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Sample records for patients developed unsightly

  1. Flooring for Schools: Unsightly Walkways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Many mattress manufacturers recommend that consumers rotate their mattresses at least twice a year to help prevent soft spots from developing and increase the product's life span. It's unfortunate that the same kind of treatment can't be applied to flooring for schools, such as carpeting, especially in hallways. Being able to flip or turn a carpet…

  2. Bilateral idiopathic calf muscle hypertrophy: an exceptional cause of unsightly leg curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, C; Chaput, B; Rivier, F; Doucet, J C; Bigorre, M; Captier, G

    2015-04-01

    The authors present the management of a young female patient who presented with longstanding bilateral calf muscle hypertrophy, with no known cause. Taking into account the patient's wishes and the fact that the hypertrophy was mainly located in the posteromedial compartment, we chose to carry out a subtotal bilateral resection of medial gastrocnemius muscles. This procedure was performed with an harmonic scalpel, permitting a excellent cosmetic result while avoiding complications or functional impairment. After a reviewing of the commonly used techniques, the authors discuss the chosen surgical approach taking into account its clinical particularity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of acromegaly in patients with prolactinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne; Hagen, Casper; Frystyk, Jan

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with prolactinomas and patients with acromegaly often have heterogenous adenomas. In this study we have focused on patients with prolactinomas who developed acromegaly and acromegalic patients with hyperprolactinaemia. Our hypothesis is that some patients with hyperprolactina......OBJECTIVES: Patients with prolactinomas and patients with acromegaly often have heterogenous adenomas. In this study we have focused on patients with prolactinomas who developed acromegaly and acromegalic patients with hyperprolactinaemia. Our hypothesis is that some patients...... with hyperprolactinaemia may develop clinical acromegaly. METHODS: We have included patients examined at department M, Odense University Hospital between 1996 and 2001. Seventy-eight patients with prolactinomas, 65 females and 13 males, with a median age (range) of 30 Years (14-74) and 47 Years (20-66), respectively, were...

  4. Developing patient safety in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety has always been important and is a source of public concern. Recent high profile scandals and subsequent reports, such as the Francis report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire, have raised those concerns even higher. Mortality and significant morbidity associated with the practice of medicine has led to many strategies to help improve patient safety, however, with its lack of associated mortality and lower associated morbidity, dentistry has been slower at systematically considering how patient safety can be improved. Recently, several organisations, researchers and clinicians have discussed the need for a patient safety culture in dentistry. Strategies are available to help improve patient safety in healthcare and deserve further consideration in dentistry.

  5. Developing patient education in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.T.G.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians’ patient education behavior and the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities in the pharmacy.

  6. Patient perspective: choosing or developing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, John R; Fries, James F; Hewlett, Sarah; Osborne, Richard H

    2011-08-01

    Previous Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meetings recognized that patients view outcomes of intervention from a different perspective. This preconference position paper briefly sets out 2 patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument approaches, the PROMISE computer adaptive testing (CAT) system and development of a rheumatoid arthritis-specific questionnaire to measure fatigue; a tentative proposal for a PRO instrument development pathway is also made.

  7. Developing virtual patients for medical microbiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, David; O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerry J

    2013-12-01

    The landscape of medical education is changing as students embrace the accessibility and interactivity of e-learning. Virtual patients are e-learning resources that may be used to advance microbiology education. Although the development of virtual patients has been widely considered, here we aim to provide a coherent approach for clinical educators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Development of operation patient security detection system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shu-Qin; Tao, Ren-Hai; Zhao, Chao; Wei, Qun

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a patient security detection system developed with two dimensional bar codes, wireless communication and removal storage technique. Based on the system, nurses and correlative personnel check code wait operation patient to prevent the defaults. The tests show the system is effective. Its objectivity and currency are more scientific and sophisticated than current traditional method in domestic hospital.

  9. Developing patient rapport, trust and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2017-08-09

    Rapport is established at the first meeting between the patient and nurse, and is developed throughout the therapeutic relationship. However, challenges can arise during this process. Initially, nurses can establish trust with the patient through the questions they ask, however, as care progresses, the nurse will be required to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the patient's psychological well-being. When the therapeutic relationship ends, the nurse should assist the patient to assess progress and plan the next stage of recovery. This article provides three reflective exercises using case study examples to demonstrate how rapport is developed and sustained. Evidence is provided to identify why challenges arise in the therapeutic relationship and how the nurse can ensure they provide care that the patient regards as genuine.

  10. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    removed from the original 69. A multidimensional questionnaire, divided into five subscales, was developed from the remaining 34 items: mobility; symptoms; sleep disturbance; everyday activity and pain; and participation in everyday life. Exploratory factor analysis supported a 5-subscale structure......OBJECTIVE: To develop a patient-reported outcome evaluating the impact of neck pain. The results of item generation and reduction and subscale structure in support of the content and construct validity of the measure are reported. METHODS: Items were generated from the literature and through focus...

  11. A method for developing standard patient education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Carolina Bryne; Hauch, Sophie Misser Pallesgaard; Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck

    2018-01-01

    for developing standard digital patient education programs for patients in self-administration of blood samples drawn from CVC. The Design Science Research Paradigm was used to develop a digital patient education program, called PAVIOSY, to increase patient safety during execution of the blood sample collection...... of the educational patient system, health professionals must be engaged early in the development of content and design phase....

  12. Virtual patients: development in cancer nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Pam; Pollard, Katherine; Armoogum, Julie; Messer, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer is increasing and internationally there are high incidence rates. It is important that nurses and healthcare professionals are enabled to provide appropriate care to those men affected by prostate cancer and their families. Despite this need, there is recognition that many professionals feel ill prepared and lack knowledge in a number of areas. This paper presents the development of a Virtual Patient (VP) online resource to support practitioner learning. To develop five online VP simulation scenarios to meet the learning needs of nurses and health-care professionals caring for men with prostate cancer. Topic areas for the VPs were taken from previous work exploring the needs of health care professionals working with men with prostate cancer. An initial scoping exercise involving nursing practitioners, students and a prostate cancer charity confirmed the focus of the case study scenarios. Service users and specialist practitioners reviewed an outline of each case study to ensure fidelity of the simulations scenarios. Cases were entered into UChoose, a web based interactive VP player and authoring tool. The final case studies were reviewed by a sample of both registered and non-registered nurses and nursing students. The majority of respondents reported an increase in knowledge and suggested that they would recommend the resource to others. A number of positive aspects of the resource were highlighted. Respondents also commented about areas of weakness, a number of which have been addressed subsequently. The VP case studies provided an opportunity to develop knowledge and confidence in caring for men with prostate cancer. The mode of delivery and the content was acceptable for less experienced and knowledgeable staff. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transaxillary Subpectoral Placement of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices in Young Female Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hyun Oh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe current indications of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs have expanded to include young patients with serious cardiac risk factors, but CIED placement has the disadvantage of involving unsightly scarring and bulging of the chest wall. A collaborative team of cardiologists and plastic surgeons developed a technique for the subpectoral placement of CIEDs in young female patients via a transaxillary approach.MethodsFrom July 2012 to December 2015, subpectoral CIED placement via an axillary incision was performed in 10 young female patients, with a mean age of 25.9 years and mean body mass index of 20.1 kg/m2. In the supine position, with the patient's shoulder abducted, an approximately 5-cm linear incision was made along one of the deepest axillary creases. The submuscular plane was identified at the lateral border of the pectoralis major, and the dissection continued over the clavipectoral fascia until the subpectoral pocket could securely receive a pulse generator. Slight upward dissection also exposed an entrance to the subclavian vein, allowing the cardiology team to gain access to the vein. One patient with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent augmentation mammoplasty and CIED insertion simultaneously.ResultsOne case of late-onset device infection occurred. All patients were highly satisfied with the results and reported that they would recommend the procedure to others.ConclusionsWith superior aesthetic outcomes compared to conventional methods, the subpectoral placement of CIEDs via a transaxillary approach is an effective, single-incision method to hide operative scarring and minimize bulging of the device, and is particularly beneficial for young female or lean patients.

  14. Patient involvement in patient safety: Protocol for developing an intervention using patient reports of organisational safety and patient incident reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armitage Gerry

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients have the potential to provide a rich source of information on both organisational aspects of safety and patient safety incidents. This project aims to develop two patient safety interventions to promote organisational learning about safety - a patient measure of organisational safety (PMOS, and a patient incident reporting tool (PIRT - to help the NHS prevent patient safety incidents by learning more about when and why they occur. Methods To develop the PMOS 1 literature will be reviewed to identify similar measures and key contributory factors to error; 2 four patient focus groups will ascertain practicality and feasibility; 3 25 patient interviews will elicit approximately 60 items across 10 domains; 4 10 patient and clinician interviews will test acceptability and understanding. Qualitative data will be analysed using thematic content analysis. To develop the PIRT 1 individual and then combined patient and clinician focus groups will provide guidance for the development of three potential reporting tools; 2 nine wards across three hospital directorates will pilot each of the tools for three months. The best performing tool will be identified from the frequency, volume and quality of reports. The validity of both measures will be tested. 300 patients will be asked to complete the PMOS and PIRT during their stay in hospital. A sub-sample (N = 50 will complete the PMOS again one week later. Health professionals in participating wards will also be asked to complete the AHRQ safety culture questionnaire. Case notes for all patients will be reviewed. The psychometric properties of the PMOS will be assessed and a final valid and reliable version developed. Concurrent validity for the PIRT will be assessed by comparing reported incidents with those identified from case note review and the existing staff reporting scheme. In a subsequent study these tools will be used to provide information to wards/units about their

  15. Patients in assisted automated peritoneal dialysis develop strategies for selfcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holch, Kirsten

      Patients in Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis develop strategies for self-care Background: Since 2000 a model for Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (AAPD) in the patients own home has been developed at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. The patient group consists of physically...

  16. Patient Safety in Pediatrics: a Developing Discipline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van der Starre (Cynthia)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The publication of the breakthrough report “To Err is Human” by the Institute of Medicine was the launch of patient safety initiatives all over the world. In the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital this resulted in the institution

  17. Development of a Professional Certification in Cancer Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, Janet; D'souza, Anna; Masse, Adeline; Boyko, Susan; Clarke, Susan; Giuliani, Meredith; MacKinnon, Keira; McBain, Sarah; McCallum, Meg; MacVinnie, Jan; Papadakos, Tina

    2018-04-19

    Patient educators come into the field from diverse professional backgrounds and often lack training in how to teach and develop patient education resources since no formal patient education professional certification program exists. A professional certification program for patient educators would further define the professional scope of practice and reduce variability in performance. The purpose of this study was to (1) determine the level of interest among Canadian cancer patient educators in a patient education professional certification program and (2) determine the competencies to be included in the professional certification program. A 12-item survey was designed by executive members of the Canadian Chapter of the Cancer Patient Education Network. The survey included a list of competencies associated with patient education, and a 4-point Likert scale ranging from "slightly important" to "very important" was used to determine the rank of each competency. The survey was sent to 53 patient educators across Canada. Ninety-two percent of the patient educators are interested in a professional certification program. Patient educators indicated that competencies related to developing patient resources, collaboration, plain language expertise, and health literacy were of most importance. Patient educators support the development of a patient education professional certification program and endorsed the competencies proposed. This information provides the foundation for the creation of a professional certification program for cancer patient educators.

  18. Partnering With Patients in the Development and Lifecycle of Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James; Boutin, Marc; Dewulf, Lode; Geissler, Jan; Johnston, Graeme; Joos, Angelika; Metcalf, Marilyn; Regnante, Jeanne; Sargeant, Ifeanyi; Schneider, Roslyn F.; Todaro, Veronica; Tougas, Gervais

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of medicines is to improve patients' lives. Stakeholders involved in the development and lifecycle management of medicines agree that more effective patient involvement is needed to ensure that patient needs and priorities are identified and met. Despite the increasing number and scope of patient involvement initiatives, there is no accepted master framework for systematic patient involvement in industry-led medicines research and development, regulatory review, or market access decisions. Patient engagement is very productive in some indications, but inconsistent and fragmentary on a broader level. This often results in inefficient drug development, increasing evidence requirements, lack of patient-centered outcomes that address unmet medical needs and facilitate adherence, and consequently, lack of required therapeutic options and high costs to society and involved parties. Improved patient involvement can drive the development of innovative medicines that deliver more relevant and impactful patient outcomes and make medicine development faster, more efficient, and more productive. It can lead to better prioritization of early research; improved resource allocation; improved trial protocol designs that better reflect patient needs; and, by addressing potential barriers to patient participation, enhanced recruitment and retention. It may also improve trial conduct and lead to more focused, economically viable clinical trials. At launch and beyond, systematic patient involvement can also improve the ongoing benefit-risk assessment, ensure that public funds prioritize medicines of value to patients, and further the development of the medicine. Progress toward a universal framework for patient involvement requires a joint, precompetitive, and international approach by all stakeholders, working in true partnership to consolidate outputs from existing initiatives, identify gaps, and develop a comprehensive framework. It is essential that all stakeholders

  19. Liver damage and senescence increases in patients developing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Silvia; Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Calabrese, Diego; Schlageter, Manuel; Quagliata, Luca; Cathomas, Gieri; Diebold, Joachim; Molinolo, Alfredo; Heim, Markus H; Terracciano, Luigi M; Matter, Matthias S

    2017-08-01

    Most patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have an underlying chronic liver inflammation, which causes a continuous damage leading to liver cirrhosis and eventually HCC. However, only a minority of cirrhotic patients develop HCC. To assess a possible differential impact of liver inflammation in patients developing HCC versus patients remaining tumor-free, we designed a longitudinal study and analysed liver tissue of the same patients (n = 33) at two points in time: once when no HCC was present and once several years later when an HCC was present. As a control group, we followed cirrhotic patients (n = 37) remaining tumor-free over a similar time frame. We analysed cell damage and senescence of hepatocytes by measuring γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, nuclear size, and telomere length. γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, in the first liver biopsy was similar in patients developing HCC later on and cirrhotic patients remaining tumor free. In contrast, γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, was significantly higher in the second non-tumoral liver biopsy of HCC patients than in the control patients. Consequently, the individual increase in γ-H2AX positivity, p16 INK4 and p21 WAF/Cip1 expression, from the first biopsy to the second biopsy was significantly higher in patients developing HCC than in patients remaining tumor free. In addition, changes in nuclear size and telomere length revealed a more pronounced cell aging in patients developing HCC than in patients remaining tumor free. Hepatocytes from patients developing HCC go through more pronounced cell damage and senescence in contrast to cirrhotic patients remaining tumor free. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Handberg, Charlotte; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Hørder, Mogens; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause to years lived with disability. 10–20% of patients with LBP experience radicular pain (lumbar radiculopathy). Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an important role in advancing patient-centered health care. Although patient involvement is essential to develop valid patient-centred PRO instruments patients are not always involved. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are proposed to facilitate consist...

  1. Development of a patient-reported outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Søgaard, Karen; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    removed from the original 69. A multidimensional questionnaire, divided into five subscales, was developed from the remaining 34 items: mobility; symptoms; sleep disturbance; everyday activity and pain; and participation in everyday life. Exploratory factor analysis supported a 5-subscale structure...

  2. Patient information letters on nutrition: development and implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, J.J. van; Drenthen, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1998 the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) began developing patient information letters (PILs), based on the practice guidelines for family physicians (FPs) (NHG standards). Five nutritional guidance letters have since been developed with the Dutch Nutrition Center.

  3. Collaborating with nurse leaders to develop patient safety practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Anne; Kivinen, Tuula; Lammintakanen, Johanna

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The organisational level and leadership development are crucial elements in advancing patient safety, because patient safety weaknesses are often caused by system failures. However, little is known about how frontline leader and director teams can be supported to develop patient safety practices. The purpose of this study is to describe the patient safety development process carried out by nursing leaders and directors. The research questions were: how the chosen development areas progressed in six months' time and how nursing leaders view the participatory development process. Design/methodology/approach Participatory action research was used to engage frontline nursing leaders and directors into developing patient safety practices. Semi-structured group interviews ( N = 10) were used in data collection at the end of a six-month action cycle, and data were analysed using content analysis. Findings The participatory development process enhanced collaboration and gave leaders insights into patient safety as a part of the hospital system and their role in advancing it. The chosen development areas advanced to different extents, with the greatest improvements in those areas with simple guidelines to follow and in which the leaders were most participative. The features of high-reliability organisation were moderately identified in the nursing leaders' actions and views. For example, acting as a change agent to implement patient safety practices was challenging. Participatory methods can be used to support leaders into advancing patient safety. However, it is important that the participants are familiar with the method, and there are enough facilitators to steer development processes. Originality/value Research brings more knowledge of how leaders can increase their effectiveness in advancing patient safety and promoting high-reliability organisation features in the healthcare organisation.

  4. Improving a newly developed patient-reported outcome for thyroid patients, using cognitive interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Groenvold, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    Objective To improve a newly developed patient-reported outcome measure for thyroid patients using cognitive interviewing. Methods Thirty-one interviews using immediate retrospective and expansive probing were conducted among patients with non-toxic goiter (n = 4), nodular toxic goiter (n = 5) Gr...

  5. The process of developing audiovisual patient information: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Catherine; McCreaddie, May

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this project was to produce audiovisual patient information, which was user friendly and fit for purpose. The purpose of the audiovisual patient information is to inform patients about randomized controlled trials, as a supplement to their trial-specific written information sheet. Audiovisual patient information is known to be an effective way of informing patients about treatment. User involvement is also recognized as being important in the development of service provision. The aim of this paper is (i) to describe and discuss the process of developing the audiovisual patient information and (ii) to highlight the challenges and opportunities, thereby identifying implications for practice. A future study will test the effectiveness of the audiovisual patient information in the cancer clinical trial setting. An advisory group was set up to oversee the project and provide guidance in relation to information content, level and delivery. An expert panel of two patients provided additional guidance and a dedicated operational team dealt with the logistics of the project including: ethics; finance; scriptwriting; filming; editing and intellectual property rights. Challenges included the limitations of filming in a busy clinical environment, restricted technical and financial resources, ethical needs and issues around copyright. There were, however, substantial opportunities that included utilizing creative skills, meaningfully involving patients, teamworking and mutual appreciation of clinical, multidisciplinary and technical expertise. Developing audiovisual patient information is an important area for nurses to be involved with. However, this must be performed within the context of the multiprofessional team. Teamworking, including patient involvement, is crucial as a wide variety of expertise is required. Many aspects of the process are transferable and will provide information and guidance for nurses, regardless of specialty, considering developing this

  6. Developing patient portals in a fragmented healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte-Trojel, Terese; de Bont, Antoinette; Aspria, Marcello; Adams, Samantha; Rundall, Thomas G; van de Klundert, Joris; de Mul, Marleen

    2015-10-01

    Use of patient portals may contribute to improved patient health and experiences and better organizational performance. In the Netherlands, patient portals have gained considerable attention in recent years, as evidenced by various policy initiatives and practical efforts directed at developing portals. Due to the fragmented setup of the Dutch healthcare system patient portals that give patients access to information and services from across their providers are developed in inter-organizational collaboration. The objective of this paper is to identify and describe the types of collaborations, or networks, that have been established to develop patient portals in the Netherlands. Understanding the characteristics of these networks as well as the development of their respective portals enables us to assess the enabling and constraining effects of different network types on patient portal initiatives. We used qualitative methods including interview and documents analysis. In a first step, we interviewed eighteen experts and reviewed relevant national policy and strategy documents. Based on this orientation, we selected three networks we deemed to be representative of inter-organizational efforts to develop Dutch patient portals in 2012. In a second step, we interviewed twelve representatives of these patient portal networks and collected documents related to the portals. We applied content analytic techniques to analyze data from the three cases. The three studied networks differed in their number and diversity of actors, the degree to which these actors were mutually dependent, the degree to which network governance was decentralized, and the dynamics of the network structures. We observed that the portals developed in networks displaying the highest degree of these characteristics experienced most difficulties associated with developing patient portals - such as achieving interoperability, successful implementation, regulatory complaisance, and financial

  7. A Method for Developing Standard Patient Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lura, Carolina Bryne; Hauch, Sophie Misser Pallesgaard; Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Pape-Haugaard, Louise

    2018-01-01

    In Denmark, patients being treated on Haematology Outpatients Departments get instructed to self-manage their blood sample collection from Central Venous Catheter (CVC). However, this is a complex and risky procedure, which can jeopardize patient safety. The aim of the study was to suggest a method for developing standard digital patient education programs for patients in self-administration of blood samples drawn from CVC. The Design Science Research Paradigm was used to develop a digital patient education program, called PAVIOSY, to increase patient safety during execution of the blood sample collection procedure by using videos for teaching as well as procedural support. A step-by-step guide was developed and used as basis for making the videos. Quality assurance through evaluation with a nurse was conducted on both the step-by-step guide and the videos. The quality assurance evaluation of the videos showed; 1) Errors due to the order of the procedure can be determined by reviewing the videos despite that the guide was followed. 2) Videos can be used to identify errors - important for patient safety - in the procedure, which are not identifiable in a written script. To ensure correct clinical content of the educational patient system, health professionals must be engaged early in the development of content and design phase.

  8. [COMETE: a tool to develop psychosocial competences in patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugeron, Benoit; Sonnier, Pierre; Marchais, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a detailed description of the development and use of the COMETE tool. The COMETE tool is designed to help medical teams identify, develop or evaluate psychosocial skills in patient education and counselling. This tool, designed in the form of a briefcase, proposes methodological activities and cards that assess psychosocial skills during a shared educational assessment, group meetings or during an individual evaluation. This tool is part of a support approach for medical teams caring for patients with chronic diseases.

  9. Monitoring of bedridden patients: development of a fall detection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, M; Silva, P; Cunha, S R; Correia, M V

    2013-01-01

    Falls of patients are an important issue in hospitals nowadays; it causes severe injuries, increases hospitalization time and treatment costs. The detection of a fall, in time, provides faster rescue to the patient, preventing more serious injuries, as well as saving nursing time. The MovinSense® is an electronic device designed for monitoring patients to prevent pressure sores, and the main goal of this work was to develop a new tool for this device, with the purpose of detecting if the patient has fallen from the hospital bed, without changing any of the device's original features. Experiments for gathering data samples of inertial signals of falling from the bed were obtained using the device. For fall detection a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 100% were reached. Another algorithm was developed to detect if the patient got out of his/her bed.

  10. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Handberg, Charlotte

    and ICF Rehabilitation Set. Items in the ICF-PRO are developed within methods and terminology of The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). The development process contains five phases (figure 1). Results This poster presents preliminary results from phase 1-3. 89...... the focus group identified three themes: 'Simplicity', 'Application' and 'Individuality' representing elements of most importance for the patients toward a patient centered consultation (figure 2). Conclusions We found that ‘Simplicity’, ‘Application’ and ‘Individuality’ was essential to patients to lead...

  11. Development and innovation of system resources to optimize patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas J; Brownlee, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    Various incremental and disruptive healthcare innovations that are occurring or may occur are discussed, with insights on how multihospital health systems can prepare for the future and optimize the continuity of patient care provided. Innovation in patient care is occurring at an ever-increasing rate, and this is especially true relative to the transition of patients through the care continuum. Health systems must leverage their ability to standardize and develop electronic health record (EHR) systems and other infrastructure necessary to support patient care and optimize outcomes; examples include 3D printing of patient-specific medication dosage forms to enhance precision medicine, the use of drones for medication delivery, and the expansion of telehealth capabilities to improve patient access to the services of pharmacists and other healthcare team members. Disruptive innovations in pharmacy services and delivery will alter how medications are prescribed and delivered to patients now and in the future. Further, technology may also fundamentally alter how and where pharmacists and pharmacy technicians care for patients. This article explores the various innovations that are occurring and that will likely occur in the future, particularly as they apply to multihospital health systems and patient continuity of care. Pharmacy departments that anticipate and are prepared to adapt to incremental and disruptive innovations can demonstrate value in the multihospital health system through strategies such as optimizing the EHR, identifying telehealth opportunities, supporting infrastructure, and integrating services. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Time dependent patient no-show predictive modelling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Li; Hanauer, David A

    2016-05-09

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop evident-based predictive no-show models considering patients' each past appointment status, a time-dependent component, as an independent predictor to improve predictability. Design/methodology/approach - A ten-year retrospective data set was extracted from a pediatric clinic. It consisted of 7,291 distinct patients who had at least two visits along with their appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Logistic regression was adopted to develop no-show models using two-thirds of the data for training and the remaining data for validation. The no-show threshold was then determined based on minimizing the misclassification of show/no-show assignments. There were a total of 26 predictive model developed based on the number of available past appointments. Simulation was employed to test the effective of each model on costs of patient wait time, physician idle time, and overtime. Findings - The results demonstrated the misclassification rate and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic gradually improved as more appointment history was included until around the 20th predictive model. The overbooking method with no-show predictive models suggested incorporating up to the 16th model and outperformed other overbooking methods by as much as 9.4 per cent in the cost per patient while allowing two additional patients in a clinic day. Research limitations/implications - The challenge now is to actually implement the no-show predictive model systematically to further demonstrate its robustness and simplicity in various scheduling systems. Originality/value - This paper provides examples of how to build the no-show predictive models with time-dependent components to improve the overbooking policy. Accurately identifying scheduled patients' show/no-show status allows clinics to proactively schedule patients to reduce the negative impact of patient no-shows.

  13. Risk of Development of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6.7/100 p-y, 95%CI 2.6–10.8) patients. Trend towards higher mortality in patients who developed TB (10.5/100 p-y, 95%CI 4.8–15.2) compared to those who did not (6.1/100 p-y, 95%CI 3.2–8.8). New TB infections play major role in India?

  14. Development of an orthopedic surgery trauma patient handover checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Justin; Donnon, Tyrone; Hutchison, Carol; Duffy, Paul

    2014-02-01

    In surgery, preoperative handover of surgical trauma patients is a process that must be made as safe as possible. We sought to determine vital clinical information to be transferred between patient care teams and to develop a standardized handover checklist. We conducted standardized small-group interviews about trauma patient handover. Based on this information, we created a questionnaire to gather perspectives from all Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) members about which topics they felt would be most important on a handover checklist. We analyzed the responses to develop a standardized handover checklist. Of the 1106 COA members, 247 responded to the questionnaire. The top 7 topics felt to be most important for achieving patient safety in the handover were comorbidities, diagnosis, readiness for the operating room, stability, associated injuries, history/mechanism of injury and outstanding issues. The expert recommendations were to have handover completed the same way every day, all appropriate radiographs available, adequate time, all appropriate laboratory work and more time to spend with patients with more severe illness. Our main recommendations for safe handover are to use standardized checklists specific to the patient and site needs. We provide an example of a standardized checklist that should be used for preoperative handovers. To our knowledge, this is the first checklist for handover developed by a group of experts in orthopedic surgery, which is both manageable in length and simple to use.

  15. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is the leading contributor to years lived with disability. It is a complex biopsychosocial phenomenon where complete differential diagnosis and assessment is difficult and needs to be comprehensive. Therefore a biopsychosocial approach is recommended. Substantial...... pain. Methods: The development of the PRO will be based on ICF Comprehensive Core Set for Low Back Pain and Rehabilitation Set and existing items from the The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). The development process will be divided into five steps: 1. Linking PROMIS....... Conclusion(s) : A PRO instrument is developed to systematise and qualify the description on functioning among patients with lumbar radicular pain. The development process is in progress and next step is to engage patients and clinicians in the development process.  Implications : With development of this PRO...

  16. Developing lifetime relationships with patients: strategies to improve patient care and build your practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger P

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe three strategies to build a thriving, patient-centered practice and promote oral health throughout a patient's lifetime. Compared to previous decades, more dental patients are "shopping around" for dental care and changing dental practices. This trend is due to factors such as acceptance of dental insurance, more comprehensive service offerings by other dentists, and effective marketing campaigns by other dental offices. Delivering customer service exceeding patient expectations ("WOW" service), advocating patient education, and developing customized home care regimens will help lead to long-term patient retention and promote optimal patient care. A dental team making relationship-building a priority conveys respect for their patients' time and well-being. Once trust has been established patients are more likely to be receptive to oral health education and become more compliant with home care regimens. Since a patient's oral health status will likely change over time, it's important to make education and customized treatment planning an integral part of each visit. By demonstrating a strong commitment to customer service, education, and home care, patients recognize the care providers in a dental practice are interested in their well-being rather than simply treating problems. If patients recognize a dental practice is focused on prevention and at-home oral health care, they are more likely to partner with that practice for a lifetime of excellent oral health care.

  17. Measuring patient engagement: development and psychometric properties of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Bonanomi, Andrea; Lozza, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the rhetorical call for increasing patients' engagement, policy makers recognize the urgency to have an evidence-based measure of patients' engagement and capture its effect when planning and implementing initiatives aimed at sustaining the engagement of consumers in their health. In this paper, authors describe the Patient Health Engagement Scale (PHE-scale), a measure of patient engagement that is grounded in rigorous conceptualization and appropriate psychometric methods. The scale was developed based on our previous conceptualization of patient engagement (the PHE-model). In particular, the items of the PHE-scale were developed based on the findings from the literature review and from interviews with chronic patients. Initial psychometric analysis was performed to pilot test a preliminary version of the items. The items were then refined and administered to a national sample of chronic patients (N = 382) to assess the measure's psychometric performance. A final phase of test-retest reliability was performed. The analysis showed that the PHE Scale has good psychometric properties with good correlation with concurrent measures and solid reliability. Having a valid and reliable measure to assess patient engagement is the first step in understanding patient engagement and its role in health care quality, outcomes, and cost containment. The PHE Scale shows a promising clinical relevance, indicating that it can be used to tailor intervention and assess changes after patient engagement interventions.

  18. Growth and psychomotor development of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Elisabeth; von der Hagen, Maja; Schara, Ulrike; von Au, Katja; Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common hereditary degenerative neuromuscular diseases and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The objective of the retrospective study was to describe growth and psychomotor development of patients with DMD and to detect a possible genotype-phenotype correlation. Data from 263 patients with DMD (mean age 7.1 years) treated at the Departments of Pediatric Neurology in three German University Hospitals was assessed with respect to body measurements (length, weight, body mass index BMI, head circumference OFC), motor and cognitive development as well as genotype (site of mutation). Anthropometric measures and developmental data were compared to those of a reference population and deviations were analyzed for their frequency in the cohort as well as in relation to the genotypes. Corticosteroid therapy was implemented in 29 from 263 patients. Overall 30% of the patients exhibit a short statue (length development at 2-5 years of age, and this is even more prevalent when steroid therapy is applied (45% of patients with steroid therapy). The BMI shows a rightwards shift (68% > 50th centile) and the OFC a leftwards shift (65% development is delayed in a third of the patients (mean age at walking 18.3 months, 30% > 18 months, 8% > 24 months). Almost half of the patients show cognitive impairment (26% learning disability, 17% intellectual disability). Although there is no strict genotype-phenotype correlation, particularly mutations in the distal part of the dystrophin gene are frequently associated with short stature and a high rate of microcephaly as well as cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Instrument development and evaluation for patient-related outcomes assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnik M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Małgorzata Farnik, Władysław PierzchałaDepartment of Pneumonology, Silesian University of Medicine, Katowice, PolandAbstract: Patient-related outcomes measures could provide important information for the current state of the art in medical care and even have an impact on macrodecisions in the health care system. Patient-related outcomes were initially defined as subjective health indicators that allow disability and illness to be assessed, based on patient, caregiver, or physician self-reports. As illness involves psychological and behavioral complex processes of care, a multidisciplinary approach in measuring patient-reported outcomes should be recommended, such as quality of life questionnaires. Patient-related outcomes measures should correspond to specific clinical situations and bring opportunities to improve quality of care. Objective measurements enable quantitative data to be collected and analyzed. Depending on the aim of the research, investigators can use existing methods or develop new tools. This publication presents a methodology for developing patient-related outcomes measures, based on a multistage procedure. The proper definition of specific study objectives and the methodology of instrument development are crucial for successfully transferring the study concept. The model of instrument development is the process of starting from the preliminary phase and includes questionnaire design and scaling, pilot testing (cognitive debriefing, revision of the preliminary version, evaluation of the new tool, and implementation. Validation of the new instrument includes reliability, reproducibility, internal consistency, and responsiveness. The process of designing the new tool should involve a panel of experts, including clinicians, psychologists (preliminary phase, and statisticians (scale development and scoring, and patients (cognitive debriefing. Implementation of a new tool should be followed by evaluation study – assessment of

  20. A healthful experience? A patient practice development journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Snelgrove Clarke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available While facilitating the first practice development school for our local healthcare authorities in Nova Scotia, Canada, recently, I was simultaneously preparing for my second hip replacement. Focusing workshop participants on the principles of practice development, collaboration, inclusion and participation, I wondered if, in my upcoming journey through the healthcare system, I would experience the processes and outcomes we were promoting in the school. I would like to share this commentary as a reflection of my practice development experience as a patient. Overall, I received care that was inclusive and collaborative – as well as care that was provider focused and system driven. It goes without saying that as a patient, I felt valued when I was included and felt part of the team when my wishes and expectations were taken into consideration. For me, inclusion in care correlates with valuing that patient as a participant in their care journey, as set out by practice development principle 6 (Manley, McCormack and Wilson, 2008 (Table 1. My recent healthcare experience has led me to reflect further on the principles of practice development and its implications and challenges for local healthcare authorities. For example, my anaesthetist comes to mind as embodying practice development principles 2, 4, 6 and 8. The anaesthetist supported my wishes surrounding narcotics, and provided research- and practice-based evidence for each of his actions. Although the offering of additional narcotics is routine practice in hip surgery, I did not want this, so we discussed my expectations and developed a plan together that reflected my wishes. He actually chatted throughout the entire two-hour procedure. I was pleasantly surprised when he told me he provides care that focuses on the patient (practice development principle 1. Nevertheless, inconsistencies in the attention to person-centred practices across the microsystem reminded me that the system is not yet set

  1. Development and testing of recipes suitable for patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The main objectives of the study were to develop and test recipes that meet the nutritional requirements of and are acceptable to patients with chronic renal failure. The secondary objectives were to determine gender and racial differences in the participants' responses during consumer sensory testing. Design: ...

  2. The effect of decreased developer activity on patient exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.B.; Turner, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Overexposing and underdeveloping a radiographic image is not a common practice, but it has been observed to occur as a result of poor processing protocols. This study discovered that, as a result of decreased developer activity, the patient exposure could be three times as great as it would be under normal conditions

  3. Development of heart failure in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B.; Ellingsen, Torkell; Pedersen, Alma B.

    2018-01-01

    Background: To investigate the incidence of heart failure (HF) and ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in different time spans following incident rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and, furthermore, to investigate the impact of IHD on the development of HF and the impact of different treatment era of RA...... risk of percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting within 10 years following the RA diagnosis was observed. HR for new onset of HF in RA without IHD was 1.23, while the HR for new onset of HF in patients with RA and IHD was 2.06. Conclusions: Rheumatoid arthritis patients...

  4. Rethinking blood components and patients: Patient blood management. Possible ways for development in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folléa, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. A better awareness of the risks of blood transfusion, the availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all have led to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. In this context, patient blood management (PBM) appears as an evidence-based, patient centred, multidisciplinary approach, aiming to optimise the care of patients who might need transfusion and consequently the use of blood products. This paper presents updated scientific bases of PBM and the three pillars founding it. As PBM is developing fast in other European countries, this review proposes ways to explore for its development in France. It finally proposes to integrate PBM in a wider and coordinated approach of the blood supply management, with tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, starting with the needs of the patients and ending with an optimum treatment of the patient, including the appropriate number of blood components of the required quality. A better understanding, implementation and assessment of this coordinated global approach, allowing to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, in a coordinated way, will certainly be a major challenge for transfusion medicine in the near future, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The development of a personalized patient education tool for decision making for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiligsmann, M.; Ronda, G.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Boonen, A.

    2016-01-01

    A personalized patient education tool for decision making (PET) for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis was developed by means of a systematic development approach. A prototype was constructed and refined by involving various professionals and patients. Professionals and patients expressed a

  6. Unbiased identification of patients with disorders of sex development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Hanauer

    Full Text Available Disorders of sex development (DSD represent a collection of rare diseases that generate substantial controversy regarding best practices for diagnosis and treatment. A significant barrier preventing a better understanding of how patients with these conditions should be evaluated and treated, especially from a psychological standpoint, is the lack of systematic and standardized approaches to identify cases for study inclusion. Common approaches include "hand-picked" subjects already known to the practice, which could introduce bias. We implemented an informatics-based approach to identify patients with DSD from electronic health records (EHRs at three large, academic children's hospitals. The informatics approach involved comprehensively searching EHRs at each hospital using a combination of structured billing codes as an initial filtering strategy followed by keywords applied to the free text clinical documentation. The informatics approach was implemented to replicate the functionality of an EHR search engine (EMERSE available at one of the hospitals. At the two hospitals that did not have EMERSE, we compared case ascertainment using the informatics method to traditional approaches employed for identifying subjects. Potential cases identified using all approaches were manually reviewed by experts in DSD to verify eligibility criteria. At the two institutions where both the informatics and traditional approaches were applied, the informatics approach identified substantially higher numbers of potential study subjects. The traditional approaches yielded 14 and 28 patients with DSD, respectively; the informatics approach yielded 226 and 77 patients, respectively. The informatics approach missed only a few cases that the traditional approaches identified, largely because those cases were known to the study team, but patient data were not in the particular children's hospital EHR. The use of informatics approaches to search electronic documentation

  7. Development and testing of emergency department patient transfer communication measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals.(1) The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality measurement of interfacility patient transfer communication. Input from existing measures, measurement and health care delivery experts, as well as hospital frontline staff was used to design and modify ED quality measures. Three field tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of data collection and the effectiveness of different training methods and types of partnerships. Measures were evaluated based on their prevalence, ease of data collection, and usefulness for internal and external improvement. It is feasible to collect ED quality measure data. Different data sources, data collection, and data entry methods, training and partners can be used to examine hospital ED quality. There is significant room for improvement in the communication of patient information between health care facilities. Current health care reform efforts highlight the importance of clear communication between organizations held accountable for patient safety and outcomes. The patient transfer communication measures have been tested in a wide range of rural settings and have been vetted nationally. They have been endorsed by the National Quality Forum, are included in the National Quality Measurement Clearinghouse supported by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ), and are under consideration by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for future payment determinations beginning in calendar year 2013. © 2011 National Rural Health Association.

  8. International collaboration including patients is essential to develop new therapies for patients with myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Ingrid E; Vencovsky, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    To discuss the needs for international collaborations between investigators in different disciplines working with myositis and with patients with myositis. Recent advances in detection of several myositis-specific autoantibodies that are associated with distinct clinical phenotypes, will enable studies in new well defined clinically homogenous subgroups of myositis This is likely to lead to development of new information on molecular pathogenesis that might be different in different myositis subgroups. Subgrouping patients according to autoantibody profile may also be important to assess outcome, to identify prognostic biomarkers and in clinical trials. As these are rare disorders international collaboration is essential to enrol large enough cohorts of the subgroups. To facilitate such collaboration we have developed a web-based international myositis register, www.euromyositis.eu, which includes validated outcome measures and patient reported outcome measures. This register is to support research but also to support decision-making in the clinic. We welcome investigators to join the Euromyositis register. Myositis is a heterogeneous disorder with varying treatment response and outcome. There is a high unmet need for new therapies which can only be achieved by increased knowledge on molecular disease mechanisms. Subgrouping patients according to autoantibody profile may be a new way forward to get a better understanding on disease mechanisms and to develop novel therapies.

  9. Development and validation of a patient-reported outcome measure for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanhong; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Yanbo

    2015-05-08

    Family support and patient satisfaction with treatment are crucial for aiding in the recovery from stroke. However, current validated stroke-specific questionnaires may not adequately capture the impact of these two variables on patients undergoing clinical trials of new drugs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a new stroke patient-reported outcome measure (Stroke-PROM) instrument for capturing more comprehensive effects of stroke on patients participating in clinical trials of new drugs. A conceptual framework and a pool of items for the preliminary Stroke-PROM were generated by consulting the relevant literature and other questionnaires created in China and other countries, and interviewing 20 patients and 4 experts to ensure that all germane parameters were included. During the first item-selection phase, classical test theory and item response theory were applied to an initial scale completed by 133 patients with stroke. During the item-revaluation phase, classical test theory and item response theory were used again, this time with 475 patients with stroke and 104 healthy participants. During the scale assessment phase, confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the final scale of the Stroke-PROM using the same study population as in the second item-selection phase. Reliability, validity, responsiveness and feasibility of the final scale were tested. The final scale of Stroke-PROM contained 46 items describing four domains (physiology, psychology, society and treatment). These four domains were subdivided into 10 subdomains. Cronbach's α coefficients for the four domains ranged from 0.861 to 0.908. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the validity of the final scale, and the model fit index satisfied the criterion. Differences in the Stroke-PROM mean scores were significant between patients with stroke and healthy participants in nine subdomains (P < 0.001), indicating that the scale showed good responsiveness. The Stroke

  10. Dyspnea descriptors developed in Brazil: application in obese patients and in patients with cardiorespiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Christiane Aires; Rodrigues Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Straccia, Luciana Cristina; Vianna, Elcio Dos Santos Oliveira; Silva, Geruza Alves da; Martinez, José Antônio Baddini

    2011-01-01

    To develop a set of descriptive terms applied to the sensation of dyspnea (dyspnea descriptors) for use in Brazil and to investigate the usefulness of these descriptors in four distinct clinical conditions that can be accompanied by dyspnea. We collected 111 dyspnea descriptors from 67 patients and 10 health professionals. These descriptors were analyzed and reduced to 15 based on their frequency of use, similarity of meaning, and potential pathophysiological value. Those 15 descriptors were applied in 50 asthma patients, 50 COPD patients, 30 patients with heart failure, and 50 patients with class II or III obesity. The three best descriptors, as selected by the patients, were studied by cluster analysis. Potential associations between the identified clusters and the four clinical conditions were also investigated. The use of this set of descriptors led to a solution with seven clusters, designated sufoco (suffocating), aperto (tight), rápido (rapid), fadiga (fatigue), abafado (stuffy), trabalho/inspiração (work/inhalation), and falta de ar (shortness of breath). Overlapping of descriptors was quite common among the patients, regardless of their clinical condition. Asthma was significantly associated with the sufoco and trabalho/inspiração clusters, whereas COPD and heart failure were associated with the sufoco, trabalho/inspiração, and falta de ar clusters. Obesity was associated only with the falta de ar cluster. In Brazil, patients who are accustomed to perceiving dyspnea employ various descriptors in order to describe the symptom, and these descriptors can be grouped into similar clusters. In our study sample, such clusters showed no usefulness in differentiating among the four clinical conditions evaluated.

  11. Patient with confirmed LEOPARD syndrome developing multiple melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmant, Caroline; Franck, Deborah; Marot, Liliane; Matthijs, Gert; Sznajer, Yves; Blomme, Sandrine; Tromme, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    LEOPARD syndrome, also known as Gorlin syndrome II, cardiocutaneous syndrome, lentiginosis profusa syndrome, Moynahan syndrome, was more recently coined as Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), inside the RASopathies. Historically, the acronym LEOPARD refers to the presence of distinctive clinical features such as: lentigines (L), electrocardiographic/conduction abnormalities (E), ocular hypertelorism (O), pulmonary stenosis (P), genital abnormalities (A), retardation of growth (R), and sensorineural deafness (D). This condition is identified in 85% of patients with phenotype hallmarks caused by presence a germline point mutation in PTPN11 gene. Association of melanoma to NSML seems to be rare: to our knowledge, two patients so far were reported in the literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with LEOPARD syndrome, in whom molecular investigation confirmed the presence of the c.1403C>T mutation in exon 12 of the PTPN11 gene, who developed four superficial spreading melanomas and three atypical lentiginous hyperplasias. Three of the melanomas were achromic or hypochromic, three were in situ, and one had a Breslow index under 0.5 mm. Dermoscopic examination showed some characteristic white structures in most of the lesions, which were a signature pattern and a key for the diagnosis.

  12. Social Media for Networking, Professional Development, and Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Merry Jennifer; Gentile, Danielle; Graham, David L

    2017-01-01

    Social media has become an established method of communication, and many physicians are finding these interactive tools and platforms to be useful for both personal and professional use. Risks of social media, or barriers to its use, include perceived lack of time, privacy concerns, and the risk of damage to one's reputation by unprofessional behavior. Of the social media platforms, Twitter has become favored by physicians and other health care professionals. Although one of the most obvious uses of social media is for rapid dissemination and receipt of information, oncologists are finding that social media is important for networking through blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. These platforms also have potential for providing opportunities for professional development, such as finding collaborators through networking, participation in Twitter journal clubs, and participating in online case-based tumor boards. Social media can also be used for patient engagement, such as through participation in tweet chats. There is emerging data that patient engagement through these platforms may lead to improvement in some health-related outcomes; however, data are sparse for oncology-specific outcomes. Efforts are underway to determine how to assess how social media engagement impacts health outcomes in oncology patients.

  13. Development of statewide geriatric patients trauma triage criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werman, Howard A; Erskine, Timothy; Caterino, Jeffrey; Riebe, Jane F; Valasek, Tricia

    2011-06-01

    The geriatric population is unique in the type of traumatic injuries sustained, physiological responses to those injuries, and an overall higher mortality when compared to younger adults. No published, evidence-based, geriatric-specific field destination criteria exist as part of a statewide trauma system. The Trauma Committee of the Ohio Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Board sought to develop specific criteria for geriatric trauma victims. A literature search was conducted for all relevant literature to determine potential, geriatric-specific, field-destination criteria. Data from the Ohio Trauma Registry were used to compare elderly patients, defined as age >70 years, to all patients between the ages of 16 to 69 years with regards to mortality risk in the following areas: (1) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score; (2) systolic blood pressure (SBP); (3) falls associated with head, chest, abdominal or spinal injury; (4) mechanism of injury; (5) involvement of more than one body system as defined in the Barell matrix; and (6) co-morbidities and motor vehicle collision with one or more long bone fracture. For GCS score and SBP, those cut-off points with equal or greater risk of mortality as compared to current values were chosen as proposed triage criteria. For other measures, any criterion demonstrating a statistically significant increase in mortality risk was included in the proposed criteria. The following criteria were identified as geriatric-specific criteria: (1) GCS score trauma; (2) SBP trauma. In addition, these data suggested that elderly patients with specific co-morbidities be given strong consideration for evaluation in a trauma center. The state of Ohio is the first state to develop evidence-based geriatric-specific field-destination criteria using data from its state-mandated trauma registry. Further analysis of these criteria will help determine their effects on over-triage and under-triage of geriatric victims of traumatic injuries and the impact on the

  14. Growth and Psychological Development in Postoperative Patients With Anterior Encephaloceles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Hemonta Kumar; Khangkeo, Chow Wachana; Baruah, Kaberi; Borbora, Debasish

    2017-06-01

    Anterior encephaloceles are rare malformations that are frequently associated with other brain anomalies. This study evaluates the growth and psychological development of children following encephalocele repair. Growth and psychological assessment was done in 24 children with only encephalocele (group I); nine children with encephalocele and hydrocephalus (group II); seven children with encephalocele, hydrocephalus, and secondary malformations (group III); and 40 apparently healthy control subjects. Psychological assessment was done by evaluating intelligence and temperament. Single-stage repair was performed in 38 children, and two underwent multistage repair. Major postoperative complications were noted in three individuals. The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 168 months, and during this time the growth velocity declined significantly among group II and group III patients when compared with control subjects. After adjusting the body mass index for age, our data revealed that group III participants had a significantly (P = 0.02) lower body mass index than the control group. Group III also had poor indices for intelligence quotient (P ≤ 0.01) and temperament (P ≤ 0.01). Female patients had lower temperament indices when compared with unaffected females with regard to approach withdrawal (P ≤ 0.01), mood (P = 0.026), and intensity (P = 0.03). Overall, increased disease severity adversely affected the psychological indices. Individuals with anterior encephalocele without associated intracranial defects had excellent postoperative outcomes in terms of growth and psychological developments. Hydrocephalus and agenesis of corpus callosum had the least impact on psychological development. However, the presence of secondary brain defects led to developmental delays. Gender differences in temperament may suggest a need for distinct treatment regimens to assess psychosocial well-being for males and females. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  16. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc., to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc., and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.. These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person′s job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  17. Developing VISO: Vaccine Information Statement Ontology for patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amith, Muhammad; Gong, Yang; Cunningham, Rachel; Boom, Julie; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    To construct a comprehensive vaccine information ontology that can support personal health information applications using patient-consumer lexicon, and lead to outcomes that can improve patient education. The authors composed the Vaccine Information Statement Ontology (VISO) using the web ontology language (OWL). We started with 6 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) documents collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website. Important and relevant selections from the documents were recorded, and knowledge triples were derived. Based on the collection of knowledge triples, the meta-level formalization of the vaccine information domain was developed. Relevant instances and their relationships were created to represent vaccine domain knowledge. The initial iteration of the VISO was realized, based on the 6 Vaccine Information Statements and coded into OWL2 with Protégé. The ontology consisted of 132 concepts (classes and subclasses) with 33 types of relationships between the concepts. The total number of instances from classes totaled at 460, along with 429 knowledge triples in total. Semiotic-based metric scoring was applied to evaluate quality of the ontology.

  18. The development and initial validation of a clinical tool for patients' preferences on patient participation--The 4Ps.

    OpenAIRE

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; Luhr, Kristina; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To report on the development and initial testing of a clinical tool, The Patient Preferences for Patient Participation tool (The 4Ps), which will allow patients to depict, prioritize, and evaluate their participation in health care. BACKGROUND: While patient participation is vital for high quality health care, a common definition incorporating all stakeholders' experience is pending. In order to support participation in health care, a tool for determining patients' preferences on partic...

  19. Concepts for the Development of a Customizable Checklist for Use by Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rohesh J; Shapiro, Fred E; Rosenberg, Noah M; Bader, Angela M; Urman, Richard D

    2015-06-10

    Checklists are tools that are developed to complete tasks by drawing on specific and relevant knowledge and supporting communication at critical times. If checklists were designed specifically for patient use, they could promote patient engagement, potentially leading to improved quality of care. Physicians of all specialties, nurses, patients, patient advocates, and administrators can take an active role in checklist development and dissemination. Our method to investigate concepts in developing a customizable patient checklist included a literature search concerning existing checklists and resources currently available to patients. Literature containing expert opinion regarding checklists, professional organization statements, and patients and providers were consulted. A template for designing a patient checklist was developed incorporating methods from previous literature and resources regarding checklists. This template includes a development, drafting, and validation phase. Sample content for inclusion in potential checklists for patients with diabetes and patients undergoing anesthesia was devised. Developed by physicians with input from patients and other involved health-care providers such as nurses, this relatively novel concept of a patient's checklist creates a role for the patient to ensure their own safety. With increasing attention to high-quality and cost-effective health care, patient satisfaction surveys will be assessed to rate overall health care. Further development of checklists will need to be guided by specific medical conditions and acceptance by patients and providers. Providers can use these checklists as a method to gauge a patient's understanding of an intervention, solidify the patient-doctor relationship, and improve patient safety.

  20. Communicating cancer treatment information using the Web: utilizing the patient's perspective in website development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopmans, W.; Damman, O.C.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Haasbeek, C.J.A.; Slotman, B.J.; Senan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Online cancer information can support patients in making treatment decisions. However, such information may not be adequately tailored to the patient's perspective, particularly if healthcare professionals do not sufficiently engage patient groups when developing online information. We

  1. Young breast cancer patients in the developing world: incidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African patients are more likely to be premenopausal at diagnosis and the ... of whether a patient had a mastectomy or breast conserving therapy. Breast conserving treat- ment is an option for treatment of breast cancer in a young patient given the ... family and society as a whole. ... breast cancer, from the perspective of.

  2. The development of the Patient Expectations of Shoulder Surgery survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; Haanstra, Tsjitske; Van't Riet, Esther; Lambers Heerspink, Okke F O; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient satisfaction after a surgical procedure is dependent on meeting preoperative expectations. There is currently no patient expectations survey available for patients undergoing shoulder surgery that is validated, reliable, and easy to use in daily practice. The aim of this study

  3. Patient understanding of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines: need for development of patient decision aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Summer V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to examine patients’ understanding of the revised screening mammogram guidelines released by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF in 2009 addressing age at initiation and frequency of screening mammography. Methods Patients from the Departments of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Obstetrics and Gynecology (n = 150 at a tertiary care medical center in the United States completed a survey regarding their understanding of the revised USPSTF guidelines following their release, within four to six months of their scheduled mammogram (March 2010 to May 2010. Results Of the patients surveyed, 97/147 (67% indicated increased confusion regarding the age and frequency of screening mammography, 61/148 (41% reported increased anxiety about mammograms, and 58/146 (40% reported anxiety about their own health status following the release of the revised screening guidelines. Most of the patients surveyed, 111/148 (75%, did not expect to change their timing or frequency of screening mammograms in the future. Conclusion Results from this survey suggested increased confusion and possibly an increase in patients’ anxiety related to screening mammography and their own health status following the release of the revised USPSTF screening mammogram guidelines to the public and subsequent media portrayal of the revised guidelines. Although the study did not specifically address causality for these findings, the results highlight the need for improvements in the communication of guidelines to patients and the public. Development of shared decision-making tools and outcomes should be considered to address the communication challenge.

  4. [Risk factors for development of hypomagnesemia in the burned patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Vega, Héctor César; Romero-Aviña, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez-Salgado, Jorge Eduardo; Silva-Díaz, Teresita; Ramos-Durón, Luis Ernesto; Carrera-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2004-01-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in the severely burned patient. There is little information with regard to the frequency and magnitude of hypomagnesemia, as well as on risk factors for this condition. We performed an observational, retrospective analysis of 35 burned patients treated at the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service at the Hospital Central Sur PEMEX, Mexico City. We determined serum magnesium behavior and divided patients into two groups: the first included 11 patients with burns and hypomagnesemia, and the second, 24 patients with burns but without hypomagnesemia. Risk factor identification was performed. We found patient at risk was the one with more than 40% of 2nd or 3rd degree total burned body area, in day 4 or 10 after the burn, and with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or both, and without intravenous (i.v.) supplementation of magnesium. The best way to prevent or avoid major complications is to identify the high-risk patient, or to diagnose earlier.

  5. Implementing incentivized practice to improve patient care in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Zia; Sanchez, Laura Rosemary; Alcantra, Jose Manuel; Shuaib, Waqas

    2014-01-01

    Faculty awards provide an incentive to encourage higher standards of personal performance, which closely reflects the quality of health care. We report the development and implementation of the first medical faculty award program in the region. Anonymous preaward survey evaluated responses to understand the overall state of our institution. Five awards were celebrated. An anonymous postaward survey gathered responses to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. A total of 60% (307/509) of preaward survey responses were collected. Among those, 92% (283/307) felt that employee recognition was important and 78% (240/307) felt that performance should be the deciding criteria for employee recognition. A 24% (20/85) of the faculty received the decade of excellence award and 13% (11/85) received the compassionate physician award. Best service award was granted to 7% (6/85) of the nominees. Postaward survey showed 68% (170/250) agreed that the award ceremony incentivized them to increase quality of personal performance. In summary, we feel that this transparent, objective, and peer-nominated awards program could serve as an incentivized model for health care providers to elevate the standards of personal performance, which in turn will benefit the advancement of patient care.

  6. The development and initial validation of a clinical tool for patients' preferences on patient participation--The 4Ps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; Luhr, Kristina; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2015-12-01

    To report on the development and initial testing of a clinical tool, The Patient Preferences for Patient Participation tool (The 4Ps), which will allow patients to depict, prioritize, and evaluate their participation in health care. While patient participation is vital for high quality health care, a common definition incorporating all stakeholders' experience is pending. In order to support participation in health care, a tool for determining patients' preferences on participation is proposed, including opportunities to evaluate participation while considering patient preferences. Exploratory mixed methods studies informed the development of the tool, and descriptive design guided its initial testing. The 4Ps tool was tested with 21 Swedish researcher experts (REs) and patient experts (PEs) with experience of patient participation. Individual Think Aloud interviews were employed to capture experiences of content, response process, and acceptability. 'The 4Ps' included three sections for the patient to depict, prioritize, and evaluate participation using 12 items corresponding to 'Having Dialogue', 'Sharing Knowledge', 'Planning', and 'Managing Self-care'. The REs and PEs considered 'The 4Ps' comprehensible, and that all items corresponded to the concept of patient participation. The tool was perceived to facilitate patient participation whilst requiring amendments to content and layout. A tool like The 4Ps provides opportunities for patients to depict participation, and thus supports communication and collaboration. Further patient evaluation is needed to understand the conditions for patient participation. While The 4Ps is promising, revision and testing in clinical practice is required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Increased risk of developing dementia in patients with major affective disorders compared to patients with other medical illnesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between affective disorder and subsequent dementia is unclear. Our aim was to investigate whether patients with unipolar or bipolar affective disorder have an increased risk of developing dementia compared to patients with other chronic illnesses. METHOD: By linkage...... of the psychiatric and somatic nation-wide registers of all hospitalised patients in Denmark, 2007 patients with mania, 11741 patients with depression, 81380 patients with osteoarthritis and 69149 patients with diabetes were identified according to diagnosis at first-ever discharge from a psychiatric or somatic...... hospital between 1 January 1977 and 31 December 1993. The risk of receiving a diagnosis of dementia on subsequent re-admission was estimated with the use of survival analyses. RESULTS: Patients with unipolar or bipolar affective disorder had a greater risk of receiving a diagnosis of dementia than patients...

  8. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  9. Wikis to facilitate patient participation in developing information leaflets: first experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Faber, M.J.; Knijnenburg, J.M.; Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although patients have gained a wealth of experienced based knowledge they are usually not involved in the development of patient information. We sought to determine the technical feasibility of wikis in generating dynamic patient information leaflets with participation from patients and

  10. Development and feasibility of a patient feedback programme to improve consultation skills in general practice training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.E.; Blankenstein, A.H.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Schleypen, H.; Schoonheim, P.L.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop an attractive and effective patient feedback training programme for general practice trainees (GPTs). Methods: First, an exploratory study was conducted in which patients and GPTs were interviewed after they had worked with patient feedback. This contributed to the development

  11. PatientVOICE: Development of a Preparatory, Pre-Chemotherapy Online Communication Tool for Older Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dulmen, Sandra; Driesenaar, Jeanine A; van Weert, Julia Cm; van Osch, Mara; Noordman, Janneke

    2017-05-10

    Good communication around cancer treatment is essential in helping patients cope with their disease and related care, especially when this information is tailored to one's needs. Despite its importance, communication is often complex, in particular in older patients (aged 65 years or older). In addition to the age-related deterioration in information and memory processing older patients experience, communication is also complicated by their required yet often unmet role of being an active, participatory patient. Older patients rarely express their informational needs and their contributions to consultations are often limited. Therefore, older patients with cancer need to be prepared to participate more actively in their care and treatment. The objective of this paper was to report the development of PatientVOICE, an online, preparatory tool with audio facility aimed to enhance the participation of older patients during educational nursing encounters preceding chemotherapy and to improve their information recall. PatientVOICE was developed by applying the following 6 steps of the intervention mapping framework that involved both patients and nurses: (1) needs assessment, (2) specifying determinants and change objectives, (3) reviewing and selecting theoretical methods and practical strategies, (4) developing intervention components, (5) designing adoption and implementation, and (6) making an evaluation plan. A careful execution of these consecutive steps resulted in the ready-to-use preparatory website. PatientVOICE provides pre-visit information about chemotherapy (ie, medical information, side effects, and recommendations of dealing with side effects), information about the educational nursing visit preceding chemotherapy (ie, aim, structure, and recommendations for preparation), techniques to improve patients' communication skills using a question prompt sheet (QPS) and video-modeling examples showing "best practices", and the opportunity to upload and listen

  12. Comparison of Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT between patients with delayed development and cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I.; Chun, K.; Won, K.; Lee, H.; Jang, S.; Lee, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: In previous study, thalamic or cerebellar hypoperfusion were reported in patients with cerebral palsy. This study was performed to evaluate cerebral perfusion abnormalities using Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT in patients with delayed motor development. Methods: Nineteen patients (9 boys, 10 girls, mean age 25.5 months) with delayed development underwent brain SPECT after injection of 185∼370 MBq of Tc-99m ECD. The imaging was obtained between 30 minutes and 1hr after injection. The patients were divided clinically as follows, patients with delayed development (n=5) and patients with cerebral palsy (n=14) who has delayed development and abnormal movement. The clinical subtypes of cerebral palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=5), spastic diplegia (n=6) and spastic hemiplegia (n=3). In each group, decrease of cerebral perfusion was evaluated visually as mild, moderate and severe and quantitation of cerebral perfusion after Lassen's correction was also obtained. Results: SPECT findings showed normal or mildly decreased thalamic perfusion in patients with delayed development and severe decrease of thalamic or cerebellar perfusion in patients with spastic quadriplegia. In patients with spastic diplegia, mild decrease of perfusion was observed in thalamus. In quantified data, thalamic perfusion was lowest in patients with spastic quadriplegia and highest in patients with delayed development, but there were no statistically significant differences. Conclusion: Brain SPECT with Tc-99m ECD has a role in the detection of perfusion abnormalities in patients with delayed development and cerebral palsy

  13. Disturbances of dental development distinguish patients with oligodontia-ectodermal dysplasia from isolated oligodontia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Dhamo (Brunilda); M.A.R. Kuijpers (Mette); Balk-Leurs, I. (I.); Boxum, C. (C.); E.B. Wolvius (Eppo); E.M. Ongkosuwito (Edwin)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractStructured Abstract: Objective: To investigate phenotypic differences in dental development between isolated oligodontia and oligodontia-ectodermal dysplasia (ED). Setting and sample population: A total of 129 patients diagnosed with isolated oligodontia and 22 patients with oligodontia

  14. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  15. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  16. A patient treated with olanzapine developing diabetes de novo : proposal for hyperglycaemia screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M. L.; Cohen, D.; van Oven, W.; Nieboer, P.

    2007-01-01

    We report a patient with schizophrenia who developed diabetes mellitus during treatment with olanzapine. The case confirms the pattern of atypical antipsychotic-related diabetic emergencies: rapid onset in relatively young patients, often with severe glucose derangements and serious complications.

  17. Antibody development in pediatric sickle cell patients undergoing erythrocytapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Gwendolyn J; Lockwood, William; Kong, Maiying; Bertolone, Salvatore; Raj, Ashok

    2010-12-01

    Erythrocytapheresis, or red blood cell exchange transfusion (RBCX), with donor red blood cell (RBC) units is now increasingly used in the treatment of acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). As in all transfusions, RCBX carries a risk of immunization against foreign antigen on transfused cells. However, by selecting donor units with RBC phenotypes similar to the patient, the risk of allo- and autoimmunization can be reduced. The formation of RBC alloantibodies and/or autoantibodies in 32 multitransfused pediatric SCD patients undergoing monthly RBCX over a 11-year period (12/1998 to 12/2009) was evaluated utilizing a retrospective patient chart review at Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. After starting C, E, K antigen-matched RBCX, the rate of clinically significant allo-immunization decreased from 0.189/100 to 0.053/100 U, with a relative risk of 27.9%. Likewise, the rate of autoimmunization decreased from 0.063/100 to 0.035/100 U, with a relative risk of 55.9%. After controlling for clinically insignificant antibodies, our auto- and alloimmunization rate was much less than previously reported values. In addition, the incidence of clinically significant allo- and autoimmunization decreased in our patient population after starting minor antigen-matched RBCX. These results suggest that by matching selected RBC phenotypes, there may be an association in the risk of allo- and autoimmunization of multi-transfused SCD patients.

  18. Development and pilot testing of a patient-participatory pressure ulcer prevention care bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Chaboyer, Wendy; Sykes, Mark; O'Brien, Jennifer; Brandis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study developed and piloted a patient-centered pressure ulcer prevention care bundle for adult hospitalized patients to promote patient participation in prevention. The care bundle had 3 core messages: (1) keep moving, (2) care for your skin, and (3) ensure a good diet. A brief video, combined brochure/checklist, and poster were developed as training resources. Patient evaluation identified benefits of the care bundle; however, the combined checklist/brochure was rarely used.

  19. Protocol: developing a conceptual framework of patient mediated knowledge translation, systematic review using a realist approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wiljer David; Webster Fiona; Brouwers Melissa C; Légaré France; Gagliardi Anna R; Badley Elizabeth; Straus Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Patient involvement in healthcare represents the means by which to achieve a healthcare system that is responsive to patient needs and values. Characterization and evaluation of strategies for involving patients in their healthcare may benefit from a knowledge translation (KT) approach. The purpose of this knowledge synthesis is to develop a conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions. Methods A preliminary conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interv...

  20. What do we know about developing patient portals? A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.T. Otte-Trojel (Eva Terese); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.G. Rundall (Thomas); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Numerous articles have reported on the development of patient portals, including development problems and solutions. We review these articles to inform future patient portal development efforts and to provide a summary of the evidence base that can guide future research.

  1. Development of the patient setting system for BNCT at JRR-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Torii, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A new treatment planning software: Computational Dosimetry System (JCDS) is in progress its development for BNCT with epithermal neutron beam in JAERI. Irradiation conditions such as beam angle to a patient are calculated by JCDS. In order to implement these conditions, it is necessary to precisely set the patient to actual irradiation position simulated by JCDS beforehand. Therefore, the Patient Setting System, which accurately and quickly sets the patient to the irradiation position, is being developed with JCDS concurrently. In this report, the current status of the development of JCDS and the Patient Setting System in JAERI will be described. (author)

  2. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Eugene F; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Rovers, Maroeska M; van Hasselt, Peter M

    2014-02-01

    The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases between January 1960 and December 2012. Studies that described patients with severe MTHFR deficiency who received betaine treatment. We identified 15 case reports and case series, totaling 36 patients. Data included the following: (1) families with 2 or more patients with severe MTHFR deficiency, of whom at least 1 received betaine, or (2) single patients with severe MTHFR deficiency treated with betaine. To define severe MTHFR deficiency, methionine, homocysteine, MTHFR enzyme activity in fibroblasts, or mutations (in the MTHFR gene) had to be described as well as the effect of treatment (survival and/or psychomotor development). We compared the outcome in treated vs untreated patients and early- vs late-treated patients. Sensitivity analysis was performed to address definition of early treatment. To further assess the impact of treatment on mortality, we performed a subanalysis in families with at least 1 untreated deceased patient. Survival and psychomotor development. Eleven of 36 patients (31%) died. All deaths occurred in patients who did not receive treatment or in patients in whom treatment was delayed. In contrast, all 5 early-treated patients survived. Subgroup analysis of patients with deceased siblings-their genotypically identical controls-revealed that betaine treatment prevented mortality (P = .002). In addition, psychomotor development in surviving patients treated with betaine was normal in all 5 early-treated patients but in none of the 19 surviving patients with delayed treatment (P psychomotor development in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency, highlighting the importance of timely recognition through newborn screening.

  3. Developing models for patient flow and daily surge capacity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, Brent R; Flottemesch, Thomas J; Gordon, Bradley D

    2006-11-01

    Between 1993 and 2003, visits to U.S. emergency departments (EDs) increased by 26%, to a total of 114 million visits annually. At the same time, the number of U.S. EDs decreased by more than 400, and almost 200,000 inpatient hospital beds were taken out of service. In this context, the adequacy of daily surge capacity within the system is clearly an important issue. However, the research agenda on surge capacity thus far has focused primarily on large-scale disasters, such as pandemic influenza or a serious bioterrorism event. The concept of daily surge capacity and its relationship to the broader research agenda on patient flow is a relatively new area of investigation. In this article, the authors begin by describing the overlap between the research agendas on daily surge capacity and patient flow. Next, they propose two models that have potential applications for both daily surge capacity and hospitalwide patient-flow research. Finally, they identify potential research questions that are based on applications of the proposed research models.

  4. Developing patient-centred care: an ethnographic study of patient perceptions and influence on quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renedo, Alicia; Marston, Cicely

    2015-04-23

    Understanding quality improvement from a patient perspective is important for delivering patient-centred care. Yet the ways patients define quality improvement remains unexplored with patients often excluded from improvement work. We examine how patients construct ideas of 'quality improvement' when collaborating with healthcare professionals in improvement work, and how they use these understandings when attempting to improve the quality of their local services. We used in-depth interviews with 23 'patient participants' (patients involved in quality improvement work) and observations in several sites in London as part of a four-year ethnographic study of patient and public involvement (PPI) activities run by Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Northwest London. We took an iterative, thematic and discursive analytical approach. When patient participants tried to influence quality improvement or discussed different dimensions of quality improvement their accounts and actions frequently started with talk about improvement as dependent on collective action (e.g. multidisciplinary healthcare professionals and the public), but usually quickly shifted away from that towards a neoliberal discourse emphasising the role of individual patients. Neoliberal ideals about individual responsibility were taken up in their accounts moving them away from the idea of state and healthcare providers being held accountable for upholding patients' rights to quality care, and towards the idea of citizens needing to work on self-improvement. Participants portrayed themselves as governed by self-discipline and personal effort in their PPI work, and in doing so provided examples of how neoliberal appeals for self-regulation and self-determination also permeated their own identity positions. When including patient voices in measuring and defining 'quality', governments and public health practitioners should be aware of how neoliberal rationalities at the

  5. Bone marrow transplantation in patients with storage diseases: a developing country experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Marcos C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is a therapeutic option for patients with genetic storage diseases. Between 1979 and 2002, eight patients, four females and four males (1 to 13 years old were submitted to this procedure in our center. Six patients had mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS I in 3; MPS III in one and MPS VI in 2, one had adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and one had Gaucher disease. Five patients had related and three unrelated BMT donor. Three patients developed graft versus host disease (two MPS I and one MPS VI and died between 37 and 151 days after transplantation. Five patients survived 4 to 16 years after transplantation. Three patients improved (one MPS I; one MPS VI and the Gaucher disease patient, one patient had no disease progression (ALD and in one patient this procedure did not change the natural course of the disease (MPS III.

  6. Development and validation of a patient-reported questionnaire assessing systemic therapy induced diarrhea in oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Michelle; Gallo-Hershberg, Daniela; DeAngelis, Carlo

    2017-12-22

    Systemic therapy-induced diarrhea (STID) is a common side effect experienced by more than half of cancer patients. Despite STID-associated complications and poorer quality of life (QoL), no validated assessment tools exist to accurately assess STID occurrence and severity to guide clinical management. Therefore, we developed and validated a patient-reported questionnaire (STIDAT). The STIDAT was developed using the FDA iterative process for patient-reported outcomes. A literature search uncovered potential items and questions for questionnaire construction used by oncology clinicians to develop questions for the preliminary instrument. The instrument was evaluated on its face validity and content validity by patient interviews. Repetitive, similar and different themes uncovered from patient interviews were implemented to revise the instrument to the version used for validation. Patients starting high-risk STID treatments were monitored using the STIDAT, bowel diaries and EORTC QLQ-C30. The STIDAT was evaluated for construct validity using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using minimal residual method with Promax rotation, reliability and consistency. A weighted scoring system was developed and a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve evaluated the tool's ability to detect STID occurrence. Median scores and variability were analysed to determine how well it differentiates between diarrhea severities. A post-hoc analysis determined how diarrhea severity impacted QoL of cancer patients. Patients defined diarrhea based on presence of watery stool. The STIDAT assessed patient's perception of having diarrhea, daily number of bowel movements, daily number of diarrhea episodes, antidiarrheal medication use, the presence of urgency, abdominal pain, abdominal spasms or fecal incontinence, patient's perception of diarrhea severity, and QoL. These dimensions were sorted into four clusters using EFA - patient's perception of diarrhea, frequency of diarrhea, fecal

  7. Suicide Risk Response: Enhancing Patient Safety Through Development of Effective Institutional Policies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Laura; Felker, Bradford; Chaney, Edmund; Vollen, Karen; Berry, Karen; Revay, Barbara; Simon, Barbara; Kofoed, Lial; Ober, Scott; Worley, Linda

    2004-01-01

    A suicidal patient requires a prompt, coordinated intervention. In this paper, we describe a process for developing a suicidality policy, which may help clinics develop effective, locally adapted policies...

  8. Development of Information System for Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate undergoing Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augsornwan, Darawan; Pattangtanang, Pantamanas; Surakunprapha, Palakorn

    2015-08-01

    Srinagarind Hospital has 150-200 patients with cleft lip and palate each year. When patients are admitted to hospital for surgery patients and family feel they are in a crisis of life, they feel fear anxiety and need to know about how to take care of wound, they worry if patient will feel pain, how to feed patients and many things about patients. Information is very important for patients/family to prevent complications and help their decision process, decrease parents stress and encourage better co-operation. To develop information system for patients with cleft lip-palate undergoing operation. This is an action research divided into 3 phases. Phase 1 Situation review: in this phase we interview, nursing care observation, and review nursing documents about the information giving. Phase 2 Develop information system: focus groups, for discussion about what nurses can do to develop the system to give information to patients/parents. Phase 3 evaluation: by interviewing 61 parents using the structure questionnaire. 100 percent of patients/parents received information but some items were not received. Patients/parents satisfaction was 94.9 percent, no complications. The information system development provides optimal care for patients and family with cleft lip and palate, but needs to improve some techniques or tools to give more information and evaluate further the nursing outcome after.

  9. Development and Validation of Simulated Virtual Patients to Impart Early Clinical Exposure in Endocrine Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akriti; Singh, Satendra; Khaliq, Farah; Dhaliwal, Upreet; Madhu, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    In the country presently, preclinical medical students are not routinely exposed to real patients. Thus, when they start clinical postings, they are found to have poor clinical reasoning skills. Simulated virtual patients (SVPs) can improve clinical skills without endangering real patients. This pilot study describes the development of two SVPs in…

  10. Development of patient centric virtual organizations (PCVOs) in clinical environment for patient information management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohyuddin; Gray, W A; Bailey, Hazel; Jones, Wendy; Morrey, David

    2007-01-01

    A novel Virtual Organization framework which incorporates wireless technology support is presented in the research work. The Virtual Organization is designed for a clinical environment to provide better patient information management and enhanced collaborative working of multidisciplinary care teams. The analysis studies the current clinical practices and looks at the general patient information resource structure currently in use for patient care. Based on this problem analysis and current requirements of the multi-disciplinary care team members, we propose a generic and sustainable Patient Centric Virtual Organization (PCVO) framework to complement the functionality of the existing infrastructure by incorporating wireless technologies support for improved patient information provision at the point of care. The preliminary results of the study identify and classify the specific point of care tasks suited to appropriate information resources needed by the care team members. This paper concentrates on the patient information management aspects brought in by incorporating wireless technologies at the point of care using patient information resources in a decentralized and distributed computing environment. This applied research is carried out in the secondary and tertiary care sector in the cancer domain. For the analysis and results of the pilot project, we have used a case study of a local NHS Cancer Hospital.

  11. Unsightly urban menaces and the rescaling of residential segregation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, James

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author uses a slum clearance project in Lexington, Kentucky, as a lens through which to examine the spatial dynamics of racial residential segregation during the first half of the twentieth century. At the time, urban migration and upward socioeconomic mobility on the part of African Americans destabilized extant residential segregation patterns. Amid this instability, various spatial practices were employed in the interest of maintaining white social and economic supremacy. The author argues that such practices were indicative of a thoroughgoing reinvention of urban socio-spatial order that in turn precipitated the vastly expanded scale of residential segregation still found in U.S. cities today. Evidence of this reinvented ordering of urban space lies in the rendering of some long-standing African American neighborhoods as “out of place” within it and the use of slum clearance to remove the “menace” such neighborhoods posed to it.

  12. Patient perspective workshop: moving towards OMERACT guidelines for choosing or developing instruments to measure patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, John R; Fries, James F; Hewlett, Sarah E; Osborne, Richard H; Newman, Stanton; Ciciriello, Sabina; van de Laar, Mart A; Dures, Emma; Minnock, Patricia; Heiberg, Turid; Sanderson, Tessa C; Flurey, Caroline A; Leong, Amy L; Montie, Pamela; Richards, Pam

    2011-08-01

    The workshop Choosing or Developing Instruments held at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 10 meeting was designed to help participants think about the underlying methods of instrument development. Conference pre-reading material and 3 brief introductory presentations elaborated the issues, and participants broke into discussion groups before reconvening to share insights, engage in a more general discussion of the issues, and vote on recommendations. Tradeoffs between using current imperfect measures and the long and complex process of developing new instruments were considered, together with the need for rigor in patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument development. The main considerations for PRO instrument development were listed and a research agenda for action produced. As part of the agenda for action, it is recommended that researchers and patient partners work together to tackle these issues, and that OMERACT bring forward proposals for acceptable instrument development protocols that would meet an enhanced "Truth" statement in the OMERACT Filter.

  13. SMARCB1 involvement in the development of leiomyoma in a patient with schwannomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, Theo J. M.; Kenter, Susan; Siebers-Renelt, Ulrike; Hans, Volkmar; Wesseling, Pieter; Flucke, Uta

    2014-01-01

    Germline SMARCB1 mutations predispose in schwannomatosis patients to the development of multiple benign schwannomas and, in some cases, meningiomas. Here, we report on a 34-year-old female patient who developed multiple schwannomas at various locations and in addition a leiomyoma of the cervix

  14. SMARCB1 Involvement in the Development of Leiomyoma in a Patient With Schwannomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T.J.M.; Kenter, S.; Siebers-Renelt, U.; Hans, V.; Wesseling, P.; Flucke, U.E.

    2014-01-01

    Germline SMARCB1 mutations predispose in schwannomatosis patients to the development of multiple benign schwannomas and, in some cases, meningiomas. Here, we report on a 34-year-old female patient who developed multiple schwannomas at various locations and in addition a leiomyoma of the cervix

  15. Challenges of tracheostomy in patients managed for severe tetanus in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayotunde James Fasunla

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: Tetanus is still a major health problem in develop-ing countries and this can be prevented if recommended childhood tetanus vaccination and booster shots regimen are properly taken. Although, tracheostomy is associated with complications in severe tetanus patients, these patients would have all died of cardio-respiratory failure if tracheostomy had not been performed.

  16. Assessment of readiness to change in patients with osteoarthritis. Development and application of a new questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, PHTG; de Bie, RA; Dijkstra, A; Aretz, K; Vlaeyen, JW; Schouten, HJA; Hopman-Rock, M; van Weel, C; van Schayck, CP; van Schayk, O.C P

    Objective: To develop a self- report measure for assessment of the stage of change in patients with osteoarthritis, in order to identify patients who would benefit from a self- management programme. Methods: According to the ' stages of change' model a questionnaire was developed with three groups

  17. Why consider patients' preferences? A discourse analysis of clinical practice guideline developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Antoine; Green, Judith; van der Meulen, Jan; Légaré, France; Nolte, Ellen

    2009-08-01

    Several organizations are advocating for patients' preferences to be considered in clinical practice guideline development and implementation. However, lack of agreement on the goal and meaning of this policy curtails evaluation and development of patient involvement programs. To describe guideline developers' discourses on the goal of considering patients' preferences. Qualitative study using discourse analysis. 18 participants (patients, health professionals, and public health experts) from 2 groups of British guideline developers. Template analysis of semi-structured individual interviews was strengthened by active search for deviant cases, team debriefing, and member checking. All respondents supported the idea of taking account of patients' preferences in guidelines. Divergences with the goal and meaning of considering preferences were structured in 4 discourses: (1) The Governance discourse constructs guideline development as a rational process of synthesizing population data-including evidence on patients' preferences-to maximize public health within the constraints of available resources; (2) the Informed Decision discourse aims at fostering patients' choice by providing tailored information on the risks and benefits of interventions; (3) the Professional Care discourse insists on basing professionals' recommendations on the individual characteristics of patients; (4) The Consumer Advocacy discourse argues for greater political power and influence over guideline development and clinical decision making. The identified discourses provide a set of hypothesis on how patient involvement programs are expected to work, which could help clarify the goals pursued by guideline organizations and anchor further evaluation efforts.

  18. [Development and short-term effects of a standardized patient education program for in-patient cardiologic rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekatz, B; Haug, G; Mosler, G; Schwaab, B; Altstidl, R; Worringen, U; Faller, H; Meng, K

    2013-10-01

    Patient education is an essential part in the treatment of coronary heart disease in medical rehabilitation. In the German-speaking area, no standardized and evaluated patient education program for coronary heart disease is available so far. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of a quality assured patient education program based on a health-education program of the German statutory pension insurance scheme. In a multi-level approach, an existing program was modified concerning treatment evidence, practical guidelines, theories of health and illness behavior and quality criteria for patient education as well as clinical experience and thereafter manualized. In a formative evaluation, feasibility and patient acceptance of this modified program were assessed using evaluation questionnaires of patients and trainers. Afterwards, effects of the patient education program as compared to a traditional education program were assessed on a short-term (at discharge), medium-term (6-month follow-up) and long-term (12-month follow-up) basis in a multicenter quasi-experimental control group study of patients with coronary heart disease (n=434). Results of the formative evaluation demonstrate an overall good acceptance and a good feasibility of the manualized program. Short-term results show a significant small treatment effect in the primary outcome variable patients' knowledge (p=0.001, η2 =0.028). Furthermore, small effects were also observed among some secondary outcomes, such as attitude towards medication, planning of physical activity, psychological quality of life and satisfaction with the education program. A standardized education program for patients with coronary heart disease has been developed in a systematic process based on established quality standards. Depending on the outstanding medium and long-term effects, the program may be recommended for general use in medical rehabilitation. The manual provides the prerequisites allowing for a successful

  19. [Aeromedical evacuation of critically ill patients in developing countries A retrospective study on 244 patients in Djibouti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, J; Loheas, D; Benois, A

    2015-01-01

    The pratice of intensive care in Africa is marked by a wide variety of health care delivery. Only a few centers offer specialized intensive care units, as cardiac or neurological units. That may explain the need for aeromedical evacuations for patients whose condition exceeds local capacity. Our objective was to assess whether the proportion of patients admitted to intensive care and evacuated had increased between 1997 and 2013 in a developing country, Djibouti. We examined the activity register of Bouffard Hospital intensive care unit in Djibouti to determine the number and characteristics of patients evacuated by air ambulance during a 16 years period. From January 1997 to December 2013, a total of 244 patients were evacuated. The evacuation rate was 5.74ù of the patients admitted to the entire duration of the study. The rate of patients evacuated was not different between 1997 and 2013 (5,69ù versus 8,33ù respectively, p = 0,269). However, the rate of djiboutian evacuated patients was statistically different between 1997 and 2013 (0,96ù versus 4,46ù, p = 0,02). The main causes were severe trauma injuries, cardiovascular diseases and neurological diseases. The aeromedical evacuation of a critically ill patient in a developing country is a process requiring heavy logistics and depending on the medical skills available in the area, and financial resources that can be implemented for the patient. Our study shows that medical evacuations in favor of Djiboutian patients are marginal but are increasing over the past decade.

  20. Incidence of and risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yujin; Kamisawa, Terumi; Anjiki, Hajime; Takuma, Kensuke; Egawa, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer sometimes occurs during the course of chronic pancreatitis. This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer associated with chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of pancreatic cancer developing in 218 patients with chronic pancreatitis and clinical features of the chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer were studied. Nine patients developed pancreatic cancer. Average period from the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was 9.6 years. All pancreatic cancers were diagnosed at an advanced stage. Only 2 patients had been followed-up periodically. There were no significant differences between chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer and those who did not in male/female ratio (3.5 vs. 8), average age on diagnosis (65.0 vs. 56.5), alcoholic/non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (1.6 vs. 2.6), smoking habits (62.5% vs. 70.7%), diabetes mellitus (77.8% vs. 54.4%), and continued alcohol drinking (37.5% vs. 53.1%). Over the period examined, 4% of chronic pancreatitis patients developed pancreatic cancer. Sex ratio, onset age, etiology, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, and continued alcohol drinking were not significant risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis patients. Periodic follow-up due to the possibility of pancreatic cancer is necessary in chronic pancreatitis patients.

  1. Lessons Learned from Developing a Patient Engagement Panel: An OCHIN Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkind, Jill; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Warren, Nate; Dickerson, Kay; Robbins, Lynn; Norman, Kathy; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    There is renewed interest in patient engagement in clinical and research settings, creating a need for documenting and publishing lessons learned from efforts to meaningfully engage patients. This article describes early lessons learned from the development of OCHIN's Patient Engagement Panel (PEP). OCHIN supports a national network of more than 300 community health centers (CHCs) and other primary care settings that serve over 1.5 million patients annually across nearly 20 states. The PEP was conceived in 2009 to harness the CHC tradition of patient engagement in this new era of patient-centered outcomes research and to ensure that patients were engaged throughout the life cycle of our research projects, from conception to dissemination. Developed by clinicians and researchers within our practice-based research network, recruitment of patients to serve as PEP members began in early 2012. The PEP currently has a membership of 18 patients from 3 states. Over the past 24 months, the PEP has been involved with 12 projects. We describe developing the PEP and challenges and lessons learned (eg, recruitment, funding model, creating value for patient partners, compensation). These lessons learned are relevant not only for research but also for patient engagement in quality improvement efforts and other clinical initiatives. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  2. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osibogun Akin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in a subsidized insurance plan in Nigeria and to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness in patients at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods/Design Design: The study has two parts. Part 1 will develop a cardiovascular health education program, using qualitative interviews with stakeholders. Part 2 will evaluate the effectiveness of the program in patients, using a prospective (pre-post observational design. Setting: A rural primary health center in Kwara State, Nigeria. Population: For part 1: 40 patients, 10 healthcare professionals, and 5 insurance managers. For part 2: 150 patients with uncontrolled hypertension or other cardiovascular risk factors after one year of treatment. Intervention: Part 2: patient-centered cardiovascular health education program. Measurements: Part 1: Semi-structured interviews to identify stakeholder perspectives. Part 2: Pre- and post-intervention assessments including patients' demographic and socioeconomic data, blood pressure, body mass index and self-reporting measures on medication adherence and perception of care. Feasibility of the intervention will be measured using process data. Outcomes: For program development (part 1: overview of healthcare professionals' perceptions on barriers and facilitators to care, protocol for patient education, and protocol implementation plan. For program evaluation (part 2: changes in patients' scores on adherence to medication and life style changes, blood pressure, and other physiological and self

  3. Added value of involving patients in the first step of multidisciplinary guideline development: a qualitative interview study among infertile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Breejen, Elvira M E; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Galama, Wienke H; Willemsen, Wim N P; Kremer, Jan A M; Nelen, Willianne L D M

    2016-06-01

    Patient involvement in scoping the guideline is emphasized, but published initiatives actively involving patients are generally limited to the writing and reviewing phase. To assess patients' added value to the scoping phase of a multidisciplinary guideline on infertility. Qualitative interview study. We conducted interviews among 12 infertile couples and 17 professionals. We listed and compared the couples' and professionals' key clinical issues (=care aspects that need improvement) to be addressed in the guideline according to four domains: current guidelines, professionals, patients and organization of care. Main key clinical issues suggested by more than three quarters of the infertile couples and/or at least two professionals were identified and compared. Overall, we identified 32 key clinical issues among infertile couples and 23 among professionals. Of the defined main key clinical issues, infertile couples mentioned eight issues that were not mentioned by the professionals. These main key clinical issues mainly concerned patient-centred (e.g. poor information provision and poor alignment of care) aspects of care on the professional and organizational domain. Both groups mentioned two main key clinical issues collectively that were interpreted differently: the lack of emotional support and respect for patients' values. Including patients from the first phase of the guideline development process leads to valuable additional main key clinical issues for the next step of a multidisciplinary guideline development process and broadens the scope of the guideline, particularly regarding patient-centredness and organizational issues from a patients' perspective. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  4. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  5. Iron metabolism in critically ill patients developing anemia of inflammation: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshuizen, Margit; Binnekade, Jan M; Nota, Benjamin; van de Groep, Kirsten; Cremer, Olaf L; Tuinman, Pieter R; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; van Bruggen, Robin; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2018-05-02

    Anemia occurring as a result of inflammatory processes (anemia of inflammation, AI) has a high prevalence in critically ill patients. Knowledge on changes in iron metabolism during the course of AI is limited, hampering the development of strategies to counteract AI. This case control study aimed to investigate iron metabolism during the development of AI in critically ill patients. Iron metabolism in 30 patients who developed AI during ICU stay was compared with 30 septic patients with a high Hb and 30 non-septic patients with a high Hb. Patients were matched on age and sex. Longitudinally collected plasma samples were analyzed for levels of parameters of iron metabolism. A linear mixed model was used to assess the predictive values of the parameters. In patients with AI, levels of iron, transferrin and transferrin saturation showed an early decrease compared to controls with a high Hb, already prior to the development of anemia. Ferritin, hepcidin and IL-6 levels were increased in AI compared to controls. During AI development, erythroferrone decreased. Differences in iron metabolism between groups were not influenced by APACHE IV score. The results show that in critically ill patients with AI, iron metabolism is already altered prior to the development of anemia. Levels of iron regulators in AI differ from septic controls with a high Hb, irrespective of disease severity. AI is characterized by high levels of hepcidin, ferritin and IL-6 and low levels of iron, transferrin and erythroferrone.

  6. Trust Development With the Spanish-Speaking Mexican American Patient: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon M

    2018-06-01

    Interpersonal trust between patient and nurse is important in patient-centered care. Trust development may be more difficult if the patient and nurse do not speak the same language. In this grounded theory study, Spanish-speaking Mexican American adults ( n = 20) hospitalized on a medical-surgical or obstetric unit in the Midwestern United States were interviewed. Through data analysis, a model of how trust develops between nurse and patient revealed eight categories and the core category Caring for Me Well Even When Not Understanding Me. The beginning phase had four categories: Asking for Help, Bothering, Communicating, and Understanding. The middle phase had two categories: Platicando (chatting) and Being Available. The end point category was Having Trust, and outcomes were Feeling Comfortable and Feeling Supported. The language barrier was a hindrance to trust development but the nurse's way of being (personality) was more important. Therefore, the patient did develop trust with nurses who did not speak Spanish.

  7. Development and validation of a multilateral index to determine economic status in developing countries: the Patient Financial Eligibility Tool (PFET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Joseph; Audureau, Etienne; Bizé, Marion; Koloshuk, Barbara; Ladner, Joël

    2013-04-01

    The objective was to develop and validate a multilateral index to determine patient ability to pay for medication in low- and middle-income countries. Primary data were collected in 2009 from 117 cancer patients in China, India, Thailand, and Malaysia. The initial tool included income, expenditures, and assets-based items using ad hoc determined brackets. Principal components analysis was performed to determine final weights. Agreement (Kappa) was measured between results from the final tool and from an Impact Survey (IS) conducted after beginning drug therapy to quantify a patient's actual ability to pay in terms of number of drug cycles per year. The authors present the step-by-step methodology employed to develop the tool on a country-by-country basis. Overall Cronbach value was 0.84. Agreement between the Patient Financial Eligibility Tool (PFET) and IS was perfect (equal number of drug cycles) for 58.1% of patients, fair (1 cycle difference) for 29.1%, and poor (>1 cycle) for 12.8%. Overall Kappa was 0.76 (Ptool for determining an individual's ability to pay for medication. Combined with tiered models for patient participation in the cost of medication, it could help to increase access to high-priced products in developing countries.

  8. Development of an inter-professional screening instrument for cancer patients' education process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaartio-Rajalin, Heli; Huumonen, Tuula; Iire, Liisa; Jekunen, Antti; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Minn, Heikki; Paloniemi, Jenni; Zabalegui, Adelaida

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of an inter-professional screening instrument for cancer patients' cognitive resources, knowledge expectations and inter-professional collaboration within patient education. Four empirical datasets during 2012-2014 were analyzed in order to identify main categories, subcategories and items for inter-professional screening instrument. Our inter-professional screening instrument integrates the critical moments of cancer patient education and the knowledge expectation types obtained from patient datasets to assessment of patients' cognitive resources, knowledge expectations and comprehension; and intra; and inter-professional. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient experiences with oily skin: The qualitative development of content for two new patient reported outcome questionnaires

    OpenAIRE

    Arbuckle, Robert; Atkinson, Mark J; Clark, Marci; Abetz, Linda; Lohs, Jan; Kuhagen, Ilka; Harness, Jane; Draelos, Zoe; Thiboutot, Diane; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Copley-Merriman, Kati

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop the content for two new patient reported outcome (PRO) measures to: a) assess the severity of symptoms; and b) the impact of facial skin oiliness on emotional wellbeing using qualitative data from face to face, and internet focus groups in Germany and the US. Methods Using input from initial treatment satisfaction focus groups (n = 42), a review of relevant literature and expert clinicians (n = 3), a discussion guide was developed to guide qualitative inquiry usi...

  10. Development of patient support devices for execution of clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper illustrates our attempt to design and test the reproducibility of low-cost patient positioning devices prepared in-house in our radiotherapy department. Rigid thermocole boards with angulations, scales and support were designed as breast, pelvis and head positioning devices. Reproducibility and accuracy were tested by serial electronic portal imaging detector imaging. The positioning devices (with or without superimposed moulds showed variations within 2-3 mm on serial treatment days which were within acceptable limits. It is therefore concluded that low-cost patient positioning devices for head, breast and pelvis (the common sites of treatments in radiotherapy can be fabricated from available materials in-house. These have been shown to be resulting in accurate immobilization, can be customized for particular techniques and are considerably cheaper than commercially available solutions.

  11. Developing a complex intervention for the outpatient management of incidentally diagnosed pulmonary embolism in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, June; Bozas, George; Stephens, Andrew; Johnson, Miriam; Avery, Ged; O'Toole, Lorcan; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2013-06-27

    Most patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) spend 5-7 days in hospital even though only 4.5% will develop serious complications during this time. In particular, the group of patients with incidentally diagnosed PE (i-PE) includes many patients with low risk features potentially ideal for outpatient management; however the evidence for their optimal management is lacking hence relative practices may vary considerably. We describe the development process, components, links and function of a nurse-led service for the management of patients with i-PE, developed in accordance to the UK Medical Research Council complex intervention guidance. Phase 0 (Theoretical underpinning): The Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) was selected for patient risk assessment and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for the management of PE in cancer patients (2007) was selected as quality measure. Historical registry and audit data from our centre regarding i-PE incidence and management for the period between 2006 and 2009 illustrating the then current practices were reviewed. Phase 1 (Modelling): Modelling of the pathway included the following: a) Identification of training needs, planning and implementation of training schemes and development of transferable competencies and training materials. b) Mapping patient pathways and flow and c) Production of key documentation and Standard Operating Procedures for the delivery of the service. Phase 2 (Implementation and testing of the intervention): During the initial 12 months of implementation, remedial action was taken to address identified deficiencies regarding patient referral to the pathway, compliance with treatment protocol, patient follow up, selection challenges from the use of PESI in cancer patients and challenges regarding the "first-pass" identification of i-PE. We have developed and piloted a complex intervention to manage cancer patients with incidental PE in an outpatient setting. Adherence to evidence

  12. Culture and Process Change as a Priority for Patient Engagement in Medicines Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Marc; Dewulf, Lode; Hoos, Anton; Geissler, Jan; Todaro, Veronica; Schneider, Roslyn F; Garzya, Vincenzo; Garvey, Andrew; Robinson, Paul; Saffer, Tonya; Krug, Sarah; Sargeant, Ify

    2017-01-01

    Patient Focused Medicines Development (PFMD) is a not-for-profit independent multinational coalition of patients, patient stakeholders, and the pharmaceutical industry with interests across diverse disease areas and conditions. PFMD aims to facilitate an integrated approach to medicines development with all stakeholders involved early in the development process. A key strength of the coalition that differentiates it from other groups that involve patients or patient groups is that PFMD has patient organizations as founding members, ensuring that the patient perspective is the starting point when identifying priorities and developing solutions to meet patients' needs. In addition, PFMD has from inception been formed as an equal collaboration among patient groups, patients, and pharmaceutical industry and has adopted a unique trans-Atlantic setup and scope that reflects its global intent. This parity extends to its governance model, which ensures at least equal or greater share of voice for patient group members. PFMD is actively inviting additional members and aims to expand the collaboration to include stakeholders from other sectors. The establishment of PFMD is particularly timely as patient engagement (PE) has become a priority for many health stakeholders and has led to a surge of mostly disconnected activities to deliver this. Given the current plethora of PE initiatives, an essential first step has been to determine, based on a comprehensive mapping, those strategic areas of most need requiring a focused initial effort from the perspective of all stakeholders. PFMD has identified four priority areas that will need to be addressed to facilitate implementation of PE. These are (1) culture and process change, (2) development of a global meta-framework for PE, (3) information exchange, and (4) training. This article discusses these priority themes and ongoing or planned PFMD activities within each.

  13. Development of sterilized porridge for patients by combined treatment of food technology with radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaehun; Choi, Jongil; Song, Beomseok

    2010-09-01

    This research was conducted to develop patient foods of high quality using a radiation fusion technology with food processing. Radiation technique to increase calorie of porridge was established, and it was investigated that radiation effects on functional materials, which can could be added to increase functionality of patient foods. Moreover, sterilized semi-fluid meal (milk porridge) for patients with higher calorie was developed by a sterilization process by gamma irradiation, combined treatments to improve the sensory qualities, and fortification with various nutrients. Also, sensory survey on irradiated commercial patient foods was performed to find the problems and improvement points of the developed products. Optimal packaging material was selected by evaluation of effect of irradiation in packaging materials and a convenient package for consuming by patients was decided. Safety of the irradiated milk porridge was confirmed by in-vivo genotoxicological test, and its nutritional composition for patients was evaluated by nutritional analysis. Finally, the milk porridge was developed as liquid, dried, powdered, and pellet type products. This research may contribute to improve life quality of patients by supplement of various foods with high quality to immuno-compromised patients. Furthermore, economic profits and technological advances are expected by commercialization of the patient foods

  14. Development of sterilized porridge for patients by combined treatment of food technology with radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaehun; Choi, Jongil; Song, Beomseok; and others

    2010-09-15

    This research was conducted to develop patient foods of high quality using a radiation fusion technology with food processing. Radiation technique to increase calorie of porridge was established, and it was investigated that radiation effects on functional materials, which can could be added to increase functionality of patient foods. Moreover, sterilized semi-fluid meal (milk porridge) for patients with higher calorie was developed by a sterilization process by gamma irradiation, combined treatments to improve the sensory qualities, and fortification with various nutrients. Also, sensory survey on irradiated commercial patient foods was performed to find the problems and improvement points of the developed products. Optimal packaging material was selected by evaluation of effect of irradiation in packaging materials and a convenient package for consuming by patients was decided. Safety of the irradiated milk porridge was confirmed by in-vivo genotoxicological test, and its nutritional composition for patients was evaluated by nutritional analysis. Finally, the milk porridge was developed as liquid, dried, powdered, and pellet type products. This research may contribute to improve life quality of patients by supplement of various foods with high quality to immuno-compromised patients. Furthermore, economic profits and technological advances are expected by commercialization of the patient foods.

  15. Development of smartphone educational application for patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Jung; Sim, Jae Lan; Hwang, Seon Young

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to develop a smartphone application (app) as an educational learning instrument for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and to assess the users' level of satisfaction. This methodological research involves elicited learning content for CAD patients to develop a learning instrument using the smartphone app. The app was developed according to the steps of Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation, which is a systematic instructional design model. The levels of satisfaction with the developed smartphone app among 30 outpatients with CAD were assessed via a questionnaire during their visits to a cardiology outpatient department. A smartphone app 'Strong Heart' was developed through reviewing the literature associated with education for CAD patients under professional supervision and searching for medical smartphone apps that are already available. The learning contents include six main sections containing essential learning issues in managing CAD and additional information to attract the user's attention, such as patient cases and quizzes. After modification with feedback from experts, the app was finally developed and evaluated by patients who reported that they were satisfied with the usefulness of the app. The developed smartphone app is available on both the iPhone App Store and the Android Play Store. Patients with CAD may utilize the app for supporting educational material without limitations of time and space.

  16. Serum thyroid auto-antibody contents in GD patients developing hypothyroidism after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Huiling; Sun Lijuan; Ji Xiaopeng; Zhao Ming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the auto-immune factors predisposing to developing hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment in patients with Graves' disease (GD). Methods: Eighty-eight GD patients treated with 131 I were followed for three years. These patients were of two groups: Group A (n=35), serum TGA, TMA, TRAb all positive before treatment; Group B (n=53) serum TGA, TMA negative but TRAb positive. Results: In Group A, 31.40% (n=11) of all the patients were hypothyroid three years after treatment. The result was much better in Group B, with only 3.8% (n=2) being hypothyroid. The difference was significant. Conclusion: GD patients with positive TGA, TMA were liable to develop hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment. Those patients should be treated with lesser amount of the drug accordingly

  17. Risk of Gonadoblastoma Development in Patients with Turner Syndrome with Cryptic Y Chromosome Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ahreum; Hyun, Sei Eun; Jung, Mo Kyung; Chae, Hyun Wook; Lee, Woo Jung; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2017-06-01

    Current guidelines recommend that testing for Y chromosome material should be performed only in patients with Turner syndrome harboring a marker chromosome and exhibiting virilization in order to detect individuals who are at high risk of gonadoblastoma. However, cryptic Y chromosome material is suggested to be a risk factor for gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome. Here, we aimed to estimate the frequency of cryptic Y chromosome material in patients with Turner syndrome and determine whether Y chromosome material increased the risk for development of gonadoblastoma. A total of 124 patients who were diagnosed with Turner syndrome by conventional cytogenetic techniques underwent additional molecular analysis to detect cryptic Y chromosome material. In addition, patients with Turner syndrome harboring Y chromosome cell lines had their ovaries removed prophylactically. Finally, we assessed the occurrence of gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome. Molecular analysis demonstrated that 10 patients had Y chromosome material among 118 patients without overt Y chromosome (8.5%). Six patients with overt Y chromosome and four patients with cryptic Y chromosome material underwent oophorectomy. Histopathological analysis revealed that the occurrence of gonadoblastoma in the total group was 2.4%, and gonadoblastoma occurred in one of six patients with an overt Y chromosome (16.7%) and 2 of 10 patients with cryptic Y chromosome material (20.0%). The risk of developing gonadoblastoma in patients with cryptic Y chromosome material was similar to that in patients with overt Y chromosome. Therefore, molecular screening for Y chromosome material should be recommended for all patients with Turner syndrome to detect individuals at a high risk of gonadoblastoma and to facilitate proper management of the disease.

  18. Using technology to develop and distribute patient education storyboards across a health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisak, Anne Z; Conrad, Kathryn J

    2004-01-01

    To describe the successful implementation of a centrally designed and managed patient education storyboard project using Microsoft PowerPoint in a large multihospital system and physician-based practice settings. Journal articles, project evaluation, and clinical and educational experience. The use of posters, bulletin boards, and storyboards as educational strategies has been reported widely. Two multidisciplinary committees applied new technology to develop storyboards for patient, family, and general public education. Technology can be used to coordinate centralized development of patient education posters, improving accuracy and content of patient education across a healthcare system while streamlining the development and review process and avoiding duplication of work effort. Storyboards are excellent sources of unit-based current, consistent patient education; reduce duplication of efforts; enhance nursing computer competencies; market nursing expertise; and promote nurse educators.

  19. Case-controlled Study on Risk Factors for the Development of Constipation in Hospitalized Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ueki, Tetsuya; Nagai, Keiko; Ooe, Nobuharu; Nakashima, Mihoko N.; Nishida, Koyo; Nakamura, Junzo; Nakashima, Mikiro

    2011-01-01

    Constipation is a common problem in hospitalized patients; however, the relative risks of its development with various factors have not been clarified. To clarify the risk factors associated with constipation, we performed a case-controlled study of 165 hospitalized patients who were not laxative users on admission. They were divided into case (n=35) and control (n=130) groups according to laxative administration during hospitalization. Comparison of the patient backgrounds in the two groups ...

  20. User-centered design and the development of patient decision aids: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteman, Holly O; Dansokho, Selma Chipenda; Colquhoun, Heather; Coulter, Angela; Dugas, Michèle; Fagerlin, Angela; Giguere, Anik Mc; Glouberman, Sholom; Haslett, Lynne; Hoffman, Aubri; Ivers, Noah; Légaré, France; Légaré, Jean; Levin, Carrie; Lopez, Karli; Montori, Victor M; Provencher, Thierry; Renaud, Jean-Sébastien; Sparling, Kerri; Stacey, Dawn; Vaisson, Gratianne; Volk, Robert J; Witteman, William

    2015-01-26

    Providing patient-centered care requires that patients partner in their personal health-care decisions to the full extent desired. Patient decision aids facilitate processes of shared decision-making between patients and their clinicians by presenting relevant scientific information in balanced, understandable ways, helping clarify patients' goals, and guiding decision-making processes. Although international standards stipulate that patients and clinicians should be involved in decision aid development, little is known about how such involvement currently occurs, let alone best practices. This systematic review consisting of three interlinked subreviews seeks to describe current practices of user involvement in the development of patient decision aids, compare these to practices of user-centered design, and identify promising strategies. A research team that includes patient and clinician representatives, decision aid developers, and systematic review method experts will guide this review according to the Cochrane Handbook and PRISMA reporting guidelines. A medical librarian will hand search key references and use a peer-reviewed search strategy to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, the ACM library, IEEE Xplore, and Google Scholar. We will identify articles across all languages and years describing the development or evaluation of a patient decision aid, or the application of user-centered design or human-centered design to tools intended for patient use. Two independent reviewers will assess article eligibility and extract data into a matrix using a structured pilot-tested form based on a conceptual framework of user-centered design. We will synthesize evidence to describe how research teams have included users in their development process and compare these practices to user-centered design methods. If data permit, we will develop a measure of the user-centeredness of development processes and identify practices that are likely

  1. Patient and family psychoeducation: Service development and implementation in a center in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsepassi, Zahra; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Sharifi, Vandad; Mottaghipour, Yasaman

    2018-02-01

    Family and patient psychoeducation have demonstrated significant improvement in clinical and social outcomes for patients suffering from severe mental disorders and their families. However, these evidence-based practices are not widely implemented at service delivery level and into routine clinical practice, especially in less developed countries. The aim of this article is to report the processes of development and implementation of a psychoeducational service for patients with severe mental illnesses and their families in Iran. The program was developed at Roozbeh Hospital in Tehran, Iran. A group of clinicians worked on the development phase of the program and drafting the manuals. Then, a series of workshops and supervision sessions were held to train group leaders for implementation of the group psychoeducation for patients and families. In the pilot phase, the services were delivered to two groups of patients and families, and then the manual was revised based on the feedback from group leaders and participants. The program consisted of eight 90-minute weekly patient group sessions and 6 weekly multiple family group sessions. Two manuals for patient education (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) were developed. Several information sheets were developed and distributed during different sessions of family and patient psychoeducation related to the content of each session. Despite providing the hospital clinicians with the information regarding these new services, less than 10% of the admitted patients were referred by their clinicians. Feasibility and sustainability of the program are affected by a number of factors. Low referral rate of clinicians, limited resources of the hospital, issues related to stigma and logistic issues are barriers in implementation of these services. Administrators' and clinicians' understanding of the importance of patient and family psychoeducation seems to be crucial in sustainability of such programs in routine service delivery.

  2. The impact of nursing leadership on patient safety in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lee; Usher, Kim

    2010-11-01

    This article is a report of a study to identify the ways nursing leaders and managers in a developing country have an impact on patient safety. The attempt to address the problem of patient safety in health care is a global issue. Literature addressing the significant impact that nursing leadership has on patient safety is extensive and focuses almost exclusively on the developed world. A critical ethnography was conducted with senior registered nursing leaders and managers throughout the Fiji Islands, specifically those in the Head Office of the Fiji Ministry of Health and the most senior nurse in a hospital or community health service. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior nursing leaders and managers in Fiji. Thematic analysis of the interviews was undertaken from a critical theory perspective, with reference to the macro socio-political system of the Fiji Ministry of Health. Four interrelated issues regarding the nursing leaders and managers' impact on patient safety emerged from the study. Empowerment of nursing leaders and managers, an increased focus on the patient, the necessity to explore conditions for front-line nurses and the direct relationship between improved nursing conditions and increased patient safety mirrored literature from developed countries. The findings have significant implications for developing countries and it is crucial that support for patient safety in developing countries become a focus for the international nursing community. Nursing leaders and managers' increased focus on their own place in the hierarchy of the health care system and on nursing conditions as these affect patient safety could decrease adverse patient outcomes. The findings could assist the global nursing community to better support developing countries in pursuing a patient safety agenda. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Disorders of sex development in Indonesia: The course of psychological development in late identified patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ediati (Annastasia)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In individuals with a disorder of sex development (DSD), prenatal development into male or female has deviated. Consequently, the child is born with anomalies of the genital tract and may have ambiguous sex characteristics. In Western countries, identification and

  4. Probability of developing severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapkin Yu.G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the probable determination of severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas based on a comprehensive assessment (clinical examination using systems — scales and determination of the level markers of SIRS. Material and methods. The analysis of peculiarities of necrotic erysipelas clinical course in 59 patients. The first group consisted of 17 patients with severe sepsis, the second — 18 patients with sepsis without multiple organ failure, in the comparison group —22 patients with local infection. We determined albumin, urea, creatinine, pro-calcitonin of plasma. The scale SAPS III was used to quantify SIRS, scale SOFA —to determine the extent of damage to organs and systems. Results. The most sensitive marker of developing sepsis in patients with necrotic erysipelas was procalcitonin. The second important indicator of SIRS severity in patients with necrotic erysipelas was the blood albumin. Scale SAPS III also allows to select a group of patients with high risk of developing severe sepsis. Use of the SOFA to predict the scale has been found out to be less important. Conclusion. A comprehensive assessment of the severity of the condition by scale SAPS III in combination with determining the levels of procalcitonin and plasma albumin is advisable to apply for prediction the probability of developing severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas. For the last indicator it is important to assess of absolute values and the decrease of its concentration.

  5. Hypocalcemia development in patients operated for primary hyperparathyroidism: Can it be predicted preoperatively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Cafer; Tam, Abbas Ali; Dirikoç, Ahmet; Kılıçyazgan, Aylin; Kılıç, Mehmet; Türkölmez, Şeyda; Ersoy, Reyhan; Çakır, Bekir

    2016-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is a common endocrine disease, and its most effective treatment is surgery. Postoperative hypocalcemia is a morbidity of parathyroid surgeries, and it may extend hospitalization durations. The purpose of this study is to determine the predictive factors related to the development of hypocalcemia and hungry bone syndrome (HBS) in patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for PHP. Laboratory data comprising parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, phosphate, 25-OHD, albumin, magnesium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of the patients were recorded preoperatively, on the 1st and 4th days postoperatively, and in the 6th postoperative month, and their neck ultrasound (US) and bone densitometry data were also recorded. Hypocalcemia was seen in 63 patients (38.4%) on the 1st day after parathyroidectomy. Ten patients (6.1%) had permanent hypocalcemia in the 6th month after surgery. Out of the patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for PHP, 22 (13.4%) had HBS. The incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia was higher in patients who underwent parathyroidectomy for PHP, who had parathyroid hyperplasia, and who had osteoporosis. Preoperative PTH, ALP, and BUN values were higher in those patients who developed HBS. Furthermore, HBS was more common in patients who had osteoporosis, who had parathyroid hyperplasia, and who underwent thyroidectomy simultaneously with parathyroidectomy. As a result, patients who have the risk factors for development of hypocalcemia and HBS should be monitored more attentively during the perioperative period.

  6. Development of Evidence-Based Disease Education Literature for Pakistani Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta Abbas Naqvi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis affects 0.5% to 1% of the population globally and is one of the most common causes of disability. Patient education plays a key role in improving treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to discuss the process involved in designing an evidence-based disease education literature for rheumatoid arthritis patients of Pakistan in Urdu language with culturally relevant illustrations. A study was conducted to develop disease education literature using Delphi consensus, content validity, and patient feedback. A panel of experts comprised of university professors and health care experts, including health practitioners and pharmacists as well as a social scientist, was set up to assess the need. Eight patients were randomly selected and were asked to give their feedback. Their feedback was incorporated in the development process. The entire process was carried out in eight steps. A disease education literature for patients of rheumatoid arthritis was developed and edited in the form of a booklet. The booklet contained evidence-based information that must be provided to patients in both Urdu and English languages with culturally relevant illustrations. The availability of such literature is significant, as it enables the patients to seek knowledge at home at their convenience. This home-based knowledge support is as helpful as any other means of medical care. The developed literature is planned to be used in further studies which will evaluate its impact in improving knowledge of RA patients.

  7. Development of the cancer patient financial aid system and analysis of user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Ho; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Myung Ha; Kim, Yun-Mi; Choi, Soo Mi

    2006-01-01

    A financial aid program for low income cancer patients in Korea was initiated in 2005, which required a web-based system. Therefore, the Cancer Patient Financial Aid System (CPFAS) was developed. To improve the CPFAS, we evaluated the nationwide satisfaction of public health center users.

  8. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0473] Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure... an opportunity for public comment on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug...

  9. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0473] Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure... for the notice of public meeting entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug...

  10. The denial of cancer interview: development and first assessment of psychometric properties in lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Martina S.; Putter, Hein; Leurs, Amber; Rooijmans, Harry G. M.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; van Houwelingen, Hans C.

    2007-01-01

    Based on Weissman and Hackett's comprehensive definition of denial, a semi-structured interview was developed to measure denial in cancer patients. The denial in cancer interview (DCI) covers both the patients' recount of their illness experience and the expert's impression of the level of denial in

  11. Patients in assisted automated peritoneal dialysis develop strategies for self-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holch, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

      Background Since 2000, a model for Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (aAPD) for patients in their own home needing chronic dialysis treatment has been developed at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. The patient group consists of physically or mentally frail elderly who cannot...

  12. Development of additional pituitary hormone deficiencies in pediatric patients originally diagnosed with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.F. Blum (Werner); C.L. Deal (Cheri Lynn); A.G. Zimmermann (Alan); E.P. Shavrikova (Elena); C.J. Child (Christopher); C.A. Quigley (Charmian); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); G. Cutler (Gordon); R.G. Rosenfeld (Ron)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We assessed the characteristics of children initially diagnosed with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) who later developed additional (multiple) pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD). Design: Data were analyzed for 5805 pediatric patients with idiopathic IGHD, who were

  13. [Patients with variations of sex development : an example of interdisciplinary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan-Hug, Franziska; Kraus, Cynthia; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Fellmann, Florence; Typaldou, Sophia-Anna; Ansermet, François; Alamo, Leonor; Eggert, Nadja; Pelet, Odile; Vial, Yvan; Muehlethaler, Vincent; Birraux, Jacques; Ramseyer, Pascal; Renteria, Saira-Christine; Dwyer, Andrew; Pitteloud, Nelly; Meyrat, Blaise J

    2016-11-09

    The medical, psychological and social aspects of disorders of sex development (DSD) represent a challenge for the management of these patients. However, advances in our understanding of the etiology and genetics of this condition, novel surgical approaches and the growing influence of patient groups as well as wider recognition of ethical issues have helped improve the care of patients with a DSD. Importantly, a multidisciplinary approach involving specialists is crucial for understanding and treating such rare and complex cases. According to the recommendations of the Swiss National Ethical Commission, we shall use the term « Variation of Sex Development » rather than « Disorder of Sex Development » in this publication. This article addresses the care of DSD patients throughout development from the point of view of specialists in complementary fields.

  14. Developing a patient-led electronic feedback system for quality and safety within Renal PatientView.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Sally J; Reynolds, Caroline; Heyhoe, Jane; Armitage, Gerry

    2017-03-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that patients can provide direct feedback about the quality and safety of their care through patient reporting systems. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of patients, healthcare professionals and researchers working in partnership to develop a patient-led quality and safety feedback system within an existing electronic health record (EHR), known as Renal PatientView (RPV). Phase 1 (inception) involved focus groups (n = 9) and phase 2 (requirements) involved cognitive walkthroughs (n = 34) and 1:1 qualitative interviews (n = 34) with patients and healthcare professionals. A Joint Services Expert Panel (JSP) was convened to review the findings from phase 1 and agree the core principles and components of the system prototype. Phase 1 data were analysed using a thematic approach. Data from phase 1 were used to inform the design of the initial system prototype. Phase 2 data were analysed using the components of heuristic evaluation, resulting in a list of core principles and components for the final system prototype. Phase 1 identified four main barriers and facilitators to patients feeding back on quality and safety concerns. In phase 2, the JSP agreed that the system should be based on seven core principles and components. Stakeholders were able to work together to identify core principles and components for an electronic patient quality and safety feedback system in renal services. Tensions arose due to competing priorities, particularly around anonymity and feedback. Careful consideration should be given to the feasibility of integrating a novel element with differing priorities into an established system with existing functions and objectives. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  15. Development and validation of multivariable predictive model for thromboembolic events in lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antic, Darko; Milic, Natasa; Nikolovski, Srdjan; Todorovic, Milena; Bila, Jelena; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Andjelic, Bosko; Djurasinovic, Vladislava; Sretenovic, Aleksandra; Vukovic, Vojin; Jelicic, Jelena; Hayman, Suzanne; Mihaljevic, Biljana

    2016-10-01

    Lymphoma patients are at increased risk of thromboembolic events but thromboprophylaxis in these patients is largely underused. We sought to develop and validate a simple model, based on individual clinical and laboratory patient characteristics that would designate lymphoma patients at risk for thromboembolic event. The study population included 1,820 lymphoma patients who were treated in the Lymphoma Departments at the Clinics of Hematology, Clinical Center of Serbia and Clinical Center Kragujevac. The model was developed using data from a derivation cohort (n = 1,236), and further assessed in the validation cohort (n = 584). Sixty-five patients (5.3%) in the derivation cohort and 34 (5.8%) patients in the validation cohort developed thromboembolic events. The variables independently associated with risk for thromboembolism were: previous venous and/or arterial events, mediastinal involvement, BMI>30 kg/m(2) , reduced mobility, extranodal localization, development of neutropenia and hemoglobin level 3). For patients classified at risk (intermediate and high-risk scores), the model produced negative predictive value of 98.5%, positive predictive value of 25.1%, sensitivity of 75.4%, and specificity of 87.5%. A high-risk score had positive predictive value of 65.2%. The diagnostic performance measures retained similar values in the validation cohort. Developed prognostic Thrombosis Lymphoma - ThroLy score is more specific for lymphoma patients than any other available score targeting thrombosis in cancer patients. Am. J. Hematol. 91:1014-1019, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Email communication in a developing country: different family physician and patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Nisrine N; Antoun, Jumana

    2016-01-01

    Email communication between physicians and patients could improve access to and delivery of health care. Most of the literature studies about email communication between physicians and patients have been conducted in developing countries. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the practices, attitudes, and barriers of both physicians' and patients' use of email within the same health care setting of a developing country. A cross-sectional paper-based survey was conducted among 39 physicians and 500 patients at the Family Medicine clinics of the American University of Beirut, a tertiary academic medical center. Most of the surveyed patients and physicians reported that they would like to communicate through email and agreed that it is useful. However, only 19% of the patients have ever communicated with their physicians via email, and only 5.1% of physicians have often communicated with their patients via email. Almost half of the patients surveyed were unaware of the possibility of this form of communication, and only 17% reported that their physician offered them his or her email address. In addition, physicians and patients did not agree on the services to be provided by email communication. For instance, almost half of the patients indicated consultation for an urgent medical matter as suitable for email communication. The use of email communication in health care is still scarce. Patients and physicians have different perspectives of its use and importance. Further rigorous research is needed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of this form of communication, especially in the developing world. Interested physicians are encouraged to establish appropriate personal policies for email communication with adequate announcement and patient education plans.

  17. Measuring patient safety in a UK dental hospital: development of a dental clinical effectiveness dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, M N; Ashley, M P; Shaw, A; Dickson, S; Saksena, A

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety is an important marker of quality for any healthcare organisation. In 2008, the British Government white paper entitled High quality care for all, resulting from a review led by Lord Darzi, identified patient safety as a key component of quality and discussed how it might be measured, analysed and acted upon. National and local clinically curated metrics were suggested, which could be displayed via a 'clinical dashboard'. This paper explains the development of a clinical effectiveness dashboard focused on patient safety in an English dental hospital and how it has helped us identify relevant patient safety issues in secondary dental care.

  18. Differentiation of mucosal disease from partial development of the paranasal sinuses in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerinckx, A.J.; Whyte, A.M.; Lufkin, R.B.; Hall, T.R.; Kangarloo, H.

    1988-01-01

    On magnetic resonance (MR) images of pediatric patients, sinus mucosal disease may have an appearance similar to that of the normal partially developed sinus, leading to an increase in the number of patients labeled as having incidental sinusitis. The paranasal sinuses were retrospectively evaluated in 27 infants and children aged 0-11 years undergoing brain MR imaging for indications both unrelated and related to sinus disease. The authors developed criteria for grading paranasal sinus development and mucosal disease. Incidental mucosal disease is not uncommon, occurring in 28% of patients aged 0-7 years. In children under 3 years of age, inflammatory mucosal thickening and marrow surrounding the partially developed sinus have a high signal on many MR sequences and may be confused. Recognition of the low-intensity peripheral cortical margin of the sinus and awareness of the stages of normal sinus development allow differentiation

  19. Development and evaluation of a patient-centred measurement tool for surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, J; Hill, K; Yule, S

    2018-06-01

    Non-technical skills are essential for safe and effective surgery. Several tools to assess surgeons' non-technical skills from the clinician's perspective have been developed. However, a reliable measurement tool using a patient-centred approach does not currently exist. The aim of this study was to translate the existing Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) tool into a patient-centred evaluation tool. Data were gathered from four cohorts of patients using an iterative four-stage mixed-methods research design. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to establish the psychometric properties of the tool, focusing on validity, reliability, usability and parsimony. Some 534 patients were recruited to the study. A total of 24 patient-centred non-technical skill items were developed in stage 1, and reduced to nine items in stage 2 using exploratory factor analysis. In stage 3, confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that these nine items each loaded on to one of three factors, with excellent internal consistency: decision-making, leadership, and communication and teamwork. In stage 4, validity testing established that the new tool was independent of physician empathy and predictive of surgical quality. Surgical leadership emerged as the most dominant skill that patients could recognize and evaluate. A novel nine-item assessment tool has been developed. The Patients' Evaluation of Non-Technical Skills (PENTS) tool allows valid and reliable measurement of surgeons' non-technical skills from the patient perspective. © 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Developing an eHealth Tool to Support Patient Empowerment at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmeijer, Kristina; Wannheden, Carolina; Nilsson, Lina; Frykholm, Oscar; Hellström, Amanda; Flink, Maria; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2018-01-01

    In previous research we have learned that patients with chronic or complex diseases often experience difficulties when transitioning from hospital care to self-care in their home. We address these difficulties by developing an eHealth tool for patients - ePATH (electronic Patient Activation in Treatment at Home) - intended to empower each patient to manage their individual situation. We have employed a user-centered design process involving both patients and healthcare personnel to specify the content and functionality of ePATH. The system is deployed as a web application with secure login for patients. In this article, we describe the main content and functionality of the system that makes it possible for a patient to manage symptoms development in relation to treatment progression Interactive functionality, e.g., reminders and social support, is included to make the ePATH a useful and informative bridge between patients, next-of-kin and different caregivers. One lesson learned is that it is necessary to incorporate motivational components in the development of an eHealth tool to successfully overcome the "intention-behavior" gap. The self-determination theory of motivation can be used to ensure that important aspects are not missed.

  1. User Requirements Based Development of a Web Portal for Chronic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we tried to identify practices that help overcoming data entering and operational barriers, and involve patients and doctors in the development process to improve the acceptance of Web portals for chronic patients. This paper presents a follow up project implementing a Web portal for chronic patients considering previously studied barriers and opportunities. The following methods were applied to facilitate the acceptance of the portal: 1) a joint use case definition and discussion session before starting the development; 2) involvement of the users in prototyping the portal; 3) training of doctors and patients together before the implementation. During the first week of the portal's operation we have measured the number of data transactions and the number of active users to compare it with previous experience. The first weeks of operating the portal, we could observe an active contribution of doctors and patients, who submitted vital signs data and recommendations to the portal.

  2. Development of an evaluation framework for African-European hospital patient safety partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Paul; Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Storr, Julie; Hightower, Joyce D; Bagheri-Nejad, Sepideh; Kelley, Edward; Pittet, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Patient safety is recognised as a significant healthcare problem worldwide, and healthcare-associated infections are an important aspect. African Partnerships for Patient Safety is a WHO programme that pairs hospitals in Africa with hospitals in Europe with the objective to work together to improve patient safety. To describe the development of an evaluation framework for hospital-to-hospital partnerships participating in the programme. The framework was structured around the programme's three core objectives: facilitate strong interhospital partnerships, improve in-hospital patient safety and spread best practices nationally. Africa-based clinicians, their European partners and experts in patient safety were closely involved in developing the evaluation framework in an iterative process. The process defined six domains of partnership strength, each with measurable subdomains. We developed a questionnaire to measure these subdomains. Participants selected six indicators of hospital patient safety improvement from a short-list of 22 based on their relevance, sensitivity to intervention and measurement feasibility. Participants proposed 20 measures of spread, which were refined into a two-part conceptual framework, and a data capture tool created. Taking a highly participatory approach that closely involved its end users, we developed an evaluation framework and tools to measure partnership strength, patient safety improvements and the spread of best practice.

  3. The influence of lymphangiography on the development of hypothyroidism in patients irradiated for Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, Steven R; Fein, Douglas A; Hanlon, Alexandria L; Corn, Benjamin W; Curran, Walter J; Coia, Lawrence R

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Lymphangiography has been a routine part of Hodgkin's disease staging over the past 3 decades and has an accepted role in assessing pelvic and paraaortic lymph node involvement, adequately staging patients as well as planning radiation fields. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the role of lymphangiography in promoting hypothyroidism in individuals with Hodgkin's disease irradiated with a mantle field. We sought to analyze the onset and rate of hypothyroidism in patients who received irradiation to the thyroid gland during treatment of Hodgkin's disease, as well as possible factors related to its development. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-two patients with Hodgkin's disease were treated between June 1967 and October 1993. All patients were treated with curative intent with radiation therapy utilizing a mantle field. Following exclusion of patients without available thyroid function tests, < 200 days of follow-up, or no radiation to the thyroid 104 patients were eligible for analysis. Follow-up ranged from 7-170 months (median 43 months). Sixty-seven patients had a lymphangiogram. 73 patients were treated with radiation alone and 31 patients with radiation therapy plus chemotherapy. All patients were treated with continuous course, once daily external beam radiotherapy using megavoltage equipment. The median external beam dose to the mantle field was 39.6 Gy while the median dose to the thyroid was 41.5 Gy. Multivariate analysis was used to determine factors affecting hypothyroidism. Results: The actuarial 2-, and 5-year rates of biochemical hypothyroidism for all 104 patients were 18% and 37%, respectively. 40 patients developed hypothyroidism: 9 (23%) at {<=} 1 year, 18 (45%) at {<=} 2 years and 33 (83%) at {<=} 5 years. 35 patients developed chemical hypothyroidism and 5 patients developed both clinical and chemical hypothyroidism. The actuarial 2-, and 5-year rates of biochemical hypothyroidism for patients who underwent a

  4. The influence of lymphangiography on the development of hypothyroidism in patients irradiated for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, Steven R.; Fein, Douglas A.; Hanlon, Alexandria L.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Lymphangiography has been a routine part of Hodgkin's disease staging over the past 3 decades and has an accepted role in assessing pelvic and paraaortic lymph node involvement, adequately staging patients as well as planning radiation fields. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the role of lymphangiography in promoting hypothyroidism in individuals with Hodgkin's disease irradiated with a mantle field. We sought to analyze the onset and rate of hypothyroidism in patients who received irradiation to the thyroid gland during treatment of Hodgkin's disease, as well as possible factors related to its development. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-two patients with Hodgkin's disease were treated between June 1967 and October 1993. All patients were treated with curative intent with radiation therapy utilizing a mantle field. Following exclusion of patients without available thyroid function tests, < 200 days of follow-up, or no radiation to the thyroid 104 patients were eligible for analysis. Follow-up ranged from 7-170 months (median 43 months). Sixty-seven patients had a lymphangiogram. 73 patients were treated with radiation alone and 31 patients with radiation therapy plus chemotherapy. All patients were treated with continuous course, once daily external beam radiotherapy using megavoltage equipment. The median external beam dose to the mantle field was 39.6 Gy while the median dose to the thyroid was 41.5 Gy. Multivariate analysis was used to determine factors affecting hypothyroidism. Results: The actuarial 2-, and 5-year rates of biochemical hypothyroidism for all 104 patients were 18% and 37%, respectively. 40 patients developed hypothyroidism: 9 (23%) at ≤ 1 year, 18 (45%) at ≤ 2 years and 33 (83%) at ≤ 5 years. 35 patients developed chemical hypothyroidism and 5 patients developed both clinical and chemical hypothyroidism. The actuarial 2-, and 5-year rates of biochemical hypothyroidism for patients who underwent a

  5. Telemedicine: Development of a distance care system for pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Oliveira, Nivalda A C de; Costa, Alex do Vale; Bernardino, Heder Soares

    2015-01-01

    The focus in the treatment of CKD is to prevent its progression through optimal medical control. The large number of patients with CKD has pressed nephrologists to assess more patients into ever-smaller periods of consultation. The use of light technologies as a promising form of health care. The internet offers the opportunity to manipulate the doctor in his professional contact with the user. To develop a web system to attend the patients with CKD not on dialysis and clinically stable stages at distance. Developed a system using the Java language, MySQL database and PrimeFaces framework; available on a Glassfish application server. The initial access is performed by the nephrologist, which registers the patients with their personal information and access data. After being registered, the patient (or family doctor) can enter the data of your query and these will be following, passed on to the nephrologist for evaluation. The form with the data of interest is pre-determined, but there is possibility to add free-form information. The system enables, in addition, there is exchange of messages between doctors and patients. In addition, users receive messages via e-mail alerting them of their duties. Confidentiality is guaranteed by individual passwords for doctors and patients. This tool will enable to increase the coverage area of nephrologists, reduce costs and bring the patient to the primary care physician, using the Family Health Program as an interface between the patient and the nephrology secondary care.

  6. Disturbances of dental development distinguish patients with oligodontia-ectodermal dysplasia from isolated oligodontia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamo, B; Kuijpers, M A R; Balk-Leurs, I; Boxum, C; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate phenotypic differences in dental development between isolated oligodontia and oligodontia-ectodermal dysplasia (ED). A total of 129 patients diagnosed with isolated oligodontia and 22 patients with oligodontia as part of ED were eligible. The phenotype of dental development was assessed for the frequency of missing a certain tooth, dental age, development of each tooth present, abnormal size and abnormal shape of teeth. The data were analysed building linear, ordinal and logistic regression models. Compared to patients with isolated oligodontia, patients with oligodontia-ED missed more frequently central incisors and second molars in both jaws, and lateral incisors in the mandible (P ectodermal abnormalities. © 2017 The Authors. Orthodontics & Craniofacial Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Protocol: developing a conceptual framework of patient mediated knowledge translation, systematic review using a realist approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Légaré, France; Brouwers, Melissa C; Webster, Fiona; Wiljer, David; Badley, Elizabeth; Straus, Sharon

    2011-03-22

    Patient involvement in healthcare represents the means by which to achieve a healthcare system that is responsive to patient needs and values. Characterization and evaluation of strategies for involving patients in their healthcare may benefit from a knowledge translation (KT) approach. The purpose of this knowledge synthesis is to develop a conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions. A preliminary conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions was compiled to describe intended purpose, recipients, delivery context, intervention, and outcomes. A realist review will be conducted in consultation with stakeholders from the arthritis and cancer fields to explore how these interventions work, for whom, and in what contexts. To identify patient-mediated KT interventions in these fields, we will search MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE from 1995 to 2010; scan references of all eligible studies; and examine five years of tables of contents for journals likely to publish quantitative or qualitative studies that focus on developing, implementing, or evaluating patient-mediated KT interventions. Screening and data collection will be performed independently by two individuals. The conceptual framework of patient-mediated KT options and outcomes could be used by healthcare providers, managers, educationalists, patient advocates, and policy makers to guide program planning, service delivery, and quality improvement and by us and other researchers to evaluate existing interventions or develop new interventions. By raising awareness of options for involving patients in improving their own care, outcomes based on using a KT approach may lead to greater patient-centred care delivery and improved healthcare outcomes.

  8. Protocol: developing a conceptual framework of patient mediated knowledge translation, systematic review using a realist approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiljer David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient involvement in healthcare represents the means by which to achieve a healthcare system that is responsive to patient needs and values. Characterization and evaluation of strategies for involving patients in their healthcare may benefit from a knowledge translation (KT approach. The purpose of this knowledge synthesis is to develop a conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions. Methods A preliminary conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions was compiled to describe intended purpose, recipients, delivery context, intervention, and outcomes. A realist review will be conducted in consultation with stakeholders from the arthritis and cancer fields to explore how these interventions work, for whom, and in what contexts. To identify patient-mediated KT interventions in these fields, we will search MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE from 1995 to 2010; scan references of all eligible studies; and examine five years of tables of contents for journals likely to publish quantitative or qualitative studies that focus on developing, implementing, or evaluating patient-mediated KT interventions. Screening and data collection will be performed independently by two individuals. Conclusions The conceptual framework of patient-mediated KT options and outcomes could be used by healthcare providers, managers, educationalists, patient advocates, and policy makers to guide program planning, service delivery, and quality improvement and by us and other researchers to evaluate existing interventions or develop new interventions. By raising awareness of options for involving patients in improving their own care, outcomes based on using a KT approach may lead to greater patient-centred care delivery and improved healthcare outcomes.

  9. Protocol: developing a conceptual framework of patient mediated knowledge translation, systematic review using a realist approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient involvement in healthcare represents the means by which to achieve a healthcare system that is responsive to patient needs and values. Characterization and evaluation of strategies for involving patients in their healthcare may benefit from a knowledge translation (KT) approach. The purpose of this knowledge synthesis is to develop a conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions. Methods A preliminary conceptual framework for patient-mediated KT interventions was compiled to describe intended purpose, recipients, delivery context, intervention, and outcomes. A realist review will be conducted in consultation with stakeholders from the arthritis and cancer fields to explore how these interventions work, for whom, and in what contexts. To identify patient-mediated KT interventions in these fields, we will search MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE from 1995 to 2010; scan references of all eligible studies; and examine five years of tables of contents for journals likely to publish quantitative or qualitative studies that focus on developing, implementing, or evaluating patient-mediated KT interventions. Screening and data collection will be performed independently by two individuals. Conclusions The conceptual framework of patient-mediated KT options and outcomes could be used by healthcare providers, managers, educationalists, patient advocates, and policy makers to guide program planning, service delivery, and quality improvement and by us and other researchers to evaluate existing interventions or develop new interventions. By raising awareness of options for involving patients in improving their own care, outcomes based on using a KT approach may lead to greater patient-centred care delivery and improved healthcare outcomes. PMID:21426573

  10. How elderly patients with femoral fracture develop pressure sores in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluysen, M

    1986-01-01

    The routine hospital management of 100 consecutive elderly patients was studied to determine the reason for the high incidence of pressure sores among patients admitted to hospital for femoral fractures. Of these patients, 66 developed sores, 83% occurring by the fifth day in hospital. This was due to the long periods that patients were immobilised on high pressure surfaces in the casualty department, wards, and theatres before repair of the fracture and restoration of their weight bearing function. Sores are not simply a ward or nursing problem, but an unintended consequence of hospital treatment. To reduce the incidence of sores elderly patients should be treated on low pressure patient support systems from the point of entry to hospital until mobility is restored. PMID:3085827

  11. Development and daily use of an electronic oncological patient record for the total management of cancer patients: 7 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligioni, E; Berloffa, F; Caffo, O; Tonazzolli, G; Ambrosini, G; Valduga, F; Eccher, C; Ferro, A; Forti, S

    2009-02-01

    We describe our experience with an electronic oncological patient record (EOPR) for the total management of cancer patients. The web-based EOPR was developed on the basis of a user-centred design including user education and training, followed by continuous assistance; user acceptance was monitored by means of three questionnaires administered after 2 weeks, 6 months and 6 years. The EOPR has been used daily for all in-ward, day hospital and ambulatory clinical activities since July 2000. The most widely appreciated functions are its rapid multipoint access, the self-updated summary of the patients' clinical course, the management of the entire therapeutic programme synchronised with working agendas and oncological teleconsultation. Security and privacy are assured by means of the separate storage of clinical and demographic data, with access protected by login and a password. The questionnaires highlighted appreciation of rapid data retrieval and exchange and the perception of improved quality of care, but also revealed a sense of additional work and a negative impact on doctor-patient relationships. Our EOPR has proved to be effective in the total management of cancer patients. Its user-centred design and flexible web technology have been key factors in its successful implementation and daily use.

  12. Embedding Patient Education in Mobile Platform for Patients With Heart Failure: Theory-Based Development and Beta Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Osorio, Richard E; Kaplan, Howard; Oliver, Drew; O'neachtain, Tara; Rogal, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Health education is an important component of multidisciplinary disease management of heart failure. The educational information given at the time of discharge after hospitalization or at initial diagnosis is often overwhelming to patients and is often lost or never consulted again. Therefore, the aim of this developmental project was to embed interactive heart failure education in a mobile platform. A patient-centered approach, grounded on several learning theories including Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning, Sweller's Cognitive Load, Instructional Design Approach, and Problem-Based Learning, was utilized to develop and test the mobile app. Ten heart failure patients, who attended an outpatient heart failure clinic, completed beta testing. A validated self-confidence questionnaire was utilized to assess patients' confidence in using the mobile app. All participants (100%) reported moderate to extreme confidence in using the app, 95% were very likely to use the app, 100% reported the design was easy to navigate, and content on heart failure was appropriate. Having the information accessible on their mobile phone was reported as a positive, like a health coach by all patients. Clinicians and nurses validated the content. Thus, embedding health education in a mobile app is proposed in promoting persistent engagement to improve health outcomes.

  13. Adherence to HAART: a systematic review of developed and developing nation patient-reported barriers and facilitators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Mills

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART medication is the greatest patient-enabled predictor of treatment success and mortality for those who have access to drugs. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine patient-reported barriers and facilitators to adhering to antiretroviral therapy.We examined both developed and developing nations. We searched the following databases: AMED (inception to June 2005, Campbell Collaboration (inception to June 2005, CinAhl (inception to June 2005, Cochrane Library (inception to June 2005, Embase (inception to June 2005, ERIC (inception to June 2005, MedLine (inception to June 2005, and NHS EED (inception to June 2005. We retrieved studies conducted in both developed and developing nation settings that examined barriers and facilitators addressing adherence. Both qualitative and quantitative studies were included. We independently, in duplicate, extracted data reported in qualitative studies addressing adherence. We then examined all quantitative studies addressing barriers and facilitators noted from the qualitative studies. In order to place the findings of the qualitative studies in a generalizable context, we meta-analyzed the surveys to determine a best estimate of the overall prevalence of issues. We included 37 qualitative studies and 47 studies using a quantitative methodology (surveys. Seventy-two studies (35 qualitative were conducted in developed nations, while the remaining 12 (two qualitative were conducted in developing nations. Important barriers reported in both economic settings included fear of disclosure, concomitant substance abuse, forgetfulness, suspicions of treatment, regimens that are too complicated, number of pills required, decreased quality of life, work and family responsibilities, falling asleep, and access to medication. Important facilitators reported by patients in developed nation settings included having a sense of self-worth, seeing positive

  14. Development of the EORTC QLQ-CAX24, A Questionnaire for Cancer Patients With Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelwright, Sally J; Hopkinson, Jane B; Darlington, Anne-Sophie; Fitzsimmons, Deborah F; Fayers, Peter; Balstad, Trude R; Bredart, Anne; Hammerlid, Eva; Kaasa, Stein; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Pinto, Monica; Schmidt, Heike; Solheim, Tora S; Strasser, Florian; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Johnson, Colin D

    2017-02-01

    Cachexia is commonly found in cancer patients and has profound consequences; yet there is only one questionnaire that examines the patient's perspective. To report a rigorously developed module for patient self-reported impact of cancer cachexia. Module development followed published guidelines. Patients from across the cancer cachexia trajectory were included. In Phase 1, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) issues were generated from a literature review and interviews with patients in four countries. The issues were revised based on patient and health care professional (HCP) input. In Phase 2, questionnaire items were formulated and translated into the languages required for Phase 3, the pilot phase, in which patients from eight countries scored the relevance and importance of each item, and provided qualitative feedback. A total of 39 patients and 12 HCPs took part in Phase 1. The literature review produced 68 HRQOL issues, with 22 new issues arising from the patient interviews. After patient and HCP input, 44 issues were formulated into questionnaire items in Phase 2. One hundred ten patients took part in Phase 3. One item was reworded, and 20 items were deleted as a consequence of patient feedback. The QLQ-CAX24 is a cancer cachexia-specific questionnaire, comprising 24 items, for HRQOL assessment in clinical trials and practice. It contains five multi-item scales (food aversion, eating and weight-loss worry, eating difficulties, loss of control, and physical decline) and four single items. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Research as an event: a novel approach to promote patient-focused drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai JH

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Jui-Hua Tsai, Ellen Janssen, John FP Bridges Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Patient groups are increasingly engaging in research to understand patients’ preferences and incorporate their perspectives into drug development and regulation. Several models of patient engagement have emerged, but there is little guidance on how to partner with patient groups to engage the disease community. Our group has been using an approach to engage patient groups that we call research as an event. Research as an event is a method for researchers to use a community-centered event to engage patients in their own environment at modest incremental cost. It is a pragmatic solution to address the challenges of engaging patients in research to minimize patients’ frustration, decrease the time burden, and limit the overall cost. The community, the event, and the research are the three components that constitute the research as an event framework. The community represents a disease-specific community. The event is a meeting of common interest for patients and other stakeholders, such as a patient advocacy conference. The research describes activities in engaging the community for the purpose of research. Research as an event follows a six-step approach. A case study is used to demonstrate the six steps followed by recommendations for future implementation. Keywords: patients’ perspectives, decision making, drug approval, patient engagement, patient organization, patients’ preference

  16. Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney: patients' characteristics and improved outcome in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Wael; Alfaar, Ahmad Samir; Yehia, Dina; Elshafie, Maged M; Zaghloul, Mohamed Saad; El-Kinaai, Naglaa; Taha, Hala; Refaat, Amal; Younes, Alaa A

    2014-12-01

    Clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) is a rare and aggressive tumor accounting for 5% of pediatric renal tumors with an incidence of 20 patients per year in the USA. It is bone metastasizing with poor prognosis. Our aim was to show characteristics of patients in relation to improved outcome in one of the developing countries. We included all patients diagnosed as CCSK in the period between July 2007 and March 2012 at Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt. Patients' demographics, clinical presentation, pathology, and management were reviewed. Follow up was continued until April 2013. Twenty-five patients were identified in the defined time interval, accounting for 7% all renal tumors diagnosed at the hospital. Mean age was 36 months. Abdominal swelling and hematuria were the most common presentations. Stages I, II, III, IV, and V represented 9 (36%), 3 (12%), 8 (32%), 3 (12%), and 2 (8%), respectively. Twenty-four patients had radical nephrectomy either upfront or after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Surgery was followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Abdominal radiotherapy was given for local stages II and III. Twenty-two patients reached complete remission, while one patient had stationary disease and two patients died due to progression and relapse. Overall survival was 88.5% and event-free survival was 87.8% at 45 months. Although previous studies indicate poor prognosis of CCSK, our experience shows that those patients can be treated using extensive chemotherapy combined with proper local control. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Patient and public involvement in scope development for a palliative care health technology assessment in europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brereton, L.; Goyder, E.; Ingleton, C.; Gardiner, C.; Chilcott, J.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oortwijn, W.; Mozygemba, K.; Lysdahl, K.B.; Sacchini, D.; Lepper, W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) helps to ensure that study findings are useful to end users but is under-developed in Health Technology Assessment (HTA). "INTEGRATE-HTA, (a co-funded European Union project -grant agreement 30614) is developing new methods to assess complex health

  18. Development of quality indicators for physiotherapy for patients with PAOD in the Netherlands: a Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, H. J. H.; Lauret, G. J.; van Hofwegen, A.; van Dockum, T. A.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Hendriks, H. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop quality indicators (QIs) for physiotherapy management of patients with intermittent claudication (IC) in the Netherlands. As part of an international six-step method to develop QIs, an online survey Delphi-procedure was completed. After two Delphi-rounds a

  19. Patient autonomy problems in palliative care: systematic development and evaluation of a questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Osse, B.H.P.; Schade, E.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    No instrument to assess autonomy problems in palliative care is currently available. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive and concise questionnaire to measure autonomy problems in palliative cancer patients and to study its validity and reliability. We systematically developed a

  20. The association between WNT10A variants and dental development in patients with isolated oligodontia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Fennis, Willem; Creton, Marijn; Vucic, Strahinja; Cune, Marco; van Amstel, Hans Kristian Ploos; Wolvius, Eppo B; van den Boogaard, Marie-Jose; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we aimed to determine the effect of WNT10A variants on dental development in patients with oligodontia. Forty-three (25 boys and 18 girls) individuals were eligible for this study. Stage of development for each present tooth was assessed using the Demirjian method. In case no

  1. Crossing the patient-centered divide: transforming health care quality through enhanced faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard M; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence; Inui, Thomas S

    2011-04-01

    In the report "Crossing the Quality Chasm," the Institute of Medicine asserted that patient-centered care is one of the six domains of quality. In this article, the authors consider how the patient- and relationship-centered components of quality can be achieved in all aspects of medical care. They suggest that faculty development in three key areas-mindful practice, formation, and training in communication skills-is necessary to achieve patient- and relationship-centeredness.The authors first review the philosophical and scientific foundations of patient-centered and relationship-centered care. They next describe and provide concrete examples to illustrate the underlying theory and practices associated with each of the three faculty development areas. They then propose five key areas for faculty development in patient- and relationship-centered care: (1) making it a central competency in all health care interactions, (2) developing a national curriculum framework, (3) requiring performance metrics for professional development, (4) partnering with national health care organizations to disseminate the curriculum framework, and (5) preserving face-to-face educational methods for delivering key elements of the curriculum. Finally, the authors consider the issues faced in faculty development today in light of the medical education issues Abraham Flexner identified more than a century ago. © by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  2. Development of Verbal Expressive Skills Management Programme (VESMP for Patients with Brocas Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Shamim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disorders of communication, including aphasia (mainly post stroke caused by the left hemisphere brain damage, is a major community health issue. The prevalence of aphasia after stroke is 25% in Pakistan in which Broca’s aphasia is predominant in stroke patients who have anterior lesion in the frontal lobe of the left hemispheres. The verbal expressive skills management programme (VESMP is the software which developed augmented management for patients to enhance verbal expressive skills for patients with severe Broca’s aphasia from different geographic areas. Moreover, the software increases the independencies which are not observed in other traditional techniques. This study is the pathway for maintaining and improving the functional life of patients. Objectives: The main objective was to develop the verbal expressive skills management programme (VESMP to enhance verbal expressive skills of patients with severe Broca’s aphasia. Methodology: Initially a pilot study with eight cases is carried out. The nonprobability purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the patients with severe aphasia who received therapy through VESMP programme on their smart phones. It contains seven domains: spontaneous speech, comprehension, naming, reading, writing, imitation, and automated speech. The programme was developed in Urdu language and its content was selected from grade three Urdu Punjab text books. The program was then updated with the help of guidance and feedback received from five experts of the relevant field. The patients scoring is recorded for each domain on basis of correct responses. The study was conducted in YUSRA general hospital and Pakistan Railway Hospital, Rawalpindi. The study includes patients that are 40+ years old, and have three months of post stroke with diagnosis of chronic Broca’s Aphasias, patients with severe cognitive impairment were excluded from the study. The pre-and post score was recorded for each

  3. Development of the Chinese version of Meaning in Life Scale for cancer patients and psychometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hao-Zhi; Gao, Lei; Wang, Yang; Song, Hui; Shi, Bao-Xin

    2017-11-01

    To develop a Meaning in Life Scale for cancer patients in Chinese version and to test the validity and reliability. Meaning in life is a protective factor of psychological well-being and is negatively related to depression and demoralisation among cancer patients. The existing scales measuring meaning in life are mostly designed in English and there is no scale designed for Chinese cancer patients based on Chinese cultural background. Process of instrument development and psychometric evaluation were used. Items were generated from literature review and a focus group interview. Delphi technique was used to test the content validity. Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis were performed with data from 251 cancer patients. The internal consistency of the scale was tested by Cronbach's alpha. A 25-item Meaning in Life Scale in Chinese version with five domains was developed. The five factors explained 62·686% of the variance. The Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0·897. The Meaning in Life Scale in Chinese version has acceptable internal consistency reliability and good content validity and acceptable construct validity. The content of the scale reflected the attitudes of cancer patients towards meaning in life based on Chinese cultural background. The Chinese version of Meaning in Life Scale for Cancer Patients appears to be a new scale to assess meaning in life among Chinese cancer patients exactly and the concept of meaning in life presented in this scale provides new ideas of meaning intervention in routine clinical practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Learning from Marketing: Rapid Development of Medication Messages that Engage Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yank, Veronica; Tribett, Erika; Green, Lydia; Pettis, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To adapt marketing approaches in a health services environment. Methods Researchers and advertising professionals partnered in developing advertising-style messages designed to activate patients pre-identified as having chronic kidney disease to ask providers about recommended medications. We assessed feasibility of the development process by evaluating partnership structure, costs, and timeframe. We tested messages with patients and providers using preliminary surveys to refine initial messages and subsequent focus groups to identify the most persuasive ones. Results The partnership achieved an efficient structure, $14,550 total costs, and 4-month timeframe. The advertising team developed 11 initial messages. The research team conducted surveys and focus groups with a total of 13 patients and 8 providers to identify three messages as most activating. Focus group themes suggested the general approach of using advertising-style messages was acceptable if it supported patient-provider relationships and had a credible evidence base. Individual messages were more motivating if they elicited personal identification with imagery, particular emotions, active patient role, and message clarity. Conclusion We demonstrated feasibility of a research-advertising partnership and acceptability and likely impact of advertising-style messages on patient medication-seeking behavior. Practice Implications Healthcare systems may want to replicate our adaptation of marketing approaches to patients with chronic conditions. PMID:25913245

  5. Learning from marketing: Rapid development of medication messages that engage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yank, Veronica; Tribett, Erika; Green, Lydia; Pettis, Jasmine

    2015-08-01

    To adapt marketing approaches in a health services environment. Researchers and advertising professionals partnered in developing advertising-style messages designed to activate patients pre-identified as having chronic kidney disease to ask providers about recommended medications. We assessed feasibility of the development process by evaluating partnership structure, costs, and timeframe. We tested messages with patients and providers using preliminary surveys to refine initial messages and subsequent focus groups to identify the most persuasive ones. The partnership achieved an efficient structure, $14,550 total costs, and 4-month timeframe. The advertising team developed 11 initial messages. The research team conducted surveys and focus groups with a total of 13 patients and 8 providers to identify three messages as most activating. Focus group themes suggested the general approach of using advertising-style messages was acceptable if it supported patient-provider relationships and had a credible evidence base. Individual messages were more motivating if they elicited personal identification with imagery, particular emotions, active patient role, and message clarity. We demonstrated feasibility of a research-advertising partnership and acceptability and likely impact of advertising-style messages on patient medication-seeking behavior. Healthcare systems may want to replicate our adaptation of marketing approaches to patients with chronic conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Identification of patients with cancer with a high risk to develop delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neefjes, Elisabeth C W; van der Vorst, Maurice J D L; Verdegaal, Bertha A T T; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Berkhof, Johannes; Verheul, Henk M W

    2017-08-01

    Delirium deteriorates the quality of life in patients with cancer, but is frequently underdiagnosed and not adequately treated. In this study, we evaluated the occurrence of delirium and its risk factors in patients admitted to the hospital for treatment or palliative care in order to develop a prediction model to identify patients at high risk for delirium. In a period of 1.5 years, we evaluated the risk of developing delirium in 574 consecutively admitted patients with cancer to our academic oncology department with the Delirium Observation Screening Scale. Risk factors for delirium were extracted from the patient's chart. A delirium prediction algorithm was constructed using tree analysis, and validated with fivefold cross-validation. A total of 574 patients with cancer were acutely (42%) or electively (58%) admitted 1733 times. The incidence rate of delirium was 3.5 per 100 admittances. Tree analysis revealed that the predisposing factors of an unscheduled admittance and a metabolic imbalance accurately predicted the development of delirium. In this group the incidence rate of delirium was 33 per 100 patients (1:3). The AUC of the model was 0.81, and 0.65 after fivefold cross-validation. We identified that especially patients undergoing an unscheduled admittance with a metabolic imbalance do have a clinically relevant high risk to develop a delirium. Based on these factors, we propose to evaluate preventive treatment of these patients when admitted to the hospital in order to improve their quality of life. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Concomitant development of hypersexuality and delusional jealousy in patients with Parkinson's disease: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Lucetti, Claudio; Baldacci, Filippo; Del Dotto, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2014-11-01

    Both impulse-control disorders and delusional jealousy (DJ) may be considered non-motor side-effects of dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to investigate the possible concomitant development of these features in PD and their clinical correlates. We performed a cross-sectional investigation in 1063 consecutive PD patients with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease and the Parkinson's Psychosis Questionnaire. 81 patients presented ICDs (prevalence 7.61%) and 23 patients presented DJ (17 males, 6 females; prevalence 2.16%). 9 male PD patients presented both DJ and ICDs (39.13% of patients with DJ, 11.11% of patients with ICDs; prevalence of 0.84% in the whole PD sample), with a concomitant onset of delusional jealousy and hypersexuality in 8 cases and a concomitant onset of delusional jealousy and pathological gambling in 2 cases. Hypersexuality and delusional jealousy may occur independently in PD patients "on" dopamine agonist therapy, but may develop together probably reflecting a common alteration of sexuality (sexual arousal and jealousy) The presence of both of these clinical features and sexuality more in general should be investigated when features of either one of them appear. Further confirmation is needed in larger samples of patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Thirst Distress Scale for patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldréus, Nana; Jaarsma, Tiny; van der Wal, Martje Hl; Kato, Naoko P

    2018-03-01

    Patients with heart failure can experience thirst distress. However, there is no instrument to measure this in patients with heart failure. The aim of the present study was to develop the Thirst Distress Scale for patients with Heart Failure (TDS-HF) and to evaluate psychometric properties of the scale. The TDS-HF was developed to measure thirst distress in patients with heart failure. Face and content validity was confirmed using expert panels including patients and healthcare professionals. Data on the TDS-HF was collected from patients with heart failure at outpatient heart failure clinics and hospitals in Sweden, the Netherlands and Japan. Psychometric properties were evaluated using data from 256 heart failure patients (age 72±11 years). Concurrent validity of the scale was assessed using a thirst intensity visual analogue scale. Patients did not have any difficulties answering the questions, and time taken to answer the questions was about five minutes. Factor analysis of the scale showed one factor. After psychometric testing, one item was deleted. For the eight item TDS-HF, a single factor explained 61% of the variance and Cronbach's alpha was 0.90. The eight item TDS-HF was significantly associated with the thirst intensity score ( r=0.55, pfailure.

  9. Involving patients in a multidisciplinary European consensus process and in the development of a 'patient summary of the consensus document for colon and rectal cancer care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Petra G; Taylor, Claire; Henning, Geoffrey; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Espin, Eloy; Wiggers, Theo; Gore-Booth, Jola; Moss, Barbara; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-01-01

    High-quality cancer care should be accessible for patients and healthcare professionals. Involvement of patients as partners in guideline formation and consensus processes is still rarely found. EURECCA, short for European Registration of Cancer Care, is the platform to improve outcomes of cancer care by reducing variation in the diagnostic and treatment process. EURECCA acknowledges the important role of patients in implementation of consensus information in clinical practice. The aim of this article is to describe the process of involving patients in the consensus process and in developing the patient summary of the consensus for colon and rectal cancer care. The Delphi method for achieving consensus was used. Three online voting rounds and one tele-voting round were offered to an expert panel of oncology professionals and patient representatives. At four different stages, patients and/or patient representatives were involved in the process: (1) during the consensus process, (2) lecturing about the role of the patient, (3) development of the patient summary, and (4) testing the patient summary. Representatives were invited to the voting and commenting rounds of this process and given an equal vote. Although patients were not consulted during the planning stages of this process, patient involvement increased following the panel's discussion of the implementation of the consensus among the patient population. After the consensus meeting, the patient summary was written by patient representatives, oncologists and nurses. A selection of proactive patients reviewed the draft patient summary; responses were positive and several patient-reported outcomes were added. Questionnaires to evaluate the use and implementation of the patient summary in daily practice are currently being developed and tested. Patient consultation will be needed in future planning for selection of topics. The present study may function as a model for future consensus processes to involve patients

  10. Development of job standards for clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Jae; Seo, Jung-Sook; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Mi-Sun; Woo, Mi-Hye; Ju, Dal-Lae; Wie, Gyung-Ah; Lee, Song-Mi; Cha, Jin-A; Sohn, Cheong-Min

    2015-04-01

    Dyslipidemia has significantly contributed to the increase of death and morbidity rates related to cardiovascular diseases. Clinical nutrition service provided by dietitians has been reported to have a positive effect on relief of medical symptoms or reducing the further medical costs. However, there is a lack of researches to identify key competencies and job standard for clinical dietitians to care patients with dyslipidemia. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the job components of clinical dietitian and develop the standard for professional practice to provide effective nutrition management for dyslipidemia patients. The current status of clinical nutrition therapy for dyslipidemia patients in hospitals with 300 or more beds was studied. After duty tasks and task elements of nutrition care process for dyslipidemia clinical dietitians were developed by developing a curriculum (DACUM) analysis method. The developed job standards were pretested in order to evaluate job performance, difficulty, and job standards. As a result, the job standard included four jobs, 18 tasks, and 53 task elements, and specific job description includes 73 basic services and 26 recommended services. When clinical dietitians managing dyslipidemia patients performed their practice according to this job standard for 30 patients the job performance rate was 68.3%. Therefore, the job standards of clinical dietitians for clinical nutrition service for dyslipidemia patients proposed in this study can be effectively used by hospitals.

  11. The Host Response in Patients with Sepsis Developing Intensive Care Unit-acquired Secondary Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Frencken, Jos F; Scicluna, Brendon P; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Lutter, Rene; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc M J; Cremer, Olaf L; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-08-15

    Sepsis can be complicated by secondary infections. We explored the possibility that patients with sepsis developing a secondary infection while in the intensive care unit (ICU) display sustained inflammatory, vascular, and procoagulant responses. To compare systemic proinflammatory host responses in patients with sepsis who acquire a new infection with those who do not. Consecutive patients with sepsis with a length of ICU stay greater than 48 hours were prospectively analyzed for the development of ICU-acquired infections. Twenty host response biomarkers reflective of key pathways implicated in sepsis pathogenesis were measured during the first 4 days after ICU admission and at the day of an ICU-acquired infection or noninfectious complication. Of 1,237 admissions for sepsis (1,089 patients), 178 (14.4%) admissions were complicated by ICU-acquired infections (at Day 10 [6-13], median with interquartile range). Patients who developed a secondary infection showed higher disease severity scores and higher mortality up to 1 year than those who did not. Analyses of biomarkers in patients who later went on to develop secondary infections revealed a more dysregulated host response during the first 4 days after admission, as reflected by enhanced inflammation, stronger endothelial cell activation, a more disturbed vascular integrity, and evidence for enhanced coagulation activation. Host response reactions were similar at the time of ICU-acquired infectious or noninfectious complications. Patients with sepsis who developed an ICU-acquired infection showed a more dysregulated proinflammatory and vascular host response during the first 4 days of ICU admission than those who did not develop a secondary infection.

  12. The influence of lymphangiography on the development of hypothyroidism in patients irradiated for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, Douglas A.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: There is no consensus in the literature regarding the role of lymphangiography in promoting hypothyroidism in individuals with Hodgkin's disease irradiated with a mantle field. We sought to analyze the onset and rate of developing clinical or chemical hypothyroidism as well as possible factors related to its development in patients who received irradiation to the thyroid gland during treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: One hundred and forty-two patients with Hodgkin's disease were treated at the Fox Chase Cancer Center between June 1967 and October 1993. All patients were treated with curative intent with radiation therapy using a mantle field. After exclusion of patients without available thyroid function tests, < 200 days of follow-up, or no radiation to the thyroid, 104 patients were eligible for analysis. Follow-up ranged from 7-170 months (median: 43 months). Sixty-seven patients had a lymph angiogram. Seventy-three patients were treated with radiation alone and 31 with radiation plus chemotherapy. Results: The actuarial 2-, and 5-year rates of biochemical hypothyroidism for all 104 patients were 18 and 37%, respectively. Forty patients developed hypothyroidism: 9 (23%) at ≤ 1 year, 18 (45%) at ≤ 2 years, and 33 (83%) at ≤ 5 years. The actuarial 2-, and 5-year rates of biochemical hypothyroidism for patients who underwent a lymph angiogram were 23 and 42%, respectively, compared to 9 and 28%, respectively, for patients who received mantle irradiation without a lymph angiogram (p = 0.05). The effects of lymph angiogram, total thyroid dose, stage, chemotherapy, dose per fraction, energy, and age were evaluated for all patients by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. The use of a lymph angiogram (p = 0.05) was the only variable that significantly influenced hypothyroidism. Conclusions: This paper demonstrates in a multivariate analysis accounting for other potentially important variables the significant effect of

  13. Developing an Anti-Xa-Based Anticoagulation Protocol for Patients with Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Adam; Mardis, B Andrew; Mardis, Caitlin R; Huber, Michelle R; New, James P; Meadows, Holly B; Cook, Jennifer L; Toole, J Matthew; Uber, Walter E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complexities associated with anticoagulation in temporary percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) recipients, a lack of standardization exists in their management. This retrospective analysis evaluates current anticoagulation practices at a single center with the aim of identifying an optimal anticoagulation strategy and protocol. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on pVAD implanted (CentriMag (Thoratec; Pleasanton, CA) / TandemHeart (CardiacAssist; Pittsburgh, PA) or Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA)), with each group individually analyzed for bleeding and thrombotic complications. Patients in the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort were subdivided based on the anticoagulation monitoring strategy (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or antifactor Xa unfractionated heparin (anti-Xa) values). In the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort, there were five patients with anticoagulation titrated based on anti-Xa values; one patient developed a device thrombosis and a major bleed, whereas another patient experienced major bleeding. Eight patients received an Impella pVAD. Seven total major bleeds in three patients and no thrombotic events were detected. Based on distinct differences between the devices, anti-Xa values, and outcomes, two protocols were created to guide anticoagulation adjustments. However, anticoagulation in patients who require pVAD support is complex with constantly evolving anticoagulation goals. The ideal level of anticoagulation should be individually determined using several coagulation laboratory parameters in concert with hemodynamic changes in the patient's clinical status, the device, and the device cannulation.

  14. Metabolic alterations in patients who develop traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodam, F; Gasco, V; Caputo, M; Zavattaro, M; Pagano, L; Marzullo, P; Belcastro, S; Busti, A; Perino, C; Grottoli, S; Ghigo, E; Aimaretti, G

    2013-08-01

    Hypopituitarism is associated with metabolic alterations but in TBI-induced hypopituitarism data are scanty. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of naïve hypertension, dyslipidemia, and altered glucose metabolism in TBI-induced hypopituitarism patients. Cross-sectional retrospective study in a tertiary care endocrinology center. 54 adult patients encountering a moderate or severe TBI were evaluated in the chronic phase (at least 12 months after injury) after-trauma. Presence of hypopituitarism, BMI, hypertension, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, oral glucose tolerance test (if available) and a lipid profile were evaluated. The 27.8% of patients showed various degrees of hypopituitarism. In particular, 9.3% had total, 7.4% multiple and 11.1% isolated hypopituitarism. GHD was present in 22.2% of patients. BMI was similar between the two groups. Hypopituitaric patients presented a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia (phypopituitaric patients. In particular, triglycerides (phypopituitaric TBI patients. We showed that long-lasting TBI patients who develop hypopituitarism frequently present metabolic alterations, in particular altered glucose levels, insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia. In view of the risk of premature cardiovascular death in hypopituitaric patients, major attention has to been paid in those who encountered a TBI, because they suffer from the same comorbidities and may present other deterioration factors due to complex pharmacological treatments and restriction in participation in life activities and healthy lifestyle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Case-controlled study on risk factors for the development of constipation in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Tetsuya; Nagai, Keiko; Ooe, Nobuharu; Nakashima, Mihoko N; Nishida, Koyo; Nakamura, Junzo; Nakashima, Mikiro

    2011-03-01

    Constipation is a common problem in hospitalized patients; however, the relative risks of its development with various factors have not been clarified. To clarify the risk factors associated with constipation, we performed a case-controlled study of 165 hospitalized patients who were not laxative users on admission. They were divided into case (n=35) and control (n=130) groups according to laxative administration during hospitalization. Comparison of the patient backgrounds in the two groups revealed significant differences in the activities of daily living, length of fasting, rest level on admission, cerebrovascular disease, and administration of hypnotics. Multiple logistic regression analysis using these five factors as autonomous variables showed that administration of hypnotics (odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-7.06; p=0.031) was significantly related to laxative use. Therefore, the administration of hypnotics may be the principal cause of constipation development in hospitalized patients and they should be used with caution.

  16. Patient-reported outcomes in insomnia: development of a conceptual framework and endpoint model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Leah; Buysse, Daniel J; Harding, Gale; Lichstein, Kenneth; Kalsekar, Anupama; Roth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This article describes qualitative research conducted with patients with clinical diagnoses of insomnia and focuses on the development of a conceptual framework and endpoint model that identifies a hierarchy and interrelationships of potential outcomes in insomnia research. Focus groups were convened to discuss how patients experience insomnia and to generate items for patient-reported questionnaires on insomnia and associated daytime consequences. Results for the focus group produced two conceptual frameworks: one for sleep and one for daytime impairment. Each conceptual framework consists of hypothesized domains and items in each domain based on patient language taken from the focus group. These item pools may ultimately serve as a basis to develop new questionnaires to assess insomnia.

  17. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  18. Developing a Framework for Evaluating the Patient Engagement, Quality, and Safety of Mobile Health Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karandeep; Drouin, Kaitlin; Newmark, Lisa P; Rozenblum, Ronen; Lee, Jaeho; Landman, Adam; Pabo, Erika; Klinger, Elissa V; Bates, David W

    2016-02-01

    Rising ownership of smartphones and tablets across social and demographic groups has made mobile applications, or apps, a potentially promising tool for engaging patients in their health care, particularly those with high health care needs. Through a systematic search of iOS (Apple) and Android app stores and an analysis of apps targeting individuals with chronic illnesses, we assessed the degree to which apps are likely to be useful in patient engagement efforts. Usefulness was determined based on the following criteria: description of engagement, relevance to the targeted patient population, consumer ratings and reviews, and most recent app update. Among the 1,046 health care-related, patient-facing applications identified by our search, 43 percent of iOS apps and 27 percent of Android apps appeared likely to be useful. We also developed criteria for evaluating the patient engagement, quality, and safety of mobile apps.

  19. Enduring increased risk of developing depression and mania in patients with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Sørensen, Tine Møller

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the time relation between dementia and major affective disorders (major depression and mania). METHODS: Register linkage study of the Danish Hospital Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register, to establish study cohorts of patients with dementia...... and control groups (osteoarthritis or diabetes) on first discharge from hospital. Follow up of cohorts was for up to 21 years. Hazard of death was allowed for by the use of competing risks models. RESULTS: Patients with dementia had an increased risk of being admitted to hospital for major depression or mania...... during the course of the illness. The incidence remained elevated throughout the rest of the patient's life. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with dementia have an increased risk of developing depression or mania. Proper treatment of affective disorders in patients with dementia is important in reducing suffering...

  20. Caring for patients with rabies in developing countries - the neglected importance of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantola, Arnaud; Crabol, Yoann; Mahendra, Bangalore Jayakrishnappa; In, Sotheary; Barennes, Hubert; Bourhy, Hervé; Peng, Yiksing; Ly, Sowath; Buchy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Although limited publications address clinical management of symptomatic patients with rabies in intensive care units, the overwhelming majority of human rabies cases occur in the rural setting of developing countries where healthcare workers are few, lack training and drugs. Based on our experience, we suggest how clinicians in resource-limited settings can make best use of essential drugs to provide assistance to patients with rabies and their families, at no risk to themselves. Comprehensive and compassionate patient management of furious rabies should aim to alleviate thirst, anxiety and epileptic fits using infusions, diazepam or midazolam and antipyretic drugs via intravenous or intrarectal routes. Although the patient is dying, respiratory failure must be avoided especially if the family, after being informed, wish to take the patient home alive for funereal rites to be observed. Healthcare staff should be trained and clinical guidelines should be updated to include palliative care for rabies in endemic countries. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nutritional and taste characteristics of low-potassium lettuce developed for patients with chronic kidney diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Takuya; Sakuma, Kozue; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Dietary potassium restriction is recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperkalemia. Boiling or soaking vegetables in water is known to decrease their potassium content. However, these methods can also reduce the quantity of other nutrients. Recently, low-potassium (LK) lettuce has been developed for CKD patients with hyperkalemia. This study compared the potassium content, other nutritional values, and taste characteristics of LK lettuce with those of normal lettuce. The...

  2. Improvement of diabetic patients nursing care by the development of educational programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalis Vissarion; Maria Malliarou; Paraskevi Theofilou; Sofia Zyga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion edu...

  3. Caring for patients with rabies in developing countries - the neglected importance of palliative care.

    OpenAIRE

    Tarantola , Arnaud; Cabrol , Yoann; Mahendra , Bangalore Jayakrishnappa; In , Sotheary; Barennes , Hubert; Bourhy , Hervé; Peng , Yiksing; Ly , Sowath; Buchy , Philippe

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Although limited publications address clinical management of symptomatic patients with rabies in intensive care units, the overwhelming majority of human rabies cases occur in the rural setting of developing countries where healthcare workers are few, lack training and drugs. Based on our experience, we suggest how clinicians in resource-limited settings can make best use of essential drugs to provide assistance to patients with rabies and their families, at no risk to...

  4. Development of the NIH PROMIS ® Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kathryn E; Lin, Li; Cyranowski, Jill M; Reeve, Bryce B; Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Jeffery, Diana D; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Porter, Laura S; Dombeck, Carrie B; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Keefe, Francis J; Weinfurt, Kevin P

    2013-02-01

    We describe the development and validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System(®) Sexual Function and Satisfaction (PROMIS(®) SexFS; National Institutes of Health) measures, version 1.0, for cancer populations. To develop a customizable self-report measure of sexual function and satisfaction as part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health PROMIS Network. Our multidisciplinary working group followed a comprehensive protocol for developing psychometrically robust patient-reported outcome measures including qualitative (scale development) and quantitative (psychometric evaluation) development. We performed an extensive literature review, conducted 16 focus groups with cancer patients and multiple discussions with clinicians, and evaluated candidate items in cognitive testing with patients. We administered items to 819 cancer patients. Items were calibrated using item-response theory and evaluated for reliability and validity. The PROMIS SexFS measures, version 1.0, include 81 items in 11 domains: Interest in Sexual Activity, Lubrication, Vaginal Discomfort, Erectile Function, Global Satisfaction with Sex Life, Orgasm, Anal Discomfort, Therapeutic Aids, Sexual Activities, Interfering Factors, and Screener Questions. In addition to content validity (patients indicate that items cover important aspects of their experiences) and face validity (patients indicate that items measure sexual function and satisfaction), the measure shows evidence for discriminant validity (domains discriminate between groups expected to be different) and convergent validity (strong correlations between scores on PROMIS and scores on conceptually similar older measures of sexual function), as well as favorable test-retest reliability among people not expected to change (interclass correlations from two administrations of the instrument, 1 month apart). The PROMIS SexFS offers researchers a reliable and valid set of tools to measure self-reported sexual function

  5. [A clinical case of development of lactic acid acidosis in a diabetic patient taking metformin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesur, Mustafa; Cekmen, Nedum; Cetinbas, Riza R; Badalov, Pavel; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    Metformin is a biguanide. Due to its effects in suppressing the hepatic production of endogenous glucose and in increasing insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle, the agent is used particularly in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, in which insulin resistance is especially pronounced. Lactic acidosis is one of the most important side effects of metformin. A male patient, born in 1923, was admitted to the emergency unit of our hospital for sudden vertigo, weakness, dyspnea, cyanosis, and lethargy. His history data showed that the patient had been suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus for 10 years and taking Glargin (insulin), 12 U/kg, once daily and Glucophage (metformin), 850 mg thrice daily. The patient's general condition was fair; stupor, time and spatial orientation were absent. Analysis of arterial blood gases showed the presence of metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. Thereafter the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit of the hospital; intubated and connected to a T-bird ventilation apparatus. On the following day, an analysis of arterial blood gases indicated the proximity of the results to their physiological parameters. Ventilation was stopped; and monitoring of the patient continued by following the T-shape type of ventilation discontinuation. There were no X-ray signs of pneumonia or pulmonary edema. On the same day, the patient was extubated and oxygen inhalation in a dose of L/min was continued through a mask. On day 4 since therapy was initiated, the patient's vital signs, serum sugar and lactate levels became normal. By determining a new treatment regimen, the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit. Dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia developed in the patient resulted from lactic acidosis caused by the use of metformin. It should be remembered that dyspnea, acidosis, and hypoxia, which suddenly developed in metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, may be

  6. Privacy-Preserving Patient Similarity Learning in a Federated Environment: Development and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghye; Sun, Jimeng; Wang, Fei; Wang, Shuang; Jun, Chi-Hyuck; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2018-04-13

    There is an urgent need for the development of global analytic frameworks that can perform analyses in a privacy-preserving federated environment across multiple institutions without privacy leakage. A few studies on the topic of federated medical analysis have been conducted recently with the focus on several algorithms. However, none of them have solved similar patient matching, which is useful for applications such as cohort construction for cross-institution observational studies, disease surveillance, and clinical trials recruitment. The aim of this study was to present a privacy-preserving platform in a federated setting for patient similarity learning across institutions. Without sharing patient-level information, our model can find similar patients from one hospital to another. We proposed a federated patient hashing framework and developed a novel algorithm to learn context-specific hash codes to represent patients across institutions. The similarities between patients can be efficiently computed using the resulting hash codes of corresponding patients. To avoid security attack from reverse engineering on the model, we applied homomorphic encryption to patient similarity search in a federated setting. We used sequential medical events extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care-III database to evaluate the proposed algorithm in predicting the incidence of five diseases independently. Our algorithm achieved averaged area under the curves of 0.9154 and 0.8012 with balanced and imbalanced data, respectively, in κ-nearest neighbor with κ=3. We also confirmed privacy preservation in similarity search by using homomorphic encryption. The proposed algorithm can help search similar patients across institutions effectively to support federated data analysis in a privacy-preserving manner. ©Junghye Lee, Jimeng Sun, Fei Wang, Shuang Wang, Chi-Hyuck Jun, Xiaoqian Jiang. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http

  7. On the increased risk of developing late-onset epilepsy for patients with major affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bolwig, Tom Gert

    2003-01-01

    for the control groups. However, the increased risk seemed to be due to the effect of comorbid alcohol or drug abuse and not to the effect of the affective illness itself. LIMITATIONS: The results only apply to hospitalised patients. Diagnoses are not validated for research purposes. CONCLUSION: Patients...... with a diagnosis of affective disorder have an increased risk of developing epilepsy in later life. In patients with affective disorder, comorbid alcoholism/drug abuse seriously increased the risk of a subsequent diagnosis of epilepsy....

  8. Genetic polymorphisms associated with psoriasis and development of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg; Skov, Lone; Rasmussen, Mads Kirchheiner

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic inflammatory disease with predominantly cutaneous manifestations. Approximately one third of patients with PsO develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas the remaining proportion of patients has isolated cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). These two phenotypes share...... (rs6887695) was associated with PsO. CONCLUSION: Among a cohort of Danish patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, two SNPs in the IL12B and TNF genes were associated with susceptibility of psoriasis. None of the SNPs were specifically associated with isolated cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic...

  9. Interdisciplinary development and implementation of communication checklist for postoperative management of pediatric airway patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang W; Maturo, Stephen; Dwyer, Danielle; Monash, Bradley; Yager, Phoebe H; Zanger, Kerstin; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe their multidisciplinary experience in applying the Institute of Health Improvement methodology to develop a protocol and checklist to reduce communication error during transfer of care for postoperative pediatric surgical airway patients. Preliminary outcome data following implementation of the protocol and checklist are also presented. Prospective study from July 1, 2009, to February 1, 2011. Tertiary care center. Subjects. One hundred twenty-six pediatric airway patients who required coordinated care between Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Massachusetts General Hospital. Two sentinel events involving airway emergencies demonstrated a critical need for a standardized, comprehensive instrument that would ensure safe transfer of care. After development and implementation of the protocol and checklist, an initial pilot period on the first set of 9 pediatric airway patients was reassessed. Subsequent prospective 11-month follow-up data of 93 pediatric airway patients were collected and analyzed. A multidisciplinary pediatric team developed and implemented a formalized, postoperative checklist and transfer protocol. After implementation of the checklist and transfer protocol, prospective analysis showed no adverse events from miscommunication during transfer of care over the subsequent 11-month period involving 93 pediatric airway patients. There has been very little written in the quality and safety patient literature about coordinating effective transfer of care between the pediatric surgical and medical subspecialty realms. After design and implementation of a simple, electronically based transfer-of-care checklist and protocol, the number of postsurgical pediatric airway information transfer and communication errors decreased significantly.

  10. Causes of Death Among 379 Patients With Hemophilia: A Developing Country's Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan; Rahimi, Hossein; Mohades, Seyed Tahereh; Behboudi, Maryam

    2018-05-01

    There are steps to achieve an optimum life for patients with hemophilia in developing countries, and awareness of the pattern of death in patients with hemophilia is a prerequisite for any health-care program. Owing to the lack of any data on the pattern of death in patients with hemophilia from developing countries, the current study was done to address common causes of death, and the spectrum of causes of death among individuals with hemophilia A and B. To address the pattern of death in northeast of Iran, we retrospectively collected demographic data regarding deceased patients with hemophilia A and B. Overall, among 379 people with hemophilia A and B, there were 46 deaths. Thirty-two deaths happened in the severe forms of the diseases. The obtained results show the patterns of death in the patients studied are not as parallel as some reports from the developed countries. Traumatic and spontaneous bleeding events were the main causes of death. The trend of death shows a decrease in the current decade post better therapeutic facilities. Evaluation of causes of death in hemophilia can be a useful indicator for managing the efficacy of health care in the current patients.

  11. Development of Foot Massage Program on Nausea and Vomiting for Cancer Patients: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Guru Prapti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to develop a foot massage program to support care activity in reducing nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Two phases, a literature review and the development of a foot massage program were conducted. The literature review was to analyze state of the art massage techniques by reviewing problems, related theories and supporting evidence. Method: Eight published studies in the English language were reviewed. A massage can be performed for different durations, from 10 minutes up to 60 minutes for three to six weeks and can be applied on various body areas. We found that the soft stroke/effleurage seems to be the best method and is most suitable for patients with cancer. It is also evident that foot massaging can be applied as a modality to reduce nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Result: We developed a foot massage program specifically for patients with cancer. The foot massage program comprised of three sessions, including 1 education session, 2 preparation session, and 3 foot massage session. In the education session, patients obtain brief information about the definition of a foot massage, the benefits and contraindication of foot massaging. During the preparation phase, foot soaking and warming up are performed. Subsequently, the foot massage is applied and should last for 30 minutes. Further research is recommended to test the effectiveness of the proposed foot massage program for nausea and vomiting in cancer patients across countries including Indonesia. Key Words: Foot massage program, chemotherapy, nausea and vomiting

  12. Developing risk factors for post traumatic empyema in patients with chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara del Pilar Quiroga; Jos Daniel Charry; Nicols Becerra; Juan Camilo Garcia; Eliana Karina Muoz; Rodrigo Lara

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To establish the risk factors associated to development of empyema posttraumatic in patients with chest trauma managed with closed thoracostomy. Methods: It was a descriptive and observational study of patients with chest trauma who were admitted between January 2013 and May 2014. The variables were evaluated and the results according to management with closed thoracostomy in patients with thoracic trauma was determined. Univariate analysis was performed and measures of central tendency were calculated. Results: In total 240 patients were analyzed. Among them, 10.4% (25) developed posttraumatic empyema. In patients who developed empyema, the mean age was 34.2 years, and the mean injury severity score was 20.6. It was identified as a risk factor closed chest trauma in 68%(17) and 84%coagulated hemothorax trauma. Empyema management thoracoscopy was in 100%of cases. Conclusions: The posttraumatic empyema is a complication that occurs in patients with thoracic trauma. One of the most important risk factors is coagulated hemothorax which could be identified and treated in time to avoid comorbidities during hospital stay.

  13. Factors associated with the development of atrial fibrillation in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaydin, Mehmet; Turker, Yasin; Varol, Ercan; Alaca, Sule; Erdogan, Dogan; Yilmaz, Nigar; Dogan, Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS). A total of 146 consecutive patients with rheumatic MS were screened. They were accepted to be in AF group and sinus rhythm group according to their rhythm in the baseline ECG. After screening, 38 patients were excluded due to hyperthyroidism (n = 13), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 22), malignancy (n = 2) and rheumatoid arthritis (n = 1). Therefore, remaining 108 patients, 74 of whom in sinus rhythm (MS-SR) and 34 of whom in AF (MS-AF) constituted study population. Fourty age- and gender-matched patients constituted control group. Factors associated with development of AF in multivariable analysis included High sensitivity C reactive protein (P = 0.005; odds ratio, 3.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-8.22), N-terminal of brain natriuretic peptide precursor (P brain natriuretic peptide precursor and left atrial diameter are associated with development AF in patients with MS.

  14. Prevalence and risk factor for symptomatic avascular necrosis development in Thai systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunyakham, Wichak; Foocharoen, Chingching; Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2012-06-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and most SLE patients suffer from this problem. To study the prevalence of AVN in Thai SLE patients and to determine the risk factors for developing AVN. A retrospective study was performed, between January 1, 1995 and August 31, 2005, on patients over 15 years of age in Khon Kaen, Thailand. The medical records of 736 SLE patients were reviewed. The female to male ratio was 15.4:1. The prevalence of AVN was 8.8%. The average age at the time of AVN detection was 27 years (range, 18-54) and the average duration of disease 69 months (range, 12-112). All cases were AVN of the hip joint. The factors correlated with AVN included: long duration of disease, history of previous septic arthritis in the ipsilateral hip to the AVN development, hematological involvement, gastrointestinal involvement, arthritis and cutaneous vasculitis. After regression analysis, hematological involvement and long duration of disease were associated with AVN with a respective odds ratio of 3.13 (95% CI 1.13-8.54) and 1.01 (95% CI 1.00-1.02). Neither high-dose steroid nor antimalarial treatment were correlated with AVN in our study and 4.6% (n = 3) of patients had never received steroid therapy during the follow-up period. Prevalence of symptomatic AVN was 8.8% in our SLE patients. A longer duration of disease and hematological involvement were associated with AVN development.

  15. Development of Postoperative Diabetes Mellitus in Patients Undergoing Distal Pancreatectomy versus Whipple Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Adrienne; Demirjian, Aram; Yamamoto, Maki; Hollenbach, Kathryn; Imagawa, David K

    2017-10-01

    Because the islets of Langerhans are more prevalent in the body and tail of the pancreas, distal pancreatectomy (DP) is believed to increase the likelihood of developing new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). To determine whether the development of postoperative diabetes was more prevalent in patients undergoing DP or Whipple procedure, 472 patients undergoing either a DP (n = 122) or Whipple (n = 350), regardless of underlying pathology, were analyzed at one month postoperatively. Insulin or oral hypoglycemic requirements were assessed and patients were stratified into preoperative diabetic status: NODM or preexisting diabetes. A retrospective chart review of the 472 patients between 1996 and 2014 showed that the total rate of NODM after Whipple procedure was 43 per cent, which was not different from patients undergoing DP (45%). The incidence of preoperative diabetes was 12 per cent in patients undergoing the Whipple procedure and 17 per cent in the DP cohort. Thus, the overall incidence of diabetes after Whipple procedure was 54 and 49 per cent in the DP group. The development of diabetes was unrelated to the type of resection performed. Age more than 65 and Caucasian ethnicity were associated with postoperative diabetes regardless of the type of resection performed.

  16. Developing and testing the patient-centred innovation questionnaire for hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Yuan; Weng, Rhay-Hung; Wu, Tsung-Chin; Lin, Tzu-En; Hsu, Ching-Tai; Hung, Chiu-Hsia; Tsai, Yu-Chen

    2018-03-01

    Develop the patient-centred innovation questionnaire for hospital nurses and establish its validity and reliability. Patient-centred care has been adopted by health care managers in their efforts to improve health care quality. It is regarded as a core concept for developing innovation. A cross-sectional study was employed to collect data from hospital nurses in Taiwan. This study was divided into two stages: pilot study and main study. In the main study, 596 valid responses were collected. This study adopted reliability analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and selected nurse innovation scale as a criterion to test criterion-related validity. Five-dimension patient-centred innovation questionnaire was proposed: access and practicability, co-ordination and communication, sharing power and responsibility, care continuity, family and person focus. Each dimension demonstrated a reliability of 0.89-0.98. All dimensions had acceptable convergent and discriminate validity. The patient-centred innovation questionnaire and nurse innovation scale exhibited a significantly positive correlation. Patient-centred innovation questionnaire not only had a good theoretical basis but also had sufficient reliability and construct validity, and criterion-related validity. Patient-centred innovation questionnaire could give a measure for evaluating the implementation of patient-centred care and could be used as a management tool during the process of nurse innovation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  18. Development and Utilization of a Patient-Oriented Outpatient Guidance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Mira; Koo, Bo Kyung; Kim, Byoung Jae; Hong, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Jongdeuk; Yoo, Sooyoung; Hwang, Hee; Seo, Jeongwan; Kim, Donghyeok; Shin, Kichul

    2016-07-01

    To develop a tool which can easily access the hospital information system (HIS) to facilitate outpatient care and maximize patient satisfaction on his or her hospital visit. Our Center for Informatics developed an outpatient guidance system (OGS) after careful analysis of the list of daily tasks undergone by patients and related work processes. Bluetooth beacons were installed to assist patients, to inform them of points of interest, and to guide them along the proper routes to and within the hospital. The OGS conveniently provided patients' clinic schedules, routes to the hospital, and direct costs; all of this information was embedded in the HIS accessed from patients' personal mobile devices or kiosks. Patients were also able to identify their locations within the hospital, receiving proper directions to subsequent task. Since its launch in October 2014, the number of mobile accesses increased from 4,011 to 8,242 per month within a year. The substantial growth of interest in and use of our OGS in such a short period indicate that this system has been successfully incorporated into patients' daily activities. We believe that this system will continue to help improve health services and the well-being of those visiting the hospital.

  19. Development of a financial literacy course for patients with newly diagnosed cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Linden, Hannah; Steelquist, Jordan; Watabayashi, Kate; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Leahy, Tony; Overstreet, Karen

    2017-03-01

    Although patients with cancer often face serious financial hardships, few studies have reported on strategies to mitigate this burden. Improving literacy about the financial aspects of cancer care may decrease the negative financial impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment. We obtained input from patient stakeholders on the perceived value and optimal design of a financial literacy program in the advanced cancer setting. Prospective cohort survey.  A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted, during which patients with either colorectal or breast cancer were asked to describe the impact of cancer on their finances and employment, to state their preferences about discussing costs with their providers, and to give input on development of a financial literacy course. Twenty-one patients (76% Caucasian) completed interviews, the majority of whom had Medicare or commercial insurance (71%). Lost income from early retirement or disability was the most financially burdensome experience for 67% of patients. The majority of patients (76%) reported that a financial literacy course would be helpful in navigating the cost of cancer care. Most preferred the course be administered at diagnosis in a live group format. Feedback from patients with cancer supported the development of a group financial literacy course that addresses barriers to discussing cost concerns, employment changes during cancer, and available resources for financial assistance.

  20. Gender identity and gender role orientation in female assigned patients with disorders of sex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Aino K; Fagerholm, Riitta; Santtila, Pekka; Miettinen, Päivi J; Taskinen, Seppo

    2012-11-01

    Gender identity and gender role orientation were assessed in 24 female assigned patients with disorders of sex development. A total of 16 patients were prenatally exposed to androgens, of whom 15 had congenital adrenal hyperplasia and 1 was virilized due to maternal tumor. Eight patients had 46,XY karyotype, of whom 5 had partial and 3 had complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. Gender identity was measured by the 27-item Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire for Adolescents and Adults with 167 female medical students as controls, and gender role was assessed by the femininity and masculinity subscales of the 30-item Bem Sex Role Inventory with 104 female and 64 male medical students as controls. No patient reached the cutoff for gender identity disorder on the Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire for Adolescents and Adults. However, patients with 46,XY karyotype demonstrated a somewhat more conflicted gender identity, although the overall differences were relatively small. As to gender role orientation, patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome had high scores on the femininity and masculinity scales of the Bem Sex Role Inventory, which made them the most androgynous group. Our findings, although clinically not clear cut, suggest that patients with disorders of sex development are a heterogeneous group regarding gender identity and gender role outcomes, and that this issue should be discussed with the family when treatment plans are made. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The educational preparation of nurses in a developing economy and patient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Z R; Gkantaras, I; Topping, A E; Cannaby, A M; Foreman, B; Watson, R; Thompson, D R; Gray, R

    2018-03-02

    Most studies have reported that higher levels (baccalaureate degree) of educational attainment by nurses are associated with lower levels of patient mortality. Researchers working in developed economies (e.g. North America and Europe) have almost exclusively conducted these studies. The value of baccalaureate nurse education has not been tested in countries with a developing economy. A retrospective observational study conducted in seven hospitals. Patient mortality was the main outcome of interest. Anonymized data were extracted from nurses and patients from two different administrative sources and linked using the staff identification number that exists in both systems. We used bivariate logistic regression models to test the association between mortality and the educational attainment of the admitting nurse (responsible for assessment and care planning). Data were extracted for 11 918 (12, 830 admissions) patients and 7415 nurses over the first 6 months of 2015. The majority of nurses were educated in South Asia and just over half were educated to at least bachelor degree level. After adjusting for confounding and clustering, nurse education was not found to be associated with mortality. Our observations may suggest that in a developing economy, the academic level of nurses' education is not associated with a reduction in patient mortality. Findings should be interpreted with considerable caution but do challenge widely held assumptions about the value of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Further research focused on nursing education in developing economies is required to inform health policy and planning. © 2018 International Council of Nurses.

  2. Development of Clinical Pharmacy in Switzerland: Involvement of Community Pharmacists in Care for Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersberger, Kurt E; Messerli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The role of the community pharmacist in primary care has been undergoing change in Switzerland in parallel to international developments: it has become more clinically and patient oriented. Special services of community pharmacists to older patients taking long-term or multiple medications, discharged from hospitals or experiencing cognitive impairment or disability have been developed. These services require more clinical knowledge and skills from community pharmacists and are based on, for example, 'simple or intermediate medication reviews' focused primarily to improve medication adherence and rational drug use by a patient. Reflecting the new role of community pharmacies, this article describes the current services provided by community pharmacies in Switzerland, e.g., 'polymedication check', 'weekly pill organizer', and 'services for chronic patients', as well as new Swiss educational and reimbursement systems supporting development of these services. In the international context, involvement of community pharmacists in patient-oriented care is growing. This review summarizes positive and negative experiences from implementation of community pharmacy services in Switzerland and provides examples for the development of such services in other countries.

  3. The Investigation of Quality of Life in 87 Chinese Patients with Disorders of Sex Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In the process of care for disorders of sex development (DSD, clinical decisions should focus on the long-term quality of life (QOL. We sought to investigate the QOL of patients with DSD in China. Design. Case-control study was carried out. Patients. 90 patients of DSD participated in the study. Finally, 87 patients were analyzed including Turner’s syndrome (23, Noonan syndrome (2, androgen insensitivity syndrome (22, testicular regression syndrome (2, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (16, and pure gonadal dysgenesis (22. Measurements. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was chosen for the present investigation. Four domain scores were analyzed independently including physical, psychological, and social relationship and environmental domains. Results. The average age of the DSD group is 22.34 ± 4.97 years, and only 13.79% patients ever had sexual life. The scores of psychological and environmental domains were lower than that of the physical and social relationship domains, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05. Compared with the Chinese urban population, the QOL scores of DSD patients in China were not significantly lower. Conclusions. With proper treatment, including the follow-up and psychological support, the QOL of DSD patients cannot be significantly reduced. For DSD patients, more attention should be paid to the potential psychological and sexual problems.

  4. A newly developed assessment tool on collaborative role of doctor–pharmacist in patient medication management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Porwal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Poor communication is one of the most important common factor contributing to medication errors. Despite their common history, there are many intellectual and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that eventually affects patient care and health outcomes. Objectives. The main objective of the study is to evaluate the coordination and teamwork between pharmacist and doctor to provide betterment in the care of the patient health. Material and methods . A questionnaire of 10 questions was developed each for the patient, pharmacist and doctor posted on District Hospital, Moradabad (U.P., India and data collected from the patient and medical professionals through questionnaire were analyzed for collaborative role of doctor-pharmacist with respect to patient care. The results were analyzed using Graph Pad Prism 5. Results. The data obtained from the questionnaire highlights a significant effort between pharmacist and doctors. However, some patients often doubt in the skills of pharmacist for treatment outcome, but the majority of people responds positive to doctor-pharmacist role as they prove to be fruitful in removing medication errors. Conclusions . To facilitate the patient care, doctor-pharmacist alliance is necessary, desired and should be motivated as professed by the respondents. Collaboration is an important element of effective patient-focused health care delivery.

  5. Incidence and risk factors for delirium development in ICU patients - a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanova, Marcela; Sklienka, Peter; Roman, Kula; Burda, Michal; Janoutova, Jana

    2017-06-01

    Delirium is an acute brain dysfunction and a frequent complication in critically ill patients. When present it significantly worsens the prognosis of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of delirium and risk factors for delirium in a mixed group of trauma, medical and surgical ICU patients. A prospective observational study was conducted in one of the six-bed Intensive Care Units of the University Hospital Ostrava in the Czech Republic during a 12-month period. We evaluated the incidence of delirium and its predisposing and precipitating risk factors. All patients were assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU). Of the total of 332 patients with a median APACHE II (the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) score of 12, who were evaluated for delirium, 48 could not be assessed using CAM-ICU (47 due to prolonged coma, 1 due to language barriers). The incidence of delirium was 26.1%, with trauma and medical patients being more likely to develop delirium than surgical patients. Risk of delirium was significantly associated with age ≥ 65 years, and alcohol abuse in their anamnesis, with APACHE II score on admission, and with the use of sedatives and/or vasopressors. Delirious patients who remained in the ICU for a prolonged period showed a greater need for ventilator support and had a greater ICU-mortality.

  6. Development of a brief multidisciplinary education programme for patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Rikke H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a prevalent progressive musculoskeletal disorder, leading to pain and disability. Patient information and education are considered core elements in treatment guidelines for OA; however, there is to our knowledge no evidence-based recommendation on the best approach, content or length on educational programmes in OA. Objective: to develop a brief, patient oriented disease specific multidisciplinary education programme (MEP to enhance self-management in patients with OA. Method Twelve persons (80% female mean age 59 years diagnosed with hand, hip or knee OA participated in focus group interviews. In the first focus group, six participants were interviewed about their educational needs, attitudes and expectations for the MEP. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thereafter condensed. Based on results from focus group interviews, current research evidence, clinical knowledge and patients' experience, a multidisciplinary OA team (dietist, nurse, occupational therapist, pharmacist, physical therapist and rheumatologist and a patient representative developed a pilot-MEP after having attended a work-shop in health pedagogics. Finally, the pilot-MEP was evaluated by a second focus group consisting of four members from the first focus group and six other experienced patients, before final adjustments were made. Results The focus group interviews revealed four important themes: what is OA, treatment options, barriers and coping strategies in performing daily activities, and how to live with osteoarthritis. Identified gaps between patient expectations and experience with the pilot-programme were discussed and adapted into a final MEP. The final MEP was developed as a 3.5 hour educational programme provided in groups of 6-9 patients. All members from the multidisciplinary team are involved in the education programme, including a facilitator who during the provision of the programme ensures that the individual

  7. Hypersensitivity to aeroallergens in adult patients with atopic dermatitis develops due to the different immunological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samochocki, Zbigniew; Owczarek, Witold; Rujna, Paweł; Raczka, Alicja

    2007-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a disease with a complex pathomechanism, it is very difficult to establish the exact factors which can either trigger or exacerbate the disease. Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in AD development can be increased by, among others, applying new diagnostic tests and careful assessment of the results obtained. The aim of this study was to determine the allergic mechanisms of hypersensitivity to selected aeroallergens in patients with AD. The study comprised 109 AD patients. In all the patients the total IgE level was measured and atopy patch tests and skin prick tests were performed. We also assessed the presence of specific IgE against house dust mite, birch-tree, mixed grass pollen and cat dander. The highest incidence of positive results was found for house dust mite allergens, irrespective of the test employed. Analysing hypersensitivity to all the examined allergens we revealed the presence of allergic mechanisms in 85.3% of the patients. In 30.2% of the examined individuals we proved a type I immunological response, in 45.9% -- both types I and IV in 9.2% -- only type IV in one patient. In 14.7% of the patients the results of all the tests performed were negative. Analysing hypersensitivity to particular aeroallergens, negative test results to house dust mite were observed in 25.8% of the patients. The percentage of positive results for birch pollen, grass pollen and cat dander were 45.0, 44.1 and 53.2, respectively. Analysis of the results showed that allergic reactions to the same aeroallergens may develop via different mechanisms. We also revealed that the coexistence of various mechanisms involved in the development of hypersensitivity to a particular aeroallergen may occur in individual patients.

  8. Development and evaluation of a multidisciplinary controlled substances committee within a patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernant, Stephanie A; Bastien, Rachel; Lai, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To present the development of a multidisciplinary controlled substances committee and describe its effectiveness in relation to prescribers' acceptance of committee recommendations, the number of premature deaths associated with controlled substances, and prescribers' need for education on controlled substances. A patient-centered medical home and accountable care organization in Maine that serves more than 60,000 patients across a large rural area, 70% of whom are classified as lower income. A multidisciplinary group of prescribers and PharmD residents created a committee to influence organizational culture regarding controlled substances. The Controlled Substances Initiative Committee (CSIC) updated institutional policies, developed provider education, and made personalized patient recommendations to prescribers. The primary outcome was average change in daily morphine equivalent dose (MED) in patients for whom CSIC recommended a dose reduction to the patient's prescriber. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who died of a known overdose or suspected drug-related death during 2012-2013 or 2013-2014. In addition, prescriber beliefs about controlled substances were measured via a needs assessment. The average daily MED for patients whom CSIC recommended dose reduction was lower after 3 months compared with at baseline (175.5 ± 344.3 mg vs. 292.7 ± 466.5 mg; P vs. 11.1%; P = 1.00). However, a greater number of patients had a suspected drug-related death during 2013-2014 compared with during 2012-2013 (0% vs. 27.3%; P = 0.05). A multidisciplinary controlled substances committee may improve patient safety and outcomes by offering prescriber support and helping alter prescribing culture.

  9. Development and validation of a clinically applicable score to classify cachexia stages in advanced cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Wang, Bangyan; Liu, Huiquan; Yang, Kaixiang; Thapa, Sudip; Zhang, Haowen; Li, Lu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome that is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients and leads to progressive functional impairments. The classification of cachexia stages is essential for diagnosing and treating cachexia. However, there is a lack of simple tools with good discrimination for classifying cachexia stages. Therefore, our study aimed to develop a clinically applicable cachexia staging score (CSS) and validate its discrimination of clinical outcomes for different cachexia stages. Methods Advanced cancer patients were enrolled in our study. A CSS comprising the following five components was developed: weight loss, a simple questionnaire of sarcopenia (SARC‐F), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, appetite loss, and abnormal biochemistry. According to the CSS, patients were classified into non‐cachexia, pre‐cachexia, cachexia, and refractory cachexia stages, and clinical outcomes were compared among the four groups. Results Of the 297 participating patients, data from 259 patients were ultimately included. Based on the CSS, patients were classified into non‐cachexia (n = 69), pre‐cachexia (n = 68), cachexia (n = 103), and refractory cachexia (n = 19) stages. Patients with more severe cachexia stages had lower skeletal muscle indexes (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004 in male and female patients, respectively), higher prevalence of sarcopenia (P = 0.017 and P = 0.027 in male and female patients, respectively), more severe symptom burden (P cachexia stages. This score is extremely useful for the clinical treatment and prognosis of cachexia and for designing clinical trials. PMID:29372594

  10. Increased active von Willebrand factor during disease development in the aging diabetic patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang Feng; Xia, Zuo Li; Han, Ji Ju; Wang, Yi Ting; Wang, Ji Yue; Pan, Shao Dong; Wu, Ya Ping; Zhang, Bin; Li, Guang Yao; Du, Jing Wei; Gao, Hen Qiang; de Groot, Philip G; de Laat, Bas; Hollestelle, Martine J

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is known to cause endothelial activation resulting in the secretion of von Willebrand factor (VWF). We have shown that levels of VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation are increased in specific clinical settings. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether active VWF levels increase during aging and the development of diabetes within the population of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Patients and controls were divided into two groups based on age: older and younger than 60 years of age. VWF antigen, VWF propeptide, VWF activation factor and total active VWF were measured. Patients older than 60 years of age had increased levels of total active VWF, VWF activation factor and VWF propeptide compared to younger patients and controls. All measured VWF parameters were associated with age in diabetic patients. Total active VWF and VWF propeptide correlated with the period of being diagnosed with diabetes. Regression analyses showed that especially the VWF activation factor was strongly associated with diabetes in patients older than 60 years of age. In conclusion, we found that the conformation of VWF could be involved in the disease process of diabetes and that the VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation could play a role as risk marker during the development of diabetes in combination with an increase in age. Our study shows that the active quality of VWF was more important than the quantity.

  11. Intravenous Vancomycin Associated With the Development of Nephrotoxicity in Patients With Class III Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yookyung Christy; Saw, Stephen; Soliman, Daniel; Bingham, Angela L; Pontiggia, Laura; Hunter, Krystal; Chuang, Linda; Siemianowski, Laura A; Ereshefsky, Benjamin; Hollands, James M

    2017-11-01

    A consensus statement recommends initial intravenous (IV) vancomycin dosing of 15-20 mg/kg every 8- 24 hours, with an optional 25- to 30-mg/kg loading dose. Although some studies have shown an association between weight and the development of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity, results have been inconsistent. To evaluate the correlation between incidence of nephrotoxicity associated with weight-based IV vancomycin dosing strategies in nonobese and obese patients. This retrospective cohort study evaluated hospitalized adult patients admitted who received IV vancomycin. Patients were stratified into nonobese (body mass index [BMI] obesity class I and II (BMI 30-39.9kg/m 2 ), and obesity class III (BMI≥40 kg/m 2 ) groups; patients who were overweight but not obese were excluded. Incidence of nephrotoxicity and serum vancomycin trough concentrations were evaluated. Of a total of 62 documented cases of nephrotoxicity (15.1%), 13 (8.7%), 23 (14.3%), and 26 (26.3%) cases were observed in nonobese, obesity class I and II, and obesity class III groups, respectively ( P=0.002). Longer durations of therapy ( P20 mg/L ( Pobesity were 3-times as likely to develop nephrotoxicity when compared with nonobese patients (odds ratio [OR]=2.99; CI=1.12-7.94) and obesity class I and II patients (OR=3.14; CI=1.27-7.75). Obesity and other factors are associated with a higher risk of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity.

  12. A model to teach concomitant patient communication during psychomotor skill development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Delwyn; Sweet, Linda; Muller, Amanda; Hyett, Jon

    2018-01-01

    Many health professionals use psychomotor or task-based skills in clinical practice that require concomitant communication with a conscious patient. Verbally engaging with the patient requires highly developed verbal communication skills, enabling the delivery of patient-centred care. Historically, priority has been given to learning the psychomotor skills essential to clinical practice. However, there has been a shift towards also ensuring competent communication with the patient during skill performance. While there is literature outlining the steps to teach and learn verbal communication skills, little is known about the most appropriate instructional approach to teach how to verbally engage with the patient when also learning to perform a task. A literature review was performed and it identified that there was no model or proven approach which could be used to integrate the learning of both psychomotor and communication skills. This paper reviews the steps to teach a communication skill and provides a suggested model to guide the acquisition and development of the concomitant -communication skills required with a patient at the time a psychomotor skill is performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [The possibility of acute inflammatory reaction affects the development of pressure ulcers in bedridden elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, N; Takano, K; Mashiko, T; Jimbo, S; Shimetani, N; Ohtani, H

    1999-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute inflammatory reaction associates with the development of pressure ulcers in bedridden elderly patients, 40 hospitalized elderly patients suffering from bacterial pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, and femoral bone fracture were enrolled in this study. All of them were divided into two groups with pressure ulcers (group P; 17 patients) and without one (group N; 23 patients). The blood samples were taken from them within 5 days after the patients being bedridden. Although no significant difference exist in pressure ulcer risk factors (age, gender, Braden scale, underlying diseases, blood pressure, and heart rate) between the two groups, white blood cell, plasma C-reactive protein and fibrinogen in group P increased significantly as compared with those in group N. Besides number of platelets and maximum platelet aggregation rate were significantly higher in group P than in group N. Serum albumin and hemoglobin of both groups decreased after being bedridden, especially hemoglobin in group P was significantly lower than that in group N. While the concentration of serum IL-6 did not indicate a significant difference between both the groups, serum IL-1 beta increased significantly in group P. In conclusion, we suggested that acute inflammatory reaction releasing proinflammatory cytokines affected the development of pressure ulcer in bedridden elderly patients.

  14. Home healthcare nurse retention and patient outcome model: discussion and model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Cushman, Margaret

    2012-08-01

    This paper discusses additions to an empirically tested model of home healthcare nurse retention. An argument is made that the variables of shared decision-making and organizational commitment be added to the model based on the authors' previous research and additional evidence from the literature. Previous research testing the home healthcare nurse retention model established empirical relationships between nurse, agency, and area characteristics to nurse job satisfaction, intent to stay, and retention. Unexplained model variance prompted a new literature search to augment understanding of nurse retention and patient and agency outcomes. Data come from the authors' previous research, and a literature search from 1990 to 2011 on the topics organizational commitment, shared decision-making, nurse retention, patient outcomes and agency performance. The literature provides a rationale for the additional variables of shared decision-making and affective and continuous organizational commitment, linking these variables to nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, nurse retention and patient outcomes and agency performance. Implications for nursing.  The new variables in the model suggest that all agencies, even those not struggling to retain nurses, should develop interventions to enhance nurse job satisfaction to assure quality patient outcomes. The new nurse retention and patient outcome model increases our understanding of nurse retention. An understanding of the relationship among these variables will guide future research and the development of interventions to create and maintain nursing work environments that contribute to nurse affective agency commitment, nurse retention and quality of patient outcomes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Development of a Performance-Based Measure of Executive Functions in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Chi Chiu

    Full Text Available A performance-based measure for assessing executive functions (EF is useful to understand patients' real life performance of EF. This study aimed to develop a performance-based measure of executive functions (PEF based on the Lezak model and to examine psychometric properties (i.e., unidimensionality and reliability of the PEF using Rasch analysis in patients with schizophrenia. We developed the PEF in three phases: (1 designing the preliminary version of PEF; (2 consultation with experts, cognitive interviews with patients, and pilot tests on patients to revise the preliminary PEF; (3 establishment of the final version of the PEF and examination of unidimensionality and Rasch reliability. Two hundred patients were assessed using the revised PEF. After deleting items which did not satisfy the Rasch model's expectations, the final version of the PEF contained 1 practice item and 13 test items for assessing the four domains of EF (i.e., volition, planning, purposive action, and effective performance. For unidimensional and multidimensional Rasch analyses, the 4 domains showed good reliability (i.e., 0.77-0.85 and 0.87-0.90, respectively. Our results showed that the PEF had satisfactory unidimensionality and Rasch reliability. Therefore, clinicians and researchers could use the PEF to assess the four domains of EF in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. Scientific basis of priority directions of the health care development for cardiac patients in city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Danilchenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the scientific basis of priority directions of the health care development for cardiac patients in city according to public health system. Improving medical and demographic situation, increasing the availability and quality of care to all segments of the population is the priority task of modern health care system in Ukraine. Various aspects of population health due to diseases of the cardiovascular system and the issues of improving public health system and the system of cardiac care for the population, is the subject of many years researches. Cardiovascular diseases are leading causes of premature death, disability, temporary disability. According to the experience of developed countries in recent decades, the prevalence of this pathology and the severity of the harm to public health can reduce significantly in case of effective organization of medical-diagnostic process and prevention system. Specialized in patient care for patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases, is very expensive. At the same time, the number of patients with such pathology is high enough in ambulatory practice. Among them, special attention should be paid to those patients, who require daily monitoring, but do not require the round-the-clock stationary mode. The organization of inpatient forms of medical care for this category of patients is a very urgent task. Equally important are the training of personnel for the cardiology service, the sustainability of human resources, economic motivation, which ensures high quality, the effectiveness of complex labor processes.

  17. Release criteria from hospitals of 131I thyrotoxicosis therapy patients in developing countries - case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, W.; Faaruq, S.; Matiullah; Hussain, A.; Khan, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    The current release limit, recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (1), from hospitals of patients undergoing 131 I thyrotoxicosis therapy is ∼1100 MBq (∼30 mCi). Owing to the difference in socio-economic conditions, literacy rate, family system, etc., this release limit may not be applicable in most of the developing countries like Pakistan. Therefore, the prime objective of this case study was to re-evaluate the release criteria for 131 I thyrotoxicosis therapy patients by taking into account their lifestyle, economic conditions and other facilities such as availability of private/public transport, etc. In this context, systematic studies were carried out and 50 patients (i.e. 35 outpatients and 15 inpatients) at the Nuclear Medicine Oncology and Radiotherapy Inst. (NORI), Islamabad, were studied. Exposure rate at the surface of the body and at a distance of 1 m from the standing patient was measured. Results obtained from this study showed that the dose equivalent delivered by these patients to their family members (particularly children) and general public was higher than annual dose limits recommended by the International Commission for Radiation Protection in their report ICRP Publication 60 (2). In the light of this study, it is recommended that the release activity limit of ∼370 MBq (or dose rate level of ∼10 μSv h -1 at 1 m from the patient) be adopted instead of ∼1100 MBq in developing countries like Pakistan. (authors)

  18. Factors predlisposing to developing early hypothyroidism after 131I therapy in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mingfeng; Wen Chijun; Qian Hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical meanings of changes of serum TRAb, TGA, TMA contents during treatment of Graves' disease with 131 I, especially in those patients developing early hypothyroidism. Methods: Serum levels of TRAb, TGA, TMA, TSH, T 3 , T 4 were measured in 167 patients with Graves' disease both before and six months after mi therapy. Results: Six months after 131 I treatment, the original 167 patients could be divided into three groups based apon their thyroid ruction statas: Group A, improved but remained hyperthyroid, n=91, Group B, enthyroid, n=48, Group C, developing early hypothyroidism, n=28. Average age in Group C (hypothyroid) was significantly lower than that in Group A (hyperthyroid) (P 131 I treatment in younger patients. (2) Patients with high TRAb levels before 131 I therapy were less likely to be rendered enthyroid after a single course of treatment while those with low TRAb levels were easily rendered hypothyroid. (3) Development of hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment was closely related to the increase of TGA, TMA levels. (authors)

  19. Patients with Multiple Myeloma Develop SOX2-Specific Autoantibodies after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kobold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of SOX2-specific autoantibodies seems to be associated with an improved prognosis in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. However, it is unclear if SOX2-specific antibodies also develop in established multiple myeloma (MM. Screening 1094 peripheral blood (PB sera from 196 MM patients and 100 PB sera from healthy donors, we detected SOX2-specific autoantibodies in 7.7% and 2.0% of patients and donors, respectively. We identified SOX2211–230 as an immunodominant antibody-epitope within the full protein sequence. SOX2 antigen was expressed in most healthy tissues and its expression did not correlate with the number of BM-resident plasma cells. Accordingly, anti-SOX2 immunity was not related to SOX2 expression levels or tumor burden in the patients’ BM. The only clinical factor predicting the development of anti-SOX2 immunity was application of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT. Anti-SOX2 antibodies occurred more frequently in patients who had received alloSCT (n=74. Moreover, most SOX2-seropositive patients had only developed antibodies after alloSCT. This finding indicates that alloSCT is able to break tolerance towards this commonly expressed antigen. The questions whether SOX2-specific autoantibodies merely represent an epiphenomenon, are related to graft-versus-host effects or participate in the immune control of myeloma needs to be answered in prospective studies.

  20. Considerations for conducting qualitative research with pediatric patients for the purpose of PRO development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zabin S; Jensen, Sally E; Lai, Jin-Shei

    2016-09-01

    To provide an overview of methodological considerations when conducting qualitative research with pediatric patients for the purpose of patient-reported outcome measure development A literature review of qualitative methods in pediatric measure development was completed. Eight clinicians providing care to pediatric patients were interviewed for their expert input. Thematic analysis of the literature and clinician interviews was used to identify themes for consideration. Findings from the literature and expert interviews emphasized the way in which cognitive, linguistic, and social developmental factors affect pediatric patients' understanding of their condition and ability to communicate about their experiences in an interview. There was consensus among the experts that traditional semi-structured interviews with children younger than eight lack characteristics necessary to yield meaningful information about condition and symptom report because they may fail to capture children's understanding and awareness of their condition and may limit their ability to express themselves comfortably. Our findings include recommended strategies to optimize data collected in qualitative interviews with pediatric patients, including modifications to the interview process to establish rapport, construction of interview questions to ensure they are developmentally appropriate, and the use of supplementary techniques to facilitate communication. When employing qualitative methods in pediatric measure development, interview guides, methods, and length require careful tailoring to ensure the child's perspectives are captured. This may be best achieved through research performed with narrow age bands that employs flexibility in methods to allow children a comfortable way in which to communicate about their experiences.

  1. Safe Patient Handling and Mobility: Development and Implementation of a Large-Scale Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Corinne; Knight, Suzanne W; Smith, Sharon L; Nagle, Dorothy J; DeVries, Lori

    This article addresses the development, implementation, and evaluation of an education program for safe patient handling and mobility at a large academic medical center. The ultimate goal of the program was to increase safety during patient mobility/transfer and reduce nursing staff injury from lifting/pulling. This comprehensive program was designed on the basis of the principles of prework, application, and support at the point of care. A combination of online learning, demonstration, skill evaluation, and coaching at the point of care was used to achieve the goal. Specific roles and responsibilities were developed to facilitate implementation. It took 17 master trainers, 88 certified trainers, 176 unit-based trainers, and 98 coaches to put 3706 nurses and nursing assistants through the program. Evaluations indicated both an increase in knowledge about safe patient handling and an increased ability to safely mobilize patients. The challenge now is sustainability of safe patient-handling practices and the growth and development of trainers and coaches.

  2. Development and implementation of a hospital-based patient safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frush, Karen S.; Alton, Michael; Frush, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from numerous studies indicates that large numbers of patients are harmed by medical errors while receiving health-care services in the United States today. The 1999 Institute of Medicine report on medical errors recommended that hospitals and health-care agencies ''establish safety programs to act as a catalyst for the development of a culture of safety'' [1]. In this article, we describe one approach to successful implementation of a hospital-based patient safety program. Although our experience at Duke University Health System will be used as an example, the needs, principles, and solutions can apply to a variety of other health-care practices. Key components include the development of safety teams, provision of tools that teams can use to support an environment of safety, and ongoing program modification to meet patient and staff needs and respond to changing priorities. By moving patient safety to the forefront of all that we do as health-care providers, we can continue to improve our delivery of health care to children and adults alike. This improvement is fostered when we enhance the culture of safety, develop a constant awareness of the possibility of human and system errors in the delivery of care, and establish additional safeguards to intercept medical errors in order to prevent harm to patients. (orig.)

  3. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. (author)

  4. Developing and Implementing a Food Insecurity Screening Initiative for Adult Patients Living With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brittany; Fitzpatrick, Sandra; Sidani, Souraya; Gucciardi, Enza

    2018-06-01

    Routine food insecurity screening is recommended in diabetes care to inform more tailored interventions that better support diabetes self-management among food-insecure patients. This pilot study explored the acceptability and feasibility of a food insecurity screening initiative within a diabetes care setting in Toronto. A systematic literature review informed the development of a food insecurity screening initiative to help health-care providers tailor diabetes management plans and better support food-insecure patients with type 2 diabetes. Interviews with 10 patients and a focus group with 15 care providers elicited feedback on the relevance and acceptance of the food insecurity screening questions and a care algorithm. Subsequently, 5 care providers at 4 sites implemented the screening initiative over 2 weeks, screening 33 patients. After implementation, 7 patients and 5 care providers were interviewed to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the screening initiative. Our findings demonstrate that patients are willing to share their experiences of food insecurity, despite the sensitivity of this topic. Screening elicited information about how patients cope with food insecurity and how this affects their ability to self-manage diabetes. Care providers found this information helpful in directing their care and support for patients. Using a standardized, respectful method of assessing food insecurity can better equip health-care providers to support food-insecure patients with diabetes self-management. Further evaluation of this initiative is needed to determine how food insecurity screening can affect patients' self-management and related health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a web-based, work-related asthma educational tool for patients with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ghajar-Khosravi, Shadi; Tarlo, Susan M; Liss, Gary M; Chignell, Mark; Ribeiro, Marcos; Levinson, Anthony J; Gupta, Samir

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic condition. Work-related asthma (WRA) has a large socioeconomic impact and is increasing in prevalence but remains under-recognized. Although international guidelines recommend patient education, no widely available educational tool exists.OBJECTIVE: To develop a WRA educational website for adults with asthma.METHODS: An evidence-based database for website content was developed, which applied evidence-based website design principles to create a website pr...

  6. Development of an adhesive surgical ward round checklist: a technique to improve patient safety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dhillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Checklists have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Checklist use is seen in the pre-operative to post-operative phases of the patient pathway. An adhesive checklist was developed for ward rounds due to the positive impact it could have on improving patient safety. Over an eight day period data were collected from five consultant-led teams that were randomly selected from the surgical department and divided into sticker groups and control groups. Across the board percentage adherence to the Good Surgical Practice Guidelines (GSPG) was markedly higher in the sticker study group, 1186 (91%) in comparison with the control group 718 (55%). There was significant improvement of documentation across all areas measured. An adhesive checklist for ward round note taking is a simple and cost-effective way to improve documentation, communication, hand-over, and patient safety. Successfully implemented in a tertiary level centre in Dublin, Ireland it is easily transferable to other surgical departments globally.

  7. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: Application of a biomarker development strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Barron

    2015-01-01

    No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons. Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  8. Development of Parkinson Patient Generated Data Collection Platform Using FHIR and IoT Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Sun-Ho; Kim, Min-Gyu; Song, Joon-Hyun; Lee, Sin-Woong; Kim, Il Kon

    2017-01-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) devices can be effectively used in cases where continuous observation of patients is required, such as Parkinson's disease. This is due to the characteristics of the IoT (Internet of Things), which allows data to be measured and transmitted at any time, anywhere. In this study, we developed a health data collection platform that stores and transmits the foot pressure data of Parkinson patients using FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources). The platform can be used to collect the foot pressure of a large number of Parkinson's patients. Based on the accumulated data, it is possible to identify abnormal behaviors such as walking pattern, tilt and instability of stride length in patients with Parkinson's disease. Based on the results of this study, accurate diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease can be made.

  9. Major life events and development of major depression in Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Bordelon, Y; Thompson, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Non-motor symptoms including depression are important features of Parkinson's disease (PD). We aim to address the relationship between major life events and depression amongst PD patients free of depressive symptoms at baseline. METHODS: New-onset PD patients from California...... were recruited in 2001-2007 and followed up for 3-4 years. The participants (n = 221) were examined by neurologists and responded to comprehensive interviews that included major life events, social support, and coping measures from validated scales. Major depression was assessed using the Structured...... Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV depression module (SCID). RESULTS: More than half of all patients had experienced major life events since diagnosed with PD, and 22 patients developed a major depression. The number of life events was associated with risk of depression in an exposure-dependent manner...

  10. Developing and piloting an instrument to prioritize the worries of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridges JFP

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available John FP Bridges,1 Allison H Oakes,1 Crystal A Reinhart,2 Ernest Voyard,3 Bernadette O’Donoghue3 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Center for Prevention Research and Development, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA; 3The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Rye Brook, NY, USA Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rapidly progressing blood cancer for which new treatments are needed. We sought to promote patient-focused drug development (PFDD for AML by developing and piloting an instrument to prioritize the worries of patients with AML.Patients and methods: An innovative community-centered approach was used to engage expert and community stakeholders in the development, pretesting, pilot testing, and dissemination of a novel best–worst scaling instrument. Patient worries were identified through individual interviews (n=15 and group calls. The instrument was developed through rigorous pretesting (n=13 and then piloted among patients and caregivers engaged in this study (n=25. Priorities were assessed using best–worst scores (spanning from +1 to -1 representing the relative number of times that items were endorsed as the most and the least worrying. All findings were presented at a PFDD meeting at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA that was attended by >80 stakeholders. Results: The final instrument included 13 worries spanning issues such as decision making, treatment delivery, physical impacts, and psychosocial effects. Patients and caregivers most prioritized worries about dying from their disease (best minus worst [BW] score=0.73, long-term side effects (BW=0.28, and time in hospital (BW=0.25.Conclusion: Community-centered approaches are valuable in designing and executing PFDD meetings and associated quantitative surveys to document the experience of patients. Expert and community stakeholders welcomed the opportunity to share

  11. Predisposition to essential hypertension and development of diabetic nephropathy in IDDM patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerudd, J A; Tarnow, L; Jacobsen, P

    1998-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported on the relationship between familial predisposition to hypertension and development of diabetic nephropathy in IDDM. In our case-control study, we assessed the prevalence of hypertension among parents of 73 IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN......+; persistent albuminuria > 200 microg/min or > 300 mg/24 h) and 73 IDDM patients without diabetic nephropathy (DN-; urinary albumin excretion hypertension, defined as antihypertensive therapy or a 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (SpaceLabs 90207) > or = 135/85 mm...... for hypertension than were patients with DN+ and without parental treatment for hypertension (100 vs. 61%; P = 0.034; difference 39% [21-57%]). In conclusion, familial predisposition to essential hypertension increases the risk of diabetic nephropathy and may also contribute to the development of systemic...

  12. Prosthetic considerations for orthodontic implant site development in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Alexandra I; Nkenke, Emeka; Blatz, Markus B; Geiselhöringer, Hans; Holst, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Proper site development is a key factor for long-term clinical success of dental implants. Whereas surgical and restorative techniques have been refined to ensure predictable functional and esthetic outcome, individual clinical prerequisites do not always allow proper placement of implants when prosthetic and material properties are considered. Orthodontic tooth movement may be a viable and nonsurgical site development treatment option. With the introduction and advancements of minimal invasive and less visible orthodontic appliances, a growing number of adult patients are willing to obtain orthodontic treatment. The spectrum of modern appliances is broad and ranges from clear aligners to lingual brackets. Skeletal anchorage devices such as orthodontic mini-implants often eliminate unpopular external anchorage devices (ie, headgear) in adult patients, This article discusses the selection of an appropriate pretreatment approach by taking patient-specific criteria into account.

  13. Increased risk of developing stroke for patients with major affective disorder--a registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Flemming M; Kessing, Lars V

    2004-01-01

    and cerebrovascular diseases in hospitalised patients. The main finding of this study was that patients with depression severe enough to be hospitalised, seem to be at an increased risk of developing cerebrovascular disease. The hazard ratio of getting a diagnosis of stroke after initially having been discharged......Only a few studies have evaluated depressive disorder as a risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. In a hospital discharge register with nation-wide coverage of all hospitals in Denmark we used linkage between the somatic and psychiatric registries to study comorbidity between affective disorders...... with a diagnosis of depression was found to be 1.22 (95% Confidence Interval: 1.06-1.41). In the group of patients with manic/bipolar disorder no association was found concerning development of stroke. In elderly with first time depression admitted to hospital, neurological disorders should be carefully evaluated...

  14. [Development of a standardized back school for in-patient orthopaedic rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, K; Seekatz, B; Rossband, H; Worringen, U; Faller, H; Vogel, H

    2009-12-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany is still lacking in patient education programmes that meet certain quality requirements such as the use of manuals, patient-oriented didactics, and evaluations of effectiveness. For patients with chronic low back pain, no standardized and evaluated back school programme has so far been available for routine use. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of a quality-assured back school based on a health-education programme of the German statutory pension insurance scheme. Both topics and didactics incorporate treatment evidence, practice guidelines, quality criteria for patient education and theories of health and illness behaviour. First, formative evaluation was conducted to assess patient acceptance and practicability of the manual. Second, effects of the back school programme were assessed on a short-term (at the end of rehabilitation), medium-term (6-month follow-up) and long-term (12-month follow-up) basis in a randomized controlled study of patients with low back pain (n=360). Results show a significant medium treatment effect in patients' knowledge about chronic back pain and its treatment at the end of rehabilitation (pmotivation to physical activity, pain beliefs and pain intensity. After the programme's medium- and long-term effects have been demonstrated, it will be recommended for implementation in medical rehabilitation. The manual meets the requirements that allow for a successful transfer into clinical practice. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  15. The Tibial Slope in Patients With Achondroplasia: Its Characterization and Possible Role in Genu Recurvatum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jaysson T; Bernholt, David L; Tran, Kevin V; Ain, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Genu recurvatum, a posterior resting position of the knee, is a common lower extremity deformity in patients with achondroplasia and has been thought to be secondary to ligamentous laxity. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the tibial slope has not been investigated, and no studies describe the tibial slope in patients with achondroplasia. Our goals were to characterize the tibial slope in children and adults with achondroplasia, explore its possible role in the development of genu recurvatum, and compare the tibial slope in patients with achondroplasia to that in the general population. We reviewed 252 lateral knee radiographs of 130 patients with achondroplasia seen at our clinic from November 2007 through September 2013. Patients were excluded if they had previous lower extremity surgery or radiographs with extreme rotation. We analyzed patient demographics and, on all radiographs, the tibial slope. We then compared the mean tibial slope to norms in the literature. Tibial slopes >90 degrees had an anterior tibial slope and received a positive prefix. Statistical analysis included intraclass and interclass reliability, Pearson correlation coefficient, and the Student t tests (significance, Pachondroplasia than in the general population; however, this difference diminishes as patients' age. An anterior tibial slope may predispose to a more posterior resting knee position, also known as genu recurvatum. Level IV-retrospective case series.

  16. Autoclaved Tumor Bone for Skeletal Reconstruction in Paediatric Patients: A Low Cost Alternative in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Umer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed in this series forty patients of pediatric age who underwent resection for malignant tumors of musculoskeletal system followed by biological reconstruction. Our surgical procedure for reconstruction included (1 wide en bloc resection of the tumor; (2 curettage of tumor from the resected bone; (3 autoclaving for 8 minutes (4 bone grafting from the fibula (both vascularized and nonvascularized fibular grafts used; (5 reimplantation of the autoclaved bone into the host bone defect and fixation with plates. Functional evaluation was done using MSTS scoring system. At final followup of at least 18 months (mean 29.2 months, 31 patients had recovered without any complications. Thirty-eight patients successfully achieved a solid bony union between the graft and recipient bone. Three patients had surgical site infection. They were managed with wound debridement and flap coverage of the defect. Local recurrence and nonunion occurred in two patients each. One patient underwent disarticulation at hip due to extensive local disease and one died of metastasis. For patients with non-union, revision procedure with bone graft and compression plates was successfully used. The use of autoclaved tumor grafts provides a limb salvage option that is inexpensive and independent of external resources and is a viable option for musculoskeletal tumor management in developing countries.

  17. [Nurses' participation in the development of a multidisciplinary team for chronic and terminal patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H E; Guitierrez, B A

    1997-08-01

    Since long ago the nurse has become more concerned about the delivery of care for patients with chronic and degeneratives diseases. Nevertheless, the accomplishment of this task is not an easy one. Moreover, when the patient reaches the final stage. Usually this patient experiences emotional and physical alteration. The family is deeply involved in this process and generally they seek nurses help because they are the closest ones to the patient and his/her family. When the patient go trough this dramatic acute change in health condition or in face of chronic degenerative or final stage disease is made, the relationship with the family becomes more difficult demanding nursing intervention. The objective of this study is to report the experience of nurse's participation in the implantation and development of multidisciplinary group for treatment of chronical and final stage patients. This group has been working for two years and has had good results. This group has worked treatment schemes for treatment used by all members of multidisciplinary team. From previous experiences, we knew that there is always a discrepancy between the information given by professional and friends and relatives ones. Which could increase fear and anxiety the reassurance given by the health team, a fair distribution of tasks and the information delivery to the patient proved to be successful.

  18. Development and validation of the Patient Benefit Index for peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Nicole; Demirel, Ebru-Berrin; Augustin, Matthias; Sommer, Rachel; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Breuer, Peter; Blome, Christine

    2018-01-25

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a specific Patient Benefit Index (PBI) version for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A non-interventional longitudinal development study was conducted. The first phase comprised a qualitative pre-study with n = 50 patients, in which the PBI was adapted for peripheral arterial disease. The resulting Patient Benefit Index for peripheral arterial disease (PBI-PAD) was validated in the second phase at two points of measurement. The total PBI-PAD score was calculated by weighting item-wise the achievement of treatment goals with the initially assessed needs. Feasibility, internal consistency, and construct validity were analysed and the generic three level version of the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D-3L) and the disease-specific instrument Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire (VascuQoL) were used for convergent validation. In the pre-study, the PBI-PAD, consisting of 12 items, was developed. N = 103 patients participated in the main study. At T2, data were available for n = 57 patients. Mean age was 71.0 years ± 9.1 and 66.7 % of the participants were male. The amount of missing values of the PBI-PAD score was low (PBI (needs at T1 and benefits at T2) were internally consistent with Cronbach's alpha > 0.7. PBI-PAD total score correlated significantly with the T2-T1-differences of the EuroQol-visual analogue scale (EQ VAS) (r = 0.4, p = 0.007) and the Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire (r = 0.5, p PBI-PAD is a feasible, internally consistent, and valid instrument to assess patient-relevant benefits in PAD patients receiving minimally invasive treatment or surgical procedures. It can be recommended for use in routine care as well as in clinical studies.

  19. Diagnostical significance of dimethylarginine in the development of hepatorenal syndrome in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ničković Vanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chronic consumption of alcohol during a longer period of time leads to the development of cirrhosis with the reduction in metabolic liver function and disorders in arginine metabolism. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is the most severe complication of alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The aim of the study was to analyze disorders in arginine metabolism by monitoring concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA in patients with liver cirrhosis and HRS. Methods. The study included three groups of subjects: a group of patients with cirrhosis and HRS (24 patients, a group of patients with cirrhosis without HRS (18 patients and a control group composed of 42 healthy voluntary blood donors. Concentrations of ADMA, SDMA and L-arginine in plasma were measured in all groups using the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC method. Results. The concentration of SDMA was significantly higher in the patients with HRS compared to the patients without HRS and it was also higher than the values obtained from the healthy participants (1.76 ± 0.3 μmol/L; 1.01 ± 0.32 and 0.520 ± 0.18 μmol/L, respectively; p < 0.01. The concentrations of ADMA were higher in the cirrhotic patients with HRS than in those without this serious complication of cirrhosis. The concentration of ADMA in all the examined cirrhotic patients was higher than those obtained from healthy volunteers (1.35 ± 0.27 μmol/L, 1.05 ± 0.35 μmol/L and 0.76 ± 0.21 μmol/L, respectively. In the patients with terminal alcoholic liver cirrhosis, the concentrations of ADMA and SDMA correlated with the progress of cirrhosis as well as with the development of cirrhosis complications. In the patients with HRS there was a positive correlation between creatinine and SDMA in plasma (r2 = 0.0756, p < 0.001 which was not found between creatinine and ADMA. Conclusion. The obtained results demonstrate that the increase in SDMA concentration is proportionate to

  20. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  1. Development of drug resistance in patients receiving combinations of zidovudine, didanosine and nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conway, B.; Wainberg, M. A.; Hall, D.; Harris, M.; Reiss, P.; Cooper, D.; Vella, S.; Curry, R.; Robinson, P.; Lange, J. M.; Montaner, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the development of phenotypic and genotypic resistance to zidovudine, didanosine and nevirapine as a function of the virologic response to therapy in a group of drug-naive individuals receiving various combinations of these agents. DESIGN: All patients were enrolled in a

  2. Assessing Hopelessness in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients: Development of the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Lewis, Charles; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Sachs, Emily; Amakawa, Lia; Kolva, Elissa; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2011-01-01

    Hopelessness has become an increasingly important construct in palliative care research, yet concerns exist regarding the utility of existing measures when applied to patients with a terminal illness. This article describes a series of studies focused on the exploration, development, and analysis of a measure of hopelessness specifically intended…

  3. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    Background and Objective: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Methods: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  4. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, H.; Erp, N. van; Bins, S.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.; Steeghs, N.; Huitema, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. METHODS: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  5. 78 FR 63223 - Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-N-2013-1041] Fibromyalgia Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug... 23, 2013 (78 FR 58313). The document announced a public meeting entitled ``Fibromyalgia Public...

  6. Development of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in patients treated for oesophageal atresia. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Rasmussen, L; Hansen, L P

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) developed in 74 patients treated for oesophageal atresia. Treatment of oesophageal atresia is frequently followed by vomiting and failure to thrive due to gastrooesophageal reflux or anastomotic stricture. The diagnose of IHPS must...

  7. Challenges in educating patients and parents about differences in sex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    This article reviews practical approaches to talking with parents and youth about Differences in Sex Development (DSD) which are conditions that affect chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sexual development, one of the most personal, and in our society, private areas of life. Talking with parents and patients about these conditions can be challenging given the complexity of sexual development and the sensitive nature of the information being shared. Changing approaches to disclosing or communicating information about conditions, such as DSD are reviewed as well as factors leading to revision in the diagnostic nomenclature. Building on these developments, strategies used by an established DSD team to enhance shared decision making and partnership with families and patients are presented followed by examples of how some particularly challenging, but not uncommon clinical situations were approached. The paper concludes by endorsing the importance of understanding the social and cultural needs and beliefs of the parents and patients with DSD to set the stage for effective disclosure of medical facts. To be most useful to parents and youth, medical disclosure needs to include discussion of practical implications and strategies to help families and patients digest, understand, and work with the information provided. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Development, implementation and evaluation of a patient handoff tool to improve safety in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnier, Joel J; Derosier, Joseph M; Maratt, Joseph D; Hake, Mark E; Bagian, James P

    2016-06-01

    To develop, implement and test the effect of a handoff tool for orthopaedic trauma residents that reduces adverse events associated with the omission of critical information and the transfer of erroneous information. Components of this project included a literature review, resident surveys and observations, checklist development and refinement, implementation and evaluation of impact on adverse events through a chart review of a prospective cohort compared with a historical control group. Large teaching hospital. Findings of a literature review were presented to orthopaedic residents, epidemiologists, orthopaedic surgeons and patient safety experts in face-to-face meetings, during which we developed and refined the contents of a resident handoff tool. The tool was tested in an orthopaedic trauma service and its impact on adverse events was evaluated through a chart review. The handoff tool was developed and refined during the face-to-face meetings and a pilot implementation. Adverse event data were collected on 127 patients (n = 67 baseline period; n = 60 test period). A handoff tool for use by orthopaedic residents. Adverse events in patients handed off by orthopaedic trauma residents. After controlling for age, gender and comorbidities, testing resulted in fewer events per person (25-27% reduction; P < 0.10). Preliminary evidence suggests that our resident handoff tool may contribute to a decrease in adverse events in orthopaedic patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  9. Nursing-care dependency : Development of an assessment scale for demented and mentally handicapped patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Buist, Girbe; Dassen, T

    1996-01-01

    This article describing the first phase in the development of an assessment scale of nursing-care dependency (NCD) for Dutch demented and mentally handicapped patients focuses on the background to the study and the content validation of the nursing-care dependency scale. The scale aims to

  10. Design and development of a mobile app for Ménière disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge REY-MARTÍNEZ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The application of information and communication technologies to health care is contributing to a real revolution in health care field. Current medicine is benefiting from the rapid and extraordinary technological development of "smart" mobile phones and tablets. The mobile medicine (mHealth allows, among other advantages, a better monitoring and tracking of the symptomatology of the patients. This fact not only facilitates the clinical follow-up, improving care, but also helps patients to be jointly responsible for their own health, contributing to improve their quality of life. Computer applications designed specifically for these devices (apps are especially useful for monitoring chronic diseases, such as Ménière's disease. Method: In this work, the process of design, development and publication of an app called "Ménière" is detailed, this app is designed to help patients and their doctors to track and follow this disease. Results: The app was developed for the iOS operating system using the Xcode software development kit, using Swift and Objective-C as programming languages. Special attention was paid to privacy, security, usability, veracity and transparency. Conclusions: This application provides the patient with a complete and versatile tool to monitor their symptoms.

  11. Development of an ASAS-endorsed disease activity score (ASDAS) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukas, C.; Landewé, R.; Sieper, J.; Dougados, M.; Davis, J.; Braun, J.; van der Linden, S.; van der Heijde, D.

    2009-01-01

    To develop a new index for disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis (ASDAS) that is truthful, discriminative and feasible, and includes domains/items that are considered relevant by patients and doctors. Eleven candidate variables covering six domains of disease activity, selected by ASAS experts

  12. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-09-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney.

  13. Development of a tailored work-related support intervention for gastrointestinal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, Anne-Claire G. N. M.; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.; Van Hezel, Sanne; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aim is the development of a work-related support intervention, tailored to the severity of work-related problems of patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer treated with curative intent. Two methods were used: (1) Work-related problems were identified from the literature and submitted to

  14. Development and initial validation of prescribing quality indicators for patients with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Kirsten P J; Sidorenkov, Grigory; Bilo, Henk J G; Bouma, Margriet; van Ittersum, Frans J; Voorham, Jaco; Navis, Gerjan; Denig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality assessment is a key element for improving the quality of care. Currently, a comprehensive indicator set for measuring the quality of medication treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is lacking. Our aim was to develop and validate a set of prescribing quality

  15. Hepatic artery aneurysm in a patient with Behcet's disease and segmental pancreatitis developing after its embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oto, A.; Cekirge, S.; Guelsuen, M.; Balkanci, F.; Besim, A.

    2000-01-01

    Segmental pancreatitis is an unusual form of acute pancreatitis mostly seen in the head of pancreas. We present the CT findings of a segmental pancreatitis in the body and tail of the pancreas developed following endovascular embolization of a giant hepatic artery aneurysm and arterioportal fistula in a patient with Behcet's disease. (orig.)

  16. Development and validation of multivariable models to predict mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Adriaan A.; Ouwerkerk, Wouter; Zannad, Faiez; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ng, Leong L.; Metra, Marco; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Lang, Chim C.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Dickstein, Kenneth; Cleland, John G.; Anker, Stefan D.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    Introduction From a prospective multicentre multicountry clinical trial, we developed and validated risk models to predict prospective all-cause mortality and hospitalizations because of heart failure (HF) in patients with HF. Methods and results BIOSTAT-CHF is a research programme designed to

  17. Development and validation of multivariable models to predict mortality and hospitalization in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Adriaan A.; Ouwerkerk, Wouter; Zannad, Faiez; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ng, Leong L.; Metra, Marco; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Lang, Chim C.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Dickstein, Kenneth; Cleland, John G.; Anker, Stefan D.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction From a prospective multicentre multicountry clinical trial, we developed and validated risk models to predict prospective all-cause mortality and hospitalizations because of heart failure (HF) in patients with HF. Methods and results BIOSTAT-CHF is a research programme designed to

  18. Development and validation of a prediction model for loss of physical function in elderly hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Shingo; Shimizu, Sayaka; Shintani, Ayumi; Kamitani, Tsukasa; Akizawa, Tadao; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-09-05

    Among aging hemodialysis patients, loss of physical function has become a major issue. We developed and validated a model of predicting loss of physical function among elderly hemodialysis patients. We conducted a cohort study involving maintenance hemodialysis patients  ≥65 years of age from the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study in Japan. The derivation cohort included 593 early phase (1996-2004) patients and the temporal validation cohort included 447 late-phase (2005-12) patients. The main outcome was the incidence of loss of physical function, defined as the 12-item Short Form Health Survey physical function score decreasing to 0 within a year. Using backward stepwise logistic regression by Akaike's Information Criteria, six predictors (age, gender, dementia, mental health, moderate activity and ascending stairs) were selected for the final model. Points were assigned based on the regression coefficients and the total score was calculated by summing the points for each predictor. In total, 65 (11.0%) and 53 (11.9%) hemodialysis patients lost their physical function within 1 year in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. This model has good predictive performance quantified by both discrimination and calibration. The proportion of the loss of physical function increased sequentially through low-, middle-, and high-score categories based on the model (2.5%, 11.7% and 22.3% in the validation cohort, respectively). The loss of physical function was strongly associated with 1-year mortality [adjusted odds ratio 2.48 (95% confidence interval 1.26-4.91)]. We developed and validated a risk prediction model with good predictive performance for loss of physical function in elderly hemodialysis patients. Our simple prediction model may help physicians and patients make more informed decisions for healthy longevity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  19. Patient Disease Perceptions and Coping Strategies for Arthritis in a Developing Nation: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogart Laura M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little prior research on the burden of arthritis in the developing world. We sought to document how patients with advanced arthritis living in the Dominican Republic are affected by and cope with their disease. Methods We conducted semi-structured, one-to-one interviews with economically disadvantaged Dominican patients with advanced knee and/or hip arthritis in the Dominican Republic. The interviews, conducted in Spanish, followed a moderator's guide that included topics such as the patients' understanding of disease etiology, their support networks, and their coping mechanisms. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim in Spanish, and systematically analyzed using content analysis. We assessed agreement in coding between two investigators. Results 18 patients were interviewed (mean age 60 years, median age 62 years, 72% women, 100% response rate. Patients invoked religious and environmental theories of disease etiology, stating that their illness had been caused by God's will or through contact with water. While all patients experienced pain and functional limitation, the social effects of arthritis were gender-specific: women noted interference with homemaking and churchgoing activities, while men experienced disruption with occupational roles. The coping strategies used by patients appeared to reflect their beliefs about disease causation and included prayer and avoidance of water. Conclusions Patients' explanatory models of arthritis influenced the psychosocial effects of the disease and coping mechanisms used. Given the increasing reach of global health programs, understanding these culturally influenced perceptions of disease will be crucial in successfully treating chronic diseases in the developing world.

  20. "PHE in Action": Development and Modeling of an Intervention to Improve Patient Engagement among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, Julia; Graffigna, Guendalina

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic conditions among older adults constitutes a major public health problem. Thus, changes in lifestyles are required to prevent secondary conditions and sustain good care practices. While patient engagement received great attention in the last years as key strategy to solve this issue, to date no interventions exist to sustain the engagement of older chronic patients toward their health management. This study describes the design, development, and optimization of PHEinAction , a theoretically-driven intervention program to increase patient engagement in older chronic populations and consequently to foster healthy changes that can help reduce risks of health problems. The development process followed the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines and involved selecting the theoretical base for the intervention, identifying the relevant evidence-based literature, and conducting exploratory research to qualitatively evaluate program's feasibility, acceptability, and comprehension. The result was a user-endorsed intervention designed to improve older patients' engagement in health management based on the theoretical framework of the Patient Health Engagement (PHE) model. The intervention program, which emerged from this process, consisted of 2 monthly face-to-face 1-h sessions delivered by a trained facilitator and one brief telephonic consultation, and aimed to facilitate a range of changes for patient engagement (e.g., motivation to change, health information seeking and use, emotional adjustment, health behaviors planning). PHEinAction is the first example of a theoretically-based patient engagement intervention designed for older chronic targets. The intervention program is based on psychological theory and evidence; it facilitates emotional, psychological, and behavioral processes to support patient engagement and lifestyle change and maintenance. It provides estimates of the extent to which it could help high-risk groups

  1. Evaluation of solitary rib lesions in CA. breast patients for development of skeletal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, A.; Fatima, S.; Khursheed, K.; Jafri, S.; Asghar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Determination of nature of single or double rib lesion on a bone scan is important but very difficult. In case of breast carcinoma rib lesion have particular importance, as they are one of the most common sites of metastasis. On the contrary surgical trauma and radiotherapy can induce metabolic changes, which can lead to rib lesions of benign etiology. As it is known that breast carcinoma patients having skeletal metastasis have worse prognosis so it is particularly important to differentiate between malignant and benign rib lesions. In this study etiology of rib lesions detected on bone scan was analyzed retrospectively patients. Study population consisted of breast cancer patients having solitary rib lesions on baseline or follow-up bone scan were included in the study. The etiology of solitary rib involvement was established using all the clinical, radiological and biochemical data available. The clinical and serial scintigraphic data were collected and analyzed for correlation in forty-two patients. Patients were followed up for at least two subsequent bone scans. Out of total study population nine patients (21.42%) developed skeletal metastasis on follow-up. Rest of the study population is disease free till last follow-up. All these patients developed metastasis within two years of appearance of the rib lesions. Correlation between sites of initial rib lesion, uptake pattern, size of tumor, mode of primary therapy, age of involvement, interval from initial therapy, biochemical and radiological findings was done. Correlation was seen between sites of uptake, uptake pattern, mode of primary therapy and biochemical findings with subsequent outcome of the patient. It is concluded from our study that solitary rib lesion have low incidence of malignancy if other risk factors are absent. (authors)

  2. Patients With Antithyroid Antibodies Are Prone To Develop Destructive Thyroiditis by Nivolumab: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomoko; Iwama, Shintaro; Yasuda, Yoshinori; Okada, Norio; Tsunekawa, Taku; Onoue, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Ito, Yoshihiro; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Goto, Motomitsu; Suga, Hidetaka; Banno, Ryoichi; Yokota, Kenji; Hase, Tetsunari; Morise, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ando, Masahiko; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Gotoh, Momokazu; Ando, Yuichi; Akiyama, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Arima, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Context Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti–programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) antibodies, have become promising treatments for a variety of advanced malignancies. However, these medicines can cause immune-related adverse events (irAEs), including endocrinopathies. Objective This study examined the incidence of endocrine irAEs induced by nivolumab. Patients and Main Outcome Measured Sixty-six patients treated with nivolumab at Nagoya University Hospital were prospectively evaluated for pituitary hormones, thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies (Abs), and glucose levels every 6 weeks after the initiation of nivolumab for 24 weeks. Results Four out of 66 patients developed destructive thyroiditis, and three patients developed hypothyroidism requiring levothyroxine replacement. The prevalence of positive anti-thyroglobulin Abs (TgAbs) and/or anti–thyroid peroxidase Abs (TPOAbs) at baseline was significantly higher in the group that developed destructive thyroiditis (3/4) compared with the group that did not develop thyroiditis (3/62; P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in other clinical variables between the groups. There were no endocrine irAEs other than destructive thyroiditis during the 24 weeks. The prevalence of TgAbs and/or TPOAbs at baseline was not associated with the development of other irAEs, including pneumonitis, colitis, or skin reactions. Conclusions Our real-world data showed that destructive thyroiditis was an endocrine irAE that was frequently induced by nivolumab and was significantly associated with positive TgAbs and/or TPOAbs before treatment. Our findings indicate that evaluating these Abs before treatment may help identify patients with a high risk of thyroidal irAEs and may have important clinical benefit. PMID:29600292

  3. An industrial perspective on the design and development of medicines for older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Sharon; Coupe, Alastair; Barrett, Andrew

    2016-10-30

    An increasing elderly population is leading to a change in the global demographics. This presents a new challenge to society and the pharmaceutical industry. This demographic shift is providing an opportunity for the pharmaceutical industry to meet the specific needs of the changing patient population. One issue that has been identified is defining what is meant by "an older patient", since this definition cannot be simply limited to chronological age. The fundamental purpose of the design and development process is to create a product that can be used by the patient group in a safe and efficacious manner. In the pharmaceutical industry ICH Q8 is used to guide the design and development of medicines. The process leads to the definition of the Quality Target Product Profile (QTPP) for a specific drug product and patient population. One can imagine a product with various presentations described in the QTPP which suit paediatrics, adults and older patients. It is recognised that designing medicines for smaller population groups will result in multiple presentations that could lead to smaller manufacturing batch sizes. In the short to medium term; dose flexibility, easy-to-swallow formulations, and easier access packaging are all factors under consideration. Dose flexibility could be achieved with various dosage forms such as oral liquids, mini-tablets, or multi-particulates. Whilst patient dosage preferences are beginning to be understood, further investigation is needed to balance the needs of the patient, care giver, prescriber, and payer. There also remain a number of challenges with the engineering solutions and delivery device for mini-tablets and multi-particulates (aside from filled capsules) to accurately and robustly deliver the dose, and issues with handling the device and the packaging for an older patient. It is also recognised that there are numerous challenges, not least of which is the definition of the older patient and a generic QTPP for an older

  4. Developing a pathway for high-value, patient-centered total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Citters, Aricca D; Fahlman, Cheryl; Goldmann, Donald A; Lieberman, Jay R; Koenig, Karl M; DiGioia, Anthony M; O'Donnell, Beth; Martin, John; Federico, Frank A; Bankowitz, Richard A; Nelson, Eugene C; Bozic, Kevin J

    2014-05-01

    Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is one of the most widely performed elective procedures; however, there are wide variations in cost and quality among facilities where the procedure is performed. The purposes of this study were to (1) develop a generalizable clinical care pathway for primary TJA using inputs from clinical, academic, and patient stakeholders; and (2) identify system- and patient-level processes to provide safe, effective, efficient, and patient-centered care for patients undergoing TJA. We used a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods to design a care pathway that spans 14 months beginning with the presurgical office visit and concluding 12 months after discharge. We derived care suggestions from interviews with 16 hospitals selected based on readmission rates, cost, and quality (n = 10) and author opinion (n = 6). A 32-member multistakeholder panel refined the pathway during a 1-day workshop. Participants were selected based on leadership in orthopaedic (n = 4) and anesthesia (n = 1) specialty societies; involvement in organizations specializing in safety and high reliability care (n = 3), lean production/consumption of care (n = 3), and patient experience of care (n = 3); membership in an interdisciplinary care team of a hospital selected for interviewing (n = 8); recent receipt of a TJA (n = 1); and participation in the pathway development team (n = 9). The care pathway includes 40 suggested processes to improve care, 37 techniques to reduce waste, and 55 techniques to improve communication. Central themes include standardization and process improvement, interdisciplinary communication and collaboration, and patient/family engagement and education. Selected recommendations include standardizing care protocols and staff roles; aligning information flow with patient and process flow; identifying a role accountable for care delivery and communication; managing patient expectations; and stratifying patients into the most appropriate care

  5. Development of Multiple Sclerosis in Patients with Optic Neuritis: Analysis of Predictive Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Durmuş

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Optic neuritis (ON is inflammation of the optic nerve that generally leads to transient loss of vision. Unilateral optic neuritis is quite common upon first presentation in multiple sclerosis (MS patients, but it may also remain as a clinically isolated syndrome. In this study we aimed to determine what factors are associated with the development of MS in isolated ON patients. METHODS: Medical charts of patients followed-up at Istanbul University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology between 1987 and 2003 were screened for patients with isolated ON at first presentation. A cohort of 90 patients was thusly obtained. Clinical and demographic features, visual evoked potential, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and magnetic resonance imaging findings, and time to definitive MS according to McDonald’s criteria were recorded. RESULTS: In all, 50% of the patients developed definitive MS after 13 months (95% CI: 4.4-19.6. Two of the patients developed neuromyelitis optica during the course of their follow-up. The development of MS was significantly associated with the presence of a T2 lesion (p= 0.001, oligoclonal bands (OCBs in the CSF (p= 0.002, absence of papilledema (p= 0.027, absence of severe visual impairment (p= 0.016, and subacute (> 1 day visual impairment (p= 0.005, as per log rank testing. According to the Cox proportional hazard regression model, the presence of a T2 lesion (hazard ratio: 4.8; 95% CI: 1.5-15.4 and OCBs (hazard ratio: 3.6; 95% CI: 1.1-11.5 are strongly predictive of the progression to MS. CONCLUSION: As some previous studies have noted, the risk of developing MS after ON is significantly higher in the presence of a T2 lesion and OCBs in the CSF. We think that this should be taken into account before starting early treatment for MS. Recent studies on the pathogenesis of MS have suggested that early treatment of MS reduces neurological disability in the long term. Our results might aid patient selection for early

  6. Development and content validation of a patient-reported endometriosis pain daily diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nooten, Floortje E; Cline, Jennifer; Elash, Celeste A; Paty, Jean; Reaney, Matthew

    2018-01-04

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disorder that causes inflammation and pelvic pain. Endometriosis-related pain is best captured with patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures, however, assessment of endometriosis-related pain in clinical trials has been difficult in the absence of a reliable and valid PRO instrument. We describe the development of the Endometriosis Pain Daily Diary (EPDD), an electronic PRO developed as a survey instrument to assess endometriosis-related pain and its impact on patients' lives. The EPDD was initially developed on the basis of an existing Endometriosis Pain and Bleeding Diary, a targeted review of relevant literature, clinical expert interviews, and open-ended (concept elicitation) patient interviews in the United States (US) and Japan which captured patients' experience with endometriosis. Cognitive interviews of patients with endometriosis were conducted to evaluate patient comprehension of the EPDD items. A conceptual model of endometriosis was developed, and meetings with US and European regulatory authorities provided feedback for validating the EPDD in the context of clinical trials. Translatability assessments of the EPDD were conducted to confirm its appropriate interpretation and ease of completion across 17 languages. The iterative development progressed through three versions of the instrument. The EPDDv1 included 18 items relating to dysmenorrhea/pelvic pain, dyspareunia and sexual activity, bleeding, hot flashes, daily activities, and use of rescue medication. The EPDDv2 was a larger 43-item survey tested in cognitive interviews and subsequently revised to yield the current 11-item EPDDv3, consisting of five core items relating to dysmenorrhea, non-menstrual pelvic pain, and dyspareunia, and six extension items relating to sexual activity, daily activities, and use of rescue medication. The EPDD is a PRO for the evaluation of endometriosis-related pain and its associated impacts on patients' lives. The EPDD

  7. Developing a mobile application to better inform patients and enable effective consultation in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erokan Canbazoglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of dentistry lacks satisfactory tools to help visualize planned procedures and their potential results to patients. Dentists struggle to provide an effective image in their patient's mind of the end results of the planned treatment only through verbal explanations. Thus, verbal explanations alone often cannot adequately help the patients make a treatment decision. Inadequate attempts are frequently made by dentists to sketch the procedure for the patient in an effort to depict the treatment. These attempts however require an artistic ability not all dentists have. Real case photographs are sometimes of help in explaining and illustrating treatments. However, particularly in implant cases, real case photographs are often ineffective and inadequate. The purpose of this study is to develop a mobile application with an effective user interface design to support the dentist–patient interaction by providing the patient with illustrative descriptions of the procedures and the end result. Sketching, paper prototyping, and wire framing were carried out with the actual user's participation. Hard and soft dental tissues were modeled using three dimensional (3D modeling programs and real cases. The application enhances the presentation to the patients of potential implants and implant supported prosthetic treatments with rich 3D illustrative content. The application was evaluated in terms of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness through an online survey. The application helps improve the information sharing behavior of dentists to enhance the patients' right to make informed decisions. The paper clearly demonstrates the relevance of interactive communication technologies for dentist–patient communication.

  8. Pathophysiologic aspects of the development of cognitive disorders in chronic heart failure in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Pokachalova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present literature review presents current views on pathophysiologic aspects of the formation and progression of cognitive disorders in chronic heart failure in elderly patients. Advanced age itself is an important predictor of the development of cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and other diseases. Involutive changes of cardiovascular system are known to potentiate the development of chronic heart failure. Heart failure in older people usually develops gradually. Formation of the cognitive deficit in heart disease is associated with chronic cerebral ischemia as well as a cascade of neurochemical processes occurring in the brain, eventually forming a vicious circle. Often the symptoms of cerebral ischemia due to reduced stroke volume occur much earlier than congestion signs in other organs and systems. Chronic cerebral ischemia that occurs due to violation of cerebral hemodynamics, is associated with both extracerebral and intracerebral causes, which in turn contributes to the development of chronic brain hypoxia and aggravation of cognitive dysfunction. Thus, the features of the development and course of disease in people of older age groups indicate that in geriatric practice existing diagnostic schemes are not always applicable. When observing patients of elderly and senile age with chronic heart failure, during the assessment of their condition and running diagnostic tests, special attention should be payed to the earliest detection of cognitive dysfunction signs in order to correct the patient's treatment and improve quality of life.

  9. Factors contributing to the development of overt encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Motoh; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Mifuji-Moroka, Rumi; Hara, Nagisa; Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Tanaka, Hideaki; Eguchi, Akiko; Yamamoto, Norihiko; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among psychometric testing results, blood ammonia (NH3) levels, electrolyte abnormalities, and degree of inflammation, and their associations with the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in liver cirrhosis (LC) patients. The relationships between covert HE and blood NH3, sodium (Na), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined in 40 LC patients. The effects of elevated NH3, hyponatremia, and elevated CRP on the development of overt HE were also investigated. The covert HE group had significantly lower serum Na levels and significantly higher serum CRP levels. During the median observation period of 11 months, 10 patients developed overt HE, and the results of multivariate analysis showed that covert HE and elevated blood NH3 were factors contributing to the development of overt HE. Electrolyte abnormalities and mild inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of HE. Abnormal psychometric testing results and hyperammonemia are linked to subsequent development of overt HE.

  10. Development and Psychometric Testing of the Caregiver Communication Competence Scale in Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hui-Chen; Yang, Ya-Ping; Huang, Mei-Chih; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate communication skills are essential for understanding patient needs, particularly those of patients with dementia. Assessing health care providers' competence in communicating with patients with dementia is critical for planning a communication education program. However, no formally established scale can be used. The purpose of the current study was to develop a valid and reliable instrument for determining the communication competence of health care providers with patients with dementia. Through use of a literature review and previous clinical experience, an initial 28-item scale was developed to assess the frequency of use of each item by health care providers. Fourteen items were extracted and three factors were distinguished. Results indicated that the internal consistency reliability of the 14-item scale was 0.84. Favorable convergent and discriminant validities were reached. The communication competence scale provides administrators or educators with a useful tool for assessing communication competence of health care providers when interacting with patients with dementia so a suitable education program can be planned and implemented. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Development of a Nursing Handoff Tool: A Web-Based Application to Enhance Patient Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Denise; Boomhower, Marc; Lancaster, Diane R.; Antonelli, Mary; Kenyon, Mary Anne Murphy; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic and complex clinical environments present many challenges for effective communication among health care providers. The omission of accurate, timely, easily accessible vital information by health care providers significantly increases risk of patient harm and can have devastating consequences for patient care. An effective nursing handoff supports the standardized transfer of accurate, timely, critical patient information, as well as continuity of care and treatment, resulting in enhanced patient safety. The Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospital Healthcare Information Technology Innovation Program (HIP) is supporting the development of a web based nursing handoff tool (NHT). The goal of this project is to develop a “proof of concept” handoff application to be evaluated by nurses on the inpatient intermediate care units. The handoff tool would enable nurses to use existing knowledge of evidence-based handoff methodology in their everyday practice to improve patient care and safety. In this paper, we discuss the results of nursing focus groups designed to identify the current state of handoff practice as well as the functional and data element requirements of a web based Nursing Handoff Tool (NHT). PMID:21346980

  12. Positioning patient-perceived medical services to develop a marketing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Hong, Myung-Sun

    2012-01-01

    In today's medical market, marketing philosophy is being rapidly transformed from customer searching to patient satisfaction and service improvement. The principal objective of this study was to contribute to the establishment of a desirable medical marketing strategy, through the factors of customer satisfaction and the positioning of patients' perceptions by marketing institutions. The data were collected from 282 students of the College of Public Health and Medicine in Seoul. The survey tools were developed using the SERVQUAL scale. Analysis in this study involved both statistical and network analysis. The former was used to verify the determinants of service satisfaction as perceived by respondents, via factor analysis and multiple regression analysis. The latter was obtained using a positioning map and 2-mode network analysis with the matrix data converted from raw data. The determining factors for patient satisfaction were identified as facilities, accessibility, process, physicians, and medical staff. The regression equation was significant (R = 0.606), and the most influential variable was the service quality of physicians (β = .569). According to multidimensional scaling, the positioning of medical institutions indicated that patients' perceptions were affected by hospital size and specialization. By recognizing and managing patient satisfaction, medical institutions are able to foster customer loyalty and, in turn, to enhance service quality. It is necessary to develop an adequate marketing mix to provide better medical services and to overcome medical competition among institutions.

  13. Development of a preliminary risk index to identify trauma patients at risk for an unplanned intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis; Kobayashi, Leslie; Chang, David; Fortlage, Dale; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The development of respiratory failure requiring an emergent unplanned intubation (UI) is a potentially preventable complication associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to develop a clinical risk index for UI based on readily available clinical data to assist in the identification of trauma patients at risk for this complication. We also sought to determine the impact of UI on patient outcomes. This is a 3-year retrospective analysis of our Level 1 trauma center registry to identify all patients requiring a UI. Patients who required a UI were compared with patients who were never intubated. An additive risk index consisting of 10 clinical variables was created using the final significant variables from a stepwise logistic regression model. The sensitivity and specificity of every possible index score were calculated and added together to calculate the "gain in certainty" values. During the 3-year period, 7,552 patients were admitted, of whom 967 (12.8%) required intubation. Of these, 55 (5.7%) underwent a UI. The final risk index consisted of 10 variables as follows: age 55 years to 64 years, age 65 years or older, male sex, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 9 to 13, seizures, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, traumatic brain injury, four or more rib fractures, spine fractures, and long-bone fractures. Gain in certainty was maximized at an index score of 4, with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity of 86.0% and 74.9%, respectively. The probability of UI increased from 0.9% at a score of 1 to 2.9% at 4 and 43% at 9. UI was associated with increased overall complications, length of stay, and mortality (p the development of an additive risk index. Prospective validation of the risk index is potentially warranted. Diagnostic study, level III.

  14. The development of PubMed search strategies for patient preferences for treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Ralph; Kievit, Wietske; Booth, Andrew; Mozygemba, Kati; Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Refolo, Pietro; Sacchini, Dario; Gerhardus, Ansgar; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Tummers, Marcia

    2016-07-29

    The importance of respecting patients' preferences when making treatment decisions is increasingly recognized. Efficiently retrieving papers from the scientific literature reporting on the presence and nature of such preferences can help to achieve this goal. The objective of this study was to create a search filter for PubMed to help retrieve evidence on patient preferences for treatment outcomes. A total of 27 journals were hand-searched for articles on patient preferences for treatment outcomes published in 2011. Selected articles served as a reference set. To develop optimal search strategies to retrieve this set, all articles in the reference set were randomly split into a development and a validation set. MeSH-terms and keywords retrieved using PubReMiner were tested individually and as combinations in PubMed and evaluated for retrieval performance (e.g. sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp)). Of 8238 articles, 22 were considered to report empirical evidence on patient preferences for specific treatment outcomes. The best search filters reached Se of 100 % [95 % CI 100-100] with Sp of 95 % [94-95 %] and Sp of 97 % [97-98 %] with 75 % Se [74-76 %]. In the validation set these queries reached values of Se of 90 % [89-91 %] with Sp 94 % [93-95 %] and Se of 80 % [79-81 %] with Sp of 97 % [96-96 %], respectively. Narrow and broad search queries were developed which can help in retrieving literature on patient preferences for treatment outcomes. Identifying such evidence may in turn enhance the incorporation of patient preferences in clinical decision making and health technology assessment.

  15. Development of a patient-doctor communication skills model for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Young-Mee

    2010-09-01

    Communication is a core clinical skill that can be taught and learned. The authors intended to develop a patient-doctor communication model for teaching and assessing undergraduate medical students in Korea. To develop a model, literature reviews and an iterative process of discussion between faculty members of a communication skills course for second year medical students were conducted. The authors extracted common communication skill competencies by comparing the Kalamazoo Consensus Statement, SEGUE framework communication skills, the Calgary Cambridge Observation Guides, and previous communication skills lists that have been used by the authors. The content validity, with regard to clinical importance and feasibility, was surveyed by both faculty physicians and students. The first version of the model consisted of 36 items under 7 categories: initiating the session (8 items), building a relationship (6), gathering information (8), understanding a patient's perspectives (4), sharing information (4), reaching an agreement (3), and closing the session (3). It was used as a guide for both students and teachers in an actual communication skills course. At the end of the course, student performance was assessed using two 7-minute standardized patient interviews with a 34-item checklist. This assessment tool was modified from the first version of the model to reflect the case specificity of the scenarios. A patient-doctor communication model, which can be taught to those with limited patient care experience, was finally developed. We recommended a patient-doctor communication skills model that can be used for teaching and evaluating preclinical and clinical students. Further studies are needed to verify its validity and reliability.

  16. A framework for the development of patient safety education and training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikos, Dimitrios; Diomidous, Marianna; Mantas, John

    2010-01-01

    Patient Safety (PS) is a major concern that involves a wide range of roles in healthcare, including those who are directly and indirectly involved, and patients as well. In order to succeed into developing a safety culture among healthcare providers, carers and patients, there should be given great attention into building appropriate education and training tools, especially addressing those who plan patient safety activities. The framework described in this policy paper is based on the results of the European Network for Patient Safety (EUNetPaS) project and analyses the principles and elements of the guidance that should be provided to those who design and implement Patient Safety Education and training activities. The main principles that it should be based on and the core teaching objectives-expected outcomes are addressed. Once the main context and considerations are properly set, the guidance should define the general schema of the content that should be included in the Education and Training activities, as well as how these activities would be delivered. It is also important that the different roles of the recipients are clearly distinguished and linked to their role-specific methods, proper delivery platforms and success stories. Setting these principles into practice when planning and implementing interventions, primarily aims to enlighten and support those who are enrolled to design and implement Patient Safety education and training teaching activities. This is achieved by providing them with a framework to build upon, succeeding to build a collaborative, safety conscious and competent environment, in terms of PS. A guidelines web platform has been developed to support this process.

  17. Development of SMOG-Cro readability formula for healthcare communication and patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangan, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication shows a positive impact on patient satisfaction, compliance and medical outcomes, at the same time reducing the healthcare costs. Written information for patients needs to correspond to health literacy levels of the intended audiences. Readability formulas correlate well with the reading and comprehension tests but are considered an easier and quicker method to estimate a text difficulty. SMOG readability formula designed for English language needs to be modified if used for texts in other languages. The aim of this study was to develop a readability formula based on SMOG, that could be used to estimate text difficulty of written materials for patients in Croatian language. Contras- tive analysis of English and Croatian language covering a corpus of almost 100,000 running words showed clear linguis- tic differences in the number of polysyllabic words. The new formula, named SMOG-Cro, is presented as an equation: SMOG-Cro = 2 + √4+ syllables, with the score showing the number of years of education a person needs to be able to understand a piece of writing. The presented methodology could help in the development of readability formulas for other languages. We hope the results of this study are soon put into practice for more effective healthcare communication and patient education, and for development of a health literacy assessment tool in Croatian language.

  18. Using stakeholder engagement to develop a patient-centered pediatric asthma intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Deborah Q; Rand, Cynthia; Streisand, Randi; Horn, Ivor B; Yadav, Kabir; Stewart, Lisa; Fousheé, Naja; Waters, Damian; Teach, Stephen J

    2016-12-01

    Stakeholder engagement has the potential to develop research interventions that are responsive to patient and provider preferences. This approach contrasts with traditional models of clinical research in which researchers determine the study's design. This article describes the effect of stakeholder engagement on the design of a randomized trial of an intervention designed to improve child asthma outcomes by reducing parental stress. The study team developed and implemented a stakeholder engagement process that provided iterative feedback regarding the study design, patient-centered outcomes, and intervention. Stakeholder engagement incorporated the perspectives of parents of children with asthma; local providers of community-based medical, legal, and social services; and national experts in asthma research methodology and implementation. Through a year-long process of multidimensional stakeholder engagement, the research team successfully refined and implemented a patient-centered study protocol. Key stakeholder contributions included selection of patient-centered outcome measures, refinement of intervention content and format, and language framing the study in a culturally appropriate manner. Stakeholder engagement was a useful framework for developing an intervention that was acceptable and relevant to our target population. This approach might have unique benefits in underserved populations, leading to sustainable improvement in health outcomes and reduced disparities. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Focused development of advanced practice nurse roles for specific patient groups in a Swiss university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spichiger, Elisabeth; Zumstein-Shaha, Maya; Schubert, Maria; Herrmann, Luzia

    2018-02-01

    Background: To cover future health care needs of the population, new care models are necessary. The development of advanced nursing practice (ANP) offers the opportunity to meet these challenges with novel services. At the Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, ANP services and corresponding advanced practice nurse (APN) roles have been developed since 2011. Purpose: The aim is to develop innovative and evidence based ANP services to supplement health care for specific patient groups and their family members with the goal to improve safety and achieve better outcomes. Methods: Project-based ANP services are developed in close collaboration of clinical departments and the Nursing Development Unit (NDU) of the Directorate of Nursing. Structure, process and outcome data are collected for evaluation. Findings: Currently, five ANP services are established and running, eight more are in the developmental phase. Most services address the long term care of patients with chronic illnesses and their family members. Ten APNs work between 10 % and 80 %, three are leading an ANP-team. APNs work over 50 % in direct clinical practice, primarily in counselling. An ANP network connects APNs and NDU, promoting synergy and exchange. Conclusions: The available resources often constitute a challenge for the development of ANP services. Vital for the long-term success are an adequate extent of the position, the support by department directorate, the conceptual framework that is implemented across the whole hospital, and the development within project structures.

  20. Development and Validation of an Instrument for Assessing Patient Experience of Chronic Illness Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Joaquín Mira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The experience of chronic patients with the care they receive, fuelled by the focus on patient-centeredness and the increasing evidence on its positive relation with other dimensions of quality, is being acknowledged as a key element in improving the quality of care. There are a dearth of accepted tools and metrics to assess patient experience from the patient’s perspective that have been adapted to the new chronic care context: continued, systemic, with multidisciplinary teams and new technologies. Methods: Development and validation of a scale conducting a literature review, expert panel, pilot and field studies with 356 chronic primary care patients, to assess content and face validities and reliability. Results: IEXPAC is an 11+1 item scale with adequate metric properties measured by Alpha Chronbach, Goodness of fit index, and satisfactory convergence validity around three factors named: productive interactions, new relational model and person’s self-management. Conclusions: IEXPAC allows measurement of the patient experience of chronic illness care. Together with other indicators, IEXPAC can determine the quality of care provided according to the Triple Aim framework, facilitating health systems reorientation towards integrated patient-centred care.

  1. How to develop a patient and carer advisory group in a quality improvement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loud, Fiona; Jain, Neerja; Thomas, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    This paper explores how a group of people with renal or other vascular conditions collaborated with renal practitioners in undertaking a quality improvement project, the aim of which was to reduce variation in care for people with Stages 3-4 chronic kidney disease. The patient advisory group supporting the project took a decisive and leading role in the creation of self-management materials and subsequent training for healthcare professionals and patients. The role of the patient advisory group was evaluated informally throughout the project. Confidence amongst the patient advisory group members grew as the project developed. Clinicians are often unclear on how to involve patients and carers in quality improvement projects, yet it is increasingly recognised as important. In practice, patients with experience of long-term conditions can co-lead quality improvement projects. It is recommended that further evaluation of the role of advisory groups is warranted. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  2. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Dialysis patient-perceived Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; You, Li-Ming; Lou, Tan-Qi; Chen, Nian-Chang; Lai, De-Yuan; Liang, Yan-Yi; Li, Ying-Na; Gu, Ying-Ming; Lv, Shao-Fen; Zhai, Cui-Qiu

    2010-02-01

    Perceptions of exercise benefits and barriers affect exercise behavior. Because of the clinical course and treatment, dialysis patients differ from the general population in their perceptions of exercise benefits and barriers, especially the latter. At present, no valid instruments for assessing perceived exercise benefits and barriers in dialysis patients are available. Our goal was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Dialysis patient-perceived Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale (DPEBBS). A literature review and two focus groups were conducted to generate the initial item pool. An expert panel examined the content validity. Then, 269 Chinese hemodialysis patients were recruited by convenience sampling. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test construct validity. Finally, internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed. The expert panel determined that the content validity index was satisfactory. The final 24-item scale consisted of six factors explaining 57% of the total variance in the data. Confirmative factor analysis supported the six-factor structure and a higher-order model. Cronbach's alpha was 0.87 for the total scale, and 0.84 for test-retest reliability. The DPEBBS was a valid and reliable instrument for evaluating dialysis patients' perceived benefits and barriers to exercise. The application value of this scale remains to be investigated by increasing the sample size and evaluating patients undergoing different dialysis modalities and coming from different regions and cultural backgrounds. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Perceived social support among patients with burn injuries: A perspective from the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Ahmed; Turk, Marvee; Naveed, Sadiq; Amin, Atif; Kiwanuka, Harriet; Shafique, Neha; Chaudhry, Muhammad Ashraf

    2018-02-01

    Social support is among the most well-established predictors of post-burn psychopathology after burn. Despite a disproportionately large burden of burns in the developing world, the nature of social support among burn patients in this context remains elusive. We, therefore, seek to investigate social support and its biopsychosocial determinants among patients with burn injuries in Pakistan. A cross-sectional study of 343 patients presenting with burn injuries at four teaching hospitals in the Punjab province of Pakistan was conducted. Patient evaluation consisted of a multi-part survey of demographic status, clinical features, and social support as measured by the validated Urdu translation of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate associations between patient characteristics and MSPSS score. Mean overall MSPSS score was 57.64 (std dev 13.57). Notable positive predictors of social support include male gender, Punjabi ethnicity, burn surface area, and ego resiliency. Our study reveals a troubling pattern of inadequate social support among certain subgroups of Pakistani burn patients. Addressing these inequities in the provision of social support must be prioritized as part of the global burn care agenda. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a wound healing index for patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Fife, Caroline E; Smout, Randall J; Barrett, Ryan S; Thomson, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials in wound care generalize poorly because they exclude patients with significant comorbid conditions. Research using real-world wound care patients is hindered by lack of validated methods to stratify patients according to severity of underlying illnesses. We developed a comprehensive stratification system for patients with wounds that predicts healing likelihood. Complete medical record data on 50,967 wounds from the United States Wound Registry were assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, etc.). Factors known to be associated with healing were evaluated using logistic regression models. Significant variables (p healing for each wound type. Some variables predicted significantly in nearly all models: wound size, wound age, number of wounds, evidence of bioburden, tissue type exposed (Wagner grade or stage), being nonambulatory, and requiring hospitalization during the course of care. Variables significant in some models included renal failure, renal transplant, malnutrition, autoimmune disease, and cardiovascular disease. All models validated well when applied to the holdout sample. The "Wound Healing Index" can validly predict likelihood of wound healing among real-world patients and can facilitate comparative effectiveness research to identify patients needing advanced therapeutics. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  5. Patients' expectations of orthodontic treatment: part 1 - development of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, M S; Newton, J T

    2006-12-01

    The development of a questionnaire to measure patients' and their parents' expectations before orthodontic treatment, and to test the reliability and validity of this measure. A two-stage methodology, with open-ended interviews to identify themes and concepts followed by development and testing of the questionnaire. GKT Orthodontic Department, King's College Dental Hospital. The sample consisted of 140 participants, 70 patients aged 12-14 years, who had been referred to the orthodontic department for treatment. One parent of each patient was also recruited. The study was in two phases. In the first phase 30 participants (15 new patients and their 15 parents) participated in open-ended interviews, which were analysed qualitatively. Information from these interviews was used to construct a questionnaire. During the second phase, the questionnaire was piloted on 10 participants, five new consecutive patients and their parents. The questionnaire was then distributed to 174 subjects (87 new patients and their 87 parents). Seventy-eight subjects (39 new patients and their 39 parents) completed the questionnaire before their orthodontic consultation. Another 96 subjects (48 new patients and their 48 parents) were invited to complete the questionnaire prior to and at their orthodontic consultation. Test-retest analysis was conducted on 22 participants (11 patients and their 11 parents), who completed the questionnaire previous to and at their orthodontic consultation, and contributed to the psychometric validation of this questionnaire. A questionnaire was devized using the key themes and concepts identified in the open-ended interviews. As a result, 10 questions, some with sub-questions were constructed using a visual analogue scale as the response format. The questionnaire developed had good face validity. Internal consistency of the questionnaire using Cronbach's alpha, produced an overall inter-item reliability > 0.7 along with item-total correlations > 0.3 in over 50

  6. Development of patient specific cardiovascular models predicting dynamics in response to orthostatic stress challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological realistic models of the controlled cardiovascular system are constructed and validated against clinical data. Special attention is paid to the control of blood pressure, cerebral blood flow velocity, and heart rate during postural challenges, including sit-to-stand and head-up tilt....... This study describes development of patient specific models, and how sensitivity analysis and nonlinear optimization methods can be used to predict patient specific characteristics when analyzed using experimental data. Finally, we discuss how a given model can be used to understand physiological changes...

  7. Low cardiac output predicts development of hepatorenal syndrome and survival in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, A; Bendtsen, F; Møller, S

    2010-01-01

    (130 (SD 46) vs 78 (SD 29) mumol/l, psyndrome type 1 within 3 months was higher in the group with low CI than in the high CI group (43% vs 5%, p = 0.04). Patients with the lowest CI (N = 8) had significantly poorer survival at 3, 9, and 12 months......OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that cardiac dysfunction precedes development of the hepatorenal syndrome. In this follow-up study, we aimed to investigate the relation between cardiac and renal function in patients with cirrhosis and ascites and the impact of cardiac systolic function...

  8. Risk profile of patients developing nonunion of the clavicle and outcome of treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ban, Ilija; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The most common complication following treatment of a clavicle fracture is nonunion. Most nonunions are symptomatic and treatment is mostly operative. The aim of this study was to describe risk profiles of patients developing nonunion and what outcome is observed following operative...... of functionality and patient reported satisfaction and remission of symptoms was done a minimum of six months post-operatively by mail. Response rate was 60%. RESULTS: The overall nonunion rate was 7.5%. Nine nonunions were initially treated operatively. Risk factors associated with nonunion of our series...

  9. Development of the electronic patient record system based on problem oriented system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Yumiko; Iwaanakuchi, Takashi; Muranaga, Fuminori; Kumamoto, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, POS (problem oriented system) is recommended in the clinical guideline. Therefore, the records are mainly made by SOAP. We developed a system mainly with a function which enabled our staff members of all kinds of professions including doctors to enter the patients' clinical information as an identical record, regardless if they were outpatients or inpatients, and to observe the contents chronologically. This electric patient record system is called "e-kanja recording system". On this system, all staff members in the medical team can now share the same information. Moreover, the contents can be reviewed by colleagues; the quality of records has been improved as it is evaluated by the others.

  10. Inter-provider comparison of patient-reported outcomes: developing an adjustment to account for differences in patient case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, David; Parkin, David; Devlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a methodology for the case-mix adjustment of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) data permitting the comparison of outcomes between providers on a like-for-like basis. Statistical models that take account of provider-specific effects form the basis of the proposed case-mix adjustment methodology. Indirect standardisation provides a transparent means of case mix adjusting the PROMs data, which are updated on a monthly basis. Recently published PROMs data for patients undergoing unilateral knee replacement are used to estimate empirical models and to demonstrate the application of the proposed case-mix adjustment methodology in practice. The results are illustrative and are used to highlight a number of theoretical and empirical issues that warrant further exploration. For example, because of differences between PROMs instruments, case-mix adjustment methodologies may require instrument-specific approaches. A number of key assumptions are made in estimating the empirical models, which could be open to challenge. The covariates of post-operative health status could be expanded, and alternative econometric methods could be employed. © 2013 Crown copyright.

  11. Patients With Antithyroid Antibodies Are Prone To Develop Destructive Thyroiditis by Nivolumab: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomoko; Iwama, Shintaro; Yasuda, Yoshinori; Okada, Norio; Tsunekawa, Taku; Onoue, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Ito, Yoshihiro; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Goto, Motomitsu; Suga, Hidetaka; Banno, Ryoichi; Yokota, Kenji; Hase, Tetsunari; Morise, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ando, Masahiko; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Gotoh, Momokazu; Ando, Yuichi; Akiyama, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Arima, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) antibodies, have become promising treatments for a variety of advanced malignancies. However, these medicines can cause immune-related adverse events (irAEs), including endocrinopathies. This study examined the incidence of endocrine irAEs induced by nivolumab. Sixty-six patients treated with nivolumab at Nagoya University Hospital were prospectively evaluated for pituitary hormones, thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies (Abs), and glucose levels every 6 weeks after the initiation of nivolumab for 24 weeks. Four out of 66 patients developed destructive thyroiditis, and three patients developed hypothyroidism requiring levothyroxine replacement. The prevalence of positive anti-thyroglobulin Abs (TgAbs) and/or anti-thyroid peroxidase Abs (TPOAbs) at baseline was significantly higher in the group that developed destructive thyroiditis (3/4) compared with the group that did not develop thyroiditis (3/62; P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in other clinical variables between the groups. There were no endocrine irAEs other than destructive thyroiditis during the 24 weeks. The prevalence of TgAbs and/or TPOAbs at baseline was not associated with the development of other irAEs, including pneumonitis, colitis, or skin reactions. Our real-world data showed that destructive thyroiditis was an endocrine irAE that was frequently induced by nivolumab and was significantly associated with positive TgAbs and/or TPOAbs before treatment. Our findings indicate that evaluating these Abs before treatment may help identify patients with a high risk of thyroidal irAEs and may have important clinical benefit.

  12. A study into the information needs of patients with urological cancers and the development of layered patient information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit, V.

    2017-01-01

    Patients are nowadays increasingly responsible for their own care process. However, it has been shown that patients experience difficulties in managing their own disease. In order to empower patients, they need to have sufficient knowledge on the care process. Patients who are well informed are more

  13. Rapid Hip Osteoarthritis Development in a Patient with Anterior Acetabular Cyst with Sagittal Alignment Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Homma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC is rare and develops unusual clinical course. Recent studies suggest multiple possible mechanisms of the development of RDC. However the exact mechanism of RDC is still not clear. The difficulty of the study on RDC is attributed to its rareness and the fact that the data before the onset of RDC is normally unavailable. In this report, we presented the patient having the radiographic data before the onset who had rapid osteoarthritis (OA development after contralateral THA, which meets the current criteria of RDC. We thought that the increased posterior tilt of the pelvis after THA reinforced the stress concentration at pre-existed anterior acetabular cyst, thereby the destruction of the cyst was occurred. As a result the rapid OA was developed. We think that there is the case of rapid osteoarthritis developing due to alternating load concentration by posterior pelvic tilt on preexisting anterior acetabular cyst such as our patient among the cases diagnosed as RDC without any identifiable etiology. The recognition of sagittal alignment changes and anterior acetabular cyst may play important role in prediction and prevention of the rapid hip osteoarthritis development similar to RDC.

  14. From transitions to transformation - A study of pharmacists developing patient-centered communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetsch, Karen; Burrows, Judith

    2017-08-12

    Pharmacists' communication with patients often focuses on technical aspects of advice giving, while limiting socio-emotional content. To develop pharmacists' patient-centered communication a learning and practice module integrating motivational interviewing (MI) was designed for an online postgraduate program, and its impact on their self-described practice evaluated. To investigate whether training in patient-centered communication changes pharmacists' perceptions of communicating with patients, and how any changes in their communication style influenced interactions and relationships with patients. A descriptive, qualitative study analyzing reflective journal entries detailing pharmacists' experiences of implementing patient-centered communication in practice was designed, evaluating reflections on initial patient interactions after training and 9-12 weeks later. Using the framework method of content and thematic analysis, an evaluation framework was devised that integrated communication, change and learning theories. Reflections were categorized within the framework as transitional (e.g. using good communication skills), transactional (e.g. using MI techniques, achieving reciprocity) or transformational (e.g. describing transformative learning, changing frames of reference in understanding of patient-centeredness). Differences between the first and last journal entries were evaluated and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Eighty-nine pharmacists provided two reflective journal entries for evaluation. Over 9-12 weeks, pharmacists described a change in their perspective of patient-centeredness, how they expanded the socio-emotional aspects of communication and succeeded in difficult conversations. When applying the thematic evaluation framework to initial journal entries, 38 (42%) of reflections fell within the transitional category, 51 (58%) were deemed transactional and none transformational. This changed to 10 (11%) transitional, 45 (51%) transactional and

  15. The development of hunger and fullness during a laboratory meal in patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Francine; Zimmerli, Ellen J.; Devlin, Michael J.; Kissileff, Harry R.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the hypothesis that, compared to similarly obese participants without BED, individuals with BED have a disturbance in the development of fullness and reduction of hunger during the course of a standard meal of large size. Method Thirteen patients with BED and 14 obese control participants consumed 975 grams of a milkshake. Participants received no information about how much they had eaten or how much of the meal remained to be consumed. Participants were interrupted after every 75 g consumed to rate hunger and fullness. Results Final fullness ratings were higher in patients with BED, but there were no differences in mean duration or mean rate of eating, or in changes in subjective ratings of hunger and fullness per gram of food. Conclusion The current study reports the surprising finding of no difference in reports of hunger and fullness between patients with BED and obese controls. PMID:18803172

  16. Radiographic study on maxillary sinus development and nasal septum deviation in cleft palate patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sam Sun; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-08-15

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of the maxillary sinus development and nasal septum deviation on diseases of maxillary sinus with cleft palate. The materials was 152 cephalometric Waters' projections consist of 76 cleft patients and 76 normal subjects. The results were as follows: 1. The disease of maxillary sinus was present in 49% of a cleft group and 14% of a control group, and prevalent in cleft side. 2. It showed no statistically significant difference in size of the maxillary sinus in cleft palate patients compared to the control population and in the cleft side to the noncleft side (p<0.05). 3. Nasal septum deviation was more severe in the cleft patient its average value was 3.55mm, compared to the control group, 0.99 mm (p<0.01) and 77% of the deviated nasal septum was deviated to the cleft side.

  17. Radiographic study on maxillary sinus development and nasal septum deviation in cleft palate patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sam Sun; You, Dong Soo

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of the maxillary sinus development and nasal septum deviation on diseases of maxillary sinus with cleft palate. The materials was 152 cephalometric Waters' projections consist of 76 cleft patients and 76 normal subjects. The results were as follows: 1. The disease of maxillary sinus was present in 49% of a cleft group and 14% of a control group, and prevalent in cleft side. 2. It showed no statistically significant difference in size of the maxillary sinus in cleft palate patients compared to the control population and in the cleft side to the noncleft side (p<0.05). 3. Nasal septum deviation was more severe in the cleft patient its average value was 3.55mm, compared to the control group, 0.99 mm (p<0.01) and 77% of the deviated nasal septum was deviated to the cleft side.

  18. Reflections on the development of health care and patients' rights in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinovic-Sunara, Dula; Finka, Dubravka

    2008-06-01

    Nowadays, in the world of markets and market economy, not only health care but medicine and medical practice in general, are looked upon more and more through the eyes of profit-making and financial interests. At the same time, there is an increasing number of initiatives intended to emphasise that human medicine should be at the service of society and that this fact should have priority over any market and financial interests of individuals even in "the market oriented world". The experience of the Croatian non-governmental organization to which the authors belong and which deals with patients' rights and helps in the development of partnership relations between patients and other subjects in the health care system, can be of a wider interest. This short review is the result of eight years' experience of the Croatian Association for Patients' Rights (CAPR), and its possible effects on the health care system in the future from the authors' points of view.

  19. Development and Validation of the Spiritual Care Needs Inventory for Acute Care Hospital Patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Fen; Koo, Malcolm; Liao, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yuh-Min; Yeh, Dah-Cherng

    2016-12-01

    Spiritual care is increasingly being recognized as an integral aspect of nursing practice. The aim of this study was to develop a new instrument, Spiritual Care Needs Inventory (SCNI), for measuring spiritual care needs in acute care hospital patients with different religious beliefs. The 21-item instrument was completed by 1,351 adult acute care patients recruited from a medical center in Taiwan. Principal components analysis of the SCNI revealed two components, (a) meaning and hope and (b) caring and respect, which together accounted for 66.2% of the total variance. The internal consistency measures for the two components were 0.96 and 0.91, respectively. Furthermore, younger age, female sex, Christian religion, and regularly attending religious activities had significantly higher mean total scores in both components. The SCNI was found to be a simple instrument with excellent internal consistency for measuring the spiritual care needs in acute care hospital patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Development and fabrication of patient-specific knee implant using additive manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Robert; Rochman, Arif

    2017-10-01

    Total knee replacement is the most effective treatment to relief pain and restore normal function in a diseased knee joint. The aim of this research was to develop a patient-specific knee implant which can be fabricated using additive manufacturing techniques and has reduced wear rates using a highly wear resistant materials. The proposed design was chosen based on implant requirements, such as reduction in wear rates as well as strong fixation. The patient-specific knee implant improves on conventional knee implants by modifying the articulating surfaces and bone-implant interfaces. Moreover, tribological tests of different polymeric wear couples were carried out to determine the optimal materials to use for the articulating surfaces. Finite element analysis was utilized to evaluate the stresses sustained by the proposed design. Finally, the patient-specific knee implant was successfully built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  1. Kyphosis in patients with cerebral palsy: causes of its development and correctional possibilities (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Vladimirovich Umnov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the literature pertaining to the treatment of kyphosis in patients with cerebral palsy was reviewed. Among the most common causes of kyphosis is the connection with pathological reflexes of newborns and infants with cerebral palsy, the presence of a hamstring syndrome, as well as weaknesses of the extensor muscles of the trunk. Attention is paid to a fundamental decrease in the quality of life of patients if they have pronounced kyphosis. Among the treatments, different variants of corsets are used, but the effectiveness of this method of treatment is low. It is notable that in some adolescent patients, they develop a fixed deformity that was successfully corrected and stabilized with spinal surgery. Therefore, a variety of techniques and devices for fixation have been used

  2. Development of a psychosocial adaptation questionnaire for Chinese patients with visual impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-jie; Wang, Ai-ping

    2011-10-01

    To develop a psychosocial adaptation questionnaire for Chinese patients with visual impairments and to examine its reliability and validity. Psychosocial adaptation with disease has been studied, however, there have been few reports on the impact of visual impairment on psychosocial adaptation. An instrument has not been developed to assess psychosocial adaptation with visual impairment specifically for patients in China. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used. A questionnaire was developed based on the concept of psychosocial adaptation with visual impairment. Items for the questionnaire were developed by reviewing the literature and carrying out a semi-structured interview with 12 visually impaired patients. Five ophthalmologists and ten patients evaluated the content validity and face validity of the questionnaire, respectively. The method of convenient sampling was used to select 213 visually impaired patients in the Ophthalmology Department of the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University to participate in the study. Discriminative index and item-total correlation analyses were used to delete items that were lower than a set criterion. Regarding construct validity, factor analysis was performed. The Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) and Self Acceptance Questionnaire (SAQ) were used to evaluate criterion validity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used as an index of internal consistency. To evaluate test-retest reliability, 50 patients were re-evaluated after 24 hours. A total of 204 questionnaire items were created. 22 items were deleted by discriminative index and item-total correlation before factor analysis; 38 items were entered into the model for factor analysis. Seven factors were extracted by using principal factor analysis and varimax rotation, with a cumulative contribution of 59·18%. The correlation coefficients between the psychosocial adaptation questionnaire for visual impairment

  3. Development and Preliminary Psychometrics of the Exercise Therapy Burden Questionnaire for Patients With Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William; Palazzo, Clémence; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2017-11-01

    To develop and validate a self-reporting questionnaire assessing the burden of exercise therapy for patients with chronic conditions. Measurement properties of an instrument. Outpatient clinics and tertiary care hospital. Patients (N=201) with at least 1 chronic condition and performing exercise therapy. Not applicable. The dimensional structure of the questionnaire was assessed by principal component analysis. Construct validity of the instrument was assessed by exploring convergent validity with the Treatment Burden Questionnaire (TBQ) and divergent validity with pain, self-efficacy, treatment satisfaction, and health state. Reliability was assessed with the Cronbach α coefficient, a test-retest method using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman plotting. A preliminary list of items was developed from semistructured interviews with 28 patients and reviewed by 2 expert physicians. Items obtained were reduced. Then a sample of 163 patients was used to measure the psychometrics of the Exercise Therapy Burden Questionnaire (ETBQ), consisting of 10 items. Principal component analysis extracted 1 dimension. The Cronbach α was .86 (.82-.89). Test-retest reliability (n=24 patients) was good with an ICC of .93 (.85-.97), and Bland-Altman analysis did not reveal a systematic trend. The ETBQ showed expected convergent validity with the TBQ (ρ=.52) and expected divergent validity with pain (ρ=.37), self-efficacy (ρ=-.34), treatment satisfaction (ρ=-.49), and perceived health state (ρ=-.28). The ETBQ is the first questionnaire assessing exercise therapy burden in patients with chronic conditions. Its psychometric properties are promising. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of ACRODAT®, a new software medical device to assess disease activity in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lely, Aart J; Gomez, Roy; Pleil, Andreas; Badia, Xavier; Brue, Thierry; Buchfelder, Michael; Burman, Pia; Clemmons, David; Ghigo, Ezio; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Luger, Anton; van der Lans-Bussemaker, Joli; Webb, Susan M; Strasburger, Christian J

    2017-12-01

    Despite availability of multimodal treatment options for acromegaly, achievement of long-term disease control is suboptimal in a significant number of patients. Furthermore, disease control as defined by biochemical normalization may not always show concordance with disease-related symptoms or patient's perceived quality of life. We developed and validated a tool to measure disease activity in acromegaly to support decision-making in clinical practice. An international expert panel (n = 10) convened to define the most critical indicators of disease activity. Patient scenarios were constructed based on these chosen parameters. Subsequently, a panel of 21 renowned endocrinologists at pituitary centers (Europe and Canada) categorized each scenario as stable, mild, or significant disease activity in an online validation study. From expert opinion, five parameters emerged as the best overall indicators to evaluate disease activity: insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) level, tumor status, presence of comorbidities (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, sleep apnea), symptoms, and health-related quality of life. In the validation study, IGF-I and tumor status became the predominant parameters selected for classification of patients with moderate or severe disease activity. If IGF-I level was ≤1.2x upper limit of normal and tumor size not significantly increased, the remaining three parameters contributed to the decision in a compensatory manner. The validation study underlined IGF-I and tumor status for routine clinical decision-making, whereas patient-oriented outcome measures received less medical attention. An Acromegaly Disease Activity Tool (ACRODAT) is in development that might assist clinicians towards a more holistic approach to patient management in acromegaly.

  5. The development of PubMed search strategies for patient preferences for treatment outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph van Hoorn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of respecting patients’ preferences when making treatment decisions is increasingly recognized. Efficiently retrieving papers from the scientific literature reporting on the presence and nature of such preferences can help to achieve this goal. The objective of this study was to create a search filter for PubMed to help retrieve evidence on patient preferences for treatment outcomes. Methods A total of 27 journals were hand-searched for articles on patient preferences for treatment outcomes published in 2011. Selected articles served as a reference set. To develop optimal search strategies to retrieve this set, all articles in the reference set were randomly split into a development and a validation set. MeSH-terms and keywords retrieved using PubReMiner were tested individually and as combinations in PubMed and evaluated for retrieval performance (e.g. sensitivity (Se and specificity (Sp. Results Of 8238 articles, 22 were considered to report empirical evidence on patient preferences for specific treatment outcomes. The best search filters reached Se of 100 % [95 % CI 100-100] with Sp of 95 % [94–95 %] and Sp of 97 % [97–98 %] with 75 % Se [74–76 %]. In the validation set these queries reached values of Se of 90 % [89–91 %] with Sp 94 % [93–95 %] and Se of 80 % [79–81 %] with Sp of 97 % [96–96 %], respectively. Conclusions Narrow and broad search queries were developed which can help in retrieving literature on patient preferences for treatment outcomes. Identifying such evidence may in turn enhance the incorporation of patient preferences in clinical decision making and health technology assessment.

  6. Impaired DNA repair as assessed by the ``comet`` assay in patients developing thyroid carcinoma after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leprat, F.; Sarasin, A.; Suarez, H.G. [Institut de Recherches sur le Cancer, 94 - Villesuif (France); Leprat, F.; Alapetite, C.; Rosselli, F.; Ridet, A.; Moustacch, E.; Alapetite, C. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Schlumberger, M. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1997-03-01

    A defective cellular response to DNA lesions induced be genotoxic agents may be associated to an increased cancer proneness. This has been clearly identified in some rare but extensively studied genetic diseases such as xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Fanconi anemia (FA). In practical oncology, most patients receive genotoxic therapeutic agents and the presence of so far unidentified sensitive genotypes could account for an increased susceptibility to cancer in a subgroup of exposed patients. The thyroid gland of children is especially sensitive to the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation. Evidence for risk is reported even at doses as low as 0.1 Gy, and the excess relative risk to develop a thyroid tumor following a radiation dose of 1 Gy in childhood is of 7.7 [l]. In order to determine if a defect in repair of DNA strand breaks could be involved, as an early step, in the development of secondary thyroid tumors after radiotherapy, we examined, using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE or `comet`), the response to in vitro {gamma}-rays exposure of lymphocytes of a small group of patients who developed thyroid carcinoma after radiotherapy for a primary tumor. Because of its practical advantages, the alkaline comet assay offers the opportunity to question the role of DNA strand beaks rejoining capacity of the individual in the radiation induced carcinogenesis of thyroid tumors. This preliminary study of a small group of patients with therapeutic irradiation at childhood for a primary tumor indicates that, at the time of blood sampling, lymphocytes of some of these patients demonstrated reduced rejoining capacity. These results suggest that the comet assay might help to distinguish a subgroup of individuals at risk for radiation induced genomic instability and encourage further investigation. (authors)

  7. Development of the PRE-HIT instrument: patient readiness to engage in health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Richelle J; Petroski, Gregory F; Canfield, Shannon M; Stuppy, Julie A; Mehr, David R

    2014-01-28

    Technology-based aids for lifestyle change are becoming more prevalent for chronic conditions. Important "digital divides" remain, as well as concerns about privacy, data security, and lack of motivation. Researchers need a way to characterize participants' readiness to use health technologies. To address this need, we created an instrument to measure patient readiness to engage with health technologies among adult patients with chronic conditions. Initial focus groups to determine domains, followed by item development and refinement, and exploratory factor analysis to determine final items and factor structure. The development sample included 200 patients with chronic conditions from 6 family medicine clinics. From 98 potential items, 53 best candidate items were examined using exploratory factor analysis. Pearson's Correlation for Test/Retest reliability at 3 months. The final instrument had 28 items that sorted into 8 factors with associated Cronbach's alpha: 1) Health Information Need (0.84), 2) Computer/Internet Experience (0.87), 3) Computer Anxiety (0.82), 4) Preferred Mode of Interaction (0.73), 5) Relationship with Doctor (0.65), 6) Cell Phone Expertise (0.75), 7) Internet Privacy (0.71), and 8) No News is Good News (0.57). Test-retest reliability for the 8 subscales ranged from (0.60 to 0.85). The Patient Readiness to Engage in Health Internet Technology (PRE-HIT) instrument has good psychometric properties and will be an aid to researchers investigating technology-based health interventions. Future work will examine predictive validity.

  8. Development and prospective validation of a model estimating risk of readmission in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carl R; Hefner, Jennifer; McAlearney, Ann S; Graham, Lisa; Johnson, Kristen; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan; Huerta, Timothy; Pawlik, Timothy M; White, Susan

    2018-02-26

    Hospital readmissions among cancer patients are common. While several models estimating readmission risk exist, models specific for cancer patients are lacking. A logistic regression model estimating risk of unplanned 30-day readmission was developed using inpatient admission data from a 2-year period (n = 18 782) at a tertiary cancer hospital. Readmission risk estimates derived from the model were then calculated prospectively over a 10-month period (n = 8616 admissions) and compared with actual incidence of readmission. There were 2478 (13.2%) unplanned readmissions. Model factors associated with readmission included: emergency department visit within 30 days, >1 admission within 60 days, non-surgical admission, solid malignancy, gastrointestinal cancer, emergency admission, length of stay >5 days, abnormal sodium, hemoglobin, or white blood cell count. The c-statistic for the model was 0.70. During the 10-month prospective evaluation, estimates of readmission from the model were associated with higher actual readmission incidence from 20.7% for the highest risk category to 9.6% for the lowest. An unplanned readmission risk model developed specifically for cancer patients performs well when validated prospectively. The specificity of the model for cancer patients, EMR incorporation, and prospective validation justify use of the model in future studies designed to reduce and prevent readmissions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Design and development of a web-based application for diabetes patient data management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Deo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A web-based database management system developed for collecting, managing and analysing information of diabetes patients is described here. It is a searchable, client-server, relational database application, developed on the WindowsTM platform using Oracle, Active Server Pages (ASP, Visual Basic Script (VB Script and Java Script. The software is menu-driven and allows authorised healthcare providers to access, enter, update and analyse patient information. Graphical representation of data can be generated by the system using bar charts and pie charts. An interactive web interface allows users to query the database and generate reports. Alpha- and beta-testing of the system was carried out and the system at present holds records of 500 diabetes patients and is found useful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition to providing patient data on a continuous basis in a simple format, the system is used in population and comparative analysis. It has proved to be of significant advantage to the healthcare provider as compared to the paper-based system.

  10. Follow-up of cochlear implant use in patients who developed bacterial meningitis following cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Patrizia; D'Elia, Chiara; Bosco, Ersilia; De Seta, Elio; Panebianco, Valeria; Vergari, Valeria; Filipo, Roberto

    2008-08-01

    The present study is a long-term follow-up of speech perception outcomes and cochlear implant use in three cases of meningitis that occurred after cochlear implantation. Case series study. Study was performed on three children implanted with different models of Clarion devices, two of them with positioner. Recognition and comprehension were assessed via the Italian adaptation of GASP (TAP) test, and phonetically balanced bi-syllabic words in open-set. High resolution computed tomography scan acquisition was performed to obtain axial coronal and oblique multiplanar reconstructions of the cochlea. Two patients were affected by enlarged cochlear acqueduct and Mondini malformation the first carrying positioner. One patient had a normal cochlea, and the positioner could have been the main cause of bacterial spread. As a consequence of meningitis the child with normal cochlea and the other with enlarged vestibular acqueduct developed cochlear ossification, increased M-level and worsening of hearing outcomes. The child with Mondini malformation developed facial nerve stimulation. Contralateral implantation was performed in the first two patients. Bacterial meningitis occurring after cochlear implantation may induce cochlear ossification, facial nerve stimulation, and permanent or temporary loss of implant use. Planned follow-up with high resolution computed tomography and evaluation of M-levels could be useful prognostic tools in the management of these patients.

  11. Development of a Streamlined Work Flow for Handling Patients' Genetic Testing Insurance Authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Wendy R; Schwalm, Katie; Raymond, Victoria M

    2017-08-01

    Obtaining genetic testing insurance authorizations for patients is a complex, time-involved process often requiring genetic counselor (GC) and physician involvement. In an effort to mitigate this complexity and meet the increasing number of genetic testing insurance authorization requests, GCs formed a novel partnership with an industrial engineer (IE) and a patient services associate (PSA) to develop a streamlined work flow. Eight genetics clinics and five specialty clinics at the University of Michigan were surveyed to obtain benchmarking data. Tasks needed for genetic testing insurance authorization were outlined and time-saving work flow changes were introduced including 1) creation of an Excel password-protected shared database between GCs and PSAs, used for initiating insurance authorization requests, tracking and follow-up 2) instituting the PSAs sending GCs a pre-clinic email noting each patients' genetic testing insurance coverage 3) inclusion of test medical necessity documentation in the clinic visit summary note instead of writing a separate insurance letter and 4) PSAs development of a manual with insurance providers and genetic testing laboratories information. These work flow changes made it more efficient to request and track genetic testing insurance authorizations for patients, enhanced GCs and PSAs communication, and reduced tasks done by clinicians.

  12. The SATISPSY-22: development and validation of a French hospitalized patients' satisfaction questionnaire in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendjidjian, X Y; Auquier, P; Lançon, C; Loundou, A; Parola, N; Faugère, M; Boyer, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a specific French self-administered instrument for measuring hospitalized patients' satisfaction in psychiatry based on exclusive patient point of view: the SATISPSY-22. The development of the SATISPSY was undertaken in three steps: item generation, item reduction, and validation. The content of the SATISPSY was derived from 80 interviews with patients hospitalized in psychiatry. Using item response and classical test theories, item reduction was performed in 2 hospitals on 270 responders. The validation was based on construct validity, reliability, and some aspects of external validity. The SATISPSY contains 22 items describing 6 dimensions (staff, quality of care, personal experience, information, activity, and food). The six-factor structure accounted for 78.0% of the total variance. Each item achieved the 0.40 standard for item-internal consistency, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficients were>0.70. Scores of dimensions were strongly positively correlated with Visual Analogue Scale scores. Significant associations with socioeconomic and clinical indicators showed good discriminant and external validity. INFIT statistics were ranged from 0.71 to 1.25. The SATISPSY-22 presents satisfactory psychometric properties, enabling patient feedback to be incorporated in a continuous quality health care improvement strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms associated with psoriasis and development of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg; Skov, Lone; Rasmussen, Mads Kirchheiner; Gniadecki, Robert; Dam, Tomas Norman; Brandslund, Ivan; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Andersen, Malene Rohr; Dessau, Ram Benny; Bergmann, Ann Christina; Andersen, Niels Møller; Abildtoft, Mikkel Kramme; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hetland, Merete Lund; Glintborg, Bente; Bank, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Andersen, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic inflammatory disease with predominantly cutaneous manifestations. Approximately one third of patients with PsO develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas the remaining proportion of patients has isolated cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). These two phenotypes share common immunology, but with different heredity that might in part be explained by genetic variables. Using a candidate gene approach, we studied 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 genes that regulate inflammation. In total, we assessed 480 patients with PsO from DERMBIO, of whom 151 had PsC for 10 years or more (PsC10), 459 patients with PsA from DANBIO, and 795 healthy controls. Using logistic regression analysis, crude and adjusted for age and gender, we assessed associations between genetic variants and PsO, PsC10, and PsA, as well as associations between genetic variants and development of PsA in PsO. Eleven polymorphisms in 10 genes were nominally associated with PsO and/or PsC and/or PsA (P psoriasis, two SNPs in the IL12B and TNF genes were associated with susceptibility of psoriasis. None of the SNPs were specifically associated with isolated cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.

  14. Improvement critical care patient safety: using nursing staff development strategies, at Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuni, Enas M; Bayoumi, Magda M

    2015-01-13

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provide lifesaving care for the critically ill patients and are associated with significant risks. Moreover complexity of care within ICUs requires that the health care professionals exhibit a trans-disciplinary level of competency to improve patient safety. This study aimed at using staff development strategies through implementing patient safety educational program that may minimize the medical errors and improve patient outcome in hospital. The study was carried out using a quasi experimental design. The settings included the intensive care units at General Mohail Hospital and National Mohail Hospital, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from March to June 2012. A convenience sample of all prevalent nurses at three shifts in the aforementioned settings during the study period was recruited. The program was implemented on 50 staff nurses in different ICUs. Their age ranged between 25-40 years. Statistically significant relation was revealed between safety climate and job satisfaction among nurses in the study sample (p=0.001). The years of experiences in ICU ranged between one year 11 (16.4) to 10 years 20 (29.8), most of them (68%) were working in variable shift, while 32% were day shift only. Improvements were observed in safety climate, teamwork climate, and nurse turnover rates on ICUs after implementing a safety program. On the heels of this improvement; nurses' total knowledge, skills and attitude were enhanced regarding patient safety dimensions. Continuous educational program for ICUs nursing staff through organized in-service training is needed to increase their knowledge and skills about the importance of improving patient safety measure. Emphasizing on effective collaborative system also will improve patient safety measures in ICUS.

  15. Developing a psychiatrist-patient relationship when both people are doctors: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Josephine; Randal, Patte

    2016-05-20

    To better understand the complexities of developing an effective psychiatrist-patient relationship when both people involved are doctors. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 doctors with experiences as patients of psychiatrists (DPs) and eight psychiatrists with experience of treating doctors (TPs). A thematic analysis was undertaken. The medical culture of unrealistically high standards with limited room for vulnerability and fallibility, vigilance for judgment and valuing clinical over personal knowledge affected both people in the relationship. DPs struggled with the contradictions involved in entering the patient role but tried hard to be good patients. They wanted guidance but found it hard to accept and seldom communicated dissatisfaction or disagreement to their TPs. They described widely varying responses to diagnosis and treatment within the biomedical model. TPs described enjoyment and satisfaction and extreme challenge in engaging with TPs. Despite focusing on providing ordinary care they described providing extra care in many ways. This study brings forward important issues when a psychiatrist is building a therapeutic relationship with another doctor. These are also likely to arise with other people and contribute to making truly patient-centred 'ordinary care' a hard ideal to fulfil. They include: (1) doctors' sense of ourselves as invincible, (2) TPs' sense of personal connection to, and identity with, DPs, (3) having extensive medical knowledge and (4) striving to be good patients. We need to make these issues explicit and enable the DP (or other patients) to tell their story and speak about their experience of the consultation so that any potential rupture in the therapeutic relationship can be addressed early. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Development and validation of a quality of life questionnaire for patients with colostomy or ileostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juul Kristian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life of stoma patients is increasingly being addressed in clinical trials. However, the instruments used in the majority of these studies have not been validated specifically for stoma patients. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and validation of a quality-of-life instrument, "Stoma-QOL", specifically for patients with colostomy or ileostomy. Methods Potential items were formulated in English on the basis of the results of a series of semi-structured interviews with 169 adult stoma patients. The process resulted in a preliminary 37-item version, which was translated into French, German, Spanish and Danish, and administered repeatedly to 182 patients with colostomy or ileostomy. A psychometric selection of items was performed through Rasch Analysis. The measurement properties of the final questionnaire version were subsequently tested. Results The 20 items in the final questionnaire covered four domains – sleep, sexual activity, relations to family and close friends, and social relations to other than family and close friends. These items were found to define a unidimensional variable according to Rasch specifications (Infit MNSQ 0.88 (p Conclusion Given the adequacy of the metric properties of the Stoma-QOL suggested by the psychometric analyses, this study confirms the suitability of the instrument in clinical practice and in clinical research.

  17. Development and validation of a prognostic scoring system for patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Such, Esperanza; Germing, Ulrich; Malcovati, Luca; Cervera, José; Kuendgen, Andrea; Della Porta, Matteo G; Nomdedeu, Benet; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Xicoy, Blanca; Amigo, Mari L; Valcarcel, David; Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Cazzola, Mario; Sanz, Guillermo

    2013-04-11

    The natural course of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is highly variable but a widely accepted prognostic scoring system for patients with CMML is not available. The main aim of this study was to develop a new CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) in a large series of 558 patients with CMML (training cohort, Spanish Group of Myelodysplastic Syndromes) and to validate it in an independent series of 274 patients (validation cohort, Heinrich Heine University Hospital, Düsseldorf, Germany, and San Matteo Hospital, Pavia, Italy). The most relevant variables for overall survival (OS) and evolution to acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were FAB and WHO CMML subtypes, CMML-specific cytogenetic risk classification, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion dependency. CPSS was able to segregate patients into 4 clearly different risk groups for OS (P < .001) and risk of AML evolution (P < .001) and its predictive capability was confirmed in the validation cohort. An alternative CPSS with hemoglobin instead of RBC transfusion dependency offered almost identical prognostic capability. This study confirms the prognostic impact of FAB and WHO subtypes, recognizes the importance of RBC transfusion dependency and cytogenetics, and offers a simple and powerful CPSS for accurately assessing prognosis and planning therapy in patients with CMML.

  18. Advancing clinical reasoning in virtual patients - development and application of a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Inga; Kononowicz, Andrzej A; Berman, Norman B; Lenzer, Benedikt; Kiesewetter, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning is a complex skill students have to acquire during their education. For educators it is difficult to explain their reasoning to students, because it is partly an automatic and unconscious process. Virtual Patients (VPs) are used to support the acquisition of clinical reasoning skills in healthcare education. However, until now it remains unclear which features or settings of VPs optimally foster clinical reasoning. Therefore, our aims were to identify key concepts of the clinical reasoning process in a qualitative approach and draw conclusions on how each concept can be enhanced to advance the learning of clinical reasoning with virtual patients. Methods: We chose a grounded theory approach to identify key categories and concepts of learning clinical reasoning and develop a framework. Throughout this process, the emerging codes were discussed with a panel of interdisciplinary experts. In a second step we applied the framework to virtual patients. Results: Based on the data we identified the core category as the "multifactorial nature of learning clinical reasoning". This category is reflected in the following five main categories: Psychological Theories, Patient-centeredness, Context, Learner-centeredness, and Teaching/Assessment. Each category encompasses between four and six related concepts. Conclusions: With our approach we were able to elaborate how key categories and concepts of clinical reasoning can be applied to virtual patients. This includes aspects such as allowing learners to access a large number of VPs with adaptable levels of complexity and feedback or emphasizing dual processing, errors, and uncertainty.

  19. Advancing clinical reasoning in virtual patientsdevelopment and application of a conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Inga; Kononowicz, Andrzej A.; Berman, Norman B.; Lenzer, Benedikt; Kiesewetter, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning is a complex skill students have to acquire during their education. For educators it is difficult to explain their reasoning to students, because it is partly an automatic and unconscious process. Virtual Patients (VPs) are used to support the acquisition of clinical reasoning skills in healthcare education. However, until now it remains unclear which features or settings of VPs optimally foster clinical reasoning. Therefore, our aims were to identify key concepts of the clinical reasoning process in a qualitative approach and draw conclusions on how each concept can be enhanced to advance the learning of clinical reasoning with virtual patients. Methods: We chose a grounded theory approach to identify key categories and concepts of learning clinical reasoning and develop a framework. Throughout this process, the emerging codes were discussed with a panel of interdisciplinary experts. In a second step we applied the framework to virtual patients. Results: Based on the data we identified the core category as the "multifactorial nature of learning clinical reasoning". This category is reflected in the following five main categories: Psychological Theories, Patient-centeredness, Context, Learner-centeredness, and Teaching/Assessment. Each category encompasses between four and six related concepts. Conclusions: With our approach we were able to elaborate how key categories and concepts of clinical reasoning can be applied to virtual patients. This includes aspects such as allowing learners to access a large number of VPs with adaptable levels of complexity and feedback or emphasizing dual processing, errors, and uncertainty. PMID:29497697

  20. Uncovering the features of negotiation in developing the patient-nurse relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Kathleen; Bugge, Carol

    2012-02-01

    This article describes a study that set out to explore the interaction between patients and nurses in community practice settings, in order to understand the social meanings and understandings brought to the interaction and at play within it. The study used a grounded theory methodology with traditional procedures. Driven by constant comparative analysis, data were collected by non-participant observation and informal and semi-structured interviews in four community health centres. Eighteen patients and 18 registered practice nurses participated. Negotiation was found to be a fundamental process in patient- nurse interaction. Navigation, socio-cultural characteristics and power and control were found to be key properties of negotiation. The negotiation processes for developing understanding required patients and nurses to draw upon social meanings and understandings generated from within and beyond their current interaction. Social meanings and understandings created within and beyond the health-care setting influence negotiation. The developmental nature of negotiation in interaction is an important dimension of the patient- nurse relationship in community practice.

  1. Positive Psychological Interventions for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Rationale, Theoretical Model, and Intervention Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff C. Huffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D have suboptimal adherence to recommended diet, physical activity, and/or medication. Current approaches to improve health behaviors in T2D have been variably effective, and successful interventions are often complex and intensive. It is therefore vital to develop interventions that are simple, well-accepted, and applicable to a wide range of patients who suffer from T2D. One approach may be to boost positive psychological states, such as positive affect or optimism, as these constructs have been prospectively and independently linked to improvements in health behaviors. Positive psychology (PP interventions, which utilize systematic exercises to increase optimism, well-being, and positive affect, consistently increase positive states and are easily delivered to patients with chronic illnesses. However, to our knowledge, PP interventions have not been formally tested in T2D. In this paper, we review a theoretical model for the use of PP interventions to target health behaviors in T2D, describe the structure and content of a PP intervention for T2D patients, and describe baseline data from a single-arm proof-of-concept (N=15 intervention study in T2D patients with or without depression. We also discuss how PP interventions could be combined with motivational interviewing (MI interventions to provide a blended psychological-behavioral approach.

  2. [Risk factors for skin cancer development in patients after organ transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imko-Walczuk, Beata; Piesiaków, Maria Luiza; Okuniewska, Aleksandra; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Lizakowski, Sławomir; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2012-11-13

    Cancer has become the second most common cause of death in patients after organ transplantation. Among all cancers arising de novo after transplantation skin cancers are the most common, accounting for 95% of all skin neoplasms. Due to the significantly higher morbidity, aggressive, rapid progression of cancer and unfavorable prognosis, the population requires a specific oncological approach. Therefore, special attention should be paid to factors predisposing to the development of cancer, including skin cancer, in patients after organ transplantation. Some of these factors are well understood, while the role of others is still ambiguous. Among the etiological factors mentioned are those that are associated with the recipient. These include genetic factors such as male sex, fair skin and inability to be tanned, and compatibility of the HLA system, and non genetic factors such as patient age, chronic skin ulcers and scars, the type of transplanted organ, immunosuppression, and particularly the type and cumulative doses of drugs. In addition, the pathogenesis of cancer is influenced by environmental factors such as exposure to sunlight and therefore latitude, ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens and viral infections. Knowledge of etiological factors and mechanisms of etiopathogenesis allow for indication and observation of patients with increased risk of cancer as well as faster healing in these patients.  

  3. Development/Testing of a Monitoring System Assisting MCI Patients: The European Project INLIFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimakamis, Evangelos; Karavidopoulou, Vaia; Kilintzis, Vassilios; Stefanopoulos, Leandros; Papageorgiou, Valentini

    2017-01-01

    INLIFE is a project cofounded from the European Union aiming in prolonging independent living of elderly people with cognitive impairment based on open, seamless ICT services supporting communication, daily activities, providing health services and professional care to the elderly. The main innovation stems from ICT solutions offering 19 different services adapted on specific characteristics elderly people with mild cognitive impairment, early and later stages of Dementia, cognitive impairment and co-morbid condition, as well as their formal and informal caregivers. All services have different focus areas and are incorporated into a unified system based on cloud architecture implemented in patients of 6 European countries, including Greece. More than 1200 patients, caregivers and healthcare providers participate in the pilot testing of the project. Primary parameter for assessing the effectiveness of the interventions is their impact on the quality of life of the elderly patients and their caregivers, contributing to prolonging independent living of the affected. A special digital platform has been developed in the Greek pilot site aiming to adapt and monitor all the implemented applications. This includes a medical decision support system that receives biosignals from patients and interaction interfaces in which all participants are involved. Recruitment and patients' participation has already started in the pilot site of Thessaloniki for the services that are to be tested in Greece.

  4. Bio-Intelligence: A Research Program Facilitating the Development of New Paradigms for Tomorrow's Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Sieu; Famili, Fazel; Liu, Ziying; Peña-Castillo, Lourdes

    The advancement of omics technologies in concert with the enabling information technology development has accelerated biological research to a new realm in a blazing speed and sophistication. The limited single gene assay to the high throughput microarray assay and the laborious manual count of base-pairs to the robotic assisted machinery in genome sequencing are two examples to name. Yet even more sophisticated, the recent development in literature mining and artificial intelligence has allowed researchers to construct complex gene networks unraveling many formidable biological puzzles. To harness these emerging technologies to their full potential to medical applications, the Bio-intelligence program at the Institute for Information Technology, National Research Council Canada, aims to develop and exploit artificial intelligence and bioinformatics technologies to facilitate the development of intelligent decision support tools and systems to improve patient care - for early detection, accurate diagnosis/prognosis of disease, and better personalized therapeutic management.

  5. Interviewing to develop Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) measures for clinical research: eliciting patients’ experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures must provide evidence that their development followed a rigorous process for ensuring their content validity. To this end, the collection of data is performed through qualitative interviews that allow for the elicitation of in-depth spontaneous reports of the patients’ experiences with their condition and/or its treatment. This paper provides a review of qualitative research applied to PRO measure development. A clear definition of what is a qualitative research interview is given as well as information about the form and content of qualitative interviews required for developing PRO measures. Particular attention is paid to the description of interviewing approaches (e.g., semi-structured and in-depth interviews, individual vs. focus group interviews). Information about how to get prepared for a qualitative interview is provided with the description of how to develop discussion guides for exploratory or cognitive interviews. Interviewing patients to obtain knowledge regarding their illness experience requires interpersonal and communication skills to facilitate patients’ expression. Those skills are described in details, as well as the skills needed to facilitate focus groups and to interview children, adolescents and the elderly. Special attention is also given to quality assurance and interview training. The paper ends on ethical considerations since interviewing for the development of PROs is performed in a context of illness and vulnerability. Therefore, it is all the more important that, in addition to soliciting informed consent, respectful interactions be ensured throughout the interview process. PMID:24499454

  6. Online virtual patients - A driver for change in medical and healthcare professional education in developing countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, David; Borgstein, Eric; Grant, Mary E; Begg, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The development of online virtual patients has proved to be an effective vehicle for pedagogical and technological skills transfer and capacity building for medical and healthcare educators in Malawi. A project between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Malawi has delivered more than 20 collaboratively developed, virtual patients, contextualised for in-country medical and healthcare education and, more significantly, a cadre of healthcare professionals skilled in developing digital resources and integrating these into their emerging curricula. The process of engaging with new approaches to teaching and delivering personalised, context sensitive content via a game-informed, technology-supported process has contributed to the ability of healthcare educators in Malawi to drive pedagogical change, meet the substantial challenges of delivering new curricula, cope with increasing student numbers and promote teacher professional development. This initial phase of the project has laid the foundation for a broader second phase that focuses on promoting curriculum change, developing educational infrastructure and in-country capacity to create, and integrate digital resources into education and training across multi-professional groups and across educational levels.

  7. Practice development: providing benefits for both managers and older patients with delerium and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzant, Kim

    2008-03-01

    This article describes the ways in which practice development can aid Nurse Managers to enhance both efficiency and effectiveness, focussing particularly on the care of older people with delerium and dementia. Practitioners caring for this group of patients in acute general hospitals need specialist skills, particularly skills in working with the unusual ('challenging') behaviours that these patients often exhibit. These skills are rarely present at the point of registration but practice development techniques can facilitate the acquisition of appropriate skills with resultant benefits for both patients and organization. The study contains an outline of the ways in which a practice development approach can be delivered and appraised: the theories are outlined, strategies for delivery of the techniques are described and methods of evaluation are suggested. These theories and techniques are being applied in a project in Portsmouth called 'Rise to the Challenge', which has the specific aim of improving the care of people with delerium and dementia in an acute hospital setting. This project is currently running and will be evaluated in the summer of 2008.

  8. The role of titration schedule of topiramate for the development of depression in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Trimble, Michael; Sander, Josemir W

    2009-05-01

    To determine whether a fast titration schedule of topiramate (TPM) has different effects on the occurrence of depression, in relation to other risk factors for TPM-induced depression, including history of depression (HxDEP), febrile seizures (FS), and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Using data from a large case registry of patients prescribed TPM, two models were constructed: Model 1 examined the independent effect of rapid TPM titration after separate adjustment for FS, HxDEP, and HS. Model 2 examined effect of the cooccurrence of rapid titration on the development of depression with each of these risk factors. A total of 423 patients were included (51.8% females), mean age (SD) 35.5 (11.8) years, mean duration of epilepsy of 22.2 (11.5) years. Forty-four patients (10.4%) developed depression during TPM therapy. A rapid TPM titration was associated with 5-fold increased risk of depression that increased to 12.7-fold in the presence of both FS and rapid TPM titration, 23.3-fold in the presence of both HxDEP and rapid TPM titration, and 7.6-fold in the presence of both HS and rapid TPM titration schedule. Our study suggests that a rapid titration schedule is associated with an increased risk of developing depression during TPM therapy. HxDEP and FS are major contraindications to the use of a rapid titration, with a 23.3-fold and 12.7 fold increased risk, respectively.

  9. [Design and development of a new information technology platform for patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osváth, Péter; Vörös, Viktor; Kovács, Attila; Boda-Jörg, Adrienn; Fekete, Szabolcs; Jankovics, Réka; Tényi, Tamás; Fekete, Sándor

    2017-01-01

    As dementia, including Alzheimer's disease is a major public health issue worldwide, there are many efforts at European level to promote active and healthy ageing. University of Pecs joined the ICT4Life project - supported by the European Union H2020 programme - in 2016. The aim of this three-years project is to improve qualityof- life and autonomy of patients with mild or moderate dementia with developing a new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platform, which may provide help for patients, caregivers and professionals. The ICT4Life research is conducted among patients with cognitive decline, their relatives, caregivers, and professionals involved in their care. The needs of the different actors are assessed with semi-structured interviews and clinical scales (cognitive and affective scales, quality-of-life measurements, functionality, caregiver burden), which help to develop a user-friendly, adaptive and personalized platform. Using the integrated ICT platform (bio-sensors, smart TV, tablet, mobile, bracelet) may contribute to monitor (physical, psycho-motor and emotional states) elderly with cognitive decline and to provide better and personalized care for them. The platform includes cognitive enhancement with gamification, and focuses also on the decrease of professional and caregiver burden. Here we report on the ICT4Life programme, which develops an ICT solution for individuals with early stage cognitive impairment while contributing in a user-friendly way to extending their independence and improve their quality-of-life.

  10. Patient experiences with oily skin: the qualitative development of content for two new patient reported outcome questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Robert; Atkinson, Mark J; Clark, Marci; Abetz, Linda; Lohs, Jan; Kuhagen, Ilka; Harness, Jane; Draelos, Zoe; Thiboutot, Diane; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Copley-Merriman, Kati

    2008-10-16

    To develop the content for two new patient reported outcome (PRO) measures to: a) assess the severity of symptoms; and b) the impact of facial skin oiliness on emotional wellbeing using qualitative data from face to face, and internet focus groups in Germany and the US. Using input from initial treatment satisfaction focus groups (n = 42), a review of relevant literature and expert clinicians (n = 3), a discussion guide was developed to guide qualitative inquiry using Internet focus groups (IFGs). IFGs were conducted with German (n = 26) and US (n = 28) sufferers of oily skin. Questionnaire items were generated using coded transcript data from the focus groups. Cognitive debriefing was conducted online with 42 participants and face to face with an additional five participants to assess the comprehension of the items. There were equal numbers of male and female participants; mean age was 35.4 (SD 9.3) years. On average, participants had had oily skin for 15.2 years, and 74% (n = 40) reported having mild-moderate acne. Participants reported using visual, tactile and sensory (feel without touching their face) methods to evaluate the severity of facial oiliness. Oily facial skin had both an emotional and social impact, and was associated with feelings of unattractiveness, self-consciousness, embarrassment, irritation and frustration. Items were generated for a measure of oily skin severity (Oily Skin Self-Assessment Scale) and a measure of the impact of oily skin on emotional well-being (Oily Skin Impact Scale). Cognitive debriefing resulted in minor changes to the draft items and confirmed their face and content validity. The research provides insight into the experience of having oily skin and illustrates significant difficulties associated with the condition. Item content was developed for early versions of two PRO measures of the symptoms and emotional impact of oily facial skin. The psychometric validation of these measures reported elsewhere.

  11. Patient experiences with oily skin: The qualitative development of content for two new patient reported outcome questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draelos Zoe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To develop the content for two new patient reported outcome (PRO measures to: a assess the severity of symptoms; and b the impact of facial skin oiliness on emotional wellbeing using qualitative data from face to face, and internet focus groups in Germany and the US. Methods Using input from initial treatment satisfaction focus groups (n = 42, a review of relevant literature and expert clinicians (n = 3, a discussion guide was developed to guide qualitative inquiry using Internet focus groups (IFGs. IFGs were conducted with German (n = 26 and US (n = 28 sufferers of oily skin. Questionnaire items were generated using coded transcript data from the focus groups. Cognitive debriefing was conducted online with 42 participants and face to face with an additional five participants to assess the comprehension of the items. Results There were equal numbers of male and female participants; mean age was 35.4 (SD 9.3 years. On average, participants had had oily skin for 15.2 years, and 74% (n = 40 reported having mild-moderate acne. Participants reported using visual, tactile and sensory (feel without touching their face methods to evaluate the severity of facial oiliness. Oily facial skin had both an emotional and social impact, and was associated with feelings of unattractiveness, self-consciousness, embarrassment, irritation and frustration. Items were generated for a measure of oily skin severity (Oily Skin Self-Assessment Scale and a measure of the impact of oily skin on emotional well-being (Oily Skin Impact Scale. Cognitive debriefing resulted in minor changes to the draft items and confirmed their face and content validity. Conclusion The research provides insight into the experience of having oily skin and illustrates significant difficulties associated with the condition. Item content was developed for early versions of two PRO measures of the symptoms and emotional impact of oily facial skin. The psychometric validation of

  12. Patient empowerment in long-term conditions: development and preliminary testing of a new measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient empowerment is viewed by policy makers and health care practitioners as a mechanism to help patients with long-term conditions better manage their health and achieve better outcomes. However, assessing the role of empowerment is dependent on effective measures of empowerment. Although many measures of empowerment exist, no measure has been developed specifically for patients with long-term conditions in the primary care setting. This study presents preliminary data on the development and validation of such a measure. Methods We conducted two empirical studies. Study one was an interview study to understand empowerment from the perspective of patients living with long-term conditions. Qualitative analysis identified dimensions of empowerment, and the qualitative data were used to generate items relating to these dimensions. Study two was a cross-sectional postal study involving patients with different types of long-term conditions recruited from general practices. The survey was conducted to test and validate our new measure of empowerment. Factor analysis and regression were performed to test scale structure, internal consistency and construct validity. Results Sixteen predominately elderly patients with different types of long-term conditions described empowerment in terms of 5 dimensions (identity, knowledge and understanding, personal control, personal decision-making, and enabling other patients). One hundred and ninety seven survey responses were received from mainly older white females, with relatively low levels of formal education, with the majority retired from paid work. Almost half of the sample reported cardiovascular, joint or diabetes long-term conditions. Factor analysis identified a three factor solution (positive attitude and sense of control, knowledge and confidence in decision making and enabling others), although the structure lacked clarity. A total empowerment score across all items showed acceptable levels of internal

  13. Development and psychometric testing of a breast cancer patient-profiling questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorini A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alessandra Gorini,1,2 Ketti Mazzocco,1,2 Sara Gandini,2 Elisabetta Munzone,2 Gordon McVie,2 Gabriella Pravettoni1,2 1Department of Health Science, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 2European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy Introduction: The advent of “personalized medicine” has been driven by technological advances in genomics. Concentration at the subcellular level of a patient's cancer cells has meant inevitably that the “person” has been overlooked. For this reason, we think there is an urgent need to develop a truly personalized approach focusing on each patient as an individual, assessing his/her unique mental dimensions and tailoring interventions to his/her individual needs and preferences. The aim of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the ALGA-Breast Cancer (ALGA-BC, a new multidimensional questionnaire that assesses the breast cancer patient's physical and mental characteristics in order to provide physicians, prior to the consultation, with a patient's profile that is supposed to facilitate subsequent communication, interaction, and information delivery between the doctor and the patient. Methods: The specific validation processes used were: content and face validity, construct validity using factor analysis, reliability and internal consistency using test–retest reliability, and Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient. The exploratory analysis included 100 primary breast cancer patients and 730 healthy subjects. Results: The exploratory factor analysis revealed eight key factors: global self-rated health, perceived physical health, anxiety, self-efficacy, cognitive closure, memory, body image, and sexual life. Test–retest reliability and internal consistency were good. Comparing patients with a sample of healthy subjects, we also observed a general ability of the ALGA-BC questionnaire to discriminate between the two. Conclusion: The ALGA-BC questionnaire with 29 items is a valid

  14. Using an intervention mapping approach to develop a discharge protocol for intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mol, Margo; Nijkamp, Marjan; Markham, Christine; Ista, Erwin

    2017-12-19

    Admission into an intensive care unit (ICU) may result in long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional consequences for patients and their relatives. The care of the critically ill patient does not end upon ICU discharge; therefore, integrated and ongoing care during and after transition to the follow-up ward is pivotal. This study described the development of an intervention that responds to this need. Intervention Mapping (IM), a six-step theory- and evidence-based approach, was used to guide intervention development. The first step, a problem analysis, comprised a literature review, six semi-structured telephone interviews with former ICU-patients and their relatives, and seven qualitative roundtable meetings for all eligible nurses (i.e., 135 specialized and 105 general ward nurses). Performance and change objectives were formulated in step two. In step three, theory-based methods and practical applications were selected and directed at the desired behaviors and the identified barriers. Step four designed a revised discharge protocol taking into account existing interventions. Adoption, implementation and evaluation of the new discharge protocol (IM steps five and six) are in progress and were not included in this study. Four former ICU patients and two relatives underlined the importance of the need for effective discharge information and supportive written material. They also reported a lack of knowledge regarding the consequences of ICU admission. 42 ICU and 19 general ward nurses identified benefits and barriers regarding discharge procedures using three vignettes framed by literature. Some discrepancies were found. For example, ICU nurses were skeptical about the impact of writing a lay summary despite extensive evidence of the known benefits for the patients. ICU nurses anticipated having insufficient skills, not knowing the patient well enough, and fearing legal consequences of their writings. The intervention was designed to target the knowledge

  15. Factors Associated with the Development of Tertiary Peritonitis in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballus, Josep; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Sabater-Riera, Joan; Perez-Fernandez, Xose L; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A

    2017-07-01

    Critically ill surgical patients remain at a high risk of adverse outcomes as a result of secondary peritonitis (SP). The risk is even higher if tertiary peritonitis (TP) develops. Factors related to the development of TP, however, are scarce in the literature. The main aim of our study was to identify factors associated with the development of TP in patients with SP in the intensive care unit (ICU), and also to report differences in microbiologic patterns and antibiotic therapy in patients with the two conditions. A prospective, observational study was conducted at our institution from 2010 to 2014. Baseline characteristics on admission, outcomes, microbiologic results, and antibiotic therapy were recorded for analysis. We included 343 patients with SP, of whom TP developed in 185 (53.9%). Almost two-thirds (64.4%) were male; mean age was 63.7 ± 14.3 years, and mean APACHE was 19.4 ± 7.8. In-hospital death was 42.6% (146). Multivariable analysis showed that longer ICU stay (odds ratio [OR]: 1.019; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.004-1.034; p = 0.010), urgent operation on hospital admission (OR: 3.247; 95% CI: 1.392-7.575; p = 0.006), total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (OR: 3.079; 95% CI: 1.535-6.177; p = 0.002) and stomach-duodenum as primary infection site (OR: 4.818; 95% CI: 1.429-16.247; p = 0.011) were factors associated with the development of TP, whereas patients with localized peritonitis were less prone to have TP develop (OR: 0.308; 95% CI: 0.152-0.624; p = 0.001). Higher incidences of Candida spp. (OR: 1.275; 95% CI: 1.096-1.789; p = 0.016), Enterococcus faecium (OR: 1.085; 95% CI: 1.018-1.400; p = 0.002), and Enterococcus spp. (OR: 1.370; 95% CI: 1.139-1.989; p = 0.047) were found in TP, and higher rates of cephalosporin use in SP (OR: 3.51; 95% CI: 1.139-10.817; p = 0.035). Complicated peritonitis remains a cause of a high numbers of deaths in the ICU. The need for TPN, urgent operation on hospital admission

  16. Does the risk of developing dementia increase with the number of episodes in patients with depressive disorder and in patients with bipolar disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several findings suggest that some patients with depressive or bipolar disorder may be at increased risk of developing dementia. The present study aimed to investigate whether the risk of developing dementia increases with the number of affective episodes in patients with depressive...... following the first discharge after 1985 was estimated. A total of 18,726 patients with depressive disorder and 4248 patients with bipolar disorder were included in the study. RESULTS: The rate of a diagnosis of dementia on readmission was significantly related to the number of prior affective episodes...... leading to admission. On average, the rate of dementia tended to increase 13% with every episode leading to admission for patients with depressive disorder and 6% with every episode leading to admission for patients with bipolar disorder, when adjusted for differences in age and sex. CONCLUSION...

  17. Development of a web-based, work-related asthma educational tool for patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajar-Khosravi, Shadi; Tarlo, Susan M; Liss, Gary M; Chignell, Mark; Ribeiro, Marcos; Levinson, Anthony J; Gupta, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic condition. Work-related asthma (WRA) has a large socioeconomic impact and is increasing in prevalence but remains under-recognized. Although international guidelines recommend patient education, no widely available educational tool exists. To develop a WRA educational website for adults with asthma. An evidence-based database for website content was developed, which applied evidence-based website design principles to create a website prototype. This was subsequently tested and serially revised according to patient feedback in three moderated phases (one focus group and two interview phases), followed by face validation by asthma educators. Patients (n=10) were 20 to 28 years of age; seven (70%) were female, three (30%) were in university, two (20%) were in college and five (50%) were currently employed. Key format preferences included: well-spaced, bulleted text; movies (as opposed to animations); photos (as opposed to cartoons); an explicit listing of website aims on the home page; and an exploding tab structure. Participants disliked integrated games and knowledge quizzes. Desired informational content included a list of triggers, prevention⁄control methods, currently available tools and resources, a self-test for WRA, real-life scenario presentations, compensation information, information for colleagues on how to react during an asthma attack and a WRA discussion forum. The website met the perceived needs of young asthmatic patients. This resource could be disseminated widely and should be tested for its effects on patient behaviour, including job choice, workplace irritant⁄allergen avoidance and⁄or protective equipment, asthma medication use and physician prompting for management of WRA symptoms.

  18. Patients in palliative care-Development of a predictive model for anxiety using routine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Sonja; Hess, Stephanie; Klein, Carsten; Lindena, Gabriele; Radbruch, Lukas; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most common psychological symptoms in patients in a palliative care situation. This study aims to develop a predictive model for anxiety using data from the standard documentation routine. Data sets of palliative care patients collected by the German quality management benchmarking system called Hospice and Palliative Care Evaluation (HOPE) from 2007 to 2011 were randomly divided into a training set containing two-thirds of the data and a test set with the remaining one-third. We dichotomized anxiety levels, proxy rated by medical staff using the validated HOPE Symptom and Problem Checklist, into two groups with no or mild anxiety versus moderate or severe anxiety. Using the training set, a multivariable logistic regression model was developed by backward stepwise selection. Predictive accuracy was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) based on the test set. An analysis of 9924 data sets suggests a predictive model for anxiety in patients receiving palliative care which contains gender, age, ECOG, living situation, pain, nausea, dyspnea, loss of appetite, tiredness, need for assistance with activities of daily living, problems with organization of care, medication with sedatives/anxiolytics, antidepressants, antihypertensive drugs, laxatives, and antibiotics. It results in a fair predictive value (AUC = 0.72). Routinely collected data providing individual-, disease- and therapy-related information contain valuable information that is useful for the prediction of anxiety risks in patients receiving palliative care. These findings could thus be advantageous for providing appropriate support for patients in palliative care settings and should receive special attention in future research.

  19. Quality of Life in Patients with Thalassemia Major in a Developing Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, S. H.; Ishtiaq, R.; Sajid, F.; Sajid, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the problems faced by thalassemic patients in their personal, psychological and social life. Study Design: A cross-sectional multi-centre survey. Place and Duration of Study: Karachi, Lahore and Quetta Centres of Fatimid Foundation, from October 2009 to October 2010. Methodology: An indigenously developed Qualifty of Life (QoL) questionnaire modified from SF-36 questionnaire was administered to 101 transfusion dependent subjects suffering from thalassemia major. Variables were analyzed using SPSS version 15 for descriptive statistics. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 10.5 years ranging from 6 - 21 years. Less than one third of the patients felt that their health was slightly worse as compared to last year. Forty five (44%) of the patients felt loneliness due to their disease. Parents of 36 (35.6%) of the children at times did not allow their children to play because of their disease. Twenty eight (27.7%) stated difficulty in mingling with children of their age. Seventy one (70.3%) of the patients reported that at some or all times they were worried about their future life and career while 70 (69.3%) admitted being taken extra care of by their friends and 56 (55.4%) by their teachers. Conclusion: The quality of life of surveyed thalassemic patients was immensely affected. Having physical impairments, social stresses, financial burdens and problems with their education and career make them very much vulnerable to psychological trauma very early in their life. All of this creates a hindrance in their way of developing into autonomous functioning adults. (author)

  20. Heterochronicity of white matter development and aging explains regional patient control differences in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochunov, Peter; Ganjgahi, Habib; Winkler, Anderson; Kelly, Sinead; Shukla, Dinesh K; Du, Xiaoming; Jahanshad, Neda; Rowland, Laura; Sampath, Hemalatha; Patel, Binish; O'Donnell, Patricio; Xie, Zhiyong; Paciga, Sara A; Schubert, Christian R; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Guohao; Thompson, Paul M; Nichols, Thomas E; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-12-01

    Altered brain connectivity is implicated in the development and clinical burden of schizophrenia. Relative to matched controls, schizophrenia patients show (1) a global and regional reduction in the integrity of the brain's white matter (WM), assessed using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) fractional anisotropy (FA), and (2) accelerated age-related decline in FA values. In the largest mega-analysis to date, we tested if differences in the trajectories of WM tract development influenced patient-control differences in FA. We also assessed if specific tracts showed exacerbated decline with aging. Three cohorts of schizophrenia patients (total n = 177) and controls (total n = 249; age = 18-61 years) were ascertained with three 3T Siemens MRI scanners. Whole-brain and regional FA values were extracted using ENIGMA-DTI protocols. Statistics were evaluated using mega- and meta-analyses to detect effects of diagnosis and age-by-diagnosis interactions. In mega-analysis of whole-brain averaged FA, schizophrenia patients had lower FA (P = 10 -11 ) and faster age-related decline in FA (P = 0.02) compared with controls. Tract-specific heterochronicity measures, that is, abnormal rates of adolescent maturation and aging explained approximately 50% of the regional variance effects of diagnosis and age-by-diagnosis interaction in patients. Interactive, three-dimensional visualization of the results is available at www.enigma-viewer.org. WM tracts that mature later in life appeared more sensitive to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and were more susceptible to faster age-related decline in FA values. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4673-4688, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Development of generic quality indicators for patient-centered cancer care by using a RAND modified Delphi method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uphoff, Eleonora P. M. M.; Wennekes, Lianne; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.; Wollersheim, Hub C. H.; Hermens, Rosella P. M. G.; Ottevanger, Petronella B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing attention to patient-centered care, the needs of cancer patients are not always met. Using a RAND modified Delphi method, this study aimed to systematically develop evidence-based indicators, to be used to measure the quality of patient-centered cancer care as a first step toward

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Training Program for Organ Procurement Coordinators Using Standardized Patient Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Orhan; Elcin, Melih; Uzun Basusta, Bilge; Gulkaya Anik, Esin; Aki, Tuncay F; Bozoklar, Ata

    2015-12-01

    The low rate of consent by next of kin of donor-eligible patients is a major limiting factor in organ transplant. Educating health care professionals about their role may lead to measurable improvements in the process. Our aim was to describe the developmental steps of a communication skills training program for health care professionals using standardized patients and to evaluate the results. We developed a rubric and 5 cases for standardized family interviews. The 20 participants interviewed standardized families at the beginning and at the end of the training course, with interviews followed by debriefing sessions. Participants also provided feedback before and after the course. The performance of each participant was assessed by his or her peers using the rubric. We calculated the generalizability coefficient to measure the reliability of the rubric and used the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare achievement among participants. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS software (SPSS: An IBM Company, version 17.0, IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA). All participants received higher scores in their second interview, including novice participants who expressed great discomfort during their first interview. The participants rated the scenarios and the standardized patients as very representative of real-life situations, with feedback forms showing that the interviews, the video recording sessions, and the debriefing sessions contributed to their learning. Our program was designed to meet the current expectations and implications in the field of donor consent from next of kin. Results showed that our training program developed using standardized patient methodology was effective in obtaining the communication skills needed for family interviews during the consent process. The rubric developed during the study was a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be used in further educational activities. The participants showed significant improvements in

  3. Informing Patients About Placebo Effects: Using Evidence, Theory, and Qualitative Methods to Develop a New Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greville-Harris, Maddy; Bostock, Jennifer; Din, Amy; Graham, Cynthia A; Lewith, George; Liossi, Christina; O'Riordan, Tim; White, Peter; Yardley, Lucy; Bishop, Felicity L

    2016-06-10

    According to established ethical principles and guidelines, patients in clinical trials should be fully informed about the interventions they might receive. However, information about placebo-controlled clinical trials typically focuses on the new intervention being tested and provides limited and at times misleading information about placebos. We aimed to create an informative, scientifically accurate, and engaging website that could be used to improve understanding of placebo effects among patients who might be considering taking part in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Our approach drew on evidence-, theory-, and person-based intervention development. We used existing evidence and theory about placebo effects to develop content that was scientifically accurate. We used existing evidence and theory of health behavior to ensure our content would be communicated persuasively, to an audience who might currently be ignorant or misinformed about placebo effects. A qualitative 'think aloud' study was conducted in which 10 participants viewed prototypes of the website and spoke their thoughts out loud in the presence of a researcher. The website provides information about 10 key topics and uses text, evidence summaries, quizzes, audio clips of patients' stories, and a short film to convey key messages. Comments from participants in the think aloud study highlighted occasional misunderstandings and off-putting/confusing features. These were addressed by modifying elements of content, style, and navigation to improve participants' experiences of using the website. We have developed an evidence-based website that incorporates theory-based techniques to inform members of the public about placebos and placebo effects. Qualitative research ensured our website was engaging and convincing for our target audience who might not perceive a need to learn about placebo effects. Before using the website in clinical trials, it is necessary to test its effects on key outcomes

  4. Developing next-generation telehealth tools and technologies: patients, systems, and data perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J; Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth?

  5. [Concomitant impact of organic pathology on the development of cognitive impairment in patients with attack-like paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, L Ia; Tagil'tseva, A V; Lifanova, D E; Ganzenko, M A; Gritsevskaia, T M; Ivanov, M B

    2014-01-01

    The study included 47 patients (23 men, 24 women) with ICD-10 diagnosis of attack-like paranoid schizophrenia. Patients were divided into two groups: with- (25 patients) or without (22 patients) a concomitant organic disease. Memory, attention and thinking were assessed with psychometric tests. Inter- and intra-group differences were identified that indicated a considerable impact of a concomitant CNS organic pathology on the development of cognitive impairment in the schizophrenic process and active antipsychotic therapy. The data obtained can be used in the development of a differentiated approach to the treatment of patients with concomitant organic pathology.

  6. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: application of a biomarker development strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  7. Development of two electronic bladder diaries: a patient and healthcare professionals pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangera, Altaf; Marzo, Alberto; Heron, Nicola; Fernando, Dayan; Hameed, Khawar; Soliman, Abdel-Hamid A; Bradley, Mike; Hosking, Ian; Abdel-Maguid, Mohamed; Levermore, Martin; Tindale, Wendy B; Chapple, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Assess patients' preferences in a pilot crossover study of two different electronic voiding diaries against a standard paper diary. Assess urological health professional (HP) opinions on the electronic bladder diary reporting system. Two different electronic diaries were developed: (1) electronically read diary-a card with predefined slots read by a card reader and (2) e-diary-a handheld touch screen device. Data uploaded from either electronic diary produced an electronic report. We recruited 22 patients split into two cohorts for each electronic diary, 11 completed each type of electronic diary for 3 days either preceded or followed by a standard paper diary for 3 days. Both diaries were completed on the 7th day. Patients' perceptions of both diaries were recorded using a standardized questionnaire. A HP study recruited 22 urologists who were given the paper diary and the electronic reports. Time taken for analysis was recorded along with accuracy and HP preferences. The majority of patients (82%) preferred the e-diary and only 1/11 found it difficult to use. Patients had the same preference for the electronically read diary as the paper diary. The paper diary took 66% longer to analyze than the electronic report (P analyzed with an accuracy of 58% compared to 100%. Slightly more HP (9%) preferred the electronic report to the paper diary. This proposed e-diary with its intuitive interface has overcome previous deficiencies in electronic diaries with most patients finding the format user-friendly. Electronic reports make analysis and interpretation by HP quicker and more accurate. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Patient-identified events implicated in the development of body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Curley, Erin E; Renshaw, Keith D; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about the causes of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), but researchers have proposed a diathesis-stress model. This study uses a patient-centered approach to identify stressful events to which patients attribute the development of their BDD symptoms. An Internet-recruited sample of 165 adults with BDD participated. A large minority of participants attributed the development of their BDD to a triggering event. Bullying experiences were the most commonly described type of event. Additionally, most events were interpersonal and occurred during grade school or middle school. There were no differences in severity of psychosocial outcomes between participants who did or did not attribute their BDD to a specific triggering event. However, participants who specifically attributed their BDD development to a bullying experience had poorer psychosocial outcomes (i.e., perceived social support, depression severity, functional impairment, quality of life) compared to those who attributed their BDD development to another type of triggering event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Early growth and development impairments in patients with ganglioside GM3 synthase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Wang, A; Wang, D; Bright, A; Sency, V; Zhou, A; Xin, B

    2016-05-01

    Ganglioside GM3 synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of gangliosides. GM3 synthase deficiency (GSD) causes a complete absence of GM3 and all downstream biosynthetic derivatives. The individuals affected by this disorder manifest severe irritability, intractable seizures and profound intellectual disability. However, we have found that most newborns seem symptom-free for a period of time after birth. In order to further understand the onset of the disease, we investigated the early growth and development of patients with this condition through this study. We compared 37 affected individuals with their normal siblings and revealed that all children with GSD had relatively normal intrauterine growth and development, as their weight, length and head circumference were similar to their normal siblings at birth. However, the disease progresses quickly after birth and causes significant constitutional impairments of growth and development by 6 months of age. Neither breastfeeding nor gastrostomy tube placement made significant difference on growth and development as all groups of patients showed the similar pattern. We conclude that GSD causes significant postnatal growth and developmental impairments and the amount of gangliosides in breast milk and general nutritional intervention do not seem to alter these outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Physiologic capacity of well-developed collaterals in patients with isolated left anterior descending artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ono, Norihisa; Ohtani, Seiji; Mori, Noriko; Yokoyama, Shoichi; Hoshino, Tsuneo; Kaburagi, Tsuneo; Kurata, Chinori.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the physiologic significance of well-developed collaterals, 34 patients, with isolated left anterior descending artery disease (LAD) and without overt prior myocardial infarction, underwent cardiac catheterization and exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 11 patients with 90% stenosis of the proximal LAD and without collaterals (group 1), 11 with 99% stenosis of the proximal LAD, and without collaterals (group 2) and 12 with a total occlusion of the proximal LAD which was completely filled by well-developed collaterals (group 3). On left ventriculography, shortening fractions of the anterior wall were significantly reduced in group 2 as compared to groups 1 and 3 (group 1 vs group 2: p<0.01, group 2 vs group 3: p<0.05), which reflected the lower ejection fraction of group 2 (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). The perfusion defects of the anterior wall on both the initial and the delayed images were severer in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1 (group 1 vs group 2 and group 1 vs group 3 on the initial image: p<0.01, for both, group 1 vs group 2 and group 1 vs group 3 on the delayed image: p<0.05, for both). However, recovery of the perfusion defects from the initial image to the delayed image was better in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (group 1 vs group 2 and group 1 vs group 3: p<0.05, for both). Therefore, coronary blood flow through well-developed collaterals was considered to be comparable to the flow through a diseased vessel with 90% stenosis at rest. During maximal exercise, blood flow through well-developed collaterals was considered to be comparable to the flow through a diseased vessel with 99% stenosis, although the blood flow through well-developed collaterals was considered to be better than that through 99% stenosis during the recovery period. These findings suggest that patients with well-developed collaterals must be treated like those with severe stenosis. (author)

  11. Developing and Validating a Survival Prediction Model for NSCLC Patients Through Distributed Learning Across 3 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Arthur; Deist, Timo M; El Naqa, Issam; Kessler, Marc; Mayo, Chuck; Reeves, Jackson; Jolly, Shruti; Matuszak, Martha; Ten Haken, Randall; van Soest, Johan; Oberije, Cary; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Price, Gareth; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2017-10-01

    Tools for survival prediction for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiation or radiation therapy are of limited quality. In this work, we developed a predictive model of survival at 2 years. The model is based on a large volume of historical patient data and serves as a proof of concept to demonstrate the distributed learning approach. Clinical data from 698 lung cancer patients, treated with curative intent with chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone, were collected and stored at 2 different cancer institutes (559 patients at Maastro clinic (Netherlands) and 139 at Michigan university [United States]). The model was further validated on 196 patients originating from The Christie (United Kingdon). A Bayesian network model was adapted for distributed learning (the animation can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDJFOxpwqEA). Two-year posttreatment survival was chosen as the endpoint. The Maastro clinic cohort data are publicly available at https://www.cancerdata.org/publication/developing-and-validating-survival-prediction-model-nsclc-patients-through-distributed, and the developed models can be found at www.predictcancer.org. Variables included in the final model were T and N category, age, performance status, and total tumor dose. The model has an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.66 on the external validation set and an AUC of 0.62 on a 5-fold cross validation. A model based on the T and N category performed with an AUC of 0.47 on the validation set, significantly worse than our model (PLearning the model in a centralized or distributed fashion yields a minor difference on the probabilities of the conditional probability tables (0.6%); the discriminative performance of the models on the validation set is similar (P=.26). Distributed learning from federated databases allows learning of predictive models on data originating from multiple institutions while avoiding many of the data-sharing barriers. We believe that

  12. Developing a Mass Casualty Surge Capacity Protocol for Emergency Medical Services to Use for Patient Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shartar, Samuel E; Moore, Brooks L; Wood, Lori M

    2017-12-01

    Metropolitan areas must be prepared to manage large numbers of casualties related to a major incident. Most US cities do not have adequate trauma center capacity to manage large-scale mass casualty incidents (MCIs). Creating surge capacity requires the distribution of casualties to hospitals that are not designated as trauma centers. Our objectives were to extrapolate MCI response research into operational objectives for MCI distribution plan development; formulate a patient distribution model based on research, hospital capacities, and resource availability; and design and disseminate a casualty distribution tool for use by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel to distribute patients to the appropriate level of care. Working with hospitals within the region, we refined emergency department surge capacity for MCIs and developed a prepopulated tool for EMS providers to use to distribute higher-acuity casualties to trauma centers and lower-acuity casualties to nontrauma hospitals. A mechanism to remove a hospital from the list of available resources, if it is overwhelmed with patients who self-transport to the location, also was put into place. The number of critically injured survivors from an MCI has proven to be consistent, averaging 7% to 10%. Moving critically injured patients to level 1 trauma centers can result in a 25% reduction in mortality, when compared with care at nontrauma hospitals. US cities face major gaps in the surge capacity needed to manage an MCI. Sixty percent of "walking wounded" casualties self-transport to the closest hospital(s) to the incident. Directing critically ill patients to designated trauma centers has the potential to reduce mortality associated with the event. When applied to MCI responses, damage-control principles reduce resource utilization and optimize surge capacity. A universal system for mass casualty triage was identified and incorporated into the region's EMS. Flagship regional coordinating hospitals were designated

  13. Collaboration of patients and health professionals in development and research of care-intervention : Case example presented by a patient research partner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer-Nijhof, N.C.; Maat, B.; de Jong, S.; Kruize, A.A.; Geenen, R.; Ammerlaan, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient participation in research and in development of interventions has become a hot topic. Research on health beliefs of stakeholders shows that patients do have other views on health and well-being than health professionals without any experience of a chronic condition themselves

  14. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  15. [Development of a gait trainer with regulated servo-drive for rehabilitation of locomotor disabled patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrock, D; Sarkodie-Gyan, T; Reiter, F; Konrad, M; Hesse, S

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new gait trainer for the rehabilitation of non-ambulatory patients. For the simulation of the gait phase, we used a commercially available fitness trainer (Fast Track) with two foot plates moving in an alternating fashion and connected to a servo-controlled propulsion system providing the necessary support for the movement depending on the patient's impairment level. To compensate deficient equilibrium reflexes, the patient was suspended in a harness capable of supporting some of his/her weight. Video analysis of gait and the kinesiological EMG were used to assess the pattern of movement and the corresponding muscle activity, which were then evaluated in healthy subjects, spinal cord injured and stroke patients and compared with walking on the flat or on a treadmill. Walking on the gait trainer was characterised by a symmetrical, sinusoidal movement of lower amplitude than in normal gait. The EMG showed a low activity of the tibialis anterior muscle, while the antigravity muscles were clearly activated by the gait trainer during the stance phase. In summary, the new gait trainer generates a symmetrical gait-like movement, promoting weight acceptance in the stance phase, which is important for the restoration of walking ability.

  16. Development of key performance indicators to evaluate centralized intake for patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Claire E; Patel, Jatin N; Woodhouse, Linda; Smith, Christopher; Weiss, Stephen; Homik, Joanne; LeClercq, Sharon; Mosher, Dianne; Christiansen, Tanya; Howden, Jane Squire; Wasylak, Tracy; Greenwood-Lee, James; Emrick, Andrea; Suter, Esther; Kathol, Barb; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Grant, Sean; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Phillips, Leah; Hendricks, Jennifer; Marshall, Deborah A

    2015-11-14

    Centralized intake is integral to healthcare systems to support timely access to appropriate health services. The aim of this study was to develop key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate centralized intake systems for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Phase 1 involved stakeholder meetings including healthcare providers, managers, researchers and patients to obtain input on candidate KPIs, aligned along six quality dimensions: appropriateness, accessibility, acceptability, efficiency, effectiveness, and safety. Phase 2 involved literature reviews to ensure KPIs were based on best practices and harmonized with existing measures. Phase 3 involved a three-round, online modified Delphi panel to finalize the KPIs. The panel consisted of two rounds of rating and a round of online and in-person discussions. KPIs rated as valid and important (≥7 on a 9-point Likert scale) were included in the final set. Twenty-five KPIs identified and substantiated during Phases 1 and 2 were submitted to 27 panellists including healthcare providers, managers, researchers, and patients in Phase 3. After the in-person meeting, three KPIs were removed and six were suggested. The final set includes 9 OA KPIs, 10 RA KPIs and 9 relating to centralized intake processes for both conditions. All 28 KPIs were rated as valid and important. Arthritis stakeholders have proposed 28 KPIs that should be used in quality improvement efforts when evaluating centralized intake for OA and RA. The KPIs measure five of the six dimensions of quality and are relevant to patients, practitioners and health systems.

  17. Developing a healthy web-based cookbook for pediatric cancer patients and survivors: rationale and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rhea; Raber, Margaret; Chandra, Joya

    2015-03-31

    Obesity has been a growing problem among children and adolescents in the United States for a number of decades. Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are more susceptible to the downstream health consequences of obesity such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine issues, and risk of cancer recurrence due to late effects of treatment and suboptimal dietary and physical activity habits. The objective of this study was to document the development of a Web-based cookbook of healthy recipes and nutrition resources to help enable pediatric cancer patients and survivors to lead healthier lifestyles. The Web-based cookbook, named "@TheTable", was created by a committee of researchers, a registered dietitian, patients and family members, a hospital chef, and community advisors and donors. Recipes were collected from several sources including recipe contests and social media. We incorporated advice from current patients, parents, and CCS. Over 400 recipes, searchable by several categories and with accompanying nutritional information, are currently available on the website. In addition to healthy recipes, social media functionality and cooking videos are integrated into the website. The website also features nutrition information resources including nutrition and cooking tip sheets available on several subjects. The "@TheTable" website is a unique resource for promoting healthy lifestyles spanning pediatric oncology prevention, treatment, and survivorship. Through evaluations of the website's current and future use, as well as incorporation into interventions designed to promote energy balance, we will continue to adapt and build this unique resource to serve cancer patients, survivors, and the general public.

  18. Pain in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: Prevalence, Mechanisms, Management and Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouris, Andreas I; Banim, Paul; Hart, Andrew R

    2017-04-01

    Pain affects approximately 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer, with half requiring strong opioid analgesia, namely: morphine-based drugs on step three of the WHO analgesic ladder (as opposed to the weak opioids: codeine and tramadol). The presence of pain is associated with reduced survival. This article reviews the literature regarding pain: prevalence, mechanisms, pharmacological, and endoscopic treatments and identifies areas for research to develop individualized patient pain management pathways. The online literature review was conducted through: PubMed, Clinical Key, Uptodate, and NICE Evidence. There are two principal mechanisms for pain: pancreatic duct obstruction and pancreatic neuropathy which, respectively, activate mechanical and chemical nociceptors. In pancreatic neuropathy, several histological, molecular, and immunological changes occur which correlate with pain including: transient receptor potential cation channel activation and mast cell infiltration. Current pain management is empirical rather etiology-based and is informed by the WHO analgesic ladder for first-line therapies, and then endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) in patients with resistant pain. For EUS-CPN, there is only one clinical trial reporting a benefit, which has limited generalizability. Case series report pancreatic duct stenting gives effective analgesia, but there are no clinical trials. Progress in understanding the mechanisms for pain and when this occurs in the natural history, together with assessing new therapies both pharmacological and endoscopic, will enable individualized care and may improve patients' quality of life and survival.

  19. Developing patient-specific dose protocols for a CT scanner and exam using diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    The management of image quality and radiation dose during pediatric CT scanning is dependent on how well one manages the radiographic techniques as a function of the type of exam, type of CT scanner, and patient size. The CT scanner's display of expected CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) after the projection scan provides the operator with a powerful tool prior to the patient scan to identify and manage appropriate CT techniques, provided the department has established appropriate diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). This paper provides a step-by-step process that allows the development of DRLs as a function of type of exam, of actual patient size and of the individual radiation output of each CT scanner in a department. Abdomen, pelvis, thorax and head scans are addressed. Patient sizes from newborns to large adults are discussed. The method addresses every CT scanner regardless of vendor, model or vintage. We cover adjustments to techniques to manage the impact of iterative reconstruction and provide a method to handle all available voltages other than 120 kV. This level of management of CT techniques is necessary to properly monitor radiation dose and image quality during pediatric CT scans. (orig.)

  20. Development and validation of a questionnaire to evaluate patient satisfaction with diabetes disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, L E; Veloski, J; Chatterton, M L; Gevirtz, F O; Nash, D B

    2000-07-01

    To develop a reliable and valid questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with diabetes disease management programs. Questions related to structure, process, and outcomes were categorized into 14 domains defining the essential elements of diabetes disease management. Health professionals confirmed the content validity. Face validity was established by a patient focus group. The questionnaire was mailed to 711 patients with diabetes who participated in a disease management program. To reduce the number of questionnaire items, a principal components analysis was performed using a varimax rotation. The Scree test was used to select significant components. To further assess reliability and validity; Cronbach's alpha and product-moment correlations were calculated for components having > or =3 items with loadings >0.50. The validated 73-item mailed satisfaction survey had a 34.1% response rate. Principal components analysis yielded 13 components with eigenvalues > 1.0. The Scree test proposed a 6-component solution (39 items), which explained 59% of the total variation. Internal consistency reliabilities computed for the first 6 components (alpha = 0.79-0.95) were acceptable. The final questionnaire, the Diabetes Management Evaluation Tool (DMET), was designed to assess patient satisfaction with diabetes disease management programs. Although more extensive testing of the questionnaire is appropriate, preliminary reliability and validity of the DMET has been demonstrated.

  1. Development of Computational Procedure for Assessment of Patient Dose in Multi-Detector Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Wook

    2007-02-01

    Technological development to improve the quality and speed with which images are obtained have fostered the growth of frequency and collective effective dose of CT examination. Especially, High-dose x-ray technique of CT has increased in the concern of patient dose. However CTDI and DLP in CT dosimetry leaves something to be desired to evaluate patient dose. And even though the evaluation of effective dose in CT practice is required for comparison with other radiography, it's not sufficient to show any estimation because it's not for medical purpose. Therefore the calculation of effective dose in CT procedure is needed for that purpose. However modelling uncertainties will be due to insufficient information from manufacturing tolerances. Therefore the purpose of this work is development of computational procedure for assessment of patient dose through the experiment for getting essential information in MDCT. In order to obtain exact absorbed dose, normalization factors must be created to relate simulated dose values with CTDI air measurement. The normalization factors applied to the calculation of CTDI 100 using axial scanning and organ effective dose using helical scanning. The calculation of helical scanning was compared with the experiment of Groves et al.(2004). The result has a about factor 2 of the experiment. It seems because AEC is not simulated. In several studies, when AEC applied to a CT examination, approximately 20-30% dose reduction was appeared. Therefore the study of AEC simulation should be added and modified

  2. [Development and validation of the Korean patient safety culture scale for nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Byungsoo; Kim, Se Young

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate patient safety culture in nursing homes and to test its validity and reliability. A preliminary tool was developed through interviews with focus group, content validity tests, and a pilot study. A nationwide survey was conducted from February to April, 2011, using self-report questionnaires. Participants were 982 employees in nursing homes. Data were analyzed using Cronbach's alpha, item analysis, factor analysis, and multitrait/multi-Item analysis. From the results of the analysis, 27 final items were selected from 49 items on the preliminary tool. Items with low correlation with total scale were excluded. The 4 factors sorted by factor analysis contributed 63.4% of the variance in the total scale. The factors were labeled as leadership, organizational system, working attitude, management practice. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was .95 and the range for the 4 factors was from .86 to .93. The results of this study indicate that the Korean Patient Safety Culture Scale has reliability and validity and is suitable for evaluation of patient safety culture in Korean nursing homes.

  3. Ethics of physiotherapy practice in terminally ill patients in a developing country, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbo, N N; Ezeome, E R; Onyeka, T C; Amah, C C

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy has been widely defined as a healthcare profession that assesses, diagnoses, treats, and works to prevent disease and disability through physical means. The World Confederation for Physical Therapy describes physiotherapy as providing services to people and populations to develop, maintain, and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. Physiotherapists working with terminally ill patients face a myriad of ethical issues which have not been substantially discussed in bioethics especially in the African perspective. In the face of resource limitation in developing countries, physiotherapy seems to be a cost-effective means of alleviating pain and distressing symptoms at the end-of-life, ensuring a more dignified passage from life to death, yet referrals to physiotherapy are not timely. Following extensive literature search using appropriate keywords, six core ethical themes related to physiotherapy in terminally ill patients were identified and using the four principles of bioethics (patient's autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice), an ethical analysis of these themes was done to highlight the ethical challenges of physiotherapists working in a typical African setting such as Nigeria.

  4. Development of a patient-specific anatomical foot model from structured light scan data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Samuel J; Huissoon, Jan P; Bedi, Sanjeev S

    2014-01-01

    The use of anatomically accurate finite element (FE) models of the human foot in research studies has increased rapidly in recent years. Uses for FE foot models include advancing knowledge of orthotic design, shoe design, ankle-foot orthoses, pathomechanics, locomotion, plantar pressure, tissue mechanics, plantar fasciitis, joint stress and surgical interventions. Similar applications but for clinical use on a per-patient basis would also be on the rise if it were not for the high costs associated with developing patient-specific anatomical foot models. High costs arise primarily from the expense and challenges of acquiring anatomical data via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) and reconstructing the three-dimensional models. The proposed solution morphs detailed anatomy from skin surface geometry and anatomical landmarks of a generic foot model (developed from CT or MRI) to surface geometry and anatomical landmarks acquired from an inexpensive structured light scan of a foot. The method yields a patient-specific anatomical foot model at a fraction of the cost of standard methods. Average error for bone surfaces was 2.53 mm for the six experiments completed. Highest accuracy occurred in the mid-foot and lowest in the forefoot due to the small, irregular bones of the toes. The method must be validated in the intended application to determine if the resulting errors are acceptable.

  5. Cytogenetic studies of 1232 patients with different sexual development abnormalities from the Sultanate of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Intisar; Goud, Tadakal Mallana; Al-Harasi, Salma; Rajab, Anna

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cytogenetic findings in Omani patients who had been referred for suspicion of sex chromosome abnormalities that resulted in different clinical disorders. Furthermore, it sought to examine the frequency of chromosomal anomalies in these patients and to compare the obtained results with those reported elsewhere. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on 1232 cases with variant characteristics of sexual development disorders who had been referred to the cytogenetic department, National Genetic Centre, Ministry of Health, from different hospitals in the Sultanate of Oman between 1999 and 2014. The karyotype results demonstrated chromosomal anomalies in 24.2% of the cases, where 67.5% of abnormalities were identified in referral females, whereas only 32.6% were in referral males. Of all sex chromosome anomalies detected, Turner syndrome was the most frequent (38.2%) followed by Klinefelter syndrome (24.9%) and XY phenotypic females (16%). XXX syndrome and XX phenotypic males represented 6.8% and 3.8% of all sex chromosome anomalies, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis of patients referred with various clinical suspicions of chromosomal abnormalities revealed a high rate of chromosomal anomalies. This is the first broad cytogenetic study reporting combined frequencies of sex chromosome anomalies in sex development disorders in Oman. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a scale to assess cancer stigma in the non-patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Laura A V; Wardle, Jane

    2014-04-23

    Illness-related stigma has attracted considerable research interest, but few studies have specifically examined stigmatisation of cancer in the non-patient population. The present study developed and validated a Cancer Stigma Scale (CASS) for use in the general population. An item pool was developed on the basis of previous research into illness-related stigma in the general population and patients with cancer. Two studies were carried out. The first study used Exploratory factor analysis to explore the structure of items in a sample of 462 postgraduate students recruited through a London university. The second study used Confirmatory factor analysis to confirm the structure among 238 adults recruited through an online market research panel. Internal reliability, test-retest reliability and construct validity were also assessed. Exploratory factor analysis suggested six subscales, representing: Awkwardness, Severity, Avoidance, Policy Opposition, Personal Responsibility and Financial Discrimination. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed this structure with a 25-item scale. All subscales showed adequate to good internal and test-retest reliability in both samples. Construct validity was also good, with mean scores for each subscale varying in the expected directions by age, gender, experience of cancer, awareness of lifestyle risk factors for cancer, and social desirability. Means for the subscales were consistent across the two samples. These findings highlight the complexity of cancer stigma and provide the Cancer Stigma Scale (CASS) which can be used to compare populations, types of cancer and evaluate the effects of interventions designed to reduce cancer stigma in non-patient populations.

  7. Development of an occupational advice intervention for patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty (the OPAL study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul; Coole, Carol; Drummond, Avril; McDaid, Catriona; Khan, Sayeed; Thomson, Louise; Hewitt, Catherine; McNamara, Iain; McDonald, David; Fitch, Judith; Rangan, Amar

    2018-06-28

    There are an increasing number of patients of working age undergoing hip and knee replacements. Currently there is variation in the advice and support given about sickness absence, recovery to usual activities and return to work after these procedures. Earlier, sustainable, return to work improves the health of patients and benefits their employers and society. An intervention that encourages and supports early recovery to usual activities, including work, has the potential to reduce the health and socioeconomic burden of hip and knee replacements. A two-phase research programme delivered over 27 months will be used to develop and subsequently test the feasibility of an occupational advice intervention to facilitate return to work and usual activities in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. The 2 phases will incorporate a six-stage intervention mapping process: Phase 1: Intervention mapping stages 1-3: 1 Needs assessment (including rapid evidence synthesis, prospective cohort analysis and structured stakeholder interviews) 2 Identification of intended outcomes and performance objectives 3 Selection of theory-based methods and practical strategies Phase 2: Intervention mapping stages 4-6: 4 Development of components and materials for the occupational advice intervention using a modified Delphi process 5 Adoption and implementation of the intervention 6 Evaluation and feasibility testing The study will be undertaken in four National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the United Kingdom and two Higher Education Institutions. OPAL (Occupational advice for Patients undergoing Arthroplasty of the Lower limb) aims to develop an occupational advice intervention to support early recovery to usual activities including work, which is tailored to the requirements of patients undergoing hip and knee replacements. The developed intervention will then be assessed with a specific focus on evaluating its feasibility as a potential trial intervention to improve speed of

  8. Development of gastric dysplasia in pernicious anaemia: a clinical and endoscopic follow up study of 80 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Armbrecht, U; Stockbrügger, R W; Rode, J; Menon, G G; Cotton, P B

    1990-01-01

    The development of gastric dysplasia and neoplasia in patients with pernicious anaemia has been evaluated in a prospective clinical and endoscopic follow up study. After initial screening of 80 patients between 1978 and 1980, one patient underwent total gastrectomy for a gastric malignancy and 12 were kept under surveillance and underwent endoscopy at a mean interval of 14 months. In the remaining 67 patients further investigation was attempted six to seven years after the initial investigati...

  9. Postoperative radiation therapy after hip replacement in high-risk patients for development of heterotopic bone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, R.; Rene, N.; Souhami, L.; Tanzer, M.; Evans, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To report the results of postoperative radiation therapy in preventing the development of heterotopic bone formation after hip replacement surgery in high-risk patients. Patients and methods. - Between 1991 and 2007, 44 patients were preventively treated with postoperative RT after total hip replacement. In total, 47 hips were treated. All patients were considered at high risk for developing heterotopic bone formation. Most patients (63.5%) were treated because of a history of severe osteoarthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. All patients were treated with shaped parallel-opposed fields with a single fraction of 7 Gy using 6 or 18 MV photons. Most patients (94%) received radiation therapy within 72 hours postoperative and in only three patients radiation therapy was delivered after 72 hours post-surgery (5-8 days). Results. - Minimum follow-up was 1 year. There were 18 females and 26 males. Median age was 63 years (range: 18-80). Treatments were well tolerated and no acute toxicity was seen post-radiation therapy. Only one of the 47 hips (2%) developed heterotopic bone formation. This patient received postoperative radiation therapy to both hips but only developed heterotopic bone formation in one of them. None of the three patients treated beyond 72 hours failed. To date no late toxicity has been observed. Conclusion. - The use of postoperative radiation therapy was an effective and safe treatment in the prevention of heterotopic bone formation in a high-risk group of patients undergoing total hip replacement. (authors)

  10. Assessing upper limb function in nonambulant SMA patients: development of a new module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena; Bianco, Flaviana; Martinelli, Diego; Glanzman, Allan M; Messina, Sonia; De Sanctis, Roberto; Main, Marion; Eagle, Michelle; Florence, Julaine; Krosschell, Kristin; Vasco, Gessica; Pelliccioni, Marco; Lombardo, Marilena; Pane, Marika; Finkel, Richard; Muntoni, Francesco; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-06-01

    We report the development of a module specifically designed for assessing upper limb function in nonambulant SMA patients, including young children and those with severe contractures. The application of the module to a preschool cohort of 40 children (age 30-48 months) showed that all the items could be completed by 30 months. The module was also used in 45 nonambulant SMA patients (age 30 months to 27 years). Their scores were more variable than in the preschool cohort, ranging from 0 to 18. The magnitude of scores was not related to age (r=-0.19). The upper limb scores had a good correlation with the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale, r=0.75, but the upper limb function did not always strictly follow the overall gross motor function. These findings suggest that even some of the very weak nonambulant children possess upper limb skills that can be measured. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased Risk of Developing Affective Disorder in Patients with Hypothyroidism: A Register-Based Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anders F.; Kvist, Tine Kajsa; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Links between thyroid function and depression have been noted in many contexts. We assessed whether hospitalization with hypothyroidism was a risk factor for developing affective disorder. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study using historical data from Danish registers....... The observational period was 1977-1999. Three study cohorts were identified: all patients with a first hospital admittance with the resulting index discharge diagnoses hypothyroidism, osteoarthritis, or nontoxic goiter. A later hospitalization with a resulting discharge diagnosis of affective disorder was used...... as event of interest, and rates of readmission were estimated and compared using competing risk models in survival analyses. FINDINGS: We identified 165,307 patients discharged with an index diagnosis. In the observational period, 1041 events occurred. An index diagnosis of hypothyroidism was associated...

  12. Use of simulated patients to develop communication skills in nursing education: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Sharon; Kelly, Michelle; Geddes, Fiona; Della, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    Registered nurses are expected to communicate effectively with patients. To improve on this skill education programmes in both hospital and tertiary settings are increasingly turning to simulation modalities when training undergraduate and registered nurses. The roles simulated patients (SPs) assume can vary according to training purposes and approach. The first aim is to analyse how SPs are used in nursing education to develop communication skills. The second aim is to evaluate the evidence that is available to support the efficacy of using SPs for training nurses in communication skills and finally to review the SP recruitment and training procedure. An Integrative review. A search was conducted on CINAHL, Psych-info, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Ovid, Medline, and ProQuest databases. Keywords and inclusion/exclusion criteria were determined and applied to the search strategy. The integrative review included Nineteen studies from 2006-2016. Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) method of evaluation was utilised. Emergent themes were extracted with similar and divergent perspectives. Analysis identified seven clinical contexts for communication skills training (CST) and two SP roles from the eighteen studies. SPs were either directly involved in the teaching of communication (active role) or used in the evaluation of the effectiveness of a communication skills program (passive role). A majority of studies utilised faculty-designed measurement instruments. The evidence presented in the 19 articles indicates that the use of SPs to teach nurse-patient communication skills targets more challenging clinical interactions. Engaging SPs in both CST program facilitation and course evaluation provides nurse educators with a strong foundation to develop further pedagogical and research capacity. Expanding the utilisation of SPs to augment nurses' communication skills and ability to engage with patients in a broader range of clinical contexts with increased

  13. The instrument 'sense of security in care--patients' evaluation': its development and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krevers, Barbro; Milberg, Anna

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the development, construction, and psychometric properties of the new instrument Sense of Security in Care - Patients' Evaluation (SEC-P) in palliative home care. The preliminary instrument was based on a review of the literature and an analysis of qualitative interviews with patients about their sense of security. To test the instrument, 161 patients (58% women) in palliative home care were recruited and participated in a structured interview based on a comprehensive questionnaire (response rate 73%). We used principal component analysis to identify subscales and tested the construction in correlation with other scales and questions representing concepts that we expected to be related to sense of security in care. The principal component analysis resulted in three subscales: Care Interaction, Identity, and Mastery, built on a total of 15 items. The component solution had an explained variance of 55%. Internal consistency of the subscales ranged from 0.84 to 0.69. Inter-scale correlations varied between 0.40 and 0.59. The scales were associated to varying degrees with the quality of the care process, perceived health, quality of life, stress, and general sense of security. The developed SEC-P provides a three-component assessment of palliative home care settings using valid and reliable scales. The scales were associated with other concepts in ways that were expected. The SEC-P is a manageable means of assessment that can be used to improve quality of care and in research focusing on patients' sense of security in care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Development of a new model to engage patients and clinicians in setting research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; St George, Bridget; Fenton, Mark; Crowe, Sally; Firkins, Lester

    2014-01-01

    Equitable involvement of patients and clinicians in setting research and funding priorities is ethically desirable and can improve the quality, relevance and implementation of research. Survey methods used in previous priority setting projects to gather treatment uncertainties may not be sufficient to facilitate responses from patients and their lay carers for some health care topics. We aimed to develop a new model to engage patients and clinicians in setting research priorities relating to life after stroke, and to explore the use of this model within a James Lind Alliance (JLA) priority setting project. We developed a model to facilitate involvement through targeted engagement and assisted involvement (FREE TEA model). We implemented both standard surveys and the FREE TEA model to gather research priorities (treatment uncertainties) from people affected by stroke living in Scotland. We explored and configured the number of treatment uncertainties elicited from different groups by the two approaches. We gathered 516 treatment uncertainties from stroke survivors, carers and health professionals. We achieved approximately equal numbers of contributions; 281 (54%) from stroke survivors/carers; 235 (46%) from health professionals. For stroke survivors and carers, 98 (35%) treatment uncertainties were elicited from the standard survey and 183 (65%) at FREE TEA face-to-face visits. This contrasted with the health professionals for whom 198 (84%) were elicited from the standard survey and only 37 (16%) from FREE TEA visits. The FREE TEA model has implications for future priority setting projects and user-involvement relating to populations of people with complex health needs. Our results imply that reliance on standard surveys may result in poor and unrepresentative involvement of patients, thereby favouring the views of health professionals.

  15. Development of the outcome expectancy scale for self-care among periodontal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakudate, Naoki; Morita, Manabu; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sugai, Makoto; Nagayama, Masato; Isogai, Emiko; Kawanami, Masamitsu; Chiba, Itsuo

    2011-12-01

    The theory of self-efficacy states that specific efficacy expectations affect behaviour. Two types of efficacy expectations are described within the theory. Self-efficacy expectations are the beliefs in the capacity to perform a specific behaviour. Outcome expectations are the beliefs that carrying out a specific behaviour will lead to a desired outcome. To develop and examine the reliability and validity of an outcome expectancy scale for self-care (OESS) among periodontal disease patients. A 34-item scale was tested on 101 patients at a dental clinic. Accuracy was improved by item analysis, and internal consistency and test-retest stability were investigated. Concurrent validity was tested by examining associations of the OESS score with the self-efficacy scale for self-care (SESS) score and plaque index score. Construct validity was examined by comparing OESS scores between periodontal patients at initial visit (group 1) and those continuing maintenance care (group 2). Item analysis identified 13 items for the OESS. Factor analysis extracted three factors: social-, oral- and self-evaluative outcome expectancy. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the OESS was 0.90. A significant association was observed between test and retest scores, and between the OESS and SESS and plaque index scores. Further, group 2 had a significantly higher mean OESS score than group 1. We developed a 13-item OESS with high reliability and validity which may be used to assess outcome expectancy for self-care. A patient's psychological condition with regard to behaviour and affective status can be accurately evaluated using the OESS with SESS. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Developing Fine-Grained Actigraphies for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients from a Single Accelerometer Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Perez, Javier; Garcia-Gancedo, Luis; McKinnell, Jonathan; Van der Drift, Anniek; Powell, Adam; Hamy, Valentin; Keller, Thomas; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2017-09-14

    In addition to routine clinical examination, unobtrusive and physical monitoring of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients provides an important source of information to enable understanding the impact of the disease on quality of life. Besides an increase in sedentary behaviour, pain in RA can negatively impact simple physical activities such as getting out of bed and standing up from a chair. The objective of this work is to develop a method that can generate fine-grained actigraphies to capture the impact of the disease on the daily activities of patients. A processing methodology is presented to automatically tag activity accelerometer data from a cohort of moderate-to-severe RA patients. A study of procesing methods based on machine learning and deep learning is provided. Thirty subjects, 10 RA patients and 20 healthy control subjects, were recruited in the study. A single tri-axial accelerometer was attached to the position of the fifth lumbar vertebra (L5) of each subject with a tag prediction granularity of 3 s. The proposed method is capable of handling unbalanced datasets from tagged data while accounting for long-duration activities such as sitting and lying, as well as short transitions such as sit-to-stand or lying-to-sit. The methodology also includes a novel mechanism for automatically applying a threshold to predictions by their confidence levels, in addition to a logical filter to correct for infeasible sequences of activities. Performance tests showed that the method was able to achieve around 95% accuracy and 81% F-score. The produced actigraphies can be helpful to generate objective RA disease-specific markers of patient mobility in-between clinical site visits.

  17. Engineering development of avian influenza virus detection system in a patient's body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budi Santoso; Romadhon; Sukandar; Istofa

    2010-01-01

    The avian influenza virus detection equipment in a patient's body has been made. Currently, detection of avian influenza virus carried out by expensive laboratory equipment's, so only certain hospitals can perform this detection. This developing equipment is expected to be cheaper than existing equipment and the diagnosis can be known immediately. The sensing device is made using the principle of nuclear radiation detection. Radiation comes from a drunk labelled tamiflu (oseltamivir) which is drunk to the patient. Tamiflu is a drug to catch, H5N1 viruses in a patient's body. A labelled tamiflu is tamiflu which is labelled by I-131 radioisotopes. The presence of virus in the body is proportional to the amount of radiation captured by the detector. The equipment is composed of a Geiger-Mueller (GM) pancake detector type, a signal processor, a counter, and a data processor (computer). The GM detector converts the radiation that comes into electrical signals. Electrical signal is then converted into TTL level pulses by the signal processor. Pulse counting results are processed by data processor. The total count is proportional to the amount of virus captured by labelled tamiflu. The measurement threshold can be set by medical officer through software. At a certain threshold can be inferred identified patients infected with avian influenza virus. If the measurement below the threshold means that the patient is still within safe limits. This equipment is expected to create avian influenza virus detection system that cheaply and quickly so that more and more hospitals are using to detect the avian influenza virus. (author)

  18. Development of indicators for patient care and monitoring standards for secondary health care services of Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Seema S; D'Souza, Roshni Cynthia; Pashte, Pramod Mukund; Satoskar, Smita Manohar; D'Souza, Remilda Joyce

    2015-01-01

    The Qualitative aspect of health care delivery is one of the major factors in reducing morbidity and mortality in a health care setup. The expanding suburban secondary health care delivery facilities of the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai are an important part of the healthcare backbone of Mumbai and therefore the quality of care delivered here needed standardization. The project was completed over a period of one year from Jan to Dec, 2013 and implemented in three phases. The framework with components and sub-components were developed and formats for data collection were standardized. The benchmarks were based on past performance in the same hospital and probability was used for development of normal range. An Excel spreadsheet was developed to facilitate data analysis. The indicators comprise of 3 components--Statutory Requirements, Patient care & Cure and Administrative efficiency. The measurements made, pointed to the broad areas needing attention. The Indicators for patient care and monitoring standards can be used as a self assessment tool for health care setups for standardization and improvement of delivery of health care services.

  19. Diffuse Hepatic Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma Developed in a Patient with Hepatitis C Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro W. Baron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE is an infrequent vascular tumor of endothelial origin that primarily occurs in women in the mid-fifth decade of life without underlying chronic liver disease or cirrhosis. Liver transplant should be the first-line of therapy in patients with large or diffuse unresectable tumors even in the presence of metastatic disease due to the favorable long-term outcome. We report the case of a 48-year-old female who complained of abdominal pain and weight loss. She has a history of cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis C (HCV and was treated with interferon and ribavirin with sustained virological response. Her work-up revealed multiple confluent infiltrating bilobar liver masses diagnosed as HEHE. She underwent a successful liver transplant without evidence of recurrent HCV infection. She developed cervical spine (C4-C6 HEHE metastases 4 years after transplant. She underwent surgical resection and local radiotherapy after resection with good clinical response. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HEHE that developed in a patient with HCV cirrhosis successfully treated with antiviral therapy before transplant and liver transplant with good allograft function without evidence of recurrent liver tumor or HCV infection but developed metastases to the cervical spine 4 years after transplant.

  20. Development of a Simple Clinical Risk Score for Early Prediction of Severe Dengue in Adult Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing-Kit Lee

    Full Text Available We aimed to develop and validate a risk score to aid in the early identification of laboratory-confirmed dengue patients at high risk of severe dengue (SD (i.e. severe plasma leakage with shock or respiratory distress, or severe bleeding or organ impairment. We retrospectively analyzed data of 1184 non-SD patients at hospital presentation and 69 SD patients before SD onset. We fit a logistic regression model using 85% of the population and converted the model coefficients to a numeric risk score. Subsequently, we validated the score using the remaining 15% of patients. Using the derivation cohort, two scoring algorithms for predicting SD were developed: models 1 (dengue illness ≤4 days and 2 (dengue illness >4 days. In model 1, we identified four variables: age ≥65 years, minor gastrointestinal bleeding, leukocytosis, and platelet count ≥100×109 cells/L. Model 1 (ranging from -2 to +6 points showed good discrimination between SD and non-SD, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.848 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.771-0.924. The optimal cutoff value for model 1 was 1 point, with a sensitivity and specificity for predicting SD of 70.3% and 90.6%, respectively. In model 2 (ranging from 0 to +3 points, significant predictors were age ≥65 years and leukocytosis. Model 2 showed an AUC of 0.859 (95% CI, 0.756-0.963, with an optimal cutoff value of 1 point (sensitivity, 80.3%; specificity, 85.8%. The median interval from hospital presentation to SD was 1 day. This finding underscores the importance of close monitoring, timely resuscitation of shock including intravenous fluid adjustment and early correction of dengue-related complications to prevent the progressive dengue severity. In the validation data, AUCs of 0.904 (95% CI, 0.825-0.983 and 0.917 (95% CI, 0.833-1.0 in models 1 and 2, respectively, were achieved. The observed SD rates (in both cohorts were 50% for those with a score of ≥2 points

  1. Differences in coronary artery disease by CT angiography between patients developing unstable angina pectoris vs. major adverse cardiac events

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    Schlett, Christopher L. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Nance, John W. Jr. [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); O’Brien, Terrence X. [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); The Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC (United States); Ebersberger, Ullrich [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Centre Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Headden, Gary F. [Heart and Vascular Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Munich, Grosshadern Campus, and Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Patients developing UAP had overall more atherosclerosis as patients without any events. • Patients developing MACE had only more mixed plaque as those developing UAP. • Different atherosclerotic plaque components by CTA carry different prognostic value. - Abstract: Objective: CT angiography (CTA) has prognostic value in patients. But it is unknown whether differences in atherosclerosis by CTA predict the development of unstable angina pectoris (UAP) vs. major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Methods: We followed patients undergoing CTA as part of their acute chest pain work-up. Primary outcome was the development of UAP or MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, revascularization) during a minimum follow-up of 12-months. CTAs were assessed for extent and composition of coronary plaque and stenosis. Ordinal regression with a 3-level outcome (no events, UAP, MACE) was applied. Results: Among 315 patients, 22 developed UAP and 31 MACE. While UAP patients had higher atherosclerosis burden with respect to all assessed features compared to patients with no events (p ≤ 0.02), only mixed plaque extent was significantly different between UAP and MACE patients (p = 0.02). The odds ratio was 4.55 for being in a higher disease-level comparing patients with low extent to those with no mixed plaque, and 3.02 comparing patients with high to those with low. These findings remained after adjustments for potential confounders. Conclusion: The extent of mixed coronary plaque is different between patients who develop UAP vs. MACE, supporting the hypothesis that it is a more culprit morphology.

  2. Design and development of a lead jar for oral administration of radioiodine In hyperthyroid patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.; Paul, A.K.; Rahman, H.A.; Begum, F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine practices involve use of radioisotopes for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radioiodine is one of such radioisotopes, being used in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases since 1942. Handling of radioiodine involves radiation hazards both for the patients as well as for the technologists. Though radioiodine is supplied in a lead container, for treatment purpose, it is administered after dispensing into a glass jar that does not adequately protect radiation hazards. For this reason, we designed and developed a lead jar and radioiodine is dispensed into that lead jar to minimize radiation hazards. For oral administration of radioiodine to hyperthyroid patients, a lead jar was designed and developed with lead in Centre for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Khulna in December 2004 by own expertise and technologies in such a way that a glass jar could be introduced into that lead jar. The thickness of lead was 4.04 mm and the thickness of glass jar was 0.7 mm and thus the whole thickness of lead jar became 4.74 mm. The desired dose of radioiodine (8 mCi) that should be given to the patients were dispensed into that lead jar and administered orally to the patients. Radiation levels in 10 such cases were measured by Mini-Rad Series-1000 survey meter at 0.5 meter, 1 meter and 3 meters distances both lead jar and glass jar. The mean radiation level of lead jar and glass jar during oral administration of 8 mCi of Na 131 I solution in 10 cases at 0.5 meter, 1 meter and 3 meters distances were 62.4 ± 1.96 microSv/h, 17.7 ±1.95 microSv/h, 3.39 ± .12 microSv/h and 20.3± 2.16 microSv/h, 79.8 ± 0.79 microSv/h, 1.97 ± 0.23 microSv/h respectively. We have found that radiation level reduced by 67.47%, 61.58%, and 41.89% with lead jar at 0.5 meter, 1 meter and 3 meters distances. In conclusion, the locally designed and developed lead jar is safe, easy to handle and reduces radiation burden significantly in oral administration of radioiodine to

  3. Risk factors for remote seizure development in patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Vahid; Keyhanian, Kiandokht; Saadatnia, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to define the possible risk factors for acute and remote seizures in patients with cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis (CVST). Ninety-four patients were recruited prospectively at Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, between April 2007 and April 2012. To identify seizure predictors, we compared demographic, clinical and imaging factors between patients with or without acute and remote seizures. Of the 94 patients, 32 (34%) experienced at least one seizure after CVST development. Bivariate analysis showed a significant association of remote seizure with loss of consciousness at presentation (P=0.05, OR: 5.11, 95%CI: 1.07-24.30), supratentorial lesions (P=0.02, OR: 9.04, 95%CI: 1.04-78.55), lesions in the occipital lobe (P=0.00, OR: 12.75, 95%CI: 2.28-71.16), lesions in the temporal and parietal lobes, thrombophilia (P=0.03, OR: 5.87, 95%CI: 1.21-28.39), seizure in the acute phase (P=0.00, OR: 13.14, 95%CI: 2.54-201.2) and sigmoid sinus thrombosis (P=0.00, OR: 12.5, 95%CI: 2.23-69.79). Seizures in the acute phase were also more common in patients with paresis (P=0.00, OR: 4.88, 95%CI: 1.91-12.46), hemorrhagic lesions indicated by imaging (P=0.02, OR: 2.77, 95%CI: 1.08-7.10), supratentorial lesions, lesions in the frontal (P=0.01, OR: 3.81, 95%CI: 1.28-11.31) and parietal lobes (P=0.00, OR: 5.16, 95%CI: 2-13.29), thrombophilia and history of miscarriage (P=0.03, OR: 2.91, 95%CI: 1.07-7.91). No factor predicted acute or remote seizure in a multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results demonstrate that seizure development in the acute phase is the most significant factor for development of remote seizure. Parenchymal lesions in the supratentorial area were also found to be associated with both acute and remote seizures. However, no factor was predictive of acute or remote seizures in a multivariate analysis. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and use of a content search strategy for retrieving studies on patients' views and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Anna; Solà, Ivan; Zhang, Yuan; Pardo-Hernandez, Hector; Haynes, R Brian; Martínez García, Laura; Navarro, Tamara; Schünemann, Holger; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2017-08-30

    Identifying scientific literature addressing patients' views and preferences is complex due to the wide range of studies that can be informative and the poor indexing of this evidence. Given the lack of guidance we developed a search strategy to retrieve this type of evidence. We assembled an initial list of terms from several sources, including the revision of the terms and indexing of topic-related studies and, methods research literature, and other relevant projects and systematic reviews. We used the relative recall approach, evaluating the capacity of the designed search strategy for retrieving studies included in relevant systematic reviews for the topic. We implemented in practice the final version of the search strategy for conducting systematic reviews and guidelines, and calculated search's precision and the number of references needed to read (NNR). We assembled an initial version of the search strategy, which had a relative recall of 87.4% (yield of 132/out of 151 studies). We then added some additional terms from the studies not initially identified, and re-tested this improved version against the studies included in a new set of systematic reviews, reaching a relative recall of 85.8% (151/out of 176 studies, 95% CI 79.9 to 90.2). This final version of the strategy includes two sets of terms related with two domains: "Patient Preferences and Decision Making" and "Health State Utilities Values". When we used the search strategy for the development of systematic reviews and clinical guidelines we obtained low precision values (ranging from 2% to 5%), and the NNR from 20 to 50. This search strategy fills an important research gap in this field. It will help systematic reviewers, clinical guideline developers, and policy-makers to retrieve published research on patients' views and preferences. In turn, this will facilitate the inclusion of this critical aspect when formulating heath care decisions, including recommendations.

  5. Development and pilot testing of a decision aid for surrogates of patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher E.; Lewis, Carmen L.; Hanson, Laura C.; Hough, Catherine L.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; White, Douglas B.; Song, Mi-Kyung; Tulsky, James A.; Carson, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Shared decision making is inadequate in intensive care units (ICUs). Decision aids can improve decision making quality, though their role in an ICU setting is unclear. We aimed to develop and pilot test a decision aid for shared decision makers of patients undergoing prolonged mechanical ventilation. Setting ICUs at three medical centers. Subjects 53 surrogate decision makers and 58 physicians. Design and interventions We developed the decision aid using defined methodological guidelines. After an iterative revision process, formative cognitive testing was performed among surrogate-physician dyads. Next, we compared the decision aid to usual care control in a prospective, before/after design study. Measurements and main results Primary outcomes were physician-surrogate discordance for expected patient survival, comprehension of relevant medical information, and the quality of communication. Compared to control, the intervention group had lower surrogate-physician discordance (7 [10] vs 43 [21]), greater comprehension (11.4 [0.7] vs 6.1 [3.7]), and improved quality of communication (8.7 [1.3] vs 8.4 [1.3]) (all ppost-intervention. Hospital costs were lower in the intervention group ($110,609 vs $178,618; p=0.044); mortality did not differ by group (38% vs 50%, p=0.95). 94% of surrogates and 100% of physicians reported that the decision aid was useful in decision making. Conclusion We developed a prolonged mechanical ventilation decision aid that is feasible, acceptable, and associated with both improved decision making quality and less resource utilization. Further evaluation using a randomized controlled trial design is needed to evaluate the decision aid's effect on long-term patient and surrogate outcomes. PMID:22635048

  6. Development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire for Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Roberta Aguiar; Riboldi, Bárbara Pelicioli; da Costa Rodrigues, Ticiana; de Azevedo, Mirela Jobim; de Almeida, Jussara Carnevale

    2013-08-09

    To investigate the association between dietary components and development of chronic diabetic complications, the dietary evaluation should include a long period, months or years. The present manuscript aims to develop a quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a portfolio with food photos to assess the usual intake pattern of Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes to be used in future studies. Dietary data using 3-day weighed diet records (WDR) from 188 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were used to construct the list of usually consumed foods. Foods were initially clustered into eight groups: "cereals, tubers, roots, and derivatives"; "vegetables and legumes"; "fruits"; "beans"; "meat and eggs"; "milk and dairy products"; "oils and fats", and "sugars and sweets". The frequency of food intake and the relative contribution of each food item to the total energy and nutrient intakes were calculated. Portion sizes were determined according to the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentiles of intake for each food item. A total of 62 food items were selected based on the 3-day WDR and another 27 foods or how they are prepared and nine beverages were included after the expert examination. Also, a portfolio with food photos of each included food item and portion sizes was made to assist the patients in identifying the consumed portion. We developed a practical quantitative FFQ and portfolio with photos of 98 food items covering those most commonly consumed in the past 12 months, to assess the usual diet pattern of patients with type 2 diabetes in Southern Brazil.

  7. Adaptation through Collaboration: Developing Novel Platforms to Advance the Delivery of Advanced Therapies to Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Magdalini

    2017-01-01

    For the nascent field of advanced therapies, collaboration will be a game-changer, turning scientific progress that was once unimaginable into transformative medical practice. Despite promise for lifelong management and even cure of disease, skepticism remains about the feasibility of their delivery to patients, fueling investment risks. With the potential for long-term effectiveness in need of frequent reassessment, current approaches to predict real-life drug performance bear little relevance, necessitating novel and iterative schemes to monitoring the benefit-risk profiles throughout the life span of advanced therapies. This work explains that reinventing an adoption route for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products is as much about the scientific and clinical components, as it is about the organizational structures, requiring an unprecedented level of interactions between stakeholders not traditionally connected; from developers and regulators, to payers, patients, and funders. By reflecting on the successes and lessons learned from the growing space of global precompetitive consortia and public-private partnerships, as well as a number of emerging accelerated development pathways, this work aims to inform the foundations for a future roadmap that can smooth the path to approval, reimbursement, and access, while delivering value to all stakeholders. Echoing the growing demands to bring these transformative products to patients, it provides critical insights to enhance our capacity in three fundamental domains: deploying the operational flexibilities offered by the growing space of collaborations, utilizing emerging flexible and accelerated pathways to tackle challenges in quantifying long-term effectiveness, and building the necessary digital and clinical infrastructure for knowledge development.

  8. Adaptation through Collaboration: Developing Novel Platforms to Advance the Delivery of Advanced Therapies to Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalini Papadaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For the nascent field of advanced therapies, collaboration will be a game-changer, turning scientific progress that was once unimaginable into transformative medical practice. Despite promise for lifelong management and even cure of disease, skepticism remains about the feasibility of their delivery to patients, fueling investment risks. With the potential for long-term effectiveness in need of frequent reassessment, current approaches to predict real-life drug performance bear little relevance, necessitating novel and iterative schemes to monitoring the benefit–risk profiles throughout the life span of advanced therapies. This work explains that reinventing an adoption route for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products is as much about the scientific and clinical components, as it is about the organizational structures, requiring an unprecedented level of interactions between stakeholders not traditionally connected; from developers and regulators, to payers, patients, and funders. By reflecting on the successes and lessons learned from the growing space of global precompetitive consortia and public–private partnerships, as well as a number of emerging accelerated development pathways, this work aims to inform the foundations for a future roadmap that can smooth the path to approval, reimbursement, and access, while delivering value to all stakeholders. Echoing the growing demands to bring these transformative products to patients, it provides critical insights to enhance our capacity in three fundamental domains: deploying the operational flexibilities offered by the growing space of collaborations, utilizing emerging flexible and accelerated pathways to tackle challenges in quantifying long-term effectiveness, and building the necessary digital and clinical infrastructure for knowledge development.

  9. Early Factors Associated with the Development of Chronic Pain in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Daoust

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify factors, available at the time of trauma admission, associated with the development of chronic pain to allow testing of preventive approaches. Methods. In a retrospective observational cohort study, we included all patients ≥ 18 years old admitted for injury in 57 adult trauma centers in the province of Quebec (Canada between 2004 and 2014. Chronic pain was defined as follows: treated in a chronic pain clinic, diagnosed with chronic pain, or received at least 2 prescriptions of chronic pain medications 3 to 12 months postinjury. Results. A total of 95,134 patients were retained for analysis. Mean age was 59.8 years (±21.7, and 52% were men. The causes of trauma were falls (63% and motor vehicle accidents (22%. We identified 14,518 patients (15.3%; 95% CI: 15.1–15.5 who developed chronic pain. After controlling for confounding factors, the variables associated with chronic pain were spinal cord injury (OR = 3.9; 95% CI: 3.4–4.6, disc-vertebra trauma (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.5–1.7, history of alcoholism (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2–1.7, history of anxiety (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2–1.5, history of depression (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1–1.4, and being female (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.2–1.3. The area under the receiving operating characteristic curve derived from the model was 0.80. Conclusions. We identified risk factors present on hospital admission that can predict trauma patients who will develop chronic pain. These factors should be prospectively validated.

  10. Development of a self-administered questionnaire to screen patients for cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiguchi Yasufumi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary care, it is often difficult to diagnose cervical myelopathy. However, a delay in treatment could cause irreversible aftereffects. With a brief and effective self-administered questionnaire for cervical myelopathy, cervical myelopathy may be screened more easily and oversight may be avoided. As there is presently no screening tool for cervical myelopathy, the aim of this study was to develop a self-administered questionnaire for the screening of cervical myelopathy. Methods A case-control study was performed with the following two groups at our university hospital from February 2006 to September 2008. Sixty-two patients (48 men, 14 women with cervical myelopathy who underwent operative treatment were included in the myelopathy group. In the control group, 49 patients (20 men, 29 women with symptoms that could be distinguished from those of cervical myelopathy, such as numbness, pain in the upper extremities, and manual clumsiness, were included. The underlying conditions were diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, diabetes mellitus neuropathy, cervical radiculopathy, and neuralgic amyotrophy. Twenty items for a questionnaire in this study were chosen from the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, which is a new self-administered questionnaire, as an outcome measure for patients with cervical myelopathy. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis using the chi-square test and by multiple logistic regression analysis. According to the resulting odds ratio, β-coefficients, and p value, items were chosen and assigned a score. Results Eight items were chosen by univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses and assigned a score. The Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic showed p = 0.805. The area under the receiver operation characteristic curve was 0.86. The developed questionnaire had a sensitivity of 93.5% and a

  11. Development of Arabic version of Berlin questionnaire to identify obstructive sleep apnea at risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Baset M Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Results: The study demonstrated a high degree of internal consistency and stability over time for the developed ABQ. The Cronbach′s alpha coefficient for the 10-item tool was 0.92. Validation of ABQ against AHI at cutoff >5 revealed a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 90%, positive and negative predictive values of 96% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion: The ABQ is reliable and valid scale in screening patients for the risk of OSA among Arabic-speaking nations, especially in resource-limited settings.

  12. Predictors of ovarian response in intrauterine insemination patients and development of a dosage nomogram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Nina La Cour; Lossl, K.; Bogstad, Jeanette Wulff

    2008-01-01

    , total Doppler score of the ovarian stromal blood flow, baseline FSH and oestradiol. Simple and multiple linear regressions were used for the statistical analysis. Appropriate ovarian response was defined as two to three mature follicles. Body weight (P = 0.001) and the number of antral follicles (P = 0.......004) were the strongest independent predictive factors of the number of mature follicles. In conclusion, body weight and antral follicle count may be used to achieve appropriate ovarian response for IUI in ovulatory patients. Based on this, a simple rFSH dosage nomogram was developed for individual ovarian...

  13. Development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with IgH-EPOR in a patient with secondary erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenichi; Tanaka, Seiji; Tomoyasu, Chihiro; Tomii, Toshihiro; Yano, Mio; Takagi, Kazutaka; Yasuhiko, Tsutsumi; Uoshima, Nobuhiko; Komatsu, Hiroshi; Imamura, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    We report the first patient to develop ALL with a fusion gene of the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) with immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) 22 years after a diagnosis of secondary erythrocytosis with unknown etiology. The IgH-EPOR rearrangement is known to induce increased expression of EPOR, and activates EPO-associated signal pathways by exogenous EPO stimulation, resulting in the increased proliferation and survival of IgH-EPOR-positive leukemic cells. Interestingly, this case may provide supporting the possibility that IgH-EPOR-positive ALL has a growth advantage under sustained high concentrations of EPO.

  14. Correlations between Cervical Vertebral Maturation (CVM) and Dental Development in Thai Cleft Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharueyskul, Pathomporn; Wangsrimonkol, Tasanee; Pisek, Poonsak; Pisek, Araya; Manosudprasit, Montian

    2015-08-01

    To examine correlations between cervical vertebral maturation stages (CVMs) and dental development stages, and cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stage 6 and completion of root formation of mandibular third molar in Thai cleft patients. Lateral cephalograms of 366 cleft subjects aged 7-9 years were assessed for CVMs using Baccetti method. Calcication stages of all left mandibular teeth within each CVMs were assessed from panoramic films using Demirjian method. Spearman rank correlation coefficients comparing CVMs and teeth were 0.51-0.79 (pmaturation indicators.

  15. Relationship between the serum TGA, TMA positiveness and development of hypothyroidism after 131I therapy in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hui; Xu Xiaohong; Yu Hui

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the likelihood of development of hypothyroidism after 131 I therapy in patients with Graves' disease as related to the serum positiveness of TGA and TMA before treatment. Methods: Altogether, 176 patients with Graves' disease were treated with 131 I and followed for 3 years of these patients, serum TGA and TMA were positive in 70 and were negative in 106. Results: In the 70 patients with positive TGA and TMA, development of hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment occurred in 22 subjects three years later (31.4%). However, only 4 of the 106 patients with negative TGA and TMA developed hypothyroidism 3 years after 131 I therapy (3.8%). Difference in the incidence of hypothyroidism was significant (P 131 I be administered to patients with Graves' disease and positive serum TGA, TMA. (authors)

  16. How to measure experiences of healthcare quality in Denmark among patients with heart disease? The development and psychometric evaluation of a patient-reported instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinckernagel, Line; Schneekloth, Nanna; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Measuring the quality of care as experienced by patients is increasingly recognised as a way of improving healthcare services. However, disease-specific measures that take the patient journey into account are needed. This paper presents the development of such a measure for patients...... with heart disease and details the psychometric evaluation. Design The questionnaire was developed based on a literature review, qualitative interviews and a pilot-test. The psychometric evaluation of the measure was assessed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA......), Cronbach's alpha coefficient and differential item functioning analysis with data from a population-based survey. Setting Denmark in 2013-2014. Study participants Nineteen heart patients, four relatives and eight health professionals participated in qualitative interviews in the development phase, and 15...

  17. Developing an Android-Based Patient Decision Aid Based on Ottawa Standards for Patients After Kidney Transplant and Its Usability Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Moayedi, Mahboobeh; Aslani, Azam; Fakhrahmad, Mostafa; Ezzatzadegan J, Shahrokh

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop an android based patient decision aid (PDA) as a self-care instrument for patients after kidney transplant and its usability evaluation. In this study, the systematic development process of Android-based self-care application for patients after kidney transplant based on Ottawa standard was included: scoping, assemble steering group, analysis of requirements, designing, develop of a prototype and system evaluation. The PDA is a self-triage system that will help early identification of risk symptoms in patients, and help manage them. System recommendations for risk signs are: Refer to the nearest hospital or healthcare center without delay, refer to the doctor and tell your doctor in the next visit. To identify patient care needs, a semi-structured interview with members of steering group, including patients and clinical experts, was conducted by the researchers. A prototype of the decision aid was made according to identified needs in the previous step. Finally, in order to evaluate its usability rate by using the System Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire, it was used by exerts and patients. This study identified information needs, risk signs and steps that patients need to make appropriate decisions about them. The main capabilities of the decision aid are features such as reminders for appointment/test, time of taking medication, registration of symptoms, weight, blood pressure, body temperature, advising to patient in case of signs of risk, weight, blood pressure, body temperature and test results which were reported in the diagram. The mean score of system's usability evaluated by medical informatics specialists, clinicians, and patients were 88.33, 95, and 91. PDAs was usable and desirable from the point of view of medical informatics specialists, clinicians and patients.

  18. Development of a computer-aided clinical patient education system to provide appropriate individual nursing care for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2012-06-01

    A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play an important role in patient education, and the health education take most time in their daily work. Such work includes the collection, production and delivery of education materials. To generate the correct and customized health education material is the key of success of patient education. In this study, we established a computer-aided health education contents generating system for psychiatric patients by integrating the databases for disease, medicine and nursing knowledge to assist nurse generating the customized health education document suitable for different patients. This system was evaluated by clinical nurses in usability and feasibility. This system is helpful for nurse to carry out the clinical health education to patients and further to encourage patient to pay attention to self-health.

  19. PatientVOICE: development of a preparatory, pre-chemotherapy online communication tool for older patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Driesenaar, J.A.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Osch, M. van; Noordman, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Good communication around cancer treatment is essential in helping patients cope with their disease and related care, especially when this information is tailored to one’s needs. Despite its importance, communication is often complex, in particular in older patients (aged 65 years or

  20. Analysis of Risk Factor for the Development of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Patients with Traumatic Subdural Hygroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jun Hyong; Jun, Hyo Sub; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although a high incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following traumatic subdural hygroma (SDG) has been reported, no study has evaluated risk factors for the development of CSDH. Therefore, we analyzed the risk factors contributing to formation of CSDH in patients with traumatic SDG. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients admitted to Hallym University Hospital with traumatic head injury from January 2004 through December 2013. A total of 45 patients with these injuries in which traumatic SDG developed during the follow-up period were analyzed. All patients were divided into two groups based on the development of CSDH, and the associations between the development of CSDH and independent variables were investigated. Results Thirty-one patients suffered from bilateral SDG, whereas 14 had unilateral SDG. Follow-up computed tomography scans revealed regression of SDG in 25 of 45 patients (55.6%), but the remaining 20 patients (44.4%) suffered from transition to CSDH. Eight patients developed bilateral CSDH, and 12 patients developed unilateral CSDH. Hemorrhage-free survival rates were significantly lower in the male and bilateral SDG group (log-rank test; p=0.043 and p=0.013, respectively). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed male (OR, 7.68; 95% CI 1.18–49.78; p=0.033) and bilateral SDG (OR, 8.04; 95% CI 1.41–45.7; p=0.019) were significant risk factors for development of CSDH. Conclusion The potential to evolve into CSDH should be considered in patients with traumatic SDG, particularly male patients with bilateral SDG. PMID:27847577

  1. 32P and acute leukemia: development of leukemia in a patient with hemoglobin Yakima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagby, G.C. Jr.; Richert-Boe, K.; Koler, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    In 1954 a then 31-yr-old male was found to have erythrocytosis. Over the ensuing decade he received 72 mCi 32 P. In 1964 his daughters were found to have erythrocytosis. Further investigation led to the discovery of hemoglobin Yakima, a variant with high oxygen affinity. He received no further therapy and was well until 1975, when he developed the preleukemic syndrome. Within 12 mo he developed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia accompanied by fetal erythropoiesis. Because the initial discovery of this type of hemoglobinopathy came 27 yr after the introduction of 32 P for use in the treatment of polycythemia vera, and because there are now known to be more than 39 different high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobins, we anticipate that more patients such as ours have been exposed to 32 P. The exposed population should be closely followed, since this will likely permit assessment of the risk of 32 P-induced leukemia in a nonneoplastic condition

  2. Education, training and continuous professional development in the radiological protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.

    2001-01-01

    Education and training in the radiological protection of patients has to face many challenges. These stem from the interdisciplinary nature of the personnel involved, their varied backgrounds, the difficult to quantify risk and benefit considerations, concern for quality of the end product, changing attitudes as knowledge develops in fast growing areas of technology and the wide complexity of the equipment used. On the one hand there is a need for giving orientation about the medical exigencies and situations in clinical practice to the radiation protection regulators and, on the other, more and more clinicians without any training in radiation protection are getting involved in the use of high levels of radiation through angiographic procedures. It is hence no wonder that the deterministic effects of radiation have been observed in patients undergoing angiographic procedures. A review of the state of the art in education and training and identifying educational challenges is therefore needed. The medical training of physicians and support personnel in the health care use of ionizing or other radiation in patients is particularly challenging for many reasons, most of which are unique to health care. These include those described in the paper. (author)

  3. Development and applicability of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shinya; Seto, Kanako; Kigawa, Mika; Fujita, Shigeru; Hasegawa, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2011-02-07

    Patient safety culture at healthcare organizations plays an important role in guaranteeing, improving and promoting overall patient safety. Although several conceptual frameworks have been proposed in the past, no standard measurement tool has yet been developed for Japan. In order to examine possibilities to introduce the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) in Japan, the authors of this study translated the HSOPS into Japanese, and evaluated its factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity. Healthcare workers (n = 6,395) from 13 acute care general hospitals in Japan participated in this survey. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the Japanese HSOPS' 12-factor model was selected as the most pertinent, and showed a sufficiently high standard partial regression coefficient. The internal reliability of the subscale scores was 0.46-0.88. The construct validity of each safety culture sub-dimension was confirmed by polychoric correlation, and by an ordered probit analysis. The results of the present study indicate that the factor structures of the Japanese and the American HSOPS are almost identical, and that the Japanese HSOPS has acceptable levels of internal reliability and construct validity. This shows that the HSOPS can be introduced in Japan.

  4. A multimedia interactive education system for prostate cancer patients: development and preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Michael A; Butz, Brian P

    2004-01-21

    A cancer diagnosis is highly distressing. Yet, to make informed treatment choices patients have to learn complicated disease and treatment information that is often fraught with medical and statistical terminology. Thus, patients need accurate and easy-to-understand information. To introduce the development and preliminary evaluation through focus groups of a novel highly-interactive multimedia-education software program for patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. The prostate interactive education system uses the metaphor of rooms in a virtual health center (ie, reception area, a library, physician offices, group meeting room) to organize information. Text information contained in the library is tailored to a person's information-seeking preference (ie, high versus low information seeker). We conducted a preliminary evaluation through 5 separate focus groups with prostate cancer survivors (N = 18) and their spouses (N = 15). Focus group results point to the timeliness and high acceptability of the software among the target audience. Results also underscore the importance of a guide or tutor who assists in navigating the program and who responds to queries to facilitate information retrieval. Focus groups have established the validity of our approach and point to new directions to further enhance the user interface.

  5. Development and treatment of spinal deformity in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsirikos Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a common deformity in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. This is usually associated with pelvic obliquity due to extension of the curve to the sacrum. Sagittal plane deformity is less common and often develops along with scoliosis. Spinal deformity in patients with severe neurological handicaps can affect their ability to sit and cause significant back pain or pain due to rib impingement against the elevated side of the pelvis on the concavity of the curvature. Surgical correction followed by spinal arthrodesis is indicated in patients with progressive deformities which interfere with their level of function and quality of life. Spinal deformity correction is a major task in children with multiple medical co-morbidities and can be associated with a high risk of complications including death. A well-coordinated multidisciplinary approach is required in the assessment and treatment of this group of patients with the aim to minimize the complication rate and secure a satisfactory surgical outcome. Good knowledge of the surgical and instrumentation techniques, as well as the principles of management is needed to achieve optimum correction of the deformity and balancing of the spine and pelvis. Spinal fusion has a well-documented positive impact even in children with quadriplegia or total body involvement and is the only surgical procedure which has such a high satisfaction rate among parents and caregivers.

  6. A personalized snack-based intervention for hip fracture patients: development, feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rosemary J G; McMurdo, Marion E T; Anderson, Annie S

    2006-04-01

    Undernutrition is common in older people admitted to hospital with hip fracture. Oral supplementation with sip feeds may be provided but compliance is a major problem. To develop a personalized snack-based intervention for practical implementation in hip fracture patients and to assess feasibility, adherence, acceptability and cost. Twenty-three older hip fracture patients with a mean age (SD) 84.1 (6.3) were provided with three between-meal snacks daily for 4 weeks following surgery. Dietary counselling, assessment of acceptability and feasibility were undertaken and costs of intervention calculated. Sixteen of the 23 participants recruited completed the study. Mean estimated energy derived from the snacks provided 26% of daily energy requirements. Monitoring adherence proved problematic and stocktakes highlighted discrepancies. Although several participants reported that they did not usually eat between meals, overall the intervention was acceptable to participants. The cost of implementation was 21.29 UK pounds per participant per week. Although it proved feasible, practical difficulties were encountered with implementation and adherence due to timing. A more appropriate time to deliver such an intervention may be after the acute phase is over and patients are back home. The costs compared favourably with the alternative of providing sip feeds.

  7. Development of a questionnaire to evaluate asthma control in Japanese asthma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohda, Yuji; Hozawa, Soichiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    The asthma control questionnaires used in Japan are Japanese translations of those developed outside Japan, and have some limitations; a questionnaire designed to optimally evaluate asthma control levels for Japanese may be necessary. The present study was conducted to validate the Japan Asthma Control Survey (JACS) questionnaire in Japanese asthma patients. A total of 226 adult patients with mild to severe persistent asthma were enrolled and responded to the JACS questionnaire, asthma control questionnaire (ACQ), and Mini asthma quality of life questionnaire (Mini AQLQ) at Weeks 0 and 4. The reliability, validity, and sensitivity/responsiveness of the JACS questionnaire were evaluated. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were within the range of 0.55-0.75 for all JACS scores, indicating moderate/substantial reproducibility. For internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.76 to 0.92 in total and subscale scores, which were greater than the lower limit of internal consistency. As for factor validity, the cumulative contribution ratio of four main factors was 0.66. For criterion-related validity, the correlation coefficients between the JACS total score and ACQ5, ACQ6, and Mini AQLQ scores were -0.78, -0.78, and 0.77, respectively, showing a significant correlation (p asthma control status in a higher number of patients. UMIN000016589. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nursing care system development for patients with cleft lip-palate and craniofacial deformities in operating room Srinagarind Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riratanapong, Saowaluck; Sroihin, Waranya; Kotepat, Kingkan; Volrathongchai, Kanittha

    2013-09-01

    For a successful surgical outcome for patients with cleft lip/palate (CLP), the attending nurses must continuously develop their potential, knowledge, capacity and skills. The goal is to meet international standards of patient safety and efficiency. To assess and improve the nursing care system for patients with CLP and craniofacial deformities at the operating room (OR), Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University. Data were collected for two months (between March 1, 2011 and April 30, 2011). Part I was an enquiry regarding the attitude of OR staff on serving patients with CLP; and, Part 2.1) patient and caregiver satisfaction with service from the OR staff and 2.2) patient and caregiver satisfaction with the OR transfer service. The authors interviewed 28 staff in OR unit 2 of the OR nursing division and 30 patients with CLP and his/her caregiver. The respective validity according to the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.87 and 0.93. The OR staff attitude visa-vis service provision for patients with CLP service was middling. Patient and caregiver satisfaction with both OR staff and the transfer service was very satisfactory. Active development of the nursing care system for patients with CLP and craniofacial deformities in the operating room, Srinagarind Hospital improved staff motivation with respect to serving patients with CLP. The operating theater staff was able to co-ordinate the multidisciplinary team through the provision of surgical service for patients with CLP.

  9. ["Active in rehab": development and formative evaluation of a patient education program to increase health literacy of patients with chronic illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, A; Schöpf, A C; Nagl, M; Farin, E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the article is to describe the development, the process of manualisation and results from the formative evaluation of a patient-oriented patient education program to increase health literacy of patients with chronic illness ("Active in rehab"). Themes of the patient education program were extracted from 17 focus groups. An expert meeting was conducted to validate the content of the patient education program. The formative evaluation was based on a questionnaire (N(max) = 295 patients and N(max) = 39 trainers). The patient education program includes 4 modules with 3 themes (bio-psycho-social model, rehabilitation goals, communication competencies). The evaluation of the modules was good to very good. An analysis of free texts and a follow-up survey among trainers helped us to infer important improvements to the patient education program. RESULTS from the formative evaluation show that the patient education program meets patients and trainers needs and is accepted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Development of an Online, Evidence-Based Patient Information Portal for Congenital Heart Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. G. Etnel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesIn response to an increased need for patient information on congenital heart disease in the Netherlands, we initiated a nationwide initiative to develop an online, evidence-based patient information portal, starting with a pilot project aimed at the subgroup of patients with congenital aortic and pulmonary valve disease.Methods and resultsWe developed an information portal that aims to (1 improve patient knowledge and involvement and to subsequently reduce anxiety and decisional conflict and improve mental quality of life and (2 to support physicians in informing and communicating with their patients. The information portal was developed according to the systematic International Patient Decision Aid Standards development process employing Delphi techniques by a multidisciplinary workgroup of pediatric and adult congenital cardiologists, a congenital cardiothoracic surgeon, a psychologist, an epidemiologist, a patient representative, and web and industrial design experts. First, patients and physicians were surveyed and interviewed to assess the current state of patient information and explore their preferences and needs to determine the focus for the development of the information portal. We found that patient knowledge and numeracy are limited, reliable information is scarce, physicians inform patients selectively and patient involvement is suboptimal, and there is a need for more reliable, tailored, and multi-faceted information. Based on the findings of these surveys and interviews, a patient-tailored information portal was designed that presents evidence-based disease- and age-specific medical and psychosocial information about diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and impact on daily life in a manner that is comprehensible and digestible for patients and that meets the needs expressed by both patients and physicians. The effect of the website on patient outcome is currently being assessed in a multicenter stepped-wedge implementation

  11. Relationship of plasma level of NT- ProBNP with development of AF in CABG patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaray B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Studies of the association between post operative AF and Plasma level of NT- Pro BNP have reported conflicting findings. The aim of the present study was evaluation of the association between post coronary bypass graft- Atrial Fibrillation (AF and Plasma level of NT- ProBNP as an independent risk factor of AF development in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft."n "nMethods: In a cohort study, 79 patients with sinus rhythm who admitted in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during February 2009 and February 2010 for CABG are included the study and followed for developing post operative AF rhythm."n "nResults: Post operative AF was found in 17.7% of patients. The peak time from the operation to the first AF episode was in second post op day in ten patients (71.4%. The serum level of ProBNP in patients with AF was significantly higher (1624± 647 versus 221± 238 pg/ml, p< 0/0001. Increased age, Increased LA size and high plasma level of ProBNP were associated with increased risk for post op AF. After adjustment of risk factors, plasma level of ProBNP was the most important risk factor with odds ratio of 15.34 with CI 95% 1.77-132.95 and then LA diameter with odds ratio of 6.11 with CI 95% 0.99-37.42 was independently correlated with post op AF. Correlation between plasma level of ProBNP with age and LA size was seen too (LA size r = 0.0281, p= 0.012. Between age and ProBNP (r= 0.337, p= 0.002. The best cut off point for plasma ProBNP as a predictor of post op AF was 854 pg/ml."n "nConclusion: Increased level of preoperative ProBNP levels could be an independent predictor of post operative Atrial Fibrillation.

  12. Development of a Web-based concept for patients with ulcerative colitis and 5-aminosalicylic acid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjaer, Margarita; Burisch, Johan; Avnstrøm, Søren

    2009-01-01

    of life (QoL). Lack of easy access to inflammatory bowel disease clinics and patient education, their understanding of the importance of early treatment at relapse, poor compliance and self-adherence can be partly solved by a newly developed Web-based concept. AIMS: To describe the development......-treatment after the educational training (ET). A significant increase in knowledge from 36 to 69% (group A) and 28 to 75% (group B) was obtained. A majority of the patients were satisfied with the ET. Patients' QoL, anxiety, depression and general well-being showed no difference after the ET. CONCLUSION: Patient...

  13. Development of the voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients and their application to organ dose assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik

    A series of realistic voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients were developed and then used for the radiation risk assessment for various exposure scenarios. The high-resolution computed tomographic images of live patients were utilized for the development of the five voxel phantoms of pediatric patients, 9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male. The phantoms were first developed as head and torso phantoms and then extended into whole body phantoms by utilizing computed tomographic images of a healthy adult volunteer. The whole body phantom series was modified to have the same anthropometrics with the most recent reference data reported by the international commission on radiological protection. The phantoms, named as the University of Florida series B, are the first complete set of the pediatric voxel phantoms having reference organ masses and total heights. As part of the dosimetry study, the investigation on skeletal tissue dosimetry methods was performed for better understanding of the radiation dose to the active bone marrow and bone endosteum. All of the currently available methodologies were inter-compared and benchmarked with the paired-image radiation transport model. The dosimetric characteristics of the phantoms were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation of the broad parallel beams of external phantom in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, rotational, and isotropic angles. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for extensive photon energies and compared with the conventional stylized pediatric phantoms of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The multi-slice helical computed tomography exams were simulated using Monte Carlo simulation code for various exams protocols, head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis studies. Results have found realistic estimates of the effective doses for frequently used protocols in pediatric radiology. The results were very

  14. Factors influencing implementation of a patient decision aid in a developing country: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wen Ting; Lee, Yew Kong; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Lee, Ping Yein

    2017-03-21

    Most studies on barriers and facilitators to implementation of patient decision aids (PDAs) are conducted in the west; hence, the findings may not be transferable to developing countries. This study aims to use a locally developed insulin PDA as an exemplar to explore the barriers and facilitators to implementing PDAs in Malaysia, an upper middle-income country in Asia. Qualitative methodology was adopted. Nine in-depth interviews (IDIs) and three focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with policymakers (n = 6), medical officers (n = 13), diabetes educators (n = 5) and a nurse, who were involved in insulin initiation management at an academic primary care clinic. The interviews were conducted with the aid of a semi-structured interview guide based on the Theoretical Domains Framework. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a thematic approach. Five themes emerged, and they were lack of shared decision-making (SDM) culture, role boundary, lack of continuity of care, impact on consultation time and reminder network. Healthcare providers' (HCPs) paternalistic attitude, patients' passivity and patient trust in physicians rendered SDM challenging which affected the implementation of the PDA. Clear role boundaries between the doctors and nurses made collaborative implementation of the PDA challenging, as nurses may not view the use of insulin PDA to be part of their job scope. The lack of continuity of care might cause difficulties for doctors to follow up on insulin PDA use with their patient. While time was the most commonly cited barrier for PDA implementation, use of the PDA might reduce consultation time. A reminder network was suggested to address the issue of forgetfulness as well as to trigger interest in using the PDA. The suggested reminders were peer reminders (i.e. HCPs reminding one another to use the PDA) and system reminders (e.g. incorporating electronic medical record prompts, displaying posters

  15. Management of patients in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU) in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Madiha; Kamal, Rehana

    2013-05-01

    In Pakistan the practice of managing extensive burns in dedicated intensive care units is not well established. This audit aims to define the characteristics of the victims of major burns and factors that increase mortality and outcome of the protocol-based management in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU). This prospective audit included all patients admitted to the BICU of Suleiman Dawood Burns Unit in Karachi from 1st September 2002 to 31st August 2011. Demographic information, type and place of burn, total body surface area burn (TBSA), type of organ support provided, length of ICU stay, any associated medical diseases, and out outcome were documented. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the BICU in 9 years. Median age of the patients was 22 (IQR =32-7). 32% victims were children 50 years old. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1. Fire was the leading cause of burns in adults (64%) and scald burns were most common in (64%) in children. 72.4% of the accidents happened at home, where kitchen was the commonest location (597 cases). Mean TBSA burnt was 32.5% (SD ± 22.95%, 95%CI: 31.36-33.61). 27% patients needed ventilatory support, 4% were dialyzed and split skin graftings were performed in 20% patients. Average length of ICU stay was 10.42 days. Epilepsy, psychiatric illness and drug addiction were not common associations with burns. Overall mortality was 41.30% but it decreased over the years from 75% to 27%. Groups of people most vulnerable to sustain burn are young females getting burnt in the kitchen, young males getting burnt at work, and small children falling in pots of hot water stored for drinking or bathing. TBSA >40%, age >50 years, fire burn and female gender were associated with a higher risk of death. Carefully planned, protocol based management of burn patients by burn teams of dedicated healthcare professionals, even with limited resources reduced mortality. Burn hazard awareness, prevention and educational programmes targeted at the

  16. The satisfaction survey of users and patients on the developed disposable tourniquet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The 18⁓20G needle is used to computer tomography (CT) contrast examination. Therefore, a patient has to apply a self-administering hemostasis (conventional method: CM) and often experience bleeding in the course. Thus, we developed the new disposable transparent tourniquet (TT) for reducing. This study was to compare the usefulness between the proposed transparent tourniquet and the existing hemostatic methods. A Satisfaction survey was conducted by 50 patients and 25 nurses. The survey contained the satisfaction of the convenience, safety, sanitation, and wearing sensation of transparent tourniquet. We employed face-to-face interview on 5 points likert scales. And Chi-square, paired T-test were used for the statistics verification. As for the patients, the satisfaction levels were measured for each category with the gender, age. Patients evaluation, overall satisfaction high average sore used TT and there were statistical significance by paired T-test(p<0.05). The following is the average satisfaction level for each category: 4.4±0.53 in; 4.28±0.57 in safety; 4.52±0.54 in sanitation; 4.16±0.54 in wearing sensation. So the overall satisfaction level is measured at 4.34±0.51. As for the nurses, CT work experience and the current satisfaction with tourniquet were counted as variables. The satisfaction level for each category is: 3.8±0.7 in; 3.6±0.68 in safety; 3.4±0.5 in sanitation; 3.9±0.49 in hemostasis. The overall satisfaction level is 3.8±0.3. Patients' satisfaction levels were very high with little difference among variables. Nurses' satisfaction levels were different with the TT depending on their work experience but their overall satisfaction was high. This TT will be a starting point to minimizing patient's inconvenience and more studies are necessary to enhance their satisfaction

  17. The satisfaction survey of users and patients on the developed disposable tourniquet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The 18⁓20G needle is used to computer tomography (CT) contrast examination. Therefore, a patient has to apply a self-administering hemostasis (conventional method: CM) and often experience bleeding in the course. Thus, we developed the new disposable transparent tourniquet (TT) for reducing. This study was to compare the usefulness between the proposed transparent tourniquet and the existing hemostatic methods. A Satisfaction survey was conducted by 50 patients and 25 nurses. The survey contained the satisfaction of the convenience, safety, sanitation, and wearing sensation of transparent tourniquet. We employed face-to-face interview on 5 points likert scales. And Chi-square, paired T-test were used for the statistics verification. As for the patients, the satisfaction levels were measured for each category with the gender, age. Patients evaluation, overall satisfaction high average sore used TT and there were statistical significance by paired T-test(p<0.05). The following is the average satisfaction level for each category: 4.4±0.53 in; 4.28±0.57 in safety; 4.52±0.54 in sanitation; 4.16±0.54 in wearing sensation. So the overall satisfaction level is measured at 4.34±0.51. As for the nurses, CT work experience and the current satisfaction with tourniquet were counted as variables. The satisfaction level for each category is: 3.8±0.7 in; 3.6±0.68 in safety; 3.4±0.5 in sanitation; 3.9±0.49 in hemostasis. The overall satisfaction level is 3.8±0.3. Patients' satisfaction levels were very high with little difference among variables. Nurses' satisfaction levels were different with the TT depending on their work experience but their overall satisfaction was high. This TT will be a starting point to minimizing patient's inconvenience and more studies are necessary to enhance their satisfaction.

  18. Development and Analysis of Patient-Based Complete Conducting Airways Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafel Bordas

    Full Text Available The analysis of high-resolution computed tomography (CT images of the lung is dependent on inter-subject differences in airway geometry. The application of computational models in understanding the significance of these differences has previously been shown to be a useful tool in biomedical research. Studies using image-based geometries alone are limited to the analysis of the central airways, down to generation 6-10, as other airways are not visible on high-resolution CT. However, airways distal to this, often termed the small airways, are known to play a crucial role in common airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Other studies have incorporated an algorithmic approach to extrapolate CT segmented airways in order to obtain a complete conducting airway tree down to the level of the acinus. These models have typically been used for mechanistic studies, but also have the potential to be used in a patient-specific setting. In the current study, an image analysis and modelling pipeline was developed and applied to a number of healthy (n = 11 and asthmatic (n = 24 CT patient scans to produce complete patient-based airway models to the acinar level (mean terminal generation 15.8 ± 0.47. The resulting models are analysed in terms of morphometric properties and seen to be consistent with previous work. A number of global clinical lung function measures are compared to resistance predictions in the models to assess their suitability for use in a patient-specific setting. We show a significant difference (p < 0.01 in airways resistance at all tested flow rates in complete airway trees built using CT data from severe asthmatics (GINA 3-5 versus healthy subjects. Further, model predictions of airways resistance at all flow rates are shown to correlate with patient forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 (Spearman ρ = -0.65, p < 0.001 and, at low flow rates (0.00017 L/s, FEV1 over forced vital capacity (FEV1

  19. Developing a tool to preserve eye contact with patients undergoing colonoscopy for pain monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Y

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Yaron Niv, Yossi TalDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, IsraelAbstract: Colonoscopy has become the leading procedure for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer. Patients’ experience of colonic endoscopic procedures is scarcely reported, even though it is considered a major factor in colorectal cancer screening participation. Pain due to air inflation or stretching the colon with an endoscope is not rare during examination and may be the main obstacle to cooperation and participation in a screening program. We propose a four-stage study for developing a tool dedicated to pain monitoring during colonoscopy, as follows: (1 comparison of patient, nurse, and endoscopist questionnaire responses about patient pain and technical details of the procedure using the PAINAD tool during colonoscopy; (2 observation of the correlation between patients’ facial expressions and other parameters (using the short PAINAD; (3 development of a device for continuous monitoring of the patient’s facial expression during the procedure; (4 assessment of the usability of such a tool and its contribution to the outcomes of colonoscopy procedures. Early intervention by the staff performing the procedure, in reaction to alerts encoded by this tool, may prevent adverse events during the procedure.Keywords: pain scoring, colonoscopy, pain monitoring, facial expression

  20. [Developing traditional Chinese medicine injection is the need for curing sickness to save patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Li, Feng-Jie; Li, Lian-da; Li, Yi-Kui

    2017-03-01

    Safety issues of traditional Chinese medicine injections has been heated debate. There are two diametrically opposed views: it should be used reasonable and developed healthily or be forbidden to use. Some people have many misunderstandings and prejudices about the safety of traditional Chinese medicine injections. Compared with western medicine,traditional Chinese medicine has its own particularity. Traditional Chinese medicine has complex components. Its research and clinical application is different from western medicine. Adverse reactions of traditional Chinese medicine injections are related to many factors,such as a large number of irrational use,blind use of traditional Chinese medicine injections and western medicine injections,counterfeit and substandard drugs,incorrect methods of intravenous infusion,toxicity of supplementary materials,drug ingredients. Developing traditional Chinese medicine injection is the need for curing sickness to save patients. The purposeful, targeted, organized and planned systematic research of traditional Chinese medicine injections should be strengthened,especially the safety of traditional Chinese medicine. Strengthen supervision and control of rational drug use.Strengthen the examination and approval,supervision and management of all aspects to ensure the safety of patients. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Development of a music therapy assessment tool for patients in low awareness states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Wendy L

    2007-01-01

    People in low awareness states following profound brain injury typically demonstrate subtle changes in functional behaviors which challenge the sensitivity of measurement tools. Failure to identify and measure changes in functioning can lead to misdiagnosis and withdrawal of treatment with this population. Thus, the development of tools which are sensitive to responsiveness is of central concern. As the auditory modality has been found to be particularly sensitive in identifying responses indicating awareness, a convincing case can be made for music therapy as a treatment medium. However, little has been recommended about protocols for intervention or tools for measuring patient responses within the music therapy setting. This paper presents the rationale for an assessment tool specifically designed to measure responses in the music therapy setting with patients who are diagnosed as minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. Developed over fourteen years as part of interdisciplinary assessment and treatment, the music therapy assessment tool for low awareness states (MATLAS) contains fourteen items which rate behavioral responses across a number of domains. The tool can provide important information for interdisciplinary assessment and treatment particularly in the auditory and communication domains. Recommendations are made for testing its reliability and validity through research.

  2. The patient safety climate in healthcare organizations (PSCHO) survey: Short-form development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Justin K; Meterko, Mark; Singer, Sara J

    2017-08-01

    Measures of safety climate are increasingly used to guide safety improvement initiatives. However, cost and respondent burden may limit the use of safety climate surveys. The purpose of this study was to develop a 15- to 20-item safety climate survey based on the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations survey, a well-validated 38-item measure of safety climate. The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations was administered to all senior managers, all physicians, and a 10% random sample of all other hospital personnel in 69 private sector hospitals and 30 Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Both samples were randomly divided into a derivation sample to identify a short-form subset and a confirmation sample to assess the psychometric properties of the proposed short form. The short form consists of 15 items represented 3 overarching domains in the long-form scale-organization, work unit, and interpersonal. The proposed short form efficiently captures 3 important sources of variance in safety climate: organizational, work-unit, and interpersonal. The short-form development process was a practical method that can be applied to other safety climate surveys. This safety climate short form may increase response rates in studies that involve busy clinicians or repeated measures. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Developments in control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices for heart failure patients: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlOmari, Abdul-Hakeem H; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H; Stevens, Michael; Mason, David G; Timms, Daniel L; Salamonsen, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    From the moment of creation to the moment of death, the heart works tirelessly to circulate blood, being a critical organ to sustain life. As a non-stopping pumping machine, it operates continuously to pump blood through our bodies to supply all cells with oxygen and necessary nutrients. When the heart fails, the supplement of blood to the body's organs to meet metabolic demands will deteriorate. The treatment of the participating causes is the ideal approach to treat heart failure (HF). As this often cannot be done effectively, the medical management of HF is a difficult challenge. Implantable rotary blood pumps (IRBPs) have the potential to become a viable long-term treatment option for bridging to heart transplantation or destination therapy. This increases the potential for the patients to leave the hospital and resume normal lives. Control of IRBPs is one of the most important design goals in providing long-term alternative treatment for HF patients. Over the years, many control algorithms including invasive and non-invasive techniques have been developed in the hope of physiologically and adaptively controlling left ventricular assist devices and thus avoiding such undesired pumping states as left ventricular collapse caused by suction. In this paper, we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the developments of control systems and techniques that have been applied to control IRBPs. (topical review)

  4. Developments in control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices for heart failure patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlOmari, Abdul-Hakeem H; Savkin, Andrey V; Stevens, Michael; Mason, David G; Timms, Daniel L; Salamonsen, Robert F; Lovell, Nigel H

    2013-01-01

    From the moment of creation to the moment of death, the heart works tirelessly to circulate blood, being a critical organ to sustain life. As a non-stopping pumping machine, it operates continuously to pump blood through our bodies to supply all cells with oxygen and necessary nutrients. When the heart fails, the supplement of blood to the body's organs to meet metabolic demands will deteriorate. The treatment of the participating causes is the ideal approach to treat heart failure (HF). As this often cannot be done effectively, the medical management of HF is a difficult challenge. Implantable rotary blood pumps (IRBPs) have the potential to become a viable long-term treatment option for bridging to heart transplantation or destination therapy. This increases the potential for the patients to leave the hospital and resume normal lives. Control of IRBPs is one of the most important design goals in providing long-term alternative treatment for HF patients. Over the years, many control algorithms including invasive and non-invasive techniques have been developed in the hope of physiologically and adaptively controlling left ventricular assist devices and thus avoiding such undesired pumping states as left ventricular collapse caused by suction. In this paper, we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the developments of control systems and techniques that have been applied to control IRBPs.

  5. Development and pilot of Case Manager: a virtual-patient experience for veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Julie K; Johnson, Susan E; Allen, L Clare V; Brilmyer, Cheryl; Griffiths, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in veterinary education to engage students, teach and reinforce clinical reasoning, and provide access anytime/anywhere to quality learning opportunities. In addition, accrediting bodies are asking for more concrete documentation of essential clinical-skills outcomes. Unfortunately, during the clinical year in a referral hospital setting, students are at the mercy of chance regarding the types of cases they will encounter and the opportunities they will have to participate. Patient- and case-simulation technology is becoming more popular as a way to achieve these objectives in human and veterinary medical education. Many of the current options available to the veterinary medical education community to develop virtual-patient cases are too time-consuming, cost prohibitive, or difficult for the instructor or learner to use. In response, we developed a learning tool, Case Manager, which is low-cost and user-friendly. Case Manager was designed to meet the demands of veterinary education by providing students with an opportunity to cultivate clinical reasoning skills and allowing for real-time student feedback. We launched a pilot test with 37 senior veterinary medical students as part of their Small Animal Internal Medicine clinical rotation. Students reported that Case Manager increased their engagement with the material, improved diagnostic and problem-solving skills, and broadened their exposure to a variety of cases. In addition, students felt that Case Manager was superior to a more traditional, less interactive case presentation format.

  6. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade ≥2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  7. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin, S.; Gondal, G.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  8. Developing a Healthy Web-Based Cookbook for Pediatric Cancer Patients and Survivors: Rationale and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity has been a growing problem among children and adolescents in the United States for a number of decades. Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are more susceptible to the downstream health consequences of obesity such as cardiovascular disease, endocrine issues, and risk of cancer recurrence due to late effects of treatment and suboptimal dietary and physical activity habits. Objective The objective of this study was to document the development of a Web-based cookbook of healthy recipes and nutrition resources to help enable pediatric cancer patients and survivors to lead healthier lifestyles. Methods The Web-based cookbook, named “@TheTable”, was created by a committee of researchers, a registered dietitian, patients and family members, a hospital chef, and community advisors and donors. Recipes were collected from several sources including recipe contests and social media. We incorporated advice from current patients, parents, and CCS. Results Over 400 recipes, searchable by several categories and with accompanying nutritional information, are currently available on the website. In addition to healthy recipes, social media functionality and cooking videos are integrated into the website. The website also features nutrition information resources including nutrition and cooking tip sheets available on several subjects. Conclusions The “@TheTable” website is a unique resource for promoting healthy lifestyles spanning pediatric oncology prevention, treatment, and survivorship. Through evaluations of the website’s current and future use, as well as incorporation into interventions designed to promote energy balance, we will continue to adapt and build this unique resource to serve cancer patients, survivors, and the general public. PMID:25840596

  9. Patient input into the development and enhancement of ED discharge instructions: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Barbara A; McCarthy, Danielle M; Forth, Victoria E; Tanabe, Paula; Schmidt, Michael J; Adams, James G; Engel, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    Previous research indicates that patients have difficulty understanding ED discharge instructions; these findings have important implications for adherence and outcomes. The objective of this study was to obtain direct patient input to inform specific revisions to discharge documents created through a literacy-guided approach and to identify common themes within patient feedback that can serve as a framework for the creation of discharge documents in the future. Based on extensive literature review and input from ED providers, subspecialists, and health literacy and communication experts, discharge instructions were created for 5 common ED diagnoses. Participants were recruited from a federally qualified health center to participate in a series of 5 focus group sessions. Demographic information was obtained and a Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) assessment was performed. During each of the 1-hour focus group sessions, participants reviewed discharge instructions for 1 of 5 diagnoses. Participants were asked to provide input into the content, organization, and presentation of the documents. Using qualitative techniques, latent and manifest content analysis was performed to code for emergent themes across all 5 diagnoses. Fifty-seven percent of participants were female and the average age was 32 years. The average REALM score was 57.3. Through qualitative analysis, 8 emergent themes were identified from the focus groups. Patient input provides meaningful guidance in the development of diagnosis-specific discharge instructions. Several themes and patterns were identified, with broad significance for the design of ED discharge instructions. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Alimentary factors in the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia in functional dyspeptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gamarra Taborda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Intestinal metaplasia of the stomach is a lesion in which metaplasia of gastric epithelial cells occurs for an intestinal phenotype. Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a lesion associated with an increase in the risk of gastric carcinoma development. Epidemiologic studies indicate a relation between dietary habits and stomach cancer development, some habits increasing the risk for it, and others have a protective effect, suggesting that antioxidants, such as vitamins A, C, and E, decrease the risk of this type of cancer. The relationship of these alimentary factors and intestinal metaplasia is unknown. METHODS: It is a case-control, observational study in which 320 patients with functional dyspepsia, divided in two groups, were assessed. The case I group (individuals with intestinal metaplasia had their dietary pattern compared to that of the control group, constituted of individuals similar to those in the case group but without intestinal metaplasia, through a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The analysis of the dietary pattern of functional dyspeptic patients with intestinal metaplasia, and its comparison with those without intestinal metaplasia, showed a higher frequency of canned and smoked foods consumption in the first group and, on the other hand, a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables in patients without intestinal metaplasia. No effect of salt consumption was detected. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this study suggest changes in the diet, with a decrease in the consumption of smoked and canned foods, and an increase in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, can lead to a diminution of gastric intestinal metaplasia cases.

  11. Development of a Healthy Eating Index for patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Peçanha ANTONIO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:This study sought to develop a dietary index for assessment of diet quality aiming for compliance with dietary recommendations for diabetes: The Diabetes Healthy Eating Index.Methods:Cross-sectional study with 201 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (61.4±9.7 years of age; 72.1% were overweight; 12.1±7.7 years of diagnosis; 7.3±1.3% mean HbA1c. Clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed together with 3-day weight diet records. The dietary index developed included 10 components: "diet variety", "fresh fruits", "vegetables", "carbohydrates and fiber sources", "meats and eggs", "dairy products and saturated fatty acids", "oils and fats", "total lipids", "cholesterol", and "transunsaturated fatty acids". The performance of each component was evaluated using the Item Response Theory, and diet quality was scored from 0-100%.Results:Overall, diet quality in this sample was 39.8±14.3% (95%CI=37.8-41.8%, and only 55 patients had a total diet quality score >50%. Good compliance was observed in only four index components: "total lipids", "variety", "fiber sources", and "dairy and saturated fatty acids". The components that differentiated patients with poor dietary quality from those with good dietary quality were "vegetables", "diet variety", "dairy and saturated fatty acids" and "total lipids". The greatest determinants of dietary quality were the components "diet variety", "vegetables", and "total lipids".Conclusion:This dietary index proposed assesses diet quality in compliance with the specific nutritional recommendations for diabetes. In clinical practice, this novel index may be a useful tool for the assessment and management of diet of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. Development of a scale to assess cancer stigma in the non-patient population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Illness-related stigma has attracted considerable research interest, but few studies have specifically examined stigmatisation of cancer in the non-patient population. The present study developed and validated a Cancer Stigma Scale (CASS) for use in the general population. Methods An item pool was developed on the basis of previous research into illness-related stigma in the general population and patients with cancer. Two studies were carried out. The first study used Exploratory factor analysis to explore the structure of items in a sample of 462 postgraduate students recruited through a London university. The second study used Confirmatory factor analysis to confirm the structure among 238 adults recruited through an online market research panel. Internal reliability, test-retest reliability and construct validity were also assessed. Results Exploratory factor analysis suggested six subscales, representing: Awkwardness, Severity, Avoidance, Policy Opposition, Personal Responsibility and Financial Discrimination. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed this structure with a 25-item scale. All subscales showed adequate to good internal and test-retest reliability in both samples. Construct validity was also good, with mean scores for each subscale varying in the expected directions by age, gender, experience of cancer, awareness of lifestyle risk factors for cancer, and social desirability. Means for the subscales were consistent across the two samples. Conclusions These findings highlight the complexity of cancer stigma and provide the Cancer Stigma Scale (CASS) which can be used to compare populations, types of cancer and evaluate the effects of interventions designed to reduce cancer stigma in non-patient populations. PMID:24758482

  13. Working with the disabled patient: exploring student nurses views for curriculum development using a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Diane S; Thurston, Mhairi

    2015-02-01

    Increased longevity will mean an increase in people presenting with cognitive and physical disabilities, such as sight loss or dementia. The Patient Rights (Scotland) Act 2011 states that health care should be patient-focussed, taking into account patient needs. This will necessitate nursing curricula to reflect the needs of people who have disabilities and equip the future workforce with knowledge and skills to provide appropriate care. This study explores student nurses' strengths and weakness when working with people with disabilities and identifies opportunities and threats to developing their knowledge and skills to meet the needs of this population. As part of a study day, students from the year one Nursing programme were asked to take part in a SWOT analysis and post comments under the categories: strengths, weakness, opportunity and threats on a central wall about working with people with disabilities. Students acknowledged some of the challenges of being disabled especially in a health setting but also believed they were developing their skills to provide holistic care that ensured autonomy. Communication was viewed as both a strength and weakness and was identified as an essential skill to working effectively with people who had a disability. Students acknowledged that clinical staff were not always experts in working with people who were disabled and welcomed the opportunity to work with experts and clients as well as being directed to resources to increase their knowledge. Integration of disability into the nursing curriculum is needed to ensure students have awareness of and the confidence to work effectively with people who have a range of cognitive and physical disabilities alongside other medical problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and Implementation Content Validity Study: Development of an instrument for measuring Patient-Centered Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The importance of content validity in the instrument psychometric and its relevance with reliability, have made it an essential step in the instrument development. This article attempts to give an overview of the content validity process and to explain the complexity of this process by introducing an example. Methods: We carried out a methodological study conducted to examine the content validity of the patient-centered communication instrument through a two-step process (development and judgment. At the first step, domain determination, sampling (item generation and instrument formation and at the second step, content validity ratio, content validity index and modified kappa statistic was performed. Suggestions of expert panel and item impact scores are used to examine the instrument face validity. Results: From a set of 188 items, content validity process identified seven dimensions includes trust building (eight items, informational support (seven items, emotional support (five items, problem solving (seven items, patient activation (10 items, intimacy/friendship (six items and spirituality strengthening (14 items. Content validity study revealed that this instrument enjoys an appropriate level of content validity. The overall content validity index of the instrument using universal agreement approach was low; however, it can be advocated with respect to the high number of content experts that makes consensus difficult and high value of the S-CVI with the average approach, which was equal to 0.93. Conclusion: This article illustrates acceptable quantities indices for content validity a new instrument and outlines them during design and psychometrics of patient-centered communication measuring instrument.

  15. Development of a prognostic nomogram for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zheng, Ji-Na; Zhou, Yi-Fan; Han, Yi-Jing; Zou, Tian-Tian; Liu, Wen-Yue; Braddock, Martin; Shi, Ke-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a complication with a high mortality rate in critically ill patients presenting with cirrhosis. Today, there exist few accurate scoring models specifically designed for mortality risk assessment in critically ill cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (CICGIB). Our aim was to develop and evaluate a novel nomogram-based model specific for CICGIB. Overall, 540 consecutive CICGIB patients were enrolled. On the basis of Cox regression analyses, the nomogram was constructed to estimate the probability of 30-day, 90-day, 270-day, and 1-year survival. An upper gastrointestinal bleeding-chronic liver failure-sequential organ failure assessment (UGIB-CLIF-SOFA) score was derived from the nomogram. Performance assessment and internal validation of the model were performed using Harrell's concordance index (C-index), calibration plot, and bootstrap sample procedures. UGIB-CLIF-SOFA was also compared with other prognostic models, such as CLIF-SOFA and model for end-stage liver disease, using C-indices. Eight independent factors derived from Cox analysis (including bilirubin, creatinine, international normalized ratio, sodium, albumin, mean artery pressure, vasopressin used, and hematocrit decrease>10%) were assembled into the nomogram and the UGIB-CLIF-SOFA score. The calibration plots showed optimal agreement between nomogram prediction and actual observation. The C-index of the nomogram using bootstrap (0.729; 95% confidence interval: 0.689-0.766) was higher than that of the other models for predicting survival of CICGIB. We have developed and internally validated a novel nomogram and an easy-to-use scoring system that accurately predicts the mortality probability of CICGIB on the basis of eight easy-to-obtain parameters. External validation is now warranted in future clinical studies.

  16. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer who develop brain metastasis: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountzilas, Christos; Chang, Katherine; Hernandez, Brian; Michalek, Joel; Crownover, Richard; Floyd, John; Mahalingam, Devalingam

    2017-02-01

    The development of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is a rare and late event. We sought to investigate the clinical characteristics, disease course and safety using biologic agents in our patients with CRC who develop brain metastases. A retrospective review of patients with CRC with brain metastases treated at our institution from 01/2005-01/2015 was performed. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Forty patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 55.5 years, 67.5% were males, and 28% had a KRAS mutation. Twenty-four percent were treatment-naive at the time of BM diagnosis. Patients had a median of two brain lesions. Sixty-five percent of the patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 22.5% had both surgical resection and brain radiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.2 months after development of BM. Overall survival was longer in patients who received combined modality local therapy compared to patients treated with surgical resection or radiotherapy alone. Patients who received systemic treatment incorporating biologics following development of BM had a median overall survival of 18.6 months. Overall, the administration of biologic agents was safe and well tolerated. In summary, BM is an uncommon and late event in the natural history of metastatic CRC. The ability to deliver combined-modality local brain therapy as well as availability of more systemic therapy options appear to lead to improved outcomes.

  17. Pre-validation methods for developing a patient reported outcome instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Mayret M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measures that reflect patients' assessment of their health are of increasing importance as outcome measures in randomised controlled trials. The methodological approach used in the pre-validation development of new instruments (item generation, item reduction and question formatting should be robust and transparent. The totality of the content of existing PRO instruments for a specific condition provides a valuable resource (pool of items that can be utilised to develop new instruments. Such 'top down' approaches are common, but the explicit pre-validation methods are often poorly reported. This paper presents a systematic and generalisable 5-step pre-validation PRO instrument methodology. Methods The method is illustrated using the example of the Aberdeen Glaucoma Questionnaire (AGQ. The five steps are: 1 Generation of a pool of items; 2 Item de-duplication (three phases; 3 Item reduction (two phases; 4 Assessment of the remaining items' content coverage against a pre-existing theoretical framework appropriate to the objectives of the instrument and the target population (e.g. ICF; and 5 qualitative exploration of the target populations' views of the new instrument and the items it contains. Results The AGQ 'item pool' contained 725 items. Three de-duplication phases resulted in reduction of 91, 225 and 48 items respectively. The item reduction phases discarded 70 items and 208 items respectively. The draft AGQ contained 83 items with good content coverage. The qualitative exploration ('think aloud' study resulted in removal of a further 15 items and refinement to the wording of others. The resultant draft AGQ contained 68 items. Conclusions This study presents a novel methodology for developing a PRO instrument, based on three sources: literature reporting what is important to patient; theoretically coherent framework; and patients' experience of completing the instrument. By systematically accounting for all items dropped

  18. Provincial development of a patient-reported outcome initiative to guide patient care, quality improvement, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Robert A; Howard, Fuchsia; Lapointe, Vincent; Schellenberg, Devin; Nichol, Alan; Bowering, Gale; Curtis, Susan; Walter, Allison; Brown, Steven; Thompson, Corinne; Bergin, Jackie; Lomas, Sheri; French, John; Halperin, Ross; Tyldesley, Scott; Beckham, Wayne

    2018-01-01

    The BC Cancer Agency Radiotherapy (RT) program started the Prospective Outcomes and Support Initiative (POSI) at all six centres to utilize patient-reported outcomes for immediate clinical care, quality improvement, and research. Patient-reported outcomes were collected at time of computed tomography simulation via tablet and 2 to 4 weeks post-RT via either tablet or over the phone by a registered nurse. From 2013 to 2016, patients were approached on 20,150 attempts by POSI for patients treated with RT for bone metastases (52%), brain metastases (11%), lung cancer (17%), gynecological cancer (16%), head and neck cancer (2%), and other pilots (2%). The accrual rate for all encounters was 85% (n = 17,101), with the accrual rate varying between the lowest and the highest accruing centre from 78% to 89% ( P < .001) and varying by tumour site ( P < .001). Using the POSI database, we have performed research and quality improvement initiatives that have changed practice.

  19. Development and Validation of a New Prognostic System for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Farinati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic assessment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains controversial. Using the Italian Liver Cancer (ITA.LI.CA database as a training set, we sought to develop and validate a new prognostic system for patients with HCC.Prospective collected databases from Italy (training cohort, n = 3,628; internal validation cohort, n = 1,555 and Taiwan (external validation cohort, n = 2,651 were used to develop the ITA.LI.CA prognostic system. We first defined ITA.LI.CA stages (0, A, B1, B2, B3, C using only tumor characteristics (largest tumor diameter, number of nodules, intra- and extrahepatic macroscopic vascular invasion, extrahepatic metastases. A parametric multivariable survival model was then used to calculate the relative prognostic value of ITA.LI.CA tumor stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance status, Child-Pugh score (CPS, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP in predicting individual survival. Based on the model results, an ITA.LI.CA integrated prognostic score (from 0 to 13 points was constructed, and its prognostic power compared with that of other integrated systems (BCLC, HKLC, MESIAH, CLIP, JIS. Median follow-up was 58 mo for Italian patients (interquartile range, 26-106 mo and 39 mo for Taiwanese patients (interquartile range, 12-61 mo. The ITA.LI.CA integrated prognostic score showed optimal discrimination and calibration abilities in Italian patients. Observed median survival in the training and internal validation sets was 57 and 61 mo, respectively, in quartile 1 (ITA.LI.CA score ≤ 1, 43 and 38 mo in quartile 2 (ITA.LI.CA score 2-3, 23 and 23 mo in quartile 3 (ITA.LI.CA score 4-5, and 9 and 8 mo in quartile 4 (ITA.LI.CA score > 5. Observed and predicted median survival in the training and internal validation sets largely coincided. Although observed and predicted survival estimations were significantly lower (log-rank test, p < 0.001 in Italian than in Taiwanese patients, the ITA.LI.CA score maintained

  20. Treating symptoms or assisting human development: Can different environmental conditions affect personal development for patients with severe mental illness? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauveng, Arnhild; Tveiten, Sidsel; Ekeland, Tor-Johan; Torleif, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that a basic anomaly in self-experience may be a core factor in patients with severe mental illnesses. Given the importance of sense of self, the traditional treatment of symptoms might not be the most effective for these groups of patients. This qualitative study examines how differences in social environmental conditions, organized as education or treatment, might affect personal development in patients with severe mental illness. A qualitative hermeneutical design was used. Data were collected through qualitative interviews. Informants included 14 patients in psychiatric treatment and 15 students at schools for adults with mental illness. Most informants were interviewed on two occasions, 6-8 months apart, totaling 47 interviews. All participants had been diagnosed with severe mental illness with pronounced impact on daily functioning (most often psychoses or personality disorders) for a minimum of 2 years. Findings and interpretations showed that the students experienced a supportive environment focused mostly on education. They described personal and enduring development in areas such as capacity for relationships, regulation of symptoms, subjective well-being, and integration in society. The patients experienced an environment focused more on treatment of their illness and less on personal development and interests. They described little development, much loneliness, a poor quality of life, an objectifying attitude of themselves and others, and hopelessness. Even if more research is needed, findings indicate that for this group of patients, problems may be closely related to identity development. Therefore, instead of solemnly focusing on specific symptoms, it might be more effective to support patients' personal and social development by offering intensive and lasting social environmental conditions. This includes stable and mutual relationships, intrinsically motivated activities, and an environment that supports personal choices