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Sample records for patient-specific stenotic carotid

  1. Preliminary Study of Hemodynamic Distribution in Patient-Specific Stenotic Carotid Bifurcation by Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Y.J.; Gao, P.Y.; Duan, Q.; Lin, Y.; Dai, C.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Regions prone to atherosclerosis, such as bends and bifurcations, tend to exhibit a certain degree of non-planarity or curvature, and these geometric features are known to strongly influence local flow patterns. Recently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used as a means of enhancing understanding of the mechanisms involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and development. Purpose: To analyze flow patterns and hemodynamic distribution in stenotic carotid bifurcation in vivo by combining CFD with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Material and Methods: Twenty-one patients with carotid atherosclerosis proved by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and/or Doppler ultrasound underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid bifurcation by a 3.0T MR scanner. Hemodynamic variables and flow patterns of the carotid bifurcation were calculated and visualized by combining vascular imaging postprocessing with CFD. Results: In mild stenotic cases, there was much more streamlined flow in the bulbs, with reduced or disappeared areas of weakly turbulent flow. Also, the corresponding areas of low wall shear stress (WSS) were reduced or even disappeared. As the extent of stenosis increased, stronger blood jets formed at the portion of narrowing, and more prominent eddy flows and slow back flows were noted in the lee of the stenosis. Regions of elevated WSS were predicted at the portion of stenosis and in the path of the downstream jet. Areas of low WSS were predicted on the leeward side of the stenosis, corresponding with the location of slowly turbulent flows. Conclusion: CFD combined with MRA can simulate flow patterns and calculate hemodynamic variables in stenotic carotid bifurcations as well as normal ones. It provides a new method to investigate the relationship of vascular geometry and flow condition with atherosclerotic pathological changes

  2. Pathologic implications of severely stenotic carotid artery in disparity to the contralateral asymptomatic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacayorin, E.D.; Schwartz, R.A.; Park, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    In 15 patients (eight women, seven men; age range 56-67 years), arteriography showed severely stenotic internal carotid artery in contrast to the contralateral asymptomatic carotid artery. The patients with recent neurologic manifestations of transient ischemic attack and amaurosis fugax underwent carotid endarterectomy and were subsequently proved to have hemorrhagic atheromatous plaques on gross and histologic examinations. The disparity was unusually significant: 80%-95% stenosis for the symptomatic side, and 0%-20% stenosis for the asymptomatic side. The authors conclude that this arteriographic finding suggests high likelihood of focal subintimal hemorrhage occurring locally; such pathologic change might actually precipitate a cerebroembolic event

  3. Revascularization of the internal carotid artery for isolated, stenotic, and symptomatic kinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calió, Francesco G; Papaspyropoulos, Vassilios; Montesano, Giuseppe; D'Urso, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    The operation for isolated, stenotic, and symptomatic kinking of the internal carotid artery is safe and effective in preventing stroke and relieving the symptoms of cerebral ischemia. A consecutive sample clinical study with a mean follow-up of 44 months. The surgical department of an academic tertiary care center and an affiliated secondary care center. Fifty-four patients with a mean age of 67 years underwent 55 revascularizations of the internal carotid artery. The surgical procedures consisted of the following: shortening and reimplantation in the common carotid artery in 36 cases, bypass grafting in 15 cases, and transposition into the external carotid artery in 4 cases. Cumulative survival, primary patency, and stroke-free and neurologic symptom-free rates expressed by standard life-table analysis. No patients died in the postoperative period. The postoperative stroke rate was 1.8%. The cumulative rates (SEs) at 5 years were as follows: survival, 70% (10.2%); primary patency, 89% (7.8%); overall stroke free, 92% (6.8%); ipsilateral stroke free, 96% (5.3%); neurologic symptom free, 90% (7.5%); and ipsilateral symptom free, 93% (6.5%). Revascularization of the internal carotid artery for the treatment of isolated, stenotic, and symptomatic kinking is safe and effective in preventing stroke and relieving symptoms of cerebrovascular insufficiency.

  4. Clinical value of MSCTA in the interventional treatment of the initial origin stenotic segment of the internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Yueyong; Zou Liguang; Chen Lin; Sun Qingrong; Shuai Jie; Zhou Zheng; Huang Lan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of MSCTA in the interventional treatment of the initial origin stenotic segment of internal carotid artery. Methods: Forty two patients with stenosis of initial origin stenotic segment of internal carotid artery underwent interventional treatment and MSCTA were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Forty two patients were diagnosed correctly through MSCTA. The percentages of stenotic area were measured from the multiplanar reconstruction (MPR)images of MSCTA, including mild stenosis( 70%)in 30, obstruction in 4 (>100%)and normal in 18. Plaques and endoscopic views of stenosis were delineated on MSCTA and CTVE. Conclusion: MSCTA is an accurate method for the assessment of the stenosis and plaques of the stenotic origin segment of internal carotid artery. MSCTA can be used as a convenient follow-up modality for instent restenosis. (authors)

  5. Measurement of stenotic rate and blood flow of carotid artery of the dogs with digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Keisuke; Kagawa, Masaaki; Asai, Masaaki; Yasue, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Kazuhiro; Yue, Shuzengmr

    1987-01-01

    Hemodynamic analysis of stenotic rate and local mean blood flow of the common carotid artery of the dogs with electromagnetic flowmeter and DSA was evaluated. Measurement of stenotic rate using local profile curve was very accurate and it was though to be useful in evaluation of local blood flow of the cervical carotid artery in the patients with carotid stenosis pre-and postoperatively. Although the measurement of absolute blood flow in the case of known diameter of the vessel is exactly reliable, the measured flow is not so reliable in the clinical application for the difficulty in the accurate measurement of the diameter. But hemodynamic analysis of the relative blood flow in the clinical ground can be estimated from this study. The theory and practical measurement are discussed. (author)

  6. Results in a consecutive series of 83 surgical corrections of symptomatic stenotic kinking of the internal carotid artery.

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    Illuminati, Giulio; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Caliò, Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of evidence to document the safety and efficacy of operative treatment of carotid stenosis, surgical indications for elongation and kinking of the internal carotid artery remain controversial. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of surgical correction of internal carotid artery kinking in patients with persistent hemispheric symptoms despite antiplatelet therapy. A consecutive series of 81 patients (mean age, 64 years) underwent 83 surgical procedures to correct kinking of the internal carotid artery either by shortening and reimplanting the vessel on the common carotid artery, inserting a bypass graft, or transposing the vessel onto the external carotid artery. Mean follow-up was 56 months (range, 15-135 months). Study endpoints were 30-day mortality and any stroke occurring during follow-up. No postoperative death was observed. The postoperative stroke rate was 1%. Primary patency, freedom from neurologic symptoms, and late survival at 5 years (x +/- standard deviation) were 89 +/- 4.1%, 92 +/- 4%, and 71 +/- 6%, respectively. The findings of this study indicate that surgical correction for symptomatic stenotic kinking of the internal carotid artery is safe and effective in relieving symptoms and preventing stroke. Operative correction should be considered as the standard treatment for patients with symptomatic carotid kinking that does not respond to antiplatelet therapy.

  7. Influence of model boundary conditions on blood flow patterns in a patient specific stenotic right coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biyue; Zheng, Jie; Bach, Richard; Tang, Dalin

    2015-01-01

    In literature, the effect of the inflow boundary condition was investigated by examining the impact of the waveform and the shape of the spatial profile of the inlet velocity on the cardiac hemodynamics. However, not much work has been reported on comparing the effect of the different combinations of the inlet/outlet boundary conditions on the quantification of the pressure field and flow distribution patterns in stenotic right coronary arteries. Non-Newtonian models were used to simulate blood flow in a patient-specific stenotic right coronary artery and investigate the influence of different boundary conditions on the phasic variation and the spatial distribution patterns of blood flow. The 3D geometry of a diseased artery segment was reconstructed from a series of IVUS slices. Five different combinations of the inlet and the outlet boundary conditions were tested and compared. The temporal distribution patterns and the magnitudes of the velocity, the wall shear stress (WSS), the pressure, the pressure drop (PD), and the spatial gradient of wall pressure (WPG) were different when boundary conditions were imposed using different pressure/velocity combinations at inlet/outlet. The maximum velocity magnitude in a cardiac cycle at the center of the inlet from models with imposed inlet pressure conditions was about 29% lower than that from models using fully developed inlet velocity data. Due to the fact that models with imposed pressure conditions led to blunt velocity profile, the maximum wall shear stress at inlet in a cardiac cycle from models with imposed inlet pressure conditions was about 29% higher than that from models with imposed inlet velocity boundary conditions. When the inlet boundary was imposed by a velocity waveform, the models with different outlet boundary conditions resulted in different temporal distribution patterns and magnitudes of the phasic variation of pressure. On the other hand, the type of different boundary conditions imposed at the

  8. A patient-specific virtual stenotic model of the coronary artery to analyze the relationship between fractional flow reserve and wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Gook Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Chung, Ju-Hyun; Shin, Eun-Seok; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-11-01

    As the stenotic severity of a patient increases, fractional flow reserve (FFR) decreases, whereas the maximum wall shear stress (WSSmax) increases. However, the way in which these values can change according to stenotic severity has not previously been investigated. The aim of this study is to devise a virtual stenosis model to investigate variations in the coronary hemodynamic parameters of patients according to stenotic severity. To simulate coronary hemodynamics, a three-dimensional (3D) coronary artery model of computational fluid dynamics is coupled with a lumped parameter model of the coronary micro-vasculature and venous system. To validate the present method, we first simulated 13 patient-specific models of the coronary arteries and compared the results with those obtained clinically. Then, virtually narrowed coronary arterial models derived from the patient-specific cases were simulated to obtain the WSSmax and FFR values. The variations in FFR and WSSmax against the percentage of diameter stenosis in clinical cases were reproducible by the virtual stenosis models. We also found that the simulated FFR values were linearly correlated with the WSSmax values, but the linear slope varied by patient. We implemented 130 additional virtual models of stenosed coronary arteries based on data from 13 patients and obtained statistically meaningful results that were identical to the large-scale clinical studies. And the slope of the correlation line between FFR and WSSmax may help clinicians to design treatment plans for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlative assessment of cerebral blood flow obtained with perfusion CT and positron emission tomography in symptomatic stenotic carotid disease

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    Bisdas, Sotirios [JWG University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Nemitz, Ole; Becker, Hartmut; Donnerstag, Frank [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Berding, Georg [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Weissenborn, Karin; Ahl, Bjoern [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neurology, Hannover (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Twelve patients with ICA stenosis underwent dynamic perfusion computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies at rest and after acetazolamide challenge. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps on perfusion CT resulted from a deconvolution of parenchymal time-concentration curves by an arterial input function (AIF) in the anterior cerebral artery as well as in both anterior choroidal arteries. CBF was measured by [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O PET using multilinear least-squares minimization procedure based on the one-compartment model. In corresponding transaxial PET scans, CBF values were extracted using standardized ROIs. The baseline perfusion CT-CBF values were lower in perfusion CT than in PET (P>0.05). CBF values obtained by perfusion CT were significantly correlated with those measured by PET before (P<0.05) and after (P<0.01) acetazolamide challenge. Nevertheless, the cerebrovascular reserve capacity was overestimated (P=0.05) using perfusion CT measurements. The AIF selection relative to the side of carotid stenosis did not significantly affect calculated perfusion CT-CBF values. In conclusion, the perfusion CT-CBF measurements correlate significantly with the PET-CBF measurements in chronic carotid stenotic disease and contribute useful information to the evaluation of the altered cerebral hemodynamics. (orig.)

  10. Correlative assessment of cerebral blood flow obtained with perfusion CT and positron emission tomography in symptomatic stenotic carotid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Nemitz, Ole; Becker, Hartmut; Donnerstag, Frank; Berding, Georg; Weissenborn, Karin; Ahl, Bjoern

    2006-01-01

    Twelve patients with ICA stenosis underwent dynamic perfusion computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies at rest and after acetazolamide challenge. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps on perfusion CT resulted from a deconvolution of parenchymal time-concentration curves by an arterial input function (AIF) in the anterior cerebral artery as well as in both anterior choroidal arteries. CBF was measured by [ 15 O]H 2 O PET using multilinear least-squares minimization procedure based on the one-compartment model. In corresponding transaxial PET scans, CBF values were extracted using standardized ROIs. The baseline perfusion CT-CBF values were lower in perfusion CT than in PET (P>0.05). CBF values obtained by perfusion CT were significantly correlated with those measured by PET before (P<0.05) and after (P<0.01) acetazolamide challenge. Nevertheless, the cerebrovascular reserve capacity was overestimated (P=0.05) using perfusion CT measurements. The AIF selection relative to the side of carotid stenosis did not significantly affect calculated perfusion CT-CBF values. In conclusion, the perfusion CT-CBF measurements correlate significantly with the PET-CBF measurements in chronic carotid stenotic disease and contribute useful information to the evaluation of the altered cerebral hemodynamics. (orig.)

  11. Vortex dynamics in Patient-Specific Stenotic Tricuspid and Bicuspid Aortic Valves pre- and post- Trans-catheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoum, Hoda; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2017-11-01

    Understanding blood flow related adverse complications such as leaflet thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) requires a deeper understanding of how patient-specific anatomic and hemodynamic factors, and relative valve positioning dictate sinus vortex flow and stasis regions. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted in compliant and transparent 3D printed patient-specific models of stenotic bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve roots from patients who underwent TAVI. Using Lagrangian particle tracking analysis of sinus vortex flows and probability distributions of residence time and blood damage indices we show that (a) patient specific modeling provides a more realistic assessment of TAVI flows, (b) TAVI deployment alters sinus flow patterns by significantly decreasing sinus velocity and vorticity, and (c) relative valve positioning can control critical vortex structures that may explain preferential leaflet thrombosis corresponding to separated flow recirculation, secondary to valve jet vectoring relative to the aorta axis. This work provides new methods and understanding of the spatio-temporal aortic sinus vortex dynamics in post TAVI pathology. This study was supported by the Ohio State University DHLRI Trifit Challenge award.

  12. Preoperative 3D FSE T1-Weighted MR Plaque Imaging for Severely Stenotic Cervical ICA: Accuracy of Predicting Emboli during Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogasawara

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether preoperative three-dimensional (3D fast spin-echo (FSE T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR plaque imaging for severely stenotic cervical carotid arteries could accurately predict the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Seventy-five patients underwent preoperative MR plaque imaging and CEA under transcranial Doppler ultrasonography of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. On reformatted axial MR image slices showing the maximum plaque occupation rate (POR and maximum plaque intensity for each patient, the contrast ratio (CR was calculated by dividing the internal carotid artery plaque signal intensity by the sternocleidomastoid muscle signal intensity. For all patients, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC—used to discriminate between the presence and absence of microembolic signals—was significantly greater for the CR on the axial image with maximum plaque intensity (CRmax intensity (0.941 than for that with the maximum POR (0.885 (p < 0.05. For 32 patients in whom both the maximum POR and the maximum plaque density were identified, the AUCs for the CR were 1.000. Preoperative 3D FSE T1-weighted MR plaque imaging accurately predicts the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in CEA.

  13. High-risk plaque features can be detected in non-stenotic carotid plaques of patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic using combined 18F-FDG PET/MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyafil, Fabien; Schindler, Andreas; Obenhuber, Tilman; Saam, Tobias; Sepp, Dominik; Hoehn, Sabine; Poppert, Holger; Bayer-Karpinska, Anna; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Hacker, Marcus; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Rominger, Axel; Dichgans, Martin; Schwaiger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in 18 patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic and presenting non-stenotic carotid atherosclerotic plaques the morphological and biological aspects of these plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18 F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) imaging. Carotid arteries were imaged 150 min after injection of 18 F-FDG with a combined PET/MRI system. American Heart Association (AHA) lesion type and plaque composition were determined on consecutive MRI axial sections (n = 460) in both carotid arteries. 18 F-FDG uptake in carotid arteries was quantified using tissue to background ratio (TBR) on corresponding PET sections. The prevalence of complicated atherosclerotic plaques (AHA lesion type VI) detected with high-resolution MRI was significantly higher in the carotid artery ipsilateral to the ischaemic stroke as compared to the contralateral side (39 vs 0 %; p = 0.001). For all other AHA lesion types, no significant differences were found between ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In addition, atherosclerotic plaques classified as high-risk lesions with MRI (AHA lesion type VI) were associated with higher 18 F-FDG uptake in comparison with other AHA lesions (TBR = 3.43 ± 1.13 vs 2.41 ± 0.84, respectively; p < 0.001). Furthermore, patients presenting at least one complicated lesion (AHA lesion type VI) with MRI showed significantly higher 18 F-FDG uptake in both carotid arteries (ipsilateral and contralateral to the stroke) in comparison with carotid arteries of patients showing no complicated lesion with MRI (mean TBR = 3.18 ± 1.26 and 2.80 ± 0.94 vs 2.19 ± 0.57, respectively; p < 0.05) in favour of a diffuse inflammatory process along both carotid arteries associated with complicated plaques. Morphological and biological features of high-risk plaques can be detected with 18 F-FDG PET/MRI in non-stenotic atherosclerotic plaques ipsilateral to the stroke, suggesting a causal

  14. High-risk plaque features can be detected in non-stenotic carotid plaques of patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic using combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging

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    Hyafil, Fabien [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Bichat University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Schindler, Andreas; Obenhuber, Tilman; Saam, Tobias [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sepp, Dominik; Hoehn, Sabine; Poppert, Holger [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Bayer-Karpinska, Anna [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Nekolla, Stephan G. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Dichgans, Martin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Munich Cluster of Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich (Germany); Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate in 18 patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic and presenting non-stenotic carotid atherosclerotic plaques the morphological and biological aspects of these plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) imaging. Carotid arteries were imaged 150 min after injection of {sup 18}F-FDG with a combined PET/MRI system. American Heart Association (AHA) lesion type and plaque composition were determined on consecutive MRI axial sections (n = 460) in both carotid arteries. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in carotid arteries was quantified using tissue to background ratio (TBR) on corresponding PET sections. The prevalence of complicated atherosclerotic plaques (AHA lesion type VI) detected with high-resolution MRI was significantly higher in the carotid artery ipsilateral to the ischaemic stroke as compared to the contralateral side (39 vs 0 %; p = 0.001). For all other AHA lesion types, no significant differences were found between ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In addition, atherosclerotic plaques classified as high-risk lesions with MRI (AHA lesion type VI) were associated with higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in comparison with other AHA lesions (TBR = 3.43 ± 1.13 vs 2.41 ± 0.84, respectively; p < 0.001). Furthermore, patients presenting at least one complicated lesion (AHA lesion type VI) with MRI showed significantly higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in both carotid arteries (ipsilateral and contralateral to the stroke) in comparison with carotid arteries of patients showing no complicated lesion with MRI (mean TBR = 3.18 ± 1.26 and 2.80 ± 0.94 vs 2.19 ± 0.57, respectively; p < 0.05) in favour of a diffuse inflammatory process along both carotid arteries associated with complicated plaques. Morphological and biological features of high-risk plaques can be detected with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in non-stenotic atherosclerotic plaques ipsilateral

  15. The role of the circle of Willis in internal carotid artery stenosis and anatomical variations: a computational study based on a patient-specific three-dimensional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangyu; Yuan, Qi; Yang, Jian; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2015-11-25

    The aim of this study is to provide better insights into the cerebral perfusion patterns and collateral mechanism of the circle of Willis (CoW) under anatomical and pathological variations. In the current study, a patient-specific three-dimensional computational model of the CoW was reconstructed based on the computed tomography (CT) images. The Carreau model was applied to simulate the non-Newtonian property of blood. Flow distributions in five common anatomical variations coexisting with different degrees of stenosis in the right internal carotid artery (RICA) were investigated to obtain detailed flow information. With the development of stenosis in unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA), the cerebral blood supply decreased when the degree of stenosis increased. The blood supply of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) was most affected by the stenosis of ICA. The anterior communicating artery (ACoA) and ipsilateral posterior communicating artery (PCoA) functioned as the important collateral circulation channels when unilateral stenosis occurred. The blood flow of the anterior circulation and the total cerebral blood flow (CBF) reached to the minimum in the configuration of the contralateral proximal anterior cerebral artery (A1) absence coexisting with unilateral ICA stenosis. Communicating arteries provided important collateral channels in the complete CoW when stenosis in unilateral ICA occurred. The cross-flow in the ACoA is a sensitive indicator of the morphological change of the ICA. The collateral function of the PCoA on the affected side will not be fully activated until a severe stenosis occurred in unilateral ICA. The absence of unilateral A1 coexisting with the stenosis in the contralateral ICA could be the most dangerous configuration in terms of the total cerebral blood supply. The findings of this study would enhance the understanding of the collateral mechanism of the CoW under different anatomical variations.

  16. Hemodynamic vascular biomarkers for initiation of paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms using patient-specific computational fluid dynamic simulation based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoya; Isoda, Haruo; Takehara, Yasuo; Terada, Masaki; Naito, Takehiro; Kosugi, Takafumi; Onishi, Yuki; Tanoi, Chiharu; Izumi, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for patients with and without paraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms to evaluate the distribution of vascular biomarkers at the aneurysm initiation sites of the paraclinoid ICA. This study included 35 patients who were followed up for aneurysms using 3D time of flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and 3D cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Fifteen affected ICAs were included in group A with the 15 unaffected contralateral ICAs in group B. Thirty-three out of 40 paraclinoid ICAs free of aneurysms and arteriosclerotic lesions were included in group C. We deleted the aneurysms in group A based on the 3D TOF MRA dataset. We performed CFD based on MR data set and obtained wall shear stress (WSS), its derivatives, and streamlines. We qualitatively evaluated their distributions at and near the intracranial aneurysm initiation site among three groups. We also calculated and compared the normalized highest (nh-) WSS and nh-spatial WSS gradient (SWSSG) around the paraclinoid ICA among three groups. High WSS and SWSSG distribution were observed at and near the aneurysm initiation site in group A. High WSS and SWSSG were also observed at similar locations in group B and group C. However, nh-WSS and nh-SWSSG were significantly higher in group A than in group C, and nh-SWSSG was significantly higher in group A than in group B. Our findings indicated that nh-WSS and nh-SWSSG were good biomarkers for aneurysm initiation in the paraclinoid ICA.

  17. Direct Doppler auscultation of the carotid arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the carotid Doppler examinations and contrast arteriograms are presented. The overall sensitivity of the carotid Doppler examinations in detecting severe stenosis or occlusion of the carotid artery was 92%. The Doppler studies correctly differentiated these two conditions in 84% of the diseased vessels. In carotid arteries with stenosis greater than or equal to 50%, the sensitivity of the Doppler examinations was 90%, and these studies suggested stenosis in all but two of the 36 abnormal examinations. In two patent carotids with greater than 90% stenosis, a signal could not be elicited, presumably because of the low blood flow through the severely stenotic segment

  18. In vitro model of platelet aggregation in stenotic arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, D.; Santamore, W.P.

    1988-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggest a strong relationship between arterial stenosis, platelet aggregation, and subsequent thrombus formation. To facilitate the study of platelet accumulation in stenotic arteries, we developed an in vitro preparation. Arterial segments were perfused with whole citrated blood. A stenosis was created by applying an external plastic constrictor to the artery. Platelet accumulation within the stenosis was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and by radioactive counts from Indium-111 labeled platelets. Utilizing this preparation, 30 carotid arterial segments from 10 mongrel dogs were perfused at 100 mmHg for 15 min. In 10 arteries without a stenosis, scanning electron microscopy and radioactive counts demonstrated little platelet accumulation. In contrast, extensive platelet aggregation was observed in 10 arteries with stenoses. Moreover, in 10 stenotic arteries exposed to the thromboxane mimetic, U46619 (Upjohn Diagnostic Group), scanning electron microscopy and radioactive counts demonstrated a significant increase in platelet deposition. Conversely, we demonstrated a dimunition of platelet accumulation in stenosed arterial segments exposed to the prostacyclin analogue platelet inhibitor, Iloprost. The in vitro preparation allows precise control of hemodynamic variables and makes it possible to perform multiple tests on segments of the same vessel from the same animal

  19. Hysteroscopic management of a stenotic cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Michael W H; Bougie, Olga; Singh, Sukhbir S

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate an approach to the hysteroscopic management of a stenotic cervix. Step-by-step explanation of the techniques using video and animation (educational video). Academic tertiary level referral center. Patients with cervical stenosis, inclusive of both reproductive age and postmenopausal women. Gynecologists require intrauterine access for many procedures, but a stenotic cervix can obstruct surgery. Blind dilation of a stenotic cervix can lead to a cervical laceration or uterine perforation, with concomitant complications. The hysteroscopic management of a stenotic cervix includes optimizing the surgical environment, performing vaginoscopy and "no-touch" hysteroscopy, and revision of the cervical canal. Revision can be performed using microscissors, micrograspers, or a cutting loop electrode. Partial cervical canal excision to aid in hysteroscopy access should be reserved in women who are not interested in future pregnancy or those who are postmenopausal. Outpatient hysteroscopy uses smaller instruments and shows operative success with patient satisfaction. Although these techniques are demonstrated in an outpatient hysteroscopy setting, they can be adapted for use in an operating theater. The individual steps and approach are emphasized. Intrauterine access can be achieved with various techniques. The "see-and-treat" approach demonstrated in this video can allow access into the uterine cavity despite a stenotic cervix. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hemodynamic study on flow patterns in the carotid bifurcation before and after carotid endarterectomy using cine magnetic resonance imaging

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    Yamane, Kanji; Shima, Takeshi; Okada, Yoshikazu; Nishida, Masahiro; Okita, Shinji; Hanaguri, Katsuro [Chugoku Rousai Hospital, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1993-11-01

    Blood flow in the cervical carotid bifurcation was investigated by cine magnetic resonance imaging. In patients with stenosis, a low-intensity stream was demonstrated from the beginning of the carotid bulb, which was more distinct in the systolic phase. In patients with stenotic carotid bifurcations,the low-intensity flow was also present but was more prominent than in the non-stenotic bifurcation. This low-intensity stream may be due to the change from steady to turbulent flow due to the geometric characteristics of the carotid bifurcation or atheromatous plaque, similar to the flow separation phenomenon in fluid dynamics because of the coincidence of location and flow pattern. After carotid endarterectomy, turbulent flow was seen at the proximal and distal ends of the endarterectomy. Close follow-up and administration of antiplatelet agents are necessary to prevent restenosis due to mural thrombosis induced by such turbulent flow. (author).

  1. Noninvasive Diagnostic Technique in Stenotic Coronary Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Vasilyev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the sensitivity and specificity of combined stress echocardiography (EchoCG using dipyri-damole and dobutamine in diagnosing and defining the extent of stenotic coronary lesions in coronary heart disease (CHD in a group of critically ill patients who are unable to perform a physical exercise.Materials and methods: the study included 57 male patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome who underwent stress EchoCG using dipyridamole in high doses in combination with dobutamine, as well as coronary angiography.Results: stress EchoCG could bring up to the diagnostic criteria in all the patients, of whom 9 patients were found at coronary angiography to have no coronary lesion, 34 and 14 patients had one- and many-vessel lesions, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of combined stress EchoCG were significantly higher than those of EchoCG used in the diagnosis of CHD.Conclusion: stress EchoCG using dipyridamole in combination with dobutamine is a highly informative safe noninvasive technique for diagnosing CHD, its helps to identify patients with atypical acute coronary syndrome and to form a group of patients to be subject to urgent coronarography and angiosurgical intervention. The pattern of segmental contractile disorders at the height of exercise during combined stress Echo-CG makes it possible to define the site of stenotic coronary atherosclerosis with 97.3% sensitivity and to diagnose many-vessel lesion with 100% sensitivity and 100%specificity.

  2. Constructing canine carotid artery stenosis model by endovascular technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guangsen; Liu Yizhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish a carotid artery stenosis model by endovascular technique suitable for neuro-interventional therapy. Methods: Twelve dogs were anesthetized, the unilateral segments of the carotid arteries' tunica media and intima were damaged by a corneous guiding wire of home made. Twenty-four carotid artery stenosis models were thus created. DSA examination was performed on postprocedural weeks 2, 4, 8, 10 to estimate the changes of those stenotic carotid arteries. Results: Twenty-four carotid artery stenosis models were successfully created in twelve dogs. Conclusions: Canine carotid artery stenosis models can be created with the endovascular method having variation of pathologic characters and hemodynamic changes similar to human being. It is useful for further research involving the new technique and new material for interventional treatment. (authors)

  3. Magnetic resonance angiography of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimura, Tatsuo; Saito, Kenichi; Nakayama, Hisato; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Kato, Shoichi; Ito, Haruhide.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the screening study of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries using the conventional head and neck coils, 500 consecutive MRAs of the cervical vessels were performed using 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance unit with circularly polarized head coil. The 5 cm-thick imaging plane was placed in coronal fashion including both carotid and vertebral arteries. The imaging sequence was three-dimensional (3D) fast imaging with steady precession (FISP). In 10 patients with failed head coil examination, 10 patients with possible carotid and vertebral diseases and 10 volunteers, the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries were examined with the Helmholtz neck coil. Both 3D- and 2D-FISP were performed in each case. The imaging plane was placed in oblique sagittal fashion. In 458 out of 500 cases (91.6%), the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries were successfully depicted using head coil. In 20 patients with high shoulders, the carotid bifurcations were out of range of the head coil. In these cases, carotid bifurcations and the origins of the carotid and vertebral arteries were successfully revealed using a neck coil. To evaluate the stenotic lesions and tortuous vessels, 2D-FISP sequence seemed to be more suitable than 3D-FISP. Compared with conventional angiography, MRA caused overestimation of the degree of stenotic lesions. For screening examination of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries, most cases can be evaluated only with the conventional head coil. If depiction of the carotid bifurcation fails and the examination of carotids or vertebrals down to the aortic arch is needed, neck coil examination is required. (author)

  4. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  5. Cone pathway function in relation to asymmetric carotid artery stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Munch, Inger Christine; Holfort, Stig K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:  To examine retinal function in relation to retinal perfusion pressure in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Methods:  Thirteen patients with carotid artery stenosis without clinical eye disease underwent assessment of ophthalmic artery systolic blood pressure (OSP) by ocular...... pneumoplethysmography, carotid artery obstructive disease by ultrasonography, intraocular pressure by applanation tonometry, retinal perfusion by fluorescein angiography and retinal function by multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Data analysis compared the eye on the most stenotic side with the fellow eye...... pressure (p = 0.0028, 0.011, 0.041 for N1, P1, N2 implicit times, respectively, and p = 0.0086, 0.016, 0.040 for N1, P1, N2 for amplitudes, respectively, corrected for OSP). Conclusion:  Cone function deviation was observed in clinically healthy eyes on the side with highest degree of carotid artery...

  6. Sequential stenotic strictures of the small bowel leading to obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are primarily caused by adhesions, hernias, neoplasms, or inflammatory strictures. Intraluminal strictures are an uncommon cause of SBO. This report describes our findings in a unique case of sequential, stenotic intraluminal strictures of the small intestine, discusses the differential diagnosis of intraluminal intestinal strictures, and reviews the literature regarding intraluminal pathology.

  7. Results of Surgical Treatment of Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia and Stenotic Lesions of the Brachiocephalic Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei L. Charyshkin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the results of the surgical treatment for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI and stenotic lesions of the brachiocephalic arteries. Methods and Results: We examined 72 patients (68/87.2% men and 4/7.3% women aged from 46 to 78 years (mean age, 62.2±4.3 years with CLI and stenotic lesions of the brachiocephalic arteries. Conservative treatment was performed in 17(23.6% patients and surgical treatment in 55(76.4%. It has been carried out 73 surgical operations: femoral popliteal bypass (5/6.8%, lumbar sympathectomy (4/5.5%, thrombectomy of occluded aortofemoral graft (2/2.7%, limb amputation (4/5.5%, iliofemoral bypass (4/5.5%, aortofemoral bifurcation bypass (10/13.1%, endovascular surgery (1/1.6%, limb amputation at thigh level - 4(5.5%, thrombectomy of occluded distal arteries (4/5.5%, femoro-femoral cross-over bypass (1/1.6%, resection of popliteal artery aneurysm and prosthesis of the popliteal artery (1/1.6%, semi-closed loop endarterectomy of occluded arteries of the lower limbs (8/10.9%, carotid endarterectomy (23/31.5%, and carotid-subclavian bypass (2/2.7%. After the surgical intervention, we observed the disappearance or reduction of pain, restoration of sensitivity and motor activity, and healing of trophic ulcers in 75% of patients. In the late postoperative period, we detected the progression of limb ischemia in 4(5.5% patients; in connection with that, we performed limb amputation at thigh level. Ischemic stroke with a lethal outcome developed in one patient (1.4%. Conclusion: In patients with multifocal atherosclerosis, multilevel reconstructive surgical interventions must be performed in stages, due to the high operational risk, and risk of complications, secondary amputations and lethality in the postoperative period.

  8. Stent impact on the geometry of the carotid bifurcation and the course of the internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F.E.; Rosendahl, H.; Theron, J.G.; Guimaraens, L.; Treggiari-Venzi, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    A measurement system is proposed to evaluate reconstructive effects of carotid stents on the geometry of the carotid bifurcation and the course of the internal carotid artery. To describe deviations of the stenotic internal carotid artery (ICA) from the extended axis of the common carotid artery (CCA) the CCA-ICA angle is measured between the CCA midaxis and the midaxis of the stenotic ICA segment. Maximal extensions of ICA tortuosities perpendicular to the course of the CCA axis are defined as ICA offset. The measurements were applied to DSA images of 224 carotid stenoses to evaluate variation and correlation between the two parameters. Comparative pre- and post-stent evaluation was performed in two series of 55 and 31 carotid stenoses treated with Wallstents and in a historic control group of 35 stenoses treated with Strecker stents. Straight course of the ICA was associated with low angle and low offset values, whereas tortuous course of the ICA showed larger angle and offset. A moderate linear correlation between the two parameters was found. Corresponding to a straightening of the stented segment, Wallstents reduced mean angle and offset values significantly. In five cases of the second series of Wallstents, transferrals of curves above the distal stent end associated with kinks were observed, and offset remained constant or increased. Strecker stent implantation caused no significant changes of bifurcational geometry. The proposed parameters corresponded to visual aspects of ICA tortuosity and detected reconstructive effects of self-expanding Wallstents on the ICA course. The measurement system may provide a basis for geometric evaluation of different stent types or implantation concepts with the aim: to optimize anatomic recanalization results in tortuous high angle-high offset bifurcations. (orig.)

  9. Patient-specific surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Technological innovations of the twentieth century have provided medicine and surgery with new tools for education and therapy definition. Thus, by combining Medical Imaging and Virtual Reality, patient-specific applications providing preoperative surgical simulation have become possible.

  10. In-stent restenosis of innominate artery with critical stenosis of right internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Raza, A.; Ahmed, W.

    2011-01-01

    A lady with aortitis syndrome developed in-stent restenosis (ISR) of the innominate artery stent and critical stenosis of right internal carotid artery. The therapeutic challenge was gaining access to the carotid vessel, after treating the innominate artery ISR and all the while using distal protection to circumvent potential cerebral embolism. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with or without stenting is a safe therapeutic option for re-vascularization of the supra aortic vessels. In the event of re-stenosis, re-treatment with PTA and stenting is safe. Ample evidence-base exists now for carotid artery stenting (CAS) in preference to carotid endarterectomy in patients with stenotic lesions of the carotid vessels. (author)

  11. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Peña, Estefanía

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses patient-specific modeling. It integrates computational modeling, experimental procedures, imagine clinical segmentation and mesh generation with the finite element method (FEM) to solve problems in computational biomedicine and bioengineering. Specific areas of interest include cardiovascular problems, ocular and muscular systems and soft tissue modeling. Patient-specific modeling has been the subject of serious research over the last seven years and interest in the area is continually growing and this area is expected to further develop in the near future.

  12. Non-stenotic intracranial arteries have atherosclerotic changes in acute ischemic stroke patients: a 3T MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jang, Jinhee; Sung, Jinkyeong; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Won; Koo, Jaseong [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong Sam [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the degree of atherosclerotic changes in intracranial arteries by assessing arterial wall thickness using T1-weighted 3D-turbo spin echo (3D-TSE) and time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) in patients with acute ischemic stroke as compared with unaffected controls. Thirty-three patients with acute ischemic stroke and 36 control patients were analyzed. Acute ischemic stroke patients were divided according to TOAST classification. At both distal internal carotid arteries and basilar artery without stenosis, TOF-MRA was used to select non-stenotic portion of assessed arteries. 3D-TSE was used to measure the area including the lumen and wall (Area{sub Outer}) and luminal area (Area{sub Inner}). The area of the vessel wall (Area{sub VW}) of assessed intracranial arteries and the ratio index (RI) of each patient were determined. Area{sub Inner}, Area{sub Outer}, Area{sub VW}, and RI showed good inter-observer reliability and excellent intra-observer reliability. Area{sub Inner} did not significantly differ between stroke patients and controls (P = 0.619). However, Area{sub Outer}, Area{sub VW}, and RI were significantly larger in stroke patients (P < 0.001). The correlation coefficient between Area{sub Inner} and Area{sub Outer} was higher in the controls (r = 0.918) than in large vessel disease patients (r = 0.778). RI of large vessel disease patients was significantly higher than that of normal control, small vessel disease, and cardioembolic groups. In patients with acute ischemic stroke, wall thickening and positive remodeling are evident in non-stenotic intracranial arteries. This change is more definite in stroke subtype that is related to atherosclerosis than that in other subtypes which are not. (orig.)

  13. Surgery for postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, M.; Al-Kattan, K.; Rafay, M.A.; El-Bakry, A.K.; El-Dawlatly, A.; Naguib, M.; Seraj, M.; Joharjy, I.; Al-Serhani, A.

    1996-01-01

    Postintubation tracheal stenosis is a recognized problem. Although its incidence has recently decreased, it is still a difficult complication to treat. We have reviewed our experience with 10 patients with tracheal stenosis over the last five years between 1990 and 1995. There were seven male and three female patients with an average age of 14.2+-4 years (range 6 to 48 years). Resection and reconstruction with primary anastomosis was performed in seven patients, while conservative treatment with dilation was performed in two patients. One patient refused surgery. Operations performed included resection of tracheocricoid segment with tracheothyroid anastomosis (N=3) and tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis (N=4). The resected airway ranged from 3 cm to 6 cm. In view of the intense inflammatory and fibrotic process in and around stenotic segment, the practice of tracheostomy for the relief of postintubation acute tracheal obstruction should not be taken lightly, as it adds not only to the severity of the inflammatory process, but also increases the length of the tracheal segment to be resected. Postoperatively, all patients were extubated; this was accomplished by the end of surgery in six patients, while the seventh patient was extubated three weeks later. There was no mortality in this series. When normal functional activity and airway patency were taken as two parameters to judge the outcome of the surgery, results were good in six (86%) patients and satisfactory in one. These results support the validity of the one-stage reconstruction approach as one alternative for the treatment of postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions. (author)

  14. Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting Overview Carotid angioplasty (kuh-ROT-id AN-jee-o-plas-tee) and stenting ... to better see and examine the blood vessels. Food and medications You'll receive instructions on what ...

  15. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  16. Effect of longitudinal anatomical mismatch of stenting on the mechanical environment in human carotid artery with atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Anqiang; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Zhanming; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2017-10-01

    Longitudinal anatomic mismatch (LAM) of stenting (i.e., a stenotic artery segment is not fully covered by a deployed stent) worsens the mechanical environment in the treated artery, which most likely is the cause for the associated high risks of restenosis, myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis. To probe the possibility, we constructed a patient-specific carotid model with two components of plaques (lipid and calcified plaque) based on MRI images; we numerically compared three different stenting scenarios in terms of von Mises stress (VMS) distribution in the treated arteries, namely, the short stenting (LAM), the medium stenting and the long stenting. The results showed that the short stenting led to more areas with abnormally high VMS along the inner surface of the treated artery with a much higher surface-averaged VMS at the distal end of the stent than both the medium and long stenting. While the VMS distribution in the calcified plaques was similar for the three stenting models, it was quite different in the lipid plaques among the three stenting models. The lipid plaque of the short-stent model showed more volume of the lipid plaque subjected to high VMS than those of the other two models. Based on the obtained results, we may infer that the short stenting (i.e., LAM) may aggravate vascular injury due to high VMS on the artery-stent interaction surface and within the lipid plaque. Therefore, to obtain a better outcome, a longer stent, rather than a short one, might be needed for arterial stenting. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Value of coronary stenotic flow velocity acceleration on the prediction of long-term improvement in functional status after angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albertal, M.; Regar, E.; Piek, J. J.; van Langenhove, G.; Carlier, S. G.; Thury, A.; Sianos, G.; Boersma, E.; de Bruyne, B.; di Mario, C.; Serruys, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    The coronary flow velocity acceleration at the stenotic site (SVA), defined as a > or = 50% increase in resting stenotic velocity when compared with the reference segment, has been shown to be highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of a hemodynamically significant stenosis. In this study,

  18. Installation of carotid stent in a group of patient of high surgical risk for carotid endarterectomy - Preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Hoyos, Juan Fernando; Celis Mejia, Jorge Ignacio; Yepes Sanchez, Carlos Jaime; Duque Botero, Julieta

    1998-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy success in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients has been demonstrated in NASCET and ACAS studies. Although, some patients with carotid stenosis have frequently other pathologies which increase risk in endarterectomy or other surgeries like coronary bypass and aortic-iliac reconstruction. Other patients have lesions such as post surgical restenosis, fibromuscular dysplasia, radiation stenosis or tumoral disease, or stenotic lesions above jaw angle. The main objectives of this work are: to demonstrate, upon the results, that multidisciplinary management of 1 patient with symptomatic or not carotid critical stenosis. Let to select, with strict clinical criteria, those doing well with endovascular therapy. To evaluate implantation technique, peryoperatory morbidity and mortality and permeability time with implanted dispositive. In this study, the preliminary experience of the neurovascular group at the Clinica Cardiovascular Santa Maria in Medellin is presented, during an 18 months period of multidisciplinary management in 15 patients, 7 men and 8 women with critical carotid stenosis. 18 procedures were performed and 21 stents were implanted. The mean age was 66 years. All patients had 70% or greater stenotic lesions, and 93.3% were symptomatic. Twelve (80%) had contraindications to perform surgery. one asymptomatic patient (6.6%) was referred with procedure indications and two (13.3%) requested the stent implantation as their own election. the patient with fibromuscular dysplasia was treated with Wallstent (number 4) and the remaining patients were treated with Palmaz stent. technical success was 100%, 3 patients had pacemaker rhythm, one patient (6.6%) presented extra-pyramidal syndrome which responded to medical treatment in 24 hours. one patient developed right side hemiparesis with total recovery in 4 hours. One patient with a critical left carotid artery stenosis presented right side hemiparesis (3/5) and aphasia, nine months later paresis

  19. Comparative analysis of conventional and eversion carotid endarterectomy: Prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dragan M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Studies completed in the last decade of the 20th century showed benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the prevention of stroke in patients with a high-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery. OBJECTIVE The aim of this prospective, randomized study was the comparison of early and long-term results between the conventional and eversion carotid endarterectomy, and literature review. METHOD By the method of random choice, 103 patients were operated on using the eversion carotid endarterectomy and 98 patients using the conventional technique. Operative treatment was carried out under general anaesthesia. Following the clammping of the carotid artery, retrograde blood pressure was determined by a direct puncture of the internal carotid artery above the stenotic lesions. In patients with retrograde pressure below 20 mm Hg intraluminal shunting was routinely performed. Early results were estimated (during the first seven postoperative days based on mortality, central neurological complications (stroke, TIA and cranial or cervical nerve lesions. Long-term results were estimated (after at least two years based on long-term survival rate, central neurological complications (stroke, TIA and the incidence of haemodynamically significant restenosis of the carotid artery treated by endarterectomy. RESULTS The average time of clamming of the internal carotid artery in the eversion carotid anderectomy group was 5.36 minutes shorter than in the group treated by the conventional technique. Student's t-test showed a statistically highly significant difference in the time needed for clamming of the internal carotid artery between the two groups. The average duration of eversion endarterectomy (82 minutes was most often 19 minutes shorter than the duration of the conventional endarterectomy (101 minutes. Student's t-test showed a statistically highly significant difference in the average length of surgeries. The distal intimal fixation was more

  20. Patient-Specific Modeling in Tomorrow's Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews the frontier of research and clinical applications of Patient Specific Modeling, and provides a state-of-the-art update as well as perspectives on future directions in this exciting field. The book is useful for medical physicists, biomedical engineers and other engineers who are interested in the science and technology aspects of Patient Specific Modeling, as well as for radiologists and other medical specialists who wish to be updated about the state of implementation.

  1. Accuracy of detecting stenotic changes on coronary cineangiograms using computer image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Tetsuo; Kimura, Koji; Maeda, Hirofumi.

    1990-01-01

    To accurately interprets stenotic changes on coronary cineangiograms, an automatic method of detecting stenotic lesion using computer image processing was developed. First, tracing of artery was performed. The vessel edges were then determined by unilateral Gaussian fitting. The stenotic change was detected on the basis of the reference diameter estimated by Hough transformation. This method was evaluated in 132 segments of 27 arteries in 18 patients. Three observers carried out visual interpretation and computer-aided interpretation. The rate of detection by visual interpretation was 6.1, 28.8 and 20.5%, and by computer-aided interpretation, 39.4, 39.4 and 45.5%. With computer-aided interpretation, the agreement between any two observers on lesions and non-lesions was 40.2% and 59.8%, respectively. Therefore, visual interpretation tended to underestimate the stenotic changes on coronary cineangiograms. We think that computer-aided interpretation increase the reliability of diagnosis on coronary cineangiograms. (author)

  2. Carotid DSA based CFD simulation in assessing the patient with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Pengcheng; Qiao, Hongyu; Liu, Xin; Luo, Liangping; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Shi, Changzheng

    2018-03-12

    Cerebrovascular events are frequently associated with hemodynamic disturbance caused by internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. It is challenging to determine the ischemia-related carotid stenosis during the intervention only using digital subtracted angiography (DSA). Inspired by the performance of well-established FFRct technique in hemodynamic assessment of significant coronary stenosis, we introduced a pressure-based carotid arterial functional assessment (CAFA) index generated from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation in DSA data, and investigated its feasibility in the assessment of hemodynamic disturbance preliminarily using pressure-wired measurement and arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI as references. The cerebral multi-delay multi-parametric ASL-MRI and carotid DSA including trans-stenotic pressure-wired measurement were implemented on a 65-year-old man with asymptomatic unilateral (left) ICA stenosis. A CFD simulation using simplified boundary condition was performed in DSA data to calculate the CAFA index. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial transit time (ATT) of ICA territories were acquired. CFD simulation showed good correlation (r = 0.839, P = 0.001) with slight systematic overestimation (mean difference - 0.007, standard deviation 0.017) compared with pressure-wired measurement. No significant difference was observed between them (P = 0.09). Though the narrowing degree of in the involved ICA was about 70%, the simulated and measured CAFA (0.942/0.937) revealed a functionally nonsignificant stenosis which was also verified by a compensatory final CBF (fronto-temporal/fronto-parietal region: 51.58/45.62 ml/100 g/min) and slightly prolonged ATT (1.23/1.4 s) in the involved territories, together with a normal left-right percentage difference (2.1-8.85%). The DSA based CFD simulation showed good consistence with invasive approach and could be used as a cost-saving and efficient way to study the relationship between

  3. A biomedical solicitation examination of nanoparticles as drug agents to minimize the hemodynamics of a stenotic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, S.; Nadeem, S.

    2017-11-01

    A theoretical examination is presented in this analysis to study the flow of a bio-nanofluid through a curved stenotic channel. The curved channel is considered with an overlapping stenotic region. The effect of convective conditions is incorporated to discuss the heat transfer characteristic. The mathematical problem of a curved stenotic channel is formulated and then solved by using the exact technique. To discuss the hemodynamics of a curved stenotic channel the expression of resistance to blood is evaluated by dividing the channel into pre-stenotic, stenotic and post stenotic region. In this investigation gold, silver and copper nanoparticles are used as drug carriers. The outcomes of the graphical illustration reveal that with an increase in nanoparticle concentration hemodynamics effects of stenosed curved channel are reduced and they also conclude that the drug Au nanoparticles are more effective to minimize hemodynamics when compared to the drug Ag and Cu nanoparticles. This analysis finds valuable theoretical information for nanoparticles used as drug agents in the field of bio-inspired applications.

  4. Current Approaches for Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Permanent neurologic injuries and death following stroke, necessitates more vigorous treatment of carotid disease. Carotid stenting and carotid endarterectomy are treatment options in many centers besides medical treatment. Whether the patient is symptomatic or asymtomatic, indications and management strategies for treatment remain controversial. Despite the debate, carotid endarterectomy is still accepted to be the most efficientintervention to decrease risk of stroke due to carotid artery stenosis.

  5. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  6. Evaluation of Facet Joint Arthrosis in Stenotic and Normal Lumbar Spines with MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Ozan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To reveal the prevalence of lumbar facet joint arthrosis in normal and stenotic lumbar spines with magnetic resonance imaging. Material and Method: Study group consisted of 30 patients with complaints and findings of lower back pain, neurologic claudicatio and lumbar spinal stenosis detected at L3-4, L4-5 and/or L5-S1 with magnetic resonance imaging (cross section area of the dural sac

  7. Increase in stenotic resistance following a brief coronary occlusion in the anesthetized open-chest dog.

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Daiji; Yasuhara, Koichiro; Takeda, Hikaru; Hyodo, Tatuo; Yamada, Nobuyuki; Uchida, Toshiaki; Haraoka, Shoichi; Nagashima, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    Changes in the stenotic resistance of a coronary artery following brief coronary occlusion were studied in the anesthetized open-chest dog. A critical coronary stenosis was constructed by tying a thick string around the circumflex coronary artery (LCx) near its origin. The LCx was occluded for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 seconds with and without coronary stenosis then the reactive hyperemia was observed. In the absence of the stenosis, resistance of the segment of the large coronary artery remained ...

  8. Diffuse stenotic change in large intracranial arteries following irradiation therapy for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Sugaya, Yuichi; Sato, Masanori; Osato, Katunobu; Yamaura, Akira; Makino, Hiroyasu.

    1990-01-01

    We reported a case of a patient who developed a diffuse stenotic change in the large intracranial arteries and repeated episodes of cerebral infarction after irradiation therapy for medulloblastoma. A three-year-old girl underwent the subtotal removal of cerebellar medulloblastoma and the subsequent irradiation therapy in the whole brain and spine (30 Gy in the whole brain, 20 Gy in the local brain, and 25 Gy in the whole spine). Two years later, she again underwent surgery and irradiation therapy because a recurrence of medulloblastoma had manifested itself in the frontal lobe; (40 Gy in the whole brain, 20 Gy in the local brain, and 25 Gy in the whole spine). One and half years after the second irradiation, she started suffering from frequent and refractory cerebral ischemic attacks. Cerebral angiography revealed a diffuse narrowing, and multifocal stenoses in the bilateral anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Computerized tomography demonstrated multiple cerebral infarctions. Her neurological condition deteriorated because of recurring strokes and she died at ten years of age. Most of the reported cases of patients who developed stenotic arteriopathy were children in the first decade of their life, and who were irradiated for parasellar brain tumor of low malignancy. Stenotic arteriopathy after irradiation has rarely been recognized in patients with malignant brain tumor. However, life expectancy is increasing even for those with malignant brain tumor, and it may make stenotic arteriopathy after irradiation recognized more commonly in patients with malignant brain tumor. Careful irradiation and subsequent angiographical examination should be required even in patients with malignant brain tumor. (author)

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Bingham Plastic Model of Blood Flow Through Stenotic Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    S.R. Verma

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the axially symmetric, laminar, steady, one-dimensional flow of blood through narrow stenotic vessel. Blood is considered as Bingham plastic fluid. The analytical results such as pressure drop, resistance to flow and wall shear stress have been obtained. Effect of yield stress and shape of stenosis on resistance to flow and wall shear stress have been discussed through tables and graphically. It has been shown that resistance to flow and th...

  10. Color Doppler flow mapping of stenotic and regurgitant natural heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    Color Doppler echocardiography has found widest application in reliable detection and assessment of severity of both atrio-ventricular and semi-lunar valve incompetence. The authors believe both the sensitivity and specificity of color Doppler for the detection of mitral and aortic regurgitation is very high in patients with adequate acoustic windows. In 82 patients with proven mitral regurgitation studied, the best correlations with angiography were noted when the maximum or average regurgitant jet are obtained by color Doppler from three standard 2-D echo planes (parasternal long and short axis and apical four chamber view) and expressed as a percentage of the left atrial area were considered. The criteria the authors used for assessment of tricuspid and pulmonary valve incompetence are similar to those used for mitral and aortic valve incompetence, but the lack of a good ''gold'' standard has hampered validation. The color Doppler technique also supplements conventional Doppler in the assessment of severity of stenotic lesions by facilitating parallel alignment of the continuous wave Doppler cursor line with the stenotic jet for accurate recording of maximal velocities and pressure gradients. The authors have found this method especially useful in the assessment of aortic stenosis. In conclusion, color Doppler flow mapping combined with conventional echocardiography provides, for the first time, a comprehensive noninvasive assessement of the severity of regurgitant and stenotic lesions

  11. Correlation of cerebrovascular reserve as measured by acetazolamide-challenged perfusion CT with collateral circulation in unilateral high grade carotid stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Doran; Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk; Je, Bo Kyoung; Suh, Sang Il; Seol, Hae Young; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Lee, Nam Joon; Yang, Kyung Sook

    2014-01-01

    We correlated cerebrovascular reserve in unilateral high grade carotid artery stenosis or occlusion with a type of collateral circulation using acetazolamide-challenged perfusion CT (ACZ-PCT). Among the patients who underwent ACZ-PCT in our institution, we retrospectively selected the patients with unilateral high grade internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis (> 70%) or occlusion; we verified the types of their dominant collateral circulation by digital subtraction angiography or 3T MR-angiography; first, the primary collaterals flow through the circle of Willis; second, the secondary collaterals that flow through the opthalmic artery, the basal artery or other external carotid artery. Using ACZ-PCT, we measured the difference in percentage change of cerebral blood flow of the stenotic hemisphere against contralateral normal hemisphere and compared cerebrovascular reserves of lesional hemisphere, according to the type of collaterals. A total of 28 patients were included. The percentage changes of cerebral blood flow were significantly lower in the stenotic hemisphere than the contralateral hemisphere (14.34 ± 36.43% and 34.53 ± 47.82%, p < 0.001), and in the hemisphere predominantly supplied by secondary collaterals than primary (7.03 ± 32.71% and 24.37 ± 42.03%, p < 0.05), respectively. Cerebrovascular reserves in the ipsilateral hemisphere predominantly supplied by secondary collaterals were more impaired than primary collaterals in patients with unilateral high grade carotid stenosis or occlusion.

  12. Early superoxide scavenging accelerates renal microvascular rarefaction and damage in the stenotic kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Silvia; He, Xiaochen; Chade, Alejandro R

    2012-08-15

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS), the main cause of chronic renovascular disease (RVD), is associated with significant oxidative stress. Chronic RVD induces renal injury partly by promoting renal microvascular (MV) damage and blunting MV repair in the stenotic kidney. We tested the hypothesis that superoxide anion plays a pivotal role in MV dysfunction, reduction of MV density, and progression of renal injury in the stenotic kidney. RAS was induced in 14 domestic pigs and observed for 6 wk. Seven RAS pigs were chronically treated with the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol (RAS+T) to reduce oxidative stress. Single-kidney hemodynamics and function were quantified in vivo using multidetector computer tomography (CT) and renal MV density was quantified ex vivo using micro-CT. Expression of angiogenic, inflammatory, and apoptotic factors was measured in renal tissue, and renal apoptosis and fibrosis were quantified in tissue sections. The degree of RAS and blood pressure were similarly increased in RAS and RAS+T. Renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were reduced in the stenotic kidney (280.1 ± 36.8 and 34.2 ± 3.1 ml/min, P < 0.05 vs. control). RAS+T kidneys showed preserved GFR (58.5 ± 6.3 ml/min, P = not significant vs. control) but a similar decreases in RBF (293.6 ± 85.2 ml/min) and further decreases in MV density compared with RAS. These changes were accompanied by blunted angiogenic signaling and increased apoptosis and fibrosis in the stenotic kidney of RAS+T compared with RAS. The current study shows that tempol administration provided limited protection to the stenotic kidney. Despite preserved GFR, renal perfusion was not improved by tempol, and MV density was further reduced compared with untreated RAS, associated with increased renal apoptosis and fibrosis. These results suggest that a tight balance of the renal redox status is necessary for a normal MV repair response to injury, at least at the early stage of RVD, and raise caution

  13. Morphing patient-specific musculoskeletal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, John; Galibarov, Pavel E.; Al-Munajjed, Amir

    the resulting models do indeed represent the patients’ biomechanics. As a particularly challenging case, foot deformities based only on point sets recovered from surface scans are considered as shown in the figure. The preliminary results are promising for the cases of severe flat foot and metatarsalgia while...... other conditions may require CT or MRI data. The method and its theoretical assumptions, advantages and limitations are presented, and several examples will illustrate morphing to patient-specific models. [1] Carbes S; Tørholm S; Rasmussen, J. A Detailed Twenty-six Segments Kinematic Foot model...

  14. Mild anastomotic stenosis in patient-specific CABG model may enhance graft patency: a new hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Huo

    Full Text Available It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40-60% may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12 patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI. The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes · cm(-2 and decreased OSI (<0.02 to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes · cm(-2. These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency.

  15. Mild anastomotic stenosis in patient-specific CABG model may enhance graft patency: a new hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yunlong; Luo, Tong; Guccione, Julius M; Teague, Shawn D; Tan, Wenchang; Navia, José A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40-60%) may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12) patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS) and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI). The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes · cm(-2)) and decreased OSI (<0.02) to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes · cm(-2)). These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency.

  16. Staged bilateral carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Engell, Hans Christian

    1986-01-01

    In a series of 56 staged bilateral carotid endarterectomies, new neurologic symptoms developed in 5% and 20% following the first and second procedure, respectively. All complications were transient or minor. The incidence of postendarterectomy hypertension was significantly higher following...... the second procedure, when operations were staged less than 3 weeks apart. A correlation between these hypertensive episodes and the occurrence of new neurologic symptoms could not be shown. However, as this correlation has been proved in several other reports, bilateral carotid endarterectomy is advised...... to be staged at least 3 weeks apart. In addition, a conservative attitude towards contralateral asymptomatic lesions is proposed....

  17. Assessment of carotid plaque vulnerability using structural and geometrical determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.Y.; Tang, T.; U-King-Im, J.; Graves, M.; Gillard, J.H.; Sutcliffe, M.

    2008-01-01

    Because many acute cerebral ischemic events are caused by rupture of vulnerable carotid atheroma and subsequent thrombosis, the present study used both idealized and patient-specific carotid atheromatous plaque models to evaluate the effect of structural determinants on stress distributions within plaque. Using a finite element method, structural analysis was performed using models derived from in vivo high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of carotid atheroma in 40 non-consecutive patients (20 symptomatic, 20 asymptomatic). Plaque components were modeled as hyper-elastic materials. The effects of varying fibrous cap thickness, lipid core size and lumen curvature on plaque stress distributions were examined. Lumen curvature and fibrous cap thickness were found to be major determinants of plaque stress. The size of the lipid core did not alter plaque stress significantly when the fibrous cap was relatively thick. The correlation between plaque stress and lumen curvature was significant for both symptomatic (p=0.01; correlation coefficient: 0.689) and asymptomatic patients (p=0.01; correlation coefficient: 0.862). Lumen curvature in plaques of symptomatic patients was significantly larger than those of asymptomatic patients (1.50±1.0 mm -1 vs 1.25±0.75 mm -1 ; p=0.01). Specific plaque morphology (large lumen curvature and thin fibrous cap) is closely related to plaque vulnerability. Structural analysis using high-resolution MRI of carotid atheroma may help in detecting vulnerable atheromatous plaque and aid the risk stratification of patients with carotid disease. (author)

  18. Translumbar carotid arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. Jr.; Kwon, O.J.; Millan, V.G.

    1983-01-01

    In seven patients, carotid arteriography and arch aortography were performed using a translumbar catheter exchange sheath which facilitated selective catheterization. No significant complications occurred. The translumbar approach is easier than the auxillary approach, will result in fewer complications, and should be considered whenever a femoral arterial access is unavailable

  19. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study) : an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Joerg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molynewc, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; Hendriks, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid

  20. Pancreatic duct drainage using EUS-guided rendezvous technique for stenotic pancreaticojejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takikawa, Tetsuya; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Nakano, Eriko; Miura, Shin; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Unno, Jun; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Katayose, Yu; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-08-21

    The patient was a 30-year-old female who had undergone excision of the extrahepatic bile duct and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy for congenital biliary dilatation at the age of 7. Thereafter, she suffered from recurrent acute pancreatitis due to pancreaticobiliary maljunction and received subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. She developed a pancreatic fistula and an intra-abdominal abscess after the operation. These complications were improved by percutaneous abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy. However, upper abdominal discomfort and the elevation of serum pancreatic enzymes persisted due to stenosis from the pancreaticojejunostomy. Because we could not accomplish dilation of the stenosis by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, we tried an endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) guided rendezvous technique for pancreatic duct drainage. After transgastric puncture of the pancreatic duct using an EUS-fine needle aspiration needle, the guidewire was inserted into the pancreatic duct and finally reached to the jejunum through the stenotic anastomosis. We changed the echoendoscope to an oblique-viewing endoscope, then grasped the guidewire and withdrew it through the scope. The stenosis of the pancreaticojejunostomy was dilated up to 4 mm, and a pancreatic stent was put in place. Though the pancreatic stent was removed after three months, the patient remained symptom-free. Pancreatic duct drainage using an EUS-guided rendezvous technique was useful for the treatment of a stenotic pancreaticojejunostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  1. IB-LBM simulation of the haemocyte dynamics in a stenotic capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan-Qing, Xu; Xiao-Ying, Tang; Fang-Bao, Tian; Yu-Hua, Peng; Yong, Xu; Yan-Jun, Zeng

    2014-01-01

    To study the behaviour of a haemocyte when crossing a stenotic capillary, the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method was used to establish a quantitative analysis model. The haemocyte was assumed to be spherical and to have an elastic cell membrane, which can be driven by blood flow to adopt a highly deformable character. In the stenotic capillary, the spherical blood cell was stressed both by the flow and the wall dimension, and the cell shape was forced to be stretched to cross the stenosis. Our simulation investigated the haemocyte crossing process in detail. The velocity and pressure were anatomised to obtain information on how blood flows through a capillary and to estimate the degree of cell damage caused by excessive pressure. Quantitative velocity analysis results demonstrated that a large haemocyte crossing a small stenosis would have a noticeable effect on blood flow, while quantitative pressure distribution analysis results indicated that the crossing process would produce a special pressure distribution in the cell interior and to some extent a sudden change between the cell interior and the surrounding plasma.

  2. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  3. Stenotic ligature: a simple technique for managing distal hypoperfusion ischemic syndrome following arteriovenous fistulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ene Cristian Roata

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Distal Hypoperfusion Ischemic Syndrome (DHIS is a multifactorial debilitating condition causing peripheral ischemia and potentially tissue necrosis. In an effort to further refine its surgical treatment we aim to describe a modified, simple and reliable technique for managing DHIS in patients with arteriovenous fistulas. Materials and Methods. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with DHIS operated by a single surgical team over a period of 7 years were included in the study. All patients underwent the same surgical technique: stenotic ligature. Outcomes were analyzed clinically and the effectiveness of the procedure was proven using McNemar test. Clinical variables were statistically analyzed in SPSS 17.0 for Windows. Results. The technique we used consists in performing a stenosing ligature on the vein, using a 0-silk suture, and adjusting the suture in order to achieve either a radial pulse or capillary pulse, while maintaining a good thrill at palpation of the vein. The procedure was successful in 83% of patients proved by immediate symptomatic relief. Paired data analysis showed significant decrease of all symptoms: cold extremity (p=0,021, paraesthesia (p<0,001, pain (p<0,001. History of coronary artery disease, arteriopathy or the absence of radial pulse is statistically correlated with an increased risk of developing DHIS. Conclusions. Stenotic ligature is a simple, cheap and reliable technique for managing DHIS with lower septic risks which can be easily performed under local anesthesia.

  4. Patient-Specific Modeling of Intraventricular Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Vijay; Marsden, Alison

    2017-11-01

    Heart disease is the one of the leading causes of death in the world. Apart from malfunctions in electrophysiology and myocardial mechanics, abnormal hemodynamics is a major factor attributed to heart disease across all ages. Computer simulations offer an efficient means to accurately reproduce in vivo flow conditions and also make predictions of post-operative outcomes and disease progression. We present an experimentally validated computational framework for performing patient-specific modeling of intraventricular hemodynamics. Our modeling framework employs the SimVascular open source software to build an anatomic model and employs robust image registration methods to extract ventricular motion from the image data. We then employ a stabilized finite element solver to simulate blood flow in the ventricles, solving the Navier-Stokes equations in arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) coordinates by prescribing the wall motion extracted during registration. We model the fluid-structure interaction effects of the cardiac valves using an immersed boundary method and discuss the potential application of this methodology in single ventricle physiology and trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This research is supported in part by the Stanford Child Health Research Institute and the Stanford NIH-NCATS-CTSA through Grant UL1 TR001085 and partly through NIH NHLBI R01 Grant 5R01HL129727-02.

  5. Update of patient-specific maxillofacial implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, James A; Boahene, Kofi

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific implant (PSI) is a personalized approach to reconstructive and esthetic surgery. This is particularly useful in maxillofacial surgery in which restoring the complex three-dimensional (3D) contour can be quite challenging. In certain situations, the best results can only be achieved with implants custom-made to fit a particular need. Significant progress has been made over the past decade in the design and manufacture of maxillofacial PSIs. Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology is rapidly advancing and has provided new options for fabrication of PSIs with better precision. Maxillofacial PSIs can now be designed using preoperative imaging data as input into CAD software. The designed implant is then fabricated using a CAM technique such as 3D printing. This approach increases precision and decreases or completely eliminates the need for intraoperative modification of implants. The use of CAD/CAM-produced PSIs for maxillofacial reconstruction and augmentation can significantly improve contour outcomes and decrease operating time. CAD/CAM technology allows timely and precise fabrication of maxillofacial PSIs. This approach is gaining increasing popularity in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. Continued advances in CAD technology and 3D printing are bound to improve the cost-effectiveness and decrease the production time of maxillofacial PSIs.

  6. Development of a Duplex Ultrasound Simulator and Preliminary Validation of Velocity Measurements in Carotid Artery Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierler, R Eugene; Leotta, Daniel F; Sansom, Kurt; Aliseda, Alberto; Anderson, Mark D; Sheehan, Florence H

    2016-07-01

    Duplex ultrasound scanning with B-mode imaging and both color Doppler and Doppler spectral waveforms is relied upon for diagnosis of vascular pathology and selection of patients for further evaluation and treatment. In most duplex ultrasound applications, classification of disease severity is based primarily on alterations in blood flow velocities, particularly the peak systolic velocity (PSV) obtained from Doppler spectral waveforms. We developed a duplex ultrasound simulator for training and assessment of scanning skills. Duplex ultrasound cases were prepared from 2-dimensional (2D) images of normal and stenotic carotid arteries by reconstructing the common carotid, internal carotid, and external carotid arteries in 3 dimensions and computationally simulating blood flow velocity fields within the lumen. The simulator displays a 2D B-mode image corresponding to transducer position on a mannequin, overlaid by color coding of velocity data. A spectral waveform is generated according to examiner-defined settings (depth and size of the Doppler sample volume, beam steering, Doppler beam angle, and pulse repetition frequency or scale). The accuracy of the simulator was assessed by comparing the PSV measured from the spectral waveforms with the true PSV which was derived from the computational flow model based on the size and location of the sample volume within the artery. Three expert examiners made a total of 36 carotid artery PSV measurements based on the simulated cases. The PSV measured by the examiners deviated from true PSV by 8% ± 5% (N = 36). The deviation in PSV did not differ significantly between artery segments, normal and stenotic arteries, or examiners. To our knowledge, this is the first simulation of duplex ultrasound that can create and display real-time color Doppler images and Doppler spectral waveforms. The results demonstrate that an examiner can measure PSV from the spectral waveforms using the settings on the simulator with a mean absolute error

  7. Patient-specific workup of adrenal incidentalomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy R. de Haan

    Full Text Available Purpose: : To develop a clinical prediction model to predict a clinically relevant adrenal disorder for patients with adrenal incidentaloma. Materials and methods: : This retrospective study is approved by the institutional review board, with waiver of informed consent. Natural language processing is used for filtering of adrenal incidentaloma cases in all thoracic and abdominal CT reports from 2010 till 2012. A total of 635 patients are identified. Stepwise logistic regression is used to construct the prediction model. The model predicts if a patient is at risk for malignancy or hormonal hyperfunction of the adrenal gland at the moment of initial presentation, thus generates a predicted probability for every individual patient. The prediction model is evaluated on its usefulness in clinical practice using decision curve analysis (DCA based on different threshold probabilities. For patients whose predicted probability is lower than the predetermined threshold probability, further workup could be omitted. Results: : A prediction model is successfully developed, with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.78. Results of the DCA indicate that up to 11% of patients with an adrenal incidentaloma can be avoided from unnecessary workup, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 11%. Conclusion: : A prediction model can accurately predict if an adrenal incidentaloma patient is at risk for malignancy or hormonal hyperfunction of the adrenal gland based on initial imaging features and patient demographics. However, with most adrenal incidentalomas labeled as nonfunctional adrenocortical adenomas requiring no further treatment, it is likely that more patients could be omitting from unnecessary diagnostics. Keywords: Adrenal incidentaloma, Patient-specific workup, Prediction model

  8. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002953.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery To use the sharing features ... to remove plaque buildup ( endarterectomy ) Carotid angioplasty with stent placement Description Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is ...

  9. Carotid ultrasonographic and brain computerized tomographic findings in patients with vascular ocular syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Matsushima, Chikage; Shimizu, Souichirou; Takasaki, Masaru; Iwasaki, Takuya; Usui, Masahiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    To clarify the characteristics of cerebrovascular lesions in subtypes of vascular ocular syndrome, including amaurosis fugax (AF), retinal artery occlusion (RAO), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO), 93 patients with vascular ocular syndrome were studied by means of carotid ultrasonography (US) and brain computerized tomography (CT). The subjects comprised 21 patients with AF, 37 with RAO, and 35 with RVO who were sequentially given these diagnoses by the department of ophthalmology. On the basis of US findings, carotid lesions were defined as the presence of plaque or stenotic changes. CT findings were assessed for the presence and distribution of low-density areas (LDAs). Mean age was similar in each group, ranging from 64.5 to 67.4 years. The RAO group had high rates of men, hypertension, and smokers. US showed that the prevalence of carotid lesions ipsilateral to the affected eye was high in the RAO group and that severe stenosis and ulcerated plaque were present in 28.6% of the AF group and 45.9% of the RAO group. On CT examination, cerebral infarctions appeared as LDAs in about 10% of the patients in each group, and the incidence and distribution of LDAs were similar. Of 13 patients with cerebral infarction, only 2 were presumably due to carotid lesions; the others had a variety of causes. The discrepancy between US and CT findings was attributed to the small number of patients with cerebral infarction, since most patients had visual defects as an initial symptom. Our results suggest that extracranial carotid lesions, considered to be a major risk factor for stroke, should be carefully assessed in patients with AF or RAO to prevent further stroke. (author)

  10. Outcomes of the Endovascular Treatment of Stenotic Lesions versus Chronic Total Occlusions in the Iliac Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta Suero, Sergio; Martínez López, Isaac; Hernández Mateo, Manuela; Marqués de Marino, Pablo; Cernuda Artero, Iñaki; Cabrero Fernández, Maday; Serrano Hernando, Francisco Javier

    2016-07-01

    This study compares outcomes of the endovascular treatment (EVT) of iliac artery occlusive disease according to whether the treated lesion is a stenosis or a chronic total occlusion (CTO). Patients undergoing EVT from 2003 to 2013 for iliac artery occlusive disease were identified and the lesions treated stratified into stenotic (Group 1, n = 375) or CTO (Group 2, n = 87). Patients were followed clinically and hemodynamically (thigh-brachial index, TBI). Comorbidities, procedural factors, and outcomes were compared between the 2 groups using Kaplan-Meier, Breslow, and Cox models. Four hundred sixty-two iliac endovascular procedures in 378 patients were included in a retrospective study. The 2 groups only differed in preprocedural TBI [0.77 (Group 1) vs. 0.67 (Group 2), P P2) patency rates [P1 93.0% and 85.8% vs. 83.1% and 74.7%, hazard ratio (HR) 1.90 (1.15-3.14), P = 0.018; P2 97.8% and 96.8% vs. 93.0% and 87.4%, HR 2.86 (1.39-5.90), P = 0.007] and freedom from reintervention (FFR) rates [91.6% and 83.5% vs. 84.1% and 78.9%, HR 1.51 (0.90-2.53), P = 0.132]. In a multivariate analysis, CTO showed a worse P2 than stenotic lesions [HR 2.81 (1.17-6.76), P = 0.021], yet no differences emerged in P1 [HR 1.41 (0.76-2.63), P = 0.277] or FFR [HR 1.43 (0.79-2.57), P = 0.237]. A lower preprocedural TBI was correlated with a greater risk of EVT failure in terms of patency and FFR (P 40 mm were related to a worse stent patency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2010-03-20

    Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy.

  12. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Bonati, L.H.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Lo, T.H.; Gaines, P.; Dorman, P.J.; Macdonald, S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Hendriks, J.M.; McCollum, C.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; et al.,

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  13. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gaibar, A. Gimenez; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  14. [Analysis of brain hemometabolism behavior during carotid endarterectomy with temporary clamping.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval Neto, Gastão Fernandes; Niencheski, Augusto H

    2004-04-01

    Carotid endarterectomy with temporary clamping changes cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic oxygen demand ratio with consequent oligemic hypoxia or hemometabolic uncoupling. This study aimed at identifying changes in brain hemometabolism, evaluated through changes in oxyhemoglobin saturation in internal jugular vein bulb (SvjO2) during carotid endarterectomy with clamping, and at correlating these changes with potentially interfering factors, mainly end tidal CO2 pressure (P ET CO2) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Sixteen patients with unilateral carotid stenotic disease scheduled to carotid endarterectomy with carotid arterial clamping were enrolled in this study. Parameters including internal jugular bulb oxyhemoglobin saturation, stump pressure and end tidal CO2 pressure were measured at the following moments: M1 - pre-clamping; M2 - 3 minutes after clamping; M3 - pre-unclamping; M4 - post-unclamping). The comparison among SvjO2 (%, mean +/- SD) in all studied periods has shown differences between those recorded in moments M1 (52.25 +/- 7.87) and M2 (47.43 +/- 9.19). This initial decrease stabilized during temporary clamping, showing decrease in the comparison between M2 and M3 (46.56 +/- 9.25), without statistical significance (p = ns). At post-unclamping, M4 (47.68 +/- 9.12), SvjO2 was increased as compared to M2 and M3 clamping stages, however it was still lower than that of pre-clamping stage M1.(M4 x M1 - p brain hemometabolic uncoupling trend were correlated to P ET CO2. The comparison between CPP and SvjO2 showed weak correlation devoid of statistical significance. In the conditions of our study, SvjO2 measurement is a fast and effective way of clinically monitoring changes in CBF/CMRO2 ratio. Temporary carotid clamping implies in a trend towards brain hemometabolic uncoupling and, as a consequence, to oligemic ischemia; cerebral perfusion pressure does not assesses brain hemometabolic status (CBF and CMRO2 ratio); hypocapnia, may lead to

  15. 4D spiral imaging of flows in stenotic phantoms and subjects with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, M J; Kadbi, Mo; Kendrick, Michael; Stoddard, Marcus F; Amini, Amir A

    2016-03-01

    The utility of four-dimensional (4D) spiral flow in imaging of stenotic flows in both phantoms and human subjects with aortic stenosis is investigated. The method performs 4D flow acquisitions through a stack of interleaved spiral k-space readouts. Relative to conventional 4D flow, which performs Cartesian readout, the method has reduced echo time. Thus, reduced flow artifacts are observed when imaging high-speed stenotic flows. Four-dimensional spiral flow also provides significant savings in scan times relative to conventional 4D flow. In vitro experiments were performed under both steady and pulsatile flows in a phantom model of severe stenosis (one inch diameter at the inlet, with 87% area reduction at the throat of the stenosis) while imaging a 6-cm axial extent of the phantom, which included the Gaussian-shaped stenotic narrowing. In all cases, gradient strength and slew rate for standard clinical acquisitions, and identical field of view and resolution were used. For low steady flow rates, quantitative and qualitative results showed a similar level of accuracy between 4D spiral flow (echo time [TE] = 2 ms, scan time = 40 s) and conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.6 ms, scan time = 1:01 min). However, in the case of high steady flow rates, 4D spiral flow (TE = 1.57 ms, scan time = 38 s) showed better visualization and accuracy as compared to conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.2 ms, scan time = 51 s). At low pulsatile flow rates, a good agreement was observed between 4D spiral flow (TE = 2 ms, scan time = 10:26 min) and conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.6 ms, scan time = 14:20 min). However, in the case of high flow-rate pulsatile flows, 4D spiral flow (TE = 1.57 ms, scan time = 10:26 min) demonstrated better visualization as compared to conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.2 ms, scan time = 14:20 min). The feasibility of 4D spiral flow was also investigated in five normal volunteers and four subjects with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis. The approach achieved TE = 1.68 ms and scan

  16. Analysis of haemodynamic disturbance in the atherosclerotic carotid artery using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchall, Daniel; Zaman, Azfar; Hacker, Jacob; Davies, Gavin; Mendelow, David

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides a means for the quantitative analysis of haemodynamic disturbances in vivo, but most work has used phantoms or idealised geometry. Our purpose was to use CFD to analyse flow in carotid atherosclerosis using patient-specific geometry and flow data. Eight atherosclerotic carotid arteries and one healthy control artery were imaged with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and duplex ultrasound, and the data used to construct patient-specific computational models used for CFD and wall shear stress (WSS) analysis. There is a progressive change in three-dimensional (3-D) velocity profile and WSS profile with increasing severity of stenosis, characterised by increasing restriction of areas of low WSS, change in oscillation patterns, and progressive rise in WSS within stenoses and downstream jets. Areas of turbulent, retrograde flow and of low WSS are demonstrated in the lee of the stenoses. This study presents the largest CFD analysis of abnormal haemodynamics at the atheromatous carotid bifurcation using patient-specific data and provides the basis for further investigation of causal links between haemodynamic variables and atherogenesis and formation of unstable plaque. We propose that this provides a means for the prospective assessment of relative stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  17. MR imaging of carotid webs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesen, Mari E.; Eswaradass, Prasanna Venkatesan; Singh, Dilip; Mitha, Alim P.; Menon, Bijoy K.; Goyal, Mayank; Frayne, Richard

    2017-01-01

    We propose a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol for the characterization of carotid web morphology, composition, and vessel wall dynamics. The purpose of this case series was to determine the feasibility of imaging carotid webs with MR imaging. Five patients diagnosed with carotid web on CT angiography were recruited to undergo a 30-min MR imaging session. MR angiography (MRA) images of the carotid artery bifurcation were acquired. Multi-contrast fast spin echo (FSE) images were acquired axially about the level of the carotid web. Two types of cardiac phase resolved sequences (cineFSE and cine phase contrast) were acquired to visualize the elasticity of the vessel wall affected by the web. Carotid webs were identified on MRA in 5/5 (100%) patients. Multi-contrast FSE revealed vessel wall thickening and cineFSE demonstrated regional changes in distensibility surrounding the webs in these patients. Our MR imaging protocol enables an in-depth evaluation of patients with carotid webs: morphology (by MRA), composition (by multi-contrast FSE), and wall dynamics (by cineFSE). (orig.)

  18. MR imaging of carotid webs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Mari E. [University of Calgary, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Calgary (Canada); Foothills Medical Centre, Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Calgary (Canada); Eswaradass, Prasanna Venkatesan; Singh, Dilip; Mitha, Alim P.; Menon, Bijoy K. [University of Calgary, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Calgary (Canada); Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary Stroke Program, Calgary (Canada); Goyal, Mayank [Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary Stroke Program, Calgary (Canada); University of Calgary, Department of Radiology, Calgary (Canada); Frayne, Richard [Foothills Medical Centre, Seaman Family MR Research Centre, Calgary (Canada); University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary (Canada)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol for the characterization of carotid web morphology, composition, and vessel wall dynamics. The purpose of this case series was to determine the feasibility of imaging carotid webs with MR imaging. Five patients diagnosed with carotid web on CT angiography were recruited to undergo a 30-min MR imaging session. MR angiography (MRA) images of the carotid artery bifurcation were acquired. Multi-contrast fast spin echo (FSE) images were acquired axially about the level of the carotid web. Two types of cardiac phase resolved sequences (cineFSE and cine phase contrast) were acquired to visualize the elasticity of the vessel wall affected by the web. Carotid webs were identified on MRA in 5/5 (100%) patients. Multi-contrast FSE revealed vessel wall thickening and cineFSE demonstrated regional changes in distensibility surrounding the webs in these patients. Our MR imaging protocol enables an in-depth evaluation of patients with carotid webs: morphology (by MRA), composition (by multi-contrast FSE), and wall dynamics (by cineFSE). (orig.)

  19. Carotid Surgery in a District General Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairgrieve, John

    1981-01-01

    The carotid surgical experience of Cheltenham General Hospital over a 13 year period (1968-81) is presented. This includes 42 operations for stenosis, and 12 further operations for carotid body tumour, carotid aneurysm, subclavian steal syndrome and trauma to the internal carotid artery. The operative techniques and complications are briefly discussed and reasons advanced for a more agressive approach to the problems of extra-cerebral carotid disease in this country. PMID:7185417

  20. Influence of Iliac Stenotic Lesions on Blood Flow Patterns Near a Covered Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Bifurcation (CERAB) Stent Configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jebbink, Erik Groot; Engelhard, Stefan; Lajoinie, Guillaume; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Versluis, Michel; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of distal stenotic lesions on flow patterns near a covered endovascular reconstruction of the aortic bifurcation (CERAB) configuration used in the treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Method: Laser particle image velocimetry measurements were performed using

  1. Carotenoids co-localize with hydroxyapatite, cholesterol, and other lipids in calcified stenotic aortic valves. Ex vivo Raman maps compared to histological patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonetti, A.; Bonifacio, A.; Della Mora, A.; Livi, U.; Marchini, M.; Ortolani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike its application for atherosclerotic plaque analysis, Raman microspectroscopy was sporadically used to check the sole nature of bioapatite deposits in stenotic aortic valves, neglecting the involvement of accumulated lipids/lipoproteins in the calcific process. Here, Raman microspectroscopy was employed for examination of stenotic aortic valve leaflets to add information on nature and distribution of accumulated lipids and their correlation with mineralization in the light of its potent...

  2. Three-year results after directional atherectomy of calcified stenotic lesions of the superficial femoral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, P; Buecker, A; Jaeger, S; Katoh, M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the 3-year outcome of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and heavily calcified stenotic lesions of the superficial femoral artery after directional atherectomy. Fifty-three patients (mean age 67 ± 10 years; 18 females, 35 males, TASC B and C, mean lesion length 7.9 ± 3.5 cm) with PAD (Rutherford 2-6) were enrolled into this prospective monocentric study. In total, 59 calcified lesions of the superficial femoral artery were treated with the Silverhawk atherectomy device (Covidien, Plymouth, MN, USA). Patients were followed-up for 36 months with a 6-month interval to perform clinical re-evaluation, including measurement of maximum walking distance and ankle-brachial index (ABI) as well as duplex-sonography. The primary success rate of the procedure was 92 %. In five cases (8 %), additional balloon-PTA and/or stent-PTA was necessary. Procedure-related embolization occurred in seven cases (12 %), which were all successfully treated by aspiration. The primary patency rate after 3 years was 55 %. Median Rutherford score decreased significantly from 5 to 0 after 36 months (p atherectomy was successfully applied to decrease the plaque burden. Results after 3 years showed a significant decrease of Rutherford score with persistent improvement of ABI and reasonable patency rate.

  3. Inflammatory aortic arch syndrome: contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional MR - angiography in stenotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, M.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.; Biederer, J.; Heller, M.; Reuter, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of contrast-enhanced, three-dimensional MR angiography for the evaluation of stenotic and occlusive vascular lesions in inflammatory aortic arch syndrome. Materials and Methods: 14 patients with inflammatory aortic arch syndrome (giant cell arteritis: n = 8, Takayasu arteritis: n = 4, ankylosing spondylitis: n = 1 sarcoidosis: n = 1) underwent MR angiography of the aortic arch and the supra-aortic vessels (n = 15,2 patients were examined twice) and of the abdominal aorta (n = 2). MRA was performed using a 3D-FLASH sequence (TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, flip angle 30 ) on a 1.5T system. MRA imaging was compared with the findings of DSA, which served as gold standard. Results: In a total of 467 examined vascular territories, DSA revealed 50 stenoses and 35 occlusions. All lesions were detected by MRA. In 23 segments, the degree of stenosis was overestimated by MRA. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA were 100% and 94,3%, positive and negative predictive values were 73.6 and 100%, and the accuracy was 95,1%. Conclusions: Despite a tendency to overestimate stenoses, contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography is a valid, non-invasive technique in the assessment of inflammatory aortic arch syndrome. (orig.) [de

  4. What Is Carotid Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lack of physical activity . Too much sitting (sedentary lifestyle) and a lack of aerobic activity can worsen other risk factors for carotid artery disease, such as unhealthy blood cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, diabetes, and ...

  5. Intracerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Boesen, J

    1987-01-01

    Among 662 consecutive carotid endarterectomies eight cases of postoperative ipsilateral intracerebral haemorrhage were identified, occurring into brain areas which, preoperatively were without infarction. As blood pressures across the stenosis were routinely measured during surgery, the internal...

  6. Hyperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, P.B.; Wong, M.J.; Belzberg, A.; Holden, J.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the CT scans of two patients who, following carotid endarterectomy, developed headache and seizures suggestive of hyperperfusion syndrome. Their CT scans demonstrated ipsilateral mass effect and white matter hypodensity. One patient progressed to hemorrhage and died. Although infarction is described as the commonest neurologic event to occur after carotid endarterectomy, autopsy or cerebral blood flow studies in these patients suggests that the changes were due to hyperperfusion rather that infarction. (orig.)

  7. Cardiac Computed Tomography versus Echocardiography in the Assessment of Stenotic Rheumatic Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal Aksu, Hale; Gorgulu, Sevket; Diker, Mustafa; Celik, Omer; Aksu, Huseyin; Ozturk, Derya; Kırıs, Adem; Kalkan, Ali Kemal; Erturk, Mehmet; Bakır, İhsan

    2016-03-01

    There are different clinical cardiac applications of dual source computed tomography (DSCT). Here, we aimed to compare the DSCT with the transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for evaluating the Wilkins score and planimetric mitral valve area (MVA) of a rheumatic stenotic mitral valve. We prospectively evaluated mitral valvular structure and function in 31 patients with known mitral stenosis undergoing electrocardiogram-gated, second-generation DSCT, in our heart center for different indications. Mitral valve was evaluated using Wilkins score, and also, the planimetric MVA was assessed. We found a significant difference between MVAs determined by DSCT (average 1.42 ± 0.44 cm2) and MVAs determined by TTE (average 1.35 ± 0.43 cm2 ; difference 0.07 ± 0.16 cm2; P = 0.018). Linear regression analysis revealed a good correlation between the two techniques (r = 0.934; P < 0.0001). The limits of agreement for DSCT and TTE in the Bland-Altman analysis were ±0.31 cm2 . DSCT using TTE as the reference enabled good discrimination between mild and moderate-to-severe stenosis and had an area under the ROC curve of 0.967 (CI 0.912-1.023; P < 0.0001). Wilkins scores obtained by DSCT (7.51 ± 1.17, range 5-10) and TTE (8.16 ± 1.27, range 6-10) had a moderate correlation (r = 0.686; P < 0.0001). We found that planimetric MVA measurements assessed by DSCT were closely correlated with MVA calculations by TTE. The moderate correlation was observed for the Wilkins score. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  9. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann–Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Results: Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P = 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P = 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P = 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P = 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Conclusions: Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or

  10. Hemodynamics in Transplant Renal Artery Stenosis and its Alteration after Stent Implantation Based on a Patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yang; Liu, Long-Shan; Cao, Hai-Ming; Li, Jun; Deng, Rong-Hai; Fu, Qian; Zhang, Huan-Xi; Fei, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chang-Xi

    Accumulating studies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) support the involvement of hemodynamic factors in artery stenosis. Based on a patient-specific CFD model, the present study aimed to investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) and its alteration after stent treatment. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) data of kidney transplant recipients in a single transplant center from April 2013 to November 2014 were reviewed. The three-dimensional geometry of transplant renal artery (TRA) was reconstructed from the qualified CTA images and categorized into three groups: the normal, stenotic, and stented groups. Hemodynamic parameters including pressure distribution, velocity, wall shear stress (WSS), and mass flow rate (MFR) were extracted. The data of hemodynamic parameters were expressed as median (interquartile range), and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for analysis. Totally, 6 normal, 12 stenotic, and 6 stented TRAs were included in the analysis. TRAS presented nonuniform pressure distribution, adverse pressure gradient across stenosis throat, flow vortex, and a separation zone at downstream stenosis. Stenotic arteries had higher maximal velocity and maximal WSS (2.94 [2.14, 3.30] vs. 1.06 [0.89, 1.15] m/s, 256.5 [149.8, 349.4] vs. 41.7 [37.8, 45.3] Pa at end diastole, P= 0.001; 3.25 [2.67, 3.56] vs. 1.65 [1.18, 1.72] m/s, 281.3 [184.3, 364.7] vs. 65.8 [61.2, 71.9] Pa at peak systole, P= 0.001) and lower minimal WSS and MFRs (0.07 [0.03, 0.13] vs. 0.52 [0.45, 0.67] Pa, 1.5 [1.0, 3.0] vs. 11.0 [8.0, 11.3] g/s at end diastole, P= 0.001; 0.08 [0.03, 0.19] vs. 0.70 [0.60, 0.81] Pa, 2.0 [1.3, 3.3] vs. 16.5 [13.0, 20.3] g/s at peak systole, P= 0.001) as compared to normal arteries. Stent implantation ameliorated all the alterations of the above hemodynamic factors except low WSS. Hemodynamic factors were significantly changed in severe TRAS. Stent implantation can restore or ameliorate deleterious change of hemodynamic

  11. Similar degree of intimal hyperplasia in surgically detected stenotic and nonstenotic arteriovenous fistula segments: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Juan C; Tabbara, Marwan; Martinez, Laisel; Paez, Angela; Selman, Guillermo; Salman, Loay H; Velazquez, Omaida C; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I

    2018-04-01

    Intimal hyperplasia has been historically associated with improper venous remodeling and stenosis after creation of an arteriovenous fistula. Recently, however, we showed that intimal hyperplasia by itself does not explain the failure of maturation of 2-stage arteriovenous fistulas. We seek to evaluate whether intimal hyperplasia plays a role in the development of focal stenosis of an arteriovenous fistula. This study compares intimal hyperplasia lesions in stenotic and nearby nonstenotic segments collected from the same arteriovenous fistula. Focal areas of stenosis were detected in the operating room in patients (n= 14) undergoing the second-stage vein transposition procedure. The entire vein was inspected, and areas of stenosis were visually located with the aid of manual palpation and hemodynamic changes in the vein peripheral and central to the narrowing. Stenotic and nonstenotic segments were documented by photography before tissue collection (14 tissue pairs). Intimal area and thickness, intima-media thickness, and intima to media area ratio were measured in hematoxylin and eosin stained cross-sections followed by pairwise statistical comparisons. The intimal area in stenotic and nonstenotic segments ranged from 1.25 to 11.61 mm 2 and 1.29 to 5.81 mm 2 , respectively. There was no significant difference between these 2 groups (P=.26). Maximal intimal thickness (P=.22), maximal intima-media thickness (P=.13), and intima to media area ratio (P=.73) were also similar between both types of segments. This preliminary study indicates that postoperative intimal hyperplasia by itself is not associated with the development of focal venous stenosis in 2-stage fistulas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Carotid cavernous fistula after elective carotid endarterectomy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Asser

    2014-12-01

    This is a case to illustrate a rare complication of carotid artery surgery. The patient had atherosclerotic vessel damage of ICA visible on earlier CT scans. This combined with abrupt increase of transmural pressure due to the revascularization procedure could possibly lead to arterial wall rupture and fistula formation.

  13. Patient-specific hip prostheses designed by surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coigny Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient-specific bone and joint replacement implants lead to better functional and aesthetic results than conventional methods [1], [2], [3]. But extracting 3D shape information from CT Data and designing individual implants is demanding and requires multiple surgeon-to-engineer interactions. For manufacturing purposes, Additive Manufacturing offers various advantages, especially for low volume manufacturing parts, such as patient specific implants. To ease these new approaches and to avoid surgeon-to-engineer interactions a new design software approach is needed which offers highly automated and user friendly planning steps.

  14. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    simulationer, som tillod beregning af longitudinelle stress-niveauer i den fibrøse kappe. Afhandlingen indeholder tre artikler, som beskriver denne metode. Den første; “Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques using MRI-Based Fluid Structure Interaction Models”, beskriver i detaljer metoden til at danne de...

  15. Modelling and simulation of temperature and concentration dispersion in a couple stress nanofluid flow through stenotic tapered arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana Reddy, J. V.; Srikanth, D.; Das, Samir K.

    2017-08-01

    A couple stress fluid model with the suspension of silver nanoparticles is proposed in order to investigate theoretically the natural convection of temperature and concentration. In particular, the flow is considered in an artery with an obstruction wherein the rheology of blood is taken as a couple stress fluid. The effects of the permeability of the stenosis and the treatment procedure involving a catheter are also considered in the model. The obtained non-linear momentum, temperature and concentration equations are solved using the homotopy perturbation method. Nanoparticles and the two viscosities of the couple stress fluid seem to play a significant role in the flow regime. The pressure drop, flow rate, resistance to the fluid flow and shear stress are computed and their effects are analyzed with respect to various fluids and geometric parameters. Convergence of the temperature and its dependency on the degree of deformation is effectively depicted. It is observed that the Nusselt number increases as the volume fraction increases. Hence magnification of molecular thermal dispersion can be achieved by increasing the nanoparticle concentration. It is also observed that concentration dispersion is greater for severe stenosis and it is maximum at the first extrema. The secondary flow of the axial velocity in the stenotic region is observed and is asymmetric in the tapered artery. The obtained results can be utilized in understanding the increase in heat transfer and enhancement of mass dispersion, which could be used for drug delivery in the treatment of stenotic conditions.

  16. 3D flow study in a mildly stenotic coronary artery phantom using a whole volume PIV method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, J; Mongrain, R; Laurier, J; Galaz, R; Tardif, J C

    2008-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics has an important role in atherosclerosis initiation, progression, plaque rupture and thrombosis eventually causing myocardial infarction. In particular, shear stress is involved in platelet activation, endothelium function and secondary flows have been proposed as possible variables in plaque erosion. In order to investigate these three-dimensional flow characteristics in the context of a mild stenotic coronary artery, a whole volume PIV method has been developed and applied to a scaled-up transparent phantom. Experimental three-dimensional velocity data was processed to estimate the 3D shear stress distributions and secondary flows within the flow volume. The results show that shear stress reaches values out of the normal and atheroprotective range at an early stage of the obstructive pathology and that important secondary flows are also initiated at an early stage of the disease. The results also support the concept of a vena contracta associated with the jet in the context of a coronary artery stenosis with the consequence of higher shear stresses in the post-stenotic region in the blood domain than at the vascular wall.

  17. Patient Specific Modeling of Head-Up Tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Nakeya; Wright, Andrew; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Short term cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) experiments involve complex cardiovascular regulation in order to maintain blood pressure at homeostatic levels. This manuscript presents a patient specific compartmental model developed to predict dynamic changes in heart rate and arterial...

  18. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain | Baichoo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain.

  19. Automatic selective feature retention in patient specific elastic surface registration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy with which a recent elastic surface registration algorithm deforms the complex geometry of a skull is examined. This algorithm is then coupled to a line based algorithm as is frequently used in patient specific feature registration...

  20. Patient specific 3D visualisation of human brain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    development of powerful new 3D image analysis and visualization algorithms that ... The tool is aimed to provide facility to reconstruct patient-specific 3D ... In this paper we present a review of the ... medical diagnosis, procedures training, pre-operative planning, ..... Body: Handbook of Numerical Analysis, Elsevier, 2004.

  1. 3D-printed patient-specific applications in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong KC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kwok Chuen Wong Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Abstract: With advances in both medical imaging and computer programming, two-dimensional axial images can be processed into other reformatted views (sagittal and coronal and three-dimensional (3D virtual models that represent a patients’ own anatomy. This processed digital information can be analyzed in detail by orthopedic surgeons to perform patient-specific orthopedic procedures. The use of 3D printing is rising and has become more prevalent in medical applications over the last decade as surgeons and researchers are increasingly utilizing the technology’s flexibility in manufacturing objects. 3D printing is a type of manufacturing process in which materials such as plastic or metal are deposited in layers to create a 3D object from a digital model. This additive manufacturing method has the advantage of fabricating objects with complex freeform geometry, which is impossible using traditional subtractive manufacturing methods. Specifically in surgical applications, the 3D printing techniques can not only generate models that give a better understanding of the complex anatomy and pathology of the patients and aid in education and surgical training, but can also produce patient-specific surgical guides or even custom implants that are tailor-made to the surgical requirements. As the clinical workflow of the 3D printing technology continues to evolve, orthopedic surgeons should embrace the latest knowledge of the technology and incorporate it into their clinical practice for patient-specific orthopedic applications. This paper is written to help orthopedic surgeons stay up-to-date on the emerging 3D technology, starting from the acquisition of clinical imaging to 3D printing for patient-specific applications in orthopedics. It 1 presents the necessary steps to prepare the medical images that are

  2. Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia: Role of Color-Coded Carotid Duplex Sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Ya; Liu, Hung-Yu; Lim, Kun-Eng; Lin, Shinn-Kuang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of color-coded carotid duplex sonography for diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. We retrospectively reviewed 25,000 color-coded carotid duplex sonograms in our neurosonographic database to establish more diagnostic criteria for internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A definitive diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia was made in 9 patients. Diagnostic findings on color-coded carotid duplex imaging include a long segmental small-caliber lumen (52% diameter) with markedly decreased flow (13% flow volume) in the affected internal carotid artery relative to the contralateral side but without intraluminal lesions. Indirect findings included markedly increased total flow volume (an increase of 133%) in both vertebral arteries, antegrade ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow, and a reduced vessel diameter with increased flow resistance in the ipsilateral common carotid artery. Ten patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection showed a similar color-coded duplex pattern, but the reductions in the internal and common carotid artery diameters and increase in collateral flow from the vertebral artery were less prominent than those in hypoplasia. The ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow was retrograde in 40% of patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection. In addition, thin-section axial and sagittal computed tomograms of the skull base could show the small diameter of the carotid canal in internal carotid artery hypoplasia and help distinguish hypoplasia from distal internal carotid artery dissection. Color-coded carotid duplex sonography provides important clues for establishing a diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A hypoplastic carotid canal can be shown by thin-section axial and sagittal skull base computed tomography to confirm the final diagnosis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Acute internal carotid artery occlusion after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Yunoki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of acute carotid artery (CA occlusion following carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Case 1: a 58-year-old man was admitted with transient right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR angiography (MRA revealed cerebral infarction in the left cerebral hemisphere and left CA stenosis. Ten days after admission, he underwent CEA. 24 h after surgery, he developed right hemiplegia. MRI and MRA demonstrated a slightly enlarged infarction and left internal carotid artery (ICA occlusion. Emergency reoperation was performed and complete recanalization achieved. The patient made a clinically significant recovery. Case 2: a 65 year-old man underwent a right-sided CEA for an asymptomatic 80% CA stenosis. 48 h after surgery, his family noticed he was slightly disorientated. MRI and MRA revealed multiple infarctions and right ICA occlusion. He was treated with antiplatelet therapy without reoperation because sufficient cross-flow from the left ICA through the anterior communicating artery was demonstrated by angiography, and his neurological symptoms were mild. His symptoms gradually alleviated and he was discharged 14 days after surgery. With ICA occlusion after CEA, immediate re-operation is mandatory with severe neurological symptoms, whereas individualized judgement is needed when the symptoms are mild.

  4. Reversal of renal dysfunction by targeted administration of VEGF into the stenotic kidney: a novel potential therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R; Kelsen, Silvia

    2012-05-15

    Renal microvascular (MV) damage and loss contribute to the progression of renal injury in renovascular disease (RVD). Whether a targeted intervention in renal microcirculation could reverse renal damage is unknown. We hypothesized that intrarenal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy will reverse renal dysfunction and decrease renal injury in experimental RVD. Unilateral renal artery stenosis (RAS) was induced in 14 pigs, as a surrogate of chronic RVD. Six weeks later, renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were quantified in vivo in the stenotic kidney using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Then, intrarenal rhVEGF-165 or vehicle was randomly administered into the stenotic kidneys (n = 7/group), they were observed for 4 additional wk, in vivo studies were repeated, and then renal MV density was quantified by 3D micro-CT, and expression of angiogenic factors and fibrosis was determined. RBF and GFR, MV density, and renal expression of VEGF and downstream mediators such as p-ERK 1/2, Akt, and eNOS were significantly reduced after 6 and at 10 wk of untreated RAS compared with normal controls. Remarkably, administration of VEGF at 6 wk normalized RBF (from 393.6 ± 50.3 to 607.0 ± 45.33 ml/min, P < 0.05 vs. RAS) and GFR (from 43.4 ± 3.4 to 66.6 ± 10.3 ml/min, P < 0.05 vs. RAS) at 10 wk, accompanied by increased angiogenic signaling, augmented renal MV density, and attenuated renal scarring. This study shows promising therapeutic effects of a targeted renal intervention, using an established clinically relevant large-animal model of chronic RAS. It also implies that disruption of renal MV integrity and function plays a pivotal role in the progression of renal injury in the stenotic kidney. Furthermore, it shows a high level of plasticity of renal microvessels to a single-dose VEGF-targeted intervention after established renal injury, supporting promising renoprotective effects of a novel potential therapeutic intervention to

  5. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Barney, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use. (paper)

  6. Peri-stent aneurysm formation following a stent implant for stenotic intracranial vertebral artery dissection: a technical report of two cases successfully treated with coil embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Hideki; Nakashima, Kazuaki; Takahata, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Yohjiro

    2013-02-01

    Although stenting for stenotic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) improves compromised blood flow, subsequent peri-stent aneurysm (PSA) formation is not well-known. We report two cases with PSA successfully treated with coil embolization. Three patients with stenotic intracranial VAD underwent endovascular angioplasty at our institution because they had acute infarction in posterior circulation territory and clinical evidence of hemodynamic insufficiency. In two of three patients balloon angioplasty at first session failed to relieve the stenosis, and a coronary stent was implanted. Angiography immediately after stenting showed no abnormality in case 1 and minimal slit-like projection at proximal portion of the stent in case 2. Angiography obtained 16 months after the stenting revealed PSA in case 1. In case 2, angiography performed 3 months later showed that the projection at proximal portion enlarged and formed an aneurysm outside the stent. Because follow-up angiographies showed growth of the aneurysm in both cases, endovascular aneurysmal embolization was performed. We advanced a microcatheter into the aneurysm through the strut of existing stent and delivered detachable coils into the aneurysm lumen successfully in both cases. The post-procedural course was uneventful, and complete obliteration of aneurysm was confirmed on angiography in both cases. Stenting for stenotic intracranial VAD may result in delayed PSA; therefore, follow-up angiographies would be necessary after stenting for stenotic intracranial arterial dissection. Coil embolization through the stent strut would be a solution for enlarging PSA.

  7. Multidisciplinary approach to carotid stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, C S; Chambers, B R; Clark, D J; Molan, M; Brooks, M; Roberts, N; Fell, G; Roberts, A K; New, G; Donnan, G A

    2011-11-01

    Stroke neurologists, vascular surgeons, interventional neuroradiologists and interventional cardiologists have embraced carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) because of potential advantages over carotid endarterectomy (CEA). At Austin Health, a multidisciplinary neuro-interventional group was formed to standardise indications and facilitate training. The aims of this study were to describe our organisational model and to determine whether 30-day complications and early outcomes were similar to those of major trials. A clinical protocol was developed to ensure optimal management. CAS was performed on patients with high medical risk for CEA, with technically difficult anatomy for CEA, or who were randomised to CAS in a trial. From October 2003 to May 2008, 47 patients (34 male, mean age 71.5) underwent CAS of 50 carotid arteries. Forty-three cases had ipsilateral carotid territory symptoms within the previous 12 months. The main indications for CAS were high risk for CEA (n= 17) and randomised to CAS (n= 21). Interventionists were proctored in 27 cases. The procedural success rate was 94% with two cases abandoned because of anatomical problems and one because of on-table angina. Hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy occurred in 12 cases (24%). The duration of follow up was one to 44 months (mean 6.8 months). The 30-day rate of peri-procedural stroke or death was 6% and the one-year rate of peri-procedural stroke or death or subsequent ipsilateral stroke was 10.6%. Restenosis occurred in 13% (all asymptomatic). A multidisciplinary approach is a useful strategy for initiating and sustaining a CAS programme. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numaguchi, Y.; Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA; Puyau, F.A.; Provenza, L.J.; Richardson, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The successful dilatation of postsurgical concentric stenosis of an internal carotid artery using percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is reported here. Only one such case has been previously documented. Review of the literature disclosed 16 patients who received transluminal angioplasty for stenosis of carotid arteries by percutaneous or open arteriotomy techniques. The authors feel that PTA may be the treatment of choice for postoperative concentric stenosis of a short segment of the carotid artery as opposed to surgical repair. (orig.)

  9. Resting and hypercapnic rCBF in patients with unilateral occlusive disease of the internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyeux, A.; Laterre, C.; Beckers, C.

    1988-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by the 133 Xe inhalation technique in 15 patients with severe unilateral internal carotid artery stenosis (75%) or occlusion, and in the absence of evidence of any sign of occlusive disease in other main afferent cerebral arteries. A comparison with normal subjects showed that lowered resting flow in both hemispheres was a common finding in all patients. Interhemispheric asymmetry was present only in patients with occlusion and the precentral, posterior temporal, and occipital regions were the most seriously affected. The CO 2 reactivity was substantially reduced in both hemispheres of all stenotic and occluded patients, but occluded patients showed an increased reduction of CO 2 reactivity only in the ipsilateral hemisphere. In addition to an hypothetical age effect, the atherosclerotic involvement of the cerebral vascular system leads to a reduction of flow and loss of CO 2 reactivity in both hemispheres. In this context, the collateral supply capacity is not overloaded in case of a unilateral severe stenosis but fails in case of a unilateral occlusion of the internal carotid artery. A suitable estimate of the blood flow reduction as a result of occlusion is made by the hemispheric and regional laterality indices applied in resting and hypercapnia conditions. These indices could be used as indicators for endarterectomy or bypass surgery as well as a sensitive means for appreciating cerebral blood flow response to treatment

  10. DURAL CAROTID-CAVERNOUS FISTULAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Cvenkel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistulas (CCF are communications fed by meningeal branches of the intracavernous internal carotid artery (ACI or/and external carotid artery (ACE. In contrast to typical CCF, the arteriovenous shunting of blood is usually low flow and low pressure. Spontaneous dural CCF are more common in postmenopausal women. Aetiology is unknown, but congenital malformation or rupture of thin-walled dural arteries within venous sinuses is believed to be the cause.Case reports. 3 cases lacking the typical clinical signs of CCF who had been treated as chronic conjunctivitis, myositis of the extraocular muscle and orbital pseudotumour are presented. Clinical presentation depends on the direction and magnitude of fistular flow and on the anatomy of the collateral branches. If increased blood flow is directed anteriorly in ophthalmic veins the signs of orbito-ocular congestion are present (»redeyed shunt syndrome«. Drainage primarly in the inferior petrosal sinus may cause painful oculomotor and abducens palsies without signs of ocular congestion (»white-eyed shunt syndrome«. Also different therapeutic approaches as well as possible complications are described.Conclusions. For definite diagnosis angiography is obligatory and is also therapeutic as one third to one half of dural CCF close spontaneously. Because of potential severe eye and systemic complications, surgical intervention is indicated only in cases with uncontrolled secondary glaucoma and hypoxic retinopathy.

  11. Internal emitter dosimetry: are patient-specific calculations necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The question of whether patient-specific calculations are needed in internal emitter dosimetry arises when radionuclides are used for therapy. In diagnostic procedures the absorbed dose delivered to normal tissue is far below hazardous levels. In internal emitter therapy, the need for patient-specific dosimetry may arise if a large variability in biodistribution, normal tissue toxicity or efficacy is anticipated. Patient-specificity may be accomplished at the level of pharmacokinetics, anatomy/tumor-geometry or both. At the first level, information regarding the biodistribution of a particular radiolabeled agent is obtained and used to determine the maximum activity that may be administered for treatment. The classical example of this is radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer. In radioiodine therapy, the therapy dose is preceded by a tracer dose of I-131-iodide which is used to measure patient kinetics by imaging and whole-body counting. Absorbed dose estimates obtained from these data are used to constrain the therapy dose to meet safety criteria established in a previously performed dose-response study. The most ambitious approach to patient-specific dosimetry, requires a three-dimensional set of images representing radionuclide distribution (SPECT or PET) and a corresponding set of registered images representing anatomy (CT or MRI). The spatial distribution of absorbed dose or dose-rate may then be obtained by convolution of a point-kernel with the radioactivity distribution or by Monte Carlo calculation. The spatial absorbed dose or dose-rate distribution may be represented as a set of images, as isodose contours, or as dose-volume histograms. The 3-D Monte Carlo approach is, in principle, the most patient-specific; it accounts for patient anatomy and tumor geometry as well as for the spatial distribution of radioactivity. It is also, however, the most logistically and technically demanding. Patients are required to undergo CT or MRI and at least one

  12. Comparison of Early Outcomes with Three Approaches for Combined Coronary Revascularization and Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Antal Dönmez

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This study aims to compare three different surgical approaches for combined coronary and carotid artery stenosis as a single stage procedure and to assess effect of operative strategy on mortality and neurological complications. Methods: This retrospective study involves 136 patients who had synchronous coronary artery revascularization and carotid endarterectomy in our institution, between January 2002 and December 2012. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the surgical technique used. Group I included 70 patients who had carotid endarterectomy, followed by coronary revascularization with on-pump technique, group II included 29 patients who had carotid endarterectomy, followed by coronary revascularization with off-pump technique, group III included 37 patients who had coronary revascularization with on-pump technique followed by carotid endarterectomy under aortic cross-clamp and systemic hypothermia (22-27ºC. Postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Results: Overall early mortality and stroke rate was 5.1% for both. There were 3 (4.3% deaths in group I, 2 (6.9% deaths in group II and 2 (5.4% deaths in group III. Stroke was observed in 5 (7.1% patients in group I and 2 (6.9% in group II. Stroke was not observed in group III. No statistically significant difference was observed for mortality and stroke rates among the groups. Conclusion: We identified no significant difference in mortality or neurologic complications among three approaches for synchronous surgery for coronary and carotid disease. Therefore it is impossible to conclude that a single principle might be adapted into standard practice. Patient specific risk factors and clinical conditions might be important in determining the surgical tecnnique.

  13. Usefulness of BMIPP SPECT to evaluate myocardial viability, contractile reserve and coronary stenotic progression after reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsunuma, Eita; Kurokawa, Shingo; Takahashi, Motoi; Fukuda, Naoto; Kurosawa, Toshiro; Izumi, Tohru

    2001-01-01

    Using combined 123 I-BMIPP (BMIPP), 201 Tl (Tl) and 99m Tc-PYP (PYP) myocardial SPECT imaging, risk areas of acute myocardial infarction were documented in the acute stage, and then these images were evaluated for how well they reflected muscle viability, contractile reserve and coronary stenotic progression subsequent to reperfusion therapy. Patients who only experienced a first attack of myocardial infarction were enrolled. In total, 36 cases who had had the occluded artery successfully reperfused were examined during the past year. They had no significant vessel disease except for the culprit single artery. The patients were comprised of 32 men and 4 women. The mean age was 59.5 years. All patients underwent coronary angiography and left ventricular (LV) angiography in the emergency room. BMIPP/Tl and PYP myocardial SPECT were conducted in the acute stage and chronic stage. In the chronic stage LV angiography was repeated to assess the improvement of LV wall motion. The response to postextrasystolic potentiation (PESP) testing was performed to estimate myocardial contractile reserve. The risk area of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was documented by reduced BMIPP accumulation. The size of reduced BMIPP accumulation was larger than that of PYP accumulation. A BMIPP/Tl discrepancy and PYP accumulation were documented to assess myocardial viability. Both improvement in LV wall motion and augmentation of PESP response were more closely related to a BMIPP/Tl discrepancy in the presence or absence of PYP accumulation. Therefore, it would be possible to evaluate myocardial viability and contractile reserve by the BMIPP/Tl discrepancy. In patients with good viability, it is important to predict whether there is coronary stenotic progression or not. In this study, we demonstrated that most patients with improved BMIPP images had no significant progression at the site of intervention. Serial observation of BMIPP images from the acute stage to the chronic stage might

  14. Patient specific ankle-foot orthoses using rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Ranky, Richard G; Sivak, Mark L; Patritti, Benjamin L; DiPisa, Joseph; Caddle, Alyssa; Gilhooly, Kara; Govoni, Lauren; Sivak, Seth; Lancia, Michael; Drillio, Robert; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-12

    Prefabricated orthotic devices are currently designed to fit a range of patients and therefore they do not provide individualized comfort and function. Custom-fit orthoses are superior to prefabricated orthotic devices from both of the above-mentioned standpoints. However, creating a custom-fit orthosis is a laborious and time-intensive manual process performed by skilled orthotists. Besides, adjustments made to both prefabricated and custom-fit orthoses are carried out in a qualitative manner. So both comfort and function can potentially suffer considerably. A computerized technique for fabricating patient-specific orthotic devices has the potential to provide excellent comfort and allow for changes in the standard design to meet the specific needs of each patient. In this paper, 3D laser scanning is combined with rapid prototyping to create patient-specific orthoses. A novel process was engineered to utilize patient-specific surface data of the patient anatomy as a digital input, manipulate the surface data to an optimal form using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, and then download the digital output from the CAD software to a rapid prototyping machine for fabrication. Two AFOs were rapidly prototyped to demonstrate the proposed process. Gait analysis data of a subject wearing the AFOs indicated that the rapid prototyped AFOs performed comparably to the prefabricated polypropylene design. The rapidly prototyped orthoses fabricated in this study provided good fit of the subject's anatomy compared to a prefabricated AFO while delivering comparable function (i.e. mechanical effect on the biomechanics of gait). The rapid fabrication capability is of interest because it has potential for decreasing fabrication time and cost especially when a replacement of the orthosis is required.

  15. Patient specific ankle-foot orthoses using rapid prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivak Seth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prefabricated orthotic devices are currently designed to fit a range of patients and therefore they do not provide individualized comfort and function. Custom-fit orthoses are superior to prefabricated orthotic devices from both of the above-mentioned standpoints. However, creating a custom-fit orthosis is a laborious and time-intensive manual process performed by skilled orthotists. Besides, adjustments made to both prefabricated and custom-fit orthoses are carried out in a qualitative manner. So both comfort and function can potentially suffer considerably. A computerized technique for fabricating patient-specific orthotic devices has the potential to provide excellent comfort and allow for changes in the standard design to meet the specific needs of each patient. Methods In this paper, 3D laser scanning is combined with rapid prototyping to create patient-specific orthoses. A novel process was engineered to utilize patient-specific surface data of the patient anatomy as a digital input, manipulate the surface data to an optimal form using Computer Aided Design (CAD software, and then download the digital output from the CAD software to a rapid prototyping machine for fabrication. Results Two AFOs were rapidly prototyped to demonstrate the proposed process. Gait analysis data of a subject wearing the AFOs indicated that the rapid prototyped AFOs performed comparably to the prefabricated polypropylene design. Conclusions The rapidly prototyped orthoses fabricated in this study provided good fit of the subject's anatomy compared to a prefabricated AFO while delivering comparable function (i.e. mechanical effect on the biomechanics of gait. The rapid fabrication capability is of interest because it has potential for decreasing fabrication time and cost especially when a replacement of the orthosis is required.

  16. Analysis of 3D geometry in the stenosis of internal carotid artery siphon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Sheng; Xiao Jiangxi; Huang Yining; Zhang Chi; Li Deyu; Li Shuyu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify the differences of 3D geometry of internal carotid artery (ICA) siphon between the controls and patients with ICA siphon stenosis. Methods: The clinical and imaging data of the inpatients under, vent carotid artery MRA in the past three years were collected. All patients were divided into the control group (17 males and 14 females with mean age of 67.5 years) and ICA siphon stenosis group (20 males and 9 females with mean age of 58.6 years). There were 5 smokers and 9 smokers in two groups, respectively. The atheroselerotic predisposing factors were compared between the two groups using chi-square test and paired t-test. In order to extract the 3D geometry of ICA siphon, the MRA data were transferred to PC and processed with the software of Mimics. The average curvature radius (ACR) was calculated and paired t-test was applied to determine the bilateral differences in the controls. According to the stenotic site of ICA siphon, ICA siphon stenosis group was divided into C2 segment stenosis group and C4 segment stenosis group. The differences of ACR among the control group, C2 segment stenosis group and C4 segment stenosis group were compared. In addition, the values of ACR in the stenotic and normal sides were compared with paired t-test in patients with unilateral C2 segment stenosis. Results: No significant differences were found in gender and smoker between the control group and the ICA siphon stenosis group (χ 2 =1.63, P>0.05; χ 2 =1.86, P>0.05). The systolic blood pressure was (146.6±21.3) mm Hg (1 mm Hg=0.133 kPa)and (140.3±17.3) mm Hg respectively in the ICA siphon stenosis group and the control group. The serum glucose level was (5.94±1.89) mmoL/L and (6.79±3.57) mmol/L respectively in two groups. The serum cholesterol level and triglyceride level were (4.57±0.87) mmol/L, (1.34±0.63) mmoL/L and (4.75±1.70) mmol/L, (1.54±0.72) mmol/L respectively in two groups. There were no differences in the atherosclerotic predisposing

  17. Establishing experimental model of human internal carotid artery siphon segment in canine common carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xuee; Li Minghua; Wang Yongli; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Wenbin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of establishing experimental model of human internal carotid artery siphon segment in canine common carotid artery (CCA) by end-to-end anastomoses of one side common carotid artery segment with the other side common carotid artery. Methods: Surgical techniques were used to make siphon model in 8 canines. One side CCA was taken as the parent artery and anastomosing with the cut off contra-lateral CCA segment which has passed through within the S-shaped glass tube. Two weeks after the creation of models angiography showed the model siphons were patent. Results: Experimental models of human internal carotid artery siphon segment were successfully made in all 8 dogs. Conclusions: It is practically feasible to establish experimental canine common carotid artery models of siphon segment simulating human internal carotid artery. (authors)

  18. Quantitative analysis of patient-specific dosimetric IMRT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budgell, G J; Perrin, B A; Mott, J H L; Fairfoul, J; Mackay, R I

    2005-01-01

    Patient-specific dosimetric verification methods for IMRT treatments are variable, time-consuming and frequently qualitative, preventing evidence-based reduction in the amount of verification performed. This paper addresses some of these issues by applying a quantitative analysis parameter to the dosimetric verification procedure. Film measurements in different planes were acquired for a series of ten IMRT prostate patients, analysed using the quantitative parameter, and compared to determine the most suitable verification plane. Film and ion chamber verification results for 61 patients were analysed to determine long-term accuracy, reproducibility and stability of the planning and delivery system. The reproducibility of the measurement and analysis system was also studied. The results show that verification results are strongly dependent on the plane chosen, with the coronal plane particularly insensitive to delivery error. Unexpectedly, no correlation could be found between the levels of error in different verification planes. Longer term verification results showed consistent patterns which suggest that the amount of patient-specific verification can be safely reduced, provided proper caution is exercised: an evidence-based model for such reduction is proposed. It is concluded that dose/distance to agreement (e.g., 3%/3 mm) should be used as a criterion of acceptability. Quantitative parameters calculated for a given criterion of acceptability should be adopted in conjunction with displays that show where discrepancies occur. Planning and delivery systems which cannot meet the required standards of accuracy, reproducibility and stability to reduce verification will not be accepted by the radiotherapy community

  19. Applications of patient-specific 3D printing in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Roth, Klaus E; Drees, Philipp; Maier, Gerrit S; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Ghazy, Ahmed; Neufurth, Meik; Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    Already three decades ago, the potential of medical 3D printing (3DP) or rapid prototyping for improved patient treatment began to be recognized. Since then, more and more medical indications in different surgical disciplines have been improved by using this new technique. Numerous examples have demonstrated the enormous benefit of 3DP in the medical care of patients by, for example, planning complex surgical interventions preoperatively, reducing implantation steps and anesthesia times, and helping with intraoperative orientation. At the beginning of every individual 3D model, patient-specific data on the basis of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound data is generated, which is then digitalized and processed using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. Finally, the resulting data sets are used to generate 3D-printed models or even implants. There are a variety of different application areas in the various medical fields, eg, drill or positioning templates, or surgical guides in maxillofacial surgery, or patient-specific implants in orthopedics. Furthermore, in vascular surgery it is possible to visualize pathologies such as aortic aneurysms so as to improve the planning of surgical treatment. Although rapid prototyping of individual models and implants is already applied very successfully in regenerative medicine, most of the materials used for 3DP are not yet suitable for implantation in the body. Therefore, it will be necessary in future to develop novel therapy approaches and design new materials in order to completely reconstruct natural tissue.

  20. Common carotid artery disease in Takayasu's arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, Nabil; Calderon, Luis I; Castro, Pablo and others

    2004-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a disease of unknown etiology with main involvement of the common carotid 5 artery and its branches. we report the case of a 69 years old female patient with Tokays arteritis with 2 bilateral involvements of the common carotid arteries, treated with percutaneous angioplasty and Stent implantation

  1. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    Neurologic symptoms in the region of an internal carotid artery stenosis are considered to be embolic in most instances. Only in a subgroup has carotid occlusive disease with impairment of the collateral supply, caused a state of hemodynamic failure with marked reduction of perfusion pressure. Th...

  2. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, Z.; Surlan, M.; Zvan, B.; Zaletel, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy is an uncommon but well-defined entity. There are only few reports of ''hyperperfusion injury'' following carotid angioplasty. Case report. We report an unstable arterial hypertension and high-grade carotid stenosis in a 58-year-old, right-handed woman. After a stroke in the territory of middle cerebral artery carotid angioplasty was performed in the patient. Among risk factors, the long lasting arterial hypertension was the most pronounced. Immediately after the procedure, the patient was stable without any additional neurologic deficit. The second day, the patient had an epileptic seizure and CT revealed a small haemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Conclusions. The combination of a high-grade carotid stenosis and unstable arterial pressure is probably an important prognostic factor in the pathogenesis of hyperperfusion syndrome. (author)

  3. Prediction of fibre architecture and adaptation in diseased carotid bifurcations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creane, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    Many studies have used patient-specific finite element models to estimate the stress environment in atherosclerotic plaques, attempting to correlate the magnitude of stress to plaque vulnerability. In complex geometries, few studies have incorporated the anisotropic material response of arterial tissue. This paper presents a fibre remodelling algorithm to predict the fibre architecture, and thus anisotropic material response in four patient-specific models of the carotid bifurcation. The change in fibre architecture during disease progression and its affect on the stress environment in the plaque were predicted. The mean fibre directions were assumed to lie at an angle between the two positive principal strain directions. The angle and the degree of dispersion were assumed to depend on the ratio of principal strain values. Results were compared with experimental observations and other numerical studies. In non-branching regions of each model, the typical double helix arterial fibre pattern was predicted while at the bifurcation and in regions of plaque burden, more complex fibre architectures were found. The predicted change in fibre architecture in the arterial tissue during plaque progression was found to alter the stress environment in the plaque. This suggests that the specimen-specific anisotropic response of the tissue should be taken into account to accurately predict stresses in the plaque. Since determination of the fibre architecture in vivo is a difficult task, the system presented here provides a useful method of estimating the fibre architecture in complex arterial geometries.

  4. Towards patient specific thermal modelling of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den; Kamer, Jeroen B van de; Leeuw, Astrid A C ee; Jeukens, Cecile R L P N; Raaymakers, Bas W; Vulpen, Marco van; Lagendijk, Jan J W

    2006-01-01

    The application of thermal modelling for hyperthermia and thermal ablation is severely hampered by lack of information about perfusion and vasculature. However, recently, with the advent of sophisticated angiography and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques, it has become possible to image small vessels and blood perfusion bringing the ultimate goal of patient specific thermal modelling closer within reach. In this study dynamic contrast enhanced multi-slice CT imaging techniques are employed to investigate the feasibility of this concept for regional hyperthermia treatment of the prostate. The results are retrospectively compared with clinical thermometry data of a patient group from an earlier trial. Furthermore, the role of the prostate vasculature in the establishment of the prostate temperature distribution is studied. Quantitative 3D perfusion maps of the prostate were constructed for five patients using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetics model to analyse dynamic CT data. CT angiography was applied to construct a discrete vessel model of the pelvis. Additionally, a discrete vessel model of the prostate vasculature was constructed of a prostate taken from a human corpse. Three thermal modelling schemes with increasing inclusion of the patient specific physiological information were used to simulate the temperature distribution of the prostate during regional hyperthermia. Prostate perfusion was found to be heterogeneous and T3 prostate carcinomas are often characterized by a strongly elevated tumour perfusion (up to 70-80 ml 100 g -1 min -1 ). This elevated tumour perfusion leads to 1-2 deg. C lower tumour temperatures than thermal simulations based on a homogeneous prostate perfusion. Furthermore, the comparison has shown that the simulations with the measured perfusion maps result in consistently lower prostate temperatures than clinically achieved. The simulations with the discrete vessel model indicate that significant pre-heating takes

  5. Surgeon Design Interface for Patient-Specific Concentric Tube Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tania K; Greer, Joseph D; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2016-06-01

    Concentric tube robots have potential for use in a wide variety of surgical procedures due to their small size, dexterity, and ability to move in highly curved paths. Unlike most existing clinical robots, the design of these robots can be developed and manufactured on a patient- and procedure-specific basis. The design of concentric tube robots typically requires significant computation and optimization, and it remains unclear how the surgeon should be involved. We propose to use a virtual reality-based design environment for surgeons to easily and intuitively visualize and design a set of concentric tube robots for a specific patient and procedure. In this paper, we describe a novel patient-specific design process in the context of the virtual reality interface. We also show a resulting concentric tube robot design, created by a pediatric urologist to access a kidney stone in a pediatric patient.

  6. Reliability of patient specific instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennart, Harold; Ngo Yamben, Marie-Ange; Kyriakidis, Theofylaktos; Zorman, David

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the precision between Patient Specific Instrumentation (PSI) and Conventional Instrumentation (CI) as determined intra-operatively by a pinless navigation system. Eighty patients were included in this prospective comparative study and they were divided into two homogeneous groups. We defined an original score from 6 to 30 points to evaluate the accuracy of the position of the cutting guides. This score is based on 6 objective criteria. The analysis indicated that PSI was not superior to conventional instrumentation in the overall score (p = 0.949). Moreover, no statistically significant difference was observed for any individual criteria of our score. Level of evidence II.

  7. Diagnosis of carotid artery stegnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwatoko, Takeshi; Okada, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Carotid Artery Stegnosis (CAS) is an important cause of the crisis of atherothrombotic cerebral infarction. This paper describes diagnosis and evaluation of CAS by echo and MRI/MR angiography (MRA) together with its clinical characteristics. Two hundreds Japanese patients undergone with carotid endarterectomy in authors' hospital are found to have had complications of coronary lesions in 38% and arteriosclerosis obliterans in 13%. Echo is a useful and simple method for detection of dynamic state of CAS and in cerebral infarction, diagnosis to decide whether the plaque is the culprit lesion is important as well as to decide the degree of stegnosis. The lesion is detected through the B mode method and the degree, through the color Doppler imaging; and blood flow rate and its waveform can be evaluated. MRI/MRA has advantages of its objectivity and wide imaging range. The MRI/MRA using various imaging techniques like black-blood method by spin echo or gradient echo modes and fat-suppression combination is advantageous and expectedly to be further developed for evaluation of plaque nature and status leading to therapeutic planning. Thus the degree of stegnosis and vulnerability of the plaque evaluated by echo and MRI/MRA of the cervical artery will be more important for judging the surgical applicability of circulatory reconstruction. (R.T.)

  8. Anomalous external carotid artery-internal carotid artery anastomosis in two patients with proximal internal carotid arterial remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hun [Dept. of Neurology, Stroke Center, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Dae; Kang, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Chai [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jun Hyong [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Two angiographic instances of anomalous external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) anastomosis are described, each occurring at the C2-3 level and bearing remnants of proximal ICA. The ICA remnant of one patient (identifiable immediately upon bifurcation of the common carotid artery) was hypoplastic, and that of the other patient was an occluded arterial stump. These features are not typical of non-bifurcating ICA. The occipital artery originated from an anomalous connection in one instance and from the main trunk of the ECA (just past the ECA-ICA connection) in the other.

  9. Cerebral intolerance during flow arrested carotid angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, Myron; Park, Brian D; Dahn, Michael; Bozeman, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The use of flow arrest as a means of providing cerebral protection during carotid angioplasty offers the advantages of improved efficiency of debris removal and the ability to provide protection under unfavorable (tortuous) anatomic circumstances. However, in contrast to the filtration methods of cerebral protection, this modality requires complete interruption of antegrade carotid artery flow during balloon angioplasty and stent deployment. We report our experience with 9 patients undergoing carotid angioplasty with the Mo.Ma device, which utilizes common and external carotid artery balloon occlusion during the angioplasty procedure. We assessed the clinical outcomes and intraprocedural hemodynamic data. The average duration of carotid occlusion was 8.3 minutes. Of the 9 patients, 2 patients (22%) experienced cerebral intolerance. No stroke occurred in this patient cohort. There appeared to be a poor relationship between procedure intolerance and the presence of significant contralateral stenosis or low carotid back pressure. Furthermore, the incidence of postangioplasty hypotension was not clearly related to cerebral intolerance. Carotid angioplasty with stenting can be safely conducted with flow arrest as an alternative to filter-type cerebral protection devices. However, because cerebral intolerance is not an infrequent occurrence with this approach, clinicians must be cognizant of management strategies for transient cerebral intolerance.

  10. Carotenoids co-localize with hydroxyapatite, cholesterol, and other lipids in calcified stenotic aortic valves. Ex vivo Raman maps compared to histological patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bonetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike its application for atherosclerotic plaque analysis, Raman microspectroscopy was sporadically used to check the sole nature of bioapatite deposits in stenotic aortic valves, neglecting the involvement of accumulated lipids/lipoproteins in the calcific process. Here, Raman microspectroscopy was employed for examination of stenotic aortic valve leaflets to add information on nature and distribution of accumulated lipids and their correlation with mineralization in the light of its potential precocious diagnostic use. Cryosections from surgically explanted stenotic aortic valves (n=4 were studied matching Raman maps against specific histological patterns. Raman maps revealed the presence of phospholipids/triglycerides and cholesterol, which showed spatial overlapping with one another and Raman-identified hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the Raman patterns correlated with those displayed by both von-Kossa-calcium- and Nile-blue-stained serial cryosections. Raman analysis also provided the first identification of carotenoids, which co-localized with the identified lipid moieties. Additional fit concerned the distribution of collagen and elastin. The good correlation of Raman maps with high-affinity staining patterns proved that Raman microspectroscopy is a reliable tool in evaluating calcification degree, alteration/displacement of extracellular matrix components, and accumulation rate of different lipid forms in calcified heart valves. In addition, the novel identification of carotenoids supports the concept that valve stenosis is an atherosclerosis-like valve lesion, consistently with their previous Raman microspectroscopical identification inside atherosclerotic plaques.

  11. Carotenoids co-localize with hydroxyapatite, cholesterol, and other lipids in calcified stenotic aortic valves. Ex vivo Raman maps compared to histological patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, A; Bonifacio, A; Della Mora, A; Livi, U; Marchini, M; Ortolani, F

    2015-04-20

    Unlike its application for atherosclerotic plaque analysis, Raman microspectroscopy was sporadically used to check the sole nature of bioapatite deposits in stenotic aortic valves, neglecting the involvement of accumulated lipids/lipoproteins in the calcific process. Here, Raman microspectroscopy was employed for examination of stenotic aortic valve leaflets to add information on nature and distribution of accumulated lipids and their correlation with mineralization in the light of its potential precocious diagnostic use. Cryosections from surgically explanted stenotic aortic valves (n=4) were studied matching Raman maps against specific histological patterns. Raman maps revealed the presence of phospholipids/triglycerides and cholesterol, which showed spatial overlapping with one another and Raman-identified hydroxyapatite. Moreover, the Raman patterns correlated with those displayed by both von-Kossa-calcium- and Nile-blue-stained serial cryosections. Raman analysis also provided the first identification of carotenoids, which co-localized with the identified lipid moieties. Additional fit concerned the distribution of collagen and elastin. The good correlation of Raman maps with high-affinity staining patterns proved that Raman microspectroscopy is a reliable tool in evaluating calcification degree, alteration/displacement of extracellular matrix components, and accumulation rate of different lipid forms in calcified heart valves. In addition, the novel identification of carotenoids supports the concept that valve stenosis is an atherosclerosis-like valve lesion, consistently with their previous Raman microspectroscopical identification inside atherosclerotic plaques.

  12. Carotid artery stenosis after neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Kasuya, Junji; Terasaki, Tadashi [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Uchino, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    Carotid artery stenosis sometimes occurs after cervical radiotherapy. We report a 70-year-old woman with a history of radiotherapy for thyroid cancer at the age of 28 years. She had no signs and symptoms except the skin lesion at the irradiation site. Duplex ultrasonography revealed heterogeneous plaques showing 50% stenosis of bilateral common carotid arteries. Those lesions were observed within segment of irradiation, where atheromatous plaque usually seldom occurs. These indicated that the carotid stenosis was induced by radiotherapy. Although the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for radiation-induced plaque is not clear, the plaques remained unchanged for 4 years in spite of aspirin administration. (author)

  13. Thalamic hemorrhage following carotid angioplasty and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Jonathan A.; Kallmes, David F.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has emerged as an alternative treatment of carotid stenosis for patients poorly suited for endarterectomy. Intracerebral hemorrhage following carotid revascularization is rare and thought to be related to hyperperfusion injury in most cases. Early experience suggests an increased incidence of hemorrhage following CAS as compared to endarterectomy. We describe a patient who suffered a thalamic hemorrhage following CAS. Because this hemorrhage occurred in a vascular territory unlikely to have been supplied by the treated artery, this case suggests that the mechanism of intracerebral hemorrhage following CAS may in some cases be different from the hyperperfusion hemorrhage classically described following endarterectomy. (orig.)

  14. Carotid artery bypass in acute postendarterectomy thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paty, P S; Darling, R C; Cordero, J A; Shah, D M; Chang, B B; Leather, R P

    1996-08-01

    Carotid endarterectomy has demonstrated excellent results over the past 2 decades with combined stroke mortality of improvement in symptoms in 79% (11 of 14) of the patients and complete resolution in 57% (8 of 14). In long-term follow up (1 to 41 months), there have been no occlusions and one restenosis requiring revision at 11 months. Carotid artery bypass can be performed safely with acceptable results. The use of autogenous venous conduits allows reconstruction with an endothelial lined conduit that may improve results in patients with acute postoperative neurologic deficit secondary to thrombosis of the endarterectomized carotid artery.

  15. Flow diversion in the treatment of carotid injury and carotid-cavernous fistula after transsphenoidal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Cheemum; Ahmed, Muhammad E; Glikstein, Rafael; dos Santos, Marlise P; Lesiuk, Howard; Labib, Mohamed; Kassam, Amin B

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of iatrogenic carotid injury with secondary carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) treated with a silk flow diverter stent placed within the injured internal carotid artery and coils placed within the cavernous sinus. Flow diverters may offer a simple and potentially safe vessel-sparing option in this rare complication of transsphenoidal surgery. The management options are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:26015526

  16. Presentation of a glomus carotid tumor as carotid sinus syndrome with syncopal episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickschas, A.; Harmann, B.; Herzog, T.; Marienhagen, J.

    1987-01-01

    An 80 year old patient was referred to neurology for clarification of her episodes of syncope. A set of radiological examinations indicated a diagnosis of paraganglion of the left carotid bifurcation. Using this case, an attempt is made to provide recommendations concerning the order of step-wise visualization techniques of clarifying glomus carotid tumors. This unusual case also provides an impetus for considering the physiology and pathogenesis of different forms of carotid sinus syndrome. (orig.) [de

  17. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ

  18. Carotid angioplasty with stenting for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Tanasawa, Toshihiko; Okada, Takeshi; Endo, Otone; Yamamoto, Naohito [Kainan Hospital Aichi Prefectural Welfare Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives, Department of Neurosurgery, Aichi (Japan); Miyachi, Shigeru; Hattori, Kenichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    Carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is becoming accepted as an effective and reliable treatment option for severe carotid artery stenosis. However, it is rarely applied for carotid occlusion, especially in its chronic stage. We report our experience of CAS for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion representing compromised cerebral blood flow using various protection methods. A 77-year-old woman, who was already diagnosed with severe left internal carotid artery stenosis, suddenly had right hemiparesis and aphasia. At that time, she was treated conservatively because her neurological status was quite good, in spite of left carotid artery occlusion. Her symptoms improved in the short term, except slight aphasia, but deteriorated again 18 days from the onset, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed new ischemic lesions. CAS was then performed for the occluded carotid artery on the 23rd day from the first onset. Using the proximal protection technique, the occluded lesion was crossed carefully with a microguidewire. Stents were also placed successfully with the distal protection technique. The occluded carotid artery was completely recanalized without any unfavorable events or neurological deterioration. In this patient, CAS was successfully to treat chronic carotid artery occlusion. These procedures and techniques are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  19. Intracranial carotid anastomosis and partial aplasia of an internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, G.

    1980-01-01

    A rare arterial anastomosis between the right and left interal carotid arteries at the base at the skull, with aplasia of the cervical part of the left internal carotid artery is reported. The case is unusual because, in addition to the vascular anomaly of the carotid artery, there is an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery and bilateral renal cysts. The condition is a complex malformation syndrome caused by defective regression of the third branchial artery. Because of the characteristic angiographic aspects such a case should be called transverse carotid anastomosis. (orig.)

  20. Intracranial carotid anastomosis and partial aplasia of an internal carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, G.

    1980-12-01

    A rare arterial anastomosis between the right and left internal carotid arteries at the base at the skull, with aplasia of the cervical part of the left internal carotid artery is reported. The case is unusual because, in addition to the vascular anomaly of the carotid artery, there is an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery and bilateral renal cysts. The condition is a complex malformation syndrome caused by defective regression of the third branchial artery. Because of the characteristic angiographic aspects such a case should be called transverse carotid anastomosis.

  1. Resolution of carotid stenosis pre-carotid intervention: A case for selective preoperative duplex ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abid; Ashrafi, Mohammed; Zeynali, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous resolution of carotid stenosis is a phenomenon that has been described in literature in the past. At present it is not routine practise to scan patients prior to carotid endarterectomy surgery within the UK. A 58 year old female presented to hospital with a history of sudden onset headache and left sided weakness. CT head showed findings in keeping with an acute right MCA territory infarct. A duplex ultrasound scan showed echolucent material in the right internal carotid artery forming a greater than 95% stenosis. The scan was unable to visualise the patency of the vessel distally due to the position of the mandible. The patient was provisionally listed for carotid endarterectomy. An MRA was requested prior to surgery to assess the patency of the distal internal carotid artery. The MRA of the carotids showed normal appearance of the common carotid, internal and vertebral arteries with no definite stenosis. A repeat duplex ultrasound confirmed there was no significant stenosis. The finding of complete resolution of stenosis on MRA was an unexpected event. Had the initial duplex imaging allowed visualisation of the distal vessel patency, our patient would have undergone unnecessary carotid surgery with the associated morbidity and mortality. This case report draws attention to the benefits of selective preoperative scanning, in sparing patients from unnecessary surgery as a result of finding occlusion or resolution of a previously diagnosed carotid stenosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Carotid angioplasty with stenting for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion: technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Tanasawa, Toshihiko; Okada, Takeshi; Endo, Otone; Yamamoto, Naohito; Miyachi, Shigeru; Hattori, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    Carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is becoming accepted as an effective and reliable treatment option for severe carotid artery stenosis. However, it is rarely applied for carotid occlusion, especially in its chronic stage. We report our experience of CAS for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion representing compromised cerebral blood flow using various protection methods. A 77-year-old woman, who was already diagnosed with severe left internal carotid artery stenosis, suddenly had right hemiparesis and aphasia. At that time, she was treated conservatively because her neurological status was quite good, in spite of left carotid artery occlusion. Her symptoms improved in the short term, except slight aphasia, but deteriorated again 18 days from the onset, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed new ischemic lesions. CAS was then performed for the occluded carotid artery on the 23rd day from the first onset. Using the proximal protection technique, the occluded lesion was crossed carefully with a microguidewire. Stents were also placed successfully with the distal protection technique. The occluded carotid artery was completely recanalized without any unfavorable events or neurological deterioration. In this patient, CAS was successfully to treat chronic carotid artery occlusion. These procedures and techniques are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  3. Using an EPID for patient-specific VMAT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiari, M.; Kumaraswamy, L.; Bailey, D. W.; Boer, S. de; Malhotra, H. K.; Podgorsak, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) method was developed to verify gantry-specific individual multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures (control points) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: VMAT treatment plans were generated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). DICOM images from a Varian EPID (aS1000) acquired in continuous acquisition mode were used for pretreatment QA. Each cine image file contains the grayscale image of the MLC aperture related to its specific control point and the corresponding gantry angle information. The TPS MLC file of this RapidArc plan contains the leaf positions for all 177 control points (gantry angles). In-house software was developed that interpolates the measured images based on the gantry angle and overlays them with the MLC pattern for all control points. The 38% isointensity line was used to define the edge of the MLC leaves on the portal images. The software generates graphs and tables that provide analysis for the number of mismatched leaf positions for a chosen distance to agreement at each control point and the frequency in which each particular leaf mismatches for the entire arc. Results: Seven patients plans were analyzed using this method. The leaves with the highest mismatched rate were found to be treatment plan dependent. Conclusions: This in-house software can be used to automatically verify the MLC leaf positions for all control points of VMAT plans using cine images acquired by an EPID.

  4. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  5. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions...... and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24-159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects...... without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). RESULTS: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile...

  6. MR plaque imaging of the carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yuji; Nagayama, Masako

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerotic carotid plaque represents a major cause of cerebral ischemia. The detection of vulnerable plaque is important for preventing future cardiovascular events. The key factors in advanced plaque that are most likely to lead to patient complications are the condition of the fibrous cap, the size of the necrotic core and hemorrhage, and the extent of inflammatory activity within the plaque. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has excellent soft tissue contrast and can allow for a more accurate and objective estimation of carotid wall morphology and plaque composition. Recent advances in MR imaging techniques have permitted serial monitoring of atherosclerotic disease evolution and the identification of intraplaque risk factors for accelerated progression. The purpose of this review article is to review the current state of techniques of carotid wall MR imaging and the characterization of plaque components and surface morphology with MR imaging, and to describe the clinical practice of carotid wall MR imaging for the determination of treatment plan. (orig.)

  7. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome. These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient′s presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

  8. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000235.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge To use the sharing ... the hospital. You may have also had a stent (a tiny wire mesh tube) placed in the ...

  9. Hemodynamic significance of internal carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T

    1988-01-01

    Neurologic symptoms in the region of an internal carotid artery stenosis are considered to be embolic in most instances. Only in a subgroup has carotid occlusive disease with impairment of the collateral supply, caused a state of hemodynamic failure with marked reduction of perfusion pressure...... stenosis. This is considered a result of chronic low perfusion pressure with subsequent loss of autoregulation, and autoregulatory control is first regained after some days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)...

  10. Angiographic diagnosis of the carotid artery pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Yueyong; Zou Liguang; Dai Shuhua; Tan Yinghui; Li Zhongyu; Zhou Zheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To create a further understanding of the angiographic features of the carotid artery pseudoaneurysm (CAPA) and to explore the clinical diagnostic value of angiography. Methods: Sixteen cases of CAPA with clinical and angiographic data were analyzed retrospectively. The angiographic appearances in all of the patients were observed dynamically and precisely with a double blind method by two experienced radiologists together and formed a consensus interpretation. Results: Angiography provided a definite diagnosis for all cases. The parent arteries included the common carotid artery (1 case), common carotid artery bifurcation (9 cases), internal carotid artery (5 cases) and external carotid artery (1 case). The angiographic features of the CAPA were: All cases showed the contrast media retension in the aneurysms; turbulent flow within aneurysm in 9 cases; the 'jetting sign' at the leak of the parent artery in 7 cases; increase angulation of the bifurcation of internal and external carotid arteries in 12 cases. Conclusions: Angiography is the most valuable examination method in diagnosis of CAPA, and it can not only provide definite diagnosis, but also play an important role in selection of therapeutic plan. (authors)

  11. Carotid chemoreceptor development and neonatal apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Peter M; Ribeiro, Ana P; Martin, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The premature transition from fetal to neonatal life is accompanied by an immature respiratory neural control system. Most preterm infants exhibit recurrent apnea, resulting in repetitive oscillations in O(2) saturation (intermittent hypoxia, IH). Numerous factors are likely to play a role in the etiology of apnea including inputs from the carotid chemoreceptors. Despite major advances in our understanding of carotid chemoreceptor function in the early neonatal period, however, their contribution to the initiation of an apneic event and its eventual termination are still largely speculative. Recent findings have provided a detailed account of the postnatal changes in the incidence of hypoxemic events associated with apnea, and there is anecdotal evidence for a positive correlation with carotid chemoreceptor maturation. Furthermore, studies on non-human animal models have shown that chronic IH sensitizes the carotid chemoreceptors, which has been proposed to perpetuate the occurrence of apnea. An alternative hypothesis is that sensitization of the carotid chemoreceptors could represent an important protective mechanism to defend against severe hypoxemia. The purpose of this review, therefore, is to discuss how the carotid chemoreceptors may contribute to the initiation and termination of an apneic event in the neonate and the use of xanthine therapy in the prevention of apnea. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Angiographic patterns of carotid-cavernous fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, G.; Jekova, M.; Genov, P.; Hadjidekov, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the study is to present our experience in angiographic evaluation of carotid-cavernous fistulas. 8 patients with carotid-cavernous fistula (6 men and 2 women, range of age from 15 to 62) are included in the study out of all undergone cerebral angiography for a four year period (1996 - 2000). All patients underwent CT brain examination, two out of 8 - MRI. Visualization of ipsi- and contra lateral cavernous sinus and ophthalmic vein dilatation are assessed. In all cases the communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus has been assessed as direct. Near simultaneous visualization of the home internal carotid artery, the dilated ipsilateral cavernous sinus and dilated superior ophthalmic vein is found in 2 patients, simultaneous visualization of both cavernous sinuses - in two. In 1 patient the early visualization of the cavernous sinus through the fistula enabled visualization of ipsilateral main internal carotid artery from the contra lateral circulation through the communicating arteries.In 1 excessive contralateral cavernous sinus and contralateral superior ophthalmic vein dilatation is detected. In other 1 excessive flow to dilated ipsilateral cavernous sinus lead insufficient circulation in distal vessels. Digital subtraction Angiography remains the most suitable imaging method in carotid-cavernous fistula assessment regarding type of communication and level of following vessels morphology changes

  13. Analysis of ion beam teletherapy patient-specific quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Deng, Yu; Schlegel, Nicki; Huang, Zhijie; Moyers, Michael F

    2018-02-27

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the procedures for patient-specific quality assurance measurements using modulated scanned and energy stacked beams for proton and carbon ion teletherapy. Delivery records from 1734 portal measurements were analyzed using a 3-point pass criteria: more than 22 of 24 chambers in a water phantom (WP) had to have a measured dose difference from the planned portal doses less than or equal to 3%, or the distance from the measurement point location to a point location in the plan having the same dose had to be less than or equal to 3 mm (distance to agreement [DTA]), and the mean dose deviation of all chambers had to be less than 3%. Stratification of results showed some associations between measurement parameters and pass rates. For proton portals, pass rates were high at all measurement depths, but for carbon ion portals, pass rates decreased as a function of increasing measurement depth. Pass rates of both proton and carbon ion portals with 1 WP were slightly lower than those with a second WP. The total pass rates were 97.7% and 91.9% for proton and carbon ion patient portals, respectively. In general, the measured doses exhibited good agreement with the treatment planning system (TPS) calculated doses. When the chamber position was deeper than 150 mm in carbon ion beams, a lower pass rate was observed, which may have been caused by ion chamber array setup uncertainty (lateral and depth) in highly modulated portals or incorrect modeling of scatter by the TPS. These deviations need further investigation. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory gated radiotherapy-pretreatment patient specific quality assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Thiyagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ motions during inter-fraction and intra-fraction radiotherapy introduce errors in dose delivery, irradiating excess of normal tissue, and missing target volume. Lung and heart involuntary motions cause above inaccuracies and gated dose delivery try to overcome above effects. Present work attempts a novel method to verify dynamic dose delivery using a four-dimensional (4D phantom. Three patients with mobile target are coached to maintain regular and reproducible breathing pattern. Appropriate intensity projection image set generated from 4D-computed tomography (4D-CT is used for target delineation. Intensity modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on selected phase using CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany in conjunction with "Real-time position management" (Varian, USA to acquire 4D-CT images. Verification plans were generated for both ion chamber and Gafchromic (EBT film image sets. Gated verification plans were delivered on the phantom moving with patient respiratory pattern. We developed a MATLAB-based software to generate maximum intensity projection, minimum intensity projections, and average intensity projections, also a program to convert patient breathing pattern to phantom compatible format. Dynamic thorax quality assurance (QA phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems type is used to perform the patient specific QA, which holds an ion chamber and film to measure delivered radiation intensity. Exposed EBT films are analyzed and compared with treatment planning system calculated dose. The ion chamber measured dose shows good agreement with planned dose within ± 0.5% (0.203 ± 0.57%. Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows passing rates 92–99% (96.63 ± 3.84% for 3% dose and 3 mm distance criteria. Respiratory gated treatment delivery accuracy is found to be within clinically acceptable level.

  15. Patient-specific prediction of functional recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douiri, Abdel; Grace, Justin; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; Tilling, Kate; McKevitt, Christopher; Wolfe, Charles DA; Rudd, Anthony G

    2017-07-01

    Background and aims Clinical predictive models for stroke recovery could offer the opportunity of targeted early intervention and more specific information for patients and carers. In this study, we developed and validated a patient-specific prognostic model for monitoring recovery after stroke and assessed its clinical utility. Methods Four hundred and ninety-five patients from the population-based South London Stroke Register were included in a substudy between 2002 and 2004. Activities of daily living were assessed using Barthel Index) at one, two, three, four, six, eight, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after stroke. Penalized linear mixed models were developed to predict patients' functional recovery trajectories. An external validation cohort included 1049 newly registered stroke patients between 2005 and 2011. Prediction errors on discrimination and calibration were assessed. The potential clinical utility was evaluated using prognostic accuracy measurements and decision curve analysis. Results Predictive recovery curves showed good accuracy, with root mean squared deviation of 3 Barthel Index points and a R 2 of 83% up to one year after stroke in the external cohort. The negative predictive values of the risk of poor recovery (Barthel Index <8) at three and 12 months were also excellent, 96% (95% CI [93.6-97.4]) and 93% [90.8-95.3], respectively, with a potential clinical utility measured by likelihood ratios (LR+:17 [10.8-26.8] at three months and LR+:11 [6.5-17.2] at 12 months). Decision curve analysis showed an increased clinical benefit, particularly at threshold probabilities of above 5% for predictive risk of poor outcomes. Conclusions A recovery curves tool seems to accurately predict progression of functional recovery in poststroke patients.

  16. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Large eddy simulation of transitional flow in an idealized stenotic blood vessel: evaluation of subgrid scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Abhro; Anupindi, Kameswararao; Delorme, Yann; Ghaisas, Niranjan; Shetty, Dinesh A; Frankel, Steven H

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, we performed large eddy simulation (LES) of axisymmetric, and 75% stenosed, eccentric arterial models with steady inflow conditions at a Reynolds number of 1000. The results obtained are compared with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data (Varghese et al., 2007, "Direct Numerical Simulation of Stenotic Flows. Part 1. Steady Flow," J. Fluid Mech., 582, pp. 253-280). An inhouse code (WenoHemo) employing high-order numerical methods for spatial and temporal terms, along with a 2nd order accurate ghost point immersed boundary method (IBM) (Mark, and Vanwachem, 2008, "Derivation and Validation of a Novel Implicit Second-Order Accurate Immersed Boundary Method," J. Comput. Phys., 227(13), pp. 6660-6680) for enforcing boundary conditions on curved geometries is used for simulations. Three subgrid scale (SGS) models, namely, the classical Smagorinsky model (Smagorinsky, 1963, "General Circulation Experiments With the Primitive Equations," Mon. Weather Rev., 91(10), pp. 99-164), recently developed Vreman model (Vreman, 2004, "An Eddy-Viscosity Subgrid-Scale Model for Turbulent Shear Flow: Algebraic Theory and Applications," Phys. Fluids, 16(10), pp. 3670-3681), and the Sigma model (Nicoud et al., 2011, "Using Singular Values to Build a Subgrid-Scale Model for Large Eddy Simulations," Phys. Fluids, 23(8), 085106) are evaluated in the present study. Evaluation of SGS models suggests that the classical constant coefficient Smagorinsky model gives best agreement with the DNS data, whereas the Vreman and Sigma models predict an early transition to turbulence in the poststenotic region. Supplementary simulations are performed using Open source field operation and manipulation (OpenFOAM) ("OpenFOAM," http://www.openfoam.org/) solver and the results are inline with those obtained with WenoHemo.

  18. Patient-Specific Variations in Biomarkers across Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Miller, Craig S.; Dawson, Dolph; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of saliva, as an emerging diagnostic fluid in conjunction with classification techniques to discern biological heterogeneity in clinically labelled gingivitis and periodontitis subjects (80 subjects; 40/group) A battery of classification techniques were investigated as traditional single classifier systems as well as within a novel selective voting ensemble classification approach (SVA) framework. Unlike traditional single classifiers, SVA is shown to reveal patient-specific variations within disease groups, which may be important for identifying proclivity to disease progression or disease stability. Salivary expression profiles of IL-1ß, IL-6, MMP-8, and MIP-1α from 80 patients were analyzed using four classification algorithms (LDA: Linear Discriminant Analysis [LDA], Quadratic Discriminant Analysis [QDA], Naïve Bayes Classifier [NBC] and Support Vector Machines [SVM]) as traditional single classifiers and within the SVA framework (SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM). Our findings demonstrate that performance measures (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of traditional classification as single classifier were comparable to that of the SVA counterparts using clinical labels of the samples as ground truth. However, unlike traditional single classifier approaches, the normalized ensemble vote-counts from SVA revealed varying proclivity of the subjects for each of the disease groups. More importantly, the SVA identified a subset of gingivitis and periodontitis samples that demonstrated a biological proclivity commensurate with the other clinical group. This subset was confirmed across SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM. Heatmap visualization of their ensemble sets revealed lack of consensus between these subsets and the rest of the samples within the respective disease groups indicating the unique nature of the patients in these subsets. While the source of variation is not known, the results presented clearly elucidate the

  19. Adaptive grid generation in a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    computational time for patient-specific hemodynamics simulations, which are used to help assess the likelihood of aneurysm rupture using CFD calculated flow patterns.

  20. Early control of distal internal carotid artery during carotid endarterectomy: does it reduce cerebral microemboli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Das, M; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Krings, T; Mess, W H; Schiefer, J; Jacobs, M J

    2010-06-01

    According to the results of the large trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), this type of surgery is only warranted if perioperative mortality and morbidity are kept considerably low. Less attention has been paid to methods of cerebral protection during CEA, although intraoperative transcranial Doppler (TCD) can visualise intracerebral microemboli (MES) during routine carotid dissection, although MES occur throughout the CEA, only those during dissection are related to neurological outcome. Prevention of MES by means of early control of the distal internal carotid artery dislodging from the carotid artery plaque during dissection is very likely the mechanism behind an eventual benefit from this approach. Hence, the amount of MES might serve as a surrogate parameter for the risk of periprocedural neurological events. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether early control of the distal carotid artery during CEA is capable of reducing the number of MES by means of a prospective randomised trial. Twenty-eight patients (29 procedures) could be prospectively included in our study. Before surgery we randomly assigned the patients to two groups: group A (N.=12): CEA by means of early control of the distal internal carotid artery; group B (N.=17): CEA with dissection of the total carotid bifurcation before clamping the arteries. Periprocedurally, we continuously monitored the cerebral blood flow in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery by means of TCD. Pre- and postoperative morbidity were independently verified by a neurologist control of the distal internal carotid artery did not reduce the occurrence of MES during dissection of the carotid bifurcation. Also, the total number of MES throughout the procedure and postoperatively was comparable between both groups. The procedure related times as well as the clinical outcome did not differ significantly. Thus, early control of the distal internal carotid artery has got no advantage but also no disadvantage

  1. Radiation-induced carotid artery atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Chahal, Navtej; Senior, Roxy; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotid arteries frequently receive significant doses of radiation as collateral structures in the treatment of malignant diseases. Vascular injury following treatment may result in carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and increased risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). This systematic review examines the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the carotid arteries, looking at the incidence of stroke in patients receiving neck radiotherapy. In addition, we consider possible surrogate endpoints such as CAS and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT) and summarise the evidence for radiation-induced carotid atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: From 853 references, 34 articles met the criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. These papers described 9 studies investigating the incidence of stroke/TIA in irradiated patients, 11 looking at CAS, and 14 examining CIMT. Results: The majority of studies utilised suboptimally-matched controls for each endpoint. The relative risk of stroke in irradiated patients ranged from 1.12 in patients with breast cancer to 5.6 in patients treated for head and neck cancer. The prevalence of CAS was increased by 16–55%, with the more modest increase seen in a study using matched controls. CIMT was increased in irradiated carotid arteries by 18–40%. Only two matched-control studies demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT of 36% and 22% (p = 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). Early prospective data demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT in irradiated arteries at 1 and 2 years after RT (p < 0.001 and <0.01, respectively). Conclusions: The incidence of stroke was significantly increased in patients receiving RT to the neck. There was a consistent difference in CAS and CIMT between irradiated and unirradiated carotid arteries. Future studies should optimise control groups

  2. Patterns of patient specific dosimetry in total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); McMullen, Kevin P.; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) has been used for bone marrow transplant for hematologic and immune deficiency conditions. The goal of TBI is to deliver a homogeneous dose to the entire body, with a generally accepted range of dose uniformity being within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. The moving table technique for TBI could make dose uniform in whole body by adjusting couch speed. However, it is difficult to accurately estimate the actual dose by calculation and hence in vivo dosimetry (IVD) is routinely performed. Here, the authors present patterns of patient-specific IVD in 161 TBI patients treated at our institution. Methods: Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit (Model C9 Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, Picker X-ray Corporation) with customized moving bed (SITI Industrial Products, Inc., Fishers, IN) were used for TBI treatment. During treatment, OneDose{sup TM} (Sicel Technology, NC) Metal Oxide-silicon Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor detectors were placed at patient body surface; both entrance and exit side of the beam at patient head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee to estimate midplane dose. When large differences (>10%) between the prescribed and measured dose were observed, dose delivery was corrected for subsequent fractions by the adjustment of couch speed and/or bolus placement. Under IRB exempt status, the authors retrospectively analyzed the treatment records of 161 patients who received TBI treatment between 2006 and 2011. Results: Across the entire cohort, the median {+-} SD (range) percent variance between calculated and measured dose for head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee was -2.3 {+-} 10.2% (-66.2 to +35.3), 1.1 {+-} 11.5% (-62.2 to +40.3), -1.9 {+-} 9.5% (-66.4 to +46.6), -1.1 {+-} 7.2% (-35.2 to +42.9), and 3.4 {+-} 12.2% (-47.9 to +108.5), respectively. More than half of treatments were within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose for all anatomical regions. For 80% of treatments (10%-90%), dose at the umbilicus was within {+-}10

  3. Carotid Atherosclerosis and Cognitive Impairment in Nonstroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Carotid atherosclerosis can be used to predict the risk of cognitive impairment. Furthermore, diagnosing and treating carotid atherosclerosis at early stage might help clinicians prevent and treat vascular cognitive impairment in nonstroke patients.

  4. Cardiac risk assessment before carotid endarterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabee, Hussein M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Preoperative cardiac assessment is an essential step to identify the patients at risk, optimize any dysfunction, anticipate perioperative and postoperative problems and plan special management. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has become one of the most commonly performed vascular procedures in Western countries. The awareness of the potential beneficial role and hazards of CEA is not proportionate to the magnitude of this problem in our countries, not only among patients, but also among the medical disciplines. This report is a retrospective analysis of the prevalence of coronary artery diseases among 442 patients who were referred to the Division of Vascular Surgery at the King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with suspicion of carotid artery disease. Eighty-two patients proved to have significant carotid artery stenosis and had thorough preoperative cardiac assessment by senior cardiologist. All cases had clinical assessment and ECG, 66 cases had echocardiogram examination, 44 had Dipyridamole Thallium-scan and 12 had coronary angiogram. Sixty-eight patients underwent 76 carotid endarterectomy. Four of them had MI and only one case died during preoperative period. This study shows that cardiac screening studies have a potential role in the candidates for carotid surgery in influencing the decision to operate and intensify of perioperative monitoring and care. We believe that the teamwork should involve vascular surgeons, cardiologist and anesthetist to manage such critical patients properly. (author)

  5. A Rare Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy: Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotid sinus hypersensitivity is a common cause of fainting and falls in the elderly, and can be diagnosed by carotid sinus massage. We present a 67-year-old diabetic man who was admitted with hyperglycemia. During thyroid examination, clouding of consciousness occurred with unilateral palpation. Asystole was documented for 4.8 seconds and suspected for 7 seconds upon carotid sinus massage. A cardioverter defibrillator was implanted. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity should be kept in mind when examining diabetic patients.

  6. Costs of secondary prevention of stroke by carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Carsten; Sørensen, Mette; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2012-01-01

    We estimated the costs to the Danish National Health Service of preventing stroke due to carotid artery stenosis by carotid endarterectomy (CEA), including costs of identifying patients, Doppler ultrasound (DUS) examination and CEA.......We estimated the costs to the Danish National Health Service of preventing stroke due to carotid artery stenosis by carotid endarterectomy (CEA), including costs of identifying patients, Doppler ultrasound (DUS) examination and CEA....

  7. Role of carotid duplex imaging in carotid screening programmes – an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillard Jonathan H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the UK and the largest single cause of severe disability. Each year more than 110,000 people in England suffer from a stroke which costs the National Health Service (NHS over GBP2.8 billion. Thus, it is imperative that patients at risk be screened for underlying carotid artery atherosclerosis. Aim To assess the role of carotid ultrasound in different carotid screening programmes. Methods A literature overview was carried out by using PubMed search engine, to identify different carotid screening programmes that had used ultrasound scan as a screening tool. Results It appears that the carotid ultrasound is an effective method for screening carotid artery disease in community as it effectively predicts the presence of stenosis with high accuracy. There is a need for primary care to recommend high risk patients for regular screening, to reduce stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA related morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Screening programmes using carotid ultrasonography contribute to public health awareness and promotion which in long term could potentially benefit in disease prevention and essentially promote better standards of healthcare.

  8. Direct-puncture approach to the extraconal portion of the superior ophthalmic vein for carotid cavernous fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, A.; Suzuki, S.; Iwamoto, K.; Miyazaki, T.; Inukai, M.; Abe, K.; Niki, J.; Yamada, M.; Fujii, K.; Kan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The transvenous approach via the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) is an available approach for carotid cavernous fistula (CCF), especially in the event that there is no other suitable approach route to the fistula. Surgical exposure of the peripheral roots of the SOV is commonly used; however, often, the SOV is often not accessible because of anatomical problems and/or complications. In this paper, we present and discuss our original direct-puncture approach to the extraconal portion of the SOV. An attempt on three patients with traumatic CCF failed with the transarterial approach and the conventional venous approach via the inferior petrosal sinus; therefore, the patients were treated with the direct-puncture approach to the extraconal portion of the SOV using two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography with local anesthesia. All cases that had tortuous and partially stenotic division of the SOV were treated successfully with this approach and without complications. This approach will become an alternate approach, especially when the peripheral roots of the SOV are focally narrowed and tortuous, making it impossible to insert a catheter. (orig.)

  9. A computational evaluation of sedentary lifestyle effects on carotid hemodynamics and atherosclerotic events incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Maria Vittoria; Serra, Raffaele; Perri, Paolo; Buffone, Gianluca; Caliò, Francesco Giuseppe; DE Franciscis, Stefano; Fragomeni, Fragomeni

    2017-01-01

    Hemodynamics has a key role in atheropathogenesis. Indeed, atherosclerotic phenomena occur in vessels characterized by complex geometry and flow pattern, like the carotid bifurcation. Moreover, lifestyle is a significant risk factor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the hemodynamic effects due to two sedentary lifestyles - sitting and standing positions - in the carotid bifurcation in order to identify the worst condition and to investigate the atherosclerosis incidence. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was chosen to carry out the analysis, in which in vivo non-invasive measurements were used as boundary conditions. Furthermore, to compare the two conditions, one patient-specific 3D model of a carotid bifurcation was reconstructed starting from computer tomography. Different mechanical indicators, correlated with atherosclerosis incidence, were calculated in addition to flow pattern and pressure distribution: the time average wall shear stress (TAWSS), the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and the relative residence time (RRT). The results showed that the bulb and the external carotid artery emergence are the most probable regions in which atherosclerotic events could happen. Indeed, low velocity and WSS values, high OSI and, as a consequence, areas with chaotic-swirling flow, with stasis (high RRT), occur. Moreover, the sitting position is the worst condition: considering a cardiac cycle, TAWSS is less than 17.2% and OSI and RRT are greater than 17.5% and 21.2%, respectively. This study suggests that if a person spends much time in the sitting position, a high risk of plaque formation and, consequently, of stenosis could happen.

  10. [Risk factors of rupture of internal carotid artery during surgical resection of carotid body tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Wang, J S; Yao, C; Chang, G Q; Yin, H H; Li, S Q; Lü, W M; Hu, Z J; Wang, S M

    2017-06-13

    Objective: To investigate risk factors of rupture of internal carotid artery resection during carotid body tumor resection and to summarize our treatment experience. Methods: During the period from 1991 to 2016, rupture of internal carotid artery occurred in 27 patients (28 tumors) during surgical resection of carotid body tumor in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. Their clinical and follow-up data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. For all patients underwent surgical resection during this period, Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors of intraoperative rupture of internal carotid artery. Results: Of these 28 tumors, there were 15 (53.6%) tumors with diameter≥5 cm and 20 (71.4%) Shamblin Ⅲ tumors. Intraoperatively, shunt was applied for 8 (28.6%) cases. Thirteen (46.4%) patients underwent ligation of external carotid artery, while 2 (7.1%) patients accepted resection of cranial nerves. Direct closure/patchplasty, autologous vessels or graft reconstruction was used in 16, 10 and 2 cases, respectively. Postoperatively, stroke occurred in 4(14.3%) cases and cranial nerve deficit in 15 (53.6%) cases. During a median length of 36 (14-125) months, cranial nerve deficit persisted in 5 cases. Follow-up radiologic examination indicated 3 (10.7%) cases of targeted vessel occlusion. However, no new-onset stroke was identified. Among all patients underwent surgical resection of carotid body tumor, female ( OR =3.650, P =0.012), age≤25 years old ( OR =3.710, P =0.013) and Shamblin Ⅲ tumor ( OR =4.631, P =0.008) increase the risks of intraoperative carotid artery rupture. Conclusions: Shamblin Ⅲ tumor is the predictor of rupture of internal carotid artery. Intraoperative, properly increased blood pressure, intraoperative heparinization and use of shunt for those cases without well-compensated cranial collateral arteries are likely to decreasing the incidence of stroke.

  11. Carotid angioplasty and stenting for symptomatic carotid kinking combined with stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Xue-li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Carotid endarterectomy (CEA is currently the preferred treatment for severe carotid kinking and stenosis. Kinking is generally believed to be a relative contraindication for endovascular stent placement. This article aims to study the necessity, feasibility and security of carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS for symptomatic carotid kinking combined with stenosis, and summarize clinical experience of this disease according to therapeutic results. Methods Twenty-two cases with symptomatic carotid kinking and high-grade stenosis demonstrated by digital subtraction angiography (DSA were performed CAS. Their clinical manifestations, imaging features, procedure safety and follow-up data were collected and retrospectively analyzed. All patients understood CEA and voluntarily received CAS. Results Twenty-two cases with carotid kinking and stenosis were all successfully performed CAS (the success rate was 100% without stent-related disability or mortality. Twenty-four self-expandable stents were implanted. The mean degree of stenosis was reduced from 85.63%before stenting to 11.25% after stenting and the angles of kinking were improved from 120° (Metz' category. During the period of hospitalization, no transient ischemic attack (TIA or cerebral infarction occurred, and the clinical symptoms and signs of ischemia, such as dizziness and headache, were improved or disappeared. Besides, no permenant complications or deaths happened. All cases were followed up from 6 to 72 months, among whom 1 patient experienced contralateral carotid TIA, and 2 patients experienced ipsilateral carotid TIA (one indicated aspirin resistance in platelet aggregation test and the other showed restenosis in DSA. Computed tomography angiography (CTA of 10 patients and Duplex scan of 7 patients during the follow-up demonstrated carotid in good morphology and fluent blood flow, without kinking or restenosis. Conclusion CAS is a feasible and safe therapeutic method and

  12. Apolipoprotein E and carotid artery atherosclerosis - The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, AJC; Bots, ML; Havekes, LM; del Sol, AI; Cruts, M; Grobbee, DE; Hofman, A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Witteman, JCM; van Duijn, CM

    Background and Purpose-Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a strong predictor for future stroke. It is yet unclear whether the apolipoprotein E polymorphism (APOE) is related to atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of APOE in carotid artery

  13. Three-dimensional carotid ultrasound plaque texture predicts vascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; Wannarong, Thapat; Parraga, Grace

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carotid ultrasound atherosclerosis measurements, including those of the arterial wall and plaque, provide a way to monitor patients at risk of vascular events. Our objective was to examine carotid ultrasound plaque texture measurements and the change in carotid plaque text...

  14. Agenesis of internal carotid artery associated with congenital anterior hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.-J.; Porto, L.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.; Weis, R.

    2002-01-01

    We report a rare case of unilateral agenesis of the internal carotid artery in association with congenital anterior hypopituitarism. The collateral circulation is supplied by a transsellar intercavernous anastomotic vessel connecting the internal carotid arteries. These abnormalities are well depicted on MRI and MRA. The agenesis of the internal carotid artery may explain the pathogenesis of some of congenital anterior hypopituitarism. (orig.)

  15. Risk of Carotid Stroke after Chiropractic Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, J. David; Boyle, Eleanor; Côté, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Chiropractic manipulation is a popular treatment for neck pain and headache, but may increase the risk of cervical artery dissection and stroke. Patients with carotid artery dissection can present with neck pain and/or headache before experiencing a stroke. These are common symptoms seen...... by both chiropractors and primary care physicians (PCPs). We aimed to assess the risk of carotid artery stroke after chiropractic care by comparing association between chiropractic and PCP visits and subsequent stroke. Methods A population-based, case-crossover study was undertaken in Ontario, Canada. All...... incident cases of carotid artery stroke admitted to hospitals over a 9-year period were identified. Cases served as their own controls. Exposures to chiropractic and PCP services were determined from health billing records. Results We compared 15,523 cases to 62,092 control periods using exposure windows...

  16. Carotid endarterectomy in patients with occlusion of the contralateral carotid artery. Perioperative risk and late results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T; Rasmussen, L

    1987-01-01

    severe strokes when compared to patients with only minor reduction in CPP. In addition, the internal carotid artery blood flow following endarterectomy was significantly higher in the low pressure group (P less than 0.02). No patients were lost during follow-up, for a mean of 34 months. The cumulative....... Compared with a complication rate of about 5% previously reported from this institution, this clearly indicates contralateral carotid occlusion as a major risk factor in carotid surgery. Though not statistically significant, patients with severely reduced cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) had suffered more...

  17. Myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging using sliding-window conjugate-gradient HYPR methods in canine with stenotic coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lan; Kino, Aya; Lee, Daniel; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2010-01-01

    First-pass perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for detecting ischemic heart disease. However, the diagnostic value of the method is limited by the low spatial coverage, resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and cardiac motion-related image artifacts. A combination of sliding window and conjugate-gradient HighlY constrained back-PRojection reconstruction (SW-CG-HYPR) method has been proposed in healthy volunteer studies to reduce the acquisition window for each slice while maintaining the temporal resolution of 1 frame per heartbeat in myocardial perfusion MRI. This method allows for improved spatial coverage, resolution, and SNR. In this study, we use a controlled animal model to test whether the myocardial territory supplied by a stenotic coronary artery can be detected accurately by SW-CG-HYPR perfusion method under pharmacological stress. Results from 6 mongrel dogs (15-25 kg) studies demonstrate the feasibility of SW-CG-HYPR to detect regional perfusion defects. Using this method, the acquisition time per cardiac cycle was reduced by a factor of 4, and the spatial coverage was increased from 2 to 3 slices to 6 slices as compared with the conventional techniques including both turbo-Fast Low Angle Short (FLASH) and echoplanar imaging (EPI). The SNR of the healthy myocardium at peak enhancement with SW-CG-HYPR (12.68 ± 2.46) is significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the turbo-FLASH (8.65 ± 1.93) and EPI (5.48 ± 1.24). The spatial resolution of SW-CG-HYPR images is 1.2 × 1.2 × 8.0 mm, which is better than the turbo-FLASH (1.8 × 1.8 × 8.0 mm) and EPI (2.0 × 1.8 × 8.0 mm). Sliding-window CG-HYPR is a promising technique for myocardial perfusion MRI. This technique provides higher image quality with respect to significantly improved SNR and spatial resolution of the myocardial perfusion images, which might improve myocardial perfusion imaging in a clinical setting.

  18. Changes in the mechanical environment of stenotic arteries during interaction with stents: computational assessment of parametric stent designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Stadler, Michael; Gasser, Thomas C

    2005-02-01

    Clinical studies have identified factors such as the stent design and the deployment technique that are one cause for the success or failure of angioplasty treatments. In addition, the success rate may also depend on the stenosis type. Hence, for a particular stenotic artery, the optimal intervention can only be identified by studying the influence of factors such as stent type, strut thickness, geometry of the stent cell, and stent-artery radial mismatch with the wall. We propose a methodology that allows a set of stent parameters to be varied, with the aim of evaluating the difference in the mechanical environment within the wall before and after angioplasty with stenting. Novel scalar quantities attempt to characterize the wall changes inform of the contact pressure caused by the stent struts, and the stresses within the individual components of the wall caused by the stent. These quantities are derived numerically and serve as indicators, which allow the determination of the correct size and type of the stent for each individual stenosis. In addition, the luminal change due to angioplasty may be computed as well. The methodology is demonstrated by using a full three-dimensional geometrical model of a postmortem specimen of a human iliac artery with a stenosis using imaging data. To describe the material behavior of the artery, we considered mechanical data of eight different vascular tissues, which formed the stenosis. The constitutive models for the tissue components capture the typical anisotropic, nonlinear and dissipative characteristics under supra-physiological loading conditions. Three-dimensional stent models were parametrized in such a way as to enable new designs to be generated simply with regard to variations in their geometric structure. For the three-dimensional stent-artery interaction we use a contact algorithm based on smooth contact surfaces of at least C-continuity, which prevents numerical problems known from standard facet-based contact

  19. Haemodynamic evaluation of carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia in the region of an internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may be caused by embolism or cerebral hypoperfusion. A severe ICA stenosis may be well compensated by collateral blood supply, however, in some patients the capacity of the collateral blood supply is insufficient. Studies...... evaluating therapeutic modalities or natural history of carotid artery disease should therefore include a test capable of assessing cerebral haemodynamics. However, most studies, invasive as well as non-invasive, have focused on the ability of the test to diagnose the ICA lesions itself, rather than...

  20. The Effect of Inlet Waveforms on Computational Hemodynamics of Patient-Specific Intracranial Aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, J.; Siddiqui, A.H.; Meng, H.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of patient-specific inlet flow waveform measurements, most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of intracranial aneurysms usually employ waveforms that are not patient-specific as inlet boundary conditions for the computational model. The current study examined how this assumption affects the predicted hemodynamics in patient-specific aneurysm geometries. We examined wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI), the two most widely studied hemodynamic qu...

  1. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junck, L.; Koeppe, R.A.; Greenberg, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of [15O]H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between [15O]H2O influx with arterial infusion and [15O]H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip

  2. Stenosis of calcified carotid artery detected on Panoramic Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, So Yang; Oh, Won Mann; Yoon, Suk Ja; Yoon, Woong; Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol [School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan M. [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2009-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the luminal stenosis of the internal carotid artery with calcification detected on panoramic radiographs. This study used fifty carotid arteries of 36 dental patients whose panoramic radiograph and computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the presence of carotid artery calcification. A neuroradiologist interpreted CTA to determine the degree of stenosis of the internal carotid arteries. The degree of stenosis was stratified in four stages; normal (no stenosis), mild stenosis (1-49%), moderate stenosis (50-69%) and severe stenosis (70-99%). Among the fifty carotid arteries with calcification detected on both panoramic radiography and CTA, 20 carotid arteries (40%) were normal, 29 carotid arteries (18%) had mild stenosis, 1 carotid artery (2%) had moderate stenosis, and there was none with severe stenosis. Sixty percent of the carotid arteries with calcification detected on both panoramic radiography and CTA had internal luminal stenosis, and two percent had moderate stenosis. When carotid atheroma is detected on panoramic radiograph, it is possible that the dental patient has luminal stenosis of the internal carotid artery.

  3. Stroke prevention-surgical and interventional approaches to carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra cranial carotid artery stenosis is an important cause of stroke, which often needs treatment with carotid revascularization. To prevent stroke recurrence, carotid endarterectomy (CEA has been well-established for several decades for symptomatic high and moderate grade stenosis. Carotid stenting is a less invasive alternative to CEA and several recent trials have compared the efficacy of the 2 procedures in patients with carotid stenosis. Carotid artery stenting has emerged as a potential mode of therapy for high surgical risk patients with symptomatic high-grade stenosis. This review focuses on the current data available that will enable the clinician to decide optimal treatment strategies for patients with carotid stenosis.

  4. Increased common carotid artery wall thickness is associated with rapid progression of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomedi, Marina; Scacciatelli, Daria; Misaggi, Giulia; Balestrini, Simona; Balucani, Clotilde; Sallustio, Fabrizio; Di Legge, Silvia; Stanzione, Paolo; Silvestrini, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify clinical and ultrasound imaging predictors of progression of carotid luminal narrowing in subjects with asymptomatic moderate internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. A total of 571 subjects with asymptomatic moderate (50-69%) ICA stenoses were enrolled. They underwent ultrasound examination at baseline and after 12 months. Demographics, vascular risk factors, medications, plaque characteristics (surface and echogenicity) and common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) were collected. At the follow-up examination, any change of ICA stenosis was graded in three categories (i) ≥70% to near occlusion, (ii) near occlusion, and (iii) occlusion. Progression of stenosis was defined as an increase in the stenosis degree by at least one category from baseline to follow-up. At 12 months, progression occurred in 142 subjects (prevalence rate 25%). At the multivariable logistic model, pathological IMT values (considered as binary variable: normal: ≤1 mm vs. pathologic: >1 mm) significantly predicted the risk for plaque progression after adjusting the model for possible confounders (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.18-4.43, P = .014, multivariable logistic model). Our results confirm the role of carotid wall thickening as a marker of atherosclerosis. Carotid IMT measurement should be considered to implement risk stratification in patients with asymptomatic carotid disease.

  5. Digital subtraction angiography of carotid bifurcation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, A.R. de.

    1984-01-01

    This study demonstrates the reliability of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) by means of intra- and interobserver investigations as well as indicating the possibility of substituting catheterangiography by DSA in the diagnosis of carotid bifurcation. Whenever insufficient information is obtained from the combination of non-invasive investigation and DSA, a catheterangiogram will be necessary. (Auth.)

  6. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welleweerd, J. C.; den Ruijter, H. M.; Nelissen, B. G. L.; Bots, M. L.; Kappelle, L. J.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Moll, F. L.; de Borst, G. J.

    Introduction: Aneurysms of the extracranial carotid artery (ECAA) are rare. Several treatments have been developed over the last 20 years, yet the preferred method to treat ECAA remains unknown. This paper is a review of all available literature on the risk of complications and long-term outcome

  7. Percutaneous angioplasty of carotid artery stenoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, G.; Freitag, J.; Koch, R.D.; Wagemann, W.

    1986-03-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is a well-established method to remedy stenoses and short occlusions in the femoro-popliteal region and has also proved worthwhile in dilating stenoses of pelvic, renal and coronary arteries. Following successful experiments in animals, Mathias et al. employed angioplasty to treat carotid artery stenoses in the same way. To date, successful treatment of carotid artery stenoses has been described only in isolated recent reports. For fear of embolism, angioplasty has not yet become standard practice in this region. Because of the limited number of carotid artery stenoses treated so far, the risk involved cannot be reliably assessed. It is remarkable that no embolism has been reported for the greater number of dilated stenoses of the subclavian artery. Moreover, the report by Mathias et al. indicated that for 350 angioplasties of pelvifemoral arteries 1.1% embolisms occured after artery occlusions only, while no embolism was observed after stenoses. Having gained experience of applying PTA to the treatment of vascular obstructions of extremities, we have adopted this technique in the carotid area as well.

  8. Carotid artery revascularization : Surgical and endovascular developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, G.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Carotid artery revascularization. Surgical and endovascular developments. Stroke is among the most disabling chronic diseases and the third major cause of death in the Western world. In the Netherlands around 12 per 1000 inhabitants suffers a stroke, and in 2005 over 10.000 people died as a result

  9. Carotid angioplasty and stenting in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Cross, DeWitte T.; Moran, Christopher J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the technical success rate as well as the procedural and mid-term complication rates of carotid angioplasty and stenting in elderly patients, a group excluded from large randomized endarterectomy trials given their perceived high surgical risk. Of 200 consecutive carotid angioplasty and/or stenting procedures performed between March 1996 and March 2005, 21 procedures were performed without cerebral protection devices in 20 patients over the age of 79 years (mean age: 83 years, 12 men, eight women). These patients' medical records were retrospectively reviewed for vascular imaging reports and available clinical follow-up. Procedural and mid-term complication rates were calculated and compared to a previously published cohort of 133 consecutive patients ≤79 years of age who also underwent endovascular treatment at our institution. Carotid stenosis was reduced from a mean of 82% to no significant stenosis in all procedures. The procedural stroke rate was zero of 21 procedures. The procedural transient ischemic attack rate (TIA) was one of 21 procedures (4.8%). Mean follow-up was 24.6 months (range: 1.0-79.5 months) with at least a 30-day follow-up for 20 of the 21 procedures (95.2%). There were no new strokes. There was one recurrent ipsilateral TIA at 1.9 months. In five cases with follow-up carotid ultrasonography, no hemodynamically significant restenosis had occurred. There were three myocardial infarctions (MI) occurring at 0.5, 2.1, and 15.2 months, of which the last MI was fatal. The composite 30-day stroke and death rate was zero of 21 procedures (95% confidence interval: 0-14%). No significant difference was found in the 30-day rate of stroke, TIA, MI, or death between the elderly and younger patients. Carotid angioplasty and stenting in elderly patients can be performed successfully with acceptable procedural and mid-term complication rates comparable to younger patients. (orig.)

  10. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  11. Bilateral carotid body tumor resection in a female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Burgess

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carotid body tumors also called carotid paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from neural crest cells, approximately 3% of all paragangliomas occur in the head and neck area (Xiao and She, 2015; although they represent 65% of the head and neck paragangliomas (Georgiadis et al., 2008. Presentation of case: We present the therapeutic management of a 65-year-old woman with bilateral carotid body tumors. The patient presented to medical clinic for unrelated signs and symptoms of weight loss, dyspepsia, and epigastric pain. Physical examination showed bilateral non-tender neck masses for which imaging studies were ordered resulting in the diagnosis of bilateral carotid tumor. Surgical resection was staged with one week of distance between each tumor resection. Discussion: Carotid Body Tumors can arise from the paraganglia located within the adventitia of the medial aspect of the carotid bifurcation.Resection is the only curative treatment. Carotid body tumors resection represents a special challenge due to potential neurovascular complications. Conclusions: Surgical resection of carotid body tumors represents a special challenge to the surgeon because of the complex anatomical location of the tumor, including close relationship with the cranial nerves, involvement of the carotid vessels and large vascularization of the tumor. With the advance of diagnosis and improvement in surgical techniques as well as the understanding of biological behavior of tumors, surgical treatment has become a safer alternative for treating these tumors. Keywords: Carotid body tumor, Bilateral, Paraganglioma, Resection

  12. Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring May Detect Carotid Occlusion Intolerance during Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Furuse, Motomasa; Yagi, Ryokichi; Ohmura, Tomohisa; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Naokado; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Kawabata, Shinji; Miyachi, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2018-02-05

    The frequency of the occurrence of adverse events associated with carotid artery stenting (CAS) is usually low, but serious adverse events such as cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may occur. Real-time monitoring is ideal for the early detection of adverse events during the surgical procedure. This study aimed to evaluate continuous blood glucose (BG) monitoring for the detection of adverse events during CAS. Forty patients undergoing scheduled CAS were prospectively enrolled. An artificial pancreas was used for continuous BG monitoring (once per minute), using venous blood extracted at a rate of 2 mL/hr during CAS. The primary endpoint was a correlation between BG change and adverse events. CAS was discontinued in 1 patient, and BG was not measured in 5 patients (12.5%) because of the inability to extract blood. Among 34 evaluable patients, no patient developed CHS, but 3 patients (9%) experienced carotid occlusion intolerance. During CAS, BG was significantly higher in patients with carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 5 mg/dL) than in patients without carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 0 mg/dL) (P = 0.0221). A cutoff BG value ≥4 mg/dL during CAS showed 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of carotid occlusion intolerance. There was no significant correlation between BG change and other adverse events. BG elevation may help detect carotid occlusion intolerance although it is still unknown whether BG monitoring can detect CHS. Further studies should validate that a cutoff BG elevation value of ≥4 mg/dL during CAS indicates carotid occlusion intolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel diagnostic parameter, foraminal stenotic ratio using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, as a discriminator for surgery in symptomatic lumbar foraminal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kentaro; Abe, Yuichiro; Satoh, Shigenobu; Yanagibashi, Yasushi; Hyakumachi, Takahiko; Masuda, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    No previous studies have reported the radiological features of patients requiring surgery in symptomatic lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS). This study aims to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of a novel technique, foraminal stenotic ratio (FSR), using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging for LFS at L5-S by comparing patients requiring surgery, patients with successful conservative treatment, and asymptomatic patients. This is a retrospective radiological comparative study. We assessed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 84 patients (168 L5-S foramina) aged ≥40 years without L4-L5 lumbar spinal stenosis. The foramina were divided into three groups following standardized treatment: stenosis requiring surgery (20 foramina), stenosis with successful conservative treatment (26 foramina), and asymptomatic stenotic foramen (122 foramina). Foraminal stenotic ratio was defined as the ratio of the length of the stenosis to the length of the foramen on the reconstructed oblique coronal image, referring to perineural fat obliterations in whole oblique sagittal images. We also evaluated the foraminal nerve angle and the minimum nerve diameter on reconstructed images, and the Lee classification on conventional T1 images. The differences in each MRI parameter between the groups were investigated. To predict which patients require surgery, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted after calculating the area under the ROC curve. The FSR showed a stepwise increase when comparing asymptomatic, conservative, and surgical groups (mean, 8.6%, 38.5%, 54.9%, respectively). Only FSR was significantly different between the surgical and conservative groups (p=.002), whereas all parameters were significantly different comparing the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. The ROC curve showed that the area under the curve for FSR was 0.742, and the optimal cutoff value for FSR for predicting a surgical requirement in symptomatic patients was 50

  14. Invasive treatment for carotid fibromuscular dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Damian R.; Dzierwa, Karolina; Kabłak-Ziembicka, Anna; Michalski, Michał; Wójcik-Pędziwiatr, Magdalena; Brzychczy, Andrzej; Moczulski, Zbigniew; Żmudka, Krzysztof; Pieniążek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an infrequent non-inflamatory disease of unknown etiology that affects mainly medium-size arteries. The prevalence of FMD among patients scheduled for endovascular treatment of carotid artery stenosis is unknown. Aim To evaluate the prevalence and treatment options of carotid FMD in patients scheduled for carotid artery stenting (CAS). Material and methods Between Jan 2001 and Dec 2013, 2012 CAS procedures were performed in 1809 patients (66.1% men; age 65.3 ±8.4 years, 49.2% symptomatic). In case of FMD suspicion in Doppler-duplex ultrasound (DUS), computed tomography angiography was performed for aortic arch and extracranial and intracranial artery imaging. For invasive treatment of FMD carotid stenosis, balloon angioplasty was considered first. If the result of balloon angioplasty was not satisfactory (> 30% residual stenosis, dissection), stent placement was scheduled. All patients underwent follow-up DUS and neurological examination 3, 6 and 12 months after angioplasty, then annually. Results There were 7 (0.4%) (4 symptomatic) cases of FMD. The FMD group was younger (47.9 ±7.5 years vs. 67.2 ±8.9 years, p = 0.0001), with higher prevalence of women (71.4% vs. 32.7%, p = 0.0422), a higher rate of dissected lesions (57.1% vs. 4.6%, p = 0.0002) and less severe stenosis (73.4% vs. 83.9%, p = 0.0070) as compared to the non-FMD group. In the non-FMD group the prevalence of coronary artery disease was higher (65.1% vs. 14.3% in FMD group, p = 0.009). All FMD patients underwent successful carotid artery angioplasty with the use of neuroprotection devices. In 4 cases angioplasty was supported by stent implantation. Conclusions Fibromuscular dysplasia is rare among patients referred for CAS. In case of significant FMD carotid stenosis, it may be treated with balloon angioplasty (stent supported if necessary) with optimal immediate and long-term results. PMID:26161104

  15. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion, External Carotid Artery Stenosis, and Vertebral Artery Kinking: May It Be Asymptomatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatic, Nikola; Jaffer, Usman; Ivana, Saicic; Gordana, Globarevic-Vukcevic; Markovic, Dragan; Kostic, Dusan; Davidovic, Lazar

    2017-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of internal carotid artery occlusion ranges from being a completely asymptomatic occlusion to a devastating stroke or death. The prevalence of asymptomatic internal carotid artery occlusion is unknown, particularly for bilateral occlusion. The distal branches of the external carotid artery anastomose with distal branches of the internal carotid artery provide important sources of collateral circulation to the brain. Stenosis of the external carotid artery with ipsilateral/bilateral internal occlusion may result in ischemic sequelae. Coiling or kinking of the vertebral artery is a rare morphological entity that is infrequently reported because it remains asymptomatic and has no clinical relevance. Currently, there is little evidence to support management strategies for this disease entity and no official recommendations for asymptomatic bilateral carotid artery occlusion. We present a case of a 62-year-old female with asymptomatic bilateral internal carotid artery occlusion, bilateral external carotid artery stenoses, and bilateral kinking of the vertebral artery at the V2 segment, who has been successfully managed conservatively for over 5 years. An individualized approach to management of patients with bilateral internal carotid artery occlusion, especially in combination with external carotid artery stenosis and elongation malformations of the vertebral artery is key to a successful strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Carotid Velocities Determine Cerebral Blood Flow Deficits in Elderly Men with Carotid Stenosis <50%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Siennicki-Lantz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To examine if mild carotid stenosis correlates with silent vascular brain changes, we studied a prospective population-based cohort “Men born in 1914.” Data from followups at ages 68 and 81, have been used. Carotid ultrasound was performed at age 81, and cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured with SPECT at age 82. Out of 123 stroke-free patients, carotid stenosis <50% was observed in 94% in the right and 89% in the left internal carotid arteries (ICAs. In these subjects, Peak Systolic Velocities in ICA correlated negatively with CBF in a majority of several brain areas, especially in mesial temporal area. Results were limited to normotensive until their seventies, who developed late-onset hypertension with a subsequent blood pressure, pulse pressure, and ankle-brachial index growth. Elderly with asymptomatic carotid stenosis <50% and peak systolic velocities in ICA 0.7–1.3 m/s, should be offered an intensified pharmacotherapy to prevent stroke or silent cerebrovascular events.

  17. Predictors of antegrade flow at internal carotid artery during carotid artery stenting with proximal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kei; Kakumoto, Kosuke; Oshikata, Shogo; Fukuyama, Kozo

    2018-06-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) with proximal occlusion effectively prevent distal cerebral embolism by flow arrest at internal carotid artery (ICA); however, the method can expose antegrade flow at ICA due to incomplete flow arrest. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of antegrade flow during CAS with proximal protection. We retrospectively analyzed clinical and angiographic data among 143 lesions treated with CAS with proximal protection by occluding the common carotid artery (CCA) and external carotid artery (ECA). Flow arrest or antegrade flow at ICA was confirmed by contrast injection during proximal protection. Antegrade flow at ICA was observed in 12 lesions (8.4%). Compared with lesions in which flow arrest of ICA was achieved, the diameter of the superior thyroid artery (STA) was significantly larger (2.4 ± 0.34 vs. 1.4 ± 0.68 mm, p protection should be combined with proximal protection for the lesions with antegrade flow to prevent distal migration of the carotid debris.

  18. Diagnosis and management of carotid stenosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, E S

    2000-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1950s, carotid endarterectomy has become one of the most frequently performed operations in the United States. The tremendous appeal of a procedure that decreases the risk of stroke, coupled with the large number of individuals in the general population with carotid stenosis, has contributed to its popularity. To provide optimal patient care, the practicing physician must have a firm understanding of the proper evaluation and management of carotid stenosis. Nevertheless, because of the large number of clinical trials performed over the last decade addressing the treatment of stroke and carotid endarterectomy, the care of patients with carotid stenosis remains a frequently misunderstood topic. This review summarizes the current evaluation and treatment options for carotid stenosis and provides a rational management algorithm for this prevalent disease process.

  19. The association of carotid cavernous fistula with Graves′ ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Celik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves′ ophthalmopathy (GO is one of the frequent manifestations of the disorder which is an inflammatory process due to fibroblast infiltration, fibroblast proliferation and accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. Eye irritation, dryness, excessive tearing, visual blurring, diplopia, pain, visual loss, retroorbital discomfort are the symptoms and they can mimic carotid cavernous fistulas. Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid arterial system and the cavernous sinus. The clinical manifestations of GO can mimic the signs of carotid cavernous fistulas. Carotid cavernous fistulas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the GO patients especially who are not responding to the standard treatment and when there is a unilateral or asymmetric eye involvement. Here we report the second case report with concurrent occurrence of GO and carotid cavernous fistula in the literature.

  20. The association of carotid cavernous fistula with Graves’ ophthalmopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ozlem; Buyuktas, Deram; Islak, Civan; Sarici, A Murat; Gundogdu, A Sadi

    2013-01-01

    Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) is one of the frequent manifestations of the disorder which is an inflammatory process due to fibroblast infiltration, fibroblast proliferation and accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. Eye irritation, dryness, excessive tearing, visual blurring, diplopia, pain, visual loss, retroorbital discomfort are the symptoms and they can mimic carotid cavernous fistulas. Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid arterial system and the cavernous sinus. The clinical manifestations of GO can mimic the signs of carotid cavernous fistulas. Carotid cavernous fistulas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the GO patients especially who are not responding to the standard treatment and when there is a unilateral or asymmetric eye involvement. Here we report the second case report with concurrent occurrence of GO and carotid cavernous fistula in the literature. PMID:23571267

  1. Advanced Asymptomatic Carotid Disease and Cognitive Impairment: An Understated Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Martinić-Popović

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced carotid disease is known to be associated with symptomatic cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA, as well as with poststroke cognitive impairment. However, cognitive decline often occurs in patients with advanced carotid stenosis without clinically evident stroke or TIA, so it is also suspected to be an independent risk factor for dementia. Neurosonological methods enable simple and noninvasive assessment of carotid stenosis in patients at risk of advanced atherosclerosis. Cognitive status in patients diagnosed with advanced carotid stenosis is routinely not taken into consideration, although if cognitive impairment is present, such patients should probably be called symptomatic. In this paper, we discuss results of some most important studies that investigated cognitive status of patients with asymptomatic advanced carotid disease and possible mechanisms involved in the causal relationship between asymptomatic advanced carotid disease and cognitive decline.

  2. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Brzost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63×55×88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible.

  3. Idiopathic multiple aneurysm of external carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Balachandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysms of external carotid artery are rare. Treatments for these are undertaken for the prevention of complications like hemorrhage or rupture, and embolism. We present a 71-year-old male with idiopathic multiple aneurysm for the past 34 years on conservative management and regular follow up for the past 4 years. This case was discussed for the rarity of idiopathic multiple aneurysm of the external carotid artery and the need for individualized treatment protocol to be followed as in this case, only watchful observation considering the age and patient compliance. In this world of evolving surgical techniques and newer treatment modalities, conservative treatment still has a role to play. Primary care physicians at the community level have a major role in following these patients and referring them as and when the need arises.

  4. Asymmetrical distribution of atherosclerosis in the carotid artery: identical patterns across age, race, and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tajik, Parvin; Meijer, Rudy; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Peters, Sanne A. E.; Kastelein, John J.; Visseren, Frank J.; Crouse, John R.; Palmer, Mike K.; Raichlen, Joel S.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bots, Michiel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Small autopsy studies and clinical practice indicated that carotid atherosclerosis develops in an asymmetrical helical pattern coinciding with regions of low shear stress. We investigated the distribution of carotid atherosclerosis as determined by maximum carotid intima-media thickness

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  13. Carotid artery aneurysm resulting in myxedema coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Lamos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intra-sellar aneurysms are a rare, but important consideration when evaluating pituitary masses. Identification of aneurysms is critical to appropriate treatment and avoiding perilous consequences. These vascular aneurysms can result in severe endocrine dysfunction due to mass effect, stripping of the vascular supply to the pituitary, or hemorrhage. Here we describe a novel case of spontaneous myxedema coma and pituitary apoplexy secondary to a large internal carotid artery aneurysm.

  14. Cerebral Ischemia Due to Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Kamacı Şener; Özlem Taşkapılıoğlu; Nermin Kelebek Girgin; Bahattin Hakyemez; Mustafa Bakar; Yakup Tomak

    2012-01-01

    Blunt injury to the neck region may lead to carotid artery dissection and cerebral ischemia. Blunt injury to carotid artery is not frequent but determination of the presence of trauma in the history of stroke patients will provide early diagnosis and treatment of them. In this article, a case with cerebral ischemia resulting from traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented and clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and choice of treatment are discussed in the light of the literature.

  15. Cerebral Ischemia Due to Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kamacı Şener

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blunt injury to the neck region may lead to carotid artery dissection and cerebral ischemia. Blunt injury to carotid artery is not frequent but determination of the presence of trauma in the history of stroke patients will provide early diagnosis and treatment of them. In this article, a case with cerebral ischemia resulting from traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented and clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and choice of treatment are discussed in the light of the literature.

  16. The selective external carotid arterial embolization treatment of uncontrollable epistaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Qunli; Liu Yizhi; Ni Caifang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the selective external carotid arterial embolization of uncontrollable epistaxis. Methods: 27 procedures of super-selective external carotid arterial embolization were performed with absorbable gelfoam by using Seldinger's method in 26 cases with uncontrollable epistaxis. Results: 27 procedures of super-selective intra-arterial embolization of uncontrollable epistaxis were all successful without any serious complication. Conclusions: Selective external carotid arterial embolization is safe, effective and successful in the treatment of severe epistaxis. (authors)

  17. Hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Reith, W.; Krick, C.; Karp, K.; Zimmer, A.; Struffert, T.; Kuehn, A.L.; Papanagiotou, P. [University of the Saarland, Department for Interventional and Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Homburg (Germany); Roth, C.; Haass, A. [University of the Saarland, Clinic for Neurology, Homburg (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    This study assesses the incidence and causes of hyperperfusion syndrome occurring after carotid artery stenting (CAS). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical database of 417 consecutive patients who were treated with CAS in our department to identify patients who developed hyperperfusion syndrome and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging was performed before and after CAS in 269 cases. A Spearman's rho nonparametric correlation was performed to determine whether there was a correlation between the occurrence/development of hyperperfusion syndrome and the patient's age, degree of stenosis on the stented and contralateral side, risk factors such as diabetes, smoking, hypertension, adiposity, gender and fluoroscopy time, and mean area of postprocedural lesions as well as preexisting lesions. Significance was established at p < 0.05. Of the 417 carotid arteries stented and where MRI was also completed, we found hyperperfusion syndrome in 2.4% (ten cases). Patients who had preexisting brain lesions (previous or acute stroke) were at a higher risk of developing hyperperfusion syndrome (p = 0.022; Spearman's rho test). We could not validate any correlation with the other patient characteristics. Extensive microvascular disease may be a predictor of hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid stent placement. We believe that further studies are warranted to predict more accurately which patients are at greater risk of developing this often fatal complication. (orig.)

  18. Approach To Unstable Plaque In Carotid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Ghabaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk of cerebral infarction due to thrombo emboli originating  from carotid artery disease estimated to be near 15%, and this risk  is closely associated with the severity of luminal stenosis. But at the same time characteristics  of the plaque should be taken into account for therapeutic planning when the patient is asymptomatic and the diameter of the stenosis does not reach the threshold of 70%. Search for markers of plaque vulnerability, instability, or thromboembolic potential as complementary to the degree of the luminal stenosis in stroke risk prediction should be considered .These morphologic features of carotid plaques are increasingly believed to be one of those markers that could carry further prognostic information, and early recognition of these plaques features may identify a high-risk subgroup of patients who might particularly benefit from aggressive interventions with aggressive medical treatment. Color and duplex Doppler sonography  evaluates both  morphologic and hemodynamic   abnormalitie of carotid. Echogensity, degree of stenosis and plaque surface features are essential parameters of morphological abnormality.

  19. Artificial Intelligence Estimation of Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity using Carotid Waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Peyman; Razavi, Marianne; Pahlevan, Niema M

    2018-01-17

    In this article, we offer an artificial intelligence method to estimate the carotid-femoral Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) non-invasively from one uncalibrated carotid waveform measured by tonometry and few routine clinical variables. Since the signal processing inputs to this machine learning algorithm are sensor agnostic, the presented method can accompany any medical instrument that provides a calibrated or uncalibrated carotid pressure waveform. Our results show that, for an unseen hold back test set population in the age range of 20 to 69, our model can estimate PWV with a Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of 1.12 m/sec compared to the reference method. The results convey the fact that this model is a reliable surrogate of PWV. Our study also showed that estimated PWV was significantly associated with an increased risk of CVDs.

  20. Nurses' Perceptions of Implementing Fall Prevention Interventions to Mitigate Patient-Specific Fall Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Montie, Mary; Conlon, Paul; Reynolds, Margaret; Ripley, Robert; Titler, Marita G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based (EB) fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risk factors are readily available but not routinely used in practice. Few studies have examined nurses' perceptions about both the use of these EB interventions and implementation strategies designed to promote their adoption. This article reports qualitative findings of nurses' perceptions about use of EB fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risks, and implementation strategies to promote use of these interventions. The findings revealed five major themes: before-study fall prevention practices, use of EB fall prevention interventions tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors, beneficial implementation strategies, overall impact on approach to fall prevention, and challenges These findings are useful to guide nurses' engagement and use of EB fall prevention practices tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Management of radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftus, C.M.; Biller, J.; Hart, M.N.; Cornell, S.H.; Hiratzka, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with long survival following cervical irradiation are at risk for accelerated carotid atherosclerosis. The neurologic presentation in these patients mimics naturally occurring atheromatous disease, but patients often present at younger ages and with less concurrent coronary or systemic vascular disease. Hypercholesterolemia also contributes to this accelerated arteriosclerosis. Angiographic findings in this disorder include disproportionate involvement of the distal common carotid artery and unusually long carotid lesions. Pathologic findings include destruction of the internal elastic lamina and replacement of the normal intima and media with fibrous tissue. This article describes two surgical patients with radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis who typify the presentation and characteristics of this disease

  2. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and risk of carotid atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosu Kim

    Full Text Available The effect of subclinical thyroid dysfunction on vascular atherosclerosis remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between sustained subclinical thyroid dysfunction and carotid plaques, which are an early surrogate marker of systemic atherosclerosis.The study included 21,342 adults with consistent thyroid hormonal status on serial thyroid function tests (TFTs and carotid artery duplex ultrasonography at a health screening center between 2007 and 2014. The effect of subclinical thyroid dysfunction on baseline carotid plaques and newly developed carotid plaques during 5-year follow-up was determined by logistic regression analyses and GEE (Generalized Estimating Equations, respectively.Carotid plaques were more common in the subclinical hypothyroidism (55.6% than the euthyroidism (47.8% at baseline. However, in multivariable analysis, thyroid status was not a significant risk for the carotid plaques at baseline. Instead, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as age (P <0.001, systolic blood pressure (P = 0.023, fasting blood glucose (P = 0.030, and creatinine (P = 0.012 were associated with baseline carotid plaques in subclinical hypothyroidism. In longitudinal analyses of subjects who were followed up for more than 5 years, there was no significant difference in the cumulative incidence of new carotid plaques according to time between subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism and those with euthyroidism (P = 0.392.Sustained subclinical thyroid dysfunction did not affect the baseline or development of carotid plaques in healthy individuals.

  3. Models of experimental saccular aneurysms of carotid arteries in canine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haixia; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the availability by making experimental saccular aneurysm models of carotid arteries in canine similar to human intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Twenty healthy canines with experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully by surgery. Results: Forty experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully with 36 aneurysms and parent arteries maintaining patency with each other and four spontaneously occluded confirmed by angiography. Model successful rate reached 90%. Conclusions: Experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries in canines were one of best models created for simulating human intracranial aneurysms. (authors)

  4. Insulin sensitivity and carotid intima-media thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, Michaela; Natali, Andrea; Dekker, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of experimental data in animal models, the independent association of insulin resistance with early carotid atherosclerosis in man has not been demonstrated. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We studied a European cohort of 525 men and 655 women (mean age, 44±8 years) free of conditions known...... to affect carotid wall (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). All subjects received an oral glucose tolerance test, a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (M/I as a measure of insulin sensitivity), and B-mode carotid ultrasound. In 833 participants (380 men), the carotid ultrasound was repeated...

  5. Surgical techniques and curative effect of carotid endarterectomy for carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min HAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the surgical techniques of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for treating carotid artery stenosis, in order to improve the surgical efficacy and reduce intraoperative adverse events and complications after operation. Methods Retrospective analysis was carried out on surgical data of 53 cases who were performed CEA from October 2010 to October 2013 in Department of Neurosurgery in Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. There were 39 males and 14 females, aged from 40 to 78 years old and mean age (60.34 ± 8.92 years old; the course of disease was from 2 d to 4 years. Twenty-six cases were diagnosed as right carotid stenosis, 15 cases left carotid stenosis and 12 cases double-sided carotid stenosis. Among all of those cases, 35 cases were diagnosed as moderate stenosis (30%-69%, 16 cases severe stenosis (70%-99% , and 2 cases complete occlusion. Results Among 53 patients, 50 patients underwent CEA; 2 cases underwent CEA and aneurysm clipping; one case underwent stent removal surgery and CEA because restenosis was found after carotid artery stenting (CAS. Postoperative neck CTA and fMRI showed good morphology of carotid artery, fluent blood flow and improved cerebral perfusion after operation. All of those patients were followed up for 3 to 24 months. One case died of myocardial infarction; 2 cases appeared skin numbness on the operating side of the neck, and the symptom disappeared 3 months later; one case appeared hoarseness after operation; 3 cases experienced mild transient ischemic attack (TIA and the symptom disappeared 2 months later. No case of stroke was found. Conclusions CEA is a safe and effective surgical approach to treat carotid stenosis. Correct and reasonable choices of the surgical indications and skilled surgical technique are the key to ensure the success of operation and to improve efficacy of the therapy. doi:10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.02.006Video: http://www.cjcnn.org/index.php/cjcnn/pages/view/v14n2a6

  6. Comparisons of carotid artery stenting and carotid endoarterectomy in terms of diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Masuda, Mikio; Higashi, Shigeki

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two methods of treatment for carotid arterial stenosis, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS), by means of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). Nineteen treatments in 18 cases during the 2007 academic year were included in this study. CAS was performed for 9 cases with 10 lesions (10 procedures), while 9 cases with 9 lesions (9 procedures) were treated by CEA. Patients were examined by a neurologist before and after the procedure, and had pre- and post-procedural DWI. No strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) were observed in these cases. New DWI lesions were found in 7 out of the 10 procedures of CAS imaged 24 hours postprocedure, (average: 2.0 lesions). No new lesions were detected on DWI of CEA cases (χ 2 =8.33, p=0.0039). Certain high-risk subsets may respond well to CAS with a very low incidence of clinically-evident neurologic events, but with significantly higher incidence of periprocedural micro-brain embolism. Currently, CEA should be the first choice of treatment for atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis. (author)

  7. Carotid Ultrasound for Assessment of Nonobstructive Carotid Atherosclerosis in Young Adults with Cryptogenic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buon, Raphael; Guidolin, Brigitte; Jaffre, Aude; Lafuma, Marie; Barbieux, Marianne; Nasr, Nathalie; Larrue, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    The role of nonobstructive (young adults with ischemic stroke is not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence and the ultrasonic characteristics of NOCA in a consecutive series of young adults with cryptogenic stroke (CS). Patients aged 18-54, consecutively treated in a tertiary hospital for first-ever CS (defined as an ischemic stroke without ASCOD (A: atherosclerosis; S: small-vessel disease; C: cardiac pathology; O: other causes) grade 1 potential cause) in the carotid artery territory, were prospectively enrolled. NOCA was assessed using carotid duplex ultrasonography. Of 148 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke, 70 had CS, including 44 patients with carotid CS. NOCA was found in 22 of 44 (50%) patients. All but 1 plaque were echolucent. NOCA was bilateral in 15 patients and unilateral in 7 patients. All unilateral plaques were on the symptomatic side (P = .02). Plaque thickness, plaque length, and plaque volume were greater on the symptomatic side than on the asymptomatic side (P = .001, P young adults with CS. Measurement of the plaque burden with carotid duplex may help to identify symptomatic NOCA. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety of Carotid Artery Stenting in Elderly Patients with Severe Carotid Artery Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seul Kee; Kim, Seul Kee; Jeong, Min Young; Yoon, Woong

    2012-01-01

    To determine the safety of carotid artery stenting (CAS) using an emboli-protection device in elderly patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. Ninety consecutive patients who were at high risk for carotid endarterectomy underwent protected CAS using an emboli-protection device. Patients were divided into two groups by age: < 70 and ≥ 70. The primary outcome measure was the combined incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and death within 30 days of CAS. The secondary outcome measures were technical success and hyperperfusion syndrome. Associations between age and the clinical outcomes were investigated. Overall, 30-day stroke, MI, and death rates were 6.7%. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the older age group (n = 56) and younger age group (n = 34) (8.9% and 2.9%, respectively; HR for age ≥ 70, 1.141; 95% CI, 0.875 to 1.488, p = 0.331). A logistic regression showed there was no independent variable associated with primary outcome. Technical success was achieved in all patients and there was no significant difference in the incidence of hyperperfusion syndrome between the two age groups. The results of this study suggest that protected CAS seems to be safe in elderly patients with severe carotid artery stenosis.

  9. Carotid bifurcation calcium and correlation with percent stenosis of the internal carotid artery on CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, Alexander M.; Casey, Sean O.; Teksam, Mehmet; Truwit, Charles L.; Kieffer, Stephen; Lucato, Leandro T.; Smith, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the correlation between calcium burden (expressed as a volume) and extent of stenosis of the origin of the internal carotid artery (ICA) by CT angiography (CTA). Previous studies have shown that calcification in the coronary arteries correlates with significant vessel stenosis, and severe calcification (measured by CT) in the carotid siphon correlates with significant (greater than 50% stenosis) as determined angiographically. Sixty-one patients (age range 50-85 years) underwent CT of the neck with intravenous administration of iodinated contrast for a variety of conditions. Images were obtained with a helical multidetector array CT scanner and reviewed on a three-dimensional workstation. A single observer manipulated window and level to segment calcified plaque from vascular enhancement in order to quantify vascular calcium volume (cc) in the region of the bifurcation of the common carotid artery/ICA origin, and to measure the extent of ICA stenosis near the origin. A total of 117 common carotid artery bifurcations were reviewed. A ''significant'' stenosis was defined arbitrarily as >40% (to detect lesions before they become hemodynamically significant) of luminal diameter on CTA using NASCET-like criteria. All ''significant'' stenoses (21 out of 117 carotid bifurcations) had measurable calcium. We found a relatively strong correlation between percent stenosis and the calcium volume (Pearson's r= 0.65, P<0.0001). We also found that there was an even stronger correlation between the square root of the calcium volume and the percent stenosis as measured by CTA (r= 0.77, P<0.0001). Calcium volumes of 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.09 and 0.12 cc were used as thresholds to evaluate for a ''significant'' stenosis. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve demonstrated that thresholds of 0.06 cc (sensitivity 88%, specificity 87%) and 0.03 cc (sensitivity 94%, specificity 76%) generated the best combinations of sensitivity and

  10. Spontaneous carotid artery dissection causing a juvenile cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Huebsch, P.; Schindler, E.

    1988-11-01

    The case of a 19-year-old patient is presented who was admitted with aphasia and hemiparesis due to basal ganglia infarction as a result of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery. The difficulties in diagnosing this disease with CT and MRI in the acute stage are demonstrated. Angiography is still imperative in order to ascertain that a carotid dissection has occurred.

  11. Cerebral monitoring during carotid endarterectomy – a comparison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All patients had general anaesthesia and were operated on by the same vascular surgeon (JvM). All patients were evaluated preoperatively by an experienced sonographer. Cerebral monitoring during carotid endarterectomy – a comparison between electroencephalography, transcranial cerebral oximetry and carotid ...

  12. Thrombosis of internal carotid artery following blunt neck injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdek, M.; Klaus, E.

    1986-01-01

    Complicated problems of nonpenetrating injuries of the internal carotid artery, their pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and therapy are analyzed. The possible surgical management is considered. Attention was paid to angiographic diagnosis of traumatic and spontaneous lesions of internal carotid arteries. (author). 87 refs

  13. Re-establishment of cerebral metabolism after carotid endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balm, R.; van der Grond, J.; Mali, W. P.; Eikelboom, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metabolic changes that occur in the human brain in patients with a symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), choline, creatine and lactate were measured both before, and 4 days after, carotid

  14. Carotid artery disease and low cerebral perfusion pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Utzon, N P; Aabech, J

    1990-01-01

    Direct internal carotid artery blood pressure measurements in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy identified 49 patients, among 239 consecutive cases (21%), who had a reduction in perfusion pressure of 20% or more. The clinical history, objective findings and angiographic data were compared...

  15. Indirect carotid- cavernous fistula — embolisation using the superior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    MD, FRCS (C). Division of Neurosurgery. Royal University Hospital. University of Saskatchewan. Saskatoon. Canada. Fig .1a. Left common carotid angiogram, AP view, showing the carotid-cavernous fistula. Note opaci- fication of the left cavernous sinus (arrow) and fill- ing of the right cavernous sinus (double arrows).

  16. Carotid Artery Stenting and Endarterectomy: a clinical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hendriks (Joke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractStroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the western world. Atherosclerotic disease of the carotid arteries is in approximately 25% of the cases responsible for the cerebral infarction.1 Since NASCET and ECST, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is considered the standard treatment

  17. Carotid Body Tumor Presenting as Parotid Swelling Misdiagnosed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carotid body tumor (CBT) also known as chemodectoma is a rare tumor of neuroendocrine tissue of carotid body and is the most commonly seen jugular paraganglioma. In most cases, it is benign but it can be malignant. Extra adrenal paraganglioma is rare. We present such a rare case where unusual presentation of ...

  18. Noninvasive characterization of carotid plaque strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir A; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Hatsukami, Thomas; Cebral, Juan; Jones, Michael; Huston, John; Howard, George; Lal, Brajesh K

    2017-06-01

    Current risk stratification of internal carotid artery plaques based on diameter-reducing percentage stenosis may be unreliable because ischemic stroke results from plaque disruption with atheroembolization. Biomechanical forces acting on the plaque may render it vulnerable to rupture. The feasibility of ultrasound-based quantification of plaque displacement and strain induced by hemodynamic forces and their relationship to high-risk plaques have not been determined. We studied the feasibility and reliability of carotid plaque strain measurement from clinical B-mode ultrasound images and the relationship of strain to high-risk plaque morphology. We analyzed carotid ultrasound B-mode cine loops obtained in patients with asymptomatic ≥50% stenosis during routine clinical scanning. Optical flow methods were used to quantify plaque motion and shear strain during the cardiac cycle. The magnitude (maximum absolute shear strain rate [MASSR]) and variability (entropy of shear strain rate [ESSR] and variance of shear strain rate [VSSR]) of strain were combined into a composite shear strain index (SSI), which was assessed for interscan repeatability and correlated with plaque echolucency. Nineteen patients (mean age, 70 years) constituting 36 plaques underwent imaging; 37% of patients (n = 7) showed high strain (SSI ≥0.5; MASSR, 2.2; ESSR, 39.7; VSSR, 0.03) in their plaques; the remaining clustered into a low-strain group (SSI routine B-mode imaging using clinical ultrasound machines. High plaque strain correlates with known high-risk echolucent morphology. Strain measurement can complement identification of patients at high risk for plaque disruption and stroke. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extramedullary plasmacytoma in the carotid space: Expanding the differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, Sneha Satish; Kane, Shubhada; Arya, Supreeta

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell neoplasms have been classified into various types, with a range of clinical and radiological presentations. Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a subset of plasma cell neoplasms which presents as an isolated non-osseous soft tissue mass. Though carotid space neoplasms are commonly encountered, EMP in the carotid space is rare and seldom considered in the initial differential diagnosis of a carotid space mass. These tumors can be treated by surgery or radiotherapy. On the other hand, the commonly encountered tumors in the carotid space are treated surgically. Also, it is mandatory to exclude multiple myeloma in the patients presenting with EMP. Hence, accurate and early diagnosis has therapeutic and prognostic implications. We report a rare case of EMP of the carotid space, describing the imaging features and the differential diagnoses with clues pointing to this rare entity

  20. Supraorbital cutaneous blood flow rate during carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens D; Rosenberg, Iben; Sejrsen, Per

    2006-01-01

    : The supraorbital cutaneous blood flow rate was measured by the application of heat to the skin and following the subsequent dissipation of the heat in seven patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. At the same time, the oxygenation in the right and left frontal region was monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy......BACKGROUND: The supraorbital skin region is supplied by the supraorbital artery, which is a branch of the internal carotid artery. The supraorbital cutaneous blood flow rate may therefore be influenced by changes in the internal carotid artery flow during carotid endarterectomy. METHODS...... (NIRS). RESULTS: During cross-clamping of the carotid artery, the ipsilateral NIRS-determined frontal oxygenation tended to decrease [67 +/- 13% to 61 +/- 11% (P = 0.06); contralateral 68 +/- 11% to 66 +/- 8%] as did the supraorbital cutaneous blood flow rate from 56 +/- 23 to 44 +/- 7 ml 100 g(-1) min...

  1. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-01

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography

  2. Experiences with carotid endarterectomy at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnikrishnan Madathipat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerotic carotid artery disease poses a grave threat to cerebral circulation, leading to a stroke with its devastating sequelae, if left untreated. Carotid endarterectomy has a proven track record with compelling evidence in stroke prevention. Objectives: aTo confirm that carotid endarterectomy (CEA is safe and effective in preventing stroke at both short and long term. b to demonstrate long term patency of internal carotid artery when arteriotomy repair is performed using autologous saphenous vein patch. Materials and Methods: During ten years, from September 1997 to February 2008, thirty nine patients who underwent consecutive carotid endarterectomy at our institute, form the basis of this report. Their age ranged from thirty to seventy eight years, with a mean age of 56. There were four women in this cohort. Thirty seven patients were symptomatic with> 70% stenosis and two were asymptomatic with> 80% stenosis, incidentally detected. Imaging included Duplex scan and MRA for carotid territory and brain, and non-invasive cardiac assessment. Co-morbidities included smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease. Carotid Endarterectomy was performed under general anaesthesia, using carotid shunt and vein patch arteriotomy repair. Results: All the patients made satisfactory recovery, without major adverse cerebral events in this series. Morbidities included Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA in two, needing only medications in one, and carotid stenting in the other. Minor morbidities included neck hematoma in two and transient hypoglossal paresis in three patients. Yearly follow-up included duplex scan assessment for all the patients. Two patients died of contralateral stroke, two of myocardial events and two were lost to follow up. Thirty three patients are well and free of the disease during the follow up of three to 120 months. Conclusion: Carotid endarterectomy provided near total freedom from adverse cerebral

  3. Long-term results after carotid artery stenting. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting using self-expandable stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yasushi; Furui, Eisuke; Tsuboi, Ken; Takahashi, Akira; Ezura, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting has emerged as an acceptable treatment alternative in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Although early clinical results of carotid artery stenting have shown promise, long, term clinical results remain less certain. We report the frequency, management, and clinical results of in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting using a self-expandable stent. Between August 1998 and September 2004, 80 carotid artery stenting procedures in 78 patients were performed. We evaluated 76 of the 80 procedures in 75 of the 78 patients treated during this period who had a minimum 6-month clinical and imaging (ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance angiography) follow-up. Recurrent stenosis (≥50%) after carotid artery stenting occurred in 3 (3.9%) patients. The recurrent stenosis occurred within one year after the procedure in all cases. The low rate of in-stent restenosis using self-expandable stent suggested that carotid artery stenting may be an effective alternative treatment for carotid artery stenosis, but more data of long-term follow-up are required. (author)

  4. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eBaldock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern precision medicine approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient specific models (PSMs can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology.

  5. Development and fabrication of patient-specific knee implant using additive manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Robert; Rochman, Arif

    2017-10-01

    Total knee replacement is the most effective treatment to relief pain and restore normal function in a diseased knee joint. The aim of this research was to develop a patient-specific knee implant which can be fabricated using additive manufacturing techniques and has reduced wear rates using a highly wear resistant materials. The proposed design was chosen based on implant requirements, such as reduction in wear rates as well as strong fixation. The patient-specific knee implant improves on conventional knee implants by modifying the articulating surfaces and bone-implant interfaces. Moreover, tribological tests of different polymeric wear couples were carried out to determine the optimal materials to use for the articulating surfaces. Finite element analysis was utilized to evaluate the stresses sustained by the proposed design. Finally, the patient-specific knee implant was successfully built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  6. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECT OF PERINDOPRIL AND LOSARTAN POTASSIUM IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND STENOTIC CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS BEFORE REVASCULARIZATION: AN OPEN RANDOMIZED COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Osipova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare effects of perindopril and losartan potassium on the parameters of the ambulatory blood pressure (BP monitoring (ABPM and circadian BP profile in patients with arterial hypertension (HT and stenotic coronary atherosclerosis before myocardium revascularization. Material and methods. 59 patients with HT degree 2-3 at the age of 35-69 were examined. ABPM was performed in all patients. Daily profile was assessed by the degree of nocturnal BP reduction. Patients were randomized to receive perindopril or losartan potassium. Perindopril was administered at dose of 4 mg/day with subsequent rising up to 8 mg/day in next 7 days. The initial dose of losartan potassium was 25 mg with subsequent rising up to 50 mg 2 times a day. Duration of observation was 8 weeks. Results. Perindopril reduced 24-hour and daytime systolic BP (SBP by 17.2% (p<0.0001, nighttime SBP - by 22.5% (p<0.0001, 24-hour and daytime diastolic BP (DBP - by 18.3% and 17.6% (p<0.0001, respectively , nighttime DBP - by 27.2% (p<0.0001. Losartan potassium reduced 24-hour SBP by 25.7% (p<0.0001, daytime SBP - by 23.6% (p<0.0001, night-time SBP – by 25.5% (p<0.0001, 24-hour DBP - by 27.4%, daytime DBP - by 26.3%, nighttime DBP - by 18.5% (p=0.003. Perindopril decreased in number of non-dippers by 24,3% and night-peakers by 5.4% as well as increased in number of dippers by 27% and over-dippers by 2.7%. A number of patients with SAD profile corresponding to non-dipper type was 45.5% more in losartan taking than this when perindopril receiving (p=0.027. Conclusion. In patients with HT and stenotic coronary atherosclerosis perindopril therapy increases a number of patients with normal BP profile before myocardium revascularization.

  7. Development of patient specific cardiovascular models predicting dynamics in response to orthostatic stress challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological realistic models of the controlled cardiovascular system are constructed and validated against clinical data. Special attention is paid to the control of blood pressure, cerebral blood flow velocity, and heart rate during postural challenges, including sit-to-stand and head-up tilt....... This study describes development of patient specific models, and how sensitivity analysis and nonlinear optimization methods can be used to predict patient specific characteristics when analyzed using experimental data. Finally, we discuss how a given model can be used to understand physiological changes...

  8. Computational biomechanics for medicine fundamental science and patient-specific applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This latest installment comprises nine of the latest developments in both fundamental science and patient-specific applications, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, France, Ireland, and China. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: cellular mechanics; tumor growth and modeling; medical image analysis; and both patient-specific fluid dynamics and solid mechanics simulations.

  9. Patient-specific estimation of detailed cochlear shape from clinical CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, H Martin; Fagertun, Jens; Wimmer, Wilhelm

    2018-01-01

    of the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape from CT images. From a collection of temporal bone [Formula: see text]CT images, we build a cochlear statistical deformation model (SDM), which is a description of how a human cochlea deforms to represent the observed anatomical variability. The model is used...... for regularization of a non-rigid image registration procedure between a patient CT scan and a [Formula: see text]CT image, allowing us to estimate the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape. We test the accuracy and precision of the predicted cochlear shape using both [Formula: see text]CT and CT images...

  10. Patient specific root-analogue dental implants – additive manufacturing and finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gattinger Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to prove the possibility of manufacturing patient specific root analogue two-part (implant and abutment implants by direct metal laser sintering. The two-part implant design enables covered healing of the implant. Therefore, CT-scans of three patients are used for reverse engineering of the implants, abutments and crowns. Patient specific implants are manufactured and measured concerning dimensional accuracy and surface roughness. Impacts of occlusal forces are simulated via FEA and compared to those of standard implants.

  11. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cil, Barbaros E.; Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-01-01

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions

  12. Clinical utility of carotid duplex ultrasound prior to cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Judith C; Kabbani, Loay S; Peterson, Edward L; Masabni, Khalil; Morgan, Jeffrey A; Brooks, Sara; Wertella, Kathleen P; Paone, Gaetano

    2016-03-01

    Clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of carotid duplex examination prior to cardiac surgery have been questioned by the multidisciplinary committee creating the 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Peripheral Vascular Laboratory Testing. We report the clinical outcomes and postoperative neurologic symptoms in patients who underwent carotid duplex ultrasound prior to open heart surgery at a tertiary institution. Using the combined databases from our clinical vascular laboratory and the Society of Thoracic Surgery, a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent carotid duplex ultrasound within 13 months prior to open heart surgery from March 2005 to March 2013 was performed. The outcomes between those who underwent carotid duplex scanning (group A) and those who did not (group B) were compared. Among 3233 patients in the cohort who underwent cardiac surgery, 515 (15.9%) patients underwent a carotid duplex ultrasound preoperatively, and 2718 patients did not (84.1%). Among the patients who underwent carotid screening vs no screening, there was no statistically significant difference in the risk factors of cerebrovascular disease (10.9% vs 12.7%; P = .26), prior stroke (8.2% vs 7.2%; P = .41), and prior transient ischemic attack (2.9% vs 3.3%; P = .24). For those undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 306 (17.8%) of 1723 patients underwent preoperative carotid duplex ultrasound. Among patients who had carotid screening prior to CABG, the incidence of carotid disease was low: 249 (81.4%) had minimal or mild stenosis (duplex scanning and those who did not. Primary outcomes of patients who underwent open heart surgery also showed no difference in the perioperative mortality (5.1% vs 6.9%; P = .14) and stroke (2.6% vs 2.4%; P = .85) between patients undergoing preoperative duplex scanning and those who did not. Operative intervention of severe carotid stenosis prior to isolated CABG occurred in 2 of the 17 patients (11.8%) identified who

  13. Cognitive changes after carotid artery stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Struffert, T.; Krick, C.; Backens, M. [University of the Saarland, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Homburg (Germany); Supprian, T.; Falkai, P.; Reith, W. [University of the Saarland, Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Homburg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    We aimed to test changes in cognitive performance after carotid artery stenting (CAS). Ten patients were neuropsychologically tested at least 24 h before and 48 h after CAS. To diminish thromboembolic events, we used a proximal protection device. The following neuropsychological tests were selected: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), symbol digit test and subtests of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery (verbal fluency, constructional practice, word list memory and delayed recall). Affective state was determined by the Beck Depression Score (BDS). No patient suffered from depression (BDS <1) or dementia (MMSE 29.9{+-}1.5). Nine of the ten patients (P=0.12) showed increased speed in the Number Connection Test (NCT) (corresponding to trail making test). Most patients showed better or similar results concerning delayed recall (P=0.31). No change was observed in the symbol digit test, word list memory, verbal fluency or constructional practice. Better results concerning NCT and delayed recall after carotid stenting might be due to improved brain perfusion. After CAS, cognitive and memory performance seem to improve. Further studies with different time intervals and more refined testing, as well as perfusion-weighted imaging, are needed. (orig.)

  14. Cognitive changes after carotid artery stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, I.Q.; Politi, M.; Struffert, T.; Krick, C.; Backens, M.; Supprian, T.; Falkai, P.; Reith, W.

    2006-01-01

    We aimed to test changes in cognitive performance after carotid artery stenting (CAS). Ten patients were neuropsychologically tested at least 24 h before and 48 h after CAS. To diminish thromboembolic events, we used a proximal protection device. The following neuropsychological tests were selected: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), symbol digit test and subtests of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery (verbal fluency, constructional practice, word list memory and delayed recall). Affective state was determined by the Beck Depression Score (BDS). No patient suffered from depression (BDS <1) or dementia (MMSE 29.9±1.5). Nine of the ten patients (P=0.12) showed increased speed in the Number Connection Test (NCT) (corresponding to trail making test). Most patients showed better or similar results concerning delayed recall (P=0.31). No change was observed in the symbol digit test, word list memory, verbal fluency or constructional practice. Better results concerning NCT and delayed recall after carotid stenting might be due to improved brain perfusion. After CAS, cognitive and memory performance seem to improve. Further studies with different time intervals and more refined testing, as well as perfusion-weighted imaging, are needed. (orig.)

  15. Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy in carotid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branchereau, A.; Bernard, P.J.; Ciosi, G.; Bazan, M.; de Laforte, C.; Elias, A.; Bouvier, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five patients (35 men, 10 women) undergoing carotid surgery had Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as part of their preoperative work-up. Imaging was performed within three hours after injection of the Indium-111. A second series of views was obtained 24 hours later and repeated at 24 hour intervals for two days. Of 54 scintigrams, 22 were positive and 32 negative. Positive results were defined as a twofold or more increase in local activity on a visualized carotid after 24 hours. The sensitivity of the method was 41%, intraoperatively, and the specificity, 100%. The low sensitivity places this method behind sonography and duplex-scanning for screening patients for surgery. We believe that indications for platelet scintigraphy are limited to: 1. Repeated transient ischemic attacks in the same territory with minimal lesions on arteriography and non-homogeneous plaque on duplex scan; 2. Symptomatic patients being treated medically as a possible argument for surgery; 3. Determining therapeutic policy for patients having experienced a transient ischemic attack with a coexisting intracardiac thrombus

  16. Clinical study of internal carotid artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kyoko

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion identified by cerebral angiography were studied for clinical features, computed tomographic findings, collateral circulation and risk factors. Eleven patients were males, and at age distribution it occurred more frequently in patients over 50 years to 60 years of age rather than other ages. As for the risk factors of cerebral infarction, smoking was more frequent in patients with thrombosis, and heart disease was more common in those with embolism. Stroke occurred progressively in patients with thrombosis whereas it occurred suddenly in those with embolism. The consciousness was more severely disturbed in patients with embolism than in those with thrombosis. On neuro-radiological findings, in the patients with thrombosis, the infarcted area on CT were small and emerged as deep or watershed types, and on the angiograms, occlusion at carotid bifurcation were found more frequently and the collateral circulation were well developed. In those with embolism, the infarcted areas were large and emerged as cortical types, and on the angiograms, occlusions were observed more frequently in the intracranial portion and collateral circulation were poorly developed. In many patients with thrombosis, platelet aggregation, hematocrit and blood viscosity increased, but in those with embolism did not. (author)

  17. Accuracy of Carotid Duplex Criteria in Diagnosis of Significant Carotid Stenosis in Asian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmasaroja, Pornpatr A; Uransilp, Nattaphol; Watcharakorn, Arvemas; Piyabhan, Pritsana

    2018-03-01

    Extracranial carotid stenosis can be diagnosed by velocity criteria of carotid duplex. Whether they are accurately applied to define severity of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis in Asian patients needs to be proved. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 2 carotid duplex velocity criteria in defining significant carotid stenosis. Carotid duplex studies and magnetic resonance angiography were reviewed. Criteria 1 was recommended by the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound; moderate stenosis (50%-69%): peak systolic velocity (PSV) 125-230 cm/s, diastolic velocity (DV) 40-100 cm/s; severe stenosis (>70%): PSV greater than 230 cm/s, DV greater than 100 cm/s. Criteria 2 used PSV greater than 140 cm/s, DV less than 110 cm/s to define moderate stenosis (50%-75%) and PSV greater than 140 cm/s, DV greater than 110 cm/s for severe stenosis (76%-95%). A total of 854 ICA segments were reviewed. There was moderate stenosis in 72 ICAs, severe stenosis in 50 ICAs, and occlusion in 78 ICAs. Criteria 2 had slightly lower sensitivity, whereas higher specificity and accuracy than criteria 1 were observed in detecting moderate stenosis (criteria 1: sensitivity 95%, specificity 83%, accuracy 84%; criteria 2: sensitivity 92%, specificity 92%, and accuracy 92%). However, in detection of severe ICA stenosis, no significant difference in sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was found (criteria 1: sensitivity 82%, specificity 99.57%, accuracy 98%; criteria 2: sensitivity 86%, specificity 99.68%, and accuracy 99%). In the subgroup of moderate stenosis, the criteria using ICA PSV greater than 140 cm/s had higher specificity and accuracy than the criteria using ICA PSV 125-230 cm/s. However, there was no significant difference in detection of severe stenosis or occlusion of ICA. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-slice spiral CT diagnosis of carotid body tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Peiling; Leng Renli; Li Shu; Xie Xiuli; Xu Ke

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to explore the Multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) findings of carotid body tumor (CBT). Methods: Twelve cases of CBT proved by surgery were collected in this study and all patients accepted contrast-enhanced MSCT examination. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional post-processing were performed at diagnostic workstation using Aquilion 1.42. The CT features of CBT were analyzed. Results Each of 12 patients had one lesion. All lesions demonstrated well-marginated masses of homogeneous soft- tissue density with CT value within 29-48 HU on pre-enhanced images. All lesions were markedly enhanced with CT value over 200 HU on arterial-phase images, and the density of lesions decreased rapidly on delay- phase images. Twelve lesions were all located at the level of carotid artery bifurcation, 3 of them enveloping common carotid artery and internal/external carotid artery, and other 9 of them riding right on the carotid bifurcation. Internal carotid artery usually were shifted toward posterior-lateral, and external carotid artery toward anterior or anterior-medial. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MSCT examination not only can make a qualitative diagnosis of CBT, but determine its accurate location. It plays an importantly instructional role in clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  19. Carotid artery stenting: Rationale, technique, and current concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Hasan; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Narata, Ana-Paula; Sztajzel, Roman; Lovblad, Karl-Olof

    2010-01-01

    Carotid stenosis is a major risk factor for stroke. With the aging of the general population and the availability of non-invasive vascular imaging studies, the diagnosis of a carotid plaque is commonly made in medical practice. Asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenoses need to be considered separately because their natural history is different. Two large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) showed the effectiveness of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in preventing ipsilateral ischemic events in patients with symptomatic severe stenosis. The benefit of surgery is much less for moderate stenosis and harmful in patients with stenosis less than 50%. Surgery has a marginal benefit in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. Improvements in medical treatment must be taken into consideration when interpreting the results of these previous trials which compared surgery against medical treatment available at the time the trials were conducted. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) might avoid the risks associated with surgery, including cranial nerve palsy, myocardial infarction, or pulmonary embolism. Therefore and additionally to well-established indications of CAS, this endovascular approach might be a valid alternative particularly in patients at high surgical risk. However, trials of endovascular treatment of carotid stenosis have failed to provide enough evidence to justify routine CAS as an alternative to CEA in patients suitable for surgery. More data from ongoing randomized trials of CEA versus CAS will be soon available. These results will help determining the role of CAS in the management of patients with carotid artery stenosis.

  20. Effect of Cervical Siphon of External and Internal Carotid Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajani; Tubbs, Richard Shane

    2017-10-01

    Variant courses, configuration, and branching pattern of the external and internal carotid arteries, especially when curved in S-shape, are important for hemodynamic changes and clinical implications. Therefore, the aim of the study is to report abnormal cervical siphons observed in external and internal carotid arteries to explore clinical significance by review of literature and hemodynamic changes theoretically.The right common carotid artery bifurcated into external and internal carotid arteries at the level of the upper border of thyroid cartilage in a 70-year-old female cadaver. After bifurcation, the external carotid artery underwent severe tortuosity coursing through 5 bends at points A, B, C, D, and E from its origin to termination and 2 bends at A' and B' in internal carotid artery in the cervical region. The angles between inflow and out flow of the blood at the bends were measured and the change in velocity at each bend was computed for both arteries. Hemodynamic changes were calculated, compared and relevant clinical complications were theoretically correlated.The angles of 20°, 30°, 51°, 52°, 60°, and 28°, 48° were formed by 5 bends of external and 2 bends of internal carotid arteries, respectively. The curved courses of these arteries caused reduction in velocity/stasis, turbulence, and low shear stress. Such kinks might cause stroke, ischemia and mistaken for tumors and abscess in imagery leading to or otherwise producing iatrogenic repercussions. This study will be useful for anatomists, clinicians, and radiologists.

  1. Current global status of carotid artery stent placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, M H; Wholey, M; Bergeron, P; Diethrich, E B; Henry, M; Laborde, J C; Mathias, K; Myla, S; Roubin, G S; Shawl, F; Theron, J G; Yadav, J S; Dorros, G; Guimaraens, J; Higashida, R; Kumar, V; Leon, M; Lim, M; Londero, H; Mesa, J; Ramee, S; Rodriguez, A; Rosenfield, K; Teitelbaum, G; Vozzi, C

    1998-05-01

    Our purpose was to review the current status of carotid artery stent placement throughout the world. Surveys were sent to major interventional centers in Europe, North and South America, and Asia. Information from peer-reviewed journals was also included and supplemented the survey. The survey asked various questions regarding the patients enrolled, procedure techniques, and results of carotid stenting, including complications and restenosis. Of the centers which were sent surveys, 24 responded. The total number of endovascular carotid stent procedures that have been performed worldwide to date included 2,048 cases, with a technical success of 98.6%. Complications that occurred during carotid stent placement or within a 30-day period following placement were recorded. Overall, there were 63 minor strokes, with a rate of occurrence of 3.08%. The total number of major strokes was 27, for a rate of 1.32%. There were 28 deaths within a 30-day postprocedure period, resulting in a mortality rate of 1.37%. Restenosis rates of carotid stenting have been 4.80% at 6 mo. Endovascular stent treatment of carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is growing as an alternative to vascular surgery, especially for patients that are at high risk for standard carotid endarterectomy. The periprocedural risks for major and minor strokes and death are generally acceptable at this early stage of development.

  2. Carotid body size on CTA: Correlation with comorbidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, J.A.; Wiggins, R.H.; Fudim, M.; Engelman, Z.J.; Sobotka, P.A.; Shah, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that computed tomographic angiography (CTA) can identify carotid body enlargement in patients with sympathetically mediated diseases. Materials and methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients obtaining CTAs of the cervical vasculature at University of Utah Health Sciences Center over a 6-month period was performed. Widest axial measurements of both carotid bodies were performed on a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Statistical analysis was then performed to compare the mean carotid body size between control patients and patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. Results: Measurements were performed on 288 patients, with 134 controls. Of the remaining 154, 72 patients had diabetes mellitus, 46 had congestive heart failure, and 130 had hypertension. The control patients had a mean carotid body diameter of 2.3 mm. There was a statistically significant (p < 0.01) 20–25% increase in mean diameter with diabetes mellitus (2.8 mm), hypertension (2.7 mm), and congestive heart failure (2.7 mm; p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study found a 20–25% larger mean carotid body size in patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and congestive heart failure relative to controls. However, this small enlargement should not mimic other carotid body diseases, such as a paraganglionoma. Moreover, these findings further support the proposed functional relationship between the carotid body and sympathetically mediated disease states

  3. Diagnostic workup in carotid stenosis - a neurologist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkranz, Michael; Gerloff, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is associated with the risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular death. In selected patients, revascularization of carotid narrowing by endarterectomy may reduce the risk of stroke distal to the stenosis. Carotid artery stenting has evolved as a potential alternative to endarterectomy. Four randomized clinical trials comparing safety and efficacy of endarterectomy versus stenting of symptomatic carotid stenosis have been published in recent years, but there remains some uncertainty about the implications of these trials for clinical routine. Both carotid stenting and endarterectomy are based on different treatment strategies which may result in different specific risk factors associated with each procedure. Hence, the procedural risk of either modality varies not only with the skills of the surgeon or the interventionalist but may depend on patient characteristics. It appears that the most important question is not whether one revascularization modality is superior but for which patient one modality is better than the other. A comprehensive diagnostic workup of patients with carotid stenosis based on a broad panel of covariates that affect the risk of vascular events may improve selection of patients for carotid revascularization and may help to decide for whom one revascularization modality is likely to be better than the other. (orig.)

  4. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ting; Zhou, Linghong; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control. (paper)

  5. Comment on “Drug Screening for ALS Using Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilican, Bilada; Serio, Andrea; Barmada, Sami J.; Nishimura, Agnes Lumi; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Carrasco, Monica; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Puddifoot, Clare A.; Story, David; Fletcher, Judy; Park, In-Hyun; Friedman, Brad A.; Daley, George Q.; Wyllie, David J. A.; Hardingham, Giles E.; Wilmut, Ian; Finkbeiner, Steven; Maniatis, Tom; Shaw, Christopher E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2014-01-01

    Egawa et al. recently showed the value of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for modeling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in vitro. Their study and our work highlight the need for complementary assays to detect small, but potentially important, phenotypic differences between control iPSC lines and those carrying disease mutations. PMID:23740897

  6. Patient-specific cardiac phantom for clinical training and preprocedure surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Justin; Moore, John; Vassallo, Reid; Bainbridge, Daniel; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve repair procedures including MitraClip ® are becoming increasingly common. For cases of complex or diseased anatomy, clinicians may benefit from using a patient-specific cardiac phantom for training, surgical planning, and the validation of devices or techniques. An imaging compatible cardiac phantom was developed to simulate a MitraClip ® procedure. The phantom contained a patient-specific cardiac model manufactured using tissue mimicking materials. To evaluate accuracy, the patient-specific model was imaged using computed tomography (CT), segmented, and the resulting point cloud dataset was compared using absolute distance to the original patient data. The result, when comparing the molded model point cloud to the original dataset, resulted in a maximum Euclidean distance error of 7.7 mm, an average error of 0.98 mm, and a standard deviation of 0.91 mm. The phantom was validated using a MitraClip ® device to ensure anatomical features and tools are identifiable under image guidance. Patient-specific cardiac phantoms may allow for surgical complications to be accounted for preoperative planning. The information gained by clinicians involved in planning and performing the procedure should lead to shorter procedural times and better outcomes for patients.

  7. Hemodynamics in stenotic vessels of small diameter under steady state conditions: Effect of viscoelasticity and migration of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakopoulos, Yannis; Kelesidis, George; Tsouka, Sophia; Georgiou, Georgios C; Tsamopoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    In microcirculation, the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the complexity of the microvessel network are responsible for the high flow resistance and the large reduction of the blood pressure. Red blood cell aggregation along with inward radial migration are two significant mechanisms determining the former. Yet, their impact on hemodynamics in non-straight vessels is not well understood. In this study, the steady state blood flow in stenotic rigid vessels is examined, employing a sophisticated non-homogeneous constitutive law. The effect of red blood cells migration on the hydrodynamics is quantified and the constitutive model's accuracy is evaluated. A numerical algorithm based on the two-dimensional mixed finite element method and the EVSS/SUPG technique for a stable discretization of the mass and momentum conservation equations in addition to the constitutive model is employed. The numerical simulations show that a cell-depleted layer develops along the vessel wall with an almost constant thickness for slow flow conditions. This causes the reduction of the drag force and the increase of the pressure gradient as the constriction ratio decreases. Viscoelastic effects in blood flow were found to be responsible for steeper decreases of tube and discharge hematocrits as decreasing function of constriction ratio.

  8. Angiographic findings of collateral vessels in cervicofacial vascular lesions with previously ligated carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Gi Seok; Yeon, Kung Mo

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the angiographic findings of collateral vessels in cervicofacial vascular lesions with previously ligated carotid arteries and to evaluate the extent of angiographic assessment needed before embolization. We retrospectively reviewed 10 cervicofacial vascular lesions with previously ligated carotid artery, which were 6 cases of arteriovenous malformation, 2 cases of carotid cavernous fistula, 1 case of hemangioma and 1 case of arteriovenous malformation with carotid cavernous fistula. The previously ligated arteries are proximal external carotid artery (n = 5), branches of external carotid artery (n = 2) and common carotid artery (n = 3). Common carotid artery or internal carotid artery (n = 9), vertebral artery (n = 5), ipsilateral external carotid artery (n = 4), contralateral external carotid artery (n = 5), costocervical trunk (n = 2), thyrocervical trunk (n = 2) were assessed by conventional angiography. Angiography of both carotid and vertebral arteries was performed in 5 cases. The collateral vascular channels were inferolateral trunk of internal carotid artery (n = 8), vertebral artery (n = 5), contralateral external carotid artery (n = 5), ipsilateral external carotid artery (n = 4), deep cervical artery (n = 2) and ascending cervical artery (n = 1). Embolization were performed in 9 cases with operative cannulation (n = 4), embolization via collateral branches of ipsilateral external carotid artery (n = 1), embolization via collateral branches of contralateral external carotid artery (n = 3) and balloon occlusion via direct puncture (n = 1). The collateral channels in cervicofacial vascular lesions with previously ligated carotid artery were inferolateral trunk of internal carotid artery, contralateral or ipsilateral external carotid artery, vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery on angiography. Complete angiographic assessment of possible collateral channels is mandatory for the

  9. Hydrocortisone supresses inflammatory activity of metalloproteinase - 8 in carotid plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Sthefano Atique; Antonangelo, Leila; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Beteli, Camila Baumann; de Camargo Júnior, Otacílio; de Aquino, José Luis Braga; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Matrix metalloproteinases are inflammatory biomarkers involved in carotid plaque instability. Our objective was to analyze the inflammatory activity of plasma and carotid plaque MMP-8 and MMP-9 after intravenous administration of hydrocortisone. Methods The study included 22 patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the carotid artery (11 symptomatic and 11 asymptomatic) who underwent carotid endarterectomy. The patients were divided into two groups: Control Group - hydrocortisone was not administered, and Group 1 - 500 mg intravenous hydrocortisone was administered during anesthetic induction. Plasma levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured preoperatively (24 hours before carotid endarterectomy) and at 1 hour, 6 hours and 24 hours after carotid endarterectomy. In carotid plaque, tissue levels of MMP-8 and MMP-9 were measured. Results Group 1 showed increased serum levels of MMP- 8 (994.28 pg/ml and 408.54 pg/ml, respectively; P=0.045) and MMP-9 (106,656.34 and 42,807.69 respectively; P=0.014) at 1 hour after carotid endarterectomy compared to the control group. Symptomatic patients in Group 1 exhibited lower tissue concentration of MMP-8 in comparison to the control group (143.89 pg/ml and 1317.36 respectively; P=0.003). There was a correlation between preoperative MMP-9 levels and tissue concentrations of MMP-8 (P=0.042) and MMP-9 (P=0.019) between symptomatic patients in the control group. Conclusion Hydrocortisone reduces the concentration of MMP- 8 in carotid plaque, especially in symptomatic patients. There was an association between systemic and tissue inflammation. PMID:26313719

  10. External Carotid-Internal Jugular Fistula as a Late Complication After Carotid Endarterectomy: A Rare Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, Bulent; Cekirge, Saruhan; Tekkok, Ismail Hakki

    2011-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with mild amnesia, progressive fatigue, ataxia, visual hallucinations, and debility. His past medical history included right-sided carotid endarterectomy performed elsewhere 6 years previously. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed left parieto-occipital arteriovenous malformation-like tortous vessels, venous congestion, and ischemic areas. Cerebral angiography showed right-sided compound external carotid artery-internal jugular vein (IJV) fistula, and distal occlusion of the right IJV. Transvenous embolization via contralateral IJV was performed, and the fistula, together with fistulous portion of the distal IJV, was sealed using coils. Two years later, patient is well with normal neurologic examination findings. The presence of an arteriovenous communication after vascular surgery is a serious complication with potential long-term effects and therefore should be diagnosed and treated as promptly as possible.

  11. The effect of patient-specific factors on radiation-induced regional lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garipagaoglu, Melahat; Munley, Michael T.; Hollis, Donna; Poulson, Jean M.; Bentel, Gunilla C.; Sibley, Gregory; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Fan Ming; Jaszczak, Ronald J.; Coleman, R. Edward; Marks, Lawrence B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of patient-specific factors on radiation (RT)-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion. Methods: Fifty patients (32 lung carcinoma, 7 Hodgkin's disease, 9 breast carcinoma and 2 other thoracic tumors) had pre-RT and ≥24-week post-RT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion images to assess the dose dependence of RT-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion. The SPECT data were analyzed using a normalized and non-normalized approach. Furthermore, two different mathematical methods were used to assess the impact of patient-specific factors on the dose-response curve (DRC). First, DRCs for different patient subgroups were generated and compared. Second, in a more formal statistical approach, individual DRCs for regional lung injury for each patient were fit to a linear-quadratic model (reduction = coefficient 1 x dose + coefficient 2 x dose 2 ). Multiple patient-specific factors including tobacco history, pre-RT diffusion capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), chemotherapy exposure, disease type, and mean lung dose were explored in a multivariate analysis to assess their impact on the coefficients. Results: None of the variables tested had a consistent impact on the radiation sensitivity of regional lung (i.e., the slope of the DRC). In the formal statistical analysis, there was a suggestion of a slight increase in radiation sensitivity in the dose range >40 Gy for nonsmokers (vs. smokers) and in those receiving chemotherapy (vs. no chemotherapy). However, this finding was very dependent on the specific statistical and normalization method used. Conclusion: Patient-specific factors do not have a dramatic effect on RT-induced reduction in regional lung perfusion. Additional studies are underway to better clarify this issue. We continue to postulate that patient-specific factors will impact on how the summation of regional injury translates into whole organ injury

  12. Systematic Review of Patient-Specific Surgical Simulation: Toward Advancing Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Dharampal, Navjit; Mostafa, Ahmed E; Sharlin, Ehud; Kopp, Gail; Jacobs, William Bradley; Hurlbert, Robin John; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    Simulation-based education has been shown to be an effective tool to teach foundational technical skills in various surgical specialties. However, most of the current simulations are limited to generic scenarios and do not allow continuation of the learning curve beyond basic technical skills to prepare for more advanced expertise, such as patient-specific surgical planning. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current medical literature with respect to the utilization and educational value of patient-specific simulations for surgical training. We performed a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Embase, and Scopus focusing on themes of simulation, patient-specific, surgical procedure, and education. The study included randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies published between 2005 and 2016. Two independent reviewers (W.H.R. and N.D) conducted the study appraisal, data abstraction, and quality assessment of the studies. The search identified 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria; 7 studies employed computer simulations and 6 studies used 3-dimensional (3D) synthetic models. A number of surgical specialties evaluated patient-specific simulation, including neurosurgery, vascular surgery, orthopedic surgery, and interventional radiology. However, most studies were small in size and primarily aimed at feasibility assessments and early validation. Early evidence has shown feasibility and utility of patient-specific simulation for surgical education. With further development of this technology, simulation-based education may be able to support training of higher-level competencies outside the clinical settingto aid learners in their development of surgical skills. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Unilateral Carotid Body Resection in Resistant Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Narkiewicz, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human data indicate pathological afferent signaling emanating from the carotid body that drives sympathetically mediated elevations in blood pressure in conditions of hypertension. This first-in-man, proof-of-principle study tested the safety and feasibility of unilateral carotid body resection in 15 patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The procedure proved to be safe and feasible. Overall, no change in blood pressure was found. However, 8 patients showed significant reductions in ambulatory blood pressure coinciding with decreases in sympathetic activity. The carotid body may be a novel target for treating an identifiable subpopulation of humans with hypertension.

  14. Measurement of carotid bifurcation pressure gradients using the Bernoulli principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, K A; Ouriel, K; DeWeese, J A; Holen, J; Green, R M

    1996-04-01

    Current randomized prospective studies suggest that the degree of carotid stenosis is a critical element in deciding whether surgical or medical treatment is appropriate. Of potential interest is the actual pressure drop caused by the blockage, but no direct non-invasive means of quantifying the hemodynamic consequences of carotid artery stenoses currently exists. The present prospective study examined whether preoperative pulsed-Doppler duplex ultrasonographic velocity (v) measurements could be used to predict pressure gradients (delta P) caused by carotid artery stenoses, and whether such measurements could be used to predict angiographic percent diameter reduction. Preoperative Doppler velocity and intraoperative direct pressure measurements were obtained, and per cent diameter angiographic stenosis measured in 76 consecutive patients who underwent 77 elective carotid endarterectomies. Using the Bernoulli principle (delta P = 4v(2), pressure gradients across the stenoses were calculated. The predicted delta P, as well as absolute velocities and internal carotid artery/common carotid velocity ratios were compared with the actual delta P measured intraoperatively and with preoperative angiography and oculopneumoplethysmography (OPG) results. An end-diastolic velocity of > or = 1 m/s and an end-diastolic internal carotid artery/common carotid artery velocity ratio of > or = 10 predicted a 50% diameter angiographic stenosis with 100% specificity. Although statistical significance was reached, preoperative pressure gradients derived from the Bernoulli equation could not predict actual individual intraoperative pressure gradients with enough accuracy to allow decision making on an individual basis. Velocity measurements were as specific and more sensitive than OPG results. Delta P as predicted by the Bernoulli equation is not sufficiently accurate at the carotid bifurcation to be useful for clinical decision making on an individual basis. However, end

  15. Increased YKL-40 expression in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel Gottlieb; Rathcke, C.N.; Skjelland, M.

    2010-01-01

    atherosclerosis and 20 healthy controls. Carotid expression of YKL-40 was examined by real time RT-PCR in 57 of the patients. Regulation and effect of YKL-40 were examined in THP-1 monocytes. Results: Our main findings were: (1) serum YKL-40 levels were significantly elevated in patients with carotid...... atherosclerosis, with particularly high levels in those with symptomatic disease; (2) patients with recent ischemic symptoms (within 2 months) had higher YKL-40 mRNA levels in carotid plaque than other patients; (3) in vitro, the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4...

  16. Carotid endarterectomy in cervical block anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilijevski Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of modern carotid surgery is relief of symptoms, stroke prevention, improvement in quality of life, prevention of vascular dementia, and prolongation of lifetime. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper was to compare the outcome of carotid endarterectomy in cervical block vs. general anesthesia in patients with occluded contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA. METHOD: One hundred patients (76 male, 24 female, mean age 60.81 years with occluded contralateral ICA were operated from 1997-2000. Neurological symptomatology, deficiency and stroke incidence were preoperatively analyzed in two groups. Duplex-scanning, angiograms and CT-scan confirmed the diagnosis. Risk factors analysis included hypertension, diabetes, lipid metabolism disorders, smoking and history of CAD, CABG and PAOD. Morbidity and mortality were used to compare the outcome of surgery in two groups. RESULTS There was no difference of age, gender and symptomatology between the groups. Paresis, TIA and dysphasia were most frequent. 70%-90% of ICA stenosis was seen in the majority of patients. Hypertension and smoking were dominant risk factors in these two groups. Eversion carotid end arterectomy was the most frequent technique used. In three cases out of nine that were operated under cervical block, the neurological symptoms developed just after clamping, so the intra-luminal shunt was placed. Postoperative morbidity was 12% and mortality was 8%. Conclusion: There was no difference of preoperative parameters, surgical technique and outcome in these two groups. Without other intraoperative monitoring, cervical block anesthesia might be an option in patients with the occlusion of the contralateral ICA. However, prospective studies involving more patients are needed.

  17. Evaluation of Freehand B-Mode and Power-Mode 3D Ultrasound for Visualisation and Grading of Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Otto Pelz

    Full Text Available Currently, colour-coded duplex sonography (2D-CDS is clinical standard for detection and grading of internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS. However, unlike angiographic imaging modalities, 2D-CDS assesses ICAS by its hemodynamic effects rather than luminal changes. Aim of this study was to evaluate freehand 3D ultrasound (3DUS for direct visualisation and quantification of ICAS.Thirty-seven patients with 43 ICAS were examined with 2D-CDS as reference standard and with freehand B-mode respectively power-mode 3DUS. Stenotic value of 3D reconstructed ICAS was calculated as distal diameter respectively distal cross-sectional area (CSA reduction percentage and compared with 2D-CDS.There was a trend but no significant difference in successful 3D reconstruction of ICAS between B-mode and power mode (examiner 1 {Ex1} 81% versus 93%, examiner 2 {Ex2} 84% versus 88%. Inter-rater agreement was best for power-mode 3DUS and assessment of stenotic value as distal CSA reduction percentage (intraclass correlation coefficient {ICC} 0.90 followed by power-mode 3DUS and distal diameter reduction percentage (ICC 0.81. Inter-rater agreement was poor for B-mode 3DUS (ICC, distal CSA reduction 0.36, distal diameter reduction 0.51. Intra-rater agreement for power-mode 3DUS was good for both measuring methods (ICC, distal CSA reduction 0.88 {Ex1} and 0.78 {Ex2}; ICC, distal diameter reduction 0.83 {Ex1} and 0.76 {Ex2}. In comparison to 2D-CDS inter-method agreement was good and clearly better for power-mode 3DUS (ICC, distal diameter reduction percentage: Ex1 0.85, Ex2 0.78; distal CSA reduction percentage: Ex1 0.63, Ex2 0.57 than for B-mode 3DUS (ICC, distal diameter reduction percentage: Ex1 0.40, Ex2 0.52; distal CSA reduction percentage: Ex1 0.15, Ex2 0.51.Non-invasive power-mode 3DUS is superior to B-mode 3DUS for imaging and quantification of ICAS. Thereby, further studies are warranted which should now compare power-mode 3DUS with the angiographic gold standard

  18. Evaluation of Freehand B-Mode and Power-Mode 3D Ultrasound for Visualisation and Grading of Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, Johann Otto; Weinreich, Anna; Karlas, Thomas; Saur, Dorothee

    2017-01-01

    Currently, colour-coded duplex sonography (2D-CDS) is clinical standard for detection and grading of internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS). However, unlike angiographic imaging modalities, 2D-CDS assesses ICAS by its hemodynamic effects rather than luminal changes. Aim of this study was to evaluate freehand 3D ultrasound (3DUS) for direct visualisation and quantification of ICAS. Thirty-seven patients with 43 ICAS were examined with 2D-CDS as reference standard and with freehand B-mode respectively power-mode 3DUS. Stenotic value of 3D reconstructed ICAS was calculated as distal diameter respectively distal cross-sectional area (CSA) reduction percentage and compared with 2D-CDS. There was a trend but no significant difference in successful 3D reconstruction of ICAS between B-mode and power mode (examiner 1 {Ex1} 81% versus 93%, examiner 2 {Ex2} 84% versus 88%). Inter-rater agreement was best for power-mode 3DUS and assessment of stenotic value as distal CSA reduction percentage (intraclass correlation coefficient {ICC} 0.90) followed by power-mode 3DUS and distal diameter reduction percentage (ICC 0.81). Inter-rater agreement was poor for B-mode 3DUS (ICC, distal CSA reduction 0.36, distal diameter reduction 0.51). Intra-rater agreement for power-mode 3DUS was good for both measuring methods (ICC, distal CSA reduction 0.88 {Ex1} and 0.78 {Ex2}; ICC, distal diameter reduction 0.83 {Ex1} and 0.76 {Ex2}). In comparison to 2D-CDS inter-method agreement was good and clearly better for power-mode 3DUS (ICC, distal diameter reduction percentage: Ex1 0.85, Ex2 0.78; distal CSA reduction percentage: Ex1 0.63, Ex2 0.57) than for B-mode 3DUS (ICC, distal diameter reduction percentage: Ex1 0.40, Ex2 0.52; distal CSA reduction percentage: Ex1 0.15, Ex2 0.51). Non-invasive power-mode 3DUS is superior to B-mode 3DUS for imaging and quantification of ICAS. Thereby, further studies are warranted which should now compare power-mode 3DUS with the angiographic gold standard imaging

  19. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  20. Extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm: case illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenteno Marco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysms (EICAA are uncommon lesion. These aneurysms can be classified as true or false aneurysms, atherosclerotic, dysplastic, infectious, posttraumatic and iatrogenic aneurysms. The most common presentation is central neurologic dysfunction, either a stroke or a transient ischemic attack. The rupture of these aneurysms can lead to severely impairment and can affect the quality of life of the patients or even may lead to death. Management of these lesions is required in most cases to prevent complications, however there is no treatment guideline or expert consensus for the management. We present a case of an unusual EICAA, associated with kinking of the affected vessel and review the literature.

  1. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance angiography for carotid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J.L.; Begue, R.; Vilanova, J.C.; Aldama, J.; Delgado, E.; Baquero, M.; Capdevila, A.; Gili, J.

    1995-01-01

    Until now, patients with extracranial cerebrovascular ischemia (ECVI) could only be studied by means of CT, which provides reliable information on the parenchyma, but is unable to assess the intracranial vessels. On the other hand, angiographic and Doppler Us studies, which reflect the underlying vascular pathology and are considered reference explorations, with clearly established levels of sensitivity and specificity, are useless in the evaluation of the parenchyma. The introduction of MR and the development of MR angiographic (MRA) sequences lends a new dimension to the study of vascular disease. The knowledge and capacity to recognize the different artefacts or sources of error in MRA images, as well as the generalization of its use offer interesting expectations for its development as a technique for the entire study of the ischemic patient. We present selected illustrations of the vascular (carotid) disease obtained from 1400 cases studied in our center from June 1993 to the present (table I)

  3. Effective imaging of carotid artery dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovis, G.

    1997-01-01

    Angiography has been the gold standard in the diagnosis of arterial dissection for many years. With recent advances in techniques, particularly in MRI it may be worthy to re-evaluate the imaging methods available in obtaining the most information to maxims the patients' level of management. Assessing the imaging methods used in four patients with clinically suspected carotid artery dissection may reveal the most appropriate clinical pathway in managing these types of patients. In today's economic environment, we are striving for the most cost-effective imaging methods combined with the least invasive and safest. We must also review the cost benefit analysis of CT, angiography (DSA), Doppler Ultrasound and MRI/MRA. It is not within the scope of this paper to argue the merits of each imaging method, but purely to present some of the benefits in using non-invasive techniques if the clinical indications warrant them and they are available. (author)

  4. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis.

  5. An unusual case of common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    pseudoaneurysm involving the right common carotid artery. Sewing needle ( ... displacement of tracheal shadow towards the left ... CT scan of brain was not done in this case as there are no .... function and allergies to CT contrast material12.

  6. Carotid body tumor imitator: An interesting case of Castleman's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Hakeem J; Diletti, Sara M; Hart, Alexandra M; Meyers, Joshua E; Dumont, Travis M; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2015-01-01

    There are very few reports in the literature of Castleman's disease affecting the carotid artery and a single previous report of a case of Castleman's disease of the neck originally mistaken as a carotid body tumor. We describe a rare case of Castleman's disease, manifesting with classic radiographic hallmarks of a carotid body tumor. The postoperative pathologic examination identified the resected mass as Castleman's lymphadenopathy. The management of this particular case is discussed, and the findings are highlighted. We present a unique case of a tumor initially and incorrectly diagnosed as a carotid body tumor. However, after comprehensive treatment with endovascular and surgical modalities and subsequent pathologic examination, the diagnosis of this rare entity was made.

  7. Treatment of a symptomatic intrathoracic internal carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Brown

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrathoracic common carotid artery bifurcations are an anatomic anomaly with such rarity that only six cases have been reported to date. The true incidence of and preferred treatment options for a diseased intrathoracic common carotid artery bifurcation or internal carotid artery (ICA have not been clearly described. This case report describes a 72-year-old man who experienced a postoperative right hemispheric stoke after an aortic valve replacement, radiofrequency maze procedure, and left atrial appendage clip. Postoperative cerebrovascular evaluation revealed a severely diseased intrathoracic ICA that was treated by ligation of the diseased proximal ICA and transposition of the distal ICA to the disease-free external carotid artery. The patient provided written consent to present the history, data, and images in this manuscript.

  8. Emergency treatment by intravascular embolization in traumatic carotid cavernous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jun; Sun Zengtao; Liu Zuoqin; Liu Yanjun; Li Fengxin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the method of intervenfional intravascular treatment in traumatic carotid cavernous fistula (TCCF) and the significance of clinical application in emergency. Methods: In 297 eases of TCCF, 36 cases were treated by interventional intravascular embolization by detachable balloon, embolization orificium or occlusion in one side of carotid artery. In the 36 cases, serious epistaxis occurred in 22 eases, cortical vein inflow in 9 cases, intracranial hemorrhage in 3 cases, aggravation of eyesight in 3 cases, and limb dysfunction in 2 cases. Results: Fistula was successfully embolized and internal carotid artery remained patent in 19 cases. Complete embolization of orificium or internal carotid artery was achieved in 17 eases. The serious epistaxias in 22 cases and intracranial hemorrhage in 3 cases stopped. Eyesight recovered in 2 eases and improved in 1 case. Limb dysfunction improved evidently in 2 cases. Conclusion: Intravascular embolization treatment is the first therapeutic choice for TCCF, especially in emergency. It is necessary, safe and effective. (authors)

  9. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, L.H.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Ederle, J.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Mali, W.P.; Beard, J.D.; Cleveland, T.; Engelter, S.T.; Lyrer, P.A.; Ford, G.A.; Dorman, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Leeuw, F.E. de; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. METHODS: Patients with symptomatic carotid

  10. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, Leo H.; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Ederle, Jörg; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Mali, Willem P. Th M.; Beard, Jonathan D.; Cleveland, Trevor; Engelter, Stefan T.; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Ford, Gary A.; Dorman, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Doig, D.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Kennedy, F.; Tindall, H.; Turner, E.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. Methods Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis

  11. Guidelines for patient selection and performance of carotid artery stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, Christopher; Chambers, Brian; New, Gishel; Denton, Michael; Lawrence-Brown, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The endovascular treatment of carotid atherosclerosis with carotid artery stenting (CAS) remains controversial. Carotid endarterectomy remains the benchmark in terms of procedural mortality and morbidity. At present, there are no consensus Australasian guidelines for the safe performance of CAS. We applied a modified Delphi consensus method of iterative consultation between the College representatives on the Carotid Stenting Guidelines Committee (CSGC). Selection of patients suitable for CAS needs careful consideration of clinical and patho-anatomical criteria and cannot be directly extrapolated from clinical indicators for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Randomized controlled trials (including pooled analyses of results) comparing CAS with CEA for treatment of symptomatic stenosis have demonstrated that CAS is more hazardous than CEA. On current evidence, the CGSC therefore recommends that CAS should not be performed in the majority of patients requiring carotid revascularisation. The evidence for CAS in patients with symptomatic severe carotid stenosis who are considered medically high risk is weak, and there is currently no evidence to support CAS as a treatment for asymptomatic carotid stenosis. The use of distal protection devices during CAS remains controversial with increased risk of clinically silent stroke. The knowledge requirements for the safe performance of CAS include an understanding of the evidence base from randomized controlled trials, carotid and aortic arch anatomy and pathology, clinical stroke syndromes, the differing treatment options for stroke and carotid atherosclerosis, and recognition and management of periprocedural complications. It is critical that all patients being considered for a carotid intervention have adequate pre-procedural neuro-imaging and an independent, standardized neurological assessment before and after the procedure. Maintenance of proficiency in CAS requires active involvement in surgical/endovascular audit and

  12. Evaluation of a patient specific femoral alignment guide for hip resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael; Naudie, Douglas D; Edwards, Max R; Sellan, Michael E; McCalden, Richard W; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-03-01

    A novel alternative to conventional instrumentation for femoral component insertion in hip resurfacing is a patient specific, computed tomography based femoral alignment guide. A benchside study using cadaveric femora was performed comparing a custom alignment guide to conventional instrumentation and computer navigation. A clinical series of twenty-five hip resurfacings utilizing a custom alignment guide was conducted by three surgeons experienced in hip resurfacing. Using cadaveric femora, the custom guide was comparable to conventional instrumentation with computer navigation proving superior to both. Clinical femoral component alignment accuracy was 3.7° and measured within ± 5° of plan in 20 of 24 cases. Patient specific femoral alignment guides provide a satisfactory level of accuracy and may be a better alternative to conventional instrumentation for initial femoral guidewire placement in hip resurfacing. Crown Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved.

  13. Conventional patient specific IMRT QA and 3DVH verification of dose distribution for helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prabhat Krishna; Joshi, Kishore; Epili, D.; Gavake, Umesh; Paul, Siji; Reena, Ph.; Jamema, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, patient-specific IMRT QA has transitioned from point dose measurements by ion chambers to films to 2D array measurements. 3DVH software has taken this transition a step further by estimating the 3D dose delivered to the patient volume from 2D diode measurements using a planned dose perturbation (PDP) algorithm. This algorithm was developed to determine, if the conventional IMRT QA though sensitive at detecting errors, has any predictive power in detecting dose errors of clinical significance related to dose to the target volume and organs at risk (OAR). The aim of this study is to compare the conventional IMRT patient specific QA and 3DVH dose distribution for patients treated with helical tomotherapy (HT)

  14. Spontaneous carotid artery dissection causing a juvenile cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Huebsch, P.; Schindler, E.

    1988-01-01

    The case of a 19-year-old patient is presented who was admitted with aphasia and hemiparesis due to basal ganglia infarction as a result of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery. The difficulties in diagnosing this disease with CT and MRI in the acute stage are demonstrated. Angiography is still imperative in order to ascertain that a carotid dissection has occurred. (orig.) [de

  15. Asymptomatic internal carotid artery stenosis and cerebrovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaides, Andrew N; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kyriacou, Efthyvoulos

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis.......The purpose of this study was to determine the cerebrovascular risk stratification potential of baseline degree of stenosis, clinical features, and ultrasonic plaque characteristics in patients with asymptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis....

  16. Guidelines for patient-specific jawline definition with titanium implants in esthetic, deformity, and malformation surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mommaerts, Maurice Yves

    2016-01-01

    Context: Asymmetry and unfavorable esthetics of the jawline have become possible to correct in three dimensions using computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing. Aims: The aim of this study was to provide esthetic, technical, and operative guidelines for mandibular angle and border augmentation using patient-specific titanium implants made by selective laser melting. Settings and Design: University hospital - prospective registry. Subjects and Methods: Twelve patients and 17 impla...

  17. Tolerance design of patient-specific range QA using the DMAIC framework in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Dongho; Manger, Ryan P; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Do Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2018-02-01

    To implement the DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) can be used for customizing the patient-specific QA by designing site-specific range tolerances. The DMAIC framework (process flow diagram, cause and effect, Pareto chart, control chart, and capability analysis) were utilized to determine the steps that need focus for improving the patient-specific QA. The patient-specific range QA plans were selected according to seven treatment site groups, a total of 1437 cases. The process capability index, C pm was used to guide the tolerance design of patient site-specific range. For prostate field, our results suggested that the patient range measurements were capable at the current tolerance level of ±1 mm in clinical proton plans. For other site-specific ranges, we analyzed that the tolerance tends to be overdesigned to insufficient process capability calculated by the patient-specific QA data. The customized tolerances were calculated for treatment sites. Control charts were constructed to simulate the patient QA time before and after the new tolerances were implemented. It is found that the total simulation QA time was decreased on average of approximately 20% after establishing new site-specific range tolerances. We simulated the financial impact of this project. The QA failure for whole process in proton therapy would lead up to approximately 30% increase in total cost. DMAIC framework can be used to provide an effective QA by setting customized tolerances. When tolerance design is customized, the quality is reasonably balanced with time and cost demands. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. A 4D digital phantom for patient-specific simulation of brain CT perfusion protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boom, Rieneke; Manniesing, Rashindra; Oei, Marcel T H; van der Woude, Willem-Jan; Smit, Ewoud J; Laue, Hendrik O A; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Optimizing CT brain perfusion protocols is a challenge because of the complex interaction between image acquisition, calculation of perfusion data, and patient hemodynamics. Several digital phantoms have been developed to avoid unnecessary patient exposure or suboptimum choice of parameters. The authors expand this idea by using realistic noise patterns and measured tissue attenuation curves representing patient-specific hemodynamics. The purpose of this work is to validate that this approach can realistically simulate mean perfusion values and noise on perfusion data for individual patients. The proposed 4D digital phantom consists of three major components: (1) a definition of the spatial structure of various brain tissues within the phantom, (2) measured tissue attenuation curves, and (3) measured noise patterns. Tissue attenuation curves were measured in patient data using regions of interest in gray matter and white matter. By assigning the tissue attenuation curves to the corresponding tissue curves within the phantom, patient-specific CTP acquisitions were retrospectively simulated. Noise patterns were acquired by repeatedly scanning an anthropomorphic skull phantom at various exposure settings. The authors selected 20 consecutive patients that were scanned for suspected ischemic stroke and constructed patient-specific 4D digital phantoms using the individual patients' hemodynamics. The perfusion maps of the patient data were compared with the digital phantom data. Agreement between phantom- and patient-derived data was determined for mean perfusion values and for standard deviation in de perfusion data using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and a linear fit. ICCs ranged between 0.92 and 0.99 for mean perfusion values. ICCs for the standard deviation in perfusion maps were between 0.86 and 0.93. Linear fitting yielded slope values between 0.90 and 1.06. A patient-specific 4D digital phantom allows for realistic simulation of mean values and

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ear for patient-specific reconstructive surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Nimeskern

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Like a fingerprint, ear shape is a unique personal feature that should be reconstructed with a high fidelity during reconstructive surgery. Ear cartilage tissue engineering (TE advantageously offers the possibility to use novel 3D manufacturing techniques to reconstruct the ear, thus allowing for a detailed auricular shape. However it also requires detailed patient-specific images of the 3D cartilage structures of the patient's intact contralateral ear (if available. Therefore the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an imaging strategy for acquiring patient-specific ear cartilage shape, with sufficient precision and accuracy for use in a clinical setting. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed on 14 volunteer and six cadaveric auricles and manually segmented. Reproducibility of cartilage volume (Cg.V, surface (Cg.S and thickness (Cg.Th was assessed, to determine whether raters could repeatedly define the same volume of interest. Additionally, six cadaveric auricles were harvested, scanned and segmented using the same procedure, then dissected and scanned using high resolution micro-CT. Correlation between MR and micro-CT measurements was assessed to determine accuracy. RESULTS: Good inter- and intra-rater reproducibility was observed (precision errors 0.82, but low for Cg.Th (0.95 demonstrated high accuracy. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that precision and accuracy of the proposed method was high enough to detect patient-specific variation in ear cartilage geometry. The present study provides a clinical strategy to access the necessary information required for the production of 3D ear scaffolds for TE purposes, including detailed patient-specific shape. Furthermore, the protocol is applicable in daily clinical practice with existing infrastructure.

  20. Coupling of EIT with computational lung modeling for predicting patient-specific ventilatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christian J; Becher, Tobias; Frerichs, Inéz; Weiler, Norbert; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    Providing optimal personalized mechanical ventilation for patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure is still a challenge within a clinical setting for each case anew. In this article, we integrate electrical impedance tomography (EIT) monitoring into a powerful patient-specific computational lung model to create an approach for personalizing protective ventilatory treatment. The underlying computational lung model is based on a single computed tomography scan and able to predict global airflow quantities, as well as local tissue aeration and strains for any ventilation maneuver. For validation, a novel "virtual EIT" module is added to our computational lung model, allowing to simulate EIT images based on the patient's thorax geometry and the results of our numerically predicted tissue aeration. Clinically measured EIT images are not used to calibrate the computational model. Thus they provide an independent method to validate the computational predictions at high temporal resolution. The performance of this coupling approach has been tested in an example patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome. The method shows good agreement between computationally predicted and clinically measured airflow data and EIT images. These results imply that the proposed framework can be used for numerical prediction of patient-specific responses to certain therapeutic measures before applying them to an actual patient. In the long run, definition of patient-specific optimal ventilation protocols might be assisted by computational modeling. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this work, we present a patient-specific computational lung model that is able to predict global and local ventilatory quantities for a given patient and any selected ventilation protocol. For the first time, such a predictive lung model is equipped with a virtual electrical impedance tomography module allowing real-time validation of the computed results with the patient measurements. First promising results

  1. Retinal artery occlusion during carotid artery stenting with distal embolic protection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Kotaro; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2018-01-01

    Retinal artery occlusion associated with carotid artery stenosis is well known. Although it can also occur at the time of carotid artery stenting, retinal artery occlusion via the collateral circulation of the external carotid artery is rare. We encountered two cases of retinal artery occlusion that were thought to be caused by an embolus from the external carotid artery during carotid artery stenting with a distal embolic protection device for the internal carotid artery. A 71-year-old man presented with central retinal artery occlusion after carotid artery stenting using the Carotid Guardwire PS and a 77-year-old man presented with branch retinal artery occlusion after carotid artery stenting using the FilterWire EZ. Because additional new cerebral ischaemic lesions were not detected in either case by postoperative diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, it was highly likely that the debris that caused retinal artery occlusion passed through not the internal carotid artery but collaterals to retinal arteries from the external carotid artery, which was not protected by a distal embolic protection device. It is suggested that a distal protection device for the internal carotid artery alone cannot prevent retinal artery embolisation during carotid artery stenting and protection of the external carotid artery is important to avoid retinal artery occlusion.

  2. A Patient-Specific Airway Branching Model for Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Salwa Damanhuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory mechanics models have the potential to guide mechanical ventilation. Airway branching models (ABMs were developed from classical fluid mechanics models but do not provide accurate models of in vivo behaviour. Hence, the ABM was improved to include patient-specific parameters and better model observed behaviour (ABMps. Methods. The airway pressure drop of the ABMps was compared with the well-accepted dynostatic algorithm (DSA in patients diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. A scaling factor (α was used to equate the area under the pressure curve (AUC from the ABMps to the AUC of the DSA and was linked to patient state. Results. The ABMps recorded a median α value of 0.58 (IQR: 0.54–0.63; range: 0.45–0.66 for these ARDS patients. Significantly lower α values were found for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P<0.001. Conclusion. The ABMps model allows the estimation of airway pressure drop at each bronchial generation with patient-specific physiological measurements and can be generated from data measured at the bedside. The distribution of patient-specific α values indicates that the overall ABM can be readily improved to better match observed data and capture patient condition.

  3. 3D-Printed Patient-Specific ACL Femoral Tunnel Guide from MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Iain; Rehman, Haroon; Frame, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Traditional ACL reconstruction with non-anatomic techniques can demonstrate unsatisfactory long-term outcomes with regards instability and the degenerative knee changes observed with these results. Anatomic ACL reconstruction attempts to closely reproduce the patient's individual anatomic characteristics with the aim of restoring knee kinematics, in order to improve patient short and long-term outcomes. We designed an arthroscopic, patient-specific, ACL femoral tunnel guide to aid anatomical placement of the ACL graft within the femoral tunnel. The guide design was based on MRI scan of the subject's uninjured contralateral knee, identifying the femoral footprint and its anatomical position relative to the borders of the femoral articular cartilage. Image processing software was used to create a 3D computer aided design which was subsequently exported to a 3D-printing service. Transparent acrylic based photopolymer, PA220 plastic and 316L stainless steel patient-specific ACL femoral tunnel guides were created; the models produced were accurate with no statistical difference in size and positioning of the center of the ACL femoral footprint guide to MRI ( p =0.344, p =0.189, p =0.233 respectively). The guides aim to provide accurate marking of the starting point of the femoral tunnel in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. This study serves as a proof of concept for the accurate creation of 3D-printed patient-specific guides for the anatomical placement of the femoral tunnel during ACL reconstruction.

  4. Common carotid artery thrombosis; Clinical and radiological evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hakusui, Shigetaka; Yanagi, Tsutomu (Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital (Japan)); Ito, Eiichi

    1994-02-01

    Common carotid artery thrombosis (CCAT) is not common. We studied 4 patients with CCAT to clarify the clinical and radiological features of this disorder. Case 1 had only episodes of TIA. Case 2 was diagnosed by chance as having CCAT at the time of admission due to cerebellar infarction. On the contrary, Cases 3 and 4 were admitted because of disturbance of consciousness and hemiparesis. Case 4 died soon after his stroke because of complications. We evaluated cases 1, 2 and 3 using head CT, head MRI, neck MRI, MR angiography, SPECT and cerebral angiography. Case 4, who was evaluated with head CT and cerebral angiography, was autopsied to confirm the occlusion of the common carotid artery. The clinical severity of CCAT varies from asymptomatic to severe, because each case differs in the time taken for complete occlusion of the common carotid artery; the development of collateral circulation; and hemodynamics of the brain. As for the collaterals their contribution is variable; for example, the thyrocervical and other arteries function as the bypass. We can diagnose CCAT easily and noninvasively using MR angiography and neck MRI based on disappearance of the flow void in the common carotid artery or internal carotid artery. On physical examination, it is important to detect faded pulsation of the superficial temporal artery that is ipsilateral to the occluded common carotid artery. (author).

  5. Carotid angioplasty and stenting under protection. Techniques, results and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, M; Polydorou, A; Henry, I; Anagnostopoulou, I S; Polydorou, I A; Hugel, M

    2006-10-01

    A carotid stenosis is responsible for about 30% of strokes occurring. Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is considered to be the gold standard treatment of a carotid stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is emerging as a new alternative treatment for a carotid artery stenosis, but the risk of neurological complications and brain embolism remains the major drawback to this procedure. Therefore, in order to reduce the risks, we need: 1) good indications, good patient and lesion selection; 2) correct techniques; 3) brain protection devices (cerebral protection devices should be routinely used and are mandatory for any procedure); 4) 3 types of protection devices are available, but filters are the most commonly used (all protection devices have limitations and cannot prevent from all embolic events; however, neurological complications can be reduced by 60%); 5) a good choice of the stent and correct implantation (all stents are not equivalent and have different geometrical effects); 6) pharmacological adjuncts; 7) a good team. Recent studies have shown that CAS has superior short-term outcomes than CEA in high surgical risk patients, but there are enough reported data to conclude that CAS is also not inferior to CEA in low-risk patients. CAS under protection is the standard of care and is maybe becoming the gold standard treatment of a carotid stenosis at least in some subgroups of patients.

  6. Recommendations for Management of Patients with Carotid Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijana Lovrencic-Huzjan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Carotid atherosclerosis is recognized as an important factor in stroke pathophysiology and represents a key target in stroke prevention; multiple treatment modalities have been developed to battle this disease. Multiple randomized trials have shown the efficacy of carotid endarterectomy in secondary stroke prevention. Carotid stenting, a newer treatment option, presents a less invasive alternative to the surgical intervention on carotid arteries. Advances in medical therapy have also enabled further risk reduction in the overall incidence of stroke. Despite numerous trials and decades of clinical research, the optimal management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease remains controversial. We will attempt to highlight some of the pivotal trials already completed, discuss the current controversies and complexities in the treatment decision-making, and postulate on what likely lies ahead. This paper will highlight the complexities of decision-making optimal treatment recommendations for patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

  7. Efficacy of Surgical Therapy for Carotid Body Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-shan Lian; Chang-wei Liu; Heng Guan; Yue-hong Zheng; Xing-ming Chen; Yong-jun Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of surgical therapy for carotid body tumors.Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted,covering the diagnosis,surgical procedure,post-operative complications,and prognosis of 120 cases of carotid body tumors in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 1949 to May,2011.Results Surgical excision was successfully performed in 111 cases with 117 tumors.In all those cases,50 underwent simple tumor resection,42 underwent resection of tumors and ligation of the external carotid arteries,7 underwent co-resection of tumors and common carotid arteries,internal carotid arteries,as well as external arteries without vascular reconstruction,and the other 12 cases experienced tumor resection and vascular reconstruction as internal carotid arteries were involved.After operation,3 cases developed cerebral infarction,30 cases showed cranial nerve palsy,including 15 cases of hypoglossal nerve damage,10 cases of vagus paralysis,and 5 cases of Horner's syndrome.Conclusion It is essential to make a proper surgical strategy,which can reduce postoperative complications.

  8. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Sara V; Blicher, Marie K; Kruger, Ruan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pres...... that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk....

  9. Tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow in a modeled human carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Atkinson, C.; Jeremy, M. C.; Soria, J.

    2011-04-01

    Hemodynamic forces within the human carotid artery are well known to play a key role in the initiation and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The degree and extent of the disease largely depends on the prevailing three-dimensional flow structure and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution. This work presents tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) measurements of the flow structure and WSS in a physiologically accurate model of the human carotid artery bifurcation. The vascular geometry is reconstructed from patient-specific data and reproduced in a transparent flow phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of Tomo-PIV in a complex three-dimensional geometry. Tomographic reconstruction is performed with the multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation and simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction (SMART) technique. The implemented methodology is validated by comparing the results with Stereo-PIV measurements in the same facility. Using a steady flow assumption, the measurement error and RMS uncertainty are directly inferred from the measured velocity field. It is shown that the measurement uncertainty increases for increasing light sheet thickness and increasing velocity gradients, which are largest near the vessel walls. For a typical volume depth of 6 mm (or 256 pixel), the analysis indicates that the velocity derived from 3D cross-correlation can be measured within ±2% of the maximum velocity (or ±0.2 pixel) near the center of the vessel and within ±5% (±0.6 pixel) near the vessel wall. The technique is then applied to acquire 3D-3C velocity field data at multiple axial locations within the carotid artery model, which are combined to yield the flow field and WSS in a volume of approximately 26 mm × 27 mm × 60 mm. Shear stress is computed from the velocity gradient tensor and a method for inferring the WSS distribution on the vessel wall is presented. The results indicate the presence of a complex and three-dimensional flow structure, with

  10. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  11. Evidence for shear stress-mediated dilation of the internal carotid artery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Howard Henry; Atkinson, Ceri L; Heinonen, Ilkka H A

    2016-01-01

    -mediated dilation of larger conduit arteries in humans. There was a strong association between change in shear and diameter of the internal carotid (r=0.68; Ptime in humans, that shear stress is an important stimulus for hypercapnic vasodilation of the internal carotid...... increases carotid shear stress, a known stimulus to vasodilation in other conduit arteries. To explore the hypothesis that shear stress contributes to hypercapnic internal carotid dilation in humans, temporal changes in internal and common carotid shear rate and diameter, along with changes in middle.......01) carotids. Diameter also increased (Ptime course is associated with shear...

  12. Results of subclavian to carotid artery bypass for occlusive disease of the common carotid artery: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Calio, Francesco G; Masci, Federica; Pasqua, Rocco; Frezzotti, Francesca; Peschillo, Simone

    2018-05-01

    Optimal treatment of significant atherosclerosis of the common carotid artery (CCA) is not well-defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of prosthetic subclavian to carotid bypass for occlusive disease of the CCA. From January 1994 to December 2015, 45 patients, mean age 67 years, underwent an ipsilateral subclavian to carotid bypass for occlusive disease of the CCA. Thirty-eight patients (84%) presented with neurologic symptoms, including transitory ischemic attacks in 29 cases and minor strokes in 9 cases. The graft material consisted of a 7 mm polytetrafluoroethylene conduit, and the distal anastomosis was done on the carotid bulb in 21 patients, on the internal carotid artery in 19 cases, and on the distal CCA in 5 cases. Median length of follow-up was 58 months. Study endpoints were the combined postoperative stroke/mortality rate, graft infection, overall late survival, freedom from ipsilateral stroke, and graft patency. Postoperative stroke/mortality rate was 2%. No graft infection was observed throughout follow-up. At 60 months, overall survival, freedom from stroke, and graft patency were 71% (standard error [SE] = 0.07), 98% (SE = 0.02), and 95.5% (SE = 0.06), respectively. Subclavian to carotid bypass allows very good patency rates and excellent protection from postoperative and late stroke, remaining a benchmark for any other treatment method. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Carotid Artery Stenting in a Patient with Spontaneous Recanalization of a Proximal Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Koh, Jun Seok; Choi, Woo Suk

    2006-01-01

    We report here on a rare case of carotid artery angioplasty and stenting in a patient with spontaneous recanalization after complete occlusion of the proximal internal carotid artery (ICA). The patient initially showed severe stenosis at the left proximal ICA on MR angiography (MRA). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) performed three days after MRA showed complete occlusion of the proximal ICA. The follow-up DSA after four weeks showed recanalization of the ICA, and then carotid artery stenting was successfully performed. There has been no neurologic complication during more than one year follow-up. cute internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusions may result in profound disability and death (1). An occluded ICA can spontaneously recanalize, but this doesn't happen frequently, and the natural course of a proximal ICA occlusion and its possibility of recanalization, including the exact time of recanalization after occlusion, are not well known (2, 3). A few studies have reported the incidence of spontaneous recanalization of the proximal internal carotid artery, which has mostly occurred in patients with ICA dissections (4 6). A few limited studies have reported a considerable incidence of spontaneous recanalization in patients with underlying atherosclerotic lesion or atherothombotic diseases (2). The possibility of repeated occlusion and repeated cerebral ischemic infarction may exist for the patients exhibiting spontaneous recanalization of the ICA and underlying atherosclerosis. We report here on a case of carotid artery stenting (CAS) in a patient who exhibited underlying atherosclerosis with spontaneous recanalization after complete occlusion of the proximal ICA

  14. The usefulness of carotid sinus massage in different patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narasimhan Pradeep; Thomas, Alan; Mudd, Paul; Morris, Robert O; Masud, Tahir

    2003-11-01

    to determine the positive yield of carotid sinus massage in different patient groups: unexplained syncope, falls, dizziness and controls. observational study. teaching hospital. we studied consecutive patients over the age of 60 years referred to the 'falls clinic' with a history of unexplained syncope, unexplained falls and unexplained dizziness. We also studied asymptomatic control subjects recruited from a general practice register aged 60 years and over. All patients and control subjects underwent a full clinical assessment (comprehensive history and detailed clinical examination including supine and erect blood pressure measurements) and 12-lead electrocardiography. We performed carotid sinus massage in the supine position for 5 seconds separately on both sides followed by repeating the procedure in the upright positions using a motorised tilt table. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded using a cardiac monitor and digital plethysmography respectively. The test was considered positive if carotid sinus massage produced asystole with more than a 3 second pause (cardioinhibitory type of carotid sinus syndrome), or a fall in systolic blood pressure of more than 50 mmHg in the absence of significant cardioinhibition (vasodepressor type of carotid sinus syndrome) or where there was evidence of both vasodepressor and cardio-inhibition as above (mixed type). we studied 44 asymptomatic control subjects and 221 symptomatic patients (130 with unexplained syncope, 41 with unexplained falls and 50 with unexplained dizziness). In the overall symptomatic patient group, the positive yield (any type of carotid sinus syndrome) was 17.6% (95% CI = 12.7-22.5). The positive yield in men (26.3% (95% CI = 16.4-36.2)) was twice that in women (13.1% (95% CI = 7.6-18.6)) (P = 0.014). Overall any type of carotid sinus syndrome was present in 22.3% (n = 29) of the syncope group, 17.1% (n = 7) in the unexplained fallers group and 6% (n = 3) in the dizziness group. We also found that

  15. Carotid artery protrusion and dehiscence in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasagawa, Yasuo; Tachibana, Osamu; Doai, Mariko; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tonami, Hisao; Iizuka, Hideaki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-10-01

    Acromegaly is a systemic disease which causes multiple bony alterations. Some authors reported that acromegalic patients have risk factors for an intraoperative vascular injury due to the specific anatomical features of their sphenoid sinus. The objective of our study was to analyze the anatomic characteristics of sphenoid sinus in acromegalic patients compared with controls, by evaluation of computed tomography (CT) findings. We examined 45 acromegalic (acromegaly group) and 45 non-acromegalic patients (control group) with pituitary adenomas who were matched for sex, age, height, tumor size, and cavernous sinus invasion (Knosp grade). Preoperative CT of the pituitary region including the sphenoid sinus was used to evaluate the following anatomic characteristics: type of sphenoid sinus (sellar or pre-sellar/conchal); intrasphenoid septa (non/single or multiple); carotid artery protrusion; carotid artery dehiscence; intercarotid distance. Sixteen acromegalic patients (35.5 %) and 6 controls (13.3 %) had carotid artery protrusion. Additionally, 10 acromegalic patients (22.2 %) and 3 controls (6.6 %) had carotid artery dehiscence. Carotid artery protrusion and dehiscence were more frequent in the acromegaly group than in control group (p = 0.013 and 0.035, respectively). Other anatomic characteristics (type of sphenoid sinus, intrasphenoid septa, and intracarotid distance) showed no significant differences between acromegaly and control groups. Our study suggests that carotid artery protrusion and dehiscence occur more frequently among acromegalic patients, compared with non-acromegalic patients. It is important for surgeons to be aware of these anatomic variations to avoid vital complications, such as carotid injuries, during surgery.

  16. National variation in preoperative imaging, carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and threshold for surgery for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arous, Edward J; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Beck, Adam W; Stone, David H; Hoel, Andrew W; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2015-10-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis is among the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, consensus is lacking regarding optimal preoperative imaging, carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and ultimately, the threshold for surgery. We sought to characterize national variation in preoperative imaging, carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and threshold for surgery for asymptomatic CEA. The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database was used to identify all CEA procedures performed for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis between 2003 and 2014. VQI currently captures 100% of CEA procedures performed at >300 centers by >2000 physicians nationwide. Three analyses were performed to quantify the variation in (1) preoperative imaging, (2) carotid duplex ultrasound criteria, and (3) threshold for surgery. Of 35,695 CEA procedures in 33,488 patients, the study cohort was limited to 19,610 CEA procedures (55%) performed for asymptomatic disease. The preoperative imaging modality used before CEA varied widely, with 57% of patients receiving a single preoperative imaging study (duplex ultrasound imaging, 46%; computed tomography angiography, 7.5%; magnetic resonance angiography, 2.0%; cerebral angiography, 1.3%) and 43% of patients receiving multiple preoperative imaging studies. Of the 16,452 asymptomatic patients (89%) who underwent preoperative duplex ultrasound imaging, there was significant variability between centers in the degree of stenosis (50%-69%, 70%-79%, 80%-99%) designated for a given peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, and internal carotid artery-to-common carotid artery ratio. Although 68% of CEA procedures in asymptomatic patients were performed for an 80% to 99% stenosis, 26% were performed for a 70% to 79% stenosis, and 4.1% were performed for a 50% to 69% stenosis. At the surgeon level, the range in the percentage of CEA procedures performed for a duplex ultrasound

  17. Patient-specific quality assurance for intracranial cases in robotic radiosurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksal, Canan; Akbas, Ugur; Donmez Kesen, Nazmiye; Okutan, Murat; Bilge, Hatice; Kemikler, Gonul

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform pretreatment patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for intracranial irradiation using CyberKnife with an ion chamber. Twenty-five intracranial plans created using the ray-tracing algorithm were used for this study. Computed tomography (CT) images of the water-equivalent RW3 slab phantom with PinPoint ionization chamber were acquired with 1-mm slice thickness and transferred to the MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS). Four gold fiducial markers embedded into two different plates were used to tracking during the irradiation. Intracranial plans were transferred to CT images of the RW3 phantom. The isodose curves and sensitive volume of ion chamber were overlapped. Point dose measurements were performed three times and the mean point doses were calculated for each plan. The mean doses measured by the PinPoint ion chamber were compared with those of the calculated by MultiPlan TPS in the sensitive volume of PinPoint. The mean percentage difference (MPD) in point dose measurements was -2.44±1.97 for 25 plans. The maximum and minimum percentage differences between the measured and calculated absolute point doses were -7.14 and 0.23, respectively. The MPD was -1.70±1.90 for 12 plans using a fixed collimator and -3.11±1.86 for 13 plans using an IRIS cone. Point dose measurement is a reliable and functional method for pre-treatment patient-specific QA in intracranial CyberKnife plans. Point dose verification should be performed to correct any possible errors prior to patient treatment. It is recommended for use in patient-specific QA process in the CyberKnife plans.

  18. Patient-specific coronary blood supply territories for quantitative perfusion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkaroff, Constantine; Biglands, John D.; Greenwood, John P.; Plein, Sven; Boyle, Roger D.; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Magee, Derek R.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial perfusion imaging, coupled with quantitative perfusion analysis, provides an important diagnostic tool for the identification of ischaemic heart disease caused by coronary stenoses. The accurate mapping between coronary anatomy and under-perfused areas of the myocardium is important for diagnosis and treatment. However, in the absence of the actual coronary anatomy during the reporting of perfusion images, areas of ischaemia are allocated to a coronary territory based on a population-derived 17-segment (American Heart Association) AHA model of coronary blood supply. This work presents a solution for the fusion of 2D Magnetic Resonance (MR) myocardial perfusion images and 3D MR angiography data with the aim to improve the detection of ischaemic heart disease. The key contribution of this work is a novel method for the mediated spatiotemporal registration of perfusion and angiography data and a novel method for the calculation of patient-specific coronary supply territories. The registration method uses 4D cardiac MR cine series spanning the complete cardiac cycle in order to overcome the under-constrained nature of non-rigid slice-to-volume perfusion-to-angiography registration. This is achieved by separating out the deformable registration problem and solving it through phase-to-phase registration of the cine series. The use of patient-specific blood supply territories in quantitative perfusion analysis (instead of the population-based model of coronary blood supply) has the potential of increasing the accuracy of perfusion analysis. Quantitative perfusion analysis diagnostic accuracy evaluation with patient-specific territories against the AHA model demonstrates the value of the mediated spatiotemporal registration in the context of ischaemic heart disease diagnosis. PMID:29392098

  19. 3D Modelling and Printing Technology to Produce Patient-Specific 3D Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbara, Nicolette S; Otton, James M; Pather, Nalini

    2017-11-10

    A comprehensive knowledge of mitral valve (MV) anatomy is crucial in the assessment of MV disease. While the use of three-dimensional (3D) modelling and printing in MV assessment has undergone early clinical evaluation, the precision and usefulness of this technology requires further investigation. This study aimed to assess and validate 3D modelling and printing technology to produce patient-specific 3D MV models. A prototype method for MV 3D modelling and printing was developed from computed tomography (CT) scans of a plastinated human heart. Mitral valve models were printed using four 3D printing methods and validated to assess precision. Cardiac CT and 3D echocardiography imaging data of four MV disease patients was used to produce patient-specific 3D printed models, and 40 cardiac health professionals (CHPs) were surveyed on the perceived value and potential uses of 3D models in a clinical setting. The prototype method demonstrated submillimetre precision for all four 3D printing methods used, and statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p3D printed models, particularly using multiple print materials, were considered useful by CHPs for preoperative planning, as well as other applications such as teaching and training. This study suggests that, with further advances in 3D modelling and printing technology, patient-specific 3D MV models could serve as a useful clinical tool. The findings also highlight the potential of this technology to be applied in a variety of medical areas within both clinical and educational settings. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The sensitivity of patient specific IMRT QC to systematic MLC leaf bank offset errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Alejandra; Palte, Gesa; Dunscombe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Patient specific IMRT QC is performed routinely in many clinics as a safeguard against errors and inaccuracies which may be introduced during the complex planning, data transfer, and delivery phases of this type of treatment. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting systematic errors in MLC leaf bank position with patient specific checks. Methods: 9 head and neck (H and N) and 14 prostate IMRT beams were delivered using MLC files containing systematic offsets (±1 mm in two banks, ±0.5 mm in two banks, and 1 mm in one bank of leaves). The beams were measured using both MAPCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) and the aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Comparisons with calculated fields, without offsets, were made using commonly adopted criteria including absolute dose (AD) difference, relative dose difference, distance to agreement (DTA), and the gamma index. Results: The criteria most sensitive to systematic leaf bank offsets were the 3% AD, 3 mm DTA for MAPCHECK and the gamma index with 2% AD and 2 mm DTA for the EPID. The criterion based on the relative dose measurements was the least sensitive to MLC offsets. More highly modulated fields, i.e., H and N, showed greater changes in the percentage of passing points due to systematic MLC inaccuracy than prostate fields. Conclusions: None of the techniques or criteria tested is sufficiently sensitive, with the population of IMRT fields, to detect a systematic MLC offset at a clinically significant level on an individual field. Patient specific QC cannot, therefore, substitute for routine QC of the MLC itself.

  1. The sensitivity of patient specific IMRT QC to systematic MLC leaf bank offset errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Alejandra; Palte, Gesa; Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2, Canada and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive North West, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Patient specific IMRT QC is performed routinely in many clinics as a safeguard against errors and inaccuracies which may be introduced during the complex planning, data transfer, and delivery phases of this type of treatment. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting systematic errors in MLC leaf bank position with patient specific checks. Methods: 9 head and neck (H and N) and 14 prostate IMRT beams were delivered using MLC files containing systematic offsets ({+-}1 mm in two banks, {+-}0.5 mm in two banks, and 1 mm in one bank of leaves). The beams were measured using both MAPCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) and the aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Comparisons with calculated fields, without offsets, were made using commonly adopted criteria including absolute dose (AD) difference, relative dose difference, distance to agreement (DTA), and the gamma index. Results: The criteria most sensitive to systematic leaf bank offsets were the 3% AD, 3 mm DTA for MAPCHECK and the gamma index with 2% AD and 2 mm DTA for the EPID. The criterion based on the relative dose measurements was the least sensitive to MLC offsets. More highly modulated fields, i.e., H and N, showed greater changes in the percentage of passing points due to systematic MLC inaccuracy than prostate fields. Conclusions: None of the techniques or criteria tested is sufficiently sensitive, with the population of IMRT fields, to detect a systematic MLC offset at a clinically significant level on an individual field. Patient specific QC cannot, therefore, substitute for routine QC of the MLC itself.

  2. The effect of inlet waveforms on computational hemodynamics of patient-specific intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J; Siddiqui, A H; Meng, H

    2014-12-18

    Due to the lack of patient-specific inlet flow waveform measurements, most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of intracranial aneurysms usually employ waveforms that are not patient-specific as inlet boundary conditions for the computational model. The current study examined how this assumption affects the predicted hemodynamics in patient-specific aneurysm geometries. We examined wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI), the two most widely studied hemodynamic quantities that have been shown to predict aneurysm rupture, as well as maximal WSS (MWSS), energy loss (EL) and pressure loss coefficient (PLc). Sixteen pulsatile CFD simulations were carried out on four typical saccular aneurysms using 4 different waveforms and an identical inflow rate as inlet boundary conditions. Our results demonstrated that under the same mean inflow rate, different waveforms produced almost identical WSS distributions and WSS magnitudes, similar OSI distributions but drastically different OSI magnitudes. The OSI magnitude is correlated with the pulsatility index of the waveform. Furthermore, there is a linear relationship between aneurysm-averaged OSI values calculated from one waveform and those calculated from another waveform. In addition, different waveforms produced similar MWSS, EL and PLc in each aneurysm. In conclusion, inlet waveform has minimal effects on WSS, OSI distribution, MWSS, EL and PLc and a strong effect on OSI magnitude, but aneurysm-averaged OSI from different waveforms has a strong linear correlation with each other across different aneurysms, indicating that for the same aneurysm cohort, different waveforms can consistently stratify (rank) OSI of aneurysms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Histological analysis of extracranial carotid artery aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna C Welleweerd

    Full Text Available Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms (ECAA are rare but may be accompanied with significant morbidity. Previous studies mostly focused on diagnostic imaging and treatment. In contrast, the pathophysiological mechanisms and natural course of ECAA are largely unknown. Understanding the pathophysiological background may add to prediction of risk for adverse outcome and need for surgical exclusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the histopathological characteristics of ECAA in patients who underwent complete surgical ECAA resection.From March 2004 till June 2013, 13 patients were treated with open ECAA repair. During surgery the aneurysm sac was resected and processed for standardized histological analysis. Sections were stained with routine hematoxylin and eosin and special stains to detect elastin, collagen, different types of inflammatory cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells.Histopathological characterization revealed two distinct categories: dissection (abrupt interruption of the media; n = 3 and degeneration (general loss of elastin fibers in the media; n = 10. In the degenerative samples the elastin fibers in the media were fragmented and were partly absent. Inflammatory cells were observed in the vessel wall of the aneurysms.Histological analysis in this small sample size revealed dissection and degeneration as the two distinct underlying mechanisms in ECAA formation.

  4. Operative management of penetrating carotid artery injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, V A; Pronchenko, A A; Samokhvalov, I M

    2011-07-01

    To analyse management and outcomes of carotid artery (CA) injuries. Retrospective study of the patients in the combat operations in Chechnya (1999-2002) and in peacetime (2003-2009). A total of 46 patients with missile (27) and stab (19) wounds, who had common and internal CA injury, underwent an open surgery. Temporary shunts (TSs) were placed in eight patients with more severe injuries. Retrospective analysis of patients' data. CA ligation and CA repair were performed in 9 and 37 patients, respectively. Of the nine patients with CA ligation, five developed neurologic deficit; the remaining four patients died (100% of poor outcomes). Of the 37 patients with blood flow restoration, nine patients died and neurologic deficit persisted in two patients (30% of poor outcomes) (p < 0.05). Among patients with TS, three patients died and two had stable neurologic deficit (63% of poor results). Of the patients without TS, 10 patients died and five had neurologic disorders (56% of poor outcomes) (p = 0.53). CA repair is the method of choice in CA injury. TS use does not result in a decreased mortality rate or neurologic deficit reduction in patients with severe injuries. Copyright © 2011 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk modelling study for carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhan, G; Gardiner, E D; Abidia, A F; Chetter, I C; Renwick, P M; Johnson, B F; Wilkinson, A R; McCollum, P T

    2001-12-01

    The aims of this study were to identify factors that influence the risk of stroke or death following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and to develop a model to aid in comparative audit of vascular surgeons and units. A series of 839 CEAs performed by four vascular surgeons between 1992 and 1999 was analysed. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to model the effect of 15 possible risk factors on the 30-day risk of stroke or death. Outcome was compared for four surgeons and two units after adjustment for the significant risk factors. The overall 30-day stroke or death rate was 3.9 per cent (29 of 741). Heart disease, diabetes and stroke were significant risk factors. The 30-day predicted stroke or death rates increased with increasing risk scores. The observed 30-day stroke or death rate was 3.9 per cent for both vascular units and varied from 3.0 to 4.2 per cent for the four vascular surgeons. Differences in the outcomes between the surgeons and vascular units did not reach statistical significance after risk adjustment. Diabetes, heart disease and stroke are significant risk factors for stroke or death following CEA. The risk score model identified patients at higher risk and aided in comparative audit.

  6. Indirect carotid cavernous fistula mimicking ocular myasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishangthem, Lakshmi; Satti, Sudhakar Reddy

    2017-10-19

    71-year-old woman with progressive left-sided, monocular diplopia and ptosis. Her symptoms mimicked ocular myasthenia, but she had an indirect carotid cavernous fistula (CCF). She was diagnosed with monocular myasthenia gravis (negative acetylcholinesterase antibody) after a positive ice test and started on Mestinon and underwent a thymectomy complicated by a brachial plexus injury. Months later, she developed left-sided proptosis and ocular bruit. She was urgently referred to neuro-interventional surgery and was diagnosed with an indirect high-flow left CCF, which was treated with Onyx liquid and platinum coil embolisation. Mestinon was discontinued. Her ophthalmic symptoms resolved. However, she was left with a residual left arm and hand hemiparesis and dysmetria secondary to a brachial plexus injury. Indirect CCF usually can present with subtle and progressive symptoms leading to delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. It is important for ophthalmologists to consider this differential in a patient with progressive ocular symptoms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Duplex ultrasound surveillance after carotid artery endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shakarchi, Julien; Lowry, Danielle; Nath, Jay; Khawaja, Aurangzaib Z; Inston, Nicholas; Tiwari, Alok

    2016-06-01

    After carotid endarterectomy (CEA), patients have been regularly followed up by duplex ultrasound imaging. However, the evidence for long-term follow-up is not clear, especially if the results from an early duplex scan are normal. This study assessed and systematically reviewed the evidence base for long-term surveillance after CEA and a normal early scan. Electronic databases were searched for studies assessing duplex surveillance after CEA in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The primary outcome for this study was the incidence of restenosis after a normal early scan. The secondary outcome was the number of reinterventions after a normal early scan. The review included seven studies that reported 2317 procedures. Of those patients with a normal early scan, 2.8% (95% confidence interval, 0.7%-6%) developed a restenosis, and 0.4% (95% confidence interval, 0%-0.9%) underwent a reintervention for their restenosis during the follow-up period. This review confirms that routine postoperative duplex ultrasound surveillance after CEA is not necessary if the early duplex scan is normal. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculating patient specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampinen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. When estimating the radiation dose of an individual patient, patient specific calculation methods must be used. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3 % with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients

  9. MMCTP: a radiotherapy research environment for Monte Carlo and patient-specific treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A; DeBlois, F; Stroian, G; Al-Yahya, K; Heath, E; Seuntjens, J

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy research lacks a flexible computational research environment for Monte Carlo (MC) and patient-specific treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to develop a flexible software package on low-cost hardware with the aim of integrating new patient-specific treatment planning with MC dose calculations suitable for large-scale prospective and retrospective treatment planning studies. We designed the software package 'McGill Monte Carlo treatment planning' (MMCTP) for the research development of MC and patient-specific treatment planning. The MMCTP design consists of a graphical user interface (GUI), which runs on a simple workstation connected through standard secure-shell protocol to a cluster for lengthy MC calculations. Treatment planning information (e.g., images, structures, beam geometry properties and dose distributions) is converted into a convenient MMCTP local file storage format designated, the McGill RT format. MMCTP features include (a) DICOM R T, RTOG and CADPlan CART format imports; (b) 2D and 3D visualization views for images, structure contours, and dose distributions; (c) contouring tools; (d) DVH analysis, and dose matrix comparison tools; (e) external beam editing; (f) MC transport calculation from beam source to patient geometry for photon and electron beams. The MC input files, which are prepared from the beam geometry properties and patient information (e.g., images and structure contours), are uploaded and run on a cluster using shell commands controlled from the MMCTP GUI. The visualization, dose matrix operation and DVH tools offer extensive options for plan analysis and comparison between MC plans and plans imported from commercial treatment planning systems. The MMCTP GUI provides a flexible research platform for the development of patient-specific MC treatment planning for photon and electron external beam radiation therapy. The impact of this tool lies in the fact that it allows for systematic, platform

  10. Creating Patient-Specific Neural Cells for the In Vitro Study of Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen J. Brennand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As a group, we met to discuss the current challenges for creating meaningful patient-specific in vitro models to study brain disorders. Although the convergence of findings between laboratories and patient cohorts provided us confidence and optimism that hiPSC-based platforms will inform future drug discovery efforts, a number of critical technical challenges remain. This opinion piece outlines our collective views on the current state of hiPSC-based disease modeling and discusses what we see to be the critical objectives that must be addressed collectively as a field.

  11. Patient-specific three-dimensional printing for pre-surgical planning in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Elizabeth; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-12-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) printing has shown great interest in medicine, and 3D printed models may be rendered as part of the pre-surgical planning process in order to better understand the complexities of an individual's anatomy. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of utilising 3D printed liver models as clinical tools in pre-operative planning for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. High-resolution contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images were acquired and utilized to generate a patient-specific 3D printed liver model. Hepatic structures were segmented and edited to produce a printable model delineating intrahepatic anatomy and a resectable HCC lesion. Quantitative assessment of 3D model accuracy compared measurements of critical anatomical landmarks acquired from the original CT images, standard tessellation language (STL) files, and the 3D printed liver model. Comparative analysis of surveys completed by two radiologists investigated the clinical value of 3D printed liver models in radiology. The application of utilizing 3D printed liver models as tools in surgical planning for resectable HCC lesions was evaluated through kappa analysis of questionnaires completed by two abdominal surgeons. A scaled down multi-material 3D liver model delineating patient-specific hepatic anatomy and pathology was produced, requiring a total production time of 25.25 hours and costing a total of AUD $1,250. A discrepancy was found in the total mean of measurements at each stage of production, with a total mean of 18.28±9.31 mm for measurements acquired from the original CT data, 15.63±8.06 mm for the STL files, and 14.47±7.71 mm for the 3D printed liver model. The 3D liver model did not enhance the radiologists' perception of patient-specific anatomy or pathology. Kappa analysis of the surgeon's responses to survey questions yielded a percentage agreement of 80%, and a κ value of 0.38 (P=0.24) indicating fair agreement. Study

  12. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  13. Contemporary carotid imaging: from degree of stenosis to plaque vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Huston, John; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Lerman, Amir; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a well-established risk factor of ischemic stroke, contributing to up to 10%-20% of strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Many clinical trials over the last 20 years have used measurements of carotid artery stenosis as a means to risk stratify patients. However, with improvements in vascular imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MR angiography, ultrasonography, and PET/CT, it is now possible to risk stratify patients, not just on the degree of carotid artery stenosis but also on how vulnerable the plaque is to rupture, resulting in ischemic stroke. These imaging techniques are ushering in an emerging paradigm shift that allows for risk stratifications based on the presence of imaging features such as intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), plaque ulceration, plaque neovascularity, fibrous cap thickness, and presence of a lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC). It is important for the neurosurgeon to be aware of these new imaging techniques that allow for improved patient risk stratification and outcomes. For example, a patient with a low-grade stenosis but an ulcerated plaque may benefit more from a revascularization procedure than a patient with a stable 70% asymptomatic stenosis with a thick fibrous cap. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art advances in carotid plaque imaging. Currently, MRI is the gold standard in carotid plaque imaging, with its high resolution and high sensitivity for identifying IPH, ulceration, LRNC, and inflammation. However, MRI is limited due to time constraints. CT also allows for high-resolution imaging and can accurately detect ulceration and calcification, but cannot reliably differentiate LRNC from IPH. PET/CT is an effective technique to identify active inflammation within the plaque, but it does not allow for assessment of anatomy, ulceration, IPH, or LRNC. Ultrasonography, with the aid of contrast enhancement, is a cost-effective technique to assess plaque morphology and characteristics, but it is

  14. Selective occlusion of a carotid sinus cavernous fistula after transsphenoidal hypophysectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, E.; Dietrich, U.; Wappenschmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    A case of carotid cavernous sinus fistula following transsphenoidal hypophysectomy is reported. A selective occlusion of the fistula with patency of the carotid artery was achieved by means of a detachable balloon catheter. (orig.) [de

  15. Association between plasma homocysteine concentrations and extracranial carotid stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Ghasemi, M.; Hoseini, T.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing epidemiologic data support a relationship between elevated plasma total homocysteine levels and an increased risk for vascular disease. Higher plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels have been associated with extracranial carotid atherosclerosis and cerebral infarction in whites. However, data regarding such associations are limited for Asians. This study examined the association between tHcy level and carotid stenosis in Iranian subjects. In this retrospective study, the subjects were 158 patients with ischemic stroke, including 105 with a normal tHcy level and 53 with a high tHcy level. We investigated the extracranial carotid arteries by ultrasonography and measured serum tHcy by ELISA method in these two groups. We found no meaningful association between a high tHcy level and carotid stenosis. The lack of any meaningful difference in carotid stenosis between patients with normal and elevated tHcy levels is probably due to the low frequency of extracranial diseases in the Asian population and to the nature of homocysteine atherosclerosis. (author)

  16. Intraoperative Hypoglossal Nerve Mapping During Carotid Endarterectomy: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Atsuhiro; Saga, Isako; Ishikawa, Mami

    2018-05-01

    Hypoglossal nerve deficit is a possible complication caused by carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The accidental injury of the hypoglossal nerve during surgery is one of the major reasons for permanent hypoglossal nerve palsy. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of intraoperative mapping of the hypoglossal nerve to identify this nerve during CEA. Five consecutive patients who underwent CEA for the treatment of symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis were studied. A hand-held probe was used to detect the hypoglossal nerve in the operative field, and the tongue motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded. The tongue MEPs were obtained in all the patients. The invisible hypoglossal nerve was successfully identified without any difficulty when the internal carotid artery was exposed. Intraoperative mapping was particularly useful for identifying the hypoglossal nerve when the hypoglossal nerve passed beneath the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. In 1 of 2 cases, MEP was also elicited when the ansa cervicalis was stimulated, although the resulting amplitude was much smaller than that obtained by direct stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve. Postoperatively, none of the patients presented with hypoglossal nerve palsy. Intraoperative hypoglossal nerve mapping enabled us to locate the invisible hypoglossal nerve during the exposure of the internal carotid artery accurately without retracting the posterior belly of the digastric muscle and other tissues in the vicinity of the internal carotid artery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The transradial approach for selective carotid and vertebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, S.; Ueda, K.; Sueyosi, S.; Nagasawa, M.; Ude, K. [Higashiosaka City General Hospital, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Yokoyama, K. [Higashiosaka City General Hospital, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Takayama, K.; Nakagawa, H.; Kichikawa, K. [Nara Medical Univ., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Purpose: The transradial approach is not so popular in cerebral angiography. The purpose of this study was therefore to present our experience of success rate and safety of this method. Material and Methods: From December 1998 to June 2001, 526 carotid and vertebral angiographies with DSA were performed via the radial artery. A 1.4-mm catheter was used through a 1.4-mm introducer sheath. We evaluated the procedure as successful if sufficient images for diagnosis were obtained of the bilateral carotid arteries and unilateral vertebral artery. Each patient was reassessed for any complications, occurring until the next morning. The length of time needed for an examination was measured in the last 10 cases. Results: In all but 5 cases, the procedures were evaluated as successful (99.0%). Unsuccessful cases manifested severe pain at the radial puncture, angiospasm at the radial artery, loop formation at the radial artery, occlusion at the subclavian artery, and an aberrant right subclavian artery. No severe complications including neurological ones were encountered. Minor complications were noted in 17 cases (3.2%): 4 cases of thrombus at the ulnar artery, 1 angiospasm at the radial artery, and 12 cases of small hematoma at the puncture site. The radial approach took 14 min less in the common carotid study and 3 min 30 s less in the internal carotid study than by the femoral approach. Conclusion: The transradial approach enabled selective studies for carotid and vertebral angiography with a high success rate and safety with few complications.

  18. The transradial approach for selective carotid and vertebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, S.; Ueda, K.; Sueyosi, S.; Nagasawa, M.; Ude, K.; Yokoyama, K.; Takayama, K.; Nakagawa, H.; Kichikawa, K.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The transradial approach is not so popular in cerebral angiography. The purpose of this study was therefore to present our experience of success rate and safety of this method. Material and Methods: From December 1998 to June 2001, 526 carotid and vertebral angiographies with DSA were performed via the radial artery. A 1.4-mm catheter was used through a 1.4-mm introducer sheath. We evaluated the procedure as successful if sufficient images for diagnosis were obtained of the bilateral carotid arteries and unilateral vertebral artery. Each patient was reassessed for any complications, occurring until the next morning. The length of time needed for an examination was measured in the last 10 cases. Results: In all but 5 cases, the procedures were evaluated as successful (99.0%). Unsuccessful cases manifested severe pain at the radial puncture, angiospasm at the radial artery, loop formation at the radial artery, occlusion at the subclavian artery, and an aberrant right subclavian artery. No severe complications including neurological ones were encountered. Minor complications were noted in 17 cases (3.2%): 4 cases of thrombus at the ulnar artery, 1 angiospasm at the radial artery, and 12 cases of small hematoma at the puncture site. The radial approach took 14 min less in the common carotid study and 3 min 30 s less in the internal carotid study than by the femoral approach. Conclusion: The transradial approach enabled selective studies for carotid and vertebral angiography with a high success rate and safety with few complications

  19. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Toshinari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR, 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI, 1.010 - 1.059, HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225, and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051 were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  20. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  1. Triglyceride glucose index and common carotid wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Scavelli, Faustina B; de Franceschi, Maria S; Esposito, Teresa; Carallo, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino

    2014-02-01

    Alterations in wall shear stress contribute to both clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis. Several conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity can impair shear stress, but the role of insulin resistance has never been investigated. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin resistance assessed by TyG Index associates with wall shear stress in the common carotid artery. One hundred six individuals were enrolled. Blood pressure, lipids, glucose, and cigarette smoking were evaluated. TyG Index was calculated as log[fasting triglycerides × fasting glucose / 2]. Subjects underwent blood viscosity measurement and echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries to calculate wall shear stress. The association between TyG Index and carotid wall shear stress was assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. TyG Index was significantly and inversely associated with carotid wall shear stress both in simple (r = -0.44, P glucose greater than 100 mg/dL, and triglycerides greater than 150 mg/dL. The present findings suggest that increasing insulin resistance, as assessed by TyG Index, associates with atherosclerosis-prone shear stress reduction in the common carotid artery.

  2. Contemporary management of carotid blowout syndrome utilizing endovascular techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Nauman F; Rezaee, Rod P; Ray, Abhishek; Wick, Cameron C; Blackham, Kristine; Stepnick, David; Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad A

    2017-02-01

    To illustrate complex interdisciplinary decision making and the utility of modern endovascular techniques in the management of patients with carotid blowout syndrome (CBS). Retrospective chart review. Patients treated with endovascular strategies and/or surgical modalities were included. Control of hemorrhage, neurological, and survival outcomes were studied. Between 2004 and 2014, 33 patients had 38 hemorrhagic events related to head and neck cancer that were managed with endovascular means. Of these, 23 were localized to the external carotid artery (ECA) branches and five localized to the ECA main trunk; nine were related to the common carotid artery (CCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA), and one event was related to the innominate artery. Seven events related to the CCA/ICA or innominate artery were managed with endovascular sacrifice, whereas three cases were managed with a flow-preserving approach (covered stent). Only one patient developed permanent hemiparesis. In two of the three cases where the flow-preserving approach was used, the covered stent eventually became exposed via the overlying soft tissue defect, and definitive management using carotid revascularization or resection was employed to prevent further hemorrhage. In cases of soft tissue necrosis, vascularized tissues were used to cover the great vessels as applicable. The use of modern endovascular approaches for management of acute CBS yields optimal results and should be employed in a coordinated manner by the head and neck surgeon and the neurointerventionalist. 4. Laryngoscope, 2016 127:383-390, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Pathway index models for construction of patient-specific risk profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Kevin H; Wang, Sijian; Bradley, William H; Rader, Janet S; Kendziorski, Christina

    2013-04-30

    Statistical methods for variable selection, prediction, and classification have proven extremely useful in moving personalized genomics medicine forward, in particular, leading to a number of genomic-based assays now in clinical use for predicting cancer recurrence. Although invaluable in individual cases, the information provided by these assays is limited. Most often, a patient is classified into one of very few groups (e.g., recur or not), limiting the potential for truly personalized treatment. Furthermore, although these assays provide information on which individuals are at most risk (e.g., those for which recurrence is predicted), they provide no information on the aberrant biological pathways that give rise to the increased risk. We have developed an approach to address these limitations. The approach models a time-to-event outcome as a function of known biological pathways, identifies important genomic aberrations, and provides pathway-based patient-specific assessments of risk. As we demonstrate in a study of ovarian cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas project, the patient-specific risk profiles are powerful and efficient characterizations useful in addressing a number of questions related to identifying informative patient subtypes and predicting survival. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Validation of Patient-Specific Cerebral Blood Flow Simulation Using Transcranial Doppler Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Groen

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a validation study comparing results from a patient-specific lattice-Boltzmann simulation to transcranial Doppler (TCD velocity measurements in four different planes of the middle cerebral artery (MCA. As part of the study, we compared simulations using a Newtonian and a Carreau-Yasuda rheology model. We also investigated the viability of using downscaled velocities to reduce the required resolution. Simulations with unscaled velocities predict the maximum flow velocity with an error of less than 9%, independent of the rheology model chosen. The accuracy of the simulation predictions worsens considerably when simulations are run at reduced velocity, as is for example the case when inflow velocities from healthy individuals are used on a vascular model of a stroke patient. Our results demonstrate the importance of using directly measured and patient-specific inflow velocities when simulating blood flow in MCAs. We conclude that localized TCD measurements together with predictive simulations can be used to obtain flow estimates with high fidelity over a larger region, and reduce the need for more invasive flow measurement procedures.

  5. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Yin

    Full Text Available Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6. The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2. This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques.

  6. Physically consistent data assimilation method based on feedback control for patient-specific blood flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Satoshi; Adib, Mohd Azrul Hisham Mohd; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Shigeo

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a novel data assimilation method for patient-specific blood flow analysis based on feedback control theory called the physically consistent feedback control-based data assimilation (PFC-DA) method. In the PFC-DA method, the signal, which is the residual error term of the velocity when comparing the numerical and reference measurement data, is cast as a source term in a Poisson equation for the scalar potential field that induces flow in a closed system. The pressure values at the inlet and outlet boundaries are recursively calculated by this scalar potential field. Hence, the flow field is physically consistent because it is driven by the calculated inlet and outlet pressures, without any artificial body forces. As compared with existing variational approaches, although this PFC-DA method does not guarantee the optimal solution, only one additional Poisson equation for the scalar potential field is required, providing a remarkable improvement for such a small additional computational cost at every iteration. Through numerical examples for 2D and 3D exact flow fields, with both noise-free and noisy reference data as well as a blood flow analysis on a cerebral aneurysm using actual patient data, the robustness and accuracy of this approach is shown. Moreover, the feasibility of a patient-specific practical blood flow analysis is demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Just-in-time Design and Additive Manufacture of Patient-specific Medical Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidid, Darpan; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Brandt, Milan

    Recent advances in medical imaging and manufacturing science have enabled the design and production of complex, patient-specific orthopaedic implants. Additive Manufacture (AM) generates three-dimensional structures layer by layer, and is not subject to the constraints associated with traditional manufacturing methods. AM provides significant opportunities for the design of novel geometries and complex lattice structures with enhanced functional performance. However, the design and manufacture of patient-specific AM implant structures requires unique expertise in handling various optimization platforms. Furthermore, the design process for complex structures is computationally intensive. The primary aim of this research is to enable the just-in-time customisation of AM prosthesis; whereby AM implant design and manufacture be completed within the time constraints of a single surgical procedure, while minimising prosthesis mass and optimising the lattice structure to match the stiffness of the surrounding bone tissue. In this research, a design approach using raw CT scan data is applied to the AM manufacture of femoral prosthesis. Using the proposed just-in-time concept, the mass of the prosthesis was rapidly designed and manufactured while satisfying the associated structural requirements. Compressive testing of lattice structures manufactured using proposed method shows that the load carrying capacity of the resected composite bone can be recovered by up to 85% and the compressive stiffness of the AM prosthesis is statistically indistinguishable from the stiffness of the initial bone.

  8. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning. (paper)

  9. Compliant Buckled Foam Actuators and Application in Patient-Specific Direct Cardiac Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C; Futran, Chaim C; Lee, Jeanne; O'Brien, Kevin W; Amiri Moghadam, Amir A; Mosadegh, Bobak; Silberstein, Meredith N; Min, James K; Shepherd, Robert F

    2018-02-01

    We introduce the use of buckled foam for soft pneumatic actuators. A moderate amount of residual compressive strain within elastomer foam increases the applied force ∼1.4 × or stroke ∼2 × compared with actuators without residual strain. The origin of these improved characteristics is explained analytically. These actuators are applied in a direct cardiac compression (DCC) device design, a type of implanted mechanical circulatory support that avoids direct blood contact, mitigating risks of clot formation and stroke. This article describes a first step toward a pneumatically powered, patient-specific DCC design by employing elastomer foam as the mechanism for cardiac compression. To form the device, a mold of a patient's heart was obtained by 3D printing a digitized X-ray computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan into a solid model. From this model, a soft, robotic foam DCC device was molded. The DCC device is compliant and uses compressed air to inflate foam chambers that in turn apply compression to the exterior of a heart. The device is demonstrated on a porcine heart and is capable of assisting heart pumping at physiologically relevant durations (∼200 ms for systole and ∼400 ms for diastole) and stroke volumes (∼70 mL). Although further development is necessary to produce a fully implantable device, the material and processing insights presented here are essential to the implementation of a foam-based, patient-specific DCC design.

  10. Estimating patient-specific soft-tissue properties in a TKA knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Joseph A; Kaufman, Michelle K; Hutter, Erin E; Granger, Jeffrey F; Beal, Matthew D; Piazza, Stephen J; Siston, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical technique is one factor that has been identified as critical to success of total knee arthroplasty. Researchers have shown that computer simulations can aid in determining how decisions in the operating room generally affect post-operative outcomes. However, to use simulations to make clinically relevant predictions about knee forces and motions for a specific total knee patient, patient-specific models are needed. This study introduces a methodology for estimating knee soft-tissue properties of an individual total knee patient. A custom surgical navigation system and stability device were used to measure the force-displacement relationship of the knee. Soft-tissue properties were estimated using a parameter optimization that matched simulated tibiofemoral kinematics with experimental tibiofemoral kinematics. Simulations using optimized ligament properties had an average root mean square error of 3.5° across all tests while simulations using generic ligament properties taken from literature had an average root mean square error of 8.4°. Specimens showed large variability among ligament properties regardless of similarities in prosthetic component alignment and measured knee laxity. These results demonstrate the importance of soft-tissue properties in determining knee stability, and suggest that to make clinically relevant predictions of post-operative knee motions and forces using computer simulations, patient-specific soft-tissue properties are needed. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Development of a patient-specific anatomical foot model from structured light scan data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Samuel J; Huissoon, Jan P; Bedi, Sanjeev S

    2014-01-01

    The use of anatomically accurate finite element (FE) models of the human foot in research studies has increased rapidly in recent years. Uses for FE foot models include advancing knowledge of orthotic design, shoe design, ankle-foot orthoses, pathomechanics, locomotion, plantar pressure, tissue mechanics, plantar fasciitis, joint stress and surgical interventions. Similar applications but for clinical use on a per-patient basis would also be on the rise if it were not for the high costs associated with developing patient-specific anatomical foot models. High costs arise primarily from the expense and challenges of acquiring anatomical data via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) and reconstructing the three-dimensional models. The proposed solution morphs detailed anatomy from skin surface geometry and anatomical landmarks of a generic foot model (developed from CT or MRI) to surface geometry and anatomical landmarks acquired from an inexpensive structured light scan of a foot. The method yields a patient-specific anatomical foot model at a fraction of the cost of standard methods. Average error for bone surfaces was 2.53 mm for the six experiments completed. Highest accuracy occurred in the mid-foot and lowest in the forefoot due to the small, irregular bones of the toes. The method must be validated in the intended application to determine if the resulting errors are acceptable.

  12. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, I.V.B., E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife (Brazil); Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  13. Patient Specific Multiscale Simulations of Blood Flow in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangalore Ramachandra, Abhay; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Kahn, Andrew M.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-11-01

    Coronary artery bypass surgery is performed to revascularize blocked coronary arteries in roughly 400,000 patients per year in the US.While arterial grafts offer superior patency, vein grafts are used in more than 70% of procedures, as most patients require multiple grafts. Vein graft failure (approx. 50% within 10 years) remains a major clinical issue. Mounting evidence suggests that hemodynamics plays a key role as a mechano-biological stimulus contributing to graft failure. However, quantifying relevant hemodynamic quantities (e.g. wall shear stress) invivo is not possible directly using clinical imaging techniques. We numerically compute graft hemodynamics in a cohort of 3-D patient specific models using a stabilized finite element method. The 3D flow domain is coupled to a 0D lumped parameter circulatory model. Boundary conditions are tuned to match patient specific blood pressures, stroke volumes & heart rates. Results reproduce clinically observed coronary flow waveforms. We quantify differences in multiple hemodynamic quantities between arterial & venous grafts & discuss possible correlations between graft hemodynamics & clinically observed graft failure.Such correlations will provide further insight into mechanisms of graft failure and may lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  14. Comparison of Detailed and Simplified Models of Human Atrial Myocytes to Recapitulate Patient Specific Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Lombardo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Computer studies are often used to study mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (AF. A crucial component in these studies is the electrophysiological model that describes the membrane potential of myocytes. The models vary from detailed, describing numerous ion channels, to simplified, grouping ionic channels into a minimal set of variables. The parameters of these models, however, are determined across different experiments in varied species. Furthermore, a single set of parameters may not describe variations across patients, and models have rarely been shown to recapitulate critical features of AF in a given patient. In this study we develop physiologically accurate computational human atrial models by fitting parameters of a detailed and of a simplified model to clinical data for five patients undergoing ablation therapy. Parameters were simultaneously fitted to action potential (AP morphology, action potential duration (APD restitution and conduction velocity (CV restitution curves in these patients. For both models, our fitting procedure generated parameter sets that accurately reproduced clinical data, but differed markedly from published sets and between patients, emphasizing the need for patient-specific adjustment. Both models produced two-dimensional spiral wave dynamics for that were similar for each patient. These results show that simplified, computationally efficient models are an attractive choice for simulations of human atrial electrophysiology in spatially extended domains. This study motivates the development and validation of patient-specific model-based mechanistic studies to target therapy.

  15. Fluid Structure Interaction simulation of heart prosthesis in patient-specific left-ventricle/aorta anatomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2009-11-01

    In order to test and optimize heart valve prosthesis and enable virtual implantation of other biomedical devices it is essential to develop and validate high-resolution FSI-CFD codes for carrying out simulations in patient-specific geometries. We have developed a powerful numerical methodology for carrying out FSI simulations of cardiovascular flows based on the CURVIB approach (Borazjani, L. Ge, and F. Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational physics, vol. 227, pp. 7587-7620 2008). We have extended our FSI method to overset grids to handle efficiently more complicated geometries e.g. simulating an MHV implanted in an anatomically realistic aorta and left-ventricle. A compliant, anatomic left-ventricle is modeled using prescribed motion in one domain. The mechanical heart valve is placed inside the second domain i.e. the body-fitted curvilinear mesh of the anatomic aorta. The simulations of an MHV with a left-ventricle model underscore the importance of inflow conditions and ventricular compliance for such simulations and demonstrate the potential of our method as a powerful tool for patient-specific simulations.

  16. An efficient parallel simulation of unsteady blood flows in patient-specific pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fande; Kheyfets, Vitaly; Finol, Ender; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2018-04-01

    Simulation of blood flows in the pulmonary artery provides some insight into certain diseases by examining the relationship between some continuum metrics, eg, the wall shear stress acting on the vascular endothelium, which responds to flow-induced mechanical forces by releasing vasodilators/constrictors. V. Kheyfets, in his previous work, studies numerically a patient-specific pulmonary circulation to show that decreasing wall shear stress is correlated with increasing pulmonary vascular impedance. In this paper, we develop a scalable parallel algorithm based on domain decomposition methods to investigate an unsteady model with patient-specific pulsatile waveforms as the inlet boundary condition. The unsteady model offers tremendously more information about the dynamic behavior of the flow field, but computationally speaking, the simulation is a lot more expensive since a problem which is similar to the steady-state problem has to be solved many times, and therefore, the traditional sequential approach is not suitable anymore. We show computationally that simulations using the proposed parallel approach with up to 10 000 processor cores can be obtained with much reduced compute time. This makes the technology potentially usable for the routine study of the dynamic behavior of blood flows in the pulmonary artery, in particular, the changes of the blood flows and the wall shear stress in the spatial and temporal dimensions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  18. Design and manufacturing of patient-specific orthodontic appliances by computer-aided engineering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Sandro; Neri, Paolo; Paoli, Alessandro; Razionale, Armando Viviano

    2018-01-01

    Orthodontic treatments are usually performed using fixed brackets or removable oral appliances, which are traditionally made from alginate impressions and wax registrations. Among removable devices, eruption guidance appliances are used for early orthodontic treatments in order to intercept and prevent malocclusion problems. Commercially available eruption guidance appliances, however, are symmetric devices produced using a few standard sizes. For this reason, they are not able to meet all the specific patient's needs since the actual dental anatomies present various geometries and asymmetric conditions. In this article, a computer-aided design-based methodology for the design and manufacturing of a patient-specific eruption guidance appliances is presented. The proposed approach is based on the digitalization of several steps of the overall process: from the digital reconstruction of patients' anatomies to the manufacturing of customized appliances. A finite element model has been developed to evaluate the temporomandibular joint disks stress level caused by using symmetric eruption guidance appliances with different teeth misalignment conditions. The developed model can then be used to guide the design of a patient-specific appliance with the aim at reducing the patient discomfort. At this purpose, two different customization levels are proposed in order to face both arches and single tooth misalignment issues. A low-cost manufacturing process, based on an additive manufacturing technique, is finally presented and discussed.

  19. Perspective: carotid stenting and the history of disruptive technology in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Frank J

    2008-06-01

    This article defines disruptive technology and discusses such technologies in Vascular Surgery. It considers the question: Is carotid artery stenting (CAS) a disruptive technology? Although CAS will impact positively on the treatment of carotid bifurcation disease, it will probably never displace carotid endarterectomy in the majority of patients. The precise role of CAS remains to be determined.

  20. Optimal Treatment of the ‘High-Risk’ Patient with Carotid Artery Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Four landmark randomized trials have clearly validated the use of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for the management of asymptomatic and symptomatic significant carotid artery stenosis. However, its risk-to-benefit ratio is variable for different patients. With the advent of carotid artery stenting

  1. Computed tomography of the carotid space and related cervical spaces. Part 1. Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, A.J.; Mawad, M.E.; Hilal, S.K.; Sane, P.; Ganti, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The carotid space, parapharyngeal space, and paraspinal space are described. The carotid space is shown on computed tomography (CT) to be posterior to the parapharyngeal space and separated from it by the styloid apparatus. The paraspinal space is posterior to the carotid space and separated from it by the longus and anterior scalene muscles

  2. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 No description Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... DRX021453,DRX021454,DRX021452 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  4. MRI of the carotid artery at 7 Tesla: Quantitative comparison with 3 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Wouter; De Rotte, Alexandra A J; Bluemink, Johanna J.; Van Der Velden, Tijl A.; Luijten, Peter R.; Klomp, DWJ; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 7 Tesla (T) MRI of the carotid arteries, as quantitatively compared with 3T. Materials and Methods: The 7T MRI of the carotid arteries was performed in six healthy subjects and in two patients with carotid stenosis. The healthy group was scanned at 3T and at 7T, using

  5. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Carotid Arterie...s DRX021452,DRX021453,DRX021454 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Carotid Arteri...es http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  6. MRT of carotid stents: influence of stent properties and sequence parameters on visualization of the carotid artery lumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straube, T.; Wolf, S.; Alfke, K.; Jansen, O.; Flesser, A.; Deli, M.; Nabavi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate MR artifacts of carotid artery stents and to optimize stent properties and sequence parameters. Material and Methods: Four carotid artery stents - Wallstent (mediloy), Precise (nitinol), ACCULINK (nitinol) and a stent prototype (nitinol) - were investigated in a flow model of the cervical vessels. The model was made of silicon tubing and a flow pump that produces realistic flow curves of the carotid artery. To investigate the effects of magnetic susceptibility and radiofrequency induced shielding artifacts, turbo spin echo and gradient echo sequences as well as CE-MRAs were measured. To improve the visualization of the stent lumen in a CE-MRA, flip angle as well as geometry and covering of the stent prototype were altered. Results: Susceptibility artifacts in stents of the carotid artery only influence the lumen visualization at the proximal and distal end of the braided mediloy stent. A change of stent coverings has no significant influence on radiofrequency artifacts, whereas a reduction in linking elements between stent segments and a change in diameter of stent struts improves visualization of the stent lumen. By increasing the flip angle in a CE-MRA, visualization of the stent lumen is possible in both mediloy and nitinol stents. Conclusion: The choice of stent material and changes in stent geometry as well as the optimization of the flip angle of the CE-MRA may reduce susceptibility and radiofrequency artifacts, rendering feasible the CE-MRA of a stented carotid artery. (orig.)

  7. In vitro shear stress measurements using particle image velocimetry in a family of carotid artery models: effect of stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity, and ulceration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kefayati

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic disease, and the subsequent complications of thrombosis and plaque rupture, has been associated with local shear stress. In the diseased carotid artery, local variations in shear stress are induced by various geometrical features of the stenotic plaque. Greater stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity (symmetry and plaque ulceration have been associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular events based on clinical trial studies. Using particle image velocimetry, the levels and patterns of shear stress (derived from both laminar and turbulent phases were studied for a family of eight matched-geometry models incorporating independently varied plaque features - i.e. stenosis severity up to 70%, one of two forms of plaque eccentricity, and the presence of plaque ulceration. The level of laminar (ensemble-averaged shear stress increased with increasing stenosis severity resulting in 2-16 Pa for free shear stress (FSS and approximately double (4-36 Pa for wall shear stress (WSS. Independent of stenosis severity, marked differences were found in the distribution and extent of shear stress between the concentric and eccentric plaque formations. The maximum WSS, found at the apex of the stenosis, decayed significantly steeper along the outer wall of an eccentric model compared to the concentric counterpart, with a 70% eccentric stenosis having 249% steeper decay coinciding with the large outer-wall recirculation zone. The presence of ulceration (in a 50% eccentric plaque resulted in both elevated FSS and WSS levels that were sustained longer (∼20 ms through the systolic phase compared to the non-ulcerated counterpart model, among other notable differences. Reynolds (turbulent shear stress, elevated around the point of distal jet detachment, became prominent during the systolic deceleration phase and was widely distributed over the large recirculation zone in the eccentric stenoses.

  8. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Knudsen, Andreas; Hag, Anne Mette F

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at comparing PET/MR to PET/CT for imaging the carotid arteries in patients with known increased risk of atherosclerosis. Six HIV-positive men underwent sequential PET/MR and PET/CT of the carotid arteries after injection of 400 MBq of (18)F-FDG. PET/MR was performed a median of 131......) indicating that the luminal (18)F-FDG content had minimal influence on the values. The study shows for the first time that simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid arteries is feasible in patients with increased risk of atherosclerosis. Quantification of (18)F-FDG uptake correlated well between PET/MR and PET...

  9. Gene expression and 18FDG uptake in atherosclerotic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Graebe, Martin; Fisker Hag, Anne Mette

    2010-01-01

    ) and an additional ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis of greater than 60% were recruited. FDG uptake in the carotids was determined by PET/computed tomography and expressed as mean and maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax). The atherosclerotic plaques were subsequently recovered...... by carotid endarterectomy. The gene expression of markers of vulnerability - CD68, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, GLUT-1, and hexokinase type II (HK2) - were measured in plaques by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: In a multivariate linear regression model, GLUT-1, CD68, cathepsin K, and HK2 gene...... expression remained in the final model as predictive variables of FDG accumulation calculated as SUVmean (R=0.26, PK, and HK2 gene expression as independent predictive variables of FDG accumulation calculated...

  10. Pain as the only manifestation of internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biousse, V; Woimant, F; Amarenco, P; Touboul, P J; Bousser, M G

    1992-10-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection is a major cause of ischemic stroke in the young. Pain is the leading symptom and is associated with other focal signs such as Horner's syndrome and painful tinnitus or with signs of cerebral or retinal ischemia. We report two patients with angiographically confirmed extracranial internal carotid artery dissection presenting with cephalic pain as the only manifestation. The first patient had a diffuse headache and a latero-cervical pain lasting for 12 days, reminiscent of carotidynia. The second patient experienced an exploding headache suggestive of subarachnoid hemorrhage, which was ruled out by computed tomography of the head and cerebrospinal fluid study. These patients demonstrate that recognition of carotid artery dissection as a cause of carotidynia and headache suggestive of subarachnoid hemorrhage may permit an earlier diagnosis and possibly the prevention of a stroke through the use of anticoagulation.

  11. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys......The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European...... using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic...

  12. Radiation-induced bilateral common carotid artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Nakagawa, Yoku; Tashiro, Kunio; Abe, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced bilateral common carotid artery stenosis is reported. This 60 years old housewife was hospitalized in 1982 because of sudden onset of mild left hemiparesis. Twenty-five years ago, she underwent radiation therapy of approximately 5,000 rads to the anterior cervical region because of thyroid cancer. Angiograms in 1982 revealed bilateral common carotid artery stenosis, especially in the right common carotid artery, the legion of which were included within the field of radiation performed in 1952. Right thromboendarterectomy was performed in 1983. At operation, slight periarterial fibrosis with calcified arteriosclerotic change was found, and dissection between the thickened intima and the media was not so difficult. Histological change of resected thromboendarterium was similar to the one observed in the pure arteriosclerotic disease. (author)

  13. Primary mycotic aneurysm of the common carotid artery: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukasiewicz, A.; Molski, S.; Jundzill, W.; Meder, G.; Lasek, W.

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysms of the common carotid artery are relatively rare. Mycotic aneurysms in such location occur even less frequently. Causative factors can be sepsis, recent surgery, or dental procedures. Immunosuppression may also be a burdening factor. The authors present the case of a 70-year-old male patient with primary mycotic carotid artery aneurysm. The patient was diagnosed with ultrasound and multidetector spiral computed tomography and treated operatively with a PTFE prosthesis. Culture-appropriate antibiotic therapy was administered during the perioperative period. The rarity of extracranial carotid artery aneurysms might cause diagnostic and treatment difficulties. Open surgery is the recommended method, although the endovascular approach is gaining more acceptance. The choice of treatment modality might be facilitated by a detailed morphologic description of the aneurysm and its surroundings. Available methods of imaging are described. (author)

  14. Endovascular therapy of carotid stenosis with self-expandable stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianmin; Huang Qinghai; Hong Bo; Xu Yi; Zhao Wenyuan; Zhang Yongwei; Zhang Long; Zhou Xiaoping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of endovascular treatment of carotid stenosis with expandable stents. Methods: Fifty-two patients with carotid stenosis who experienced repeated transient ischemic attacks or cerebral infarction were admitted to our hospital. The stenosis was pre-expanded with undetachable balloon, and self-expandable stents were implanted across the stenosis. A balloon catheter was used to further expand stents in 29 patients. Results: The stent was accurately implanted, and total disappearance of stenosis was obtained in 34 patients, the degree of stenosis reduced more than 90% in 16 patients, and more than 70% in 2 patients. The patients recovered well and no complications related to the procedure occurred. None experienced TIA or infarction postoperatively in 52 cases and follow-up imaging in 19 patients (6 - 12 months) demonstrated no restenosis. Conclusion: Endovascular stenting may be a safe and valid choice for the treatment of extracranial carotid stenosis

  15. Quality of life after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most studies documenting beneficial outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CE are limited to mortality and morbidity rates, costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS. Few have examined the dependency of patients and how they perceive their own health changes after surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life and independence in activities of daily living (ADL and to study its determinants. Methods Sixty-three patients admitted in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU after CE were eligible for this 14-month follow-up study. Patients were contacted 6 months after discharge to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36 and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Results Among 59 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 43 completed the questionnaires. Sixty-three percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients had worse SF-36 scores for all domains except bodily pain than a general urban population, and comparison with a group of patients 6 months after surgical ICU discharge showed no differences. Six months after PACU discharge, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of ADL Scale and the Katz Index of ADL demonstrated higher dependency scores (5.9 ± 2.2 versus 4.3 ± 2.4 and 0.3 ± 0.8 versus 0.6 ± 0.9, p Conclusion Patients undergoing CE have improved self-perception of quality of life despite being more dependent. Almost all their scores are worse than those in an urban population. We could identify no predictors of greater dependency in ADL tasks six months after PACU discharge.

  16. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  17. Homocystein and carotid atherosclerosis in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubomirova, M; Tzoncheva, A; Petrova, J; Kiperova, B

    2007-10-01

    Since total homocysteine (Hcy) is markedly elevated in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), it has been presented as potential factor contributing to the high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in CRF. The aim of the study was to examine the significance of elevated Hcy and other cardiovascular risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis in patients with CRF. Fifty six patients 16-M, 40-F, average age 58+/-14.55, creatinine clearance 39.19+/-10.11 ml/min were examined. In addition, 20 control healthy subjects were examined. The association of Hcy levels and classic risk factors for atherosclerosis with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was examined. B-mode ultrasound measurement of carotid IMT was performed in 56 hypertensive pts with CRF (glomerular filtration rate>20 ml/min and 0.05). Significant predictors for IMT were age (r=0.358, p<0.04), duration of hypertension (r=0.395, p=0.023), diabetes duration (r=0.343, p<0.02), as well as duration of CRF (r=0.324, p<0.006). There was a negative correlation between IMT and glomerular filtration rate assessed by creatinine clearance (r=-0.303, p<0.003). Renal function, described by creatinine clearance was the strongest determinant for Hcy levels (r=-0.332, p<0.008). Increased IMT was estimated in pts with CRF compared to healthy controls (0.74+/-0.10 vs 0.59+/-0.10, p<0.001). We found association between Hcy and carotid IMT ( r=0.344, p<0.015). No consistent association was found between IMT and other specific for CRF cardiovascular risk factors. The study suggests that patients with mild renal failure have increased IMT of the common carotid artery and that elevated plasma Hcy level in CRF is associated with carotid intima- media thickening.

  18. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  19. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo, who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression.

  20. [Current guidelines on carotid artery stenting. Critical evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein-Rothweiler, R; Mudra, H

    2013-11-01

    Scientific data underlying current guidelines on treatment of carotid artery stenosis is subject to interdisciplinary discussion. In particular selective weighting of the randomized European studies leads to conflicting levels of recommendation and levels of evidence, especially when directly comparing guidelines under surgical versus endovascular guidance. Surgical guidelines recommend a limitation of carotid artery stenting (CAS) to symptomatic patients with specific surgical/anatomical disadvantages and/or severe comorbidities. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines recommend the use of CAS only in patients at increased surgical risk but at the same time requires morbidity and mortality rates comparable to those of surgical interventions. Even one step further, the American guidelines and specifically the associated comments of the German Society of Cardiology on the above mentioned ESC guidelines put CAS and carotid endarterectomy (CEA) on a par in terms of treatment alternatives, presupposing analogous CEA complication rates. Differential interpretation of the so far inadequate data is a common issue of current evidence-based medicine. The difficulty in conceptualization of new studies concerning the therapy of carotid stenosis lies in the funding these large projects and also on the high patient number required to achieve adequate statistical power. Furthermore, during the estimated long study period substantial changes of current techniques and devices can be anticipated which might render the study results in part outdated by the time of publication. However, as long as no new randomized study results comparing medical, surgical and interventional treatment of carotid stenosis are available, the question on the optimal therapy for patients with carotid artery disease remains unanswered.

  1. Case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-08-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one.

  2. A case of radiation induced aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Takashi; Ikota, Toshio; Yamashita, Kousuke; Kodama, Takao

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case of post-irradiation aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery is presented. A 70-year-old man, complaining of left cervical throbbing mass with focal pain, was admitted on February 8, 1985. It was noted, from his past history, that he had had surgery of the removal of cervical lymphnodes and that unknown dosage of irradiation had been added to the cervical region 30 years before. Left carotid angiography (on admission) demonstrated a giant aneurysm in the cervical portion of internal carotid artery. Right carotid angiography with compression of left carotid artery revealed good cross filling through anterior communicating artery. Computed tomography with contrast media showed a ring like enhanced mass, which was thought to suggest that a large part of the aneurysm was filled with intraluminal thrombosis. During 30 days of evaluation, the aneurysm grew larger and his cervical pain became untolerable. Operation, the resection of the aneurysm and the reconstruction (of circulation) with vein graft, was challenged on March 12. It was so difficult with meticulous work that the ligation of left common carotid artery was performed after all. Seven days after the operation, he suffered from the gastrointestinal bleeding, which was enough to lead him to hypovolemic shock. Thereafter, right hemiparesis and aphasia were brought about. Two months later, he died of pneumonia. On histological examination, it was demonstrated that the aneurysm communicated with the necrotic tissue and that the normal structure of the blood vessel was not observed in the aneurysmal wall and consisted of the collagenous fiber and granulated tissue. The aneurysm was interpreted as a false one. (author)

  3. Acute hemifacial ischemia as a late complication of carotid stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Domanin, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about carotid artery stenting (CAS center primarily on procedural complications like acute occlusion, stroke, and long-term intrastent restenosis. External carotid artery (ECA thrombosis is observed during CAS follow-up, but it often remains asymptomatic or, at worst, results in jaw claudication. We report here a case of late occlusion of the ECA after CAS with symptoms of acute homolateral facial ischemia as well as pain, cyanosis, tongue numbness, and skin coldness. The patient was submitted to local thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty with regression of symptoms after recanalization. With this report, we add a caveat about blockage of the ECA ostium during CAS.

  4. Neuroradiological diagnosis and interventional therapy of carotid cavernous fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, T.; Engelhorn, T.; Doelken, M.; Doerfler, A.; Holbach, L.

    2008-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas are pathologic connections between the internal and/or external carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. According to Barrow one can distinguish between direct (high flow) and indirect (low flow) fistulas, whereby direct fistulas are often traumatic while indirect fistulas more frequently occur spontaneously in postmenopausal women. Diagnosis can easily be established using MRI and angiography, which allow exact visualization of the anatomy of fistulas to plan the interventional neurological therapy that in recent years has replaced surgical therapy. This article provides an overview on imaging findings, diagnosis using MRI and angiography as well as interventional treatment strategies. (orig.) [de

  5. Aberrant internal carotid artery presenting as a retrotympanic vascular mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolay, Simon; De Foer, Bert; Bernaerts, Anja; Van Dinther, Joost; Parizel, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a young woman with an aberrant right internal carotid artery (ICA) presenting as a retrotympanic reddish mass. This variant of the ICA represents the collateral pathway that is formed as a result of an embryological agenesis of the cervical segment of the ICA. The embryonic inferior tympanic artery is recruited to bypass the absent carotid segment. This hypertrophied vessel may be seen otoscopically and wrongfully considered to be a vascular middle ear tumor. Informing the otorhinolaryngologist of this important vascular variant not only obviates biopsy but also helps in careful preoperative planning of eventual middle ear procedures

  6. A suggested training programme for carotid artery stenting (CAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, Peter; Nicholson, Tony

    2006-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting as an alternative to traditional carotid endartrectomy is becoming increasingly important in the treatment of transient ischemic attack and stroke. Physicians from several different medical disciplines are interested in treating appropriate patients by this method. Patients are entitled to know what training and experience the surgeon or clinician has before giving consent. This should involve endovascular experience in all systems and experience and knowledge of cerebral angiography and intervention. A multidisciplinary approach and reporting of adverse events is vital for patient safety

  7. Computed tomography scan based prediction of the vulnerable carotid plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diab, Hadi Mahmoud Haider; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary to validate a commercial semi-automated computed tomography angiography (CTA) -software for vulnerable plaque detection compared to histology of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens and secondary validating calcifications scores by in vivo CTA with ex vivo non......-contrast enhanced computed tomography (NCCT). METHODS: From January 2014 to October 2016 53 patients were included retrospectively, using a cross-sectional design. All patients underwent both CTA and CEA. Sixteen patients had their CEA specimen NCCT scanned. The semi-automated CTA software analyzed carotid stenosis...

  8. Self expandable polytetrafluoroethylene stent for carotid blowout syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, E C; Yildirim, U M; Dündar, Y; Ozdek, A; Işik, E; Korkmaz, H

    2012-01-01

    Carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) is an emergency complication in patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers. The classical management of CBS is the ligation of the common carotid artery, because suturing is not be possible due to infection and necrosis of the field. In this case report, we present a patient with CBS, in whom we applied a self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) stent and observed no morbidity. Endovascular stent is a life-saving technique with minimum morbidity that preserves blood flow to the brain. We believe that this method is preferable to ligation of the artery in CBS.

  9. Contemporary medical therapies of atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Suk F; Brown, Martin M

    2017-03-01

    Contemporary medical therapy consists of identification and treatment of all patient-modifiable vascular risk factors. Specific atherosclerotic disease therapies are designed to reduce the risk of thrombosis, and the disease progression in order to reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events. Contemporary medical management emphasizes the need to support the patient in achieving lifestyle modifications and to adjust medication to achieve individualized target values for specific quantifiable risk factors. Antiplatelet therapy in the form of aspirin or clopidogrel is routinely used for the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients who have had a transient ischemic attack or stroke. There is evidence from a recent trial that the use of combination antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel started within 24 hours of minor stroke or transient ischemic attack reduces the risk of recurrent stroke compared to the use of aspirin alone, and therefore we use aspirin plus clopidogrel in recently symptomatic patients with carotid stenosis pending carotid revascularization. Anticoagulation with heparins or vitamin K antagonist is not recommended except in patients at risk for cardio-embolic events. Lowering blood pressure to target levels has been shown to slow down the progression of carotid artery stenosis and reduces the intima-media thickness of the carotid plaque, while lowering lipid levels with statins has become an essential element in the medical therapy of carotid artery stenosis. Diabetes management should be optimized. Lifestyle choices, including tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, obesity, and excessive alcohol intake, are all important modifiable vascular risk factors. The combination of dietary modification, physical exercise, and use of aspirin, a statin, and an antihypertensive agent can be expected to give a cumulative relative stroke risk reduction of 80%. The evidence suggests that intensive medical therapy is so effective that

  10. The evidence for medicine versus surgery for carotid stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederle, Joerg; Brown, Martin M.

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of the internal carotid artery is an important cause of stroke. Several large randomised trials have compared best medical management with carotid endarterectomy and provide a strong evidence base for advising and selecting patients for carotid surgery. Best medical management of carotid stenosis includes lowering of blood pressure, treatment with statins and antiplatelet therapy in symptomatic patients. Combined analysis of the symptomatic carotid surgery trials, together with observational data, has shown that patients with recently symptomatic severe carotid stenosis have a very high risk of recurrent stroke in the first few days and weeks after symptoms. Carotid endarterectomy has a risk of causing stroke or death at the time of surgery in symptomatic patients of around 5-7%, but in patients with recently symptomatic stenosis of more than 70%, the benefits of endarterectomy outweigh the risks. In patients with moderate stenosis of between 50 and 69%, the benefits may justify surgery in patients with very recent symptoms, and in patients older than 75 years within a few months of symptoms. Patients with less than 50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. In asymptomatic patients, or those whose symptoms occurred more than 6 months ago, the benefits of surgery are considerably less. Patients with asymptomatic stenosis treated medically only have a small risk of future stroke when treated medically of about 2% per annum. If carotid endarterectomy can be performed safely with a perioperative stroke and death rate of no more than 3%, then the randomised trials showed a significant benefit of surgery over 5 years follow-up, with an overall reduction in the risk of stroke from about 11% over 5 years down to 6%. However, of 100 patients operated, only 5 will benefit from avoiding a stroke over 5 years. The majority of neurologists have concluded that this does not justify a policy of routine screening and endarterectomy for asymptomatic

  11. [An automatic system controlled by microcontroller for carotid sinus perfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, X L; Wang, M Y; Fan, Z Z; He, R R

    2001-08-01

    To establish a new method for controlling automatically the carotid perfusion pressure. A cheap practical automatic perfusion unit based on AT89C2051 micro controller was designed. The unit, LDB-M perfusion pump and the carotid sinus of an animal constituted an automatic perfusion system. This system was able to provide ramp and stepwise updown perfusion pattern and has been used in the research of baroreflex. It can insure the precision and reproducibility of perfusion pressure curve, and improve the technical level in corresponding medical field.

  12. Effect of white-matter lesions on the risk of periprocedural stroke after carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy in the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS): a prespecified analysis of data from a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Davagnanam, I.; Worp, H.B. van der; Venables, G.S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Featherstone, R.L.; Brown, M.M.; Jager, H.R.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Findings from randomised trials have shown a higher early risk of stroke after carotid artery stenting than after carotid endarterectomy. We assessed whether white-matter lesions affect the perioperative risk of stroke in patients treated with carotid artery stenting versus carotid

  13. [Prevalence and correlation factors of carotid atherosclerosis among the middle and old aged workers in an iron and steel corporation, Chongqing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-ping; Li, Jin-fang; Hu, Chang-lin; Huang, Hui

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence and correlation factors of carotid atherosclerosis (CAS) among workers of Chongqing Iron and Steel Corporation, and to offer information for the development of prevention program for cerebro-vascular disease. 512 asymptomatic individuals (mean age 56.8 years, ranged from 45 to 80) from the subsidiary workshop of Chongqing Iron and Steel Corporation were recruited. Demographic data and serum were collected and the internal-media thickness (IMT) of the CAS and the extent of plaque formation were evaluated by B-mode ultrasound. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the correlation factors of CAS. Results (1) The overall prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis among the iron and steel workers was 37.6%. IMT was found as 10.2% , with the prevalence rates of nonstenotic plaque and stenotic plaque were 25.0% and 2.4% respectively. (2) It was shown by logistic regression analysis that age (OR = 1.289, 95% CI: 1.014-1.568, P < 0.001), smoking (OR = 1.420, 95% CI: 0.802-3.872, P < 0.001), hypertension (OR= 4.530, 95% CI: 3.952-6.753, P < 0.001) , diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.285, 95% CI: 1.008-5.057, P < 0.001), HsCRP (OR = 1.273, 95% CI: 0.479-2.889, P = 0.037), TC (OR = 1.032, 95% CI: 0.320-1.882, P = 0.047) and LDL-C (OR = 2.313, 95% CI: 1.237-4.331, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with the severity of CAS. (3) Prevalence of the CAS increased with the increasing number of correlation factors. The prevalence of CAS among the iron and steel workers was higher than those in ordinary people of the same age. Age, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, HsCRP, TC and LDL-C were independent risk factors related to CAS. The prevalence of CAS was increasing parallel to the number of correlation factors.

  14. GPU-accelerated Lattice Boltzmann method for anatomical extraction in patient-specific computational hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, C.; Chen, N.; Zhao, Y.; Sawchuk, A. P.; Dalsing, M. C.; Teague, S. D.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Existing research of patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) heavily relies on software for anatomical extraction of blood arteries. Data reconstruction and mesh generation have to be done using existing commercial software due to the gap between medical image processing and CFD, which increases computation burden and introduces inaccuracy during data transformation thus limits the medical applications of PSCH. We use lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve the level-set equation over an Eulerian distance field and implicitly and dynamically segment the artery surfaces from radiological CT/MRI imaging data. The segments seamlessly feed to the LBM based CFD computation of PSCH thus explicit mesh construction and extra data management are avoided. The LBM is ideally suited for GPU (graphic processing unit)-based parallel computing. The parallel acceleration over GPU achieves excellent performance in PSCH computation. An application study will be presented which segments an aortic artery from a chest CT dataset and models PSCH of the segmented artery.

  15. Generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-En Lu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disease caused by homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. In this report, we generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs line, TVGH-iPSC-010-09, from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a female patient with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON by using the Sendai-virus delivery system. The resulting iPSCs retained the disease-causing mitochondrial DNA mutation, expressed pluripotent markers and could differentiate into the three germ layers. We believe LHON patient-specific iPSCs provide a powerful in vitro model for evaluating the pathological phenotypes of the disease.

  16. Hemodynamics of a Patient-Specific Aneurysm Model with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suyue; Chang, Gary Han; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2017-11-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) are two of the most-widely studied hemodynamic quantities in cardiovascular systems that have been shown to have the ability to elicit biological responses of the arterial wall, which could be used to predict the aneurysm development and rupture. In this study, a reduced-order model (ROM) of the hemodynamics of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm is studied. The snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is utilized to construct the reduced-order bases of the flow using a CFD training set with known inflow parameters. It was shown that the area of low WSS and high OSI is correlated to higher POD modes. The resulting ROM can reproduce both WSS and OSI computationally for future parametric studies with significantly less computational cost. Agreement was observed between the WSS and OSI values obtained using direct CFD results and ROM results.

  17. Modeling Patient-Specific Magnetic Drug Targeting Within the Intracranial Vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patronis, Alexander; Richardson, Robin A; Schmieschek, Sebastian; Wylie, Brian J N; Nash, Rupert W; Coveney, Peter V

    2018-01-01

    Drug targeting promises to substantially enhance future therapies, for example through the focussing of chemotherapeutic drugs at the site of a tumor, thus reducing the exposure of healthy tissue to unwanted damage. Promising work on the steering of medication in the human body employs magnetic fields acting on nanoparticles made of paramagnetic materials. We develop a computational tool to aid in the optimization of the physical parameters of these particles and the magnetic configuration, estimating the fraction of particles reaching a given target site in a large patient-specific vascular system for different physiological states (heart rate, cardiac output, etc.). We demonstrate the excellent computational performance of our model by its application to the simulation of paramagnetic-nanoparticle-laden flows in a circle of Willis geometry obtained from an MRI scan. The results suggest a strong dependence of the particle density at the target site on the strength of the magnetic forcing and the velocity of the background fluid flow.

  18. Improvements on a patient-specific dose estimation system in nuclear medicine examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, K. S.; Lu, J. C.; Lin, H. H.; Dong, S. L.; Yang, H. J.; Shih, C. T.; Lin, C. H.; Yao, W. J.; Ni, Y. C.; Jan, M. L.; Chang, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a patient-specific dose estimation system in nuclear medicine examination. A dose deposition routine to store the deposited energy of the photons during their flights was embedded in the widely used SimSET Monte Carlo code and a user-friendly interface for reading PET and CT images was developed. Dose calculated on ORNL phantom was used to validate the accuracy of this system. The ratios of S value for 99m Tc, 18 F and 131 I computed by this system to those obtained with OLINDA for various organs were ranged from 0.93 to 1.18, which were comparable to that obtained from MCNPX2.6 code (0.88-1.22). Our system developed provides opportunity for tumor dose estimation which cannot be known from the MIRD. The radiation dose can provide useful information in the amount of radioisotopes to be administered in radioimmunotherapy. (authors)

  19. Fast Setting Silk Fibroin Bioink for Bioprinting of Patient-Specific Memory-Shape Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, João B; Silva-Correia, Joana; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L

    2017-11-01

    The pursuit for the "perfect" biomimetic and personalized implant for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration remains a big challenge. 3D printing technology that makes use of a novel and promising biomaterials can be part of the solution. In this study, a fast setting enzymatic-crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) bioink for 3D bioprinting is developed. Their properties are fine-tuned and different structures with good resolution, reproducibility, and reliability can be fabricated. Many potential applications exist for the SF bioinks including 3D bioprinted scaffolds and patient-specific implants exhibiting unique characteristics such as good mechanical properties, memory-shape feature, suitable degradation, and tunable pore architecture and morphology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Novel flow quantification of the carotid bulb and the common carotid artery with vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    2014-01-01

    technique transverse oscillation the blood velocities of both the axial and the transverse directions are obtained and the complexity of blood flow can be visualized. The aim of the study was to determine the technical performance and interpretation of vector concentration as a tool for estimation of flow...... (US) using a commercial vector flow ultrasound scanner (ProFocus, BK Medical, Denmark) with a linear 5 MHz transducer transverse oscillation vector flow software. CCA and CB areas were marked in one cardiac cycle from each volunteer. The complex flow was assessed by medical expert evaluation...... and by vector concentration calculation. A vortex with complex flow was found in all carotid bulbs, whereas the CCA had mainly laminar flow. The medical experts evaluated the flow to be mainly laminar in the CCA (0.82 +/- 0.14) and mainly complex (0.23 +/- 0.22) in the CB. Likewise, the estimated vector...

  1. Principal direction of inertia for 3D trajectories from patient-specific TMJ movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Seung; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Hwang, Soon-Jung; Kim, Seong-Ha; Yi, Won-Jin

    2013-03-01

    Accurate simulation and evaluation of mandibular movement is fundamental for the analysis of functional changes and effects of the mandible and maxilla before and after surgical treatments. We applied principal axes of inertia to the three-dimensional (3D) trajectories generated by patient-specific simulations of TMJ movements for the functional evaluations of mandible movement. Three-dimensional movements of the mandible and the maxilla were tracked based on a patient-specific splint and an optical tracking system. The dental occlusion recorded on the sprint provided synchronization for initial movement in the tracking and the simulation phases. The translation and rotation recorded during movement tracking was applied sequentially to the mandibular model in relation to a fixed maxilla model. The sequential 3D positions of selected landmarks on the mandible were calculated based on the reference coordinate system. The landmarks selected for analysis were bilateral condyles and pogonion points. The moment of inertia tensor was calculated with respect to the 3D trajectory points. Using the unit vectors along the principal axes derived from the tensor matrix, α, β and γ rotations around z-, y- and x-axes were determined to represent the principal directions as principal rotations respectively. The γ direction showed the higher standard deviation, variation of directions, than other directions at all the landmarks. The mandible movement has larger kinematic redundancy in the γ direction than α and β during mouth opening and closing. Principal directions of inertia would be applied to analyzing the changes in angular motion of trajectories introduced by mandibular shape changes from surgical treatments and also to the analysis of the influence of skeletal deformities on mandibular movement asymmetry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EFFECTS OF PARENT ARTERY SEGMENTATION AND ANEURISMALWALL ELASTICITY ON PATIENT-SPECIFIC HEMODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-liang; DING Guang-hong; YANG Xin-jian; LI Hai-yun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that hemodynamics and wall tension play an important role in the formation,growth and rupture of aneurysms.In the present study,the authors investigated the influence of parent artery segmentation and aneurismal-wall elasticity on patient-specific hemodynamic simulations with two patient-specific eases of cerebral aneurysms.Realistic models of the aneurysms were constructed from 3-D angiography images and blood flow dynamics was studied under physiologically representative waveform of inflow.For each aneurysm three computational models were constructed:Model 1 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 2 with the partial upstream parent artery with the elastic arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 3 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid wall for arterial wall far from the aneurysm and the elastic wall for arterial wall near the aneurysm.The results show that Model 1 could predict complex intra-aneurismal flow patterns and wall shear stress distribution in the aneurysm,but is unable to give aneurismal wall deformation and tension,Model 2 demonstrates aneurismal wall deformation and tension,but fails to properly model inflow pattern contributed by the upstream parent artery,resulting in local misunderstanding Wall Shear Stress (WSS) distribution,Model 3 can overcome limitations of the former two models,and give an overall and accurate analysis on intra-aneurismal flow patterns,wall shear stress distribution,aneurismal-wall deformation and tension.Therefore we suggest that the proper length of extensive upstream parent artery and aneuri-smal-wall elasticity should be considered carefully in establishing computational model to predict the intra-aneurismal hemodynamic and wall tension.

  3. Patient specific actual size 3D printed models for patient education in glioma treatment: first experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Belt, Tom H; Nijmeijer, Hugo; Grim, David; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Vreeken, Rinaldo; van Gelder, Marleen Mmj; Laan, Mark Ter

    2018-06-02

    Cancer patients need high quality information about the disease stage, treatment options and side effects. High quality information can also improve health literacy, shared decision-making and satisfaction. We created patient-specific 3D models of tumours including surrounding functional areas, and assessed what patients with glioma actually value (or fear) about these models when they are used to educate them about the relation between their tumour and specific brain parts, the surgical procedure, and risks. We carried out an explorative study with adult glioma patients, who underwent functional MRI and DTi as part of the pre-operative work-up. All participants received an actual size 3D model, printed based on fMRI and DTi imaging. Semi-structured interviews were held to identify facilitators and barriers for using the model, and perceived effects. A model was successfully created for all 11 participants. A total of 18 facilitators and 8 barriers were identified. The model improved patients' understanding about their situation, that it was easier to ask questions to their neurosurgeon based on their model and that it supported their decision about the preferred treatment. A perceived barrier for using the 3D model was that it could be emotionally confronting, particularly in an early phase of the disease process. Positive effects were related to psychological domains including coping, learning effects and communication. Patient-specific 3D models are promising and simple tools that could help patients with glioma to better understand their situation, treatment options and risks. They have the potential to improve shared decision-making. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The technique for 3D printing patient-specific models for auricular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Roberto L; Liss, Hannah; Raffaelli, Samuel; Humayun, Aiza; Khouri, Kimberly S; Coelho, Paulo G; Witek, Lukasz

    2017-06-01

    Currently, surgeons approach autogenous microtia repair by creating a two-dimensional (2D) tracing of the unaffected ear to approximate a three-dimensional (3D) construct, a difficult process. To address these shortcomings, this study introduces the fabrication of patient-specific, sterilizable 3D printed auricular model for autogenous auricular reconstruction. A high-resolution 3D digital photograph was captured of the patient's unaffected ear and surrounding anatomic structures. The photographs were exported and uploaded into Amira, for transformation into a digital (.stl) model, which was imported into Blender, an open source software platform for digital modification of data. The unaffected auricle as digitally isolated and inverted to render a model for the contralateral side. The depths of the scapha, triangular fossa, and cymba were deepened to accentuate their contours. Extra relief was added to the helical root to further distinguish this structure. The ear was then digitally deconstructed and separated into its individual auricular components for reconstruction. The completed ear and its individual components were 3D printed using polylactic acid filament and sterilized following manufacturer specifications. The sterilized models were brought to the operating room to be utilized by the surgeon. The models allowed for more accurate anatomic measurements compared to 2D tracings, which reduced the degree of estimation required by surgeons. Approximately 20 g of the PLA filament were utilized for the construction of these models, yielding a total material cost of approximately $1. Using the methodology detailed in this report, as well as departmentally available resources (3D digital photography and 3D printing), a sterilizable, patient-specific, and inexpensive 3D auricular model was fabricated to be used intraoperatively. This technique of printing customized-to-patient models for surgeons to use as 'guides' shows great promise. Copyright © 2017 European

  5. Towards Effective and Efficient Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ronald. Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS. The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic.

  6. Patient-specific pediatric silicone heart valve models based on 3D ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Anna; Lasso, Andras; Jolley, Matthew A.; Wohler, Brittany; Nguyen, Alex; Scanlan, Adam; Baum, Zachary; McGowan, Frank; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Patient-specific heart and valve models have shown promise as training and planning tools for heart surgery, but physically realistic valve models remain elusive. Available proprietary, simulation-focused heart valve models are generic adult mitral valves and do not allow for patient-specific modeling as may be needed for rare diseases such as congenitally abnormal valves. We propose creating silicone valve models from a 3D-printed plastic mold as a solution that can be adapted to any individual patient and heart valve at a fraction of the cost of direct 3D-printing using soft materials. METHODS: Leaflets of a pediatric mitral valve, a tricuspid valve in a patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and a complete atrioventricular canal valve were segmented from ultrasound images. A custom software was developed to automatically generate molds for each valve based on the segmentation. These molds were 3D-printed and used to make silicone valve models. The models were designed with cylindrical rims of different sizes surrounding the leaflets, to show the outline of the valve and add rigidity. Pediatric cardiac surgeons practiced suturing on the models and evaluated them for use as surgical planning and training tools. RESULTS: Five out of six surgeons reported that the valve models would be very useful as training tools for cardiac surgery. In this first iteration of valve models, leaflets were felt to be unrealistically thick or stiff compared to real pediatric leaflets. A thin tube rim was preferred for valve flexibility. CONCLUSION: The valve models were well received and considered to be valuable and accessible tools for heart valve surgery training. Further improvements will be made based on surgeons' feedback.

  7. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a "marching cubes" algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing.

  8. Patient-specific in silico models can quantify primary implant stability in elderly human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Juri A; Hofmann, Urs A T; Christen, Patrik; Favre, Jean M; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2018-03-01

    Secure implant fixation is challenging in osteoporotic bone. Due to the high variability in inter- and intra-patient bone quality, ex vivo mechanical testing of implants in bone is very material- and time-consuming. Alternatively, in silico models could substantially reduce costs and speed up the design of novel implants if they had the capability to capture the intricate bone microstructure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to validate a micro-finite element model of a multi-screw fracture fixation system. Eight human cadaveric humerii were scanned using micro-CT and mechanically tested to quantify bone stiffness. Osteotomy and fracture fixation were performed, followed by mechanical testing to quantify displacements at 12 different locations on the instrumented bone. For each experimental case, a micro-finite element model was created. From the micro-finite element analyses of the intact model, the patient-specific bone tissue modulus was determined such that the simulated apparent stiffness matched the measured stiffness of the intact bone. Similarly, the tissue modulus of a small damage region around each screw was determined for the instrumented bone. For validation, all in silico models were rerun using averaged material properties, resulting in an average coefficient of determination of 0.89 ± 0.04 with a slope of 0.93 ± 0.19 and a mean absolute error of 43 ± 10 μm when correlating in silico marker displacements with the ex vivo test. In conclusion, we validated a patient-specific computer model of an entire organ bone-implant system at the tissue-level at high resolution with excellent overall accuracy. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:954-962, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Polyunsaturated fats, carbohydrates and carotid disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Jennifer L; Qiao, Ye; Guallar, Eliseo; Steffen, Lyn M; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Zhang, Yiyi; Wasserman, Bruce A

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrates and fat intake have both been linked to development of atherosclerosis. We examined associations between glycemic index (GI) and fat intake with carotid atherosclerosis. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort enrolled participants during the period 1987-1989 and the Carotid MRI sub-study occurred between 2004 and 2006 (1672 participants attending both visits). Measures of carbohydrate quality (usual GI), fat intake (total, polyunsaturated and saturated) and overall dietary quality index (DASH Diet Score) were derived from a 66-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Trained readers measured lipid core presence and maximum wall thickness. Using multivariate logistic regression, we determined the odds of lipid core presence by quintile (Q) of energy-adjusted dietary components. Restricted cubic spline models were used to examine non-linear associations between dietary components and maximum wall thickness. Mean daily polyunsaturated fat intake was 5 g (SD 1.4). GI and polyunsaturated fat intake had a nonlinear relationship with maximum wall thickness. Low (1-4 g) and high (6-12 g) polyunsaturated fat intake were associated with a statistically significant decreased odds of lipid core presence compared to intake in a majority of participants (OR Q5 vs. Q2-4: 0.64, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.98; OR Q1 vs. Q2-4: 0.64, 95% CI 0.42, 0.96), however, the association with lipid core was attenuated by adjustment for maximum wall thickness, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. GI and polyunsaturated fat intake were not associated with high-risk plaque features, such as lipid core presence, independent of traditional vascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The changes of individual carotid artery wall layer by aging and carotid intima-media thickness value for high risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jang-Ho; Kim, Wuon-Shik; Lee, Moo-Sik; Kim, Kee-Sik; Park, Jeong Bae; Youn, Ho-Joong; Park, Chang-Gyu; Hong, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Jang-Young; Jeong, Jin-Won; Park, Jong Chun; Lim, Do-Sun; Kim, Moo Hyun; Woo, Jeong Taek

    2016-12-01

    It is still unclear which layer (intima or media) is mainly involved in increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) by aging and also unclear regarding CIMT value suggesting high cardiovascular risk, although 75th percentile value of CIMT is known as a high risk in asymptomatic adults. We sought to find the changes of carotid intima thickness (CIT) and carotid media thickness (CMT) by aging and the 75th percentile value of CIMT in asymptomatic Korean adults. This is an observational cohort study. Carotid ultrasound findings (n=2204 from 12 hospitals) were prospectively collected. The carotid images were sent to Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science for analysis using specialized software which can measure intima and media wall also. Mean age was 58.1±13.5 years old (52% of men). Pearson's correlation coefficient between age and right CIMT (r=.489, Pvalue was 0.778 and 0.771 mm, respectively. Mean right CIT was 0.311±0.069 and 0.303±0.064 mm (P=.009), and mean right CMT was 0.391±0.124 and 0.388±0.131 mm (P=.694) in male and female, respectively. Left carotid ultrasound findings showed similar to the right one. An increased CIMT by aging was mainly due to increased CMT rather than CIT in asymptomatic adults. The 75th percentile values of right CIMT were 0.778 and 0.771 mm in asymptomatic Korean male and female adults, respectively. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion Associated with the Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Anand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old woman presented with a right-hemispheric stroke 1 year after she had suffered a left-hemispheric stroke. Her diagnostic workup was notable for bilateral occlusions of the internal carotid arteries at their origins and a positive lupus anticoagulant antibody test. There was no evidence of carotid dissection or another identifiable cause for her carotid occlusions. These findings suggest that the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome may be implicated in the pathological changes that resulted in occlusions of the extracranial internal carotid arteries. Young stroke patients who present with unexplained internal carotid artery occlusions may benefit from testing for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies.

  12. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Greve, Sara; Blicher, Marie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood...... pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV. DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age...

  13. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation.

  14. Evaluative Measurement Properties of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale for Primary Shoulder Complaints in Physical Therapy Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehorst, Marije L. S.; van Trijffel, Emiel; Lindeboom, Robert

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Clinical measurement, longitudinal. OBJECTIVES: To assess the test-retest reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) in patients with a primary shoulder complaint. BACKGROUND: Health measurement outcomes have become increasingly

  15. Quality of life after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando José; Quevedo, Susana; Barros, Henrique

    2008-11-20

    Most studies documenting beneficial outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CE) are limited to mortality and morbidity rates, costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS). Few have examined the dependency of patients and how they perceive their own health changes after surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) and to study its determinants. Sixty-three patients admitted in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) after CE were eligible for this 14-month follow-up study. Patients were contacted 6 months after discharge to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Among 59 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 43 completed the questionnaires. Sixty-three percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients had worse SF-36 scores for all domains except bodily pain than a general urban population, and comparison with a group of patients 6 months after surgical ICU discharge showed no differences. Six months after PACU discharge, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of ADL Scale and the Katz Index of ADL demonstrated higher dependency scores (5.9 +/- 2.2 versus 4.3 +/- 2.4 and 0.3 +/- 0.8 versus 0.6 +/- 0.9, p < 0.001 and p = 0.047). Sixty-five percent and 33% were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental and personal ADL, respectively. Patients dependent in at least one ADL task had higher Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) scores (1.0 versus 1.5, p = 0.017). After controlling for multiple comparisons, no significant differences were found. Patients undergoing CE have improved self-perception of quality of life despite being more dependent. Almost all their scores are worse than those in an urban population. We could identify no predictors of greater dependency in ADL tasks six months after PACU discharge.

  16. Clinical observations on the effect of carotid artery occlusion on cerebral blood flow mapped by xenon computed tomography and its correlation with carotid artery back pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steed, D.L.; Webster, M.W.; DeVries, E.J.; Jungreis, C.A.; Horton, J.A.; Sehkar, L.; Yonas, H.

    1990-01-01

    Xenon computed tomographic cerebral blood flow mapping was correlated with internal carotid artery stump pressures and clinical neurologic assessment during temporary internal carotid artery occlusion. One hundred fourteen patients with skull base tumors or intracranial aneurysms potentially requiring carotid resection or ligation underwent angiography, xenon CT cerebral blood flow mapping, and internal carotid artery blood pressure monitoring. The internal carotid artery was then temporarily occluded with a balloon catheter, stump pressure was measured through the catheter, and the xenon CT cerebral blood flow mapping was repeated. Adequate xenon CT cerebral blood flow was defined as greater than 30 cc/100 gm/min. All patients had normal xenon CT cerebral blood flow before internal carotid artery occlusion. During internal carotid artery occlusion, xenon CT cerebral blood flow was found to be normal (group I, 40 patients), globally reduced but still within the normal range (group II, 50 patients), or low in the distribution of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (group III, 13 patients). With balloon occlusion, an immediate neurologic deficit developed in 11 patients (9%) requiring deflation of the balloon preceding xenon CT cerebral blood flow measurement (group IV). In group I internal carotid artery blood pressure was 128 mm Hg. (range 85 to 171 mm Hg) with stump pressure 86 mm Hg (range 46 to 125 mm Hg). In group II internal carotid artery blood pressure was 130 mm Hg. (range 78 to 199 mm Hg), with stump pressure 86 mm Hg (range 31 to 150 mm Hg)

  17. Visualization and analysis of flow patterns of human carotid bifurcation by computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yunjing; Gao Peiyi; Lin Yan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate flow patterns at carotid bifurcation in vivo by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD)and MR angiography imaging. Methods: Seven subjects underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of carotid artery in Siemens 3.0 T MR. Flow patterns of the carotid artery bifurcation were calculated and visualized by combining MR vascular imaging post-processing and CFD. Results: The flow patterns of the carotid bifurcations in 7 subjects were varied with different phases of a cardiac cycle. The turbulent flow and back flow occurred at bifurcation and proximal of internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA), their occurrence and conformation were varied with different phase of a cardiac cycle. The turbulent flow and back flow faded out quickly when the blood flow to the distal of ICA and ECA. Conclusion: CFD combined with MR angiography can be utilized to visualize the cyclical change of flow patterns of carotid bifurcation with different phases of a cardiac cycle. (authors)

  18. Experimental Study of Flow Through Carotid Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi, Faezeh; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    There is evidence that traditional endovascular techniques like coiling are not effective for treatment of wide-neck cerebral aneurysms. Flow Diverter Stents (FDS) have emerged as promising devices for treating complex aneurysms since they enable treatment of aneurysms that were considered untreatable before. Recent studies suggest a number of associated risks with FDS, including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, delayed hemorrhage, and perforator occlusions. Chong et al. simulated hemodynamic behavior using patient-specific data. From their study, it is possible to infer that the standard deviation of energy loss could be a good predictor for intervention success. The aim of this study is to investigate the flow in models of cerebral aneurysms before and after FDS insertion using PIV. These models will be based on actual clinical studies and will be fabricated with advanced additive manufacturing techniques. These data will then be used to explore flow parameters that could inform the likelihood of post-intervention aneurysm rupture, and help determine FDS designs that better suit any particular patient before its procedure.

  19. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    AS in a prospective population-based study. APPROACH AND RESULTS: A random sample of participants (age, 45-68 years) in the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study underwent B-mode ultrasound with measurements of IMT and the presence of plaque in the common carotid artery (n=5079). Potential risk factors...

  20. Transcranial Doppler for detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Schroeder, T V

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) for the detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy in 30 male and 14 female patients with ipsilateral focal cerebro-vascular symptoms. Surgery was performed during halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia with moderate hypocapnia...

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ULTRASOUND AND STENOSIS OF INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Flis

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elucidation of the ultrasound structure of the atherosclerotic plaque in stenosis of internal carotid artery may have important implications for carotid surgery. This study compares the ability of computer derived 3D ultrasound gray scale volumetric measurements to diferentiate between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid plaque causing more than 70% stenosis.Methods. Eightysix internal carotid artery stenoses (70–99%, 45 symptomatic, 41 asymptomatic were imaged with 3D ultrasound to obtain the whole volume of the atherosclerotic plaque. Digitalized sonograms were computerized and normalized to the gray scale median (GSM of blood (0 and vessel adventitia (200. Plaque GSM was obtained for the whole volume by computing the volume ratio between echolucent and echogenic areas. The plaque heterogeneity was obtained by computing the density of echogenic areas per volume unit. Parametric t test was used for statistic analysis.Results. Minimum volume GSM ratio (determining echolucency was higher for asymptomatic plaque (0.6 – CI 0.48– 0.91 versus 0.3 – CI 0.21–0.75: p = 0.002. Greater GSM heterogeneity was present in symptomatic plaque (6.8 – CI 2.5– 18.3 versus 0.41 – CI 0.2–3.4;.p = 0.0001.Conclusions. Volume ultrasound imaging that enables objective assessment of whole ultrasonic plaque structure is more sensitive that single longitudinal view sonography for differentiating between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque.

  2. Spontaneous Recanalization of Complete Internal Carotid Artery: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    examination revealed global aphasia and right hemiplegia. No carotid bruits or heart murmurs were. ABSTRACT. Spontaneous recanalization of atherothrombotic extracranial cerebral arteries is rare vis-à-vis recanalization of intracranial vessels. The time course is unknown. The question is the advisability and timing of ...

  3. [Revascularization of the carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; Bezzi, M; D'Urso, A; Giacobbi, D; Ceccanei, G; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    From January 1994 to July 2004, 323 patients underwent 348 revascularization of carotid bifurcation for atherosclerotic stenoses. Eighty eight patients (group A) were 75 year-old or older, whereas 235 (group B) were younger than 75 years. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was 1% in group A, and 1.4% in group B. At 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 91% and 92% in group A, and 89% and 91% in group B. None of these differences was statistically significant. In the same time period, 26 internal carotid arteries were revascularized in 24 patients, 75 or more aged, for a symptomatic kinking. Postoperative mortality/morbidity rate was absent, whereas, at 5 years, patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were, respectively, 88% and 92%. Twelve vertebral arteries were revascularized in 12 patients, 75 or more aged, for invalidating symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Postoperative mortality/neurologic morbidity rate was absent. In one case postoperative recurrence of symptoms occurred, despite a patent revascularization. Patency and freedom from symptoms/stroke were 84% and 75%, at 5 years. Revascularization of carotid and vertebral arteries in the elderly can be accomplished with good results, superposable to those of standard revascularization of carotid bifurcation in a younger patients' population.

  4. Dissecting aneurysm of the cervical internal carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yoshihiro; Itoyama, Youichi; Fukumura, Akinobu; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Takafumi.

    1987-01-01

    On lifting a heavy case, a 51-year-old male experienced a sudden onset of headache with giddiness and clouded vision. A week later, vertigo and right hand numbness were added to his symptoms. The next day anisocoria (right > left) and dilation of the left retinal veins were noted. Cranial computed tomography (CT) scan appeared normal and there were no other remarkable neurological findings. The patient was treated conservatively for cerebral infarction, however, the headache worsened and diplopia occurred. Neurological examination on admission revealed nothing unusual except for left Horner's syndrome. Physical examination showed a palpable sausage-like painless tumor on the left side of the neck. Angiography showed a narrowing of the internal carotid artery in the cervical region with a small dissecting aneurysm at the C3 level. Cervical CT scan at the upper C3 level showed a low density lunar defect in the high density section of the enlarged left internal carotid artery. The patient was operated on by superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis to increase the intracranial blood flow. Postoperatively the symptoms were quickly relieved. Angiography 1 month later showed less narrowing of the carotid artery, though the dissecting aneurysm still remained. Postoperative cervical CT scan showed the left internal carotid artery to be of normal size. The patient returned to his work in normal condition 2 months later. It is emphasized that cervical CT scan may be useful in the diagnosis of this unusual type of cervical dissecting aneurysm. (author)

  5. Association between internal carotid artery dissection and arterial tortuosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario; Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Siotto, Paolo; Sumer, Suna; Wintermark, Max; Raz, Eytan; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery dissection is an important cause of ischemic stroke in all age groups, particularly in young patients. The purpose of this work was to assess whether there is an association between the presence of an internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and the arterial tortuosity. This study considered 124 patients (72 males and 52 females; median age 57 years) with CT/MR diagnosis of ICAD of the internal carotid artery were considered in this multi-centric retrospective study. The arterial tortuosity was evaluated and, when present, was categorized as elongation, kinking, or coiling. For each patient, both the right and left sides were considered for a total number of 248 arteries in order to have the same number of cases and controls. Fisher's exact test was applied to test the association between elongation, kinking, coiling, dissection, and the side affected by CAD. Fisher's exact test showed a statistically significant association between the ICAD and kinking (p = 0.0089) and coiling (p = 0.0251) whereas no statistically significant difference was found with arterial vessel elongation (p = 0.444). ICAD was more often seen on the left side compared to the right (p = 0.0001). These results were confirmed using both carotid arteries of the same patient as dependent parameter with p = 0.0012, 0.0129, and 0.3323 for kinking, coiling, and elongation, respectively. The presence of kinking and coiling is associated with ICAD. (orig.)

  6. A curve model for association of serum homocysteine with carotid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ma'anshan, China, enrolled in the cross-sectional study. Data collection included .... 1 drink /week, or never, and physical exercise was defined as .... P75), or n. (%), BMI =body mass index, CAD =Carotid artery disease, HTN = hypertension ...

  7. Screen for intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae with carotid duplex sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, L-K; Yeh, S-J; Chen, Y-C; Liu, H-M; Jeng, J-S

    2009-11-01

    Early diagnosis and management of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) may prevent the occurrence of stroke. This study aimed to identify the best carotid duplex sonography (CDS) parameters for screening DAVF. 63 DAVF patients and 170 non-DAVF patients received both CDS and conventional angiography. The use of seven CDS haemodynamic parameter sets related to the resistance index (RI) of the external carotid artery (ECA) for the diagnosis of DAVF was validated and the applicability of the best CDS parameter set in 20 400 patients was tested. The CDS parameter set (ECA RI (cut-off point = 0.7) and internal carotid artery (ICA) to ECA RI ratio (cut-off point = 0.9)) had the highest specificity (99%) for diagnosis of DAVF with moderate sensitivity (51%). Location of the DAVF was a significant determinant of sensitivity of detection, which was 70% for non-cavernous DAVF and 0% for cavernous sinus DAVF (pdetected abnormality in 92 of 20 400 patients. These abnormalities included DAVF (n = 25), carotid stenosis (n = 32), vertebral artery stenosis (n = 7), intracranial arterial stenosis (n = 6), head and neck tumour (n = 3) and unknown aetiology (n = 19). Combined CDS parameters of ECA RI and ICA to ECA RI ratio can be used as a screening tool for the diagnosis of DAVF.

  8. Percutaneous implantation of endoprostheses in the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Jr. José Ribamar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the in-hospital evolution of patients undergoing percutaneous stent placement in the carotid arteries. METHODS: From August 1996 to April 2001, we studied 86 patients with carotid arterial obliterative lesions > 70% who were treated with percutaneous stent placement in the carotid arteries. We assessed the rate of success of the implantation and of the procedure, the types of stents used, mortality rate, and neurological complications. RESULTS: Successful implantation was obtained in 98.9% of the cases, and the procedure was successful in 91.8%. The Wallstent was the most frequently used stent (73 patients - 77%. Cerebral strokes occurred as follows: 3 (3.2% transient ischemic attacks, 1 (1.1% minor stroke, and 3 (3.1% major strokes. One (1.1% patient died during hospitalization. CONCLUSION: The high rate of success of stent implantation (98.9% in addition to the low rate of cerebral stroke/death (4.2% showed the efficiency and safety of percutaneous stent placement in carotid arteries.

  9. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köklü, Erkan; Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Koç, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication

  10. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual r...

  11. Carotid endarterectomy in Durban - the first 10 years

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease of the carotid bifurcation at the Metropolitan. Vascular Service (University of .... Three patients died of respiratory failure: aspiration pneumonia occurred in 1, aspiration pneumonia after emergency tracheostomy for an expanding wound haematoma in another, and acute respiratory obstruc- tion caused by laryngeal ...

  12. Preliminary Report of Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Tapered Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Seung; Jeong; Kim, Young Suk; Byun, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Hwan [Dept. of Neurology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To analyze the results of carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent and to evaluate the effectiveness of the tapered stent compared to previously reported studies using non-tapered stents. From October 2008 to August 2010, elective carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent was attempted in 39 lesions from 36 consecutive patients. Post-procedural complications were evaluated by neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Restenosis or occlusion was evaluated by carotid Doppler ultrasound and computerized tomography with angiography. Newly developed neurologic symptoms were evaluated clinically. The self-expandable tapered stent was placed across the carotid artery stenosis. A total stroke was noted in 3 patients, while a major stroke was noted in 1 patient. On diffusion weighted imaging, new lesions were observed in 15 patients, but 13 patients were clinically silent. Follow-up imaging studies were performed in the 13 clinically silent lesions, and no evidence of restenosis or occlusion was found any of the 13 lesions. During clinical follow-up in 34 lesions from 31 patients, there were newly developed neurological symptoms in only 1 patient.

  13. A case of unusual collateral circulation from internal carotid occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Il Jung; Choi, Byung So

    1972-01-01

    A 23 year old Korean boy was admitted to Dept. of Neurosurgery. Capital Army Hospital on Feb. 2, 1971 because of recurrent transient focal seizure and more weakness in the left extremities. During hospitalization, he recovered from focal seizure and motor weakness in the left extremities without specific therapy. Right carotid angiograms were performed. Right carotid angiograms show right internal carotic occlusion at the level of distal siphon of extradural level with good filling of ophthalmic artery of right. Extensive small vascular network developed intracranial region of right hemisphere. There are appearance to be two major anastomotic communication. 1. Via at the base of the brain. 2. Via the rete mirabile with external carotid artery. These angiographic finding were similar to that of the so-called 'cerebral rete mirabile' which was described in many literature. Etiology of cerebral rete mirabile is divided as to whether these represent true congenital vascular malformations or whether the 'rete mirabile' develops as a collateral because of a primary stenosis in the internal carotid arteries. Evidence for either theory is still inconclusive

  14. Association between internal carotid artery dissection and arterial tortuosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Piga, Mario [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Radiology, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Siotto, Paolo [Azienda Ospedaliero Brotzu (A.O.B.), Department of Radiology, di Cagliari (Italy); Sumer, Suna; Wintermark, Max [Neuroradiology Division, Neuroradiology, UVA Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Raz, Eytan [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Rome (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Department of Vascular Surgery, di Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-10-18

    Carotid artery dissection is an important cause of ischemic stroke in all age groups, particularly in young patients. The purpose of this work was to assess whether there is an association between the presence of an internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and the arterial tortuosity. This study considered 124 patients (72 males and 52 females; median age 57 years) with CT/MR diagnosis of ICAD of the internal carotid artery were considered in this multi-centric retrospective study. The arterial tortuosity was evaluated and, when present, was categorized as elongation, kinking, or coiling. For each patient, both the right and left sides were considered for a total number of 248 arteries in order to have the same number of cases and controls. Fisher's exact test was applied to test the association between elongation, kinking, coiling, dissection, and the side affected by CAD. Fisher's exact test showed a statistically significant association between the ICAD and kinking (p = 0.0089) and coiling (p = 0.0251) whereas no statistically significant difference was found with arterial vessel elongation (p = 0.444). ICAD was more often seen on the left side compared to the right (p = 0.0001). These results were confirmed using both carotid arteries of the same patient as dependent parameter with p = 0.0012, 0.0129, and 0.3323 for kinking, coiling, and elongation, respectively. The presence of kinking and coiling is associated with ICAD. (orig.)

  15. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva On-Chai Lau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors.

  16. Hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery with intercavernous anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.J.; Wang, L.J.; Wong, Y.C.; Chen, S.T.; Hsieh, F.Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report a symptomatic case of unilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery with an intercavernous anastomosis, a very rare developmental anomaly. The symptoms were caused by occlusion of the proximal middle cerebral artery which possibly related to the haemodynamic stress caused by the anomalous intercavernous anastomosis. (orig.)

  17. Immediate Catheter Directed Thrombolysis for Thromboembolic Stroke During Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fletcher

    Full Text Available : Background: Carotid artery endarterectomy (CEA is a common procedure undertaken by vascular surgeons with over 5,000 procedures performed annually worldwide. Published rates of perioperative stroke range from 1.3% to 6.3%. Case report: A case is presented in which on-table intra-cranial angiography and catheter directed thrombolysis were used for a thromboembolic occlusion of the distal internal carotid artery (ICA and proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA. An 83-year-old lady developed a dense right hemiparesis while undergoing a CEA under local anaesthetic (LA. Immediate re-exploration of the endarterectomy did not reveal technical error. Intraoperative duplex scanning of the internal carotid artery revealed no detectable diastolic flow. On-table angiogram showed complete occlusion of the distal ICA and proximal MCA. Catheter directed administration of TPA was undertaken. The entire ICA and MCA were completely clear on a completion angiogram. The patient made a full neurological recovery. Discussion and conclusion: Prompt diagnosis and treatment with intraoperative catheter directed thrombolysis can resolve thromboembolic occlusion of the ICA/MCA. It is argued that performing CEA under LA is useful for immediate recognition of perioperative stroke. Furthermore, the advantage is highlighted of vascular surgeons having both the resources and skillset to perform on-table angiography and thrombolysis. Keywords: Carotid endarterectomy, Stroke, Thrombolysis, Thromboembolus, Local anaesthetic

  18. Resection of recurrent neck cancer with carotid artery replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Schneider, Fabrice; Minni, Antonio; Calio, Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Ricco, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival rate, primary patency of vascular reconstructions, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) after en bloc resection of the carotid artery and tumor with in-line polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) carotid grafting, followed by radiotherapy. From 2000 to 2014, 31 consecutive patients with recurrent neck cancer invading the carotid artery underwent en bloc resection and simultaneous carotid artery reconstruction with a PTFE graft, which was associated in 18 cases with a myocutaneous flap. The primary tumor was a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx in 17 patients and of the hypopharynx in 7, an undifferentiated carcinoma of unknown origin in 4, and an anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid in 3. All of the patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (50-70 Gy), and 10 of them also underwent chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cisplatin). None of the patients died or sustained a stroke during the first 30 days after the index procedure. Postoperative morbidity consisted of 6 transitory dysphagias, 3 vocal cord palsies, 2 wound dehiscences, 1 transitory mandibular claudication, and 1 partial myocutaneous flap necrosis. No graft infection occurred during follow-up. Fifteen patients (48%) died from metastatic cancer during a mean follow-up of 45.4 months (range, 8-175 months). None of the patients showed evidence of local recurrence, stroke, or thrombosis of the carotid reconstruction. The 5-year survival rate was 49 ± 10%. The overall number of QALYs was 3.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-4.37) with a significant difference between patients without metastasis at the time of redo surgery (n = 26; QALYs, 3.74) and those with metastasis (n = 5; QALYs, 0.56; P = .005). QALYs were also significantly improved in patients with cancer of the larynx (n = 17; QALYs, 4.69) compared to patients presenting with other types of

  19. Amaurosis fugax: risk factors and prevalence of significant carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvickström P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pia Kvickström,1 Bertil Lindblom,2,3 Göran Bergström,4,5 Madeleine Zetterberg2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience/Ophthalmology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, 4Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, 5Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and prevalence of carotid stenosis in patients with amaurosis fugax (AF.Method: Patients diagnosed with AF and subjected to carotid ultrasound in 2004–2010 in Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (n=302, were included, and data were retrospectively collected from medical records.Results: The prevalence of significant carotid stenosis was 18.9%, and 14.2% of the subjects were subjected to carotid endarterectomy. Significant associations with risk of having ≥70% stenosis were male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–5.46, current smoking (aOR: 6.26; 95% CI: 2.62–14.93, diabetes (aOR: 3.68; 95% CI: 1.37–9.90 and previous vasculitis (aOR: 10.78; 95% CI: 1.36–85.5. A majority of the patients (81.4% was seen by an ophthalmologist prior to the first ultrasound. Only 1.7% of the patients exhibited retinal artery emboli at examination.Conclusion: The prevalence of carotid stenosis among patients with AF is higher than has previously been demonstrated in stroke patients. An association with previously reported vascular risk factors and with vasculitis is seen in this patient group. Ocular findings are scarce. Keywords: amaurosis fugax, carotid stenosis, carotid ultrasound, giant cell arteritis, transient ischemic attack, transient monocular visual loss

  20. Cerebral hemodynamic changes and electroencephalography during carotid endarterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K.; Rehncrona, S.; Skeidsvoll, H.; Ryding, E.

    1990-01-01

    Some patients undergoing endarterectomy for occlusive carotid artery disease run a risk of brain ischemia during cross-clamping of the artery. The present study of 15 patients was undertaken to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), as measured with an intravenous (IV) tracer (133Xenon) technique, and to relate CBF changes to changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). CBF was measured before and after induction of anesthesia, during cross-clamping of the carotid artery, after release of the clamps, and at 24 hours after the operation. All the patients were anesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl, and nitrous oxide and oxygen. EEG was continuously recorded during the operation. Carotid artery shunts were not used. In 8 patients, cross-clamping of the carotid artery did not influence the EEG. In this group of patients, induction of anesthesia caused a 38% decrease in CBF, which presumably reflects the normal reaction to the anesthetic agent given. There were no further changes in CBF during cross-clamping. In 7 patients, the EEG showed signs of deterioration during the intraoperative vascular occlusion. In these patients, anesthesia did not cause any CBF change, whereas cross-clamping the artery induced a 33% decrease in CBF. In individual patients, the severity of EEG changes correlated with the decrease in CBF. The absence of a change in CBF by anesthesia and a decrease due to cross-clamping of the carotid artery may be explained by the presence of a more advanced cerebrovascular disease and an insufficiency to maintain CBF during cross-clamping

  1. Cerebral hemodynamic changes and electroencephalography during carotid endarterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algotsson, L.; Messeter, K.; Rehncrona, S.; Skeidsvoll, H.; Ryding, E. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden))

    1990-05-01

    Some patients undergoing endarterectomy for occlusive carotid artery disease run a risk of brain ischemia during cross-clamping of the artery. The present study of 15 patients was undertaken to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), as measured with an intravenous (IV) tracer (133Xenon) technique, and to relate CBF changes to changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). CBF was measured before and after induction of anesthesia, during cross-clamping of the carotid artery, after release of the clamps, and at 24 hours after the operation. All the patients were anesthetized with methohexitone, fentanyl, and nitrous oxide and oxygen. EEG was continuously recorded during the operation. Carotid artery shunts were not used. In 8 patients, cross-clamping of the carotid artery did not influence the EEG. In this group of patients, induction of anesthesia caused a 38% decrease in CBF, which presumably reflects the normal reaction to the anesthetic agent given. There were no further changes in CBF during cross-clamping. In 7 patients, the EEG showed signs of deterioration during the intraoperative vascular occlusion. In these patients, anesthesia did not cause any CBF change, whereas cross-clamping the artery induced a 33% decrease in CBF. In individual patients, the severity of EEG changes correlated with the decrease in CBF. The absence of a change in CBF by anesthesia and a decrease due to cross-clamping of the carotid artery may be explained by the presence of a more advanced cerebrovascular disease and an insufficiency to maintain CBF during cross-clamping.

  2. Efficacy of Carotid Artery Stenting by the Universal Protection Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shunsaku; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Kato, Kyozo; Izumi, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2018-04-18

    To avoid distal plaques embolization during carotid artery stenting, we developed Universal Protection Method that combined the use of a proximal common carotid artery balloon, an external carotid artery balloon, and a distal internal carotid artery filter, with continuous flow reversal to the femoral vein. Herein, we assessed the efficacy of the Universal Protection Method by comparing stenting outcomes before and after its introduction. We assessed outcomes for 115 cases before and 41 cases after the Universal Protection Method was adopted (non-Universal Protection Method and Universal Protection Method groups, respectively). We then compared procedure details, magnetic resonance imaging (within 48 hours after the procedure), intraprocedural complications, and postoperative stroke rates. Ischemic stroke was not observed in the Universal Protection Method group, but 1 major stroke and 2 minor strokes were observed in the non-Universal Protection Method group. High-intensity areas were seen in 6 (15.0%) and 49 (42.6%) cases in the Universal Protection Method and non-Universal Protection Method groups, respectively (P = .001). Contrastingly, intraprocedural complications were observed in 9 (22.5%) and 21 (18.3%) cases in the Universal Protection Method and non-Universal Protection Method groups, respectively. Among these intraprocedural complication cases, high-intensity areas were observed in 1 case (11.1%) in the Universal Protection Method group and in 15 cases (71.4%) in the non-Universal Protection Method group. Universal Protection Method is a safe technique that is applicable to all patients undergoing carotid artery stenting, irrespective of individual risk factors. Notably, the incidence rates of both distal embolization and unexpected intraprocedural complications are low. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgical construction of a novel simulated carotid siphon in canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Huaqiao; Li Minghua; Zhu Yueqi; Fang Chun; Wang Jue; Wu Chungen; Cheng Yingsheng; Xie Jian; Zhang He

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop in vivo carotid siphon models by surgical method using the shaped devices for testing the performance of covered stent specially designed for intracranial vascular diseases. Methods: Six carotid siphon-shaped devices were established using stereolithographic biomodeling and the lost-wax technique. Six canines underwent surgery to expose and isolate bilateral CCA. The right CCA origin was ligated and incised distal to the ligation point after the distal right CCA was temporarily closed. The distal left CCA was ligated and incised proximal to the ligation point after the left CCA origin was closed. The proximal isolated left CCA was passed through the shaped device. The distal isolated right CCA and the proximal isolated left CCA were anastomosed end-to-end. Finally, the shaped device of carotid siphon was fixed with suture and embedded in the left neck. The intraarterial DSA was performed on postprocedural 7 days, 2 weeks and 1 month. The morphological characteristics of carotid siphon models were visually evaluated by two observers. The patency of siphon model and the stenosis of anastomotic stoma were followed-up. Results: All animals tolerated the surgical procedure well with mean model time construction of 90 minutes. The morphological characteristics of siphon models were similar to those in human. The anastomotic stoma stenosis occurred in 2 siphon models, and thrombosis of anastomotic stoma in 1, but all siphons of these models were patent on post-procedural follow-up angiography. Conclusion: Surgical construction of an in vivo carotid siphon model of canine with shaped device is practically feasible. This model can be used for testing neurovascular devices. (authors)

  4. Carotid stiffness indicates risk of ischemic stroke and TIA in patients with internal carotid artery stenosis: the SMART study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Joke M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bots, Michiel L.

    2004-01-01

    Patients with a carotid artery stenosis, including those with an asymptomatic or moderate stenosis, have a considerable risk of ischemic stroke. Identification of risk factors for cerebrovascular disease in these patients may improve risk profiling and guide new treatment strategies. We

  5. Impact on outcome of different types of carotid stent: results from the European Registry of Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Eugenio; Giugliano, Giuseppe; Cremonesi, Alberto; Bosiers, Marc; Reimers, Bernhard; Setacci, Carlo; Cao, Piergiorgio; Schmidt, Andrej; Sievert, Horst; Peeters, Patrick; Nikas, Dimitrios; Sannino, Anna; de Donato, Gianmarco; Parlani, Giambattista; Castriota, Fausto; Hornung, Marius; Rubino, Paolo; Esposito, Giovanni; Tesorio, Tullio

    2016-06-12

    Conflicting data exist on the impact on outcome of the use of different stent types during carotid artery stenting (CAS). The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes according to different carotid stent design among the population of the European Registry of Carotid Artery Stenting (ERCAS). The present study was conducted in 1,604 patients who underwent neuroprotected CAS in ERCAS. All types of commercially available carotid stent were used. Open-cell design stents were classified according to free cell area into 7.5 mm2. A total of 713 closed-cell, 456 hybrid-cell, 238 7.5 mm2 open-cell stents were implanted. Overall, the 30-day stroke and death rate was 1.37%. At 30 days, 19 strokes occurred (1.18%): eight in the group of patients treated with a closed-cell (1.12%), two in those with a hybrid-cell (0.44%), three in those with a 7.5 mm2 open-cell stent (3.05%) (p=0.045). Data of the present study suggest that, in the setting of neuroprotected CAS performed in high-volume centres by properly trained operators, the use of an open-cell design stent with a free cell area >7.5 mm2 may be associated with an increased 30-day stroke risk.

  6. Efficacy of different types of self-expandable stents in carotid artery stenting for carotid bifurcation stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-min; Qin, Hao; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-jing; Feng, Jun; Wu, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Both open and closed loop self-expandable stents were used in carotid artery stenting (CAS) for carotid bifurcation stenosis. We sought to compare the efficacy of two types of stents in CAS. The data of 212 patients treated with CAS (42 and 170 cases implanted with closed and open loop stents, respectively) for carotid bifurcation stenosis and distal filtration protection devices were retrospectively analyzed. Between closed and open loop stents, there were no significant differences in hospitalization duration, NIHSS score before and after the treatment, stenosis at 12th month, and cumulative incidence of primary endpoint events within 30 days or from the 31st day to the 12th month; while there were significant differences in hemodynamic changes and rate of difficulty in recycling distal filtration protection devices. Use of open vs. closed loop stents for carotid bifurcation stenosis seems to be associated with similar incidence of complications, except for greater rate of hemodynamic changes and lower rate of difficulty in recycling the distal filtration protection devices.

  7. Carotid artery disease progression and related neurologic events after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Go, Catherine; Ling, Jennifer; Naddaf, Abdallah; Steinmetz, Amy; Abou Ali, Adham N; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2016-08-01

    During the last decade, there has been a dramatic improvement in best medical treatment for patients with vascular disease. Yet, there is a paucity of contemporary long-term data for restenosis and contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA) progression. This study assessed ipsilateral and contralateral disease progression and cerebrovascular events after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). A consecutive cohort of CEAs between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, was retrospectively analyzed. End points were restenosis ≥50% and ≥70%, contralateral carotid disease progression (50%-69%, 70%-99%, or occlusion) and stroke. Survival analysis and Cox regression models were used to assess the effect of baseline predictors. During the 11-year study period, 1639 patients underwent 1782 CEAs (50.0% patch closure, 23.9% primary closure, 26.1% eversion, and 2.5% combined with coronary artery bypass grafting). The combined stroke/death rate was 2.6% overall and 1.8% in the asymptomatic cohort. The rate of restenosis ≥50% at 2, 5, and 10 years was 8.5%, 15.6%, 27.2%, and the rate for restenosis ≥70% was 3.4%, 6.5%, 10.2%, respectively. Restenosis ≥50% was predicted by hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 2.09; P = .027), female gender (HR, 1.43; P = .042), and younger age (≤65 years; HR, 1.56; P = .016), but not by statins, surgical technique, symptoms, or other baseline risk factors. Restenoses remained asymptomatic in 125 of 148 (84.5%). Progression of contralateral ICA disease at 2, 5, and 10 years was estimated at 5.4%, 15.5%, and 46.8%, respectively. Contralateral progression was only predicted by smoking (HR, 1.74; P = .008). The stroke rate in patients with disease progression of the contralateral ICA was not different compared with those without progression (7.0% vs 3.3%; P = .063). Any-stroke rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 4.6%, 7.3%, and 15.7%, respectively. Predictors were symptomatic lesion (HR, 1.48; P = .039), renal insufficiency, defined as a

  8. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burfeindt, Matthew J; Zastrow, Earl; Hagness, Susan C; Van Veen, Barry D; Medow, Joshua E

    2011-01-01

    We present a numerical study of an array-based microwave beamforming approach for non-invasive hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain tumors. The transmit beamformer is designed to achieve localized heating-that is, to achieve constructive interference and selective absorption of the transmitted electromagnetic waves at the desired focus location in the brain while achieving destructive interference elsewhere. The design process takes into account patient-specific and target-specific propagation characteristics at 1 GHz. We evaluate the effectiveness of the beamforming approach using finite-difference time-domain simulations of two MRI-derived child head models from the Virtual Family (IT'IS Foundation). Microwave power deposition and the resulting steady-state thermal distribution are calculated for each of several randomly chosen focus locations. We also explore the robustness of the design to mismatch between the assumed and actual dielectric properties of the patient. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of the beamformer to suppress hot spots caused by pockets of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Our results show that microwave beamforming has the potential to create localized heating zones in the head models for focus locations that are not surrounded by large amounts of CSF. These promising results suggest that the technique warrants further investigation and development.

  9. Induced radioactivity in a patient-specific collimator used in proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M; Mauro, Egidio; Silari, Marco

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the activation of a patient-specific collimator, calculating dose rates, total activities and activities per unit mass of the mixture of radionuclides generated by proton irradiation in the energy range 100-250 MeV. Monte Carlo simulations were first performed for a generic case, using an approximate geometry and on the basis of assumptions on beam intensity and irradiation profile. A collimator used for a prostate cancer treatment was obtained from the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), Houston, USA, from which a number of samples were cut and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The results of the gamma spectrometry are compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations performed using geometrical and irradiation data specific to the unit. The assumptions made for the simulations and their impact on the results are discussed. Dose rate measurements performed in a low-background area at CERN and routine radiation protection measurements at the MDACC are also reported. It is shown that it sh...

  10. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  11. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S; Dalman, Ronald L; Shadden, Shawn C

    2014-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. MRI was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and associated Lagrangian coherent structures were computed from blood velocity data and were used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Splintless orthognathic surgery: a novel technique using patient-specific implants (PSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Thomas; Bredell, Marius; Eliades, Theodore; Rücker, Martin; Essig, Harald

    2015-04-01

    In the past few years, advances in three-dimensional imaging have conducted to breakthrough in the diagnosis, treatment planning and result assessment in orthognathic surgery. Hereby error-prone and time-consuming planning steps, like model surgery and transfer of the face bow, can be eluded. Numerous positioning devices, in order to transfer the three-dimensional treatment plan to the intraoperative site, have been described. Nevertheless the use of positioning devices and intraoperative splints are failure-prone and time-consuming steps, which have to be performed during the operation and during general anesthesia of the patient. We describe a novel time-sparing and failsafe technique using patient-specific implants (PSI) as positioning guides and concurrently as rigid fixation of the maxilla in the planned position. This technique avoids elaborate positioning and removal of manufactured positioning devices and allows maxillary positioning without the use of occlusal splints. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient-specific lean body mass can be estimated from limited-coverage computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2018-06-01

    In PET/CT, quantitative evaluation of tumour metabolic activity is possible through standardized uptake values, usually normalized for body weight (BW) or lean body mass (LBM). Patient-specific LBM can be estimated from whole-body (WB) CT images. As most clinical indications only warrant PET/CT examinations covering head to midthigh, the aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable method to estimate LBM from limited-coverage (LC) CT images and test its validity. Head-to-toe PET/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semiautomatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units. LC was obtained by omitting image slices. Image segmentation was validated on the WB CT examinations by comparing CT-estimated BW with actual BW, and LBM estimated from LC images were compared with LBM estimated from WB images. A direct method and an indirect method were developed and validated on an independent data set. Comparing LBM estimated from LC examinations with estimates from WB examinations (LBMWB) showed a significant but limited bias of 1.2 kg (direct method) and nonsignificant bias of 0.05 kg (indirect method). This study demonstrates that LBM can be estimated from LC CT images with no significant difference from LBMWB.

  14. Quantification of hepatic flow distribution using particle tracking for patient specific virtual Fontan surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiguang; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Troianowski, Guillaume; Shadden, Shawn; Mohhan Reddy, V.; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2010-11-01

    The Fontan surgery is the third and final stage in a palliative series to treat children with single ventricle heart defects. In the extracardiac Fontan procedure, the inferior vena cava (IVC) is connected to the pulmonary arteries via a tube-shaped Gore-tex graft. Clinical observations have shown that the absence of a hepatic factor, carried in the IVC flow, can cause pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Although it is clear that hepatic flow distribution is an important determinant of Fontan performance, few studies have quantified its relation to Fontan design. In this study, we virtually implanted three types of grafts (T-junction, offset and Y-graft) into 5 patient specific models of the Glenn (stage 2) anatomy. We then performed 3D time-dependent simulations and systematically compared the IVC flow distribution, energy loss, and pressure levels in different surgical designs. A robustness test is performed to evaluate the sensitivity of hepatic distribution to pulmonary flow split. Results show that the Y-graft design effectively improves the IVC flow distribution, compared to traditional designs and that surgical designs could be customized on a patient-by-patient basis.

  15. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Measuring the relative extent of pulmonary infiltrates by hierarchical classification of patient-specific image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevas, S.; Iakovidis, D. K.

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary infiltrates are common radiological findings indicating the filling of airspaces with fluid, inflammatory exudates, or cells. They are most common in cases of pneumonia, acute respiratory syndrome, atelectasis, pulmonary oedema and haemorrhage, whereas their extent is usually correlated with the extent or the severity of the underlying disease. In this paper we propose a novel pattern recognition framework for the measurement of the extent of pulmonary infiltrates in routine chest radiographs. The proposed framework follows a hierarchical approach to the assessment of image content. It includes the following: (a) sampling of the lung fields; (b) extraction of patient-specific grey-level histogram signatures from each sample; (c) classification of the extracted signatures into classes representing normal lung parenchyma and pulmonary infiltrates; (d) the samples for which the probability of belonging to one of the two classes does not reach an acceptable level are rejected and classified according to their textural content; (e) merging of the classification results of the two classification stages. The proposed framework has been evaluated on real radiographic images with pulmonary infiltrates caused by bacterial infections. The results show that accurate measurements of the infiltration areas can be obtained with respect to each lung field area. The average measurement error rate on the considered dataset reached 9.7% ± 1.0%.

  17. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Voß

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches—when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac—are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations.

  18. Generating patient specific pseudo-CT of the head from MR using atlas-based regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjölund, J; Forsberg, D; Andersson, M; Knutsson, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy planning and attenuation correction of PET images require simulation of radiation transport. The necessary physical properties are typically derived from computed tomography (CT) images, but in some cases, including stereotactic neurosurgery and combined PET/MR imaging, only magnetic resonance (MR) images are available. With these applications in mind, we describe how a realistic, patient-specific, pseudo-CT of the head can be derived from anatomical MR images. We refer to the method as atlas-based regression, because of its similarity to atlas-based segmentation. Given a target MR and an atlas database comprising MR and CT pairs, atlas-based regression works by registering each atlas MR to the target MR, applying the resulting displacement fields to the corresponding atlas CTs and, finally, fusing the deformed atlas CTs into a single pseudo-CT. We use a deformable registration algorithm known as the Morphon and augment it with a certainty mask that allows a tailoring of the influence certain regions are allowed to have on the registration. Moreover, we propose a novel method of fusion, wherein the collection of deformed CTs is iteratively registered to their joint mean and find that the resulting mean CT becomes more similar to the target CT. However, the voxelwise median provided even better results; at least as good as earlier work that required special MR imaging techniques. This makes atlas-based regression a good candidate for clinical use. (paper)

  19. Numerical simulation of magnetic nano drug targeting in patient-specific lower respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Flavia; Boghi, Andrea; Gori, Fabio

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic nano drug targeting, with an external magnetic field, can potentially improve the drug absorption in specific locations of the body. However, the effectiveness of the procedure can be reduced due to the limitations of the magnetic field intensity. This work investigates this technique with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. A single rectangular coil generates the external magnetic field. A patient-specific geometry of the Trachea, with its primary and secondary bronchi, is reconstructed from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) formatted images, throughout the Vascular Modelling Tool Kit (VMTK) software. A solver, coupling the Lagrangian dynamics of the magnetic nanoparticles with the Eulerian dynamics of the air, is used to perform the simulations. The resistive pressure, the pulsatile inlet velocity and the rectangular coil magnetic field are the boundary conditions. The dynamics of the injected particles is investigated without and with the magnetic probe. The flow field promotes particles adhesion to the tracheal wall. The particles volumetric flow rate in both cases has been calculated. The magnetic probe is shown to increase the particles flow in the target region, but at a limited extent. This behavior has been attributed to the small particle size and the probe configuration.

  20. Evaluation of a patient-specific Monte Carlo software for CT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myronakis, M.; Perisinakis, K.; Tzedakis, A.; Gourtsoyianni, S.; Damilakis, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to validate the ImpactMC computed tomography (CT) dosimetry software that allows patient-specific dose determination. Measured values of head- and body-weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) were compared with corresponding values derived using ImpactMC software. A physical anthropomorphic phantom simulating the average adult was employed to study the effect of exposure parameters used to produce the input image set on a normalised dose output and the relationship between exposure parameters selected for simulation on the dose output. The difference between CTDIw values obtained through measurements and simulations were found to be up to 12.8 and 18.3% for head and body phantoms, respectively. Exposure parameters of the image set used as input were found to have a minor impact on the normalised dose output. Simulations confirmed the expected linear relationship between dose and tube load and the power law relationship between dose and tube potential. Results demonstrate that ImpactMC may be capable of providing reliable CT dose estimates. (authors)

  1. Guidelines for patient-specific jawline definition with titanium implants in esthetic, deformity, and malformation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Maurice Yves

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetry and unfavorable esthetics of the jawline have become possible to correct in three dimensions using computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing. The aim of this study was to provide esthetic, technical, and operative guidelines for mandibular angle and border augmentation using patient-specific titanium implants made by selective laser melting. University hospital - prospective registry. Twelve patients and 17 implantation sites were documented and prospectively registered. Malformational, deformational, and purely esthetic indications were encountered. Descriptive. Patient satisfaction was high, probably because the patients had input into the planned dimensions and shape. A serious infection with implant removal occurred in one patient who had six previous surgeries at the same sites. Technical and surgical guidelines were developed including splitting implants into two segments when the mental nerve was at risk, using a three-dimensional (3D) puzzle connection, providing at least two screw holes per segment, using scaffolds at the bony contact side, using a "satin" finish at the periosteal side, referring to anatomical structures where possible, making provisions for transbuccal and transoral fixation, using a high vestibular incision, and using a double-layer closure. Esthetic guidelines are discussed but could not be upgraded. Mirroring techniques and 3D print accuracy up to 0.1 mm allow precise planning of jaw angle implants. Patients are pleased when given preoperative renderings for their consideration. Infections can be managed using technical and operative recommendations and careful patient selection.

  2. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Molineu, Andrea [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Paola [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process.

  3. Patient-Specific Modeling of Interventricular Hemodynamics in Single Ventricle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Vijay; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2016-11-01

    Single ventricle (SV) congenital heart defects, in which babies are born with only functional ventricle, lead to significant morbidity and mortality with over 30% of patients developing heart failure prior to adulthood. Newborns with SV physiology typically undergo three palliative surgeries, in which the SV becomes the systemic pumping chamber. Depending on which ventricle performs the systemic function, patients are classified as having either a single left ventricle (SLV) or a single right ventricle (SRV), with SRV patients at higher risk of failure. As the native right ventricles are not designed to meet systemic demands, they undergo remodeling leading to abnormal hemodynamics. The hemodynamic characteristics of SLVs compared with SRVs is not well established. We present a validated computational framework for performing patient-specific modeling of ventricular flows, and apply it across 6 SV patients (3SLV + 3SRV), comparing hemodynamic conditions between the two subgroups. Simulations are performed with a stabilized finite element method coupled with an immersed boundary method for modeling heart valves. We discuss identification of hemodynamic biomarkers of ventricular remodeling for early risk assessment of failure. This research is supported in part by the Stanford Child Health Research Institute and the Stanford NIH-NCATS-CTSA through Grant UL1 TR001085 and due to U.S. National Institute of Health through NIH NHLBI R01 Grants 5R01HL129727-02 and 5R01HL121754-03.

  4. Recent advancements in medical simulation: patient-specific virtual reality simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, Willem I M; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Van Herzeele, Isabelle; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Vermassen, Frank E

    2012-07-01

    Patient-specific virtual reality simulation (PSVR) is a new technological advancement that allows practice of upcoming real operations and complements the established role of VR simulation as a generic training tool. This review describes current developments in PSVR and draws parallels with other high-stake industries, such as aviation, military, and sports. A review of the literature was performed using PubMed and Internet search engines to retrieve data relevant to PSVR in medicine. All reports pertaining to PSVR were included. Reports on simulators that did not incorporate a haptic interface device were excluded from the review. Fifteen reports described 12 simulators that enabled PSVR. Medical procedures in the field of laparoscopy, vascular surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and plastic surgery were included. In all cases, source data was two-dimensional CT or MRI data. Face validity was most commonly reported. Only one (vascular) simulator had undergone face, content, and construct validity. Of the 12 simulators, 1 is commercialized and 11 are prototypes. Five simulators have been used in conjunction with real patient procedures. PSVR is a promising technological advance within medicine. The majority of simulators are still in the prototype phase. As further developments unfold, the validity of PSVR will have to be examined much like generic VR simulation for training purposes. Nonetheless, similar to the aviation, military, and sport industries, operative performance and patient safety may be enhanced by the application of this novel technology.

  5. Evaluation of Dosimetry Check software for IMRT patient-specific quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Zalman, Travis; Ha, Chul S; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of the Dosimetry Check system for patient-specific IMRT QA. Typical QA methods measure the dose in an array dosimeter surrounded by homogenous medium for which the treatment plan has been recomputed. With the Dosimetry Check system, fluence measurements acquired on a portal dosimeter is applied to the patient's CT scans. Instead of making dose comparisons in a plane, Dosimetry Check system produces isodose lines and dose-volume histograms based on the planning CT images. By exporting the dose distribution from the treatment planning system into the Dosimetry Check system, one is able to make a direct comparison between the calculated dose and the planned dose. The versatility of the software is evaluated with respect to the two IMRT techniques - step and shoot and volumetric arc therapy. The system analyzed measurements made using EPID, PTW seven29, and IBA MatriXX, and an intercomparison study was performed. Plans from patients previously treated at our institution with treated anatomical site on brain, head & neck, liver, lung, and prostate were analyzed using Dosimetry Check system for any anatomical site dependence. We have recommendations and possible precautions that may be necessary to ensure proper QA with the Dosimetry Check system.

  6. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Molineu, Andrea; Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie; Alvarez, Paola; Stingo, Francesco; Followill, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process

  7. Patient-specific dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: a clinical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalkia, M.T.; Stefanoyiannis, A.P.; Chatziioannou, S.N.; Efstathopoulos, E.P.; Round, W.H.; Nikiforidis, G.C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) belong to a relatively rare class of neoplasms. Nonetheless, their prevalence has increased significantly during the last decades. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new treatment approach for inoperable or metastasised NETs. The therapeutic effect is based on the binding of radiolabelled somatostatin analogue peptides with NETs’ somatostatin receptors, resulting in internal irradiation of tumours. Pre-therapeutic patient-specific dosimetry is essential to ensure that a treatment course has high levels of safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the methods applied for PRRT dosimetry, as well as the dosimetric results presented in the literature. Focus is given on data concerning the therapeutic somatostatin analogue radiopeptides 111 In-[DTPA o , D -Phe 1 ]-octreotide ( 111 In-DTPA-octreotide), 90 Y-[DOTA o ,Tyr 3 ]-octreotide ( 90 Y-DOTATOC) and 177 Lu-[DOTA o ,Tyr 3 ,Thr 8 ]-octreotide ( 177 Lu-DOTATATE). Following the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee formalism, dosimetric analysis demonstrates large interpatient variability in tumour and organ uptake, with kidneys and bone marrow being the critical organs. The results are dependent on the image acquisition and processing protocol, as well as the dosimetric imaging radiopharmaceutical.

  8. Total knee arthroplasty using patient-specific blocks after prior femoral fracture without hardware removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Vaishya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The options to perform total knee arthroplasty (TKA with retained hardware in femur are mainly – removal of hardware, use of extramedullary guide, or computer-assisted surgery. Patient-specific blocks (PSBs have been introduced with many potential advantages, but their use in retained hardware has not been adequately explored. The purpose of the present study was to outline and assess the usefulness of the PSBs in performing TKA in patients with retained femoral hardware. Materials and Materials and Methods: Nine patients with retained femoral hardware underwent TKA using PSBs. All the surgeries were performed by the same surgeon using same implants. Nine cases (7 males and 2 females out of total of 120 primary TKA had retained hardware. The average age of the patients was 60.55 years. The retained hardware were 6 patients with nails, 2 with plates and one patient had screws. Out of the nine cases, only one patient needed removal of a screw which was hindering placement of pin for the PSB. Results: All the patients had significant improvement in their Knee Society Score (KSS which improved from 47.0 to postoperative KSS of 86.77 (P < 0.00. The mechanical axis was significantly improved (P < 0.03 after surgery. No patient required blood transfusion and the average tourniquet time was 41 min. Conclusion: TKA using PSBs is useful and can be used in patients with retained hardware with good functional and radiological outcome.

  9. Patient specific quality assurance of IMRT: quantitative approach using film dosimetry and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Dong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Film dosimetry an a part of patient specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) was performed to develop a new optimization method of film isocenter offset and to then suggest new quantitative criteria for film dosimetry. Film dosimetry was performed on 14 IMRT patients with head and neck cancers. An optimization method for obtaining the local minimum was developed to adjust for the error in the film isocenter offset, which is the largest part of the systemic errors. The adjust value of the film isocenter offset under optimization was 1 mm in 12 patients, while only two patients showed 2 mm translation. The means of absolute average dose difference before and after optimization were 2.36 and 1.56%, respectively, and the mean radios over a 5% tolerance were 9.67 and 2.88%. After optimization, the differences in the dose decreased dramatically. A low dose range cutoff (L-Cutoff) had been suggested for clinical application. New quantitative criteria of a ratio of over a 5%, but less than 10% tolerance, and for an absolute average dose difference less than 3% have been suggested for the verification of film dosimetry. The new optimization method was effective in adjusting for the film dosimetry error, and the newly quantitative criteria suggested in this research are believed to be sufficiently accurate and clinically useful

  10. Intracranial Vascular Disease Evaluation With Combined Vessel Wall Imaging And Patient Specific Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Kurt; Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Yuan, Chun; Canton, Maria De Gador; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    Intracranial vascular pathologies are evaluated with angiography, conventional digital subtraction angiography or non-invasive (MRI, CT). Current techniques present limitations on the resolution with which the vessel wall characteristics can be measured, presenting a major challenge to differential diagnostic of cerebral vasculopathies. A new combined approach is presented that incorporates patient-specific image-based CFD models with intracranial vessel-wall MRI (VWMRI). Comparisons of the VWMRI measurements, evaluated for the presence of wall enhancement and thin-walled regions, against CFD metrics such as wall shear stress (WSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) are used to understand how the new imaging technique developed can predict the influence of hemodynamics on the deterioration of the aneurysmal wall, leading to rupture. Additionally, histology of each resected aneurysm, evaluated for inflammatory infiltration and wall thickness features, is used to validate the analysis from VWMRI and CFD. This data presents a solid foundation on which to build a new framework for combined VWMRI-CFD to predict unstable wall changes in unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and support clinical monitoring and intervention decisions.

  11. Modeling Patient-Specific Magnetic Drug Targeting Within the Intracranial Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Patronis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug targeting promises to substantially enhance future therapies, for example through the focussing of chemotherapeutic drugs at the site of a tumor, thus reducing the exposure of healthy tissue to unwanted damage. Promising work on the steering of medication in the human body employs magnetic fields acting on nanoparticles made of paramagnetic materials. We develop a computational tool to aid in the optimization of the physical parameters of these particles and the magnetic configuration, estimating the fraction of particles reaching a given target site in a large patient-specific vascular system for different physiological states (heart rate, cardiac output, etc.. We demonstrate the excellent computational performance of our model by its application to the simulation of paramagnetic-nanoparticle-laden flows in a circle of Willis geometry obtained from an MRI scan. The results suggest a strong dependence of the particle density at the target site on the strength of the magnetic forcing and the velocity of the background fluid flow.

  12. Feasibility study of patient-specific surgical templates for the fixation of pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salako, F; Aubin, C-E; Fortin, C; Labelle, H

    2002-01-01

    Surgery for scoliosis, as well as other posterior spinal surgeries, frequently uses pedicle screws to fix an instrumentation on the spine. Misplacement of a screw can lead to intra- and post-operative complications. The objective of this study is to design patient-specific surgical templates to guide the drilling operation. From the CT-scan of a vertebra, the optimal drilling direction and limit angles are computed from an inverse projection of the pedicle limits. The first template design uses a surface-to-surface registration method and was constructed in a CAD system by subtracting the vertebra from a rectangular prism and a cylinder with the optimal orientation. This template and the vertebra were built using rapid prototyping. The second design uses a point-to-surface registration method and has 6 adjustable screws to adjust the orientation and length of the drilling support device. A mechanism was designed to hold it in place on the spinal process. A virtual prototype was build with CATIA software. During the operation, the surgeon places either template on patient's vertebra until a perfect match is obtained before drilling. The second design seems better than the first one because it can be reused on different vertebra and is less sensible to registration errors. The next step is to build the second design and make experimental and simulations tests to evaluate the benefits of this template during a scoliosis operation.

  13. Numerical simulation of magnetic nano drug targeting in a patient-specific coeliac trunk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghi, Andrea; Russo, Flavia; Gori, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic nano drug targeting, through the use of an external magnetic field, is a new technique for the treatment of several diseases, which can potentially avoid the dispersion of drugs in undesired locations of the body. Nevertheless, due to the limitations on the intensity of the magnetic field applied, the hydrodynamic forces can reduce the effectiveness of the procedure. This technique is studied in this paper with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), focusing on the influence of the magnetic probe position, and the direction of the circulating electric current. A single rectangular coil is used to generate the external magnetic field. A patient-specific geometry of the coeliac trunk is reconstructed from DICOM images, with the use of VMTK. A new solver, coupling the Lagrangian dynamics of the nanoparticles with the Eulerian dynamics of the blood, is implemented in OpenFOAM to perform the simulations. The resistive pressure, the Womersley's profile for the inlet velocity and the magnetic field of a rectangular coil are implemented in the software as boundary conditions. The results show the influence of the position of the probe, as well as the limitations associated with the rectangular coil configuration.

  14. Patient-specific 3D hemodynamics modelling of left coronary artery under hyperemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Govindaraju, Kalimuthu; Nik-Ghazali, N; Badarudin, A; Viswanathan, Girish N; Ahmed, N J Salman; Khan, T M Yunus

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of various degrees of percentage stenosis on hemodynamic parameters during the hyperemic flow condition. 3D patient-specific coronary artery models were generated based on the CT scan data using MIMICS-18. Numerical simulation was performed for normal and stenosed coronary artery models of 70, 80 and 90% AS (area stenosis). Pressure, velocity, wall shear stress and fractional flow reserve (FFR) were measured and compared with the normal coronary artery model during the cardiac cycle. The results show that, as the percentage AS increase, the pressure drop increases as compared with the normal coronary artery model. Considerable elevation of velocity was observed as the percentage AS increases. The results also demonstrate a recirculation zone immediate after the stenosis which could lead to further progression of stenosis in the flow-disturbed area. Highest wall shear stress was observed for 90% AS as compared to other models that could result in the rupture of coronary artery. The FFR of 90% AS is found to be considerably low.

  15. A novel patient-specific model to compute coronary fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon-Sung; Chung, Eui-Chul; Park, Jin-Seo; Kim, Gook-Tae; Kim, Jun-Woo; Kim, Keun-Hong; Shin, Eun-Seok; Shim, Eun Bo

    2014-09-01

    The fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a widely used clinical index to evaluate the functional severity of coronary stenosis. A computer simulation method based on patients' computed tomography (CT) data is a plausible non-invasive approach for computing the FFR. This method can provide a detailed solution for the stenosed coronary hemodynamics by coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the lumped parameter model (LPM) of the cardiovascular system. In this work, we have implemented a simple computational method to compute the FFR. As this method uses only coronary arteries for the CFD model and includes only the LPM of the coronary vascular system, it provides simpler boundary conditions for the coronary geometry and is computationally more efficient than existing approaches. To test the efficacy of this method, we simulated a three-dimensional straight vessel using CFD coupled with the LPM. The computed results were compared with those of the LPM. To validate this method in terms of clinically realistic geometry, a patient-specific model of stenosed coronary arteries was constructed from CT images, and the computed FFR was compared with clinically measured results. We evaluated the effect of a model aorta on the computed FFR and compared this with a model without the aorta. Computationally, the model without the aorta was more efficient than that with the aorta, reducing the CPU time required for computing a cardiac cycle to 43.4%. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Modeling retinal degeneration using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Bing Jin

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is the most common inherited human eye disease resulting in night blindness and visual defects. It is well known that the disease is caused by rod photoreceptor degeneration; however, it remains incurable, due to the unavailability of disease-specific human photoreceptor cells for use in mechanistic studies and drug screening. We obtained fibroblast cells from five RP patients with distinct mutations in the RP1, RP9, PRPH2 or RHO gene, and generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells by ectopic expression of four key reprogramming factors. We differentiated the iPS cells into rod photoreceptor cells, which had been lost in the patients, and found that they exhibited suitable immunocytochemical features and electrophysiological properties. Interestingly, the number of the patient-derived rod cells with distinct mutations decreased in vitro; cells derived from patients with a specific mutation expressed markers for oxidation or endoplasmic reticulum stress, and exhibited different responses to vitamin E than had been observed in clinical trials. Overall, patient-derived rod cells recapitulated the disease phenotype and expressed markers of cellular stresses. Our results demonstrate that the use of patient-derived iPS cells will help to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms caused by genetic mutations in RP.

  17. Surface mesh to voxel data registration for patient-specific anatomical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; Giessler, Paul; Keszei, András.; Herrler, Andreas; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) models are frequently used for training, planning, and performing medical procedures. The Regional Anaesthesia Simulator and Assistant (RASimAs) project has the goal of increasing the application and effectiveness of regional anesthesia (RA) by combining a simulator of ultrasound-guided and electrical nerve-stimulated RA procedures and a subject-specific assistance system through an integration of image processing, physiological models, subject-specific data, and virtual reality. Individualized models enrich the virtual training tools for learning and improving regional anaesthesia (RA) skills. Therefore, we suggest patient-specific VPH models that are composed by registering the general mesh-based models with patient voxel data-based recordings. Specifically, the pelvis region has been focused for the support of the femoral nerve block. The processing pipeline is composed of different freely available toolboxes such as MatLab, the open Simulation framework (SOFA), and MeshLab. The approach of Gilles is applied for mesh-to-voxel registration. Personalized VPH models include anatomical as well as mechanical properties of the tissues. Two commercial VPH models (Zygote and Anatomium) were used together with 34 MRI data sets. Results are presented for the skin surface and pelvic bones. Future work will extend the registration procedure to cope with all model tissue (i.e., skin, muscle, bone, vessel, nerve, fascia) in a one-step procedure and extrapolating the personalized models to body regions actually being out of the captured field of view.

  18. Patient-specific bronchoscopy visualization through BRDF estimation and disocclusion correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Adrian J; Deligianni, Fani; Shah, Pallav; Wells, Athol; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an image-based method for virtual bronchoscope with photo-realistic rendering. The technique is based on recovering bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) parameters in an environment where the choice of viewing positions, directions, and illumination conditions are restricted. Video images of bronchoscopy examinations are combined with patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography data through two-dimensional (2-D)/3-D registration and shading model parameters are then recovered by exploiting the restricted lighting configurations imposed by the bronchoscope. With the proposed technique, the recovered BRDF is used to predict the expected shading intensity, allowing a texture map independent of lighting conditions to be extracted from each video frame. To correct for disocclusion artefacts, statistical texture synthesis was used to recreate the missing areas. New views not present in the original bronchoscopy video are rendered by evaluating the BRDF with different viewing and illumination parameters. This allows free navigation of the acquired 3-D model with enhanced photo-realism. To assess the practical value of the proposed technique, a detailed visual scoring that involves both real and rendered bronchoscope images is conducted.

  19. The Effect of Femoral Cutting Guide Design Improvements for Patient-Specific Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-Ryong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the application of patient-specific instruments (PSI for total knee arthroplasty (TKA increases the cost of the surgical procedure, PSI may reduce operative time and improve implant alignment, which could reduce the number of revision surgeries. We report our experience with TKA using PSI techniques in 120 patients from March to December 2014. PSI for TKA were created from data provided by computed tomography (CT scans or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; which imaging technology is more reliable for the PSI technique remains unclear. In the first 20 patients, the accuracy of bone resection and PSI stability were compared between CT and MRI scans with presurgical results as a reference; MRI produced better results. In the second and third groups, each with 50 patients, the results of bone resection and stability were compared in MRI scans with respect to the quality of scanning due to motion artifacts and experienced know-how in PSI design, respectively. The optimized femoral cutting guide design for PSI showed the closest outcomes in bone resection and PSI stability with presurgical data. It is expected that this design could be a reasonable guideline in PSI.

  20. High-fidelity haptic and visual rendering for patient-specific simulation of temporal bone surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sonny; Li, Peter; Locketz, Garrett; Salisbury, Kenneth; Blevins, Nikolas H

    2016-12-01

    Medical imaging techniques provide a wealth of information for surgical preparation, but it is still often the case that surgeons are examining three-dimensional pre-operative image data as a series of two-dimensional images. With recent advances in visual computing and interactive technologies, there is much opportunity to provide surgeons an ability to actively manipulate and interpret digital image data in a surgically meaningful way. This article describes the design and initial evaluation of a virtual surgical environment that supports patient-specific simulation of temporal bone surgery using pre-operative medical image data. Computational methods are presented that enable six degree-of-freedom haptic feedback during manipulation, and that simulate virtual dissection according to the mechanical principles of orthogonal cutting and abrasive wear. A highly efficient direct volume renderer simultaneously provides high-fidelity visual feedback during surgical manipulation of the virtual anatomy. The resulting virtual surgical environment was assessed by evaluating its ability to replicate findings in the operating room, using pre-operative imaging of the same patient. Correspondences between surgical exposure, anatomical features, and the locations of pathology were readily observed when comparing intra-operative video with the simulation, indicating the predictive ability of the virtual surgical environment.