swiss non-university hospital. We analysed a random sample of 50 patients, hospitalized in 2013, whose readmission within 30 days of discharge had been potentially preventable, and compared them to a sample of 50 sex- and age-matched patients who were not readmitted. PIMs were screened using the STOPP/START tool, developed for geriatric patients, and the PIM-Check tool, developed for internal medicine patients. The time needed to perform each patient's analysis was measured. A clinical pharmacist counted and evaluated each PIM detected, based on its clinical relevance to the individual patient's case. The rates of screened and validated PIMs involving readmitted and non-readmitted patients were compared. Across the whole population, PIM-Check and STOPP/START detected 1348 and 537 PIMs, respectively, representing 13.5 and 5.4 PIMs/patient. Screening time was substantially shorter with PIM-Check than with STOPP/START (4 vs 10 minutes, respectively). The clinical pharmacist judged that 45% and 42% of the PIMs detected using PIM-Check and STOPP/START, respectively, were clinically relevant to individual patients' cases. No significant differences in the rates of detected and clinically relevant PIM were found between readmitted and non-readmitted patients. Internal medicine patients are frequently prescribed PIMs. PIM-Check's PIM detection rate was three times higher than STOPP/START's, and its screening time was shorter thanks to its electronic interface. Nearly

  19. Comparison of interferon {gamma} release assays and conventional screening tests before tumour necrosis factor {alpha} blockade in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) and conventional screening tests in patients with inflammatory arthritis undergoing screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) before treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) compounds. METHODS: Successive patients were subjected to conventional LTBI screening, including a tuberculin skin test (TST). The T-SPOT.TB test was performed on all patients and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test was performed on a large subset. The results of the IGRAs were compared with the results of conventional screening tests. RESULTS: A total 150 patients were evaluated. The majority (57.9%) had rheumatoid arthritis. Previous vaccination with Bacille Calmette-Guerin was confirmed in 82% of patients. No patient had received prior anti-TB treatment. A total of 57 patients (38.0%) had at least one positive conventional risk factor. In contrast, an unequivocally positive T-SPOT.TB test was seen in only 14\\/143 (9.8%). There was 98.2% agreement between the two IGRAs. Statistically significant associations were found between each of the IGRAs and both TST and risk history, but not chest x-ray (CXR). A positive IGRA result was significantly associated with increased age. TB was not reactivated in any patient during the follow-up period. Interpretation: This study suggests that IGRAs may be useful when screening for LTBI before anti-TNFalpha therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The observations reported here also highlight the inadequate performance of CXR as a marker of LTBI.

  20. Screening for sepsis in general hospitalized patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, L; Marshall, A P; Walker, R; Aitken, L M

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis is a condition widely observed outside critical care areas. To examine the application of sepsis screening tools for early recognition of sepsis in general hospitalized patients to: (i) identify the accuracy of these tools; (ii) determine the outcomes associated with their implementation; and (iii) describe the implementation process. A systematic review method was used. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane, Scopus, Web of Science, and Embase databases were systematically searched for primary articles, published from January 1990 to June 2016, that investigated screening tools or alert mechanisms for early identification of sepsis in adult general hospitalized patients. The review protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42016042261). More than 8000 citations were screened for eligibility after duplicates had been removed. Six articles met the inclusion criteria testing two types of sepsis screening tools. Electronic tools can capture, recognize abnormal variables, and activate an alert in real time. However, accuracy of these tools was inconsistent across studies with only one demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. Paper-based, nurse-led screening tools appear to be more sensitive in the identification of septic patients but were only studied in small samples and particular populations. The process of care measures appears to be enhanced; however, demonstrating improved outcomes is more challenging. Implementation details are rarely reported. Heterogeneity of studies prevented meta-analysis. Clinicians, researchers and health decision-makers should consider these findings and limitations when implementing screening tools, research or policy on sepsis recognition in general hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of ultrasonography screening for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in metabolic syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Supakankunti, Siripen; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Apisarnthanarak, Piyaporn; Charoensak, Aphinya; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can be diagnosed early by noninvasive ultrasonography; however, the cost-effectiveness of ultrasonography screening with intensive weight reduction program in metabolic syndrome patients is not clear. This study aims to estimate economic and clinical outcomes of ultrasonography in Thailand. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis used decision tree and Markov models to estimate lifetime costs and health benefits from societal perspective, based on a cohort of 509 metabolic syndrome patients in Thailand. Data were obtained from published literatures and Thai database. Results were reported as incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in 2014 US dollars (USD) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained with discount rate of 3%. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the influence of parameter uncertainty on the results. Results: The ICER of ultrasonography screening of 50-year-old metabolic syndrome patients with intensive weight reduction program was 958 USD/QALY gained when compared with no screening. The probability of being cost-effective was 67% using willingness-to-pay threshold in Thailand (4848 USD/QALY gained). Screening before 45 years was cost saving while screening at 45 to 64 years was cost-effective. Conclusions: For patients with metabolic syndromes, ultrasonography screening for NAFLD with intensive weight reduction program is a cost-effective program in Thailand. Study can be used as part of evidence-informed decision making. Translational Impacts: Findings could contribute to changes of NAFLD diagnosis practice in settings where economic evidence is used as part of decision-making process. Furthermore, study design, model structure, and input parameters could also be used for future research addressing similar questions. PMID:28445256

  2. Establishing Decision Trees for Predicting Successful Postpyloric Nasoenteric Tube Placement in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weisheng; Sun, Cheng; Wei, Ru; Zhang, Yanlin; Ye, Heng; Chi, Ruibin; Zhang, Yichen; Hu, Bei; Lv, Bo; Chen, Lifang; Zhang, Xiunong; Lan, Huilan; Chen, Chunbo

    2018-01-01

    Despite the use of prokinetic agents, the overall success rate for postpyloric placement via a self-propelled spiral nasoenteric tube is quite low. This retrospective study was conducted in the intensive care units of 11 university hospitals from 2006 to 2016 among adult patients who underwent self-propelled spiral nasoenteric tube insertion. Success was defined as postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement confirmed by abdominal x-ray scan 24 hours after tube insertion. Chi-square automatic interaction detection (CHAID), simple classification and regression trees (SimpleCart), and J48 methodologies were used to develop decision tree models, and multiple logistic regression (LR) methodology was used to develop an LR model for predicting successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of these models. Successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement was confirmed in 427 of 939 patients enrolled. For predicting successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement, the performance of the 3 decision trees was similar in terms of the AUCs: 0.715 for the CHAID model, 0.682 for the SimpleCart model, and 0.671 for the J48 model. The AUC of the LR model was 0.729, which outperformed the J48 model. Both the CHAID and LR models achieved an acceptable discrimination for predicting successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement and were useful for intensivists in the setting of self-propelled spiral nasoenteric tube insertion. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. A new score for screening of malnutrition in patients with inoperable gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Ali; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Ghayour Nahand, Mousa; Fathifar, Zahra; Doostzadeh, Akram; Ghoreishi, Zohreh

    2017-06-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with gastric cancer. Early identification of malnourished patients results in improving quality of life. We aimed to assess the nutritional status of patients with inoperable gastric adenocarcinoma (IGA) and finding a precise malnutrition screening score for these patients before the onset of chemotherapy. Nutritional status was assessed using patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA), visceral proteins, and high-sensitivity C reactive protein. Tumor markers of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA-125) and CA 19-9 and their association with nutritional status were assessed. Then a new score for malnutrition screening was defined. Seventy-one patients with IGA completed the study. Malnourished and well-nourished patients (based on PG-SGA) were statistically different regarding albumin, prealbumin and CA-125. The best cut-off value for prealbumin for prediction of malnutrition was determined at 0.20 mg/dl and using known cut-off values for albumin (3.5 g/dl) and CA-125 (35 U/ml), a new score was defined for malnutrition screening named MS-score. According to MS-score, 92% of the patients had malnutrition and it could predict malnutrition with 96.8% sensitivity, 50% specificity and accuracy of 91.4%. MS-score has been suggested as an available and easy-to-use tool for malnutrition screening in patients with IGA. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Using the Frailty Assessment for Care Planning Tool (FACT) to screen elderly chronic kidney disease patients for frailty: the nurse experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Heather; Moorhouse, Paige; Mallery, Laurie; Landry, David; Tennankore, Karthik

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the prognostic significance of frailty for functional decline and poor health outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet, despite the development of clinical tools to screen for frailty, little is known about the experiential impact of screening for frailty in this setting. The Frailty Assessment for Care Planning Tool (FACT) evaluates frailty across 4 domains: mobility, function, social circumstances, and cognition. The purpose of this qualitative study was as follows: 1) explore the nurse experience of screening for frailty using the FACT tool in a specialized outpatient renal clinic; 2) determine how, if at all, provider perceptions of frailty changed after implementation of the frailty screening tool; and 3) determine the perceived factors that influence uptake and administration of the FACT screening tool in a specialized clinical setting. A semi-structured interview of 5 nurses from the Nova Scotia Health Authority, Central Zone Renal Clinic was conducted. A grounded theory approach was used to generate thematic categories and analysis models. Four primary themes emerged in the data analysis: "we were skeptical", "we made it work", "we learned how", and "we understand". As the renal nurses gained a sense of confidence in their ability to implement the FACT tool, initial barriers to implementation were attenuated. Implementation factors - such as realistic goals, clear guidelines, and ongoing training - were important factors for successful uptake of the frailty screening initiative. Nurse participants reported an overall positive experience using the FACT method to screen for frailty and indicated that their understanding of the multiple dimensions and subtleties of "frailty" were enhanced. Future nurse-led FACT screening initiatives should incorporate those factors identified as being integral to program success: realistic goals, clear guidelines, and ongoing training. Adopting the evaluation of frailty as a priority

  5. Successful remediation of patient safety incidents: a tale of two medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmchen, Lorens A; Richards, Michael R; McDonald, Timothy B

    2011-01-01

    As patient safety acquires strategic importance for all stakeholders in the health care delivery chain, one promising mechanism centers on the proactive disclosure of medical errors to patients. Yet, disclosure and apology alone will not be effective in fully addressing patients' concerns after an adverse event unless they are paired with a remediation component. The purpose of this study was to identify key features of successful remediation efforts that accompany the proactive disclosure of medical errors to patients. We describe and contrast two recent and very similar cases of preventable medical error involving inappropriate medication at a large tertiary-care academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Despite their similarity, the two medical errors led to very different health outcomes and remediation trajectories for the injured patients. Although one error causing no permanent harm was mismanaged to the lasting dissatisfaction of the patient, the other resulted in the death of the patient but was remediated to the point of allowing the family to come to terms with the loss and even restored a modicum of trust in the providers' sincerity. To maximize the opportunities for successful remediation, as soon as possible after the incident, providers should pledge to injured patients and their relatives that they will assist and accompany them in their recovery as long as necessary and then follow through on their pledge. As the two case studies show, it takes training and vigilance to ensure adherence to these principles and reach an optimal outcome for patients and their relatives.

  6. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-01-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m2 of carboplatin and 50 mg/m2 of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of ov...

  7. Engaging Patients in Decisions About Cancer Screening: Exploring the Decision Journey Through the Use of a Patient Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Steven H; Krist, Alex H; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Jones, Resa M; Lehman, Rebecca R; Hochheimer, Camille J; Sabo, Roy T; Frosch, Dominick L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Longo, Daniel R

    2018-02-01

    Engaging patients to make informed choices is paramount but difficult in busy practices. This study sought to engage patients outside the clinical setting to better understand how they approach cancer screening decisions, including their primary concerns and their preferences for finalizing their decision. Twelve primary care practices offering patients an online personal health record invited eligible patients to complete a 17-item online interactive module. Among 11,458 registered users, invitations to complete the module were sent to adults aged 50-74 years who were overdue for colorectal cancer screening and to women aged 40-49 years and men aged 55-69 who had not undergone a recent mammogram or prostate-specific antigen test, respectively. The module was started by 2,355 patients and completed by 903 patients. Most respondents (76.8%) knew they were eligible for screening. Preferred next steps were talking to the clinician (76.6%), reading/research (28.6%), and consulting trusted friends/family (16.4%). Priority topics included how much screening improves life expectancy, comparative test performance, and the prevalence/health risks of the cancer. Leading fears were getting cancer/delayed detection (79.2%), abnormal results (40.5%), and testing complications (39.1%), the last referring to false test results, medical complications, or unnecessary treatments. Men eligible for prostate-specific antigen screening were more likely than women eligible for mammography to express concerns about testing complications and to prioritize weighing pros and cons over gut feelings (pengagement strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pitfall in metabolic screening in a patient with fatal peroxisomal beta-oxidation defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosewich, H.; Waterham, H. R.; Wanders, R. J. A.; Ferdinandusse, S.; Henneke, M.; Hunneman, D.; Gärtner, J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a rare case of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency that was not detected by the common metabolic screening program for peroxisomal disorders. The patient presented with a typical MRI pattern showing pachygyria, perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebral and cerebellar white matter

  9. Red flags to screen for malignancy and fracture in patients with low back pain : systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Downie, Aron; Williams, Christopher M.; Henschke, Nicholas; Hancock, Mark J.; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; de Vet, Henrica C W; Macaskill, Petra; Irwig, Les; van Tulder, Maurits W; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence on diagnostic accuracy of red flag signs and symptoms to screen for fracture or malignancy in patients presenting with low back pain to primary, secondary, or tertiary care. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: Medline, OldMedline, Embase, and CINAHL from

  10. Screening for primary creatine deficiencies in French patients with unexplained neurological symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheillan, D.; Curt, M.J.; Briand, G.; Salomons, G.S.; Mention-Mulliez, K.; Dobbelaere, D.; Cuisset, J.M.; Lion-Francois, L.; Portes, V.D.; Chabli, A.; Valayannopoulos, V.; Benoist, J.F.; Pinard, J.M.; Simard, G.; Douay, O.; Deiva, K.; Afenjar, A.; Heron, D.; Rivier, F.; Chabrol, B.; Prieur, F.; Cartault, F.; Pitelet, G.; Goldenberg, A.; Bekri, S.; Gerard, M.; Delorme, R.; Tardieu, M.; Porchet, N.; Vianey-Saban, C.; Vamecq, J.

    2012-01-01

    A population of patients with unexplained neurological symptoms from six major French university hospitals was screened over a 28-month period for primary creatine disorder (PCD). Urine guanidinoacetate (GAA) and creatine:creatinine ratios were measured in a cohort of 6,353 subjects to identify PCD

  11. Poor performance of mandatory nutritional screening of in-hospital patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Larsen, Sisse Marie Hørup; Stender, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Background & aims: Since 2006 it has been mandatory at Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte to screen all patients for nutritional risk within 24 h of admittance. Audits conducted by department staff estimate that 70-80% of assessments are correctly executed, but the validity of this estimate ...

  12. RPE65 gene: multiplex PCR and mutation screening in patients from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The RPE65 protein is believed to play an important role in the metabolism of vitamin A in the ... PCR and mutation screening in patients from India with retinal degenerative diseases. ..... Bennett J. 2001 Gene therapy restores vision in a canine.

  13. Screening for autoantibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome and a matched control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Høyer-Madsen, M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1990-01-01

    Primary fibromyalgia syndrome (PFS) is a non-articular rheumatic condition characterized by chronic muscular pain. We have performed screening for autoantibodies in 20 women with PFS and in 19 age-matched healthy women. Fifty-five percent of the PFS patients had anti-smooth muscle antibodies and 40...

  14. Patients' Characteristics and Providers' Attitudes: Predictors of Screening Pregnant Women for Illicit Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerker, Bonnie D.; Horwitz, Sarah M.; Leventhal, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study's aim was to determine how patients' and providers' characteristics affect hospital providers' decisions to screen pregnant and postpartum women for illicit substances. Methods: A retrospective design was used. Participants included all low-income women (N=1,100) who delivered at an urban teaching hospital over a 12-month…

  15. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Armina; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003-2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted.

  16. Brief assessments and screening for geriatric conditions in older primary care patients: a pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seematter-Bagnoud, Laurence; Büla, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the rationale behind performing a brief geriatric assessment as a first step in the management of older patients in primary care practice. While geriatric conditions are considered by older patients and health professionals as particularly relevant for health and well-being, they remain too often overlooked due to many patient- and physician-related factors. These include time constraints and lack of specific training to undertake comprehensive geriatric assessment. This article discusses the epidemiologic rationale for screening functional, cognitive, affective, hearing and visual impairments, and nutritional status as well as fall risk and social status. It proposes using brief screening tests in primary care practice to identify patients who may need further comprehensive geriatric assessment or specific interventions.

  17. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: early screening of risk patients by spinal biphotonic absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatier, J.P.; Guaydier-Souquieres, G.; Loyau, G.

    1990-01-01

    With quantification techniques of the spinal bone condition, especially with spinal biphotonic absorptiometry, early screening of patients risking subsequent development of osteoporosis complicated with vertebral compression is possible. An investigation was conducted in Lower Normandy, in 386 women who had undergone menopause or an ovariectomy, with ages ranging between 40 and 56 years; 274 were in a peri-menopausal state. A curve of the bone mineral content according to age was previously established. From this curve, in semilogarithmic representation, each patient risk was assessed. This risk is considered as high in 30 p. cent of the patients, non existent in 52 p. cent and 18 p. cent are borderline. The percentage of high risk patients increases with the number of years since menopause. It is hoped that the incidence of osteoporosis will decrease with early screening and preventive therapeutic measures [fr

  18. Challenges Facing Successful Scaling Up of Effective Screening for Cardiovascular Disease by Community Health Workers in Mexico and South Africa: Policy Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Abrahams-Gessel; Denman, C A; Ta, Gaziano; Ns, Levitt; T, Puoane

    The integration of community health workers (CHWs) into primary and secondary prevention functions in health programs and services delivery in Mexico and South Africa has been demonstrated to be effective. Task-sharing related to adherence and treatment, from nurses to CHWs, has also been effectively demonstrated in these areas. HIV/AIDS and TB programs in South Africa have seen similar successes in task-sharing with CHWs in the areas of screening for risk and adherence to treatment. In the area of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), there is a policy commitment to integrating CHWs into primary health care programs at public health facilities in both Mexico and South Africa in the areas of reproductive health and infant health. Yet current programs utilizing CHWs are not integrated into existing primary health care services in a comprehensive manner for primary and secondary prevention of NCDs. In a recently completed study, CHWs were trained to perform the basic diagnostic function of primary screening to assess the risk of suffering a CVD-related event in the community using a non-laboratory risk assessment tool and referring persons at moderate to high risk to local government clinics, for further assessment and management by a nurse or physician. In this paper we compare the experience with this CVD screening study to successful programs in vaccination, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, and TB specifically to identify the barriers we identified as limitations to replicating these programs in the area of CVD diagnosis and management. We review barriers impacting the effective translation of policy into practice, including scale up issues; training and certification issues; integrating CHW to existing primary care teams and health system; funding and resource gaps. Finally, we suggest policy recommendations to replicate the demonstrated success of programs utilizing task-sharing with CHWs in infectious diseases and reproductive health, to integrated programs in NCD.

  19. Depression Screening Using Daily Mental-Health Ratings from a Smartphone Application for Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junetae; Lim, Sanghee; Min, Yul Ha; Shin, Yong-Wook; Lee, Byungtae; Sohn, Guiyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Lee, Jae-Ho; Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, Jong Won

    2016-08-04

    Mobile mental-health trackers are mobile phone apps that gather self-reported mental-health ratings from users. They have received great attention from clinicians as tools to screen for depression in individual patients. While several apps that ask simple questions using face emoticons have been developed, there has been no study examining the validity of their screening performance. In this study, we (1) evaluate the potential of a mobile mental-health tracker that uses three daily mental-health ratings (sleep satisfaction, mood, and anxiety) as indicators for depression, (2) discuss three approaches to data processing (ratio, average, and frequency) for generating indicator variables, and (3) examine the impact of adherence on reporting using a mobile mental-health tracker and accuracy in depression screening. We analyzed 5792 sets of daily mental-health ratings collected from 78 breast cancer patients over a 48-week period. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as the measure of true depression status, we conducted a random-effect logistic panel regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the screening performance of the mobile mental-health tracker. In addition, we classified patients into two subgroups based on their adherence level (higher adherence and lower adherence) using a k-means clustering algorithm and compared the screening accuracy between the two groups. With the ratio approach, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is 0.8012, indicating that the performance of depression screening using daily mental-health ratings gathered via mobile mental-health trackers is comparable to the results of PHQ-9 tests. Also, the AUC is significantly higher (P=.002) for the higher adherence group (AUC=0.8524) than for the lower adherence group (AUC=0.7234). This result shows that adherence to self-reporting is associated with a higher accuracy of depression screening. Our results support the potential of a mobile mental

  20. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV screening and detection in healthy patient saliva samples: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Robert C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human papillomaviruses (HPV are a large family of non-enveloped DNA viruses, mainly associated with cervical cancers. Recent epidemiologic evidence has suggested that HPV may be an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal cancers. Evidence now suggests HPV may modulate the malignancy process in some tobacco- and alcohol-induced oropharynx tumors, but might also be the primary oncogenic factor for inducing carcinogenesis among some non-smokers. More evidence, however, is needed regarding oral HPV prevalence among healthy adults to estimate risk. The goal of this study was to perform an HPV screening of normal healthy adults to assess oral HPV prevalence. Methods Healthy adult patients at a US dental school were selected to participate in this pilot study. DNA was isolated from saliva samples and screened for high-risk HPV strains HPV16 and HPV18 and further processed using qPCR for quantification and to confirm analytical sensitivity and specificity. Results Chi-square analysis revealed the patient sample was representative of the general clinic population with respect to gender, race and age (p Conclusions The successful recruitment and screening of healthy adult patients revealed HPV16, but not HPV18, was present in a small subset. These results provide new information about oral HPV status, which may help to contextualize results from other studies that demonstrate oral cancer rates have risen in the US among both females and minorities and in some geographic areas that are not solely explained by rates of tobacco and alcohol use. The results of this study may be of significant value to further our understanding of oral health and disease risk, as well as to help design future studies exploring the role of other factors that influence oral HPV exposure, as well as the short- and long-term consequences of oral HPV infection.

  1. Latent tuberculosis infection screening prior to biological treatment in Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouma, Marwa; Mahmoud, Ines; Saidane, Olfa; Bouden, Selma; Abdelmoula, Leila

    2017-10-01

    The screening of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is necessary to prevent infection in patients with chronic inflammatory disease (CID) undergoing biological treatment. We aimed to assess the efficacy of LTBI screening prior to biological treatment in Tunisia, considered as a high-incidence area of active TB disease. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 8 years [2007-2014] including patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatism receiving biologic agents since at least 6 months. The screening of LTBI was performed according to national Tunisian guidelines. There were 35 men and 78 women. The mean age was 47.67±13.50 years. Rheumatoid arthritis (70.8%) was the most common cause of CID. The diagnosis of LTBI was established in 23 cases. Among these 23 patients, 12 patients had negative tuberculin skin test (TST) associated with positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G), 10 had TST more than 10mm, one patient had a TST between 5 and 10mm associated with positive QFT-G and one patient had a history of tuberculosis inadequately treated. Preventive anti-tuberculous therapy was prescribed before biological therapy initiation in cases of LTBI. During the follow-up period (3.91 years), no case of tuberculosis reactivation has been reported among patients diagnosed with LTBI. However, 2 cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis were reported in patients with initially negative TST and QFT-G. Our study showed that the Tunisian recommendations allowed detecting a LTBI in 20% of biologic therapy candidates. Preventive measures including screening of LTBI and eventually a prophylactic treatment improve the safety of biological treatments. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Is the presence of a validated malnutrition screening tool associated with better nutritional care in hospitalized patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglseer, Doris; Halfens, Ruud J G; Lohrmann, Christa

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between the use of clinical guidelines and the use of validated screening tools, evaluate the nutritional screening policy in hospitals, and examine the association between the use of validated screening tools and the prevalence of malnutrition and nutritional interventions in hospitalized patients. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study. Data were collected using a standardized questionnaire on three levels: institution (presence of a guideline for malnutrition), department (use of a validated screening tool), and patient (e.g., malnutrition prevalence). In all, 53 hospitals with 5255 patients participated. About 45% of the hospitals indicated that they have guidelines for malnutrition. Of the departments surveyed, 38.6% used validated screening tools as part of a standard procedure. The nutritional status of 74.5% of the patients was screened during admission, mostly on the basis of clinical observation and patient weight. A validated screening tool was used for 21.2% of the patients. Significant differences between wards with and without validated screening tools were found with regard to malnutrition prevalence (P = 0.002) and the following interventions: referral to a dietitian (P malnutrition screening tools is associated with better nutritional care and lower malnutrition prevalence rates in hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inconsistencies in patient perceptions and observer ratings of shared decision making: the case of colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Tracy; Cooper, Gregory; Divine, George; Flocke, Susan; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Stange, Kurt; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2010-09-01

    To compare patient-reported and observer-rated shared decision making (SDM) use for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and evaluate patient, physician and patient-reported relational communication factors associated with patient-reported use of shared CRC screening decisions. Study physicians are salaried primary care providers. Patients are insured, aged 50-80 and due for CRC screening. Audio-recordings from 363 primary care visits were observer-coded for elements of SDM. A post-visit patient survey assessed patient-reported decision-making processes and relational communication during visit. Association of patient-reported SDM with observer-rated elements of SDM, as well as patient, physician and relational communication factors were evaluated using generalized estimating equations. 70% of patients preferred SDM for preventive health decisions, 47% of patients reported use of a SDM process, and only one of the screening discussions included all four elements of SDM per observer ratings. Patient report of SDM use was not associated with observer-rated elements of SDM, but was significantly associated with female physician gender and patient-reported relational communication. Inconsistencies exist between patient reports and observer ratings of SDM for CRC screening. Future studies are needed to understand whether SDM that is patient-reported, observer-rated or both are associated with informed and value-concordant CRC screening decisions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization of patient protection using rare earth screen in conventional imaging procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkoom, S.; Schandorf, C.; Fletcher, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize patient protection using rare earth screen of speed 400 in place of conventional screen-film of speed 200. The entrance surface dose (ESD) for the two screen-film systems was determined for patients undergoing simple radiographic examinations (chest, lumbar spine and pelvis series). The determination of the ESD included backscatter factors. The ESD was the optimizing parameter and its trade off with the image quality assessment, which was surveyed based on the information obtained through standardized questionnaire. The estimated ESDs were compared with reference levels set by the Community of European Commission (CEC) for a standard adult patient. For chest PA, ESD estimates were lower than the CEC reference levels whilst that of lumbar spine AP and LAT and pelvis AP were high. Upon the adoption of rare earth screen of speed 400, a dose reduction of 33% for chest, 17% for lumbar spine and 28% for pelvis examinations was achieved. From the observations made from this study, some corrective actions such as equipment quality control of parameters that affect patient dose and image quality like kVp accuracy and consistency, mAs accuracy and consistency, optimal film processing conditions, regular film reject analysis to detect and minimize the root causes and contributory factors to poor image quality and periodic training of staff on dose reduction techniques must be undertaken. Regular assessment of patient dose and image quality, equipment quality control, adoption of faster rare earth screens and optimum radiographic technique are therefore recommended in order to achieve optimization goals. (author)

  5. Beliefs and Attitudes to Bowel Cancer Screening in Patients with CKD: A Semistructured Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Laura J; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Ju, Angela; Williams, Narelle; Lim, Wai H; Cross, Nicholas; Tong, Allison

    2017-04-03

    Bowel cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in people with CKD. Shared decision making regarding cancer screening is particularly complex in CKD and requires an understanding of patients' values and priorities, which remain largely unknown. Our study aimed to describe the beliefs and attitudes to bowel cancer screening in patients with CKD. Face to face, semistructured interviews were conducted from April of 2014 to December of 2015 with 38 participants ages 39-78 years old with CKD stages 3-5, on dialysis, or transplant recipients from four renal units in Australia and New Zealand. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Five themes were identified: invisibility of cancer (unspoken stigma, ambiguity of risk, and absence of symptomatic prompting); prioritizing kidney disease (preserving the chance of transplantation, over-riding attention to kidney disease, protecting graft survival, and showing loyalty to the donor); preventing the crisis of cancer (evading severe consequences and cognizant of susceptibility); cognitive resistance (reluctance to perform a repulsive procedure, intensifying disease burden threshold, anxiety of a positive test, and accepting the inevitable); and pragmatic accessibility (negligible financial effect, convenience, and protecting anonymity). Patients with CKD understand the potential health benefits of bowel cancer screening, but they are primarily committed to their kidney health. Their decisions regarding screening revolve around their present health needs, priorities, and concerns. Explicit consideration of the potential practical and psychosocial burdens that bowel cancer screening may impose on patients in addition to kidney disease and current treatment is suggested to minimize decisional conflict and improve patient satisfaction and health care outcomes in CKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Risk factors for neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected patients and comparison of different screening tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Moreira de Souza

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND is relatively frequent among HIV-infected patients and is often underdiagnosed. Assessment of HAND in daily clinical practice is challenging and different tools have been proposed. Objective : To evaluate risk factors and compare different screening tools for neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected patients. Methods : HIV-infected patients were evaluated using the International HIV-Dementia Scale (IHDS, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and a neurocognitive self-perception questionnaire recommended by the European AIDS Clinical Society. Sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data were obtained through chart review and patient interview. Results : Among the 63 patients included, low performance on the IHDS was observed in 54.0% and IHDS score was inversely associated with age (OR 0.13; 95%CI [0.02-0.67]. Regarding cognitive self-perception, 63.5% of patients reported no impairment on the three domains covered by the questionnaire. Among those patients self-reporting no problems, 42.1% had low performance on the IHDS. None of the patients scored below the education-adjusted cut-off on the MMSE. Conclusion : IHDS scores suggestive of HAND were observed in more than half of the patients and lower scores were found among older patients. There was low agreement between the different tools, suggesting that the MMSE may be inadequate for assessing HAND. The self-assessment questionnaire had low sensitivity and might not be useful as a screening tool.

  7. Screening for hypopituitarism in 509 patients with traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczak, Anna; Kilimann, Ingo; von Rosen, Friedrich; Krewer, Carmen; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Stalla, Günter Karl; Schneider, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    We performed a screening on patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism in neurorehabilitation in a cross-sectional, observational single-center study. In addition, the therapeutic consequences of our screening were analyzed retrospectively. From February 2006 to August 2009, patients between 18 and 65 years (n=509) with the diagnosis of TBI (n=340) or SAH (n=169) were screened within two weeks of admittance to neurorehabilitation as clinical routine. Blood was drawn to determine fasting cortisol, free thyroxine (fT4), prolactin, testosterone or estradiol, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Patients with abnormalities in the screening or clinical signs of hypopituitarism received further stimulation tests: growth hormone releasing hormone -L-arginine-test and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-test (n=36); ACTH-test alone (n=26); or insulin tolerance test (n=56). In our screening of 509 patients, 28.5% showed lowered values in at least one hormone of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and 4.5% in two or more axes. The most common disturbance was a decrease of testosterone in 40.7% of all men (in the following 13/131 men were given substitution therapy). Low fT4 was detected in 5.9% (n=3 were given substitution therapy). Low IGF-I was detected in 5.8%, low cortisol in 1.4%, and low prolactin in 0.2%; none were given substitution therapy. Further stimulation tests revealed growth hormone deficiency in 20.7% (n=19/92) and hypocortisolism in 23.7% (n=28/118). Laboratory values possibly indicating hypopituitarism (33%) were common but did not always implicate post-traumatic hypopituitarism. Laboratory values possibly indicating hypopituitarism were common in our screening but most patients were clinically not diagnosed as pituitary insufficient and did not receive hormone replacement therapy. A routine screening of all patients in neurorehabilitation without considering

  8. A protective screen for persons assisting in X-ray examination of children and patients with severe diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, N.V.

    1978-01-01

    To increase the radiation protection reliability when carrying out auxiliary actions by medical attendants or patient relatives during X-ray investigations of children and seriously ill patients, X-ray screen provided with self-installed supporting rolls, a window with secured lead glass and a hand port is suggested. A screen constructure is described. Using the screens improves the radiation protection of roentgenologist

  9. Prospects of success of radon cures in patients with progressive sclerodermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenke, R.; Brenke, A.

    1989-01-01

    Physiotherapy and spa-therapy occupy a high value in the treatment of the progressive sclerodermia. On the basis of 59 radon cures at Bad Brambach in patients with this disease is shown that a success of the cure lasting for a long time is to be expected particularly in patients with a relatively bad initial situation. Above all an amelioration of the subjective condition as well as the movability of the joints is achieved. The necessity of repeated cures for selected patients at an interval of 1 to 2 years is discussed. There was no evidence concerning a possibly specific radon effect. (author)

  10. Five days of successful oral alimentation for hospitalized patients based upon passing the Yale Swallow Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Steven B; Suiter, Debra M

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the success of oral alimentation and patient retention rate 1 to 5 days after passing the Yale Swallow Protocol. Participants were 200 consecutive acute care inpatients referred for swallow assessment. Inclusion criteria were adequate cognitive abilities to participate safely, completing an oral mechanism examination, and passing the 3-ounce water swallow challenge. Exclusion criteria were altered mental status, failing the 3-ounce challenge, preadmission dysphagia, head-of-bed restrictions alimentation and retention rate. All patients who remained medically and neurologically stable drank thin liquids and ate successfully 1 to 5 days after passing the protocol. Mean (SD) volume of liquid ingested per day was 474.2 (435.5) cc. Patient retention declined steadily from day of testing (n = 200) through post-testing day 5 (n = 95). Passing the Yale Swallow Protocol allowed for initial determination of aspiration risk followed by successful oral alimentation for 1 to 5 days in medically and neurologically stable acute care hospitalized patients and without the need for instrumental dysphagia testing. The decline in patient retention was expected because of increasingly rapid transit through the acute care setting, which often renders longer follow-up problematic. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Determinants of noninvasive ventilation success or failure in morbidly obese patients in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemyze, Malcolm; Taufour, Pauline; Duhamel, Alain; Temime, Johanna; Nigeon, Olivier; Vangrunderbeeck, Nicolas; Barrailler, Stéphanie; Gasan, Gaëlle; Pepy, Florent; Thevenin, Didier; Mallat, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a common life-threatening complication in morbidly obese patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). We aimed to identify the determinants of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) success or failure for this indication. We prospectively included 76 consecutive patients with BMI>40 kg/m2 diagnosed with OHS and treated by NIV for ARF in a 15-bed ICU of a tertiary hospital. NIV failed to reverse ARF in only 13 patients. Factors associated with NIV failure included pneumonia (n = 12/13, 92% vs n = 9/63, 14%; psuccessful response to NIV was idiopathic decompensation of OHS (n = 30, 48% vs n = 0, 0%; p = 0.001). In the NIV success group (n = 63), 33 patients (53%) experienced a delayed response to NIV (with persistent hypercapnic acidosis during the first 6 hours). Multiple organ failure and pneumonia were the main factors associated with NIV failure and death in morbidly obese patients in hypoxemic ARF. On the opposite, NIV was constantly successful and could be safely pushed further in case of severe hypercapnic acute respiratory decompensation of OHS.

  12. Red flags to screen for malignancy and fracture in patients with low back pain: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Downie, A.; Williams, C.M.; Henschke, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence on diagnostic accuracy of red flag signs and symptoms to screen for fracture or malignancy in patients presenting with low back pain to primary, secondary, or tertiary care. Design: Systematic review. Data sources: Medline, OldMedline, Embase, and CINAHL from......-test probability for detection of spinal malignancy was history of malignancy (33%, 22% to 46%). Conclusions: While several red flags are endorsed in guidelines to screen for fracture or malignancy, only a small subset of these have evidence that they are indeed informative. These findings suggest a need...

  13. Promising Approaches From Behavioral Economics to Improve Patient Lung Cancer Screening Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Andrew J; Groskaufmanis, Lauren; Thomson, Norman B

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease, the deadliest form of cancer in the world and in the United States. As a consequence of CMS's determination to provide low-dose CT (LDCT) as a covered service for at-risk smokers, LDCT lung cancer screening is now a covered service for many at-risk patients that first requires counseling and shared clinical decision making, including discussions of the risks and benefits of LDCT screening. However, shared decision making fundamentally relies on the premise that with better information, patients will arrive at rational decisions that align with their preferences and values. Evidence from the field of behavioral economics offers many contrary viewpoints that take into account patient decision making biases and the role of the shared decision environment that can lead to flawed choices and that are particularly relevant to lung cancer screening and treatment. This article discusses some of the most relevant biases, and suggests incorporating such knowledge into screening and treatment guidelines and shared decision making best practices to increase the likelihood that such efforts will produce their desired objectives to improve survival and quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Correlates of women's cancer screening and contraceptive knowledge among female emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bock Beth C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of knowledge regarding preventive health services for women might impede campaigns to expand these services in the emergency department setting. For 18–55-year-old English-speaking women visiting an urban emergency department, we aimed to: (1 Ascertain their knowledge regarding the applicability, purpose, and recommended intervals of three women's cancer screening and three contraceptive methods; and (2 Determine if patient age, race/ethnicity, medical insurance status, and current or recent usage of these methods are associated with greater or lesser knowledge about them. Methods Emergency department-based survey on recent or current usage and knowledge about Pap smears, breast self-examinations, mammograms, condoms, birth control, and emergency contraception. Analyses included calculation of summary statistics and creation of multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 1,100 patients eligible for the study, 69.9% agreed to participate. Most of the participants were Conclusion Although these female ED patients demonstrated strong knowledge on some women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods, there were several areas of knowledge deficit. Women without private medical insurance and those who have not used a particular cancer screening or contraceptive method demonstrated less knowledge. Reduced knowledge about women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods should be considered during clinical encounters and when instituting or evaluating emergency department-based initiatives that assess the need for these methods.

  15. Patient doses and radiation risks in film-screen mammography in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T.; Komppa, T.

    1995-01-01

    Screen-film mamography is the most sensitive method for the early detection of breast cancer. Breast doses in mamography should be measured for several reasons, especially for the evaluation of patient risk in a screening programme, but also for the assessment and comparison of imaging techniques and equipment performance. In this study, the factors affecting patient doses were assessed by making performance and patient dose measurements; about 50 mammographic units used for screening were included in the study. The lifetime risk as a function of age at exposure was calculated using the average glandular dose, the relative risk model shown in the BEIR V report, and the breast cancer mortality in Finland. The mean surface dose of a 4.5 cm thick phantom was 6.3 mGy, and the mean glandular dose 1.0 mGy. Analysis of the surface dose with respect to film optical density, relative speed of film processing, sensitivity of image receptors, and antiscatter grid showed that the mean surface dose could be decreased by more than 50%. For the screened age group of 50 to 59 years, the risk of exposure-induced death (REID) of breast cancer is about 1.4 x 10 -6 mSv -1 , and the average loss of life expectancy due to the radiation-induced breast cancer deaths (LLE/REID) is about 9.5 years. (Author)

  16. MR elastography: high rate of technical success in pediatric and young adult patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Madalsa [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dillman, Jonathan R.; Towbin, Alexander J.; Serai, Suraj D.; Trout, Andrew T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) elastography allows the noninvasive assessment of liver stiffness, which is a surrogate for fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to describe our experience using liver MR elastography in a large pediatric population with attention to the frequency and causes of exam failure. Imaging records were searched for patients ≤18 years of age who underwent 2-D gradient recalled echo (GRE) MR elastography of the liver between September 2011 and August 2015 on one of two 1.5-T MRI platforms. Imaging reports and clinical records were reviewed for failed MR elastography acquisitions, factor(s) resulting in failure and whether a subsequent successful examination had been performed. Four hundred sixty-eight MR elastography examinations were performed in 372 patients between 1.5 months and 18 years of age during the study period. Ninety-six percent (450/468) of the examinations were successful. There was no significant difference in mean age (12.6±3.6 vs. 11.2±4.1 years, P=0.12) or body mass index (BMI) (28.2±12.4 vs. 29.5±10 kg/m{sup 2}, P=0.6) between patients with and without successful examinations. MR elastography failures were due to poor paddle positioning resulting in inadequate generation of hepatic shear waves (n=5), iron overload (n=4), patient inability to tolerate MRI (n=3), patient breathing/motion (n=3), artifact from implanted hardware (n=1) and technical malfunction (n=2). Seven of nine (78%) repeat examinations were successful (78%). Hepatic 2-D GRE MR elastography at 1.5 T is technically robust in children. Exam failure is infrequent and largely reflects patient specific factors, some of which can be mitigated with careful technique. (orig.)

  17. Successful pregnancy in a female patient with congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) and renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshio; Kamoda, Tomohiro; Nagata, Michio; Yoh, Keigyo; Hashimoto, Yuko; Matsui, Akira; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Koyama, Akio

    2009-01-01

    We report a successful case of pregnancy in a female patient with congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) and reduced renal function due to interruption of treatment. CLD is an autosomal recessive disorder of intestinal electrolyte absorption caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 (SLC26A3) gene, and continuous production of watery diarrhea induces dehydration, metabolic alkalosis and many kinds of electrolyte disturbances in CLD patients. The patient in our case was a 24-year-old female CLD patient with moderate renal impairment; a renal biopsy specimen showed minimal glomerular changes, but tubulointerstitial damage by crystal formation, consistent with renal function data. One year after our initial examination and reinstitution of therapy, the patient got married and soon conceived. There were no major problems during the course of pregnancy, and the patient successfully delivered a healthy full-term infant vaginally. The symptoms and clinical course of the patient were particularly mild, and we discuss possible reasons for these observations from a perspective of genotype, phenotype and environmental conditions.

  18. Assessment of Substances Abuse in Burn Patients by Using Drug Abuse Screening Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Gaseminegad

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increase in the frequency of substance abuse among hospitalized burn injury patients. However, few studies have investigated substance abuse among burn patients. This study was aimed to identify the incidence of substance abuse in burn injury patients using the "Drug Abuse Screening Test" (DAST-20. We determined the validity of DAST-20 in spring 2010. Subsequently, this descriptive study was performed on 203 burn injury patients who fit the study's inclusion criteria. We chose a score of 6 as the cutoff and thus achieved a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 85% for the DAST-20. During the study, we gathered demographic data, burn features and DAST-20 results for all patients. Patients with scores of 6 or more were considered to be substances abusers. A statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS v16 software. According to the DAST-20 results, 33% of the patients were in the user group. The mean score of DAST-20 was significantly higher among users than it was among nonusers (P<0.05. The level of substance abuse was severe in 77% of users. No significant differences were found among the substances, with the exception of alcohol. Substance abuse is an important risk factor for burn patients. In addition, this study showed that DAST-20 is a valid screening measure for studies on burn patients.

  19. Screening of Nutritional Risk and Nutritional Support in General Surgery Patients: A Survey from Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen-Yi; Yang, Jun; Tong, Da-Nian; Peng, Jia-Yuan; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Liu, Wei-Jie; Xia, Yang; Qin, Huan-long

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of nutritional risk in surgical departments and to evaluate the impact of nutritional support on clinical outcomes. The nutritional risk in different surgical diseases and the different way of nutritional support on clinical outcomes in patients at nutritional risk remain unclear. Hospitalized patients from general surgical departments were screened using the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 questionnaire on admission. Data were collected on nutritional risk, complications, and length of stay (LOS). Overall, 5034 patients were recruited; the overall prevalence of nutritional risk on admission were 19.2%. The highest prevalence was found among patients with gastric cancer. At-risk patients had more complications and longer LOS than nonrisk patients. Of the at-risk patients, the complication rate was significantly lower and LOS was significantly shorter in the nutritional-support group than in the no-support group (20.9 versus 30.0%, P nutrition or who received support for 5 to 7 days, or daily support entailing 16 to 25 kcal/kg of nonprotein energy. Different surgical diseases have different levels of nutritional risk. The provision of nutritional support was associated with a lower complication rate and a shorter LOS for gastric, colorectal, and HPB cancer patients at nutritional risk. The improper use of nutritional support may not improve outcomes for at-risk patients. PMID:26011204

  20. MRI screening on bone ischemia of hip and knee in recovered SARS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Qu Hui; Liu Wei; Sun Jing; Cheng Kebin; Feng Suchen; Li Xiaosong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To screen ischemia in the hip and knee joints of recovered SARS patients with MRI, and to investigate the prevalence rate of bone ischemia in those patients and its relationship with the use of steroid. Methods: Hip and knee MRI examinations were performed in 76 recovered SARS patients. There were 17 males and 59 females. Eight patients were treated without steroid, while 68 patients with steroid. Dose and duration of steroid usage were available in 30 out of 68 patients. The MRI images were read by senior radiologists to determine whether bone ischemia and/or osteonecrosis was present. Appropriate statistic analysis was performed to determine the significance of difference between groups. Results: (1) The MRI appearance of osteonecrosis in femoral head and condyle and bone infarct in bone marrow found in SARS patients was identical to those caused by other conditions (including steroid usage in other diseases). (2) No one of 8 SARS without steroid developed osteonecrosis, while 25 out of 68 steroid users had osteonecrosis found by MRI screening, and the difference in prevalence of osteonecrosis between these 2 groups was significant. In 25 patients with osteonecrosis, 20 of them involved more than one joints. Osteonecrosis involved 32 femoral heads, 26 femoral condyles, and 6 in femoral and tibial shafts. Thirteen patients with osteonecrosis had greater total steroid dose, greater daily dose, and longer duration than those (17 patients) without osteonecrosis, however, the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. Sixty-four patients out of 76 complained pain in joints, 50 of them had multiple joint pains. The pain was reported in hips in 40 cases, followed by knees in 36, low backs in 10, shoulders in 7, and wrists in 4, respectively. The differences in frequency of pain between steroid users and non-steroid users, as well as between osteonecrosis and non-osteonecrosis were not significant. Conclusion: MRI is recommended for

  1. Screening for comorbid conditions in patients enrolled in the SODA registry: a 2-year observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmansee, Whitney W; Gordon, Murray B; Molitch, Mark E; Ioachimescu, Adriana G; Carver, Don W; Mirakhur, Beloo; Cox, David; Salvatori, Roberto

    2018-05-16

    This 2-year analysis assessed frequency of comorbidities and comorbidity screening in the Somatuline ® (lanreotide, LAN) Depot for Acromegaly (SODA) registry. Patient data collected included pituitary hormone deficiencies, sleep studies, echocardiograms, gallbladder sonographies, colonoscopies, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and growth hormone levels in patients with (DM) and without (non-DM) diabetes mellitus were analyzed. There were 241 patients enrolled. Pituitary hormone deficiencies were reported more frequently at enrollment in male (56.9%) vs female patients (32.0%; p < 0.001). TSH deficiency was the most common endocrine deficiency (69.8%), followed by gonadotropin deficiency (62.3%). Screening tests reported at enrollment: sleep studies in 29.9% (79.2% had sleep apnea), echocardiogram in 46.1% (46.8% abnormal), gallbladder sonography in 18.7% (17.8% had gallstones), and colonoscopy in 48.1% (35.3% had polyps). Follow-up studies were reported less frequently at 1 and 2 years. HbA1c data were reported in 30.8% and 41.2% after 1 and 2 years. HbA1c levels were similar at 1 and 2 years of LAN therapy among DM and non-DM patients with available data. Fewer DM vs non-DM patients achieved IGF-1 below upper limit of normal at Month 24 (58.3% vs 80.6%; p = 0.033). Fewer than half of patients in SODA had screening results reported at enrollment for sleep apnea, cardiomyopathy, and colon polyps. Gallbladder imaging was reported in a minority of patients. Lower IGF-1 control rates were observed in DM vs non-DM patients at Month 24. These data suggest a need for better monitoring of comorbidities in US acromegaly patients.

  2. Successful cardiac transplantation outcomes in patients with adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachem, Jonathan N; Golbus, Jessica R; Molina, Maria; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Hornsby, Nicole; Atluri, Pavan; Fuller, Stephanie; Birati, Edo Y; Kim, Yuli Y; Goldberg, Lee R; Wald, Joyce W

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of our study is (1) to characterise patients with congenital heart disease undergoing heart transplantation by adult cardiac surgeons in a large academic medical centre and (2) to describe successful outcomes associated with our multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Heart failure is the leading cause of death in patients with ACHD leading to increasing referrals for OHT. The Penn Congenital Transplant Database comprises a cohort of patients with ACHD who underwent OHT between March 2010 and April 2016. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the 20 consecutive patients. Original cardiac diagnoses include single ventricle palliated with Fontan (n=8), dextro-transposition of the great arteries after atrial switch (n=4), tetralogy of Fallot (n=4), pulmonary atresia (n=1), Ebstein anomaly (n=1), unrepaired ventricular septal defect (n=1) and Noonan syndrome with coarctation of the aorta (n=1). Eight patients required pretransplant inotropes and two required pretransplant mechanical support. Nine patients underwent heart-liver transplant and three underwent heart-lung transplant. Three patients required postoperative mechanical circulatory support. Patients were followed for an average of 38 months as of April 2016, with 100% survival at 30 days and 1 year and 94% overall survival (19/20 patients). ACHD-OHT patients require highly specialised, complex and multidisciplinary healthcare. The success of our programme is attributed to using team-based, patient-centred care including our multidisciplinary staff and specialists across programmes and departments. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Predicting Manual Therapy Treatment Success in Patients With Chronic Ankle Instability: Improving Self-Reported Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikstrom, Erik A; McKeon, Patrick O

    2017-04-01

      Therapeutic modalities that stimulate sensory receptors around the foot-ankle complex improve chronic ankle instability (CAI)-associated impairments. However, not all patients have equal responses to these modalities. Identifying predictors of treatment success could improve clinician efficiency when treating patients with CAI.   To conduct a response analysis on existing data to identify predictors of improved self-reported function in patients with CAI.   Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled clinical trial.   Sports medicine research laboratories.   Fifty-nine patients with CAI, which was defined in accordance with the International Ankle Consortium recommendations.   Participants were randomized into 3 treatment groups (plantar massage [PM], ankle-joint mobilization [AJM], or calf stretching [CS]) that received six 5-minute treatments over 2 weeks.   Treatment success, defined as a patient exceeding the minimally clinically important difference of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure-Sport (FAAM-S).   Patients with ≤5 recurrent sprains and ≤82.73% on the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure had a 98% probability of having a meaningful FAAM-S improvement after AJM. As well, ≥5 balance errors demonstrated 98% probability of meaningful FAAM-S improvements from AJM. Patients <22 years old and with ≤9.9 cm of dorsiflexion had a 99% probability of a meaningful FAAM-S improvement after PM. Also, those who made ≥2 single-limb-stance errors had a 98% probability of a meaningful FAAM-S improvement from PM. Patients with ≤53.1% on the FAAM-S had an 83% probability of a meaningful FAAM-S improvement after CS.   Each sensory-targeted ankle-rehabilitation strategy resulted in a unique combination of predictors of success for patients with CAI. Specific indicators of success with AJM were deficits in self-reported function, single-limb balance, and <5 previous sprains. Age, weight-bearing-dorsiflexion restrictions, and single-limb balance

  4. Socioeconomic rehabilitation of successful renal transplant patients and impact of funding source: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Srivastava, Aneesh; Kapoor, Rohit; Arora, Sohrab; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Socio-economic rehabilitation is an important outcome parameter in successful renal transplant recipients, particularly in developing countries with low income patients who often depend on extraneous sources to fund their surgery costs. We studied the socioeconomic rehabilitation and changes in socioeconomic status (SES) of successful renal allograft recipients among Indian patients and its correlation with their source of funding for the surgery. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted on 183 patients between January 2010 to January 2013. Patients with follow up of at least 1 year after successful renal transplant were included. During interview, two questionnaires were administered, one related to the SES including source of funding before transplantation and another one relating to the same at time of interview. Changes in SES were categorized as improvement, stable and deterioration if post-transplant SES score increased >5%, increased or decreased by 5% of pre-transplant value, respectively. In this cohort, 97 (52.7%), 67 (36.4%) and 19 (10.3%) patients were non-funded (self-funded), one-time funded and continuous funded, respectively. Fifty-six (30.4%) recipients had improvement in SES, whereas 89 (48.4%) and 38 (20.7%) recipients had deterioration and stable SES. Improvement in SES was seen in 68% patients with continuous funding support whereas, in only 36% and 12% patients with non-funded and onetime funding support (P = 0.001) respectively. Significant correlation was found (R = 0.715) between baseline socioeconomic strata and changes in SES after transplant. 70% of the patients with upper and upper middle class status had improving SES. Patients with middle class, lower middle and lower class had deterioration of SES after transplant in 47.4%, 79.6% and 66.7% patients, respectively. Most of the recipients from middle and lower social strata, which included more than 65% of our patient's population, had deteriorating SES even after a

  5. Evaluation of nutritional screening tools for patients scheduled for cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomivorotov, Vladimir V; Efremov, Sergey M; Boboshko, Vladimir A; Nikolaev, Dmitry A; Vedernikov, Pavel E; Lomivorotov, Vladimir N; Karaskov, Alexander M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of different nutritional screening tools in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass with regard to an adverse clinical course. This prospective cohort study analyzed 894 adult patients who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were screened using four nutritional screening tools: Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002), the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and the Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire (SNAQ). Nutritional status was assessed using the Subjective Global Assessment. In-hospital mortality, postoperative complications, length of stay in the intensive care unit, and length of hospitalization were analyzed. The sensitivities of the SNAQ, MUST, and NRS-2002 to detect the malnutrition confirmed by the Subjective Global Assessment were 91.5%, 97.9%, and 38.3%, respectively, and the MNA showed a sensitivity of 81.8% for the elderly. Malnutrition detected by the SNAQ, MUST, and NRS-2002 was associated with postoperative complications (odds ratios [ORs] 1.75, 1.98, and 1.82, respectively) and a stay in the intensive care unit longer than 2 d (ORs 1.46, 1.56, and 2.8). Malnutrition as detected by the SNAQ and MUST was also associated with prolonged hospitalization (ORs 1.49 and 1.59). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, postoperative complications were independently predicted by the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (OR 1.1, P nutritional therapy would improve the outcome in malnourished patients needs to be studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assay format as a critical success factor for identification of novel inhibitor chemotypes of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase from high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Thomas D Y; Sergienko, Eduard; Millán, José Luis

    2010-04-27

    The tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozyme is centrally involved in the control of normal skeletal mineralization and pathophysiological abnormalities that lead to disease states such as hypophosphatasia, osteoarthritis, ankylosis and vascular calcification. TNAP acts in concert with the nucleoside triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase-1 (NPP1) and the Ankylosis protein to regulate the extracellular concentrations of inorganic pyrophosphate (PP(i)), a potent inhibitor of mineralization. In this review we describe the serial development of two miniaturized high-throughput screens (HTS) for TNAP inhibitors that differ in both signal generation and detection formats, but more critically in the concentrations of a terminal alcohol acceptor used. These assay improvements allowed the rescue of the initially unsuccessful screening campaign against a large small molecule chemical library, but moreover enabled the discovery of several unique classes of molecules with distinct mechanisms of action and selectivity against the related placental (PLAP) and intestinal (IAP) alkaline phosphatase isozymes. This illustrates the underappreciated impact of the underlying fundamental assay configuration on screening success, beyond mere signal generation and detection formats.

  7. Selective screening of 650 high risk Iranian patients for detection of inborn error of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Pishva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although metabolic diseases individually are rare ,but overall have an incidence of 1/2000 and can cause devastating and irreversible effect if not diagnosed early and treated promptly. selective screening is an acceptable method for detection of these multi presentation diseases.Method: using panel neonatal screening for detection of metabolic diseases in 650 high risk Iranian patients in Fars province. The following clinical features were used as inclusion criteria for investigation of the patients.Lethargy, poor feeding ,persistent vomiting, cholestasis, intractable seizure ,decreased level of consciousness ,persistent hypoglycemia, unexplained acid base disturbance and unexplained neonatal death.Result: Organic acidemia with 40 cases (42% was the most frequent disorder diagnosed in our high risk populations, followed by disorder of galactose metabolism(30%, 15 patient had classic galactosemia(GALT

  8. Selective screening of 650 high risk Iranian patients for detection of inborn error of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Pishva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although metabolic diseases individually are rare ,but overall have an incidence of 1/2000 and can cause devastating and irreversible effect if not diagnosed early and treated promptly. selective screening is an acceptable method for detection of these multi presentation diseases. Method: using panel neonatal screening for detection of metabolic diseases in 650 high risk Iranian patients in Fars province. The following clinical features were used as inclusion criteria for investigation of the patients. Lethargy, poor feeding ,persistent vomiting, cholestasis, intractable seizure ,decreased level of consciousness ,persistent hypoglycemia, unexplained acid base disturbance and unexplained neonatal death. Result: Organic acidemia with 40 cases (42% was the most frequent disorder diagnosed in our high risk populations, followed by disorder of galactose metabolism(30%, 15 patient had classic galactosemia(GALT

  9. Prognostic factors of successful tympanoplasty in pediatric patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boronat-Echeverría Nuria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tympanoplasty in children is a current and controversial theme. The success of tympanoplasty traditionally has been measured only by the post-operative integrity of the graft. Yet, there are other variables that may be used to determine success. The objectives of the present work were to analyze which factors are predictive of successful tympanoplasty in pediatric patients and to construct and validate a prognostic index that could be used as a tool to predict the success of tympanoplasty in children. Methods Setting. Department of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, tertiary-care hospital, Mexico City. Patients. Forty-eight patients, who were older that five years of age, had persistent perforation of the tympanic membrane, and had undergone tympanoplasty (January 2005–June 2008, were followed for a year. Main Outcome Measures. The factors tested for their value as predictors were the following: age at time of surgery, state of contralateral ear, previous adenoidectomy, cause of perforation, size of perforation, infection at the time of surgery, state of mucosa, age at first occurrence of perforation, presence of craniofacial dysmorphia, and surgical technique. These factors were compared with the criterion, success, which was defined as attaining three positive outcomes: 1 integrity of the implant or membrane; 2 minimum of 10-dB gain in the auditory threshold or, in the case of normal hearing, conservation of same; and 3 air-filled space in the middle ear. The best model was obtained through logistic regression analysis; the model was validated. Results The most balanced prediction model was that in which the three success criteria were included, with age, surgical technique, and infection at surgery being excluded as variables. The additional 12 pediatric cases used in the validation had a probability of success >0.425 (best cut-off level; two patients (17% had poor evolution. Conclusions This is the first study that

  10. Impact of Patient-Provider Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Concordance on Cancer Screening: Findings from Medical Expenditure Panel Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jyoti; Rotter, David; Tsui, Jennifer; Llanos, Adana A M; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Demissie, Kitaw

    2017-12-01

    Background: Racial and ethnic minorities experience lower rates of cancer screening compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). Previous studies evaluating the role of patient-provider race, ethnicity, or gender concordance in cancer screening have been inconclusive. Methods: In a cross-sectional analysis using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), data from 2003 to 2010 were assessed for associations between patient-provider race, ethnicity, and/or gender concordance and, screening (American Cancer Society guidelines) for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer. Multivariable logistic analyses were conducted to examine associations of interest. Results: Of the 32,041 patient-provider pairs in our analysis, more than 60% of the patients were NHW, 15% were non-Hispanic black (NHB), and 15% were Hispanic. Overall, patients adherent to cancer screening were more likely to be non-Hispanic, better educated, married, wealthier, and privately insured. Patient-provider gender discordance was associated with lower rates of breast [OR, 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76-0.90], cervical (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76-0.91), and colorectal cancer (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.79-0.90) screening in all patients. This association was also significant after adjusting for racial and/or ethnic concordance. Conversely, among NHWs and NHBs, patient-provider racial and/or ethnic concordance was not associated with screening. Among Hispanics, patient-provider ethnic discordant pairs had higher breast (58% vs. 52%) and colorectal cancer (45% vs. 39%) screening rates compared with concordant pairs. Conclusions: Patient-provider gender concordance positively affected cancer screening. Patient-provider ethnic concordance was inversely associated with receipt of cancer screening among Hispanics. This counter-intuitive finding requires further study. Impact: Our findings highlight the importance of gender concordance in improving cancer screening rates. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26

  11. Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening in Burkina Faso: Needs for Patient and Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaore, Salomon; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne M R; Koanda, Seni; Haynatzki, Gleb; Chamberlain, Robert M; Soliman, Amr S

    2016-12-01

    rates. Organized patient and professional education programs in gynecologic services are warranted for improving screening in Burkina Faso and other low-resource countries in Africa.

  12. Focused use of drug screening in overdose patients increases impact on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Andreas; Werner, Dominique; Hugli, Olivier; Yersin, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Drug poisoning is a common cause for attendance in the emergency department. Several toxicology centres suggest performing urinary drug screens, even though they rarely influence patient management. Measuring the impact on patient management, in a University Emergency Department with approximately 40 000 admissions annually, of a rapid urinary drug screening test using specifically focused indications. Drug screening was restricted to patients having a first psychotic episode or cases demonstrating respiratory failure, coma, seizures, a sympathomimetic toxidrome, severe opiate overdose necessitating naloxone, hypotension, ventricular arrhythmia, acquired long QT or QRS >100 ms, and high-degree heart block. Retrospective analysis of Triage® TOX drug screen tests performed between September 2009 and November 2011, and between January 2013 and March 2014. A total of 262 patients were included, mean age 35 ± 14.6 (standard deviation) years, 63% men; 29% poisoning with alcohol, and 2.3% deaths. Indications for testing were as follows: 34% were first psychotic episodes; 20% had acute respiratory failure; 16% coma; 8% seizures; 8% sympathomimetic toxidromes; 7% severe opioid toxidromes; 4% hypotension; 3% ventricular arrhythmias or acquired long QT intervals on electrocardiogram. A total of 78% of the tests were positive (median two substances, maximum five). The test resulted in drug-specific therapy in 6.1%, drug specific diagnostic tests in 13.3 %, prolonged monitoring in 10.7% of methadone-positive tests, and psychiatric admission in 4.2%. Overall, 34.3% tests influenced patient management. In contrast to previous studies showing modest effects of toxicological testing, restricted use of rapid urinary drug testing increases the impact on management of suspected overdose patients in the ED.

  13. Community Pharmacist-Provided Osteoporosis Screening and Education: Impact on Patient Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Brookhart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact pharmacist-provided screening and education had on patient knowledge of osteoporosis and preventive strategies. Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted at 16 locations of a national supermarket chain pharmacy in the Richmond, Virginia area. Women 30 years and older with no history of osteoporosis were enrolled in the study. Patients self-selected into the study by agreeing to the bone density screening, pharmacist-provided education, and completion of a knowledge survey. Subjects were randomized to complete the osteoporosis-related knowledge survey either before (Group A or after (Group B the screening and education session. The survey was developed after guideline and literature evaluation and was pretested with a group of patients for content and clarity. The survey evaluated knowledge of osteoporosis, risk factors for the disease, appropriate age for testing, and preventive strategies. Groups A and B were compared using t-tests. Results: A total of 110 women were enrolled in the study. The mean (±SD age was 52.5 ± 13.1 years in Group A (n=52 and 52.7 ± 11.5 years in Group B (n=58. Knowledge scores were higher in the group who received pharmacist-provided education prior to completing the survey in each category (knowledge of the disease, risk factors, preventive strategies, and appropriate age for testing and overall (p<0.001. Conclusions: Community pharmacist-provided osteoporosis screening and education increased patient knowledge about osteoporosis and preventive strategies. Community pharmacist involvement with increasing patient knowledge may empower patients to engage in prevention strategies to improve bone mass.   Type: Original Research

  14. Nonselective carotid artery ultrasound screening in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: Is it necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masabni, Khalil; Sabik, Joseph F.; Raza, Sajjad; Carnes, Theresa; Koduri, Hemantha; Idrees, Jay J.; Beach, Jocelyn; Riaz, Haris; Shishehbor, Mehdi H.; Gornik, Heather L.; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether nonselective preoperative carotid artery ultrasound screening alters management of patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and whether such screening affects neurologic outcomes. Methods From March 2011 to September 2013, preoperative carotid artery ultrasound screening was performed on 1236 of 1382 patients (89%) scheduled to undergo CABG. Carotid artery stenosis (CAS) was classified as none or mild (any type 0%–59% stenosis), moderate (unilateral 60%-79% stenosis), or severe (bilateral 60%-79% stenosis or unilateral 80%–100% stenosis). Results A total of 1069 (86%) hadpatients with patients with ≥moderate CAS, 1 of 19 (5.3%) undergoing CABG + CEA and 3 of 148 (2.0%) undergoing CABG alone experienced stroke (P = .4). In patients with moderate CAS, stroke occurred in 1 of 11 (9.1%) off-pump and 1 of 79 (1.3%) on-pump patients (P = .2). In patients with severe CAS, stroke occurred in 1 of 6 (17%) off-pump and 1 of 71 (1.4%) on-pump patients (P = .15). Conclusions Routine preoperative carotid artery evaluation altered the management of a minority of patients undergoing CABG; this did not translate into perioperative stroke risk. Hence, a more targeted approach for preoperative carotid artery evaluation should be adopted. PMID:26586360

  15. Women patients' preference for women physicians is a barrier to colon cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menees, Stacy B; Inadomi, John M; Korsnes, Sheryl; Elta, Grace H

    2005-08-01

    The preference of women patients for women physicians has been shown in many specialties. Women patients awaiting a lower endoscopy have been shown to have a preference for women endoscopists. The reasons for this preference and the strength of this preference have not been studied in the primary care setting. A questionnaire was given to female patients who were waiting for primary care appointments at 4 offices. Patients reported sociodemographic characteristics, experiences with colorectal cancer (CRC), barriers to CRC screening, gender preference of their physician, the significance, and reasons for this preference. A total of 202 women patients aged 40 to 70 years (mean 53 years) completed the questionnaire. Of these patients, 43% preferred a woman endoscopist, and of these, 87% would be willing to wait >30 days for a woman endoscopist, and 14% would be willing to pay more for one. The most common reason (in 75%) for this gender preference was embarrassment. Univariate analysis revealed that gender of the primary care physician (PCP), younger patient age, current employment, and no previous history of colonoscopy were predictors of preference for a woman endoscopist. Of these variables, only female gender of the PCP (OR 2.84: 95% CI[1.49, 5.40]) and employment (OR 2.4: 95% CI[1.23, 4.67]) were positive predictors for a woman endoscopist preference by multivariable analysis; 5% stated that they would not undergo a colonoscopy unless guaranteed a woman endoscopist. The sole independent factor associated with adherence to screening was PCP recommendation (OR 2.93: 95% CI[1.63, 5.39]). Women patients frequently prefer a woman endoscopist, and this preference is reported as being strong enough to delay the procedure and to incur personal expense. It is an absolute barrier to endoscopy according to 5% in this subset of women surveyed. Interventions must be made in the primary care setting to address this issue and to increase the participation of women patients in

  16. Attitudes towards colorectal cancer (CRC) and CRC screening tests among elderly Malay patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A; Al-Kubaisy, Waqar; Yap, Bee W; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Osman, Muhamed T

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in Malaysia, where data are limited regarding knowledge and barriers in regard to CRC and screening tests. The aim of the study was to assess these parameters among Malaysians. The questionnaires were distributed in the Umra Private Hospital in Selangor. The questionnaire had four parts and covered social-demographic questions, respondent knowledge about CRC and colorectal tests, attitude towards CRC and respondentaction regarding CRC. More than half of Malay participants (total n=187) were female (57.2%) and 36.9% of them were working as professionals. The majority of the participants (93.6%) never had a CRC screening test. The study found that only 10.2% of the study participants did not consider that their chances of getting CRC were high. A high percentage of the participants (43.3%) believed that they would have good chance of survival if the cancer would be found early. About one third of the respondents did not want to do screening because of fear of cancer, and concerns of embarrassment during the procedure adversely affected attitude to CRC screening as well. Age, gender, income, family history of CRC, vegetable intake and physical activity were found to be significant determinants of knowledge on CRC. The major barriers identified towards CRC screening identified in our study were fear of pain and embarrassment. The findings have implications for understanding of similarities and differences in attitude to CRC amongst elderly patients in other cultural/ geographic regions.

  17. Interest of MIBG scintigraphy in screening for pheochromocytoma in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, F.; Lumbroso, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Megnigbeto, A.; Tenenbaum, F.; Leclere, J.; Travagli, J.P.; Gardet, P.; Parmentier, C.

    1995-01-01

    Adrenal medullary disease (AMD) is clinically silent in most patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). During 16 years, a series of 174 MTC patients was screened yearly for AMD. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scans were performed in 54 cases (21 at diagnosis and 33 during the follow up of MTC) either systematically (43 cases) or in patients with biological or ultrasonographic signs of AMD (11 cases). AMD was discovered in ten patients: five patients were already known to have a type II multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-2); in five patients previously considered as having either a sporadic (four cases) or a familial type of isolated MTC (one case), the occurrence of AMD led to diagnose a MEN-2 a syndrome. In three cases, AMD was bilateral. MIBG scan were performed in nine of the ten patients with AMD. No false positive MIBG scan was observed in the series. All patients with positive MIBG scan had either elevated excretion of catecholamines and derivates. MIBG scan had a sensitivity of 0.9 and specificity of 1. MIBG should not be used as a screening test. In particular, MIBG scan should not be performed systematically neither at diagnosis nor during follow-up. But, in cases with suspicion of AMD, it provides important complementary functional information. (authors). 15 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  18. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duy K. Duong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low dose CT (LDCT for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%, 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04 were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79% self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41% responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient “procrastinators” were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  19. Integrating Customer Intimacy Into Radiology to Improve the Patient Perspective: The Case of Breast Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Chloe M; Mercado, Cecilia L

    2016-02-01

    The customer intimacy business model has emerged as a key operational approach for health care organizations as they move toward patient-centered care. The question arises how the customer intimacy approach can be implemented in the clinical setting and whether it can help practitioners address problems and improve quality of care. Breast cancer screening and its emphasis on the patient perspective provides an interesting case study for understanding how the customer intimacy approach can be integrated into radiologic practice to improve the patient experience.

  20. Patient Preferences Regarding Colorectal Cancer Screening: Test Features and Cost Willing to Pay Out of Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Courtney C; Weiss, Paul S; Jarrett, Thomas L; Roberts, David L; Mittal, Pardeep K; Votaw, John R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether test features would make an individual more or less likely to undergo colorectal cancer screening and how much an individual would be willing to pay out of pocket for a screening test. The methods include an administration of a survey to consecutive adult patients of a general medicine clinic. The survey consisted of Likert-scale questions assessing the patients' likelihood of choosing a screening test based on various test characteristics. Additional questions measured the patients' age, race, gender, and maximum out-of-pocket cost they would be willing to pay. Chi-square tests were used to assess the associations between the likelihood questions and the various demographic characteristics. In results, survey response rate was 88.8% (213 of 240). Respondents were 48.4% female (103 of 213), 51.6% male (110 of 213), 82.6% White (176 of 213), 11.3% African-American (24 of 213), and 6.1% other (13 of 213). Risk of internal injury and light exposure to radiation were the least desirable test features. Light sedation was the only test feature that most respondents (54.8%) indicated would make them likely or very likely to undergo a colorectal cancer screening test. The vast majority of respondents (86.8%) were willing to pay less than $200 out of pocket for a colorectal cancer screening test. There was no statistically significant difference in the responses of males and females, or in the responses of individuals of different races or different ages regarding test features, or the amount individuals were willing to pay for a screening test. To conclude, survey results suggest that patient education emphasizing the low complication rate of computed tomographic colonography (CTC), the minimal risks associated with the low-level radiation exposure resulting from CTC, and the benefits of a sedation-free test (eg, no risk of sedation-related complication and no need for a driver) may increase patient acceptance of

  1. Helios: History and Anatomy of a Successful In-House Enterprise High-Throughput Screening and Profiling Data Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, Hanspeter; Clare, Nicholas; Galafassi, Laurent; Geissler, Uwe; Girod, Michel; Herr, Guy

    2018-06-01

    We describe the main characteristics of the Novartis Helios data analysis software system (Novartis, Basel, Switzerland) for plate-based screening and profiling assays, which was designed and built about 11 years ago. It has been in productive use for more than 10 years and is one of the important standard software applications running for a large user community at all Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research sites globally. A high degree of automation is reached by embedding the data analysis capabilities into a software ecosystem that deals with the management of samples, plates, and result data files, including automated data loading. The application provides a series of analytical procedures, ranging from very simple to advanced, which can easily be assembled by users in very flexible ways. This also includes the automatic derivation of a large set of quality control (QC) characteristics at every step. Any of the raw, intermediate, and final results and QC-relevant quantities can be easily explored through linked visualizations. Links to global assay metadata management, data warehouses, and an electronic lab notebook system are in place. Automated transfer of relevant data to data warehouses and electronic lab notebook systems are also implemented.

  2. The importance of tracheostomy to the weaning success in patients with conscious disturbance in the respiratory care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chan Lee

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Tracheostomy increases the success rate of weaning in patients with low GCS, but not in patients with high GCS. Mental status graded by GCS did affect the outcomes in patients with conscious disturbance in the RCC. The low tracheostomy rate in patients with low GCS affected the rate of successful weaning, which might have contributed to the higher mortality rate in patients with low GCS in the RCC.

  3. [Screening for rehabilitation needs of patients in care of family practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullwitt, D H; Krause, O; Hildebrand, F; Fischer, G C

    1997-11-01

    Family doctors play an important role in promoting the access of patients to rehabilitation. On the one hand they are very often the first professionals to be contacted if patients want to take part in rehabilitation procedures whereas on the other hand there are also many patients whose need for rehabilitation remains undisclosed. No detailed estimates are available on how many of such patients exist in German GP-practices although it should be an important task of family doctors to discuss the pros and cons of rehabilitation particularly with their patients who are in need of it. We performed a non-representative pilot study in three GP offices during ten working days. patients older than 29 years were screened for their "rehabilitation status" with an instrument frequently used in German rehabilitation clinics. The patients were also asked whether or not they would like to participate in a rehabilitation procedure and what was the reason for their decision. Not knowing the patients' answers their doctors rated whether or not it would be appropriate for their patients to take part in rehabilitation. Additionally the doctors stated what kind of rehabilitation should be performed and what could be ist aims. In a sample of 181 patients about one-third was found to be in a severe "rehabilitation status", about one third in a state with higher than normal values--although not severe--and also approx. another third had a normal status. Family doctors stated that for one-third of their patients rehabilitation would be undoubtedly suitable at the time of the screening. In about two thirds of the cases the results of the questionnaire and the doctors' ratings corresponded. Some patients felt completely healthy although the results of the questionnaire and the doctors' statements rated them as being in need of rehabilitation. Other patients in need of rehabilitation rejected it for other than health-related reasons. The results of our study give evidence to the family

  4. Evaluation of nutritional screening tools among patients scheduled for heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomivorotov, Vladimir V; Efremov, Sergey M; Boboshko, Vladimir A; Nikolaev, Dmitry A; Vedernikov, Pavel E; Shilova, Anna N; Lomivorotov, Vladimir N; Karaskov, Alexander M

    2013-03-01

    The study aim was to detect the most sensitive nutritional screening tool and to assess its prognostic value with regards to an adverse clinical course in patients with heart valve disease undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This prospective cohort study included 441 adult patients who were screened using four nutritional screening tools: Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002); Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST); Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA); and Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire (SNAQ). Nutritional assessment was performed using a Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). In-hospital mortality, postoperative complications, and duration of hospital stay were each analyzed. With regards to the detection of malnutrition, the sensitivities of MUST, SNAQ, MNA and NRS-2002 were 100%, 92%, 84.6% and 43.6%, respectively. Malnutrition identified by MUST and MNA were associated with postoperative complications (OR 1.63, p = 0.033 and OR 1.6, p = 0.035) and prolonged hospitalization (OR 1.57, p = 0.048 and OR 1.7, p = 0.02). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, along with well-known age and duration of CPB, malnutrition identified by MUST and MNA was associated with a risk of development of complications (OR 1.6, p = 0.049 and OR 1.6, p = 0.04, respectively). The sensitivities of SNAQ, MUST, NRS-2002 and MNA with regards to postoperative complications were 26.8%, 28.8%, 10%, and 31.6%, respectively. The MUST tool is preferable with regards to the detection of malnutrition. Both, MUST and MNA independently predicted postoperative complications. SNAQ and NRS-2002 proved insensitive with regards to the postoperative course among patients with heart valve disease who were scheduled for cardiothoracic surgery.

  5. Adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with rheumatic heart disease diagnosed through screening in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Daniel; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Ah Kee, Maureen; Donath, Susan; Parks, Tom; Steer, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) can detect subclinical cases; however, adequate adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) is required to alter disease outcomes. We aimed to investigate the adherence to SAP among young people with RHD diagnosed through echocardiographic screening in Fiji and to investigate factors associated with adherence. Patients diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji from 2006 to 2014 were included. Dates of benzathine penicillin G injections were collected from 76 health clinics nationally from December 2011 to December 2014. Adherence was measured using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with any adherence (≥1 injection received) and adequate adherence (PDC ≥0.80). Of 494 patients, 268 (54%) were female and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 203 (41%) had no injections recorded and just 33 (7%) had adequate adherence. Multivariate logistic regression showed increasing age (OR 0.93 per year, 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.79) to be inversely associated with any adherence. Non-iTaukei ethnicity (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.04-6.33) and urban residence (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.54-7.36) were associated with adequate adherence, whereas time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.17-0.83) was inversely associated with adequate adherence. Adherence to SAP after screening in Fiji is currently inadequate for individual patient protection or population disease control. Secondary prevention should be strengthened before further screening can be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fundus autofluorescence and colour fundus imaging compared during telemedicine screening in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeyer, Anton M; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Szirth, Bernard C; Shahid, Khadija; Khouri, Albert S

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the use of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in screening the eyes of patients with diabetes. Images were obtained from 50 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing telemedicine screening with colour fundus imaging. The colour and FAF images were obtained with a 15.1 megapixel non-mydriatic retinal camera. Colour and FAF images were compared for pathology seen in nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and PDR, respectively). A qualitative assessment was made of the ease of detecting early retinopathy changes and the extent of existing retinopathy. The mean age of the patients was 47 years, most were male (82%) and most were African American (68%). Their mean visual acuity was 20/45 and their mean intraocular pressure was 14.3 mm Hg. Thirty-eight eyes (76%) did not show any diabetic retinopathy changes on colour or FAF imaging. Seven patients (14%) met the criteria for NPDR and five (10%) for severe NPDR or PDR. The most common findings were microaneurysms, hard exudates and intra-retinal haemorrhages (IRH) (n = 6 for each). IRH, microaneurysms and chorioretinal scars were more easily visible on FAF images. Hard exudates, pre-retinal haemorrhage and fibrosis, macular oedema and Hollenhorst plaque were easier to identify on colour photographs. The value of FAF imaging as a complementary technique to colour fundus imaging in detecting diabetic retinopathy during ocular screening warrants further investigation.

  7. Screening of depression in cardiology: A study on 617 cardiovascular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesio, Valentina; Marra, Sebastiano; Molinaro, Stefania; Torta, Riccardo; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Castelli, Lorys

    2017-10-15

    Depression screening in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) care setting is under-performed, also because the issue of the optimal screening tools cut-off is still open. We analysed which HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) total score cut-off value shows the best properties in two groups of 357 Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and 260 Chronic Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) hospitalized patients. A Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve was plotted for both groups using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) as the criterion. Accuracy, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were computed for different cut-off scores. The ROC curves confirmed the excellent/very good accuracy of the HADS in both groups, with an area under the curve of 0.911 for the ACS and 0.893 for the CAD patients. The cut-off of 14 showed the best compromise between high sensitivity and good specificity in both groups, with high negative predicted values (95.5% and 92.4%, respectively). Using a cut-off value of 14, the HADS could be considered a good screening tool to identify hospitalized CAD and ACS patients requiring a more accurate depression assessment, in order to promptly plan the most appropriate treatment strategies and prevent the negative effects of depression in CVD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Is it worthwhile to screen patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for subclinical Cushing's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyal, Sweta; Jadhav, Swati Sachin; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Patt, Hiren; Khare, Shruti; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Lila, Anurag R; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2015-01-01

    Variable prevalence of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS) has been reported in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), making the need for screening in this population uncertain. It is unknown if this variability is solely due to study-related methodological differences or a reflection of true differences in ethnic predisposition. The objective of this study is to explore the prevalence of SCS in Asian Indian patients with T2DM. In this prospective single center study conducted in a tertiary care referral center, 993 T2DM outpatients without any discriminatory clinical features (easy bruising, facial plethora, proximal muscle weakness, and/or striae) of hypercortisolism underwent an overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (ODST). ODST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl was considered positive, and those with positive results were subjected to 48 h, 2 mg/day low dose DST (LDDST). A stepwise evaluation for endogenous hypercortisolism was planned for patients with LDDST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl. Patients with positive ODST and negative LDDST were followed up clinically and re-evaluated a year later for the development of clinically evident Cushing's syndrome (CS). In this largest single center study reported to date, we found 37 out of 993 (3.72%) patients had ODST serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl. None of them had LDDST cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dl, nor did they develop clinically evident CS over a follow-up period of 1 year. Specificity of ODST for screening of CS was 96.3% in our cohort. None of the T2DM outpatients in our cohort had SCS, hence cautioning against routine biochemical screening for SCS in this cohort. We suggest screening be based on clinical suspicion only. PMID:26420669

  9. Successful Management of Psychotropics Induced Stuttering Priapism with Pseudoephedrine in a Patient with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippaiah, Srinagesh Mannekote; Nagaraja, Soumya; Birur, Badari; Pandurangi, Ananda

    2018-02-05

    Stuttering Priapism is a recurrent, persistent penile erection in the absence of sexual desire due to altered genital hemodynamics, affecting the arterial component (high flow, non-ischemic) or the veno-occlusive mechanism (low flow, ischemic). Both typical and atypical antipsychotics increase the risk for priapism with greater implications in typicals than atypicals. Prompt recognition and treatment are important as 40% to 50% of patients with stuttering priapism may develop an erectile dysfunction if left untreated. There are several case reports in the literature about the association between psychotropic agents and priapism. However, there are no reports of successfully treating stuttering priapism using pseudoephedrine (sudafed) in the adult population. Here we present successful management of psychotropics induced stuttering priapism with pseudoephedrine in a male patient with schizophrenia.

  10. Successful intraosseous infusion in the critically ill patient does not require a medullary cavity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Gerard

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate that successful intraosseous infusion in critically ill patients does not require bone that contains a medullary cavity. DESIGN: Infusion of methyl green dye via standard intraosseous needles into bones without medullary cavity-in this case calcaneus and radial styloid-in cadaveric specimens. SETTING: University department of anatomy. PARTICIPANTS: Two adult cadaveric specimens. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Observation of methyl green dye in peripheral veins of the limb in which the intraosseous infusion was performed. RESULTS: Methyl green dye was observed in peripheral veins of the chosen limb in five out of eight intraosseous infusions into bones without medullary cavity-calcaneus and radial styloid. CONCLUSIONS: Successful intraosseous infusion does not always require injection into a bone with a medullary cavity. Practitioners attempting intraosseous access on critically ill patients in the emergency department or prehospital setting need not restrict themselves to such bones. Calcaneus and radial styloid are both an acceptable alternative to traditional recommended sites.

  11. Analysis of ABC (D) stratification for screening patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Satoru; Sohara, Naondo; Onozato, Yasuhiro; Okamura, Shinichi; Inui, Yoshikatsu; Mori, Masatomo

    2011-11-21

    To evaluate the value of ABC (D) stratification [combination of serum pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antibody] of patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five consecutive patients with gastric cancer were enrolled into the study. The serum pepsinogen I (PG I)/pepsinogen II (PG II) and H. pylori antibody levels were measured. Patients were classified into five groups of ABC (D) stratification according to their serological status. Endoscopic findings of atrophic gastritis and histological differentiation were also analyzed in relation to the ABC (D) stratification. The mean patient age was (67.9 ± 8.9) years. Three patients (3.2%) were classified into group A, 7 patients (7.4%) into group A', 27 patients (28.4%) into group B, 54 patients (56.8%) into group C, and 4 patients (4.2%) into group D, respectively. There were only three cases in group A when the patients taking acid proton pump inhibitors and those who had undergone eradication therapy for H. pylori (group A') were excluded. These three cases had mucosal atrophy in the grey zone according to the diagnostic manual of ABC (D) stratification. Histologically, the mean age of the patients with well differentiated adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that of the patients with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (P ABC (D) stratification is a good method for screening patients with gastric cancers. Endoscopy is needed for grey zone cases to check the extent of mucosal atrophy.

  12. APC-PCI complex levels for screening of AAA in patients with peripheral atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Moncef; Keshavarz, Kave; Lindblad, Bengt; Gottsäter, Anders

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the use of activated protein C-protein C inhibitor (APC-PCI) complex levels for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with peripheral atherosclerotic disease (PAD). APC-PCI levels and aortic diameter evaluated in 511 PAD patients without previously known AAA followed-up concerning survival for 4.8(0.5) years. AAA was found in 13% of patients. Aortic diameter correlated (r = 0.138; p = 0.002) with APC-PCI levels which were higher (0.40[0.45] vs. 0.30[0.49] μg/l; p = 0.004) in patients with AAA. This difference persisted in multivariate analysis (p = 0.029). A threshold value of APC-PCI ≥0.15 μg/L showed a specificity of 11%, a sensitivity of 97% and a negative predictive value of 96% for an AAA diagnosis. APC-PCI levels were higher in patients with AAA, and showed high sensitivity but low specificity for the diagnosis and can therefore not be considered as a screening tool in PAD patients. An AAA prevalence of 13% in patients with PAD indicates a need for AAA screening within this population.

  13. Estimates of success in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation depend upon outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Grøvle, Lars; Brox, Jens Ivar; Natvig, Bård; Keller, Anne; Soldal, Dag; Grotle, Margreth

    2011-10-01

    The objectives were to estimate the cut-off points for success on different sciatica outcome measures and to determine the success rate after an episode of sciatica by using these cut-offs. A 12-month multicenter observational study was conducted on 466 patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation. The cut-off values were estimated by ROC curve analyses using Completely recovered or Much better on a 7-point global change scale as external criterion for success. The cut-off values (references in brackets) at 12 months were leg pain VAS 17.5 (0-100), back pain VAS 22.5 (0-100), Sciatica Bothersomeness Index 6.5 (0-24), Maine-Seattle Back Questionnaire 4.5 (0-12), and the SF-36 subscales bodily pain 51.5, and physical functioning 81.7 (0-100, higher values indicate better health). In conclusion, the success rates at 12 months varied from 49 to 58% depending on the measure used. The proposed cut-offs may facilitate the comparison of success rates across studies.

  14. Screening for Acromegaly in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Study (ACROCARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoicas, F; Kleindienst, A; Mayr, B; Buchfelder, M; Megele, R; Schöfl, C

    2016-07-01

    Early diagnosis of acromegaly prevents irreversible comorbidities and facilitates surgical cure. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in acromegaly and patients have often undergone surgery for CTS prior to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We hypothesized that screening CTS-patients for acromegaly could facilitate active case-finding. We prospectively enrolled 196 patients [135 women, 56.9 (range 23-103) years] who presented with CTS for surgery. Patients were asked about 6 symptoms suggestive of acromegaly using a questionnaire calculating a symptom score (0-6 points), and insulin-like-growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured. If IGF-1 was increased, IGF-1 measurement was repeated, and random growth hormone (GH) and/or an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of GH-suppression were performed. The mean symptom score was 1.7±1.3 points. Three patients reported the maximal symptom score of 6 points, but none of them had an increased IGF-1. There was no correlation between the symptom score and IGF-1-SDS (standard deviation score) (r=0.026; p=0.71). Four patients had an IGF-1>2 SDS. In 2 patients acromegaly was ruled out using random GH and OGTT. One patient had normal IGF-1 and random GH at follow-up. One patient refused further diagnostics. In this prospective cohort of patients with CTS, the observed frequency of acromegaly was at most 0.51% (95% CI 0.03 to 2.83%). In this prospective study, none of the 196 patients with CTS had proven acromegaly. Thus, we see no evidence to justify general screening of patients with CTS for acromegaly. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Successful leukocytapheresis therapy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Keisuke; Torigoe, Masataka; Iwakura, Mikako; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ishii, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis in whom early-phase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was successfully treated by leukocytapheresis (LCAP). The effects of prednisone, tacrolimus, and etanercept were limited, but LCAP was highly effective and its efficacy continued even after cessation of LCAP. Moreover, remission was maintained for 2 years after discontinuation of medication. LCAP may be an important treatment option for RA patients with end-stage renal failure who are on hemodialysis.

  16. Successful operative rib fixation of traumatic flail chest in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulaylat, Afif N; Chesnut, Charles H; Santos, Ariel P; Armen, Scott B

    2014-09-01

    Increasing attention has been directed towards operative rib fixation of traumatic flail chest; reported benefits include more rapid weaning from the ventilator, decreased intensive care unit stays, decreased complications and improved functional results. The outcomes of this surgical intervention in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare condition characterized by low bone density and bone fragility, are unknown. This case demonstrates that, in the management of traumatic flail chest in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta, surgical fixation can be successful and should be considered early. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Successful pregnancy after uterovaginal anastomosis in patients with congenital atresia of cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prorocic, M; Vasiljevic, M; Tasic, L; Brankovic, S

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of successful pregnancy after effective uterovaginal anastomosis in a 26-years-old patient with congenital atresia of the cervix uteri. She spontaneously achieved pregnancy after four years of uterovaginal anastomosis. Gestation was at the eighth lunar month and the delivery was done by cesarean section due to rapidly progressing fetal asphyxia. The patient gave birth to a live healthy male, weighing 1,950 g, with an Apgar score of 5 and 8 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. The postoperative course was uneventful, and leakage of lochia was normal.

  18. Primary Care Perspectives on Hepatitis C Virus Screening, Diagnosis and Linking Patients to Appropriate Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovics, Edward; Torres, Richard; Porter, Lucinda K

    2017-02-01

    Enormous progress has been made in recent years toward effectively treating and curing patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). However, at least half of the possible 7 million individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the US remain undiagnosed. The formidable task of increasing the number of patients diagnosed, and subsequently linked to appropriate care has fallen to primary care clinicians, who are mandated by some US States to offer screening to individuals born between 1945 and 1965 (the Baby Boomer Generation). This peer-reviewed video roundtable discussion http://hepcresource.amjmed.com/Content/jplayer/video_roundtable.html#video0 addresses the challenges encountered by primary care clinicians faced with the increasing societal need to screen for HCV, make appropriate diagnoses, and subsequently link infected patients to appropriate care. Discussion in this roundtable initially focuses on the offering of HCV screening to patients in primary care settings. Roundtable participants discuss the need for primary care clinicians to ask appropriate risk factor-based questions of their patients, especially if the ongoing HCV epidemic is to be curtailed. The participants note, however, that the majority of patients currently infected with HCV in the US are Baby Boomers, and USPTF guidelines require this population to be tested for HCV regardless of any past risk-taking behaviors. So while asking the right questions is important, the failure of a Baby Boomer to recall risk-taking behavior does not preclude HCV screening. In fact, clinicians should proactively screen all persons in this birth cohort, and be more sensitive and open to screening requests from these individuals. Roundtable participants also discuss how HCV screening results should be communicated to patients, and how physicians can keep patients engaged and not lost to follow-up after an initial positive HCV antibody test. Patients screened and found to be HCV antibody positive require a follow

  19. Successful Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in a Patient with Severe Complicated Clostridium difficile Infection after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Markus Schneider

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI represents one of the most common healthcare-associated infections. Due to increasing numbers of recurrences and therapy failures, CDI has become a major disease burden. Studies have shown that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT can both be a safe and highly efficacious therapy for patients with therapy-refractory CDI. However, patients undergoing solid organ transplantation are at high risk for CDI due to long-term immunosuppression, previous antibiotic therapy, and proton pump inhibitor use. Additionally, these patients may be especially prone to adverse events related to FMT. Here, we report a successful FMT in a patient with severe therapy-refractory CDI after liver transplantation.

  20. Successful drug-eluting stent implantation in a male patient with dextrocardia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Wenjie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Situs inversus with dextrocardia is a rare condition, with complete transposition of all the body organs, including the heart. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in these patients is technically difficult because of the mirror image of organs. Here, we describe a 56-year-old man with coronary heart disease with known situs inversus with dextrocardia and coronary percutaneous intervention was performed for stenosis in the right coronary artery. A drug eluting stent was implanted at this site successfully. This case suggested that the interventional management of such patients follows the same general rules as for non-dextrocardia patients, but the manipulation of the catheter and projection position choices need to be taken into consideration to obtain optimal benefits for the patient.

  1. Successful Renal Transplantation with Desensitization in Highly Sensitized Patients: A Single Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Hyoung, Bok Jin; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Lee, So Young; Jeon, Youn Joo; Song, Joon Chang; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Sun Cheol; Choi, Bum Soon; Moon, In Sung; Kim, Yong Soo

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and/or plasmapheresis (PP) are effective in preventing antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of kidney allografts, but AMR is still a problem. This study reports our experience in living donor renal transplantation in highly sensitized patients. Ten patients with positive crossmatch tests or high levels of panel-reactive antibody (PRA) were included. Eight patients were desensitized with pretransplant PP and low dose IVIG, and two were additionally treated with rituximab. Allograft function, number of acute rejection (AR) episodes, protocol biopsy findings, and the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA) were evaluated. With PP/IVIG, six out of eight patients showed good graft function without AR episodes. Protocol biopsies revealed no evidence of tissue injury or C4d deposits. Of two patients with AR, one was successfully treated with PP/IVIG, but the other lost graft function due to de novo production of DSA. Thereafter, rituximab was added to PP/IVIG in two cases. Rituximab gradually decreased PRA levels and the percentage of peripheral CD20+ cells. DSA was undetectable and protocol biopsy showed no C4d deposits. The graft function was stable and there were no AR episodes. Conclusively, desensitization using PP/IVIG with or without rituximab increases the likelihood of successful living donor renal transplantation in sensitized recipients. PMID:19194545

  2. Opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matérne, Marie; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Strandberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Many people who suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) are of working age. There are benefits, for the patient, the workplace, and society, to finding factors that facilitate successful return to work (RTW). The aim was to increase knowledge of opportunities and barriers for a successful RTW in patients with ABI. Five men and five women with ABI participated. All had successfully returned to work at least 20 hours a week. Their experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews, which were subsequently subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes that influenced RTW were identified: individually adapted rehabilitation; motivation for RTW; and cognitive and social abilities. An individually adapted rehabilitation was judged important because the patients were involved in their own rehabilitation and required individually adapted support from rehabilitation specialists, employers, and colleagues. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was needed. Awareness of the person's cognitive and social abilities is essential, in finding compensatory strategies and adaptations. It seems that the vocational rehabilitation process is a balancing act in individualized planning and support, as a partnership with the employer needs to be developed, motivation needs to be generated, and awareness built of abilities that facilitate or hinder RTW.

  3. Successful Insular Glioma Removal in a Deaf Signer Patient During an Awake Craniotomy Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metellus, Philippe; Boussen, Salah; Guye, Maxime; Trebuchon, Agnes

    2017-02-01

    Resection of tumors located within the insula of the dominant hemisphere represents a technical challenge because of the complex anatomy, including the surrounding vasculature, and the relationship to functional (motor and language) structures. We report here the case of a successful resection of a left insular glioma in a native deaf signer during an awake craniotomy. The patient, a congenitally deaf right-handed patient who is a native user of sign language, presented with a seizure 1 week before he was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left heterogeneous insular tumor enhanced after intravenous gadolinium infusion. Because of its deep and dominant hemisphere location, an awake craniotomy was decided. The patient was evaluated intraoperatively using object naming, text reading, and sign repetition tasks. An isolated inferior frontal gyrus site evoked repeated object naming errors. A transopercular parietal approach was performed and allowed the successful removal of the tumor under direct electric stimulation and electrocorticography. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful removal of a left insular tumor without any functional sequelae in a native deaf signer using intraoperative direct cerebral stimulation during an awake craniotomy. The methodology used also provides the first evidence of the actual anatomo-functional organization of language in deaf signers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-invasive examinations successfully select patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy for anterior temporal lobectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Takato; Nishio, Shunji; Kawamura, Tadao; Fukui, Kimiko; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukui, Masashi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-06-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 8 patients with intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who underwent the anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy (ATL) without invasive examinations such as chronic subdural electrode recording. Five patients had a history of febrile convulsion. While all 8 patients had oral automatism, automatism of ipsilateral limbs with dystonic posture of contralateral limbs was demonstrated in 2 patients. Bilateral temporal paroxysmal activities on interictal EEG was observed in 4 patients and all patients had clear ictal onset zone on unilateral anterior temporal region. MRI demonstrated unilateral hippocampal sclerosis in 5 cases. Interictal FDG-PET depicted hypometabolism of the unilateral temporal lobe in all cases, however, ECD-SPECT failed to reveal the hypoperfusion of the unilateral temporal lobe in a case. Postoperatively, 7 cases became seizure free, and one had rare seizure. Non-invasive examinations, especially ictal EEG and concordant FDG-PET findings, in patients with oral automatism in seizure semiology, successfully select patients with MTLE for ATL. (author)

  5. Non-invasive examinations successfully select patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy for anterior temporal lobectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Takato; Nishio, Shunji; Kawamura, Tadao; Fukui, Kimiko; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukui, Masashi

    2001-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 8 patients with intractable medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) who underwent the anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy (ATL) without invasive examinations such as chronic subdural electrode recording. Five patients had a history of febrile convulsion. While all 8 patients had oral automatism, automatism of ipsilateral limbs with dystonic posture of contralateral limbs was demonstrated in 2 patients. Bilateral temporal paroxysmal activities on interictal EEG was observed in 4 patients and all patients had clear ictal onset zone on unilateral anterior temporal region. MRI demonstrated unilateral hippocampal sclerosis in 5 cases. Interictal FDG-PET depicted hypometabolism of the unilateral temporal lobe in all cases, however, ECD-SPECT failed to reveal the hypoperfusion of the unilateral temporal lobe in a case. Postoperatively, 7 cases became seizure free, and one had rare seizure. Non-invasive examinations, especially ictal EEG and concordant FDG-PET findings, in patients with oral automatism in seizure semiology, successfully select patients with MTLE for ATL. (author)

  6. SOS score: an optimized score to screen acute stroke patients for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Millene R; Sander, Heidi H; Eckeli, Alan L; Fernandes, Regina M F; Dos Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E G; Leite, Joao P; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M

    2014-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is frequent in acute stroke patients, and has been associated with higher mortality and worse prognosis. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard diagnostic method for OSA, but it is impracticable as a routine for all acute stroke patients. We evaluated the accuracy of two OSA screening tools, the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) when administered to relatives of acute stroke patients; we also compared these tools against a combined screening score (SOS score). Ischemic stroke patients were submitted to a full PSG at the first night after onset of symptoms. OSA severity was measured by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). BQ and ESS were administered to relatives of stroke patients before the PSG and compared to SOS score for accuracy and C-statistics. We prospectively studied 39 patients. OSA (AHI ≥10/h) was present in 76.9%. The SOS score [area under the curve (AUC): 0.812; P = 0.005] and ESS (AUC: 0.789; P = 0.009) had good predictive value for OSA. The SOS score was the only tool with significant predictive value (AUC: 0.686; P = 0.048) for severe OSA (AHI ≥30/h), when compared to ESS (P = 0.119) and BQ (P = 0.191). The threshold of SOS ≤10 showed high sensitivity (90%) and negative predictive value (96.2%) for OSA; SOS ≥20 showed high specificity (100%) and positive predictive value (92.5%) for severe OSA. The SOS score administered to relatives of stroke patients is a useful tool to screen for OSA and may decrease the need for PSG in acute stroke setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Poor Performance on a Preoperative Cognitive Screening Test Predicts Postoperative Complications in Older Orthopedic Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Deborah J; Flaherty, Devon; Fahey, Margaret C; Rudolph, James L; Javedan, Houman; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Wright, John; Bader, Angela M; Hyman, Bradley T; Blacker, Deborah; Crosby, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    The American College of Surgeons and the American Geriatrics Society have suggested that preoperative cognitive screening should be performed in older surgical patients. We hypothesized that unrecognized cognitive impairment in patients without a history of dementia is a risk factor for development of postoperative complications. We enrolled 211 patients 65 yr of age or older without a diagnosis of dementia who were scheduled for an elective hip or knee replacement. Patients were cognitively screened preoperatively using the Mini-Cog and demographic, medical, functional, and emotional/social data were gathered using standard instruments or review of the medical record. Outcomes included discharge to place other than home (primary outcome), delirium, in-hospital medical complications, hospital length-of-stay, 30-day emergency room visits, and mortality. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty of 211 (24%) patients screened positive for probable cognitive impairment (Mini-Cog less than or equal to 2). On age-adjusted multivariate analysis, patients with a Mini-Cog score less than or equal to 2 were more likely to be discharged to a place other than home (67% vs. 34%; odds ratio = 3.88, 95% CI = 1.58 to 9.55), develop postoperative delirium (21% vs. 7%; odds ratio = 4.52, 95% CI = 1.30 to 15.68), and have a longer hospital length of stay (hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.42 to 0.95) compared to those with a Mini-Cog score greater than 2. Many older elective orthopedic surgical patients have probable cognitive impairment preoperatively. Such impairment is associated with development of delirium postoperatively, a longer hospital stay, and lower likelihood of going home upon hospital discharge.

  8. Mutation screening of the PCDH15 gene in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaijo, Teresa; Oshima, Aki; Aller, Elena; Carney, Carol; Usami, Shin-ichi; Millán, José M; Kimberling, William J

    2012-01-01

    PCDH15 codes for protocadherin-15, a cell-cell adhesion protein essential in the morphogenesis and cohesion of stereocilia bundles and in the function or preservation of photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the PCDH15 gene are responsible for Usher syndrome type I (USH1F) and non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB23). The purpose of this work was to perform PCDH15 mutation screening to identify the genetic cause of the disease in a cohort of Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I and establish phenotype-genotype correlation. Mutation analysis of PCDH15 included additional exons recently identified and was performed by direct sequencing. The screening was performed in 19 probands with USH already screened for mutations in the most prevalent USH1 genes, myosin VIIA (MYO7A) and cadherin-23 (CDH23), and for copy number variants in PCDH15. Seven different point mutations, five novel, were detected. Including the large PCDH15 rearrangements previously reported in our cohort of patients, a total of seven of 19 patients (36.8%) were carriers of at least one pathogenic allele. Thirteen out of the 38 screened alleles carried pathogenic PCDH15 variants (34.2%). Five out of the seven point mutations reported in the present study are novel, supporting the idea that most PCDH15 mutations are private. Furthermore, no mutational hotspots have been identified. In most patients, detected mutations led to a truncated protein, reinforcing the hypothesis that severe mutations cause the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  9. Medical Residents’ and Practicing Physicians’ e-Cigarette Knowledge and Patient Screening Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Karen W. Geletko; Karen Myers; Naomi Brownstein; Breanna Jameson; Daniel Lopez; Alaine Sharpe; Gail R. Bellamy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare medical residents and practicing physicians in primary care specialties regarding their knowledge and beliefs about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). We wanted to ascertain whether years removed from medical school had an effect on screening practices, recommendations given to patients, and the types of informational sources utilized. Methods: A statewide sample of Florida primary care medical residents (n = 61) and practicing physicians (...

  10. Does routine psychosocial screening improve referral to psychosocial care providers and patient-radiotherapist communication? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeken, Anna P B M; Lechner, Lilian; Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Houben, Ruud M A; van Gils, Francis C J M; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2013-11-01

    This study tests whether using a screening instrument improves referral to psychosocial care providers (e.g. psychologist) and facilitates patient-radiotherapist communication. A cluster randomized controlled trial was used. Fourteen radiotherapists were randomly allocated to the experimental or control group and 568 of their patients received care in accordance with the group to which their radiotherapist was allocated. Patients in the experimental group were asked to complete a screening instrument before and at the end of the radiation treatment period. All patients were requested to complete questionnaires concerning patient-physician communication after the first consultation and concerning psychosocial care 3 and 12 months post-intervention. Patients who completed the screening instrument were referred to social workers at an earlier stage than patients who did not (Pcommunication. Our results suggest that a simple screening procedure can be valuable for the timely treatment of psychosocial problems in patients. Future efforts should be directed at appropriate timing of screening and enhancing physicians' awareness regarding the importance of identifying, discussing and treating psychosocial problems in cancer patients. Psychosocial screening can be enhanced by effective radiotherapist-patient communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease for Barrett's Esophagus With a Minimally Invasive Cell Sampling Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Curtis R; Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Ali, Ayman; Kroep, Sonja; Kong, Chung Yin; Inadomi, John M; Rubenstein, Joel H; Tramontano, Angela C; Dowling, Emily C; Hazelton, William D; Luebeck, E Georg; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Hur, Chin

    2017-09-01

    It is important to identify patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE), the precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Patients with BE usually are identified by endoscopy, which is expensive. The Cytosponge, which collects tissue from the esophagus noninvasively, could be a cost-effective tool for screening individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are at increased risk for BE. We developed a model to analyze the cost effectiveness of using the Cytosponge in first-line screening of patients with GERD for BE with endoscopic confirmation, compared with endoscopy screening only. We incorporated data from a large clinical trial of Cytosponge performance into 2 validated microsimulation models of EAC progression (the esophageal adenocarcinoma model from Massachusetts General Hospital and the microsimulation screening analysis model from Erasmus University Medical Center). The models were calibrated for US Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data on EAC incidence and mortality. In each model, we simulated the effect of a 1-time screen for BE in male patients with GERD, 60 years of age, using endoscopy alone or Cytosponge collection of tissue, and analysis for the level of trefoil factor 3 with endoscopic confirmation of positive results. For each strategy we recorded the number of cases of EAC that developed, the number of EAC cases detected with screening by Cytosponge only or by subsequent targeted surveillance, and the number of endoscopies needed. In addition, we recorded the cumulative costs (including indirect costs) incurred and quality-adjusted years of life lived within each strategy, discounted at a rate of 3% per year, and computed incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) among the 3 strategies. According to the models, screening patients with GERD by Cytosponge with follow-up confirmation of positive results by endoscopy would reduce the cost of screening by 27% to 29% compared with screening by endoscopy, but led to 1.8 to 5

  12. Significance of endoscopic screening and endoscopic resection for esophageal cancer in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Kinji; Nakamura, Satoaki

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of endoscopic screening for esophageal cancer in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer remains controversial and its impact on prognosis has not been adequately discussed. We studied the use of endoscopic screening to detect esophageal cancer in hypopharyngeal cancer patients by analyzing the incidence, stage and prognosis. We included 64 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer who received radical radiotherapy at our institute. Chromoendoscopic esophageal examinations with Lugol dye solution were routinely performed at and after treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer. Twenty-eight esophageal cancers were detected in 28 (41%) patients (18 synchronous and 10 metachronous cancers). Of the 28 cancers, 23 were stage 0 or I cancer and 15 of these were treated with endoscopic resection. Local control was achieved in all of these 23 stage 0 or I cancers. The 5-year overall survival rates with esophageal cancer were 83% in stage 0, 47% in stage I and 0% in stage IIA-IVB. This study showed a strikingly high incidence of esophageal cancer in hypopharyngeal cancer patients. We suppose that the combination of early detection by chromoendoscopic examination and endoscopic resection for associated esophageal cancer in hypopharyngeal cancer patients improve prognosis and maintain quality of life. (author)

  13. [Screening for psychiatric risk factors in a facial trauma patients. Validating a questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletti, J M; Bruneau, S; Farisse, J; Thiery, G; Chossegros, C; Guyot, L

    2014-12-01

    We recorded similarities between patients managed in the psychiatry department and in the maxillo-facial surgical unit. Our hypothesis was that some psychiatric conditions act as risk factors for facial trauma. We had for aim to test our hypothesis and to validate a simple and efficient questionnaire to identify these psychiatric disorders. Fifty-eight consenting patients with facial trauma, recruited prospectively in the 3 maxillo-facial surgery departments of the Marseille area during 3 months (December 2012-March 2013) completed a self-questionnaire based on the French version of 3 validated screening tests (Self Reported Psychopathy test, Rapid Alcohol Problem Screening test quantity-frequency, and Personal Health Questionnaire). This preliminary study confirmed that psychiatric conditions detected by our questionnaire, namely alcohol abuse and dependence, substance abuse, and depression, were risk factors for facial trauma. Maxillo-facial surgeons are often unaware of psychiatric disorders that may be the cause of facial trauma. The self-screening test we propose allows documenting the psychiatric history of patients and implementing earlier psychiatric care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. "Am I carrier?" The patient's lived experience of thrombophilia genetic screening and its outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Leone, Daniela; Vegni, Elena

    2014-01-01

    How do patients with thrombophilia experience a physician's request to undergo a genetic test? How do they experience the test outcome? To answer these questions, we conducted an interpretative phenomenological analysis study, based on 10 in-depth interviews with patients who underwent genetic testing for thrombophilia in Italy, half with positive and half with negative results. The experience of undergoing genetic screening for thrombophilia plays an important role in reconfiguring patients' signification of their illness experience. A positive outcome becomes a cue to reorganize in a more adaptive way the illness meaning at the cognitive and emotive levels, whereas a negative outcome appears more distressing and confusing. As a clinical implication of the study, clinicians should consider communicating carefully with the patients regardless from the positive/negative test results and they should explore the patient's specific reaction and understanding of test result.

  15. Does the Age of Donor Kidneys Affect Nocturnal Polyuria in Patients With Successful Real Transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, T; Morita, K; Iwami, D; Kitta, T; Kanno, Y; Moriya, K; Takeda, M; Shinohara, N

    We investigated whether the age of donor kidneys influences the incidence of nocturnal polyuria in patients with successful renal transplantation (RTX). Eighty-five patients (45 men and 40 women) undergoing RTX (median age, 47 years) were included in this study. Twenty-four-hour bladder diaries were kept for 3 days, and nocturnal polyuria was defined as a nocturnal polyuria index (nocturnal urine volume/24-hour urine volume) of >0.33. Risk factors for nocturnal polyuria were analyzed in patients with RTX by means of the Mann-Whitney U test, χ 2 test, and a logistic regression analysis. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) developed from diabetes mellitus in 16 patients (19%). Sixty-five patients (76%) received pre-transplant dialysis, with a median duration of 5 years. The median serum creatinine level and body mass index at the most recent visit were 1.2 mg/dL and 21.2 kg/m 2 , respectively. On the basis of the 24-hour bladder diaries, nocturnal polyuria was identified in 48 patients (56%). A logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus as the original disease for ESRD was the only risk factor for nocturnal polyuria (odds ratio, 8.95; 95% confidence interval, 2.01-65.3; P = .0028). The age of donor kidneys at examination did not affect the incidence of nocturnal polyuria (P = .9402). Nocturnal polyuria was not uncommon in patients with successful RTX. Diabetes mellitus as the original disease for ESRD was the only risk factor for nocturnal polyuria, whereas the age of donor kidneys at examination did not affect the incidence of nocturnal polyuria. Thus, nocturnal polyuria is caused by recipient factors but not donor factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Screening for NDP mutations in 44 unrelated patients with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy or Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiqin; Li, Shiqiang; Xiao, Xueshan; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2012-08-01

    To screen mutations in the norrin (NDP) gene in 44 unrelated Chinese patients with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR, 38 cases) or Norrie disease (6 cases) and to describe the associated phenotypes. Of the 44 patients, mutation in FZD4, LRP5, and TSPAN12 was excluded in 38 patients with FEVR in previous study. Sanger sequencing was used to analyze the 2 coding exons and their adjacent regions of NDP in the 44 patients. Clinical data were presented for patients with mutation. NDP variants in 5 of the 6 patients with Norrie disease were identified, including a novel missense mutation (c.164G>A, p.Cys55Phe) in one patient, two known missense mutations (c.122G>A, p.Arg41Lys; c.220C>T, p.Arg74Cys) in two patients, and a gross deletion encompassing the two coding exons in two patients. Of the 5 patients, 3 had a family history and 2 were singleton cases. No mutation in NDP was detected in the 38 patients with FEVR. NDP mutations are common cause of Norrie disease but might be rare cause for FEVR in Chinese.

  17. Cobalt Chrome Spinal Constructs Trigger Airport Security Screening in 24% of Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Regina P; Andras, Lindsay M; Barrett, Kody K; Skaggs, David L

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective study. To determine whether pediatric patients undergo additional airport security screening after posterior spinal fusion. Airport security has expanded to include body scanners as well as traditional metal detectors. Families frequently ask whether spinal implants will trigger airport security, but there is limited information on modern implants and screening methods. The researchers conducted a survey of 50 pediatric patients after posterior spinal fusion from 2004 to 2013. Inclusion criteria were posterior instrumentation, pedicle screws for at least 80% of anchors, and at least 1 trip through an American airport after surgery. Charts and radiographs were reviewed for metal type, number of levels fused, number of anchors, and rod diameter. A total of 16% of patients (8 of 50) were detected by body scan or metal detector and all had cobalt chrome (CoCr) rods. No patients with stainless-steel (SS) rods were detected. The CoCr rods triggered additional screening in 24% of children (8 of 33), compared with none of 17 with SS rods (p = .03). For patients with CoCr rods, the detection rate was 18% (5 of 28) by metal detector and 17% (3 of 18) by body scanner. For patients with CoCr rods, there was no significant difference between detection rates and levels fused (p = .30), number of anchors (p = .15), or rod diameter (p = .17). In this series, CoCr constructs were more likely to incur additional airport security compared with more traditional SS constructs. Copyright © 2015 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Low Rates of Dermatologic Care and Skin Cancer Screening Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alyce; Ferris, Laura K; Click, Benjamin; Ramos-Rivers, Claudia; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Hashash, Jana G; Dunn, Michael; Barrie, Arthur; Schwartz, Marc; Regueiro, Miguel; Binion, David G

    2018-04-30

    Dermatologic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are common, and certain IBD medications increase the risk of skin cancer. To define the rates of care and factors associated with dermatologic utilization with a focus on skin cancer screening. We utilized a prospective, natural history IBD research registry to evaluate all outpatient healthcare encounters from 2010 to 2016. Gastrointestinal, dermatologic and primary care visits per individual were identified. We calculated the proportion of patients obtaining care, categorized primary indications for dermatologic visits, determined the incidence of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, and used logistic regression to determine factors associated with dermatology utilization. Of the 2127 IBD patients included, 452 (21.3%) utilized dermatology over the study period, and 55 (2.6%) had a total body skin examination at least once. The 452 patients incurred 1633 dermatology clinic visits, 278 dermatologic procedures, and 1108 dermatology telephone encounters. The most frequent indication was contact dermatitis or dermatitis. Factors associated with dermatology use were family history of skin cancer, employment, systemic steroids, longer disease duration, emergency room use, and the number of IBD-related clinic visits. Between 8.3 and 11% of IBD patients recommended for skin cancer screening visited dermatology each year, and the resulting incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer was 35.4/10,000 [95% CI 23.3-51.5] and melanoma was 6.56/10,000 [95% CI 2.1-15.3]. Less than one in ten IBD patients obtain dermatologic care. Given the increased risk of skin cancers among IBD patients, an emphasis on education, prevention, and screening merits attention.

  19. Successful enteral nutrition in the treatment of esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portanova Michel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophagojejunal fistula is a serious complication after total gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. This study describes the successful conservative management in 3 gastric cancer patients with esophagojejunal fistula after total gastrectomy using total enteral nutrition. Methods Between January 2004 to December 2008, 588 consecutive patients with a proven diagnosis of gastric cancer were taken to the operation room to try a curative treatment. Of these, 173 underwent total gastrectomy, 9 of them had esophagojejunal fistula (5.2%. In three selected patients a trans-anastomotic naso-enteral feeding tube was placed under fluoroscopic vision when the fistula was clinically detected and a complete polymeric enteral formula was used. Results The complete closing of the esophagojejunal fistula was obtained in day 8, 14 and 25 respectively. Conclusion In some selected cases it is possible to make a successful enteral nutrition using a feeding tube distal to the leak area inserted with the help of fluoroscopic vision. The specialized management of a gastric surgery unit and nutritional therapy unit are highlighted.

  20. Screening of KCNN3 in patients with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Sig; Jabbari, Javad; Holst, Anders G

    2011-01-01

    -nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in KCNN3 with lone AF. Methods and results We sequenced the coding region and splice junctions of KCNN3 in 209 early-onset lone AF patients, screening for variations. A group of 208 healthy blood donors with normal ECGs and without cardiac symptoms were used as controls. All patients...... and controls were of Danish ethnicity. No mutations were found in the coding regions or splice sites of KCNN3. We found one known exonic synonymous SNP (rs1131820) in KCNN3 that was associated with AF. Both the genotype distribution and allele frequencies of SNP rs1131820 were significantly different between...

  1. Prognostic factors for non-success in patients with sciatica and disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grøvle, Lars; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Soldal, Dag; Grotle, Margreth

    2012-09-22

    Few studies have investigated prognostic factors for patients with sciatica, especially for patients treated without surgery. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with non-success after 1 and 2 years of follow-up and to test the prognostic value of surgical treatment for sciatica. The study was a prospective multicentre observational study including 466 patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation. Potential prognostic factors were sociodemographic characteristics, back pain history, kinesiophobia, emotional distress, pain, comorbidity and clinical examination findings. Study participation did not alter treatment considerations for the patients in the clinics. Patients reported on the questionnaires if surgery of the disc herniation had been performed. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate factors associated with non-success, defined as Maine-Seattle Back Questionnaire score of ≥5 (0-12) (primary outcome) and Sciatica Bothersomeness Index ≥7 (0-24) (secondary outcome). Rates of non-success were at 1 and 2 years 44% and 39% for the main outcome and 47% and 42% for the secondary outcome. Approximately 1/3 of the patients were treated surgically. For the main outcome variable, in the final multivariate model non-success at 1 year was significantly associated with being male (OR 1.70 [95% CI; 1.06 - 2.73]), smoker (2.06 [1.31 - 3.25]), more back pain (1.0 [1.01 - 1.02]), more comorbid subjective health complaints (1.09 [1.03 - 1.15]), reduced tendon reflex (1.62 [1.03 - 2.56]), and not treated surgically (2.97 [1.75 - 5.04]). Further, factors significantly associated with non-success at 2 years were duration of back problems >; 1 year (1.92 [1.11 - 3.32]), duration of sciatica >; 3 months (2.30 [1.40 - 3.80]), more comorbid subjective health complaints (1.10 [1.03 - 1.17]) and kinesiophobia (1.04 [1.00 - 1.08]). For the secondary outcome variable

  2. Factors associated with a clinician's offer of screening HIV-positive patients for sexually transmitted infections, including syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R; Fernando, I; MacDougall, M

    2011-06-01

    This retrospective study assessed whether Quality Improvement Scotland national standards for the sexual health care offered to HIV-positive individuals are being met by the Edinburgh genitourinary (GU) medicine clinic; specifically whether HIV-positive patients are offered: (a) sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening annually and (b) syphilis testing six-monthly. The study also reviewed what factors were associated with a clinician's offer of STI screening and syphilis testing. Of the 509 patients seen within the study period, case notes documented that 64% were offered STI screens, and 69% were offered syphilis testing, results consistent with audits of services elsewhere. Sexual orientation (P offer of STI screening, while gender (P offer of syphilis testing. Our results suggest that one explanation for clinicians failing to offer STI screens and syphilis serology testing is their (implicit) risk assessment that STI testing is not required in individual patients.

  3. Successful microsurgical penile replantation following self amputation in a schizophrenic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of the penis is a rare condition reported from various parts of the world as isolated cases or small series of patients; the common etiology is self-mutilating sharp amputation or an avulsion or crush injury in an industrial accident. A complete reconstruction of all penile structures should be attempted in one stage which provides the best chance for full rehabilitation of the patient. We report here a single case of total amputation of the penis in an acute paranoid schizophrenic patient .The penis was successfully reattached using a microsurgical technique. After surgery, near-normal appearance and function including a good urine flow and absence of urethral stricture, capabilities of erection and near normal sensitivity were observed.

  4. Identification of genetic markers for treatment success in heart failure patients: insight from cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; De Maria, Renata; Gatsios, Dimitris; Chrysanthakopoulou, Theodora; Landolina, Maurizio; Gasparini, Maurizio; Campolo, Jonica; Parolini, Marina; Sanzo, Antonio; Galimberti, Paola; Bianchi, Michele; Lenders, Malte; Brand, Eva; Parodi, Oberdan; Lunati, Maurizio; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can improve ventricular size, shape, and mass and reduce mitral regurgitation by reverse remodeling of the failing ventricle. About 30% of patients do not respond to this therapy for unknown reasons. In this study, we aimed at the identification and classification of CRT responder by the use of genetic variants and clinical parameters. Of 1421 CRT patients, 207 subjects were consecutively selected, and CRT responder and nonresponder were matched for their baseline parameters before CRT. Treatment success of CRT was defined as a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume >15% at follow-up echocardiography compared with left ventricular end-systolic volume at baseline. All other changes classified the patient as CRT nonresponder. A genetic association study was performed, which identified 4 genetic variants to be associated with the CRT responder phenotype at the allelic (Passociated with remodeling of the failing ventricle. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) For Depression Screening in Adults with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Jaivir S.; Jehi, Lara E.; Fan, Youran; Patel, Sima I.; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Ramirez, Maya J.; Busch, Robyn M.; Obuchowski, Nancy A.; Tesar, George E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assess accuracy and operating characteristics of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) for depression-screening in adults with epilepsy. Methods Tertiary epilepsy center patients served as the study population with 237 agreeing to structured interview using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a “gold standard” instrument developed for rapid diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD); 172 also completed the PHQ-9, and 127 completed both the PHQ-9 and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) within two days of the MINI. Sensitivity, specificity, positive & negative predictive values & areas under the ROC curves for each instrument were determined. Cut-points of 10 for the PHQ-9 and 15 for the NDDI-E were used and ratings at or above the cut-points were considered screen-positive. The PHQ-9 was divided into cognitive/affective (PHQ-9/CA) and somatic (PHQ-9/S) subscales to determine comparative depression-screening accuracy. Results The calculated areas under the ROC curves for the PHQ-9 (n=172) and the PHQ-9/CA and PHQ-9/S sub-scales were 0.914, 0.924, and 0.846, respectively, with the PHQ-9 more accurate than the PHQ-9/S (p=0.002) but no different than the PHQ-9/CA (p=0.378). At cut-points of 10 and 15, respectively, the PHQ-9 had higher sensitivity (0.92 vs 0.87), but lower specificity (0.74 vs 0.89) than the NDDI-E. The areas under the ROC curves of the PHQ-9 and the NDDI-E showed similar accuracy (n=127; 0.930 vs 0.934; p=0.864). Significance The PHQ-9 is an efficient & non-proprietary depression screening instrument with excellent accuracy validated for use in adult epilepsy patients as well as multiple other medical populations. PMID:25064739

  6. A Chinese version of the Language Screening Test (CLAST for early-stage stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Yang

    Full Text Available There is a severe lack of aphasia screening tools for bedside use in Chinese. A number of aphasia assessment tools have recently been developed abroad, but some of these scales were not suitable for patients with acute stroke. The Language Screening Test (which includes two parallel versions [a/b] in French has been proven to be an effective and time-saving aphasia screening scale for early-stage stroke patients. Therefore, we worked out a Chinese version of the LAST taking into consideration Chinese language and culture. Two preliminary parallel versions (a/b were tested on 154 patients with stroke at acute phase and 107 patients with stroke at non-acute phase, with the Western Aphasia Battery serving as a gold standard. The equivalence between the two parallel versions and the reliability/validity of each version were assessed. The median time to complete one preliminary Chinese version (each had some item redundancy was 98 seconds. Two final parallel versions were established after adjustment/elimination of the redundant items and were found to be equivalent (intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.991. Internal consistency is(Cronbach α for each version [a/b] was 0.956 and 0.965, respectively good. Internal validity was fine: (a no floor or ceiling effect/item redundancy; (b construct validity revealed a 1-dimension structure, just like the French version. The higher educated subjects scored higher than their lower educated counterparts (p<0.01. The external validity: at the optimum cut-off point where the score of version a/b <14 in higher educated group(<13 in lower: the specificity of each version was 0.878/0.902(1/1 in lower and sensitivity was 0.972/0.944(0.944/0.944 in lower. Inter-rater equivalence (intra-class correlation coefficient was 1. The Chinese version of the Language Screening Test was proved to be an efficient and time-saving bedside aphasia screening tool for stroke patients at acute phase and can be used by an average

  7. Knowledge and attitudes of primary healthcare patients regarding population-based screening for colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrent Maties

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the extent of knowledge of primary health care (PHC patients about colorectal cancer (CRC, their attitudes toward population-based screening for this disease and gender differences in these respects. Methods A questionnaire-based survey of PHC patients in the Balearic Islands and some districts of the metropolitan area of Barcelona was conducted. Individuals between 50 and 69 years of age with no history of CRC were interviewed at their PHC centers. Results We analyzed the results of 625 questionnaires, 58% of which were completed by women. Most patients believed that cancer diagnosis before symptom onset improved the chance of survival. More women than men knew the main symptoms of CRC. A total of 88.8% of patients reported that they would perform the fecal occult blood test (FOBT for CRC screening if so requested by PHC doctors or nurses. If the FOBT was positive and a colonoscopy was offered, 84.9% of participants indicated that they would undergo the procedure, and no significant difference by gender was apparent. Fear of having cancer was the main reason for performance of an FOBT, and also for not performing the FOBT, especially in women. Fear of pain was the main reason for not wishing to undergo colonoscopy. Factors associated with reluctance to perform the FOBT were: (i the idea that that many forms of cancer can be prevented by exercise and, (ii a reluctance to undergo colonoscopy if an FOBT was positive. Factors associated with reluctance to undergo colonoscopy were: (i residence in Barcelona, (ii ignorance of the fact that early diagnosis of CRC is associated with better prognosis, (iii no previous history of colonoscopy, and (iv no intention to perform the FOBT for CRC screening. Conclusion We identified gaps in knowledge about CRC and prevention thereof in PHC patients from the Balearic Islands and the Barcelona region of Spain. If fears about CRC screening, and CRC per se

  8. Knowledge and attitudes of primary healthcare patients regarding population-based screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria; Llagostera, Maria; Esteva, Magdalena; Cabeza, Elena; Cantero, Xavier; Segarra, Manel; Martín-Rabadán, Maria; Artigues, Guillem; Torrent, Maties; Taltavull, Joana Maria; Vanrell, Joana Maria; Marzo, Mercè; Llobera, Joan

    2011-09-25

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the extent of knowledge of primary health care (PHC) patients about colorectal cancer (CRC), their attitudes toward population-based screening for this disease and gender differences in these respects. METHODS: A questionnaire-based survey of PHC patients in the Balearic Islands and some districts of the metropolitan area of Barcelona was conducted. Individuals between 50 and 69 years of age with no history of CRC were interviewed at their PHC centers. RESULTS: We analyzed the results of 625 questionnaires, 58% of which were completed by women. Most patients believed that cancer diagnosis before symptom onset improved the chance of survival. More women than men knew the main symptoms of CRC. A total of 88.8% of patients reported that they would perform the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) for CRC screening if so requested by PHC doctors or nurses. If the FOBT was positive and a colonoscopy was offered, 84.9% of participants indicated that they would undergo the procedure, and no significant difference by gender was apparent. Fear of having cancer was the main reason for performance of an FOBT, and also for not performing the FOBT, especially in women. Fear of pain was the main reason for not wishing to undergo colonoscopy. Factors associated with reluctance to perform the FOBT were: (i) the idea that that many forms of cancer can be prevented by exercise and, (ii) a reluctance to undergo colonoscopy if an FOBT was positive. Factors associated with reluctance to undergo colonoscopy were: (i) residence in Barcelona, (ii) ignorance of the fact that early diagnosis of CRC is associated with better prognosis, (iii) no previous history of colonoscopy, and (iv) no intention to perform the FOBT for CRC screening. CONCLUSION: We identified gaps in knowledge about CRC and prevention thereof in PHC patients from the Balearic Islands and the Barcelona region of Spain. If fears about CRC screening, and CRC per se, are

  9. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AK Lofters,1–4 M Vahabi,5 V Prakash,6 L Banerjee,7 P Bansal,8 S Goel,7,8 S Dunn1,2,9 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St Michael’s Hospital, 5Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, 6Screening Saves Lives Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Mississauga, 7Wise Elephant Family Health Team, Brampton, 8Mississauga Halton Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga, 9Women’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach.Materials and methods: Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months.Results: Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer to 44.6% (breast cancer of patients came in for screening

  10. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in patients with screen-detected type 2 diabetes in Denmark: the ADDITION study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bek, Toke; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Hansen, Anja Bech

    2009-01-01

    . There was no significant difference between age, sex and visual acuity among patients with and without retinopathy. However, the patients with retinopathy had significantly higher HbA1c and systolic and diastolic blood pressure than the patients without retinopathy. CONCLUSION: Patients with screen-detected diabetes have......BACKGROUND: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing, but the exact prevalence of the disease and its accompanying late complications are unknown. In the Anglo-Danish-Dutch study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen-detected Diabetes in Primary Care (ADDITION study), patients...... with hitherto undiagnosed type 2 diabetes are identified using a stepwise screening strategy in selected general practices. This article reports the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in this population. METHODS: In Arhus and Copenhagen counties, a total of 12,708 of the persons invited by mail were screened...

  11. Mutational screening of FGFR1, CER1, and CDON in a large cohort of trigonocephalic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Alonso, Luis G; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Kim, Chong; Wall, Steven A; Mulliken, John B; Sun, Miao; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2006-03-01

    Screen the known craniosynostotic related gene, FGFR1 (exon 7), and two new identified potential candidates, CER1 and CDON, in patients with syndromic and nonsyndromic metopic craniosynostosis to determine if they might be causative genes. Using single-strand conformational polymorphisms (SSCPs), denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and/or direct sequencing, we analyzed a total of 81 patients for FGFR1 (exon 7), 70 for CER1, and 44 for CDON. Patients were ascertained in the Centro de Estudos do Genoma Humano in São Paulo, Brazil (n = 39), the Craniofacial Unit, Oxford, U.K. (n = 23), and the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (n = 31). Clinical inclusion criteria included a triangular head and/or forehead, with or without a metopic ridge, and a radiographic documentation of metopic synostosis. Both syndromic and nonsyndromic patients were studied. No sequence alterations were found for FGFR1 (exon 7). Different patterns of SSCP migration for CER1 compatible with the segregation of single nucleotide polymorphisms reported in the region were identified. Seventeen sequence alterations were detected in the coding region of CDON, seven of which are new, but segregation analysis in parents and homology studies did not indicate a pathological role. FGFR1 (exon 7), CER1, and CDON are not related to trigonocephaly in our sample and should not be considered as causative genes for metopic synostosis. Screening of FGFR1 (exon 7) for diagnostic purposes should not be performed in trigonocephalic patients.

  12. Success of single-balloon enteroscopy in patients with surgically altered anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynske, Frank C; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brock, Andrew S

    2015-08-01

    Single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) was introduced in 2007 to diagnose and treat small-bowel disorders. No study to date has evaluated SBE in patients with surgically altered anatomy outside of ERCP. To evaluate the efficacy, yield, and safety of SBE in patients with surgically altered anatomy. Retrospective study. Tertiary-care academic medical center. All patients with altered surgical anatomy who underwent SBE at the Medical University of South Carolina from July 2007 to September 2013. SBE. Diagnostic yield, therapeutic yield, technical success, and adverse events. A total of 48 patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 56 years (77% female). Eleven patients underwent single-balloon PEG placement, 8 single-balloon ERCP, 22 non-PEG/non-ERCP anterograde SBE, and 7 retrograde SBE. Previous surgeries included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n=26), small-intestine resection (n=6), colon resection (n=5), Whipple procedure (n=4), choledochojejunostomy (n=3), hepaticojejunostomy (n=1), Billroth I (n=1), Billroth II (n=1), and Puestow procedure (n=1). Procedural indications were PEG tube placement (n=11), choledocholithiasis (n=2), biliary stricture (n=2), obstructive jaundice (n=1), cholangitis (n=1), ampullary mass (n=1), sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (n=1), anemia and/or bleeding (n=15), abdominal pain (n=9), radiologic evidence of obstruction (n=3), and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (n=2). The technical success rate was 73% in single-balloon PEG placement, 88% in single-balloon ERCP, 82% in other anterograde SBEs, and 86% in retrograde SBEs. No intraprocedural or postprocedural adverse events were observed. Single center, retrospective study. SBE is safe and effective in patients with surgically altered anatomy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. "Cough officer screening" improves detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in hospital in-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jen-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current tuberculosis (TB reporting protocols are insufficient to achieve the goals established by the Stop TB partnership. Some countries have recommended implementation of active case finding program. We assessed the effect of Cough Officer Screening (an active screening system on the rate of TB detection and health care system delays over the course of four years. Methods Patients who were hospitalized at the Changhua Christian Hospital (Changhua, Taiwan were enrolled from September 2004 to July 2006 (Stage I and August 2006 to August 2008 (Stage II. Stage II was implemented after a Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA cycle analysis indicated that we should exclude ICU and paediatric patients. Results In Stage I, our COS system alerted physicians to 19,836 patients, and 7,998 were examined. 184 of these 7,998 patients (2.3% had TB. Among these 184 patients, 142 (77.2% were examined for TB before COS alarming and 42 were diagnosed after COS alarming. In Stage II, a total of 11,323 patients were alerted by the COS system. Among them, 6,221 patients were examined by physicians, and 125 of these patients (2.0% had TB. Among these 125 patients, 113 (90.4% were examined for TB before COS alarming and 12 were diagnosed after COS alarming. The median time from COS alarm to clinical action was significantly less (p = 0.041 for Stage I (1 day; range: 0-16 days than for Stage II (2 days; range: 0-10 days. Conclusion Our COS system improves detection of TB by reducing the delay from infection to diagnosis. Modifications of scope may be needed to improve cost-effectiveness.

  14. Ultrasound surface probe as a screening method for evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasr-Esfahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the causes of mortality in emergency department. Free fluid in the abdomen due to intra-abdominal blunt trauma can be determined by the surface probe of ultrasound. Since the importance of this free fluid in hemodynamic stable patients with blunt trauma is associated with the unknown outcome for surgeons, this study was performed to evaluate the role of ultrasound surface probe as a screening method in evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods: A descriptive-analytical study was done on 45 patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. The patients were evaluated twice during the three-hours, including repeated ultrasound surface probe and clinical examinations. Computerized tomography was also performed. The patients were divided based on the amount of the free fluid in the abdomen during the evaluations into two groups: Fixed or increased, and decreased free fluid. The results of the different evaluated methods were compared using the sensitivity and specificity. Results: From 17 patients with CT abnormalities, free fluid increased in 14 patients (82.4%. Free fluid was decreased in three patients who were discharged well from the surgery service without any complication. Surface probe in prognosis detection had a sensitivity of 82.4% and specificity of 92.9%. The percentage of false positive and negative ultrasound compared with CT scan was 7.1% and 17.6%. Also, positive and negative predictive value of the ultrasound with surface probe was 87.5% and 89.7% respectively. Conclusion: The use of the ultrasound with surface probe in the diagnosis of free fluid in blunt abdominal trauma in hemodynamic stable patients can be considered as a useful screening method.

  15. Successful Treatment of Bleeding Gastric Varices with Splenectomy in a Patient with Splenic, Portal, and Mesenteric Thromboses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Menasherian-Yaccobe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female with a history of multiple splanchnic and portal thromboses treated with warfarin underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy for cancer screening, and a polypoid mass was biopsied. One week later, she was admitted with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Her therapeutic coagulopathy was reversed with fresh frozen plasma, and she was transfused with packed red blood cells. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated an erosion of a gastric varix without evidence of recent bleeding. Conservative measures failed, and she continued to bleed during her stay. She was not considered a candidate for a shunt procedure; therefore, a splenectomy was performed. Postoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy demonstrated near complete resolution of gastric varices. One year after discharge on warfarin, there has been no recurrence of hemorrhage. Gastric varices often arise from either portal hypertension or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage can be challenging. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is often effective for emergency control in varices secondary to portal hypertension. Splenectomy is the treatment for varices that arise from splenic vein thrombosis. However, treatment of gastric variceal hemorrhage in the context of multiple splanchnic and portal vein thromboses is more complicated. We report splenectomy as a successful treatment of gastric varices in a patient with multiple extrahepatic thromboses.

  16. An open-access endoscopy screen correctly and safely identifies patients for conscious sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Darshan; Feuerstein, Joseph D; Moss, Laureen; D'Souza, Julie; Montanaro, Kerri; Leffler, Daniel A; Sheth, Sunil G

    2016-11-01

    Open-access scheduling is highly utilized for facilitating generally low-risk endoscopies. Preprocedural screening addresses sedation requirements; however, procedural safety may be compromised if screening is inaccurate. We sought to determine the reliability of our open-access scheduling system for appropriate use of conscious sedation. We prospectively and consecutively enrolled outpatient procedures booked at an academic center by open-access using screening after in-office gastroenterology (GI) consultation. We collected the cases inappropriately booked for conscious sedation and compared the characteristics for significant differences. A total of 8063 outpatients were scheduled for procedures with conscious sedation, and 5959 were booked with open-access. Only 78 patients (0.97%, 78/8063) were identified as subsequently needing anesthesiologist-assisted sedation; 44 (56.4%, 44/78) were booked through open-access, of which chronic opioid (47.7%, 21/44) or benzodiazepine use (34.1%, 15/44) were the most common reasons for needing anesthesiologist-assisted sedation. Patients on chronic benzodiazepines required more midazolam than those not on chronic benzodiazepines (P = .03) of those patients who underwent conscious sedation. Similarly, patients with chronic opioid use required more fentanyl than those without chronic opioid use (P = .04). Advanced liver disease and alcohol use were common reasons for patients being booked after in-office consultation and were significantly higher than those booked with open-access (both P open-access scheduling. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  17. Non-invasive carboxyhemoglobin monitoring: screening emergency medical services patients for carbon monoxide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, Douglas; Partridge, Robert; Suner, Selim; Jay, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) toxicity is a significant health problem. The use of non-invasive pulse CO-oximetry screening in the emergency department has demonstrated that the rapid screening of numerous individuals for CO toxicity is simple and capable of identifying occult cases of CO toxicity. The objective of this study was to extend the use of this handheld device to the prehospital arena, assess carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO) levels in emergency medical services (EMS) patients, and correlate these levels with clinical and demographic data. This was a retrospective, observational, chart review of adult patients transported to hospital emergency departments by urban fire department EMS ambulances during a six-week period. Each ambulance used a non-invasive pulse CO-oximeter (Rad-57, Masimo Inc.) to record patients' COHb concentrations (SpCO) along with the standard EMS assessment data. Spearman's Rank Correlation tests and Student's t-tests were used to analyze the data and calculate relationships between SpCO and other variables (age, gender, respiratory rate, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry). A total of 36.4% of the patients transported during the study had SpCO documented. Of the 1,017 adults included in this group, 11 (1.1%) had an SpCO >15%. There was no correlation between SpCO and heart rate, ventilatory rate, mean arterial pressure, and oxygen saturation. Screening for CO toxicity in the EMS setting is possible, and may aid in the early detection and treatment of CO-poisoned patients.

  18. Automated assessment of patients' self-narratives for posttraumatic stress disorder screening using natural language processing and text mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Qiwei; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; de Vries, Theo

    2017-01-01

    Patients’ narratives about traumatic experiences and symptoms are useful in clinical screening and diagnostic procedures. In this study, we presented an automated assessment system to screen patients for posttraumatic stress disorder via a natural language processing and text-mining approach. Four

  19. Stage of presentation and visual outcome of patients screened for familial retinoblastoma: nationwide registration in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imhof, S. M.; Moll, A. C.; Schouten-van Meeteren, A. Y. N.

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands a comprehensive programme for screening just after birth for familial retinoblastoma is taking place. In this report the stage of the disease at the time of detection, by way of screening, and the long term visual outcome in these patients was evaluated. A nationwide,

  20. Feasibility of screening patients for emotional risk factors before in vitro fertilization in daily clinical practice: a process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, A.J.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Sluisveld, P.H. van; Verhaak, C.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2012-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is patient screening for emotional risk factors before starting IVF treatment feasible? SUMMARY ANSWER: Introduction of screening for emotional risk factors by a validated instrument (SCREENIVF) in couples treated by IVF or ICSI is feasible, indicated by a moderate to high and stable

  1. Diagnostic yield, interpretation, and clinical utility of mutation screening of sarcomere encoding genes in Danish hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Paal Skytt; Havndrup, Ole; Hougs, Lotte

    2008-01-01

    persons. Index patients were screened for mutations in all coding regions of 10 sarcomere genes (MYH7, MYL3, MYBPC3, TNNI3, TNNT2, TPM1, ACTC, CSRP3, TCAP, and TNNC1) and five exons of TTN. Relatives were screened for presence of minor or major diagnostic criteria for HCM and tracking of DNA variants...

  2. Seroprevalence and real-time PCR study of Epstein-Barr virus and the value of screening in pretransplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Elansary

    2016-01-01

    Routine screening for Epstein-Barr virus in blood bags is not economical. Screening is highly recommended only for immunocompromised and pretransplant patients. Viremia is not the role in individuals with EBV IgM positive sera, which in turn changes some concepts in organ transplantation.

  3. Turning patient-centeredness from ideal to real: lessons from 2 success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenson, Michael L; DiGioia, Anthony M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Swieskowski, David

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report established patient-centeredness as 1 of 6 core principles for health system redesign. Yet, turning aspiration into accomplishment has proven arduous. Patient-centered care has components that challenge established professional norms, and the term itself has not always been clearly defined. However, these barriers can be overcome using Rogers' principles of diffusion of innovation, as is shown by 2 case histories. One involves care at an urban academic medical center, the other outpatient care at multiple physician sites located in urban, suburban, and rural locations. At the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the Patient- and Family-Centered Care Methodology and Practice has become the new "operating system" in 60 clinical areas, using a 6-step approach to engage patients and families as codesigners of ideal care. Meanwhile, the Health Coach Program at Mercy Clinics, Inc, Des Moines, Iowa, has used a "high-tech/high-touch" combined approach to change the organizational culture through patient-centered initiatives. By doing so, it has put the organization in a position to accept risk for populations of patients. Importantly, both programs have been financially and clinically successful, are accepted by frontline physicians and senior management, and are nationally recognized. Common principles include physician leadership, comfort with uncertainty during innovation, organizational structures that send a consistent message about expectations, and quality improvement as a constant cycle with no end point.

  4. Colorectal cancer screening at US community health centers: Examination of sociodemographic disparities and association with patient-provider communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sue C; McKinley, Duane; Sripipatana, Alek; Makaroff, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are low among underserved populations. High-quality patient-physician communication potentially influences patients' willingness to undergo CRC screening. Community health centers (HCs) provide comprehensive primary health care to underserved populations. This study's objectives were to ascertain national CRC screening rates and to explore the relations between sociodemographic characteristics and patient-provider communication on the receipt of CRC screening among HC patients. Using 2014 Health Center Patient Survey data, bivariate and multivariate analyses examined the association of sociodemographic variables (sex, race/ethnicity, age, geography, preferred language, household income, insurance, and employment status) and patient-provider communication with the receipt of CRC screening. Patients between the ages of 65 and 75 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-4.64) and patients not in the labor force (aOR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.37-3.94) had higher odds of receiving CRC screening, whereas patients who were uninsured (aOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.18-0.61) and patients who were non-English-speaking (aOR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.18-0.99) had lower odds. Patient-provider communication was not associated with the receipt of CRC screening. The CRC screening rate for HC patients was 57.9%, whereas the rate was 65.1% according to the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 58.2% according to the 2013 National Health Interview Survey. The high ratings of patient-provider communication, regardless of the screening status, suggest strides toward a patient-centered medical home practice transformation that will assist in a positive patient experience. Addressing the lack of insurance, making culturally and linguistically appropriate patient education materials available, and training clinicians and care teams in cultural competency are critical for increasing future CRC screening rates. Cancer 2017

  5. Success of Two-Stage Reimplantation in Patients Requiring an Interim Spacer Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jaiben; Miller, Evan M; Curtis, Gannon L; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K; Mont, Michael A; Higuera, Carlos A

    2018-03-23

    Some patients undergoing a 2-stage revision for a periprosthetic joint infection require a repeat spacer in the interim (removal of existing spacer with insertion of a new spacer or spacer exchange) due to persistent infection. The objectives of this study are to (1) determine the factors associated with patients who receive a repeat spacer and (2) compare the infection-free survival (overall and stratified by joint type) of reimplantation in patients who did or did not receive a repeat spacer. From 2001 to 2014, 347 hip or knee 2-stage revisions that finally underwent reimplantation and had a minimum 2-year follow-up were identified. An interim spacer exchange was performed in 59 (17%) patients (exchange cohort). Patient-related and organism-related factors were compared between the exchange and non-exchange cohorts. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were performed to assess the success (absence of signs of infection, reoperation for infection, periprosthetic joint infection-related mortality) of both cohorts. Patients in the exchange group had higher comorbidity score (P = .020), prolonged time to reimplantation (P exchange cohort, and 78% (knee 77%, hip 78%) in the non-exchange cohort (P = .020). Patients requiring an interim spacer exchange were found to have more comorbidities, prolonged treatment period, and were more likely to be infected with a resistant organism. About one-third of such patients became reinfected within 5 years compared to only one-fifth of the patients without an interim spacer exchange. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Lalji, Ulrich; Houwers, Janneke; Nijssen, Estelle C; Nelemans, Patty J; van Roozendaal, Lori; Smidt, Marjolein L; Heuts, Esther; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2014-07-01

    Feasibility studies have shown that contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) increases diagnostic accuracy of mammography. We studied diagnostic accuracy of CESM in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme, who have a lower disease prevalence than previously published papers on CESM. During 6 months, all women referred to our hospital were eligible for CESM. Two radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis provided BI-RADS classifications for conventional mammography and CESM. Statistical significance of differences between mammography and CESM was calculated using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for both imaging modalities. Of the 116 eligible women, 113 underwent CESM. CESM increased sensitivity to 100.0% (+3.1%), specificity to 87.7% (+45.7%), PPV to 76.2% (+36.5%) and NPV to 100.0% (+2.9%) as compared to mammography. Differences between conventional mammography and CESM were statistically significant (p mammography, AUC was 0.779. With CESM, AUC increased to 0.976 (p mammography, even in lower prevalence patient populations such as referrals from breast cancer screening. • CESM is feasible in the workflow of referrals from routine breast screening. • CESM is superior to mammography, even in low disease prevalence populations. • CESM has an extremely high negative predictive value for breast cancer. • CESM is comparable to MRI in assessment of breast cancer extent. • CESM is comparable to histopathology in assessment of breast cancer extent.

  7. Prevalence of colon polyps detected by colonoscopy screening in asymptomatic black and white patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, David; Holub, Jennifer; Moravec, Matthew; Eisen, Glenn; Peters, Dawn; Morris, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Context Compared to whites, Black men and women have a higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer and may develop cancer at a younger age. Colorectal cancer screening might be less effective in Blacks, if there are racial differences in the age-adjusted prevalence and location of cancer precursor lesions. Objectives To determine and compare the prevalence rates and location of polyp(s) >9mm in asymptomatic Blacks and whites who receive colonoscopy screening. Design, Setting, and Patients Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 practice sites in the United States using a computerized endoscopic report generator from 2004–2005. Data were transmitted to a central data repository, where all asymptomatic whites (n = 80,061) and Blacks (n = 5464) who received screening colonoscopy were identified. Main outcome measures Prevalence and location of polyp(s) >9mm, adjusted for age, gender, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis. Results Both Black men and women had a higher prevalence of polyp(s) >9mm (7.7 versus 6.2%; p 9mm (OR 1.133; 95% CI 0.93,1.38). However, in a sub-analysis of patients over age 60 years, proximal polyps >9mm were more likely in Black men (p = 0.026) and women (p9mm, and Black over age 60 years are more likely to proximal polyps >9mm. PMID:18812532

  8. Scalp cooling successfully prevents alopecia in breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline/taxane-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Ines; Wiesske, Alexandra; Schoenegg, Winfried

    2018-04-13

    Chemotherapy for breast cancer induces alopecia, representing a major source of patient distress. This study assesses whether a scalp-cooling device is effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia, and assesses adverse treatment effects. A prospective observational study including women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy and scalp cooling using a Paxman device. The primary efficacy end points were: successful hair preservation (no hair loss; <30% hair loss not requiring a wig; or <50% hair loss not requiring a wig) at the completion of chemotherapy. Secondary end points included adverse effects such as headache, pain, nausea or dizziness. The study enrolled 131 participants. Mean patient age was 49.8 years; 74% received anthracycline/taxane-based chemotherapy and 26% received taxane-monotherapy based chemotherapy. Hair preservation was successful in 102 women who underwent scalp cooling (71.0%; 95% CI = 63-79%). Only adverse events related to device use were collected, representing 7% (95% CI = 3-11%) of cases. Scalp cooling is effective in preventing hair loss among breast cancer patients undergoing standard chemotherapy treatment, and has minimal adverse effects. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Successful Pregnancy in a Patient with Combined Deficiency of Factor V and Factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Adib, Ahmed Ghassan; Majdi, Farah; Dilai, Mohamed Othmane; Asmouki, Hamid; Bassir, Ahlam; Harou, Karam; Soumani, Abderraouf; Younous, Said; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2014-01-01

    Inherited combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency (F5F8D) is autosomal recessive transmission disorder. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding, and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The risk of miscarriage and placental abruption is consequent. We report a case of successful pregnancy in a patient with F5F8D. 20-year-old woman, born of consanguineous parents, third gestate, first parity, two miscarriages, admitted for child birth of a spontaneous pregnancy estimated at 38 weeks and was diagnosed with F5F8D. At admission, patient was hemodynamically stable, with good obstetric conditions. The biologic results showed low levels of PT (52%), factor V (7%), and factor VIII (5%), and the activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged (68,6%). Parturient was admitted in intensive care unit, maternal and fetal monitoring was performed. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and factor VIII concentrates were perfused at the induction of labor. Analgesia used fentanyl titration. The delivery gave birth to a newborn male, with Apgar 10/10 and 3000 g. The puerperium was simple without any important bleeding. Laboratory tests for the newborn were acceptable. Little literature is available on this subject and there are no guidelines available concerning pregnancy; we chose to prescribe a combination of factor VIII concentrate and FFP in pre-, per- and postpartum. The same protocol was successfully used in a patient before dental extraction and prostatectomy. Vaginal delivery is possible, as our case. Management by multidisciplinary team is recommended.

  10. Organisational readiness: exploring the preconditions for success in organisation-wide patient safety improvement programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Susan; Benn, Jonathan; Pinto, Anna; Parand, Anam; Iskander, Sandra; Vincent, Charles

    2010-08-01

    Patient safety has been high on the agenda for more than a decade. Despite many national initiatives aimed at improving patient safety, the challenge remains to find coherent and sustainable organisation-wide safety-improvement programmes. In the UK, the Safer Patients' Initiative (SPI) was established to address this challenge. Important in the success of such an endeavour is understanding 'readiness' at the organisational level, identifying the preconditions for success in this type of programme. This article reports on a case study of the four NHS organisations participating in the first phase of SPI, examining the perceptions of organisational readiness and the relationship of these factors with impact by those actively involved in the initiative. A mixed-methods design was used, involving a survey and semistructured interviews with senior executive leads, the principal SPI programme coordinator and the four operational leads in each of the SPI clinical work areas in all four organisations taking part in the first phase of SPI. This preliminary work would suggest that prior to the start of organisation-wide quality- and safety-improvement programmes, organisations would benefit from an assessment of readiness with time spent in the preparation of the organisational infrastructure, processes and culture. Furthermore, a better understanding of the preconditions that mark an organisation as ready for improvement work would allow policymakers to set realistic expectations about the outcomes of safety campaigns.

  11. Bone scan as a screening test for missed fractures in severely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K-J; Jung, K; Kim, J; Kwon, J

    2014-12-01

    In many cases, patients with severe blunt trauma have multiple fractures throughout the body. These fractures are not often detectable by history or physical examination, and their diagnosis can be delayed or even missed. Thus, screening test fractures of the whole body is required after initial management. We performed this study to evaluate the reliability of bone scans for detecting missed fractures in patients with multiple severe traumas and we analyzed the causes of missed fractures by using bone scan. A bone scan is useful as a screening test for fractures of the entire body of severe trauma patients who are passed the acute phase. We reviewed the electronic medical records of severe trauma patients who underwent a bone scan from September 2009 to December 2010. Demographic and medical data were compared and statistically analyzed to determine whether missed fractures were detected after bone scan in the two groups. A total of 382 patients who had an injury severity score [ISS] greater than 16 points with multiple traumas visited the emergency room. One hundred and thirty-one patients underwent bone scan and 81 patients were identified with missed fractures by bone scan. The most frequent location for missed fractures was the rib area (55 cases, 41.98%), followed by the extremities (42 cases, 32.06%). The missed fractures that required surgery or splint were most common in extremities (11 cases). In univariate analysis, higher ISS scores and mechanism of injury were related with the probability that missed fractures would be found with a bone scan. The ISS score was statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Bone scan is an effective method of detecting missed fractures among patients with multiple severe traumas. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Interactional behaviour as a marker for screening patients with environment-related complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Heller, Pia; Bircher, Andreas; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Huss, Anke; Niederer, Markus; Schwarzenbach, Simone; Waeber, Roger; Wegmann, Lukas; Küchenhoff, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Adequate assessment of symptoms of patients suffering from environmental illnesses requires appropriate procedures such as psychological and psychiatric diagnostics, medical screening and a thorough analysis of noxious environmental factors. The Basel pilot research project established a multi-methodological assessment procedure that meets these criteria. However, an exhaustive three-fold analysis is very costly in terms of both equipment and personnel, and hence the need for a heuristic approach and pre-screening persists. The three-fold diagnostic approach was preceded by a structured psychodynamic interview; the findings were used to construct a new profile of the patient's interactional behaviour (IB) in conjunction with the interviewer's countertransference. The extent to which this new profile could predict the results of the multi-method assessment was then assessed. A low level of IB on the part of the patient significantly predicted the degree of stress and the extent of the psychiatric diagnosis, including personality disorders. A negative IB was associated with negative personality traits. Furthermore, a high level of IB implied more medical, but not more environmental, findings which could plausibly be related to the patient's complaints. Assessment of patients' IB in conjunction with one's own countertransference is very helpful as a preliminary heuristic approach and may lead to consequences for treatment and therapy. Therefore, the training provided for experts who deal with patients suffering from environment-related complaints should place more specific emphasis on assessing patients' behaviour and on incorporating information gathered from countertransference. Nevertheless, an interdisciplinary assessment including medical, psychological/psychiatric, and environmental expertise remains mandatory for adequate and satisfactory diagnosis of patients with environment-related complaints.

  13. Screening for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen test: are patients making informed decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, K J; Volk, R J; Cass, A R; Spann, S J

    1999-09-01

    The benefits of early detection of prostate cancer are uncertain, and the American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend individual decision making in prostate cancer screening. This study reports the knowledge of male primary care patients about prostate cancer and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and examines how that knowledge is related to PSA testing, preferences for testing in the future, and desire for involvement in physician-patient decision making. The sample included 160 men aged 45 to 70 years with no history of prostate cancer who presented for care at a university-based family medicine clinic. Before scheduled office visits, patients completed a questionnaire developed for this study that included a 10-question measure of prostate cancer knowledge, the Deber-Kraestchmer Problem-Solving Decision-Making Scale, sociodemographic indicators, and questions on PSA testing. In general, patients who were college graduates were more knowledgeable about prostate cancer and early detection than those with a high school education or less. Aside from college graduates, most patients could not identify the principle advantages and disadvantages of PSA testing. Patients indicating previous or future plans for PSA testing demonstrated greater knowledge than other patients. Desire for involvement in decision making varied by patient education but was not related to past PSA testing. Patients lack knowledge about prostate cancer and early detection. This knowledge deficit may impede the early detection of prostate cancer and is a barrier to making an informed decision about undergoing PSA testing.

  14. Impact Exerted by Nutritional Risk Screening on Clinical Outcome of Patients with Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Cai, Hongfei; Li, Yang; Chen, Caiwen; Cui, Youbin

    2018-01-01

    Preoperative nutritional status of patients is closely associated with their recovery after the surgery. This study aims to ascertain the impact exerted by the nutritional risk screening on clinical outcome of patients with esophageal cancer. 160 patients with esophageal cancer aged over 60, having got therapy at the First Hospital of Jilin University from Jun 2016 to Feb 2017 were evaluated by adopting the NRS2002. 80 cases of patients got active therapy of nutritional support, and the other patients not supported nutritionally were selected as the control group. The comparison was drawn between two groups in serum albumin, serum immunoglobulin, postoperative complications, hospitalization, and hospitalization expenses. For all the patients, in 3 and 7 days after the surgery, the serum albumin in the nutritionally supported group outstripped that in group without nutritional support ( P nutritional risk. For the patients in the risk of nutrition, the IgA in the nutritionally supported group outstripped that of group without nutritional support ( P group without nutritional support in 1 and 3 days before the surgery ( P nutrition, the average hospitalization of nutritionally supported group was shorter ( P group without nutritional support. And for the patients in no risk, the hospitalization expenses of supported group surmounted those of group without nutritional support ( P 0.05). For the patients in the risk of nutrition, preoperative nutritional support can facilitate the nutritional status and immunization-relative result after surgery, which shall also decrease the average hospitalization and hospitalization cost.

  15. Using the Frailty Assessment for Care Planning Tool (FACT to screen elderly chronic kidney disease patients for frailty: the nurse experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffatt H

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Heather Moffatt,1 Paige Moorhouse,1,2 Laurie Mallery,1,2 David Landry,1 Karthik Tennankore2 1Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, NS, Canada; 2Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, CanadaPurpose: Recent evidence supports the prognostic significance of frailty for functional decline and poor health outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet, despite the development of clinical tools to screen for frailty, little is known about the experiential impact of screening for frailty in this setting. The Frailty Assessment for Care Planning Tool (FACT evaluates frailty across 4 domains: mobility, function, social circumstances, and cognition. The purpose of this qualitative study was as follows: 1 explore the nurse experience of screening for frailty using the FACT tool in a specialized outpatient renal clinic; 2 determine how, if at all, provider perceptions of frailty changed after implementation of the frailty screening tool; and 3 determine the perceived factors that influence uptake and administration of the FACT screening tool in a specialized clinical setting.Methods: A semi-structured interview of 5 nurses from the Nova Scotia Health Authority, Central Zone Renal Clinic was conducted. A grounded theory approach was used to generate thematic categories and analysis models.Results: Four primary themes emerged in the data analysis: “we were skeptical”, “we made it work”, “we learned how”, and “we understand”. As the renal nurses gained a sense of confidence in their ability to implement the FACT tool, initial barriers to implementation were attenuated. Implementation factors – such as realistic goals, clear guidelines, and ongoing training – were important factors for successful uptake of the frailty screening initiative.Conclusion: Nurse participants reported an overall positive experience using the FACT method to screen for frailty and indicated that their understanding of the multiple dimensions and subtleties of

  16. Illness Representations of HIV Positive Patients Are Associated with Virologic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Daniela; Borghi, Lidia; Lamiani, Giulia; Barlascini, Luca; Bini, Teresa; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Vegni, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is important for HIV positive patients to be engaged in their care and be adherent to treatment in order to reduce disease progression and mortality. Studies found that illness representations influence adherence through the mediating role of coping behaviors. However, no study has ever tested if patient engagement to the visits mediate the relationship between illness perceptions and adherence. This study aimed to explore illness representations of HIV positive patients and test the hypothesis that illness representations predict adherence through the mediating role of a component of behavioral engagement. Methods: HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least one year and presenting to a check-up visit were eligible to participate in the study. Patients completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Behavioral engagement was measured based on the patients' clinical attendance to the check-up visits; adherence to HAART was measured by viral load. Undetectable viral load or HIV-RNA perception that the disease does not have serious consequences on patient's life and the prevalence of negative emotions toward HIV were associated with virologic success. On the contrary, the patient's perception that the disease has serious consequences on his/her life and the prevalence of positive emotions were associated with virologic failure. This model showed good fit indexes (CFI = 1; TLI = 1; RMSEA = 0.00; and WRMSR = 0.309). Discussion: Results do not support the mediating role of behavioral engagement in the relationship between illness representations and adherence. As perception of serious consequences coupled with positive emotions are directly associated with virologic failure, clinicians should take them into account to promote treatment adherence.

  17. Medical Residents’ and Practicing Physicians’ e-Cigarette Knowledge and Patient Screening Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen W. Geletko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare medical residents and practicing physicians in primary care specialties regarding their knowledge and beliefs about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes. We wanted to ascertain whether years removed from medical school had an effect on screening practices, recommendations given to patients, and the types of informational sources utilized. Methods: A statewide sample of Florida primary care medical residents (n = 61 and practicing physicians (n = 53 completed either an online or paper survey, measuring patient screening and physician recommendations, beliefs, and knowledge related to e-cigarettes. χ 2 tests of association and linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the differences within- and between-participant groups. Results: Practicing physicians were more likely than medical residents to believe e-cigarettes lower cancer risk in patients who use them as an alternative to cigarettes ( P = .0003. Medical residents were more likely to receive information about e-cigarettes from colleagues ( P = .0001. No statistically significant differences were observed related to e-cigarette knowledge or patient recommendations. Conclusions: Practicing primary care physicians are accepting both the benefits and costs associated with e-cigarettes, while medical residents in primary care are more reticent. Targeted education concerning the potential health risks and benefits associated with the use of e-cigarettes needs to be included in the current medical education curriculum and medical provider training to improve provider confidence in discussing issues surrounding the use of this product.

  18. Screening for fecal carriage of MCR-producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthy humans and primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Zurfluh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of the occurrence of the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance genes mcr-1 and mcr-2 among humans is currently sparsely studied in Western Europe. Objectives To determine the occurrence of MCR-producing Enterobacteriaceae in fecal samples of healthy humans with high occupational exposure to food and primary care patients in Switzerland. Methods Stool samples from 1091 healthy individuals and fecal swabs from 53 primary care patients were screened for polymyxin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae using LB agar containing 4 mg/L colistin. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of colistin were determined for non-intrinsic colistin-resistant isolates. Isolates were screened by PCR for the presence of mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes. Results The fecal carriage rate of colistin resistant (MIC value >2 mg/l Enterobacteriaceae was 1.5% for healthy people and 3.8% for primary care patients. Isolates included Hafnia alvei (n = 9, Escherichia coli (n = 3, Enterobacter cloacae (n = 4, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1 and Raoultella ornithinolytica (n = 1. None of the isolates harbored the mcr-1 or mcr-2 genes. Conclusions There is no evidence for the presence of MCR-producers in the fecal flora of healthy people or primary care patients. Therefore, the risk of transfer of mcr genes from animals, food or the environment to humans is likely to be low in Switzerland.

  19. Medical Residents' and Practicing Physicians' e-Cigarette Knowledge and Patient Screening Activities: Do They Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geletko, Karen W; Myers, Karen; Brownstein, Naomi; Jameson, Breanna; Lopez, Daniel; Sharpe, Alaine; Bellamy, Gail R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare medical residents and practicing physicians in primary care specialties regarding their knowledge and beliefs about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). We wanted to ascertain whether years removed from medical school had an effect on screening practices, recommendations given to patients, and the types of informational sources utilized. A statewide sample of Florida primary care medical residents (n = 61) and practicing physicians (n = 53) completed either an online or paper survey, measuring patient screening and physician recommendations, beliefs, and knowledge related to e-cigarettes. χ 2 tests of association and linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the differences within- and between-participant groups. Practicing physicians were more likely than medical residents to believe e-cigarettes lower cancer risk in patients who use them as an alternative to cigarettes ( P = .0003). Medical residents were more likely to receive information about e-cigarettes from colleagues ( P = .0001). No statistically significant differences were observed related to e-cigarette knowledge or patient recommendations. Practicing primary care physicians are accepting both the benefits and costs associated with e-cigarettes, while medical residents in primary care are more reticent. Targeted education concerning the potential health risks and benefits associated with the use of e-cigarettes needs to be included in the current medical education curriculum and medical provider training to improve provider confidence in discussing issues surrounding the use of this product.

  20. Successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Maraj, Hemant; Mohajer, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Deepannita

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type 2. She had a previous caesarean section and went on to have an uncomplicated vaginal birth in her last pregnancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in a patient with EDS. EDS is a multisystem disorder involving a genetic defect in collagen and connective-tissue synthesis and structure. It is a heterogeneous group of 11 different inherited disorders. Obs...

  1. Successful Treatment of Disseminated Cryptococcal Infection in a Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patient During Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jessica L.; Yin, Dwight E.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Turner, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcal infection is rarely reported in the setting of pediatric acute leukemia, despite the immunocompromised state of these patients. However, when present, disseminated cryptococcal infection poses treatment challenges and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment of invasive fungal disease in a child with acute leukemia requires a delicate balance between anti-fungal and anti-neoplastic therapy. This balance is particularly important early in the course of leukemia, since both the underlying disease and overwhelming infection can be life threatening. We describe the successful management of life-threatening disseminated cryptococcosis in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:22258349

  2. Successful use of sugammadex for caesarean section in a patient with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokman Soyoral

    Full Text Available Abstract Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder that is characterized by muscle weakness that fluctuates, worsening with exertion, and improving with rest. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is made following clinical and physical examination and is confirmed by serum immunoassays to measure autoantibody levels. Myasthenia gravis especially when associated with pregnancy is a high-risk disease, and its course is unpredictable. We described the second report about use of sugammadex after rocuronium for a caesarean delivery with myasthenia gravis, but, unlike our case that formerly was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, the patient was extubated on postoperative successfully and we did not encounter any respiratory problems.

  3. Successful lipid-complexed amphotericin B treatment of Candida arthritis in a lymphoma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaceta, G; Olave, T; de los Martires, L D; Delgado, C; Gutierrez, M; Palomera, L

    1999-01-01

    Fungal arthritis is uncommon but has been increasingly diagnosed over recent years, particularly in patients with immunodeficiency due for instance to hematological malignancies. Candida albicans is the most frequent causative agent, and the knee is the joint most often involved. Amphotericin B is the drug of choice, but is associated with significant toxicity. Recently developed lipid formulations of amphotericin B have been found as effective and less toxic than the conventional formulation. We report a new case of Candida arthritis that occurred after chemotherapy for nonHodgkin's lymphoma and was successfully treated with lipid-complexed amphotericin B.

  4. Using screen-based simulation of inhaled anaesthetic delivery to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J H

    2015-12-01

    Screen-based simulation can improve patient care by giving novices and experienced clinicians insight into drug behaviour. Gas Man(®) is a screen-based simulation program that depicts pictorially and graphically the anaesthetic gas and vapour tension from the vaporizer to the site of action, namely the brain and spinal cord. The gases and vapours depicted are desflurane, enflurane, ether, halothane, isoflurane, nitrogen, nitrous oxide, sevoflurane, and xenon. Multiple agents can be administered simultaneously or individually and the results shown on an overlay graph. Practice exercises provide in-depth knowledge of the subject matter. Experienced clinicians can simulate anaesthesia occurrences and practices for application to their clinical practice, and publish the results to benefit others to improve patient care. Published studies using this screen-based simulation have led to a number of findings, as follows: changing from isoflurane to desflurane toward the end of anaesthesia does not accelerate recovery in humans; vital capacity induction can produce loss of consciousness in 45 s; simulated context-sensitive decrement times explain recovery profiles; hyperventilation does not dramatically speed emergence; high fresh gas flow is wasteful; fresh gas flow and not the vaporizer setting should be reduced during intubation; re-anaesthetization can occur with severe hypoventilation after extubation; and in re-anaesthetization, the anaesthetic redistributes from skeletal muscle. Researchers using screen-based simulations can study fewer subjects to reach valid conclusions that impact clinical care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Screening for Lynch syndrome using risk assessment criteria in patients with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Tsuji, Kosuke; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2018-05-01

    Lynch syndrome is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Lynch syndrome only causes about 0.4% of cases of ovarian cancer, which suggests that universal screening may not be cost-efficient. However, the frequency of Lynch syndrome in ovarian cancer is unclear in the Asian population. The goal of the study was to investigate a screening strategy using family history. The subjects were 129 patients with ovarian cancer. Clinical and family history were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, and Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) criteria 2007 and PREMM₅ were used for risk assessment. Microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and methylation of MMR genes were analyzed. Of the 129 cases, 25 (19.4%) met the SGO criteria, and 4 of these 25 had MSI-high and MMR deficiency. Two cases had loss of MSH2 and MSH6, indicating MSH2 mutation, and the other two had loss of MLH1 and PMS2, including one without MLH1 methylation indicating MLH1 mutation. These results show that screening using family history can detect Lynch syndrome in 12.0% (3/25) of ovarian cancer cases. The 3 cases were positive for PREMM₅, but negative for Amsterdam II criteria and revised Bethesda guidelines. Genetic testing in one case with MSH2 and MSH6 deficiency confirmed the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome with MSH2 mutation. This is the first study of screening for Lynch syndrome in ovarian cancer using clinical and family history in an Asian population. This approach may be effective for diagnosis in these patients. Copyright © 2018. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  6. Psychological distress screening in cancer patients: psychometric properties of tools available in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzatti, Barbara; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    The main national and international organisms recommend continuous monitoring of psychological distress in cancer patients throughout the disease trajectory. The reasons for this concern are the high prevalence of psychological distress in cancer patients and its association with a worse quality of life, poor adherence to treatment, and stronger assistance needs. Most screening tools for psychological distress were developed in English-speaking countries. To be fit for use in different cultural contexts (like the Italian), they need to undergo accurate translation and specific validation. In the present work we summarized the validation studies for psychological distress screening tools available in Italian that are most widely employed internationally, with the aim of helping clinicians choose the adequate instrument. With knowledge of the properties of the corresponding Italian versions, researchers would be better able to identify the instruments that deserve further investigation. We carried out a systematic review of the literature. Results. Twenty-nine studies of eight different instruments (five relating to psychological distress, three to its depressive component) were identified. Ten of these studies involved cancer patients and 19 referred to the general population or to non-cancer, non-psychiatric subjects. For seven of the eight tools, data on concurrent and discriminant validity were available. For five instruments data on criterion validity were available, for four there were data on construct validity, and for one tool divergent and cross-cultural validity data were provided. For six of the eight tools the literature provided data on reliability (mostly about internal consistency). Since none of the eight instruments for which we found validation studies relative to the Italian context had undergone a complete and organic validation process, their use in the clinical context must be cautious. Italian researchers should be proactive and make a valid

  7. Successful desensitization protocol for hypersensitivity reaction probably caused by dabrafenib in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Abu-Amna, Mahmoud; Hadad, Salim; Haim, Nissim; Shahar, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib are both orally bioavailable small molecule agents that block mitogen activated protein kinase signalling in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation. Generalized hypersensitivity reactions to vemurafenib or dabrafenib have not been described. Continuing vemurafenib or dabrafenib therapy despite hypersensitivity reaction is especially important in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation, in whom this mutation plays a critical role in tumour growth. Desensitization protocols to overcome hypersensitivity reactions by gradual reintroduction of small amounts of the offending drug up to full therapeutic doses are available for many anti-cancer agents, including vemurafenib but, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported for dabrafenib. We describe a patient with metastatic melanoma who developed Type I hypersensitivity reaction to vemurafenib and to subsequent treatment with dabrafenib, and who was successfully treated by drug desensitization which allowed safe prolonged continuation of dabrafenib. The development of hypersensitivity reactions for both dabrafenib and vemurafinib in the current case could be because these drugs have a similar chemical structure and cause a cross-reactivity. However, hypersensitivity reaction to a non-medicinal ingredient shared by the two drugs is also possible. Oral desensitization appears to be an option for patients with hypersensitivity Type I to dabrafenib. This approach may permit clinicians to safely administer dabrafenib to patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions to this life-prolonging medication. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Patient Perceptions of Whom is Most Involved in Their Care with Successive Duty Hour Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vineet M; Prochaska, Micah T; Farnan, Jeanne M; Meltzer, David O

    2015-09-01

    Although direct patient care is necessary for experiential learning during residency, inpatient perceptions of the roles of resident and attending physicians in their care may have changed with residency duty hours. We aimed to assess if patients' perceptions of who is most involved in their care changed with residency duty hours. This was a prospective observational study over 12 years at a single institution. Participants were 22,408 inpatients admitted to the general medicine teaching service from 2001 to 2013, who completed a 1-month follow-up phone interview. Percentage of inpatients who reported an attending, resident, or intern as most involved in their care by duty hour period (pre-2003, post-2003-pre-2011, post-2011). With successive duty hour limits, the percentage of patients who reported the attending as most involved in their care increased (pre-2003 20 %, post-2003-pre-2011 29 %, post-2011 37 %, p care (pre-2003 20 %, post-2003-pre-2011 17 %, post-2011 12 %, p duty hours limits, hospitalized patients were more likely to report the attending physician and less likely to report the resident or intern as most involved in their hospital care. Given the importance of experiential learning to the formation of clinical judgment for independent practice, further study on the implications of these trends for resident education and patient safety is warranted.

  9. The Lung Screen Uptake Trial (LSUT): protocol for a randomised controlled demonstration lung cancer screening pilot testing a targeted invitation strategy for high risk and 'hard-to-reach' patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaife, Samantha L; Ruparel, Mamta; Beeken, Rebecca J; McEwen, Andy; Isitt, John; Nolan, Gary; Sennett, Karen; Baldwin, David R; Duffy, Stephen W; Janes, Samuel M; Wardle, Jane

    2016-04-20

    Participation in low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening offered in the trial context has been poor, especially among smokers from socioeconomically deprived backgrounds; a group for whom the risk-benefit ratio is improved due to their high risk of lung cancer. Attracting high risk participants is essential to the success and equity of any future screening programme. This study will investigate whether the observed low and biased uptake of screening can be improved using a targeted invitation strategy. A randomised controlled trial design will be used to test whether targeted invitation materials are effective at improving engagement with an offer of lung cancer screening for high risk candidates. Two thousand patients aged 60-75 and recorded as a smoker within the last five years by their GP, will be identified from primary care records and individually randomised to receive either intervention invitation materials (which take a targeted, stepped and low burden approach to information provision prior to the appointment) or control invitation materials. The primary outcome is uptake of a nurse-led 'lung health check' hospital appointment, during which patients will be offered a spirometry test, an exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) reading, and an LDCT if eligible. Initial data on demographics (i.e. age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation score) and smoking status will be collected in primary care and analysed to explore differences between attenders and non-attenders with respect to invitation group. Those who attend the lung health check will have further data on smoking collected during their appointment (including pack-year history, nicotine dependence and confidence to quit). Secondary outcomes will include willingness to be screened, uptake of LDCT and measures of informed decision-making to ensure the latter is not compromised by either invitation strategy. If effective at improving informed uptake of screening and reducing bias in participation, this invitation

  10. Utility of screening ultrasound after first febrile UTI among patients with clinically significant vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanyi, Eric Z; Preece, Janae; Gupta, Angela; Lin, Susan M; Wang, Ming-Hsien

    2013-10-01

    To assess the sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) of screening renal and bladder ultrasound (RBUS) after initial febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) among patients with clinically significant vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). A retrospective review was performed of all children UTI between 2004 and 2011. The sensitivity and NPV of initial RBUS was calculated among patients who were found to have high-grade (IV-V) VUR. Additionally, initial RBUS among patients with evidence of photopenia on dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan or who underwent surgical intervention were reviewed. One hundred forty-four patients with febrile UTI were identified; available RBUS, voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG), and DMSA results for each kidney were reviewed. One hundred fifty-eight kidneys had evidence of VUR on VCUG, and initial RBUS demonstrated abnormality in 25 (sensitivity 0.17). Forty-five kidneys had high-grade VUR and RBUS revealed abnormality in 16 (sensitivity 0.36). One hundred seventy-eight kidneys had no evidence of abnormality on initial RBUS, and 136 (76%) were found to have VUR (NPV 0.24), of which 31 had high-grade VUR (NPV 0.83). Seven kidneys had scarring on DMSA and initial RBUS was normal in 4 (57%). Twelve of 19 patients (63%) who eventually underwent surgical intervention had a normal initial RBUS. RBUS has poor sensitivity and NPV for detecting high-grade VUR in patients UTI. A significant number of patients who were diagnosed with high-grade VUR, renal scarring, or underwent surgical correction of VUR had a negative screening RBUS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactional difficulties as a resource for patient participation in prenatal screening consultations in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Agnes; Zayts, Olga A

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we examine the interactional means by which non-native English speaking patients in Hong Kong participate in prenatal screening sessions. Using interactional sociolinguistics as the theoretical framework, we apply the concept of contextualization cues to illustrate that patients indicate their participation in the consultation through verbal and non-verbal modes. We find that non-native English speaking patients participate: (1) by displaying the interactional difficulties they are encountering and (2) by coordinating their displays of interactional difficulties with the activities of the healthcare provider. We conclude that the notion of patient participation must be expanded to take into account non-native speaking contexts; in particular, that collaborative displays of knowledge (or lack thereof) must be included as part of the definition of patient participation. While verbal contributions represent an important mode of participation in consultations, patients also participate by contextualizing their lack of understanding, which then can serve as a resource to healthcare providers in pursuing meaningful consultations. Our analysis illustrates how health care professionals' awareness of the modes of patient participation and what these modes may signal in non-native consultations can help to establish what the patient knows in the consultation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A sensitive immunoblotting method for screening of microalbuminuria in diabetic patient's urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdolkhaleg, D.; Behrooz, S.

    2005-01-01

    Urinary albumin excretion is a useful marker in the prognosis of diabetic nephropathy and microvascular diseases. Methods such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radio immunoassay(RIA), radial immunodiffusion, albu screen, micro bumin and micral test are usually used for detection and screening of microalbuminuria in these patients. With consideration to the cost of an assay, methods such as ELISA and RIA are not suitable methods for screening purpose. Therefore, the aim of this work is to set a dot immunoblotting method for the measurement and screening of microalbumin in urine samples. The study was conducted during the period August 2001 to June 2003 at the National Research Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NRCGEB) and Pars Hospital Laboratory of Tehran, Iran on 96 diabetic patients urine samples. First, anti human albumin antibodies (Abs) were produced in rabbit and immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction was purified by protein-A affinity chromatography. Titer of Abs and optimum incubation conditions were tested by direct ELISA. Then different concentration of human albumin (0-300 mg/l) was loaded to nitrocellulose membranes and was assayed by dot immunoblotting method. The specificity and cross reactivity of Abs was tested by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and western immunoblotting. The sensitivity of the method was calculated from human albumin calibration curve and compared with commercial immunoturbidimetric assays. Our results indicates that in using IgG with the concentrations 0.5-1 ug/ml (2 x 10-5 to 10-4 dilutions) the intensity of color directly increased with the increase of human albumin standards in blots. Western immunoblotting of urine samples did not show any cross reactivity with other urine proteins. Comparison of results of this method by commercial immunoturbidimetric methods indicates the correlation regression of approximately 0.979. The sensitivity of the method was approximately 5 mg/L of human albumin. This simple

  13. Successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, M B; Marques, C; Mendes, G J; Gonçalves, C

    2015-11-01

    To report a case of successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in an adult patient with type III osteogenesis imperfecta, which is commonly regarded as a contraindication to this procedure. A 45-year-old man with type III osteogenesis imperfecta presented with mixed hearing loss. There was a mild sensorineural component in both ears, with an air-bone gap between 45 and 50 dB HL. He was implanted with a bone-anchored hearing aid. The audiological outcome was good, with no complications and good implant stability (as measured by resonance frequency analysis). To our knowledge, this is the first recorded case of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  14. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Sickle Cell Patient Transplant Recipient: A Successful Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Paciaroni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA is the most common inherited blood disorder and is associated with severe morbidity and decreased survival. Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT is the only curative approach. Nevertheless the decision to perform a marrow transplant includes the risk of major complications  and mortality transplant related. The infections represent the main cause of mortality for SCA patients undergoing transplant. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis (IPA is a devastating opportunistic infection and remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in HSCT recipients. Data regarding IPA in the setting of SCA are lacking. In the present report,  we describe a patient with SCA who developed IPA after allogeneic bone marrow transplant. The fungal infection was treated by systemic antifungal therapy in addition to the surgery, despite  mild chronic GVHD and with continuing immunosuppression therapy. This case shows that IPA occurring in bone marrow recipient with SCA can be successful treated

  15. Patient experience of CT colonography and colonoscopy after fecal occult blood test in a national screening programme

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, Andrew A.; Ghanouni, Alex; Rees, Colin J.; Hewitson, Paul; Nickerson, Claire; Wright, Suzanne; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve; von Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patient experience of CT colonography (CTC) and colonoscopy in a national screening programme. Methods Retrospective analysis of patient experience postal questionnaires. We included screenees from a fecal occult blood test (FOBt) based screening programme, where CTC was performed when colonoscopy was incomplete or deemed unsuitable. We analyzed questionnaire responses concerning communication of test risks, test-related discomfort and post-test pain, as well as compl...

  16. Patient experience of CT colonography and colonoscopy after fecal occult blood test in a national screening programme

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, A. A.; Ghanouni, A.; Rees, C. J.; Hewitson, P.; Nickerson, C.; Wright, S.; Taylor, S. A.; Halligan, S.; von Wagner, C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patient experience of CT colonography (CTC) and colonoscopy in a national screening programme. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patient experience postal questionnaires. We included screenees from a fecal occult blood test (FOBt) based screening programme, where CTC was performed when colonoscopy was incomplete or deemed unsuitable. We analyzed questionnaire responses concerning communication of test risks, test-related discomfort and post-test pain, as well as com...

  17. Comparison of clinical and survival characteristics between prostate cancer patients of PSA-based screening and clinical diagnosis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libo; Wang, Jinguo; Guo, Baofeng; Zhang, Haixia; Wang, Kaichen; Wang, Ding; Dai, Chang; Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Xuejian

    2018-01-02

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based mass screening remains the most controversial topic in prostate cancer. PSA-based mass screening has not been widely used in China yet. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the PSA-based screening in China. The cohort consisted of 1,012 prostate cancer patients. Data were retrospectively collected and clinical characteristics of the cohorts were investigated. Survival was analyzed for prostatic carcinoma of both PSA screened and clinically diagnosed patients according to clinical characteristics and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk classification. Cox Proportional Hazards Model analysis was done for risk predictor identification. The median age was 71 years old. Five-year overall and prostate-cancer-specific survival in prostatic adenocarcinoma patients were 77.52% and 79.65%; 10-year survivals were 62.57% and 68.60%, respectively. Survival was significantly poorer in patients with metastases and non-curative management. T staging and Gleason score by NCCN classification effectively stratified prostatic adenocarcinoma patients into different risk groups. T staging was a significant predictor of survival by COX Proportional Hazard Model. PSA screened patients had a significantly higher percentage diagnosed in early stage. PSA screened prostatic adenocarcinoma patients had a better prognosis in both overall and prostate cancer-specific survivals. This Chinese cohort had a lower overall and prostate cancer survival rate than it is reported in western countries. The incidence of early-stage prostate cancer found in PSA-based mass screening was high and there were significant differences in both overall and prostate cancer-specific survival between the PSA-screened and clinically diagnosed patients.

  18. FRAIL Questionnaire Screening Tool and Short-Term Outcomes in Geriatric Fracture Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Lauren Jan; Benton, Emily A; Alvarez-Nebreda, M Loreto; Weaver, Michael J; Harris, Mitchel B; Javedan, Houman

    2017-12-01

    There are limited screening tools to predict adverse postoperative outcomes for the geriatric surgical fracture population. Frailty is increasingly recognized as a risk assessment to capture complexity. The goal of this study was to use a short screening tool, the FRAIL scale, to categorize the level of frailty of older adults admitted with a fracture to determine the association of each frailty category with postoperative and 30-day outcomes. Retrospective cohort study. Level 1 trauma center. A total of 175 consecutive patients over age 70 years admitted to co-managed orthopedic trauma and geriatrics services. The FRAIL scale (short 5-question assessment of fatigue, resistance, aerobic capacity, illnesses, and loss of weight) classified the patients into 3 categories: robust (score = 0), prefrail (score = 1-2), and frail (score = 3-5). Postoperative outcome variables collected were postoperative complications, unplanned intensive care unit admission, length of stay (LOS), discharge disposition, and orthopedic follow-up after surgery. Thirty-day outcomes measured were 30-day readmission and 30-day mortality. Analysis of variance (1-way) and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare continuous variables across the 3 FRAIL categories. Fisher exact tests were used to compare categorical variables. Multiple regression analysis, adjusted by age, sex, and Charlson index, was conducted to study the association between frailty category and outcomes. FRAIL scale categorized the patients into 3 groups: robust (n = 29), prefrail (n = 73), and frail (n = 73). There were statistically significant differences between groups in terms of age, comorbidity, dementia, functional dependency, polypharmacy, and rate of institutionalization, being higher in the frailest patients. Hip fracture was the most frequent fracture, and it was more frequent as the frailty of the patient increased (48%, 61%, and 75% in robust, prefrail, and frail groups, respectively). The American

  19. Newborn screening for six lysosomal storage disorders in a cohort of Mexican patients: Three-year findings from a screening program in a closed Mexican health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Martínez, Juana Inés; Limón-Rojas, Ana Elena; Gaytán-García, Maria de Jesús; Reyna-Figueroa, Jesús; Wakida-Kusunoki, Guillermo; Delgado-Calvillo, Ma Del Rocío; Cantú-Reyna, Consuelo; Cruz-Camino, Héctor; Cervantes-Barragán, David Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the results of a lysosomal newborn screening (NBS) program in a cohort of 20,018 Mexican patients over the course of 3years in a closed Mexican Health System (Petróleos Mexicanos [PEMEX] Health Services). Using dried blood spots (DBS), we performed a multiplex tandem mass spectrometry enzymatic assay for six lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) including Pompe disease, Fabry disease, Gaucher disease, mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I), Niemann-Pick type A/B, and Krabbe disease. Screen-positive cases were confirmed using leukocyte enzymatic activity and DNA molecular analysis. From July 2012 to April 2016, 20,018 patients were screened; 20 patients were confirmed to have an LSD phenotype (99.9 in 100,000 newborns). Final distributions include 11 Pompe disease, five Fabry disease, two MPS-I, and two Niemann-Pick type A/B patients. We did not find any Gaucher or Krabbe patients. A final frequency of 1 in 1001 LSD newborn phenotypes was established. NBS is a major public health achievement that has decreased the morbidity and mortality of inborn errors of metabolism. The introduction of NBS for LSD presents new challenges. This is the first multiplex Latin-American study of six LSDs detected through NBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Engaging Patients through Mobile Phones: Demonstrator Services, Success Factors, and Future Opportunities in Low and Middle-income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A; Wetter, T

    2014-08-15

    Evolving technology and infrastructure can benefit patients even in the poorest countries through mobile health (mHealth). Yet, what makes mobile-phone-based services succeed in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) and what opportunities does the future hold that still need to be studied. We showcase demonstrator services that leverage mobile phones in the hands of patients to promote health and facilitate health care. We surveyed the recent biomedical literature for demonstrator services that illustrate well-considered examples of mobile phone interventions for consumer health. We draw upon those examples to discuss enabling factors, scalability, reach, and potential of mHealth as well as obstacles in LMIC. Among the 227 articles returned by a PubMed search, we identified 55 articles that describe services targeting health consumers equipped with mobile phones. From those articles, we showcase 19 as demonstrator services across clinical care, prevention, infectious diseases, and population health. Services range from education, reminders, reporting, and peer support, to epidemiologic reporting, and care management with phone communication and messages. Key achievements include timely adherence to treatment and appointments, clinical effectiveness of treatment reminders, increased vaccination coverage and uptake of screening, and capacity for efficient disease surveillance. We discuss methodologies of delivery and evaluation of mobile-phone-based mHealth in LMIC, including service design, social context, and environmental factors to success. Demonstrated promises using mobile phones in the poorest countries encourage a future in which IMIA takes a lead role in leveraging mHealth for citizen empowerment through Consumer Health Informatics.

  1. [Successful transcatheter ablation of fascicular potential in pediatric patients with left posterior fascicular tachycardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shao-ying; Shi, Ji-jun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-wei; Li, Yu-fen

    2010-08-01

    To simplify the methods of transcatheter mapping and ablation in the pediatric patients with left posterior fascicular tachycardia. While in sinus rhythm, the fascicular potential can be mapped at the posterior septal region (1 - 2 cm below inferior margin of orifice of coronary sinus vein), which display a biphasic wave before ventricular wave, and exist equipotential lines between them. When the fascicular potential occurs 20 ms later than the bundle of His' potential, radiofrequency was applied. Before applying radiofrequency, catheter position must be observed using double angle viewing (LAO 45°RAO 30°), and it should be made sure that the catheter is not at His' bundle. If the electrocardiogram displays left posterior fascicular block, the correct region is identified and ablation can continue for 60 s. Electrocardiogram monitoring should continue for 24 - 48 hours after operation, and notice abnormal repolarization after termination of ventricular tachycardia. Aspirin [2 - 3 mg/(kg·d)] was used for 3 months, and antiarrhythmic drug was discontinued. Surface electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and ultrasound cardiography were rechecked 1 d after operation. Follow-up was made at 1 month and 3 months post-discharge. Recheck was made half-yearly or follow-up was done by phone from then on. Fifteen pediatric patients were ablated successfully, and their electrocardiograms all displayed left posterior fascicular block after ablation. None of the patients had recurrences during the 3 to 12 months follow-up period. In one case, the electrocardiogram did not change after applying radiofrequency ablation and the ventricular tachycardia remained; however, on second attempt after remapping, the electrocardiogram did change. The radiofrequency lasted for 90 seconds and ablation was successful. This case had no recurrences at 6 months follow-up. Transcatheter ablation of the fascicular potential in pediatric patients with left posterior fascicular tachycardia can simplify

  2. Screening for Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Emergency Department Medical Patients: Instrument and Results from the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael H.; Abar, Beau W.; McCormick, Mark; Barnes, Donna H.; Haukoos, Jason; Garmel, Gus M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2013-01-01

    Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 15 calls for organizations "to identify patients at risk for suicide." Overt suicidal behavior accounts for 0.6% of emergency department (ED) visits, but incidental suicidal ideation is found in 3%-11.6%. This is the first multicenter study of suicide screening in EDs. Of 2,243 patients in…

  3. Successful twin delivery following transmyometrial embryo transfer in a patient with a false uterine cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Galindo, Noemí; Pérez-Cano, Inmaculada; Cruz, María; García-Velasco, Juan Antonio

    2014-02-01

    A successful pregnancy is the greatest goal for reproductive medicine. The probability that pregnancy occurs during a cycle of assisted reproduction is a function of multiple factors, of which embryo transfer is one of the most critical steps in these treatments. This article reports a case of successful pregnancy and twin delivery by transmyometrial embryo transfer after IVF in a woman with a neocavity parallel to the uterine cavity, which prevented the transfer of embryos to the correct place. The patient first went to another fertility centre where embryo transfer was impossible to perform because the cervix could not be canalized. Subsequently in this study clinic, after considering the difficulty of inserting a catheter into the endometrial cavity, a trial transfer was performed, which discovered a false route parallel to endometrial cavity. Following a first cycle in which conventional transcervical embryo transfer was performed, a transmyometrial embryo transfer was carried out and the patient became pregnant with twins. In cases where transcervical embryo transfer is very difficult or impossible to perform, the value of transmyometrial transfer is self-evident. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The longitudinal impact of patient navigation on equity in colorectal cancer screening in a large primary care network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percac-Lima, Sanja; López, Lenny; Ashburner, Jeffrey M; Green, Alexander R; Atlas, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The long-term effects of interventions to improve colorectal (CRC) screening in vulnerable populations are uncertain. The authors evaluated the impact of patient navigation (PN) on the equity of CRC prevention over a 5-year period. A culturally tailored CRC screening PN program was implemented in 1 community health center (CHC) in 2007. In a primary care network, CRC screening rates from 2006 to 2010 among eligible patients from the CHC with PN were compared with the rates from other practices without PN. Multivariable logistic regression models for repeated measures were used to assess differences over time. Differences in CRC screening rates diminished among patients at the CHC with PN and at other practices between 2006 (49.2% vs 62.5%, respectively; P practices (5% vs 3.4% per year; P practices, lower CRC screening rates in 2006 (47.5% vs 52.1%, respectively; P = .02) were higher by 2010 (73.5% vs 67.3%, respectively; P practices in 2006 (44.3% vs 44.7%, respectively; P = .79) were higher at the CHC by 2010 (70.6% vs 58.6%, respectively; P practices (both P < .001). A PN program increased CRC screening rates in a CHC and improved equity in vulnerable patients. Long-term funding of PN programs has the potential to reduce cancer screening disparities. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  5. How is success achieved by individuals innovating for patient safety and quality in the NHS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Laura; Jackson, Cath; Lawton, Rebecca

    2017-09-11

    Innovation in healthcare is said to be notoriously difficult to achieve and sustain yet simultaneously the health service is under intense pressure to innovate given the ever increasing demands placed upon it. Whilst many studies have looked at diffusion of innovation from an organisational perspective, few have sought to understand how individuals working in healthcare innovate successfully. We took a positive deviance approach to understand how innovations are achieved by individuals working in the NHS. We conducted in depth interviews in 2015 with 15 individuals who had received a national award for being a successful UK innovator in healthcare. We invited only those people who were currently (or had recently) worked in the NHS and whose innovation focused on improving patient safety or quality. Thematic analysis was used. Four themes emerged from the data: personal determination, the ability to broker relationships and make connections, the ways in which innovators were able to navigate organisational culture to their advantage and their ability to use evidence to influence others. Determination, focus and persistence were important personal characteristics of innovators as were skills in being able to challenge the status quo. Innovators were able to connect sometimes disparate teams and people, being the broker between them in negotiating collaborative working. The culture of the organisation these participants resided in was important with some being able to use this (and the current patient safety agenda) to their advantage. Gathering robust data to demonstrate their innovation had a positive impact and was seen as essential to its progression. This paper reveals a number of factors which are important to the success of innovators in healthcare. We have uncovered that innovators have particular personal traits which encourage a propensity towards change and action. Yet, for fruitful innovation to take place, it is important for relational networks and

  6. Screening ultrasonography of 2,204 patients with blunt abdominal trauma in the Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jixiang; Huang, Jiwei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Heqing; Prasoon, Pankaj; Xu, Yinglong; Bai, Yannan; Qiu, Jianguo; Zeng, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Abdominal injuries constitute a small proportion of all earthquake-related traumas; however, it often resulted in fatal hemorrhage. Ultrasonography has been described as an effective triage tool in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. We aimed to present an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of screening ultrasonography for patients with blunt abdominal trauma admitted to various hospitals during the Wenchuan earthquake in China. We retrospectively analyzed the patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent ultrasonography after admission to various hospitals. Ultrasonography findings were considered positive if evidence of free fluid or a parenchymal injury was identified. Ultrasonography findings were compared with the findings of computed tomography, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, repeated ultrasonography, cystography, operation, and/or the clinical course. Findings from 2,204 ultrasonographic examinations were evaluated. Findings of 199 ultrasonographic examinations (9.0%) were considered positive. Of the patients, 12 (0.5%) had a false-negative ultrasonographic findings; of this group, 3 (25%) required exploratory laparotomy. Ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 91.9%, specificity of 96.9%, and an accuracy of 96.6% for detection of abdominal injuries. Positive predictive value was 68.3%, and negative predictive value was 99.4%. Screening ultrasonography is highly reliable in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma after earthquake. It should be used as an initial diagnostic modality in the evaluation of most blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnostic study, level III.

  7. Identification of risk factors for enteral feeding intolerance screening in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Ting; Chen, Ting; Yang, Wen-Qun; Liang, Ze-Ping; Zhu, Jing-Ci

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To identify risk factors for enteral feeding intolerance screening in critically ill patients, thereby, provide some reference for healthcare staff to assess the risk of feeding intolerance, and lay the foundation for future scale development. Methods: This study used a mixed methodology, including a literature review, semi-structured interviews, the Delphi technique, and the analytic hierarchy process. We used the literature review and semi-structured interviews (n=22) to draft a preliminarily item pool for feeding intolerance, Delphi technique (n=30) to screen and determine the items, and the analytic hierarchy process to calculate the weight of each item. The study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2015 in Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. Results: Twenty-three risk factors were selected for the scale, including 5 dimensions. We assigned a weight to each item according to their impact on the feeding intolerance, with a higher score indicating a greater impact. The weight of each dimension was decreasing as follows: patient conditions, weight score equals 42; general conditions, weight score equals 23; gastrointestinal functions, weight score equals 15; biochemical indexes, weight score equals 14; and treatment measures, weight score equals 6. Conclusion: Developed list of risk factors based on literature review, survey among health care professionals and expert consensus should provide a basis for future studies assessing the risk of feeding intolerance in critically ill patients. PMID:28762434

  8. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen included the deep squat, the hurdle step (HS) and the in-line lunge (ILL). The symmetry ratios (RS) were accurately measured during the deep squat trial. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in scores on the LE-FMS, HS, ILL, RS, FADI, and FADI-sport. The FADI was strongly correlated with both LE-FMS score (r=0.807) and ILL score (r=0.896). There was a strong relationship (r=0.818) between LE-FMS score and FADI-sport. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the LE-FMS may be used to detect deficits related to CAI. Additionally, this instrument is reliable in detecting functional limitations in patients with CAI.

  9. Genetic screening and testing in an episode-based payment model: preserving patient autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Sharon; Farrell, Ruth M; Lockwood, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The State of Ohio is implementing an episode-based payment model for perinatal care. All costs of care will be tabulated for each live birth and assigned to the delivering provider, creating a three-tiered model for reimbursement for care. Providers will be reimbursed as usual for care that is average in cost and quality, while instituting rewards or penalties for those outside the expected range in either domain. There are few exclusions, and all methods of genetic screening and diagnostic testing are included in the episode cost calculation as proposed. Prenatal ultrasonography, genetic screening, and diagnostic testing are critical components of the delivery of high-quality, evidence-based prenatal care. These tests provide pregnant women with key information about the pregnancy, which, in turn, allows them to work closely with their health care provider to determine optimal prenatal care. The concepts of informed consent and decision-making, cornerstones of the ethical practice of medicine, are founded on the principles of autonomy and respect for persons. These principles recognize that patients' rights to make choices and take actions are based on their personal beliefs and values. Given the personal nature of such decisions, it is critical that patients have unbarred access to prenatal genetic tests if they elect to use them as part of their prenatal care. The proposed restructuring of reimbursement creates a clear conflict between patient autonomy and physician financial incentives.

  10. Successful collection of peripheral blood stem cells upon VIDE chemomobilization in sarcoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsmann, Katharina; Heilig, Christoph; Cremer, Martin; Novotny, Philipp; Kriegsmann, Mark; Bruckner, Thomas; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Egerer, Gerlinde; Wuchter, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    In patients with Ewing sarcoma and some distinct subgroups of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), a quantitatively sufficient autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection for stem cell support might facilitate treatment continuation, dose-intensification, and high-dose chemotherapy. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of PBSC collection upon vincristine, ifosfamide, doxorubicin, and etoposide (VIDE) chemomobilization. Mobilization and collection parameters of 42 sarcoma patients (Ewing sarcoma n = 35, other STS n = 7) were analyzed retrospectively. Data were evaluated with regard to the number of previous VIDE therapy cycles. All patients reached the collection goal of ≥2.0 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg body weight (bw) upon VIDE/G-CSF mobilization, in the majority of cases with one single leukapheresis (LP) session (n = 29, 69%). No significant differences were identified with regard to mobilization and collection variables or the number of previous induction VIDE therapy cycles. However, upon 5 cycles of VIDE, we found the highest relative proportion of patients who required two or three LP sessions. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of successful PBSC collection upon VIDE chemomobilization even after up to five cycles of induction therapy, while at the same time the increasing risk of bone marrow exhaustion with every consecutive cycle is outlined. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Successful Omalizumab treatment in HIV positive patient with chronic spontaneous urticaria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemoli, E; Niero, F; Borgonovo, L; Cossu, M V; Piconi, S

    2017-03-01

    We described a case of a 56 year old homosexual HIV positive man who presented a history of CSU since one year (2012). All the allergologic, immunologic and microbiologic tests to evaluate the pathogenesis of wheals resulted negative. Therefore in June 2015 we decided to start therapy with Omalizumab while the patient kept on effective antiretroviral therapy with 310 cells/mm3 TCD4 counts and undetectable HIV viremia. After two monthly subcutaneuous injection of 150 mg of Omalizumab the patient had no more urticarial symptoms. UAS7 (Urticaria Activity Score over 7 days) and Cu-Q2oL (chronic urticarial quality of life questionnaire) dropped respectively to 14 from 42 and to 0 from 40 with increase of TCD4 counts while viral load remained undetectable. In November 2015, i.e. 4 months after the end of Omalizumab therapy, the patient was still asymptomatic with persistent effective immune-virological response to antiretroviral therapy. This case report confirms the excellent tolerability and efficacy of anti-IgE therapy in the treatment of spontaneous chronic urticarial even in an immunodepressed patient for HIV infection. Omalizumab therapy shows a remarkable clinical success and had no effect on peripheral TCD4 counts and HIV viral load.

  12. Systematic review of fall risk screening tools for older patients in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Maria; Ivziku, Dhurata; Bartolozzi, Francesco; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2015-06-01

    To determine the most accurate fall risk screening tools for predicting falls among patients aged 65 years or older admitted to acute care hospitals. Falls represent a serious problem in older inpatients due to the potential physical, social, psychological and economic consequences. Older inpatients present with risk factors associated with age-related physiological and psychological changes as well as multiple morbidities. Thus, fall risk screening tools for older adults should include these specific risk factors. There are no published recommendations addressing what tools are appropriate for older hospitalized adults. Systematic review. MEDLINE, CINAHL and Cochrane electronic databases were searched between January 1981-April 2013. Only prospective validation studies reporting sensitivity and specificity values were included. Recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Reviews have been followed. Three fall risk assessment tools were evaluated in seven articles. Due to the limited number of studies, meta-analysis was carried out only for the STRATIFY and Hendrich Fall Risk Model II. In the combined analysis, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model II demonstrated higher sensitivity than STRATIFY, while the STRATIFY showed higher specificity. In both tools, the Youden index showed low prognostic accuracy. The identified tools do not demonstrate predictive values as high as needed for identifying older inpatients at risk for falls. For this reason, no tool can be recommended for fall detection. More research is needed to evaluate fall risk screening tools for older inpatients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Telephone based cognitive-behavioral screening for frontotemporal changes in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Georgia; Gennings, Chris; Hupf, Jonathan; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Murphy, Jennifer; Goetz, Raymond R; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    Our objective was to establish a valid and reliable battery of measures to evaluate frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in patients with ALS over the telephone. Thirty-one subjects were administered either in-person or by telephone-based screening followed by the opposite mode of testing two weeks later, using a modified version of the UCSF Cognitive Screening Battery. Equivalence testing was performed for in-person and telephone based tests. The standard ALS Cognitive Behavioral Screen (ALS-CBS) showed statistical equivalence at the 5% significance level compared to a revised phone version of the ALS-CBS. In addition, the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) and Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS) were also found to be equivalent at the 5% and 10% significance level, respectively. Similarly, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the well-established Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) were also statistically equivalent. Equivalence could not be claimed for the ALS-Frontal Behavioral Inventory (ALS-FBI) caregiver interview and the Written Verbal Fluency Index (WVFI). In conclusion, our study suggests that telephone-based versions of the ALS-CBS, COWAT, and CNS-LS may offer clinicians valid tools to detect frontotemporal changes in the ALS population. Development of telephone based cognitive testing for ALS could become an integral resource for population based research in the future.

  14. Peripheral artery questionnaire improves ankle brachial index screening in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B-H; Cho, K-I; Spertus, J; Park, Y-H; Je, H-G; Shin, M-S; Lee, J-H; Jang, J-S

    2014-12-01

    The peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) is a disease-specific health status measure of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Whether the PAQ scores are associated with a PAD diagnosis among patients with symptoms suspicious for PAD is unknown and could help increase the pretest probability of ankle brachial index (ABI) screening among patients with suspicious symptoms. The PAQ was completed by 567 patients evaluated for potential intermittent claudication at six tertiary centres. Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings and the PAQ domain scores were compared with ABI. A diagnostic threshold PAQ scores. The correlation between the PAQ Summary Score and ABI was also calculated. The PAQ Summary Score was significantly lower in patients with low ABI as compared with those having a normal ABI (37.6 ± 19.0 vs. 70.1 ± 22.7, p PAQ Summary Score and ABI were highly correlated (r = 0.56, p PAQ Summary Score for predicting low ABI was 50.3 (AUC = 0.86, sensitivity 80.3%, specificity 78.3%). The PAQ Summary Score was associated with an increased likelihood of PAD in patients with suspected PAD symptoms, and a low summary score (≤ 50.3) was an optimal threshold for predicting PAD among patients referred for ABI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Attitudes, access and anguish: a qualitative interview study of staff and patients' experiences of diabetic retinopathy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipwell, A E; Sturt, J; Lindenmeyer, A; Stratton, I; Gadsby, R; O'Hare, P; Scanlon, P H

    2014-12-15

    To examine the experiences of patients, health professionals and screeners; their interactions with and understandings of diabetic retinopathy screening (DRS); and how these influence uptake. Purposive, qualitative design using multiperspectival, semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Three UK Screening Programme regions with different service-delivery modes, minority ethnic and deprivation levels across rural, urban and inner-city areas, in general practitioner practices and patients' homes. 62 including 38 patients (22 regular-screening attenders, 16 non-regular attenders) and 24 professionals (15 primary care professionals and 9 screeners). Antecedents to attendance included knowledge about diabetic retinopathy and screening; antecedents to non-attendance included psychological, pragmatic and social factors. Confusion between photographs taken at routine eye tests and DRS photographs was identified. The differing regional invitation methods and screening locations were discussed, with convenience and transport safety being over-riding considerations for patients. Some patients mentioned significant pain and visual disturbance from mydriasis drops as a deterrent to attendance. In this, the first study to consider multiperspectival experiential accounts, we identified that proactive coordination of care involving patients, primary care and screening programmes, prior to, during and after screening is required. Multiple factors, prior to, during and after screening, are involved in the attendance and non-attendance for DRS. Further research is needed to establish whether patient self-management educational interventions and the pharmacological reformulation of shorter acting mydriasis drops, may improve uptake of DRS. This might, in turn, reduce preventable vision loss and its associated costs to individuals and their families, and to health and social care providers, reducing current inequalities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  16. Evaluation of California's Alcohol and Drug Screening and Brief Intervention Project for Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan I Woodruff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Visits to settings such as emergency departments (EDs may present a “teachable moment” in that a patient may be more open to feedback and suggestions regarding their risky alcohol and illicit drug-use behaviors. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT is an ’opportunistic’ public health approach that targets low-risk users, in addition to those already dependent on alcohol and/or drugs. SBIRT programs provide patients with comprehensive screening and assessments, and deliver interventions of appropriate intensity to reduce risks related to alcohol and drug use. Methods: This study used a single group pre-post test design to assess the effect of the California SBIRT service program (i.e., CASBIRT on 6 substance-use outcomes (past-month prevalence and number of days of binge drinking, illegal drug use, and marijuana use. Trained bilingual/bicultural Health Educators attempted to screen all adult patients in 12 EDs/trauma centers (regardless of the reason for the patient’s visit using a short instrument, and then delivered a brief motivational intervention matched to the patient’s risk level. A total of 2,436 randomly selected patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or drug use consented to be in a 6-month telephone follow-up interview. Because of the high loss to follow-up rate, we used an intention-to-treat approach for the data analysis. Results: Results of generalized linear mixed models showed modest reductions in all 6 drug- and alcohol-use outcomes. Men (versus women, those at relatively higher risk status (versus lower risk, and those with only one substance of misuse (versus both alcohol and illicit drug misuse tended to show more positive change. Conclusion: These results suggest that SBIRT services provided in acute care settings are associated with modest changes in self-reported recent alcohol and illicit drug use. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:263–270.

  17. Readability, suitability, and health content assessment of web-based patient education materials on colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chenlu; Champlin, Sara; Mackert, Michael; Lazard, Allison; Agrawal, Deepak

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates in the Unites States are still below target level. Web-based patient education materials are used by patients and providers to provide supplemental information on CRC screening. Low literacy levels and patient perceptions are significant barriers to screening. There are little data on the quality of these online materials from a health literacy standpoint or whether they address patients' perceptions. To evaluate the readability, suitability, and health content of web-based patient education materials on colon cancer screening. Descriptive study. Web-based patient materials. Twelve reputable and popular online patient education materials were evaluated. Readability was measured by using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Grade Level, and suitability was determined by the Suitability Assessment of Materials, a scale that considers characteristics such as content, graphics, layout/typography, and learning stimulation. Health content was evaluated within the framework of the Health Belief Model, a behavioral model that relates patients' perceptions of susceptibility to disease, severity, and benefits and barriers to their medical decisions. Each material was scored independently by 3 reviewers. Flesch-Kincaid Reading Grade Level score, Suitability Assessment of Materials score, health content score. Readability for 10 of 12 materials surpassed the maximum recommended sixth-grade reading level. Five were 10th grade level and above. Only 1 of 12 materials received a superior suitability score; 3 materials received inadequate scores. Health content analysis revealed that only 50% of the resources discussed CRC risk in the general population and <25% specifically addressed patients at high risk, such as African Americans, smokers, patients with diabetes, and obese patients. For perceived barriers to screening, only 8.3% of resources discussed embarrassment, 25% discussed pain with colonoscopy, 25% addressed cost of colonoscopy, and none

  18. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than patients. Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D immersive patient simulators and their impact on learning success: a thematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Hua; Plum, Patrick; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk L

    2015-04-08

    Immersive patient simulators (IPSs) combine the simulation of virtual patients with a three-dimensional (3D) environment and, thus, allow an illusionary immersion into a synthetic world, similar to computer games. Playful learning in a 3D environment is motivating and allows repetitive training and internalization of medical workflows (ie, procedural knowledge) without compromising real patients. The impact of this innovative educational concept on learning success requires review of feasibility and validity. It was the aim of this paper to conduct a survey of all immersive patient simulators currently available. In addition, we address the question of whether the use of these simulators has an impact on knowledge gain by summarizing the existing validation studies. A systematic literature search via PubMed was performed using predefined inclusion criteria (ie, virtual worlds, focus on education of medical students, validation testing) to identify all available simulators. Validation testing was defined as the primary end point. There are currently 13 immersive patient simulators available. Of these, 9 are Web-based simulators and represent feasibility studies. None of these simulators are used routinely for student education. The workstation-based simulators are commercially driven and show a higher quality in terms of graphical quality and/or data content. Out of the studies, 1 showed a positive correlation between simulated content and real content (ie, content validity). There was a positive correlation between the outcome of simulator training and alternative training methods (ie, concordance validity), and a positive coherence between measured outcome and future professional attitude and performance (ie, predictive validity). IPSs can promote learning and consolidation of procedural knowledge. The use of immersive patient simulators is still marginal, and technical and educational approaches are heterogeneous. Academic-driven IPSs could possibly enhance the

  20. Screening mammography: a successful public health initiative El tamizaje mamográfico: una iniciativa de salud pública que ha dado buenos resultados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Feig

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the ability of screening mammography to reduce breast cancer death rates, and it discusses methods that maximize benefits and reduce false-positive interpretations in a screening program. The review covers published results from screening mammography programs conducted in Europe and North America, along with quality assurance measures designed to ensure that similar or even better outcomes will be shared by other populations of screened women. Randomized trials in Europe and the United States of America have shown the benefit from screening women ages 40-70 years. Encouraged by the success of these trials, many Scandinavian countries now offer screening mammography to their populations as a public health service. These service screening programs have reduced breast cancer deaths as much as 63% among women who were screened. In the United States, where 61.5% of women age 40 and older report having had a mammogram in the preceding year, death rates from breast cancer have been falling despite an increasing incidence of the disease. The technical quality of mammography in the United States has improved as a result of advances in mammography equipment, including the film-screen systems. Also contributing to the improvement has been the implementation of federally mandated quality control testing at each mammography facility, as required by the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA, which the Congress of the United States approved in 1992. Factors that result in increased detection of early-stage cancers include better technique, use of two mammographic views per breast, annual screening intervals, and improved interpretation. Mammography is one of the 10 major subject categories on the American Board of Radiology examinations. Furthermore, MQSA requires radiologists who practice mammography to obtain continuing medical education credits and to use standard interpretation assessments on every report. Manuals for technical quality

  1. The importance of tracheostomy to the weaning success in patients with conscious disturbance in the respiratory care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chan; Wang, Hao-Chien; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Wu, Huey-Dong; Hsu, Han-Shui; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-02-01

    When to extubate the endotracheal tube is controversial in patients with depressed mental status. The use of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) with score 8 or above as a criterion for extubation by many investigators is questionable. A total of 133 consecutive patients (M/F: 86/47; age: 71 ± 17 years) admitted to the respiratory care center (RCC) of the hospital were enrolled. The effects of GCS score on the outcomes and weaning rate of the patients were evaluated. The mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with a GCS scoretracheostomy was significantly higher than that in patients without tracheostomy (GCS and dGCS: 94.4% vs. 38.5%, p = 0.001). However, tracheostomy in patients with a high GCS (GCS score ≥ 7T or dGCS score ≥ 10) did not lead to a higher success rate of weaning. In multivariable analysis, tracheostomy was still an independent determinant of successful weaning in patients with low GCS. Tracheostomy increases the success rate of weaning in patients with low GCS, but not in patients with high GCS. Mental status graded by GCS did affect the outcomes in patients with conscious disturbance in the RCC. The low tracheostomy rate in patients with low GCS affected the rate of successful weaning, which might have contributed to the higher mortality rate in patients with low GCS in the RCC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  2. Underestimation of substance abuse in psychiatric patients by conventional hospital screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Lisa J; Junquera, Patricia; Van Dijck, Karolien; Steele, Bernard W; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Psychiatric diagnosis mainly relies on behavioral signs and symptoms. Substance abuse can mimic the clinical presentation of primary psychiatric disorders and can also complicate the management of psychiatric patients. The reliability and accuracy of urine toxicology is a vital tool in the optimal treatment of these patients. Current demographics of substance abuse suggest that in addition to the most conventional drugs of abuse (e.g. cocaine, cannabis) that are of concern to treating physicians, prescription medications and new designer drugs also should be when evaluating patients who present with symptoms of psychosis/drug addiction or altered mental status. Urine samples from 220 psychiatric inpatients admitted to either an acute drug and alcohol unit or acute psychiatric unit were analyzed for drugs by the standard hospital assay (KIMS) and by a more sensitive ELISA and GC-MS basic drug screening protocol. The standard hospital toxicology (KIMS) was inferior to the ELISA and GC-MS methods in terms of both assay sensitivity and in detecting a broader number of drugs. The KIMS tests failed to identify opiates and amphetamine/methamphetamine in 50% of the patients. The KIMS screen did not identify zolpidem, buprenorphine and a number of synthetic drugs of abuse including cathinone and tryptamines. In order to reliably identify substance abuse in patients with altered mental status in inpatient settings, analytical methodologies with adequate assay sensitivity and range to detect the vast majority of commonly abused illicit drugs and prescription medications are required for optimal clinical assessment and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Web-based symptom screening in cystic fibrosis patients: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, Julie; Fresenius, Ashley; Walker, Patricia; Berdella, Maria; Portenoy, Russell K; Bookbinder, Marilyn; Glajchen, Myra; Plachta, Amy; Langfelder-Schwind, Elinor; Chen, Jack; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) causes high illness burden. Screening may identify patients who could potentially benefit from interventions for symptoms or other sources of distress. We evaluated the feasibility of a web-based system for routine monitoring. Adult CF patients enrolled in a study of palliative care service delivery completed web-based assessments every 30 days on global distress, physical and psychological symptom distress, and the perceived benefits of discussing advance care planning (ACP) with CF clinicians. Feasibility was assessed by the rate of survey completion, survey reminders, and missed surveys during a 9-month rolling enrollment period. Of 74 participants (47.3% women, 94.4% white), 36.7% had comorbid diabetes, and 56.9% had an FEV1% predicted score of 40-69. In total, patients completed 456 (80.6%) of 566 surveys every 30 days over the assessment period. Sixty-five (87.8%) completed 405 (79.7%) of 508 surveys online and 9 (12.2%) completed 51 (88.0%) of 58 surveys using a combination of online, telephone, and mail-based methods. Many surveys were completed without reminders (online: 261 [64.4%] of 405; combined methods: 29 [56.9%] of 51), with 166 (36.4%) surveys requiring 1 or more reminders. Further, 23.0% (17) of patients noted elevated global distress; 20.3% (15) endorsed physical symptom distress, 12.2% (9) had psychological distress, and 58.1% (43) reported that discussing ACP would be beneficial. Repeated web-based screening for symptom distress and ACP preferences is feasible in adult CF patients. Future studies should assess the system's generalizability and staff resources when implementing reminders and non-web methods of completion. Copyright © 2015 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Presenting Symptoms and Dysphagia Screen Predict Outcome in Mild and Rapidly Improving Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadodia, Gaurav; Rizk, Nibal; Camp, Deborah; Bryant, Katja; Zimmerman, Susan; Brasher, Cynthia; Connelly, Kerrin; Dunn, Joshua; Frankel, Michael; Ido, Moges Seymour; Lugtu, James; Nahab, Fadi

    2016-12-01

    There are limited data on which patients not treated with intravenous (IV) tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) due to mild and rapidly improving stroke symptoms (MaRISS) have unfavorable outcomes. Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients not treated with IV tPA due to MaRISS from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 were identified as part of the Georgia Coverdell Acute Stroke Registry. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with a lower likelihood of favorable outcome, defined as discharge to home. There were 1614 AIS patients who did not receive IV tPA due to MaRISS (median National Institutes of Health stroke scale [NIHSS] 1], of which 305 (19%) did not have a favorable outcome. Factors associated with lower likelihood of favorable outcome included Medicare insurance status (odds ratio [OR]: .53, 95% confidence interval [CI]: .34-.84), arrival by emergency medical services (OR: .46, 95% CI: .29-.73), increasing NIHSS score (per unit OR: .89, 95% CI: .84-.93), weakness as the presenting symptom (OR: .50, 95% CI: .30-.84), and a failed dysphagia screen (OR: .43, 95% CI: .23-.80). During the study period, dysphagia screen identify a subgroup of patients who are more likely to have an unfavorable outcome. Whether IV tPA treatment can improve the outcome in this subgroup of patients needs to be evaluated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic immunohistochemical screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer: a single centre experience of 486 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Valentin; Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zettl, Andreas; Heinimann, Karl; Koeberle, Dieter; von Flüe, Markus; Bolli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 cause autosomal dominantly inherited Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome patients and their families benefit from life-saving intensive cancer surveillance. Approximately one in 30 colorectal cancers arises in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the detection rate of Lynch syndrome at our institution after introduction of systematic immunohistochemical screening for MMR deficiency in colorectal cancers from 2011 to 2015. Following the recommendations by the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention working group all colorectal cancers were immunohistochemically stained for the presence of MMR proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6, independent of clinical criteria. In the case of loss of MLH1, the somatic BRAF mutation V600E was assessed with molecular testing and/or immunohistochemistry. Clinical follow-up of potential Lynch syndrome carriers (patients with tumours showing loss of MLH1 expression with absence of BRAFV600E, loss of PMS2, MSH2 or MSH6) was evaluated. Of all patients (n = 486), loss of MMR protein expression was found in 73 (15.0%) tumours. Twenty-eight (6.0%) were classified as potential Lynch syndrome carriers. Of the genetically tested potential Lynch syndrome carriers (10 out of 28 patients), 40% were first diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Implementation of systematic immunohistochemistry screening for Lynch syndrome showed that 6% of colorectal cancers were potentially Lynch-syndrome related. Tumour board protocols should systematically contain information on MMR status of all colorectal cancers and, in MMR deficient cases, include clear recommendations for genetic counselling for all potential Lynch syndrome patients.

  6. Investigation of mental health and its influence on Chinese cancer patients using a multidisciplinary screening flow:an epidemiological survey in the west of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Huan; LI Jin; LU You; DENG Lei; SUN Xue-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite psycho-oncological concerns and studies having thrived these past decades,sparse reports illustrate to what extent Chinese cancer patients are involved and influenced by comorbid mental health problems.To investigate the mental health condition of cancer patient,as well as its possible impacts on prognosis,the first large-scale survey was performed in the west of China.Methods For standardizing and facilitating the assessment of mental illness in inpatients with cancer,a multidisciplinary rating flow was designed and established.On the basis of this system,between May 1st and 31st 2009,2279 cancer inpatients from nine medical centers received preliminarily screening executed by oncologists using screening scales Mental Health Screening Questionnaire (MHSQ),Zung self-rating depression scales (SDS),Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS),and posttraumatic stress disorder checklist-civilian version (PCL-C).Further analyses of the ones screened positively were conducted by psychiatrists applying corresponding symptom-rating scales (HAMA/HAMD/BPRS).We summarized the overall proportion of patients with impaired mental health based on the data acquired from preliminary screening,and then calculated occurrence rates of each clinical syndrome of mental disorder according to symptom conclusions.The impact of comorbid mental illness was evaluated through the follow-up scheduled 1 year later,by comparing the survival rate,progression of disease,and quality of life (QoL) between subgroup patients with or without clinical syndrome of mental disorder.Results In preliminary screenings,26.1% (595/2279) yielded positive results.Further symptom conclusions confirmed 15.8% (359/2279) with clinical syndrome of mental disorder.Regarding specific type of syndrome,the occurrence rates of depression,anxiety,psychotic symptoms,and stress-related disorders were 13.3%,10.2%,2.8%,and 1.4%,respectively.Follow-up assessments were successfully performed in 1918

  7. Genetic screening of Greek patients with Huntington’s disease phenocopies identifies an SCA8 expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, G; Karadima, G; Pandraud, A; Sweeney, M G; Paudel, R; Houlden, H; Wood, N W; Panas, M

    2012-09-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a triad of chorea, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. Around 1% of patients with HD-like symptoms lack the causative HD expansion and are considered HD phenocopies. Genetic diseases that can present as HD phenocopies include HD-like syndromes such as HDL1, HDL2 and HDL4 (SCA17), some spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). In this study we screened a cohort of 21 Greek patients with HD phenocopy syndromes formutations causing HDL2, SCA17, SCA1, SCA2, SCA3,SCA8, SCA12 and DRPLA. Fifteen patients (71%) had a positive family history. We identified one patient (4.8% of the total cohort) with an expansion of 81 combined CTA/CTG repeats at the SCA8 locus. This falls within what is believed to be the high-penetrance allele range. In addition to the classic HD triad, the patient had features of dystonia and oculomotor apraxia. There were no cases of HDL2, SCA17, SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA12 or DRPLA. Given the controversy surrounding the SCA8 expansion, the present finding may be incidental. However, if pathogenic, it broadens the phenotype that may be associated with SCA8 expansions. The absence of any other mutations in our cohort is not surprising, given the low probability of reaching a genetic diagnosis in HD phenocopy patients.

  8. Exploring the interest in and the usage of the internet among patients eligible for osteoporosis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomian, J; Reginster, J Y; Gaspard, U; Streel, S; Beaudart, C; Appelboom, G; Buckinx, F; Bruyère, O

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interest in the Internet and its usage for health-related issues among people eligible for osteoporosis screening. Self-administered questionnaires have been distributed to subjects who were screened for osteoporosis and to menopausal women. 177 patients have responded to the survey (64.5 ± 10.1 years, 88.1% of women). There are 78.5% of Internet users. Among them, 67.2% said searching information about their health and 74.5% said using the Internet for this purpose. All respondents attributed an average score, out of 10, of 5.7 ± 2.3 regarding the reliability of information that they could find on the Internet. The use of the Internet differs significantly depending on age: those who use the Internet are younger (62.1 ± 8.91 years) than those who do not use it (73.3 ± 9.42 years). The socioeconomic status also has an impact on the Internet use: Internet users have a higher education, are more professionally active and have a higher net monthly household income compared to the group of non-users. Even if age and socioeconomic status appear to be determining factors in the use of the Internet for the search of health information in patients eligible for osteoporosis screening, almost 75% of the study population use the Internet for this purpose. Action to promote health through an Internet platform must therefore take these parameters into account.

  9. Predictors for success of internal urethrotomy in patients with urethral contracture following perineal repair of pelvic fracture urethral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young-Kwon; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, Seung-Ryeol

    2017-05-01

    Internal urethrotomy (IU) in patients with urethral contracture following perineal repair of pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PRPFUI) is troublesome. We evaluated the clinical factors affecting the surgical outcome of IU for urethral contracture after PRPFUI. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 35 patients who underwent IU for urethral contracture after PRPFUI between March 2004 and June 2013. Ages of patients ranged from 18 to 50, and their follow-up duration was more than 1year after IU. The urethral contracture was confirmed by retrograde urethrogram or cysto-urethroscopy. Success was defined as greater than 15mL/s of peak urinary flow rate at 1year after IU without any clinical evidence of urethral contracture. Success rates were investigated according to the number of IU. Age, body mass index, urethral defect length before PRPFUI, time interval between the original urethral injury and the PRPFUI or between a previous operation and the PRPFUI, time interval between the PRPFUI and the urethral contracture, number of PRPFUI performed, and the type of urethral lengthening procedure were compared between patients with and without success according to the number of IU. Among the 35 patients, the overall success rate of IU was 37% (13/35) during the mean follow-up period of 53 months (range: 17-148 months). There were 8 and 5 patients with success in first and second IU, respectively. However, there was no success after third IU. Urethral defect length before PRPFUI was significantly shorter in patients with success who underwent first and second IU (p<0.05). There were significant differences of success between patients with and without previous repeated failures of PRPFUI in first and second IU (p<0.05). Short urethral defect length and no previous surgical failures before PRPFUI are good prognostic factors for IU following PRPFUI. Only one or two IUs will be helpful in patients with urethral contracture following PRPFUI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in patient with Ehler-Danlos syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraj, Hemant; Mohajer, Michelle; Bhattacharjee, Deepannita

    2011-12-01

    We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type 2. She had a previous caesarean section and went on to have an uncomplicated vaginal birth in her last pregnancy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a successful vaginal birth after caesarean section in a patient with EDS. EDS is a multisystem disorder involving a genetic defect in collagen and connective-tissue synthesis and structure. It is a heterogeneous group of 11 different inherited disorders. Obstetric complications in these patients include miscarriages, stillbirths, premature rupture of the membranes, preterm labour, uterine prolapse, uterine rupture and severe postpartum haemorrhage. There has been much controversy over the appropriate mode of delivery. Abdominal deliveries are complicated by delayed wound healing and increased perioperative blood loss. Vaginal deliveries may be complicated by tissue friability causing extensive perineal tears, pelvic floor and bladder lesions. Our case highlights that in specific, controlled situations it is possible to have a vaginal delivery even after previous caesarean section in patients with EDS.

  11. Successful endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy in a patient with Wegener’s granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Eloy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available P Eloy, E Leruth, B Bertrand, Ph RombauxENT and HNS department, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Université Catholique de Louvain, 5530, Yvoir, BelgiumAbstract: Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG is one form of idiopathic autoimmune vasculitis. The disease has a predilection for the upper and lower respiratory tracts (lungs, nose, sinus, and kidneys. WG may be systemic, severe, and potentially lethal, but it may also be limited to the otolaryngological area or to the eyes and the orbits. Obstruction of the lacrimal pathway is a possible complication of the disease that affects approximately 7% of patients with WG. It usually occurs as a direct extension of sinonasal disease and typically is a late manifestation. Management of such a condition is generally viewed as difficult. We report the case of a patient with a quiescent WG limited to the otolaryngological area. This patient presented a bilateral obstruction of the nasolacrimal ducts caused by bilateral extensive adhesions in the nasal cavity. Because she had several episodes of left-side acute dacryocystitis which necessitated several courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, she successfully underwent an endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy using a diode laser and powered instrumentation. The authors describe the clinical case, the surgical technique, and review the literature.Keywords: Wegener’s granulomatosis, recurrent dacryocystitis, endonasal DCR, diode, laser, powered instrumentation

  12. Initiation of universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer patients as a model for the implementation of genetic information into clinical oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stacey A; Laurino, Mercy; Bowen, Deborah J; Upton, Melissa P; Pritchard, Colin; Hisama, Fuki; Jarvik, Gail; Fichera, Alessandro; Sjoding, Britta; Bennett, Robin L; Naylor, Lorraine; Jacobson, Angela; Burke, Wylie; Grady, William M

    2016-02-01

    Lynch syndrome confers a hereditary predisposition to colorectal and other cancers. Universal tumor screening (UTS) for Lynch syndrome is recommended by several professional societies, but the implementation can be complex. This article describes the evaluation, process development, and initiation of Lynch syndrome UTS at a tertiary referral cancer center. A multidisciplinary team developed the new process design. Issues in 5 themes were noted: timing, funding, second-opinion patients, result processing, and the role of genetics providers. A committee approach was used to examine each issue for process-improvement development. The issues related to testing were addressed individually for the successful implementation of UTS at the institutional level. In the conventional-care period, 9 of 30 cases (30%) received Lynch syndrome screening, and 4 cases were referred to medical genetics. During the 6 months following the implementation of UTS, 32 of 44 patients (73%) received Lynch syndrome screening. The 13 unscreened patients all had identified reasons for nonscreening (eg, financial limitations). Ten patients were referred to medical genetics, which identified no new cases of Lynch syndrome, but a low-risk adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) variant was detected in 1 individual. The implementation of effective Lynch syndrome UTS can feasibly alter practice at the institutional level. This experience with the assessment and management of issues relevant to the successful implementation of a new clinical care paradigm based on emerging technology has implications for the uptake of advances across molecular oncology into clinical practice, and this is highly relevant in the current era of rapidly evolving genomic technology. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  13. Functional Movement Screen (FMS - kompleksowy system oceny funkcjonalnej pacjenta = Functional Movement Screen (FMS - a comprehensive system for the functional evaluation of the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kochański

    2015-04-01

    4 Wydział Kultury Fizycznej, Zdrowia i Turystyki, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego w Bydgoszczy, Polska   Streszczenie   System oceny funkcjonalnej - Functional Movement Screen (FMS został stworzony przez Graya Cooka oraz Lee Burtona w 1995 roku. FMS jest koncepcją, która umożliwia kompleksową analizę jakości podstawowych wzorców ruchowych, ocenę ryzyka kontuzji oraz stwierdzenie istnienia ograniczeń i asymetrii. Test FMS złożony jest z 7 prób (głęboki przysiad, przeniesienie kończyny dolnej nad płotkiem, przysiad w wykroku, ruchomość obręczy barkowej, aktywne uniesienie wyprostowanej kończyny dolnej, ugięcie ramion w podporze, stabilność rotacyjna tułowia. W pracy zaprezentowano test Functional Movement Screen, jako kompleksowy system oceny funkcjonalnej pacjenta.   Słowa kluczowe: Functional Movement Screen, FMS, ocena funkcjonalna, rehabilitacja.   Abstract   Functional Movement Screen (FMS was created by Gray Cook and Lee Burton in 1995. FMS is a concept that allows comprehensive analysis of the quality of basic movement patterns, risk assessment and finding of injury to the limitations and asymmetries. FMS test consists of 7 samples (deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability push up, rotational stability. The paper presents the Functional Movement Screen test, as a comprehensive system of functional assessment of the patient.   Key words: Functional Movement Screen, FMS, functional assessment, rehabilitation.

  14. Novel screen printed electrode set for routine EEG recordings in patients with altered mental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllymaa, Sami; Lepola, Pasi; Hukkanen, Taina; Oun, Andre; Mervaala, Esa; Toyras, Juha; Lappalainen, Reijo; Myllymaa, Katja

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for an easy to use screening tool for the assessment of brain's electrical function in patients with altered mental status (AMS). The purpose of this study is to give a brief overview of the state-of-the-art in electrode technology, and to present a novel sub-hairline electrode set developed in our research group. Screen-printing technology was utilized to construct the electrode set consisting of ten electroencephalography (EEG) electrodes, two electrooculography (EOG) electrodes, two ground electrodes and two reference electrodes. Electrical characteristics of hydrogel-coated silver ink electrodes were found adequate for clinical EEG recordings as assessed by electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The skin-electrode impedances remain stable and low enough at least two days enabling high-quality long-term recordings. Due to the proper material selection, thin ink layers and detachable zero insertion force (ZIF) - connector, electrode was observed to be CT- and MRI-compatible allowing imaging without removing the electrodes. Pilot EEG recordings gave very promising results and an on-going clinical trial with larger number of patients will show the true feasibility of this approach.

  15. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lalji, Ulrich; Houwers, Janneke; Nijssen, Estelle C. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Roozendaal, Lori van; Heuts, Esther [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Smidt, Marjolein L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Feasibility studies have shown that contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) increases diagnostic accuracy of mammography. We studied diagnostic accuracy of CESM in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme, who have a lower disease prevalence than previously published papers on CESM. During 6 months, all women referred to our hospital were eligible for CESM. Two radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis provided BI-RADS classifications for conventional mammography and CESM. Statistical significance of differences between mammography and CESM was calculated using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for both imaging modalities. Of the 116 eligible women, 113 underwent CESM. CESM increased sensitivity to 100.0 % (+3.1 %), specificity to 87.7 % (+45.7 %), PPV to 76.2 % (+36.5 %) and NPV to 100.0 % (+2.9 %) as compared to mammography. Differences between conventional mammography and CESM were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). A similar trend was observed in the ROC curve. For conventional mammography, AUC was 0.779. With CESM, AUC increased to 0.976 (p < 0.0001). In addition, good agreement between tumour diameters measured using CESM, breast MRI and histopathology was observed. CESM increases diagnostic performance of conventional mammography, even in lower prevalence patient populations such as referrals from breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  16. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Lalji, Ulrich; Houwers, Janneke; Nijssen, Estelle C.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Roozendaal, Lori van; Heuts, Esther; Smidt, Marjolein L.

    2014-01-01

    Feasibility studies have shown that contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) increases diagnostic accuracy of mammography. We studied diagnostic accuracy of CESM in patients referred from the breast cancer screening programme, who have a lower disease prevalence than previously published papers on CESM. During 6 months, all women referred to our hospital were eligible for CESM. Two radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis provided BI-RADS classifications for conventional mammography and CESM. Statistical significance of differences between mammography and CESM was calculated using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for both imaging modalities. Of the 116 eligible women, 113 underwent CESM. CESM increased sensitivity to 100.0 % (+3.1 %), specificity to 87.7 % (+45.7 %), PPV to 76.2 % (+36.5 %) and NPV to 100.0 % (+2.9 %) as compared to mammography. Differences between conventional mammography and CESM were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). A similar trend was observed in the ROC curve. For conventional mammography, AUC was 0.779. With CESM, AUC increased to 0.976 (p < 0.0001). In addition, good agreement between tumour diameters measured using CESM, breast MRI and histopathology was observed. CESM increases diagnostic performance of conventional mammography, even in lower prevalence patient populations such as referrals from breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  17. Clinical Efficacy of Transthoracic Echocardiography for Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Turkish Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Salih; Saracoglu, Erhan; Cekici, Yusuf

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in Turkish patients aged ≥ 65 years, and to demonstrate the applicability of echocardiography to AAA screening. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed in all consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years who were referred to cardiology clinics or were referred from other outpatient clinics. The abdominal aorta (AA) of each patient was scanned using the same probe, and the time spent was recorded. Demographic and clinic characteristics of the patients were recorded at the end of the echocardiography. Among 1948 patients (mean age 70.9 ± 6 years; 49.8% male), the AA was visualized in 96.3%. AAA was identified in 3.7% (69/1878) of the patients, of whom AAA was previously known in 20.3% (n = 14). The prevalence of unknown AAA was 2.93%. The average time needed to scan and measure the AA was 1 minute and 3 seconds (±23 seconds). Aortic root diameters were significantly higher in the patients with AAA than in those without AAA (34.7 ± 4.2 vs. 29.8 ± 4.7; p < 0.001). Age (per 1 year increase) [odds ratio (OR), 1.245; p < 0.001], male gender (OR, 5.382; p < 0.001), smoking (OR, 2.118; p = 0.037), and aortic root diameter (per 1 mm increase) (OR, 1.299; p < 0.001) were independent predictors of AAA. This study is important in that it showed a high prevalence of AAA in Turkish patients aged ≥ 65 years, and demonstrated that AAA can be visualized in the majority of patients in as little as 1 minute during TTE.

  18. SDOCT imaging to identify macular pathology in patients diagnosed with diabetic maculopathy by a digital photographic retinal screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mackenzie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetic macular edema (DME is an important cause of vision loss. England has a national systematic photographic retinal screening programme to identify patients with diabetic eye disease. Grading retinal photographs according to this national protocol identifies surrogate markers for DME. We audited a care pathway using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT clinic to identify macular pathology in this subset of patients. METHODS: A prospective audit was performed of patients referred from screening with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and surrogate markers for diabetic macular edema (M1 attending an SDOCT clinic. The SDOCT images were graded by an ophthalmologist as SDOCT positive, borderline or negative. SDOCT positive patients were referred to the medical retina clinic. SDOCT negative and borderline patients were further reviewed in the SDOCT clinic in 6 months. RESULTS: From a registered screening population of 17 551 patients with diabetes mellitus, 311 patients met the inclusion criteria between (March 2008 and September 2009. We analyzed images from 311 patients' SDOCT clinic episodes. There were 131 SDOCT negative and 12 borderline patients booked for revisit in the OCT clinic. Twenty-four were referred back to photographic screening for a variety of reasons. A total of 144 were referred to ophthalmology with OCT evidence of definite macular pathology requiring review by an ophthalmologist. DISCUSSION: This analysis shows that patients with diabetes, mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and evidence of diabetic maculopathy on non-stereoscopic retinal photographs (M1 have a 42.1% chance of having no macular edema on SDOCT imaging as defined by standard OCT definitions of DME when graded by a retinal specialist. SDOCT imaging is a useful adjunct to colour fundus photography in screening for referable diabetic maculopathy in our screening population.

  19. Mobile applications for handheld devices to screen and randomize acute stroke patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ai; Connelly, B; Abbott, Ei; Maland, E; Kim, J; Blake, J

    2012-08-01

    The availability of internet connectivity and mobile application software used by low-power handheld devices makes smart phones of unique value in time-sensitive clinical trials. Trial-specific applications can be downloaded by investigators from various mobile software distribution platforms or web applications delivered over HTTP. The Antihypertensive Treatment in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage (ATACH) II investigators in collaboration with MentorMate released the ATACH-II Patient Recruitment mobile application available on iPhone, Android, and Blackberry in 2011. The mobile application provides tools for pre-screening, assessment of eligibility, and randomization of patients. Since the release of ATACH-II mobile application, the CLEAR-IVH (Clot Lysis Evaluating Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage) trial investigators have also adopted such a mobile application. The video-conferencing capabilities of the most recent mobile devices open up additional opportunities to involve central coordinating centers in the recruitment process in real time.

  20. An atypical case of successful resuscitation of an accidental profound hypothermia patient, occurring in a temperate climate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, E

    2010-03-01

    Cases of accidental profound hypothermia occur most frequently in cold, northern climates. We describe an atypical case, occurring in a temperate climate, where a hypothermic cardiac-arrested patient was successfully resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation (ECC).

  1. Preimplantation genetic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Joyce C

    2018-03-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis was first successfully performed in 1989 as an alternative to prenatal diagnosis for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic or chromosomal abnormality, such as cystic fibrosis, to their child. From embryos generated in vitro, biopsied cells are genetically tested. From the mid-1990s, this technology has been employed as an embryo selection tool for patients undergoing in vitro fertilisation, screening as many chromosomes as possible, in the hope that selecting chromosomally normal embryos will lead to higher implantation and decreased miscarriage rates. This procedure, preimplantation genetic screening, was initially performed using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, but 11 randomised controlled trials of screening using this technique showed no improvement in in vitro fertilisation delivery rates. Progress in genetic testing has led to the introduction of array comparative genomic hybridisation, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and next generation sequencing for preimplantation genetic screening, and three small randomised controlled trials of preimplantation genetic screening using these new techniques indicate a modest benefit. Other trials are still in progress but, regardless of their results, preimplantation genetic screening is now being offered globally. In the near future, it is likely that sequencing will be used to screen the full genetic code of the embryo.

  2. Successful drug desensitization in patients with delayed-type allergic reactions to anti-tuberculosis drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krittaecho Siripassorn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of anti-tuberculosis drug desensitization. Methods: This was a retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were as follows: age >18 years, documented tuberculosis infection, a previous cutaneous allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs, and having undergone drug desensitization between January 2003 and March 2014. The definition of allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs included (1 a temporal relationship between drug use and the allergic reaction; (2 improvement in the allergic reaction after drug withdrawal; (3 recurrence of the allergic reaction after reintroduction of only the offending drug; and (4 absence of other causes. Results: A total of 19 desensitization procedures were performed. The drugs used for these procedures were isoniazid (n = 7, rifampicin (n = 6, or ethambutol (n = 6. Of note, severe allergic reactions (Stevens–Johnson syndrome (n = 4, erythema multiforme (n = 3, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic syndrome (n = 1 were included. All patients underwent resolution of the previous allergic reactions before desensitization. The median duration of desensitization was 18 days. The success rate was 78.9%. The allergic reactions following failed desensitization were not severe; most were maculopapular rashes. Conclusions: The desensitization protocol for anti-tuberculosis drugs was associated with a high success rate, and the individuals who failed desensitization experienced mild allergic reactions. Keywords: Desensitization, Antituberculosis, Steven-Johnson syndrome, Allergic drug reaction, Tolerance induction, Drug allergy

  3. Successful use of sugammadex for caesarean section in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyoral, Lokman; Goktas, Ugur; Cegin, Muhammed Bilal; Baydi, Volkan

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder that is characterized by muscle weakness that fluctuates, worsening with exertion, and improving with rest. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is made following clinical and physical examination and is confirmed by serum immunoassays to measure autoantibody levels. Myasthenia gravis especially when associated with pregnancy is a high-risk disease, and its course is unpredictable. We described the second report about use of sugammadex after rocuronium for a caesarean delivery with myasthenia gravis, but, unlike our case that formerly was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, the patient was extubated on postoperative successfully and we did not encounter any respiratory problems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. [Successful use of sugammadex for caesarean section in a patient with myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyoral, Lokman; Goktas, Ugur; Cegin, Muhammed Bilal; Baydi, Volkan

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder that is characterized by muscle weakness that fluctuates, worsening with exertion, and improving with rest. Diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is made following clinical and physical examination and is confirmed by serum immunoassays to measure autoantibody levels. Myasthenia gravis especially when associated with pregnancy is a high-risk disease, and its course is unpredictable. We described the second report about use of sugammadex after rocuronium for a caesarean delivery with myasthenia gravis, but, unlike our case that formerly was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, the patient was extubated on postoperative successfully and we did not encounter any respiratory problems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Successful birth of an IVF baby in a patient with Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Baxi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease, although rare in young patients, may be encountered in the reproductive age group. We report a rare combination of this disease with infertility, which has not been previously reported. The case record of a 29-year-old woman with infertility and Parkinson′s disease are retrospectively reviewed. An IVF indicated for tubal factor infertility resulted in a successful singleton pregnancy. She delivered a healthy male baby without experiencing any worsening of her Parkinsonism. The course of pregnancy remained unaffected by the Parkinson′s disease and anti-Parkinsonian drugs. The details of the infertility management, antenatal and postnatal course, and medications are described. With careful evaluation, counseling, and monitoring, IVF may be safely used in women with Parkinson′s disease.

  6. Should we screen for masked hypertension in patient with vascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Delsart

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Pascal Delsart1, Philippe Marboeuf1, Cedric Delhaye2, Gilles Lemesle2, Claire Mounier-Vehier11Service de Médecine Vasculaire et Hypertension Artérielle, 2Service d’hémodynamique et de Cardiologie B, University Hospital of Lille, FranceBackground: The influence of hypertension on cardiovascular risk is well known. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM is able to identify patients with masked hypertension (MH underdetected by clinical BP measurement. The benefit of screening for MH in a highrisk population was investigated.Aims: To detect MH in a population with no prior history of hypertension and medically treated for peripheral or coronary arterial disease.Methods: Thirty-eight consecutive patients with peripheral or coronary artery disease documented with arteriography, without a history of hypertension, and with an admission BP < 140/90 mmHg underwent ABPM after discharge. Ambulatory BP ≥ 125/80 mmHg were defined as MH.Results: MH was found in 11 patients (28.9%. The MH group had a mean systolic and diastolic hospitalization BP significantly higher (127 versus 115 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.002 and 76 versus 66 mmHg, P = 0.01, and tended to have a higher admission systolic BP and pulse pressure (127 versus 121 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.07; and 54 versus 46 mmHg, P = 0.06. The first BP measurement on the 24-hour ABPM was significantly higher in the MH group 140 versus 121 mmHg, P = 0.001, for systolic BP and 84 versus 74 mmHg, P = 0.03, for diastolic BP.Conclusions: MH was found in patients with documented and medically treated vascular disease. BP in the prehypertensive range is associated with MH. Systematic screening for MH in this high-risk population requires further investigation.Keywords: blood pressure, monitoring, masked hypertension, vascular disease

  7. Utility of screening computed tomography of chest, abdomen and pelvis in patients after heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, Tarun W.; Pavlovic-Surjancev, Biljana; Dusek, Linda; Patel, Nilamkumar; Heroux, Alain L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Malignancy is a late cause of mortality in heart transplant recipients. It is unknown if screening computed tomography scan would lead to early detection of such malignancies or serious vascular anomalies post heart transplantation. Methods: This is a single center observational study of patients undergoing surveillance computed tomography of chest, abdomen and pelvis atleast 5 years after transplantation. Abnormal findings, included pulmonary nodules, lymphadenopathy and intra-thoracic and intra-abdominal masses and vascular anomalies such as abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical follow up of each of these major abnormal findings is summarized. Results: A total of 63 patients underwent computed tomography scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis at least 5 years after transplantation. Of these, 54 (86%) were male and 9 (14%) were female. Mean age was 52 ± 9.2 years. Computed tomography revealed 1 lung cancer (squamous cell) only. Non specific pulmonary nodules were seen in 6 patients (9.5%). The most common incidental finding was abdominal aortic aneurysms (N = 6 (9.5%)), which necessitated follow up computed tomography (N = 5) or surgery (N = 1). Mean time to detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms from transplantation was 14.6 ± 4.2 years. Mean age at the time of detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms was 74.5 ± 3.2 years. Conclusion: Screening computed tomography scan in patients 5 years from transplantation revealed only one malignancy but lead to increased detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Thus the utility is low in terms of detection of malignancy. Based on this study we do not recommend routine computed tomography post heart transplantation.

  8. Following patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment: Identification of treatment needs by clinical staff and electronic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Fanny L; Meraner, Verena; Holzner, Bernhard; Singer, Susanne; Virgolini, Irene; Gamper, Eva M

    2018-04-01

    In this retrospective investigation of patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment (POT), we compared the number of POT referrals before and after implementation of electronic screening for POT needs and investigated psychosocial predictors for POT wish at a nuclear medicine department. We extracted medical chart information about number of referrals and extent of follow-up contacts. During standard referral (November 2014 to October 2015), POT needs were identified by clinical staff only. In the screening-assisted referral period (November 2015 to October 2016), identification was supported by electronic screening for POT needs. Psychosocial predictors for POT wish were examined using logistic regression. We analysed data from 487 patients during standard referral (mean age 56.4 years; 60.2% female, 88.7% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours) of which 28 patients (5.7%) were referred for POT. Of 502 patients in the screening-assisted referral period (mean age 57.0 years; 55.8% female, 86.6% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours), 69 (13.7%) were referred for POT. Of these, 36 were identified by psycho-oncological (PO) screening and 33 by clinical staff. After PO-screening implementation, referrals increased by a factor of 2.4. The strongest predictor of POT wish was depressive mood (P patients visited the PO outpatient unit additionally to inpatient PO consultations. Our results provide evidence from a real-life setting that PO screening can foster POT referrals, reduce barriers to express the POT wish, and hence help to meet psychosocial needs of this specific patient group. Differences between patients' needs, wish, and POT uptake should be further investigated. © 2018 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Screening and managing obstructive sleep apnoea in nocturnal heart block patients: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Liu, Zilong; Chang, Su Chi; Fu, Cuiping; Li, Wenjing; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Liyan; Li, Shanqun

    2016-02-16

    Nocturnal heart block often occurs in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). It is more likely to be undiagnosed in heart block patients who are ignorant of the symptoms of sleep disorder. Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) is a highly reliable way to discover the risk factors of OSA, whereas the validity in sleep-related heart block patients is uncertain. We performed an observational study to address these issues and confirmed the potential protective effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Patients who were previously diagnosed with nocturnal heart block with R-R pauses exceeding 2 seconds were retrospective screened from the ECG centre of Zhongshan hospital. These recruited participants completed Berlin Questionnaire and underwent polysomnography synchronously with 24-hour Holter monitoring. A cross-sectional analysis was performed to confirm the association between nocturnal arrhythmia and OSA, as well as to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the BQ. Subsequently, subjects diagnosed with OSA (apnoea-hypopnoea index > 5) underwent 3 consecutive days of CPAP therapy. On the third day, patients repeated 24-hour Holter monitoring within the institution of CPAP. The symptoms of disruptive snoring and hypersomnolence in 72 enrolled patients were more related to the occurrence of nocturnal heart block (r = 0.306, 0.226, respectively, p = 0.015, 0.019) than syncope (r = 0.134, p = 0.282) and palpitations (r = 0.106, p = 0.119), which were prominent trait of our study population. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the BQ at a cut-off point of 5 of AHI for detecting OSA in heart block patients was 81.0 %, 44.4 %, 91.07 % and 25 %. Nocturnal heart block does not appear to occur exclusively in severe sleep apnoea. The frequent occurrence of arrhythmias in prominent oxygen desaturation supports the correlation between them. CPAP therapy resulted in significant decrease in the average number of

  10. Role of routine pre-operative screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Praveen Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It is well established that obesity is a strongly associated risk factor for post-operative deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Physical effects and pro-thrombotic, pro-inflammatory and hypofibrinolytic effects of severe obesity may predispose to idiopathic DVT (pre-operatively because of which bariatric patients are routinely screened before surgery. The aim of this study was to audit the use of routine screening venous duplex ultrasound in morbidly obese patients before undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 180 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from August 2013 to August 2014 who had undergone pre-operative screening bilateral lower-extremity venous duplex ultrasound for DVT. Data were collected on patient's demographics, history of venous thromboembolism, prior surgeries and duplex ultrasound details of the status of the deep veins and superficial veins of the lower limbs. Results: No patients had symptoms or signs of DVT pre-operatively. No patient gave history of DVT. No patient was found to have iliac, femoral or popliteal vein thrombosis. Superficial venous disease was found in 17 (8%. One patient had a right lower limb venous ulcer. Conclusion: Thromboembolic problems in the morbidly obese before bariatric surgery are infrequent, and screening venous duplex ultrasound can be done in high-risk patients only.

  11. Screening, monitoring, and educating patients with diabetes in an independent community pharmacy in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, F J; Monsanto, H A

    2001-03-01

    Increase the awareness about the importance of Diabetes mellitus (DM) management and assess the educational and monitoring needs of patients visiting a community pharmacy in Puerto Rico. A community service activity focusing on DM was held in a community pharmacy. The educational and monitoring needs of the participants were assessed using a questionnaire. Glucose tests were conducted in the pharmacy by medical technologists. Educational activities consisted of presentations and printed materials. Two-thirds of the fasting people had blood glucose levels higher than 140 mg/dl. Seventy-nine percent of the patients with diabetes were not aware of the glycosilated hemoglobin test. Most of the patients were interested in learning more about how to manage their condition. A greater understanding is needed among patients with DM that blood glucose control decreases diabetes related complications. Community pharmacists are in an excellent position to collaborate with other health professionals in screening, monitoring and educating patients with DM to prevent long-term complications.

  12. Depression and self-esteem: rapid screening for depression in black, low literacy, hospitalized tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, M S; Wolmarans, L

    1992-11-01

    One hundred black hospitalized tuberculosis (TB) patients (75 males and 25 females) were interviewed to ascertain levels of depression and self-esteem. The standard of literacy for 65% of the sample was such that they were unable to complete a self-report inventory. Reliability (internal consistency) was good for the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI: r = 0.79), the 13-item shortened BDI (ABDI: r = 0.76) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSE: r = 0.78). There was a significant positive relationship between the BDI and the ABDI (r = 0.92, P = 0.0001). The recommended ABDI cut-off scores established no depression for 32 patients, mild depression for 22 patients, moderate depression for 38 patients and severe depression for 8 patients. There were significant negative relationships between the BDI and the RSE (r = -0.54, P = 0.0001), and between the ABDI and the RSE (r = -0.56, P = 0.0001). Self-esteem scores dropped in accordance with category of depression, revealing that low self-esteem is a characteristic feature of depression. It was concluded that the ABDI was a reliable, rapid, initial screening device for depression in black persons with low literacy levels.

  13. Can Radiologists Learn From Airport Baggage Screening?: A Survey About Using Fictional Patients for Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Andrew; Callen, Andrew L; Marcovici, Peter; Naeger, David M; Mongan, John; Webb, Emily M

    2018-02-01

    For both airport baggage screeners and radiologists, low target prevalence is associated with low detection rate, a phenomenon known as "prevalence effect." In airport baggage screening, the target prevalence is artificially increased with fictional weapons that are digitally superimposed on real baggage. This strategy improves the detection rate of real weapons and also allows airport supervisors to monitor screener performance. A similar strategy using fictional patients could be applied in radiology. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to review the psychophysics literature regarding low target prevalence and (2) to survey radiologists' attitudes toward using fictional patients as a quality assurance tool. We reviewed the psychophysics literature on low target prevalence and airport x-ray baggage screeners. An online survey was e-mailed to all members of the Association of University Radiologists to determine their attitudes toward using fictional patients in radiology. Of the 1503 Association of University Radiologists member recipients, there were 153 respondents (10% response rate). When asked whether the use of fictional patients was a good idea, the responses were as follows: disagree (44%), neutral (25%), and agree (31%). The most frequent concern was the time taken away from doing clinical work (89% of the respondents). The psychophysics literature supports the use of fictional targets to mitigate the prevalence effect. However, the use of fictional patients is not a popular idea among academic radiologists. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The usefulness and feasibility of a screening instrument to identify psychosocial problems in patients receiving curative radiotherapy: a process evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeken, Anna PBM; Kempen, Gertrudis IJM; Eekers, Daniëlle; Gils, Francis CJM van; Houben, Ruud MA; Lechner, Lilian

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial problems in cancer patients are often unrecognized and untreated due to the low awareness of the existence of these problems or pressures of time. The awareness of the need to identify psychosocial problems in cancer patients is growing and has affected the development of screening instruments. This study explored the usefulness and feasibility of using a screening instrument (SIPP: Screening Inventory of Psychosocial Problems) to identify psychosocial problems in cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy treatment (RT). The study was conducted in a radiation oncology department in the Netherlands. Several methods were used to document the usefulness and feasibility of the SIPP. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires completed by seven radiotherapists and 268 cancer patients. Regarding the screening procedure 33 patients were offered to consult a psychosocial care provider (e.g. social worker, psychologist) during the first consultation with their radiotherapist. Of these patients, 31 patients suffered from at least sub-clinical symptoms and two patients hardly suffered from any symptoms. Patients' acceptance rate 63.6% (21/33) was high. Patients were positive about the content of the SIPP (mean scores vary from 8.00 to 8.88, out of a range between 0 and 10) and about the importance of discussing items of the SIPP with their radiotherapist (mean score = 7.42). Radiotherapists' perspectives about the contribution of the SIPP to discuss the different psychosocial problems were mixed (mean scores varied from 3.17 to 4.67). Patients were more positive about discussing items of the SIPP if the radiotherapists had positive attitudes towards screening and discussing psychosocial problems. The screening procedure appeared to be feasible in a radiotherapy department. In general, patients' perspectives were at least moderate. Radiotherapists considered the usefulness and feasibility of the SIPP generally to be lower, but their

  15. Risk of high-level viraemia in HIV-infected patients on successful antiretroviral treatment for more than 6 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig, F N; Omland, Lars Haukali Hvass; Larsen, M V

    2010-01-01

    According to the Swiss Federal Commission for HIV/AIDS, HIV-infected patients on successful antiretroviral treatment have a negligible risk of transmitting HIV sexually. We estimated the risk that patients considered to have an undetectable viral load (VL) are actually viraemic.......According to the Swiss Federal Commission for HIV/AIDS, HIV-infected patients on successful antiretroviral treatment have a negligible risk of transmitting HIV sexually. We estimated the risk that patients considered to have an undetectable viral load (VL) are actually viraemic....

  16. Introducing routine HIV screening for patients on an internal medicine residency inpatient service: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrnos, Leslie J; Barr, Patrick J; Klassen, Christine L; Fields, Heather E; Azadeh, Natalya; Mendoza, Neil; Saadiq, Rayya A; Pauwels, Emanuel M; King, Christopher S; Chung, Andrew A; Sakata, Kenneth K; Blair, Janis E

    2016-01-01

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening for all persons aged 13 to 64 years who present to a health care provider. We sought to improve adherence to the CDC guidelines on the Internal Medicine Resident Hospital Service. We surveyed residents about the CDC guidelines, sent email reminders, provided education, and engaged them in friendly competition. Credit for guideline adherence was awarded if an offer of HIV screening was documented at admission, if a screening test was performed, or if a notation in the resident sign out sheet indicated why screening was not performed. We examined HIV screening of a postintervention group of patients admitted between August 8, 2012, and June 30, 2013, and compared them to a preintervention group admitted between August 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012. Postintervention offers of HIV screening increased significantly (7.9% [44/559] vs 55.5% [300/541]; P<.001), as did documentation of residents' contemplation of screening (8.9% [50/559] vs 67.5% [365/541]; P<.001). A significantly higher proportion of HIV screening tests was ordered postintervention (7.7% [43/559] vs 44.4% [240/541]; P<.001). Monthly HIV screening documentation ranged from 0% (0/53) to 17% (9/53) preintervention, whereas it ranged from 30.6% (11/36) to 100% (62/62) postintervention. HIV screening adherence can be improved through resident education, friendly competition, and system reminders. Barriers to achieving sustained adherence to the CDC guidelines include a heterogeneous patient population and provider discomfort with the subject.

  17. Screening for Fabry's disease in young patients with ischemic stroke in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaowei; Xue, Sufang; Zhao, Jingyan; Wu, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder frequently associated with cerebrovascular disease. Data regarding Fabry disease and ischemic stroke has been lacking in China. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of Fabry disease and the distribution of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) gene - GLA mutations in young stroke patients in the Chinese population and its association with stroke subtypes. A total of 357 ischemic stroke patients admitted to Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University, aged 18-55 years old, including 293 patients with cerebral infarction and 64 patients with transient ischemic attack, were enrolled in this study. Mutations in the GLA gene were screened by Sanger sequencing. Enzyme levels were measured to further confirm the disease in patients with the gene mutation. The mutation frequency was compared among different stroke subtypes and further compared with the control group individually. No pathogenic mutations in the coding regions of the GLA gene were identified in this group of patients and thus no Fabry disease was found in our study. However, the frequency of an intronic polymorphism c.-10C>T was significantly different among different Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtypes (p T polymorphism in patients with stroke due to other causes and undetermined causes was much higher than that in the control group (OR = 3.18, 95% CI: 1.29-7.83, p stroke patients. In addition, our results suggested that the c.-10C>T polymorphism may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke of other and undetermined causes. Further study is required to confirm our findings.

  18. Screening Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniçerioğlu, Yavuz; Akdam, Hakan; Dursun, Belda; Alp, Alper; Sağlam Eyiler, Funda; Akın, Davut; Gün, Yelda; Hüddam, Bülent; Batmazoğlu, Mehmet; Gibyeli Genek, Dilek; Pirinççi, Serhat; Ersoy, İsmail Rıfkı; Üzüm, Atilla; Soypaçacı, Zeki; Tanrısev, Mehmet; Çolak, Hülya; Demiral Sezer, Sibel; Bozkurt, Gökay; Akyıldız, Utku Oğan; Akyüz Ünsal, Ayşe İpek; Ünübol, Mustafa; Uslu, Meltem; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Günel, Ceren; Meteoğlu, İbrahim; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Ünsal, Alparslan; Akar, Harun; Okyay, Pınar

    2017-11-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked inherited, rare, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder, affecting multiple organs due to the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme. The prevalence has been reported to be 0.15-1% in hemodialysis patients; however, the information on the prevalence in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis is lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease. The patients older than 18 years, enclosing KDIGO 2012 chronic kidney disease definitions, not on dialysis, were enrolled. Dried blood spots on Guthrie papers were used to analyze α-Gal A enzyme and genetic analysis was performed in individuals with enzyme activity ≤1.2 μmol/L/h. A total of 1453 chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis from seven clinics in Turkey were screened. The mean age of the study population was 59.3 ± 15.9 years. 45.6% of patients were female. The creatinine clearance of 77.3% of patients was below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , 8.4% had proteinuria, and 2.5% had isolated microscopic hematuria. The mean value of patients' α-Gal A enzyme was detected as 2.93 ± 1.92 μmol/L/h. 152 patients had low levels of α-Gal A enzyme activity (≤1.2 μmol/L/h). In mutation analysis, A143T and D313Y variants were disclosed in three male patients. The prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis was found to be 0.2% (0.4% in male, 0.0% in female). Fabry's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic kidney disease with unknown etiology even in the absence of symptoms and signs suggestive of Fabry's disease.

  19. Primary breast lymphoma: a consideration in an HIV patient when a mass is discovered by screening mammography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwande, Olagoke K; Paley, Robert

    2008-12-11

    Primary Breast lymphoma is a rare lesion that has been reported in patients without HIV. However, Primary Breast lymphoma occurring in a patient with HIV has rarely been reported despite the fact that HIV infection is known to increase the propensity to develop certain types of lymphoma. We report a case of an HIV patient with breast lymphoma that was discovered by screening mammography while presenting our argument for more cautionary management in this patient population.

  20. Successful endoscopic treatment of fecalith blocking sinus in a patient with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ulcerative colitis patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis can develop various mechanical complications. Among them is presacral sinus resulting from chronic anastomotic leak. Methods: We present a symptomatic patient with a large fecalith blocking the sinus which was successfully treated with Doppler ultrasound guided endoscopic needle knife sinusotomy along with fecalith extraction. Results: A 67-year-old female presented with a 4-month history of perianal pain and urgency. Pouchocopy showed a 3-cm deep wide-mouthed anastomotic sinus, the orifice of which was blocked by a large hard fecalith. Removal of the fecalith using RothNet, Tripod, or Basket were made but failed. Then needle knife was applied to cut the orifice to enlarge the opening of the sinus. One month later, the patient returned and the fecalith was successfully removed with two Baskets and two Rothnets. Six months after fecalith extraction, pouchoscopy showed a compartalized distal pouch sinus with two cavities, which was treated by two sessions of Doppler ultrasound guided endoscopic needle knife sinusotomy. Six months following the treatment, the sinus was completed healed. The patient tolerated all procedures well without any complication. Conclusion: Fecalith blocking pouch anastomotic sinus is a rare complication in patients with restorative proctocolectomy. In our case, this surgical complication was successfully treated with a carefully planned, stepwise endoscopy approach. Resumo: Experiência: Pacientes com colite ulcerativa tratados por proctocolectomia restauradora com anastomose bolsa ileal-anal podem ser acometidos por diversas complicações mecânicas. Entre elas, cita-se o seio pré-sacral resultante de vazamento crônico pela anastomose. Métodos: Apresentamos uma paciente sintomática com um grande fecálito bloqueando o seio, com tratamento bem-sucedido com sinusotomia por bisturi-agulha guiado por

  1. Antenatal screening of women for hepatitis B and C in an out-patient department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, A.; Bano, K.A.; Khan, M.U.I.; Hussain, R.

    2008-01-01

    To determine frequency of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and its clinical manifestation in pregnant women. Pregnant women visiting the Gynaecology and Obstetrics out patient's department of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital Lahore for antenatal check-ups from October 2006 to March 2007 were screened for hepatitis B and C. Immune- chromatography was used for initial screening and diagnosis was confirmed by ELISA technique. Data collection included maternal age, parity, symptoms or past history of jaundice, fatigue, tiredness, insomnia, depression, dyspepsia, fever, anorexia and pale stool. Risk factors investigated include past history of some surgical procedures, the dental visit, blood transfusion, tattooing, hospitalization and history of injection. Among the screened population, 7.3% out of 2439 ladies were positive for anti HCV and 2.2% for HBsAg while dual infection with HBV and HCV was observed in 0.08 % . Symptoms observed in hepatitis B patients were fatigue (90%), depression and pale stool (70%), anorexia (60%), jaundice (57.2%), fever (56.4%) and dyspepsia (51.2%). In hepatitis C antibody positive patients fatigue was the main symptom (95.7%) followed by pale stool (84.5%) and depression (80.2%); 63.3% had insomnia, 59.1% had anorexia, 50.7% had fever, 50.7% had jaundice and 43.6% had dyspepsia. Past history of blood transfusion was reported by 32.3% patients, surgery by 42.2% and tattooing was observed in 0.70%. One or more tooth extraction was reported by 50.2% subjects, and 49.25% had history of repeated injections. The frequency of sero-positivity for HBsAg and HCV among pregnant women is alarming. These sero-positive mothers are not only predisposed to chronic consequences of hepatitis, but also are a continuous threat to their offsprings and care providers. Hence, there is a direct need for further epidemiological studies and to take measures for prevention and control of the disease. (author)

  2. [Systematic screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the nasal cavities of patients hospitalized in the dermatology departments of the Saint-Louis Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, G; Dupuy, A; Rouveau, M; Claisse, J-P; Casin, I; Dubertret, L; Morel, P; Simon, F; Viguier, M

    2008-12-01

    In a bid to combat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more efficiently in our department, we performed a study to 1) clarify the MRSA carriage rate in patients hospitalized in the department; 2) evaluate the rate of MRSA acquisition during hospitalization; 3) describe the MRSA carrier profile; 4) study the morbidity and mortality associated with MRSA. We conducted a three-month prospective study in all patients hospitalized for more than 24hours in the dermatology department of the Saint-Louis Hospital. Nasal swab cultures were performed on the day of admission, once a week thereafter and on the day of discharge. Clinical and epidemiological data were individually reviewed by means of a standardized questionnaire. In 310 patients, the prevalence of nasal MRSA carriage at admission was 6.5%. During hospitalization, 1.9% of our patients became colonized with MRSA. MRSA carriers were significantly older than non-carriers and had been hospitalized more frequently over the previous 12 months, principally in intensive care or in intermediate or long-term care facilities, and erosive and/or ulcerated dermatitis was more common in this population. Of the 27 patients colonized with MRSA, only three had MRSA infections, and these were successfully treated with antibiotics. The observed rate of MRSA carriage was close to that seen in intensive care units (7%). While systematic screening for MRSA in patients with erosive and/or ulcerated dermatitis would allow detection of twice as many cases of MRSA than the usual screening recommendations, this would be associated with little tangible benefit and high costs, and we therefore decided not to change the usual MRSA screening politic in our dermatology department.

  3. Identifying Psychosocial Distress and Stressors Using Distress-screening Instruments in Patients With Localized and Advanced Penile Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Désirée Louise; Protzel, Chris; Hakenberg, Oliver W

    2017-10-01

    We examined the effects of treatment on the psychological well-being of patients with localized or advanced penile cancer using screening questionnaires to determine the consecutive need for psychosocial care. Penile cancer is a rare, but highly aggressive, malignancy. The psychological stress of patients with penile cancer arises from the cancer diagnosis per se and the corresponding consequences of treatment. In addition, cancer-specific distress results (eg, fear of metastasis, progression, relapse, death). Studies of the psychosocial stress of penile cancer patients are rare. We undertook a prospective analysis of the data from patients with penile cancer who had undergone surgery or chemotherapy from August 2014 to October 2016 at our department. Patients were evaluated using standardized questionnaires for stress screening and the identification for the need for psychosocial care (National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Thermometer and Hornheider screening instrument) and by assessing the actual use of psychosocial support. The average stress level was 4.5. Of all the patients, 42.5% showed increased care needs at the time of the survey. Younger patients, patients undergoing chemotherapy, and patients with recurrence were significantly more integrated with the psychosocial care systems. Finally, 67% of all patients received inpatient psychosocial care. Owing to the potentially mutilating surgery, patients with penile cancer experience increased psychological stress and, consequently, have an increased need for psychosocial care. Therefore, the emotional stress of these patients should be recognized and support based on interdisciplinary collaboration offered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chest Computed Tomographic Image Screening for Cystic Lung Diseases in Patients with Spontaneous Pneumothorax Is Cost Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Langenderfer, Dale; McCormack, Francis X; Schauer, Daniel P; Eckman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Patients without a known history of lung disease presenting with a spontaneous pneumothorax are generally diagnosed as having primary spontaneous pneumothorax. However, occult diffuse cystic lung diseases such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) can also first present with a spontaneous pneumothorax, and their early identification by high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) chest imaging has implications for subsequent management. The objective of our study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HRCT chest imaging to facilitate early diagnosis of LAM, BHD, and PLCH. We constructed a Markov state-transition model to assess the cost-effectiveness of screening HRCT to facilitate early diagnosis of diffuse cystic lung diseases in patients presenting with an apparent primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Baseline data for prevalence of BHD, LAM, and PLCH and rates of recurrent pneumothoraces in each of these diseases were derived from the literature. Costs were extracted from 2014 Medicare data. We compared a strategy of HRCT screening followed by pleurodesis in patients with LAM, BHD, or PLCH versus conventional management with no HRCT screening. In our base case analysis, screening for the presence of BHD, LAM, or PLCH in patients presenting with a spontaneous pneumothorax was cost effective, with a marginal cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,427 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Sensitivity analysis showed that screening HRCT remained cost effective for diffuse cystic lung diseases prevalence as low as 0.01%. HRCT image screening for BHD, LAM, and PLCH in patients with apparent primary spontaneous pneumothorax is cost effective. Clinicians should consider performing a screening HRCT in patients presenting with apparent primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

  5. Screening for bipolar disorders in patients with alcohol or substance use disorders: Performance of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Jan; van den Berg, Belinda; Draisma, Stasja; Nolen, Willem A.; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Screening properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to detect bipolar disorder (BD) in patients with substance use disorders are unknown. Methods: 403 treatment seeking patients with a substance use disorder completed the MDQ and subsequently 111 MDQ positives and 59 MDQ

  6. Screening for bipolar disorders in patients with alcohol or substance use disorders : Performance of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zaane, Jan; van den Berg, Belinda; Draisma, Stasja; Nolen, Willem A.; van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Screening properties of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) to detect bipolar disorder (BD) in patients with substance use disorders are unknown. Methods: 403 treatment seeking patients with a substance use disorder completed the MDQ and subsequently 111 MDQ positives and 59 MDQ

  7. Screening for Depression, Sleep-Related Disturbances, and Anxiety in Patients with Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Boyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Screening for depression, sleep-related disturbances, and anxiety in patients with diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Materials and Methods. Patients were evaluated at initial consultation and subsequent visits at the multidisciplinary pancreatic cancer clinic at our University Cancer Center. Cross-sectional and longitudinal psychosocial distress was assessed utilizing Personal Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ9 to screen for depression and monitor symptoms, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ for generalized anxiety, and the University of Michigan Sleep Questionnaire to monitor sleep symptoms. Results. Twenty-two patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer participated during the 6-month pilot study with longitudinal followup for thirteen patients. In this study, mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms, anxiety, and potential sleep problems were common. The main finding of the study was 23% of the patients who were part of this pilot project screened positive for moderately severe major depressive symptoms, likely anxiety disorder or a potential sleep disorder during the study. One patient screened positive for moderately severe depressive symptoms in longitudinal followup. Conclusions. Depression, anxiety, and sleep problems are evident in patients with pancreatic cancer. Prospective, longitudinal studies, with larger groups of patients, are needed to determine if these comorbid symptoms impact outcome and clinical course.

  8. Use of a patient decision aid for prenatal screening for Down syndrome: what do pregnant women say?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portocarrero, M.E.; Giguere, A.M.; Lepine, J.; Garvelink, M.M.; Robitaille, H.; Delanoe, A.; Levesque, I.; Wilson, B.J.; Rousseau, F.; Legare, F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient decision aids (PtDAs) help people make difficult, values-sensitive decisions. Prenatal screening for assessing the risk of genetic conditions in the fetus is one such decision and patient decision aids are rarely used in this clinical context. We sought to identify factors

  9. Screening Adult Patients with a Tracheostomy Tube for Dysphagia: A Mixed-Methods Study of Practice in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnelly, Aeron; Greenwood, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with tracheostomy tubes are at risk of aspiration and swallowing problems (dysphagia), and because of their medical acuity, complications in this patient population can be severe. It is well recognized that swallow screening in stroke significantly reduces potential complications by allowing early identification and…

  10. Screening for amyloid in subcutaneous fat tissue of Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis : clinical and laboratory characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Mansoury, T.M.; Hazenberg, B. P. C.; Badawy, S. A. El; Ahmed, A.H.; Bijzet, J.; Limburg, P.C.; Van Rijswijk, M.H.

    Objective: To screen for amyloid and to assess associated clinical and laboratory characteristics in Egyptian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Abdominal subcutaneous fat aspirates were consecutively collected from 112 patients (103 women, nine men) having RA for five years or more.

  11. High incidence of pseudotumours after hip resurfacing even in low risk patients; results from an intensified MRI screening protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weegen, W. van der; Smolders, J.M.; Sijbesma, T.; Hoekstra, H.J.; Brakel, K.; Susante, J.L.C. van

    2013-01-01

    We intensified our screening protocol for the presence of pseudotumours in a consecutive series of patients with a hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA), to establish whether we should be alert to the presence of 'silent' pseudotumours. Patients categorised with high risk (11 hips) and low risk (10

  12. Successful use of guanfacine in a patient with chronic refractory cough: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory W. Kirschen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic idiopathic cough is a common and often frustrating complaint for patients as well as providers. When common etiologies of cough are ruled out and/or do not respond to usual treatments, neurogenic cough should be considered as a diagnosis of exclusion. Here, we report on a 58-year-old woman with an 8-year history of chronic, treatment-refractory cough of unknown etiology that we diagnosed as neurogenic cough and successfully treated with guanfacine monotherapy, with rapid and durable improvement in symptoms. This case was particularly challenging for a number of reasons, including a distant past smoking history and previous pneumonia, a significant psychiatric history, and a mildly deviated nasal septum and nasal osteophyte, all or some of which could have contributed to the etiology of the cough. This case illustrates that neurogenic cough should be a diagnostic consideration in patients presenting with chronic cough in whom other treatment modalities have failed, and also suggests that the therapeutic use of guanfacine in this clinical setting warrants future investigation.

  13. Successful Pregnancy in a Patient with Takayasu’s Arteritis: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Ebrahimi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and objectives

    Takayasu’s arteritis, so-called pulseless disease, is a syndrome mostly seen in young women. It is a chronic inflammatory arteritis affecting large vessels. It is associated with abnormal angiography of the upper aorta and its main branches, resulting in vascular impairment in the upper extremities. This report presents a case of successful pregnancy in a patient with Takayasu’s arteritis.

    Case

    The patient was a 36 years old G2P1 woman. Her first child was delivered by cesarean section. She was suffering from Takayasu’s arteritis and was treated with prednisolone since 7 years ago. She had an unplanned pregnancy after expulsion of IUD. In her past medical history, in addition to Takayasu’s arteritis involving subclavian artery, an iodine 131 ablation for treatment of hyperthyroidism was noticed. She was first sought medical attention at 8th week of pregnancy and as she had normal cardiopulmonary and renal functions, the pregnancy was continued. Subtotal thyroidectomy was performed at 10th week of gestation following a suspicious FNA showing a cold thyroid nodule. She was then treated with thyroxine in addition to prednisolone to control the post-thyroidectomy hypothyroidism. At 37th week, her pregnancy was terminated by cesarean section with epidural analgesia because of reduction of amniotic fluid index and a BPS of 8/10.

  14. Successful application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy to orbital floor trapdoor fracture in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yasunori; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Although surgical treatment of orbital floor fractures can be performed by many different approaches, the application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for this condition has rarely been described in the literature. We report on a case of a 7-year-old boy with a trapdoor orbital floor fracture successfully treated with the application of EMMM. The patient suffered trauma to the right orbit floor and the inferior rectus was entrapped at the orbital floor. Initially, surgical repair via endoscopic endonasal approach was attempted. However, we were unable to adequately access the orbital floor through the maxillary ostium. Therefore, an alternative route of access to the orbital floor was established by EMMM. With sufficient visualization and operating space, the involved orbital content was completely released from the entrapment site and reduced into the orbit. To facilitate wound healing, the orbital floor was supported with a water-inflated urethral balloon catheter for 8 days. At follow-up 8 months later, there was no gaze restriction or complications associated with the EMMM. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of EMMM in endoscopic endonasal repair of orbital floor fracture, particularly for cases with a narrow nasal cavity such as in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction of a Successful Pregnancy in a Patient with Advanced Chronic Renal Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saghafi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectiveIn the women with chronic renal insufficiency ovulation is suppressed therefore they rarely become pregnant. If pregnancy occurs, they might encounter many conflictions. It may lead to death (fetus or mother. The aim of this study was reporting a successful pregnancy in a patient with advanced chronic renal insufficiency.Case reportThe patient was a 32 years old woman with long period of infertility (8 years. The first main clinical symptom was abdominal pain especially in hypogastric area as well as hyperuremia, elevated levels of creatinine (2.9 mg/dl, mild proteinuria and hematuria. The urine specific gravity was 1010. Sonography data showed asymmetrical small kidneys. Other complaints were pruritus and flank pain during urination. The primary diagnosis was chronic renal failure due to probable chronic pyelonephritis. After an interval she returned with positive pregnancy test. She decided to continue the pregnancy in despite of obstetrician belief for aborting. During pregnancy, proteinuria reached to two plus, hemoglobin fell to 9.7, creatinine levels reached to 3.7 mg/dl and blood pressure was fluctuating between 110/80 and 130/85 mmHg. She admitted in the hospital in third trimester of pregnancy because of preterm labor. However the pain was suppressed after starting magnesium sulfate infusion. Keywords: Renal Insufficiency, Chronic Renal Insufficiency, Pregnancy

  16. The keys to successful TIPS in patients with portal vein thrombosis and cavernous transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, S; Espejo, J J; Pérez-Montilla, M E; Zurera, L J; González-Galilea, Á

    Portal vein thrombosis is a common complication in patients with cirrhosis. Anticoagulation involves a high risk of bleeding secondary to portal hypertension, so placing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) has become an alternative treatment for portal vein thrombosis. Three strategies for TIPS placement have been reported: 1) portal recanalization and conventional implantation of the TIPS through the jugular vein; 2) portal recanalization through percutaneous transhepatic/transsplenic) access; and (3) insertion of the TIPS between the suprahepatic vein and a periportal collateral vessel without portal recanalization. We describe different materials that can be used as fluoroscopic targets for the TIPS needle and for portal recanalization. This article aims to show the success of TIPS implantation using different combinations of the techniques listed above, which is a good treatment alternative in these patients whose clinical condition makes them difficult to manage, and to show that portal vein thrombosis/cavernous transformation should not be considered a contraindication for TIPS. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient health questionnaire for school-based depression screening among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fang-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Liu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Huang, Yen-Hsun; Liu, Shen-Ing

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of a Chinese version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 item (PHQ-9) and its 2 subscales (1 item and 2 items) for the screening of major depressive disorder (MDD) among adolescents in Taiwan. A total of 2257 adolescents were recruited from high schools in Taipei. The participants completed assessments including demographic information, the Chinese version of the PHQ-9, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and data on the number of physical illnesses and mental health service utilizations were recorded. Among them, 430 were retested using the PHQ-9 within 2 weeks. Child psychiatrists interviewed a subsample of the adolescents (n = 165) using the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia Epidemiological Version as the criterion standard. The PHQ-9 had good internal consistency (α = 0.84) and acceptable test-rete