WorldWideScience

Sample records for patient monitoring devices

  1. [Wireless device for monitoring the patients with chronic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorap, R; Zaharia, D; Corciovă, C; Ungureanu, Monica; Lupu, R; Stan, A

    2008-01-01

    Remote monitoring of chronic diseases can improve health outcomes and potentially lower health care costs. The high number of the patients, suffering of chronically diseases, who wish to stay at home rather then in a hospital increasing the need of homecare monitoring and have lead to a high demand of wearable medical devices. Also, extended patient monitoring during normal activity has become a very important target. In this paper are presented the design of the wireless monitoring devices based on ultra low power circuits, high storage memory flash, bluetooth communication and the firmware for the management of the monitoring device. The monitoring device is built using an ultra low power microcontroller (MSP430 from Texas Instruments) that offers the advantage of high integration of some circuits. The custom made electronic boards used for biosignal acquisition are also included modules for storage device (SD/MMC card) with FAT32 file system and Bluetooth device for short-range communication used for data transmission between monitoring device and PC or PDA. The work was focused on design and implementation of an ultra low power wearable device able to acquire patient vital parameters, causing minimal discomfort and allowing high mobility. The proposed wireless device could be used as a warning system for monitoring during normal activity.

  2. Patient perspective on remote monitoring of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, H; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Mastenbroek, M H

    2014-01-01

    -implantation, other check-ups are performed remotely. Patients are asked to complete questionnaires at five time points during the 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: The REMOTE-CIED study will provide insight into the patient perspective on remote monitoring in ICD patients, which could help to support patient......BACKGROUND: Remote patient monitoring is a safe and effective alternative for the in-clinic follow-up of patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). However, evidence on the patient perspective on remote monitoring is scarce and inconsistent. OBJECTIVES: The primary...

  3. Exploring a New Security Framework for Remote Patient Monitoring Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Ondiege

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Security has been an issue of contention in healthcare. The lack of familiarity and poor implementation of security in healthcare leave the patients’ data vulnerable to attackers. The main issue is assessing how we can provide security in an RPM infrastructure. The findings in literature show there is little empirical evidence on proper implementation of security. Therefore, there is an urgent need in addressing cybersecurity issues in medical devices. Through the review of relevant literature in remote patient monitoring and use of a Microsoft threat modelling tool, we identify and explore current vulnerabilities and threats in IEEE 11073 standard devices to propose a new security framework for remote patient monitoring devices. Additionally, current RPM devices have a limitation on the number of people who can share a single device, therefore, we propose the use of NFC for identification in Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM devices for multi-user environments where we have multiple people sharing a single device to reduce errors associated with incorrect user identification. We finally show how several techniques have been used to build the proposed framework.

  4. Investigating User Identification in Remote Patient Monitoring Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondiege, Brian; Clarke, Malcolm

    2017-09-13

    With the increase in the number of people having a chronic disease, there is an increase in households having more than a single person suffering from the same chronic illness. One problem of monitoring such patients in their own home is that current devices have a limitation in the number of people who can use a single device. This study investigates the use of Near Field Communication (NFC) for identification in a multi-user environment. A mixed-method qualitative and quantitative approach was adopted, including focus groups, observations and a field trial. Data were collected in three phases. In Phase 1, five focus groups were conducted with patients to determine their beliefs, concerns and issues with using identification in remote patient monitoring devices. In Phase 2, participants were given a blood pressure monitor modified to include an NFC reader to enable identification. The modified device was given to patients living as a couple in the same household and both suffering from hypertension. Both patients used the device for a period of two weeks to observe their acceptance of the technology and determine their experience of usage. A total of 40 (20 couples) patients participated in the trial. Non-adherence to the full monitoring regimen was low and was mainly due to usability issues or commitments taking them away from the home and thus unable to take readings. After the trial period participants were invited to discuss their experiences with the technology in a focus group discussion (Phase 3), a total of five focus groups were conducted. Focus group discussions with the patients revealed that most participants liked using the system and were not apprehensive towards Healthcare Information Technology (HIT). The participants also had suggestions for improvements that could be made to the modified blood pressure monitor (such as, rechargeable in place batteries, integrate the components, easier to use cuff, and increased sensitivity of the NFC reader) that

  5. The impact of an electronic monitoring and reminder device on patient compliance with antihypertensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Arne; Christrup, Lona Louring; Fabricius, Paul Erik

    2010-01-01

    . In the first half of the study, patients using the device reported 91% compliance versus 85% in the control group. This difference diminished after crossover (88 versus 86%). BP was not affected. Electronic monitoring data on compliance revealed taking, dosing and timing compliance between 45 and 52% in study...... to be effective in improving patient compliance to some extent, but the combined effect has not been documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of an electronic reminder and monitoring device on patient compliance and BP control. METHODS: All patients received medical treatment with telmisartan once daily...... and were randomized to either electronic compliance monitoring with a reminder and monitoring device or standard therapy for 6 months. Both groups were crossed over after 6 months. Intervention effectiveness was assessed using self-reported compliance and BP. RESULTS: Data from 398 patients were analysed...

  6. Monitoring mobility assistive device use in post-stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Hester, Todd; Sherrill, Delsey

    2007-01-01

    Mobility assistive devices (MAD) such as canes can improve mobility and allow independence in the performance of mobility-related tasks. The use of MAD is often prescribed for stroke survivors. Despite their acknowledged qualities, MAD in real life conditions are typically underutilized, misused...

  7. Exploring a new security framework for remote patient monitoring devices

    OpenAIRE

    Ondiege, Brian; Clarke, Macolm; Mapp, Glenford E.

    2017-01-01

    Security has been an issue of contention in healthcare. The lack of familiarity and poor implementation of security in healthcare leave the patients’ data vulnerable to attackers. The main issue is assessing how we can provide security in an RPM infrastructure. The findings in literature show there is little empirical evidence on proper implementation of security. Therefore, there is an urgent need in addressing cybersecurity issues in medical devices. Through the review of relevant literatur...

  8. Results of remote follow-up and monitoring in young patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvetti, Massimo S; Saputo, Fabio A; Palmieri, Rosalinda; Placidi, Silvia; Santucci, Lorenzo; Di Mambro, Corrado; Righi, Daniela; Drago, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring is increasingly used in the follow-up of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices. Data on paediatric populations are still lacking. The aim of our study was to follow-up young patients both in-hospital and remotely to enhance device surveillance. This is an observational registry collecting data on consecutive patients followed-up with the CareLink system. Inclusion criteria were a Medtronic device implanted and patient's willingness to receive CareLink. Patients were stratified according to age and presence of congenital/structural heart defects (CHD). A total of 221 patients with a device - 200 pacemakers, 19 implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and two loop recorders--were enrolled (median age of 17 years, range 1-40); 58% of patients were younger than 18 years of age and 73% had CHD. During a follow-up of 12 months (range 4-18), 1361 transmissions (8.9% unscheduled) were reviewed by technicians. Time for review was 6 ± 2 minutes (mean ± standard deviation). Missed transmissions were 10.1%. Events were documented in 45% of transmissions, with 2.7% yellow alerts and 0.6% red alerts sent by wireless devices. No significant differences were found in transmission results according to age or presence of CHD. Physicians reviewed 6.3% of transmissions, 29 patients were contacted by phone, and 12 patients underwent unscheduled in-hospital visits. The event recognition with remote monitoring occurred 76 days (range 16-150) earlier than the next scheduled in-office follow-up. Remote follow-up/monitoring with the CareLink system is useful to enhance device surveillance in young patients. The majority of events were not clinically relevant, and the remaining led to timely management of problems.

  9. Personalized Remote Monitoring of the Atrial Fibrillation Patients with Electronic Implant Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce B. Laleci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED are gaining popularity in treating patients with heart disease. Remote monitoring through care management systems enables continuous surveillance of such patients by checking device functions and clinical events. These care management systems include decision support capabilities based on clinical guidelines. Data input to such systems are from different information sources including medical devices and Electronic Health Records (EHRs. Although evidence-based clinical guidelines provides numerous benefits such as standardized care, reduced costs, efficient and effective care management, they are currently underutilized in clinical practice due to interoperability problems among different healthcare data sources. In this paper, we introduce the iCARDEA care management system for atrial fibrillation patients with implant devices and describe how the iCARDEA care plan engine executes the clinical guidelines by seamlessly accessing the EHR systems and the CIED data through standard interfaces.

  10. Electronic adherence monitoring device performance and patient acceptability: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Amy Hai Yan; Stewart, Alistair William; Harrison, Jeff; Black, Peter Nigel; Mitchell, Edwin Arthur; Foster, Juliet Michelle

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the performance and patient acceptability of an inhaler electronic monitoring device in a real-world childhood asthma population. Children 6 to 15 years presenting with asthma to the hospital emergency department and prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were included. Participants were randomized to receive a device with reminder features enabled or disabled for use with their preventer. Device quality control tests were conducted. Questionnaires on device acceptability, utility and ergonomics were completed at six months. A total of 1306 quality control tests were conducted; 84% passed pre-issue and 87% return testing. The most common failure reason was actuation under-recording. Acceptability scores were high, with higher scores in the reminder than non-reminder group (median, 5 th -95 th percentile: 4.1, 3.1-5.0 versus 3.7, 2.3-4.8; p 90%) rated the device easy to use. Feedback was positive across five themes: device acceptability, ringtone acceptability, suggestions for improvement, effect on medication use, and effect on asthma control. This study investigates electronic monitoring device performance and acceptability in children using quantitative and qualitative measures. Results indicate satisfactory reliability, although failure rates of 13-16% indicate the importance of quality control. Favorable acceptability ratings support the use of these devices in children.

  11. Monitoring device acceptance in implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients using the Florida Patient Acceptance Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Starrenburg, Annemieke; Denollet, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Patient device acceptance might be essential in identifying patients at risk for adverse patient-reported outcomes following implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). We examined the validity and reliability of the Florida Patient Acceptance Scale (FPAS) and identified corr...

  12. Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices: shared care goals of monitoring and treating patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Jerry D; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Loza, Laurie P; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have been clinically adopted as a long-term standard of care therapy option for patients with end-stage heart failure. For many patients, shared care between the care providers at the implanting center and care providers in the community in which the patient resides is a clinical necessity. The aims of this review are to (1) provide a rationale for the outpatient follow-up exam and surveillance testing used at our center to monitor patients supported by the HeartMate II(®) CF-LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) and (2) provide the protocol/algorithms we use for blood pressure, driveline exit site, LVAD alarm history, surveillance blood work, and echocardiography monitoring in this patient population. In addition, we define our partnership outpatient follow-up protocol and the "shared care" specific responsibilities we use with referring health care providers to best manage many of our patients.

  13. Use of wearable devices for post-discharge monitoring of ICU patients: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R. Kroll

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wearable devices generate signals detecting activity, sleep, and heart rate, all of which could enable detailed and near-continuous characterization of recovery following critical illness. Methods To determine the feasibility of using a wrist-worn personal fitness tracker among patients recovering from critical illness, we conducted a prospective observational study of a convenience sample of 50 stable ICU patients. We assessed device wearability, the extent of data capture, sensitivity and specificity for detecting heart rate excursions, and correlations with questionnaire-derived sleep quality measures. Results Wearable devices were worn over a 24-h period, with excellent capture of data. While specificity for the detection of tachycardia was high (98.8%, sensitivity was low to moderate (69.5%. There was a moderate correlation between wearable-derived sleep duration and questionnaire-derived sleep quality (r = 0.33, P = 0.03. Devices were well-tolerated and demonstrated no degradation in quality of data acquisition over time. Conclusions We found that wearable devices could be worn by patients recovering from critical illness and could generate useful data for the majority of patients with little adverse effect. Further development and study are needed to better define and enhance the role of wearables in the monitoring of post-ICU recovery. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02527408

  14. Incore monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, Ichiro; Shirayama, Shin-pei; Nozaki, Shin-ichi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an incore monitoring device wherein both radiation monitoring and acoustic monitoring are carried out simultaneously by one detector, whereby installation of the device and signal pick-up are facilitated. Incore conditions are accurately grasped. Constitution: When a neutron is irradiated in a state where a DC voltage is applied between the electrode and the vessel in the device, an ionization current is occured by (n.γ) reaction of the transformed substance as in an ionization chamber, Accordingly, a voltage drop occurs at both ends of the resistor of the radiation signal processing system, as a result of which a neutron flux can be detected. Further, when a sound is generated in the reactor, the monitoring device bottom wall which formed by a piezoelectric element detects the sound-waves. This output signal is picked up by the acoustic signal processing system to judge the generation of sound. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Movement monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuaki; Hanatsumi, Masaharu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device suitable to accurate recognition for the moving state of reactor core fuels as an object to be monitored in a nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention prepares each of scheduled paths for the movement of the object to be monitored and executed moving paths along with the movement based on the information of the movement obtained from scheduled information for the movement of the reactor core fuels as a object to be monitored and the actual movement of the object to be monitored. The results of the preparation are outputted. As an output mode, (1) the results of preparation for each of the paths for movement and the results of the monitoring obtained by monitoring the state of the object to be monitored are jointed and outputted, (2) images showing each of the paths for the movement are formed, and the formed images are displayed on a screen, and (3) each of the moving paths is prepared as an image, and the image is displayed together with the image of the regions before and after the movement of the object to be monitored. In addition, obtained images of each of the paths for the movement and the monitored images obtained by monitoring the state of the object to be monitored are joined and displayed. (I.S.)

  16. Nuclear reactor monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, Ishi; Honma, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring device of the present invention comprises a reactor core/reactor system data measuring and controlling device, a radioactivity concentration calculation device for activated coolants for calculating a radioactivity concentration of activated coolants in a main steam and reactor water by using an appropriate physical model, a radioactivity concentration correlation and comparison device for activated coolants for comparing correlationship with a radiation dose and an abnormality alarm device. Since radioactivity of activated primary coolants is monitored at each of positions in the reactor system and occurrence of leakage and the amount thereof from a primary circuit to a secondary circuit is monitored if the reactor has secondary circuit, integrity of the reactor system can be ensured and an abnormality can be detected rapidly. Further, radioactivity concentration of activated primary circuit coolants, represented by 16 N or 15 C, is always monitored at each of positions of PWR primary circuits. When a heat transfer pipe is ruptured in a steam generator, leakage of primary circuit coolants is detected rapidly, as well as the amount of the leakage can be informed. (N.H.)

  17. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  18. Monitor inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueshima, Yoshinobu.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention reliably conducts monitoring by radiation monitors in a nuclear power plant thereby contributing to save the number of radiation operators and reduction of radiation exposure. Namely, radiation monitors continuously measure a plurality of γ-ray levels. A branched simultaneously counting circuit receives these signals. The output of the branched simultaneously counting circuit is inputted to a differentiation means. The differentiation means calculates a variation coefficient for each of the radiation monitoring values, namely, equivalent dose rates, and records and monitors change with time of the equivalent dose rates. With such procedures, the results of the monitoring of γ-ray levels can be judged objectively corresponding to the increase of the equivalent dose rates. As a result, the number of radiation operators can be saves and radiation exposure of the radiation operators can be reduced. (I.S.)

  19. Plant monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Kunio.

    1991-01-01

    The monitoring device of the present invention is most suitable to early detection for equipment abnormality, or monitoring of state upon transient conditions such as startup and shutdown of an electric power plant, a large-scaled thermonuclear device and an accelerator plant. That is, in existent moitoring devices, acquired data are stored and the present operation states are monitored in comparison. A plant operation aquisition data reproduction section is disposed to the device. From the past operation conditions stored in the plant operation data aquisition reproducing section, the number of operation cycles that agrees with the present plant operation conditions is sought, to determine the agreed aquired data. Since these aquired data are time sequential data measured based on the standard time determined by the operation sequence, aquired data can be reproduced successively on every sample pitches. With such a constitution, aquired data under the same operation conditions as the present conditions are displayed together with the measured data. Accordingly, accurate monitoring can be conducted from the start-up to the shutdown of the plant. (I.S.)

  20. Reactor noise monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Hiroto.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor noise monitoring device by detecting abnormal sounds in background noises. Vibration sounds detected by accelerometers are applied to a loose parts detector. The detector generates high alarm if there are sudden impact sounds in the background noises and applies output signals to an accumulation device. If there is slight impact sounds in the vicinity of any of the accelerometers, the accumulation device accumulates the abnormal sounds assumed to be generated from an identical site while synchronizing the waveforms for all of the channels. Then, the device outputs signals in which the background noises are cancelled, as detection signals. Therefore, S/N ratio can be improved and the abnormal sounds contained in the background noises can be detected, to thereby improve the accuracy for estimating the position where the abnormal sounds are generated. (I.S.)

  1. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Shigehiro.

    1990-01-01

    Among a plurality of power monitoring programs in a reactor power monitoring device, rapid response is required for a scram judging program for the power judging processing of scram signals. Therefore, the scram judging program is stored independently from other power monitoring programs, applied with a priority order, and executed in parallel with other programs, to output scram signals when the detected data exceeds a predetermined value. As a result, the capacity required for the scram judging program is reduced and the processing can be conducted in a short period of time. In addition, since high priority is applied to the scram judging program which is divided into a small capacity, it is executed at higher frequency than other programs when they are executed in parallel. That is, since the entire processings for the power monitoring program are repeated in a short cycle, the response speed of the scram signals required for high responsivity can be increased. (N.H.)

  2. Radiation monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshifumi.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns a reactor start-up region monitor of a nuclear power plant. In an existent start-up region monitor, bias voltage is limited, if the reactor moves to a power region, in order to prevent degradation of radiation detectors. Accordingly, since the power is lower than an actual reactor power, the reactor power can not be monitored. The device of the present invention comprises a memory means for previously storing a Plateau's characteristic of the radiation detectors and a correction processing means for obtaining a correction coefficient in accordance with the Plateau's characteristic to correct and calculate the reactor power when the bias voltage is limited. With such a constitution, when the reactor power exceeds a predetermined value and the bias voltage is limited, the correction coefficient can be obtained by the memory means and the correction processing means. Corrected reactor power can also be obtained from the start-up region monitor by the correction coefficient. As a result, monitoring of the reactor power can be continued while preventing degradation of the radiation detector even if the bias voltage is limited. (I.S.)

  3. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  4. Remote Monitoring of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Christopher C; Deyell, Marc W

    2018-01-08

    Over the past decade, technological advancements have transformed the delivery of care for arrhythmia patients. From early transtelephonic monitoring to new devices capable of wireless and cellular transmission, remote monitoring has revolutionized device care. In this article, we review the current evolution and evidence for remote monitoring in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices. From passive transmission of device diagnostics, to active transmission of patient- and device-triggered alerts, remote monitoring can shorten the time to diagnosis and treatment. Studies have shown that remote monitoring can reduce hospitalization and emergency room visits, and improve survival. Remote monitoring can also reduce the health care costs, while providing increased access to patients living in rural or marginalized communities. Unfortunately, as many as two-thirds of patients with remote monitoring-capable devices do not use, or are not offered, this feature. Current guidelines recommend remote monitoring and interrogation, combined with annual in-person evaluation in all cardiac device patients. Remote monitoring should be considered in all eligible device patients and should be considered standard of care. Copyright © 2018 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogen, Ayumi; Ozawa, Michihiro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the working efficiency of a nuclear reactor by reflecting the control rod history effect on thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation. Constitution: An incore power distribution calculation section reads the incore neutron fluxes detected by neutron detectors disposed in the reactor to calculate the incore power distribution. A burnup degree distribution calculation section calculates the burnup degree distribution in the reactor based on the thus calculated incore power distribution. A control rod history date store device supplied with the burnup degree distribution renews the stored control rod history data based on the present control rod pattern and the burnup degree distribution. Then, thermal variants of the nuclear reactor are calculated based on the thus renewed control rod history data. Since the control rod history effect is reflected on the thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation, the working efficiency of the nuclear reactor can be improved significantly. (Seki, T.)

  6. Design and study of ultrasound-based automatic patient movement monitoring device for quantifying the intrafraction motion during teletherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, S; Vinothraj, R

    2012-11-08

    The aim of the present study is to fabricate indigenously ultrasonic-based automatic patient's movement monitoring device (UPMMD) that immediately halts teletherapy treatment if a patient moves, claiming accurate field treatment. The device consists of circuit board, magnetic attachment device, LED indicator, speaker, and ultrasonic emitter and receiver, which are placed on either side of the treatment table. The ultrasonic emitter produces the ultrasound waves and the receiver accepts the signal from the patient. When the patient moves, the receiver activates the circuit, an audible warning sound will be produced in the treatment console room alerting the technologist to stop treatment. Simultaneously, the electrical circuit to the teletherapy machine will be interrupted and radiation will be halted. The device and alarm system can detect patient movements with a sensitivity of about 1 mm. Our results indicate that, in spite of its low-cost, low-power, high-precision, nonintrusive, light weight, reusable and simplicity features, UPMMD is highly sensitive and offers accurate measurements. Furthermore, UPMMD is patient-friendly and requires minimal user training. This study revealed that the device can prevent the patient's normal tissues from unnecessary radiation exposure, and also it is helpful to deliver the radiation to the correct tumor location. Using this alarming system the patient can be repositioned after interrupting the treatment machine manually. It also enables the technologists to do their work more efficiently.

  7. Real-time signal processing of accelerometer data for wearable medical patient monitoring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wieringen, Matt; Eklund, J

    2008-01-01

    Elderly and other people who live at home but required some physical assistance to do so are often more susceptible injury causing falls in and around their place of residence. In the event that a fall does occur, as a direct result of a previous medical condition or the fall itself, these people are typically less likely to be able to seek timely medical help without assistance. The goal of this research is to develop a wearable sensor device that uses an accelerometer for monitoring the movement of the person to detect falls after they have occurred in order to enable timely medical assistance. The data coming from the accelerometer is processed in real-time in the device and sent to a remote monitoring station where operators can attempt to make contact with the person and/or notify medical personnel of the situation. The ADXL330 accelerometer is contained within a Nintendo WiiMote controller, which forms the basis of the wearable medical sensor. The accelerometer data can then be sent via Bluetooth connection and processed by a local gateway processor. If a fall is detected, the gateway will then contact a remote monitoring station, on a cellular network, for example, via satellite, and/or through a hardwired phone or Internet connection. To detect the occurrence of ta fall, the accelerometer data is passed through a matched filter and the data is compared to benchmark analysis data that will define the conditions that represents the occurrence of a fall.

  8. Plant monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Toru.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a data collecting section for periodically collecting processed data sent from plant equipments, a top node induction and processing section for an important plant function model for inducing the plant function to be noted particularly by an operator from important plant function models by using process data and a window screen selection section for selecting a window screen to be displayed based on the result of the evaluation for each of function nodes based on the processing described above and determining the layout and automatically forming the display screen. It is constituted so that the kind and the layout of the window under display are checked if they are the same as those one cycle before or not and, if they are different, the screen is automatically switched to a new screen display. Then, operator's psychological burdens such as selection of information and judgement for the operation upon occurrence of plant abnormality and accident can be mitigated, to provide a safe operation circumstance having reinforced monitoring of the function of the whole plant can be provided. (N.H.)

  9. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  10. Loose part monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention estimates a place where loose parts occur and structural components as the loose parts in a fluid flow channel of a reactor device, to provide information thereof to a plant operator. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a plurality of detectors disposed to each of equipments constituting fluid channels, (2) an abnormal sound sensing device for sensing signals from the detectors, (3) an estimation section for estimating the place where the loose parts occur and the structural components thereof based on the signals sensed by the abnormal sound sensing section, (4) a memory section for storing data of the plant structure necessary for the estimation, and (5) a display section for displaying the result of the estimation. In such a device, the position where the loose parts collide against the plant structural component and the energy thereof are estimated. The dropping path of the loose parts is estimated from the estimation position. Parts to be loose parts in the path are listed up. The parts on the list is selected based on the estimated energy thereby enabling to determine the loose parts. (I.S.)

  11. Internal pump monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Toshikazu.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a thermometer is disposed at the upper end of an internal pump casing of a coolant recycling system in a BWR type reactor to detect leakage of reactor water thereby ensuring the improvement of reliability of the internal pump. Namely, a thermometer is disposed, which can detect temperature elevation occurred when water in the internal pump leaked from a reactor pressure vessel passes through the gap between a stretch tube and an upper end of the pump casing. Signals from the thermometer are transmitted to a signal processing device by an instrumentation cable. The signal processing device generates an alarm when the temperature signal exceeds a predetermined value and announces that leakage of reactor water occurs in the internal pump. Since the present invention can detect the leakage of the reactor water in the pump casing in an early stage, it can contribute to the improvement of the safety and reliability of the internal pump. (I.S.)

  12. Design of wearable health monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devara, Kresna; Ramadhanty, Savira; Abuzairi, Tomy

    2018-02-01

    Wearable smart health monitoring devices have attracted considerable attention in both research community and industry. Some of the causes are the increasing healthcare costs, along with the growing technology. To address this demand, in this paper, design and evaluation of wearable health monitoring device integrated with smartphone were presented. This device was designed for patients in need of constant health monitoring. The performance of the proposed design has been tested by conducting measurement once in 2 minutes for 10 minutes to obtain heart rate and body temperature data. The comparation between data measured by the proposed device and that measured by the reference device yields only an average error of 1.45% for heart rate and 1.04% for body temperature.

  13. Integrated control rod monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Katsuhiro

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a device in which an entire control rod driving time measuring device and a control rod position support device in a reactor building and a central control chamber are integrated systematically to save hardwares such as a signal input/output device and signal cables between boards. Namely, (1) functions of the entire control rod driving time measuring device for monitoring control rods which control the reactor power and a control rod position indication device are integrated into one identical system. Then, the entire devices can be made compact by the integration of the functions. (2) The functions of the entire control rod driving time measuring device and the control rod position indication device are integrated in a central operation board and a board in the site. Then, the place for the installation of them can be used in common in any of the cases. (3) The functions of the entire control rod driving time measuring device and the control rod position indication device are integrated to one identical system to save hardware to be used. Then, signal input/output devices and drift branching panel boards in the site and the central operation board can be saved, and cables for connecting both of the boards is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  14. Reactor core monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takanobu; Handa, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsumi; Narita, Hitoshi; Shimozaki, Takaaki

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention reliably and conveniently detects an event of rapid increase of a coolant void coefficient at a portion of a channel by flow channel clogging event in a PWR-type reactor. Namely, upon flow channel clogging event, the coolant void coefficient is increased, an effective density is lowered, and a coolant shielding effect is lowered. Therefore, fast neutron fluxes at the periphery of a pressure tube are increased. The increase of the fast neutron fluxes is detected by a fast neutron flux detector disposed in a guide tube of an existent neutron flux detector. Based on the result, increase of coolant void coefficient can be detected. When an average void coefficient reaches from 30% to 100%, for example, the fast neutron fluxes are increased by about twice at a neutron permeation distance of coolants of about 10cm, thereby enabling to perform effective detection. (I.S.)

  15. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truşcă, M. R. C., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Albert, Ş., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Tudoran, C., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Soran, M. L., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro; Fărcaş, F., E-mail: radu.trusca@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Abrudean, M. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  16. Survey of hydrogen monitoring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.

    1981-01-01

    Presented are results of a survey of commercially available monitoring devices suitable for hydrogen detection in the secondary containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during the post postulated accident period. Available detectors were grouped into the following five classes: combustion, solid state, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and absorption. The performance of most available sensors is likely to deteriorate when exposed to the postulated conditions which include moisture, which could be at high temperature, and radioactive noncondensibles. Of the commercial devices, those using metallic filament thermal conductivity detectors seem least susceptible to performance change. Absorption detectors are best suited for this monitoring task but the only available device is designed for pipeline corrosion assessment. Initiation of experimental study to assess apparent deficiencies of commercial detectors is recommended. Also recommended is an analytical/experimental effort to determine the optimum detector array for monitoring in the secondary containment vessels

  17. Device for monitoring cell voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepke, Matthias [Garbsen, DE; Eisermann, Henning [Edermissen, DE

    2012-08-21

    A device for monitoring a rechargeable battery having a number of electrically connected cells includes at least one current interruption switch for interrupting current flowing through at least one associated cell and a plurality of monitoring units for detecting cell voltage. Each monitoring unit is associated with a single cell and includes a reference voltage unit for producing a defined reference threshold voltage and a voltage comparison unit for comparing the reference threshold voltage with a partial cell voltage of the associated cell. The reference voltage unit is electrically supplied from the cell voltage of the associated cell. The voltage comparison unit is coupled to the at least one current interruption switch for interrupting the current of at least the current flowing through the associated cell, with a defined minimum difference between the reference threshold voltage and the partial cell voltage.

  18. Measuring Patient Adherence to Malaria Treatment: A Comparison of Results from Self-Report and a Customised Electronic Monitoring Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Festo, Charles; Cairns, Matthew; Kalolella, Admirabilis; Mayaya, Frank; Kachur, S Patrick; Schellenberg, David; Goodman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Self-report is the most common and feasible method for assessing patient adherence to medication, but can be prone to recall bias and social desirability bias. Most studies assessing adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) have relied on self-report. In this study, we use a novel customised electronic monitoring device--termed smart blister packs--to examine the validity of self-reported adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in southern Tanzania. Smart blister packs were designed to look identical to locally available AL blister packs and to record the date and time each tablet was removed from packaging. Patients obtaining AL at randomly selected health facilities and drug stores were followed up at home three days later and interviewed about each dose of AL taken. Blister packs were requested for pill count and extraction of smart blister pack data. Data on adherence from both self-report verified by pill count and smart blister packs were available for 696 of 1,204 patients. There was no difference between methods in the proportion of patients assessed to have completed treatment (64% and 67%, respectively). However, the percentage taking the correct number of pills for each dose at the correct times (timely completion) was higher by self-report than smart blister packs (37% vs. 24%; psmart blister packs, 64% of patients completing treatment did not take the correct number of pills per dose or did not take each dose at the correct time interval. Smart blister packs resulted in lower estimates of timely completion of AL and may be less prone to recall and social desirability bias. They may be useful when data on patterns of adherence are desirable to evaluate treatment outcomes. Improved methods of collecting self-reported data are needed to minimise bias and maximise comparability between studies.

  19. Measuring Patient Adherence to Malaria Treatment: A Comparison of Results from Self-Report and a Customised Electronic Monitoring Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Bruxvoort

    Full Text Available Self-report is the most common and feasible method for assessing patient adherence to medication, but can be prone to recall bias and social desirability bias. Most studies assessing adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs have relied on self-report. In this study, we use a novel customised electronic monitoring device--termed smart blister packs--to examine the validity of self-reported adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL in southern Tanzania.Smart blister packs were designed to look identical to locally available AL blister packs and to record the date and time each tablet was removed from packaging. Patients obtaining AL at randomly selected health facilities and drug stores were followed up at home three days later and interviewed about each dose of AL taken. Blister packs were requested for pill count and extraction of smart blister pack data.Data on adherence from both self-report verified by pill count and smart blister packs were available for 696 of 1,204 patients. There was no difference between methods in the proportion of patients assessed to have completed treatment (64% and 67%, respectively. However, the percentage taking the correct number of pills for each dose at the correct times (timely completion was higher by self-report than smart blister packs (37% vs. 24%; p<0.0001. By smart blister packs, 64% of patients completing treatment did not take the correct number of pills per dose or did not take each dose at the correct time interval.Smart blister packs resulted in lower estimates of timely completion of AL and may be less prone to recall and social desirability bias. They may be useful when data on patterns of adherence are desirable to evaluate treatment outcomes. Improved methods of collecting self-reported data are needed to minimise bias and maximise comparability between studies.

  20. Optical Structural Health Monitoring Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Benjamin D.; Markov, Vladimir; Earthman, James C.

    2010-01-01

    This non-destructive, optical fatigue detection and monitoring system relies on a small and unobtrusive light-scattering sensor that is installed on a component at the beginning of its life in order to periodically scan the component in situ. The method involves using a laser beam to scan the surface of the monitored component. The device scans a laser spot over a metal surface to which it is attached. As the laser beam scans the surface, disruptions in the surface cause increases in scattered light intensity. As the disruptions in the surface grow, they will cause the light to scatter more. Over time, the scattering intensities over the scanned line can be compared to detect changes in the metal surface to find cracks, crack precursors, or corrosion. This periodic monitoring of the surface can be used to indicate the degree of fatigue damage on a component and allow one to predict the remaining life and/or incipient mechanical failure of the monitored component. This wireless, compact device can operate for long periods under its own battery power and could one day use harvested power. The prototype device uses the popular open-source TinyOS operating system on an off-the-shelf Mica2 sensor mote, which allows wireless command and control through dynamically reconfigurable multi-node sensor networks. The small size and long life of this device could make it possible for the nodes to be installed and left in place over the course of years, and with wireless communication, data can be extracted from the nodes by operators without physical access to the devices. While a prototype has been demonstrated at the time of this reporting, further work is required in the system s development to take this technology into the field, especially to improve its power management and ruggedness. It should be possible to reduce the size and sensitivity as well. Establishment of better prognostic methods based on these data is also needed. The increase of surface roughness with

  1. Control rod withdrawal monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisuya, Mitsuo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the power ramp even if a plurality of control rods are subjected to withdrawal operation at a time, by reducing the reactivity applied to the reactor. Constitution: The control rod withdrawal monitoring device is adapted to monitor and control the withdrawal of the control rods depending on the reactor power and the monitoring region thereof is divided into a control rod group monitoring region a transition region and a control group monitoring not interfere region. In a case if the distance between a plurality of control rods for which the withdrawal positions are selected is less than a limiting value, the coordinate for the control rods, distance between the control rods and that the control rod distance is shorter are displayed on a display panel, and the withdrawal for the control rods are blocked. Accordingly, even if a plurality of control rods are subjected successively to the withdrawal operation contrary to the control rod withdrawal sequence upon high power operation of the reactor, the power ramp can be prevented. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Positioning devices for patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavens, M.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that it is very important to position patients reproducibly at different stages of radiotherapy treatment planning and treatment, or similar procedures. Devices have been described for positioning a patient's upper and lower thorax. This invention provides reproducible positioning for a female patient's breasts, for example in planning treatment of and treating breast tumours. The patient is placed prone, using for example an upper thorax device. A support device is placed central to and beneath her breasts to partially displace them outwards. The device may be triangular in section with one apex contacting the chest wall at the sternum. Restraining straps may be provided to hold the breasts against the support device. Means may be provided to take a healthy breast from the path of radiation through the tumour. (author)

  3. Activity monitoring using a mHealth device and correlations with psychopathology in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seunghwan; Yeom, Chan-Woo; Shin, Cheolmin; Shin, Jae-Hyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Jung Uk; Lee, Young Ryeol

    2016-12-30

    There are few studies of mobile-Health (mHealth) device application with schizophrenic patients. We aimed to quantitatively assess patient's activity and the relationship between their physical activity and the severity of their psychopathologies. Then we attempted to identify the patients who required intervention and evaluated the feasibility of using the mHealth device. A total of 61 of the 76 available hospitalized patients with chronic schizophrenia who participated in the activity programs were enrolled. They wore a mHealth device for a week to assess their activity (steps/day). The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was completed by the subjects. As a result, the positive subscale of the PANSS and the positive and negative factors of the PANSS 5-factor structure showed a predictive value for low levels of physical activity. The group of subjects with a high total PANSS score had a significantly lower level of physical activity than the other groups. In conclusion, physical activity showed a significant association with positive symptoms as well as negative symptoms. The mHealth device showed relatively good feasibility for schizophrenic patients. We should pay more attention to the activity of patients with high PANSS scores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Steven H [Rigby, ID; Derr, Kurt W [Idaho Falls, ID; Rohde, Kenneth W [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-08

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  5. Valve packing leakage monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezekoye, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    A device for monitoring leakage of fluid across a seal in a component connected to a pressurized fluid system including a housing having a chamber with an inlet for receiving fluid leaking across the seal and an outlet. A positioning means is connected to an orifice plug so as to move the plug for permitting the fluid to be discharged through the orifice at the same rate at which it enters the first chamber and means for detecting the movement of the plug is provided to produce and output signal corresponding to the distance moved by the plug and thereby indicate flow rate. The positioning means compromise a piston attached to the plug by a hollow tube and springs, which at low flow rates locate the piston. When flow increases sufficiently pressure increases and urges the piston upwards. A magnetic portion of tube actuates a succession of proximity switches to indicate flow rate. (author)

  6. Process monitoring by display devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggerdinger, C.; Schattner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The use of extensive automation, regulating, protection and limiting devices and the application of ergonomic principles (e.g. the increased use of mimic diagrams) has led to plant being capable of continued operation. German nuclear power stations are in top position worldwide as regards safety and availability. However, there is already a requirement to overcome the unmanageable state due to the large number and miniaturization of elements by renewed efforts. An attempt at this made with conventional technology is represented by a mimic board, which was provided in a powerstation just being set to work. Such mimic boards give the opportunity of monitoring the most important parameters at a glance but there are limits to their use due to the large space required. The use of VDU screens represents a possibility of solving this problem. (orig./DG) [de

  7. Monitoring device for withdrawing control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashigawa, Yuichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the sensitivity and the responsivity to an equivalent extent to those in the case where local power range monitors are densely arranged near each of the control rods, with no actual but pseudo increase of the number of local power range monitors. Constitution: The monitor arrangement is patterned by utilizing the symmetricity of the reactor core and stored in a monitor designating device. The symmetricity of control rods to be selected and withdrawn by an operator is judged by a control rod symmetry monitoring device, while the symmetricity of the withdrawn control rods is judged by a control rod withdrawal state monitoring device. Then, only when both of the devices judge the symmetricity, the control rods are subjected to gang driving by the control rod drive mechanisms. In this way, monitoring at a high sensitivity and responsivity is enabled with no increase for the number of monitors. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. A new device for monitoring moorings

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Namboothiri, E.G.; Krishnakumar, V.

    A new device - Mooring Monitoring Unit (MMU), which consists of an inwater unit and a deck unit has been designed to monitor mooring in situ. This device helps tracing underwater moorings, once its marker buoy is removed either by accident or theft...

  9. A Comparison and Calibration of a Wrist-Worn Blood Pressure Monitor for Patient Management: Assessing the Reliability of Innovative Blood Pressure Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Sarah; Teskey, Robert; Philip, Shona; Simpson, Jeremy A; Lutchmedial, Sohrab

    2018-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines recommend monitoring of blood pressure at home using an automatic blood pressure device for the management of hypertension. Devices are not often calibrated against direct blood pressure measures, leaving health care providers and patients with less reliable information than is possible with current technology. Rigorous assessments of medical devices are necessary for establishing clinical utility. Objective The purpose of our study was 2-fold: (1) to assess the validity and perform iterative calibration of indirect blood pressure measurements by a noninvasive wrist cuff blood pressure device in direct comparison with simultaneously recorded peripheral and central intra-arterial blood pressure measurements and (2) to assess the validity of the measurements thereafter of the noninvasive wrist cuff blood pressure device in comparison with measurements by a noninvasive upper arm blood pressure device to the Canadian hypertension guidelines. Methods The cloud-based blood pressure algorithms for an oscillometric wrist cuff device were iteratively calibrated to direct pressure measures in 20 consented patient participants. We then assessed measurement validity of the device, using Bland-Altman analysis during routine cardiovascular catheterization. Results The precalibrated absolute mean difference between direct intra-arterial to wrist cuff pressure measurements were 10.8 (SD 9.7) for systolic and 16.1 (SD 6.3) for diastolic. The postcalibrated absolute mean difference was 7.2 (SD 5.1) for systolic and 4.3 (SD 3.3) for diastolic pressures. This is an improvement in accuracy of 33% systolic and 73% diastolic with a 48% reduction in the variability for both measures. Furthermore, the wrist cuff device demonstrated similar sensitivity in measuring high blood pressure compared with the direct intra-arterial method. The device, when calibrated to direct aortic pressures, demonstrated the potential to reduce a treatment gap in high blood

  10. CT evaluation of patient deep inspiration self-breath-holding: How precisely can patients reproduce the tumor position in the absence of respiratory monitoring devices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Tanaka, Shiho; Ueki, Junko; Sano, Naoki; Araki, Tsutomu; Ikenaga, Satoshi; Tateda, Yoshihito; Aikawa, Yoshihito

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reproducibility of tumor position under patient deep inspiration self-breath-holding in the absence of respiratory monitoring devices, as well as to compare the reproducibility of deep inspiration self-breath-holding on the verbal command of a radiation technologist (Passive mode) with that initiated by patients' own estimation (Active mode). Twenty patients with lung cancer were shown how the tumor and diaphragm move during the respiration cycle. Patients were instructed to hold their breath during deep inspiration and reproduce identical tumor position as well as possible either by the Active mode or by the Passive mode. After patients had practiced self-breath-holding during deep inspiration, a set of three CT scans was obtained for each of the two modes of self-breath-holding (6 CT scans total) to obtain randomly timed images of 2 mm thickness in the vicinity of the tumor. The first three scans were performed during breath-hold using the Active mode, and next three scans were using the Passive mode. Maximum difference in tumor position for the three CT scans was then calculated along three axes: cranial-caudal (C-C); anterior-posterior (A-P); and right-left (R-L). In the 20 patients who underwent analysis of self-breath-holding, mean maximum difference in tumor position obtained under breath-hold using the Active and the Passive modes were: 2.2 and 3.1 mm along the C-C axis; 1.4 and 2.4 mm along the A-P axis; and 1.3 and 2.2 mm along the R-L axis, respectively. These differences in all axes were significantly smaller (p<0.05) for the Active mode than for the Passive mode. Most tumors displayed maximal respiratory movement along the C-C axis, and minimal movement along the R-L axis, but tumors located in the upper lung displayed maximal movement along the A-P axis. Significant correlation (p<0.05) was observed between differences along three axes in either mode of breath-hold. In conclusion, the reproducibility of

  11. Clinician-Driven Design of VitalPAD–An Intelligent Monitoring and Communication Device to Improve Patient Safety in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Luisa; Beaudry, Shaylene; Johnson, K Taneille; West, Nicholas; Burns, Catherine M; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A; Wensley, David; Skippen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) is a complex environment, in which a multidisciplinary team of clinicians (registered nurses, respiratory therapists, and physicians) continually observe and evaluate patient information. Data are provided by multiple, and often physically separated sources, cognitive workload is high, and team communication can be challenging. Our aim is to combine information from multiple monitoring and therapeutic devices in a mobile application, the VitalPAD, to improve the efficiency of clinical decision-making, communication, and thereby patient safety. We observed individual ICU clinicians, multidisciplinary rounds, and handover procedures for 54 h to identify data needs, workflow, and existing cognitive aid use and limitations. A prototype was developed using an iterative participatory design approach; usability testing, including general and task-specific feedback, was obtained from 15 clinicians. Features included map overviews of the ICU showing clinician assignment, patient status, and respiratory support; patient vital signs; a photo-documentation option for arterial blood gas results; and team communication and reminder functions. Clinicians reported the prototype to be an intuitive display of vital parameters and relevant alerts and reminders, as well as a user-friendly communication tool. Future work includes implementation of a prototype, which will be evaluated under simulation and real-world conditions, with the aim of providing ICU staff with a monitoring device that will improve their daily work, communication, and decision-making capacity. Mobile monitoring of vital signs and therapy parameters might help improve patient safety in wards with single-patient rooms and likely has applications in many acute and critical care settings. PMID:29552425

  12. Monitoring device for reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Masaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the freedom for the power control due to control rod operation and flow rate control, as well as prevent fuel failures by the provision of a power distribution forecasting device for forecasting the changes in the reactor core power distribution and a device for calculating the fuel performance index and judging to display the calculated values. Constitution: The results for the calculation of the reactor core power distribution from a process computer that processes each of measuring signals of a nuclear power plant are used as inputs to a fuel power history calculator to constitute the power history up to the present time for each of the fuels. The date are inputted to a fuel performance index calculator to calculate the fuel performance index at present time for each of the fuels. Changes in the power distribution are forecast in a forecasting device for reactor power distribution relative to the changes in the control variables of a control variable memory unit and the date are inputted to a fuel power history calculator to forecast the power changes for each of the fuels. The amount of the power changes is inputted to a fuel performance index calculator and a fuel performance indicating and judging device judges and displays if they exceed a predetermined value. (Seki, T.)

  13. Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alex L [Albuquerque, NM; Manginell, Ronald P [Albuquerque, NM; Moorman, Matthew W [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-04

    A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

  14. Validity and reliability of a novel slow cuff-deflation system for noninvasive blood pressure monitoring in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Gregg M; Orlanes, Khristine; Hayashi, Yacki; Murphy, Jennifer; Flannery, Margaret; Te-Frey, Rosie; Uriel, Nir; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Mancini, Donna M; Naka, Yoshifumi; Takayama, Hiroo; Jorde, Ulrich P; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2013-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound is the clinical gold standard for noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement among continuous-flow left ventricular assist device patients. The relationship of Doppler BP to systolic BP (SBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) is uncertain and Doppler measurements require a clinic visit. We studied the relationship between Doppler BP and both arterial-line (A-line) SBP and MAP. Validity and reliability of the Terumo Elemano BP Monitor, a novel slow cuff-deflation device that could potentially be used by patients at home, were assessed. Doppler and Terumo BP measurements were made in triplicate among 60 axial continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (HeartMate II) patients (30 inpatients and 30 outpatients) at 2 separate exams (360 possible measurements). A-line measures were also obtained among inpatients. Mean absolute differences (MADs) and correlations were used to determine within-device reliability (comparison of second and third BP measures) and between-device validity. Bland-Altman plots assessed BP agreement between A-line, Doppler BP, and Terumo Elemano. Success rates for Doppler and Terumo Elemano were 100% and 91%. Terumo Elemano MAD for repeat SBP and MAP were 4.6±0.6 and 4.2±0.6 mm Hg; repeat Doppler BP MAD was 2.9±0.2 mm Hg. Mean Doppler BP was lower than A-line SBP by 4.1 (MAD=6.4±1.4) mm Hg and higher than MAP by 9.5 (MAD=11.0±1.2) mm Hg; Terumo Elemano underestimated A-line SBP by 0.3 (MAD=5.6±0.9) mm Hg and MAP by 1.7 (MAD=6.0±1.0) mm Hg. Doppler BP more closely approximates SBP than MAP. Terumo Elemano was successful, reliable, and valid when compared with A-line and Doppler.

  15. Monitoring Device Safety in Interventional Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Matheny, Michael E.; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Resnic, Frederic S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: A variety of postmarketing surveillance strategies to monitor the safety of medical devices have been supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but there are few systems to automate surveillance. Our objective was to develop a system to perform real-time monitoring of safety data using a variety of process control techniques.

  16. Monitoring device for glass melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Noboru; Asano, Naoki; Higuchi, Tatsuo; Koyama, Mayumi; Hanado, Shinji.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can monitor, from a remote place, a liquid surface in a glass melting furnace for use in a solidification treatment, for example, of high level radioactive wastes. Namely, a vertical sleeve is disposed penetrating a ceiling wall of a melting vessel. A reflection mirror is disposed above the vertical sleeve and flex an optical axis. A monitoring means is disposed on the optical axis of the reflecting mirror at a spaced position. The monitoring means may have an optical telescopic means, a monitoring camera by way of a half mirror and an illumination means. The reflection mirror may be made of a metal. The monitoring device thus constituted suffer from no effects of high temperature and high radiation dose rate, thereby enabling to easily monitor the liquid surface in the melting furnace. (I.S.)

  17. Leakage monitoring device and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji; Fujimori, Haruo.

    1995-01-01

    In a water leakage monitor for a steam generator, output signals from an acoustic sensor disposed in the vicinity of a region to be monitored is subjected to phasing calculation (beam forming calculation) to determine the distribution of a sound source intensity distribution. A peak is retrieved based on the distribution of the sound source intensity distribution. A correction coefficient depending on the position of the peak is multiplied to the sound source intensity. The presence or absence of leakage is determined based on the degree of the sound source intensity after the completion of correction. Namely, a relative value of sound source intensity for each of the portions in the region to be monitored is determined, and the point of the greatest sound source intensity is assumed as a leaking point, to determine the position of the leakage. An absolute value of the sound source intensity at the leaking point is determined by such a constitution that a correction coefficient depending on the position is multiplied to the intensity of the position of the peak in the distribution of the sound intensity. A threshold value for the determination of the presence or absence of the leakage can be set if a relation between an amount of the leakage previously determined experimentally and the intensity of the sound source. Then, a countermeasure can easily be taken after the detection of the leakage and a restoring operation can be carried out rapidly after the occurrence of leakage while avoiding unnecessary shutdown. (N.H.)

  18. Electrocardiographic Patch Devices and Contemporary Wireless Cardiac Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eFung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac electrophysiologic derangements often coexist with disorders of the circulatory system. Capturing and diagnosing arrhythmias and conduction system disease may lead to a change in diagnosis, clinical management and patient outcomes. Standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, Holter monitors and event recorders have served as useful diagnostic tools over the last few decades. However, their shortcomings are only recently being addressed by emerging technologies. With advances in device miniaturization and wireless technologies, and changing consumer expectations, wearable ‘on-body’ ECG patch devices have evolved to meet contemporary needs. These devices are unobtrusive and easy to use, leading to increased device wear time and diagnostic yield. While becoming the standard for detecting arrhythmias and conduction system disorders in the outpatient setting where continuous ECG monitoring in the short to medium term (days to weeks is indicated, these cardiac devices and related digital mobile health technologies are reshaping the clinician-patient interface with important implications for future healthcare delivery.

  19. Wide range neutron monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Fumiyasu; Arita, Setsuo; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Matsumiya, Shoichi; Furusato, Ken-ichiro; Nishida, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention has a function of reliably switching measuring values between a pulse method and a Cambel method even if noise level and saturated level are fluctuated. That is, a proportional range judging means always monitors neutron flux measuring values in a start-up region and neutron flux measuring values in an intermediate power region, so that the proportional range is detected depending on whether the difference or a variation coefficient of both of the measured values is constant or not. A switching value determining means determines a switching value by the result of judgement of the proportional range judging means. A selection/output means selects and outputs measuring signals at a neutron flux level in the start-up region or the intermediate power region by the output of the switching value determining means. With such procedures, since the measuring value is switched after confirming that arrival at the proportional range where the difference or a variation coefficient of the measured value between the pulse processing method and the measured value by the Cambel method is constant, an accurate neutron flux level containing neither noise level nor saturated level can be outputted. (I.S.)

  20. Monitoring device for reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Saito, Koichi; Furukawa, Hideyasu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor container made of reinforced concretes is monitored for the temperature at each of portions upon placing concretes under construction of a plant, upon pressure-proof test and during plant operation. That is, optical fibers are uniformly laid spirally throughout the inside of the concretes. Pulses are injected from one end of the optical fibers, and the temperature at a reflection point can be measured by measuring specific rays (Raman scattering rays) among lights reflected after a predetermined period of time. According to the present invention, measurement for an optional position within a range where one fiber cable is laid can be conducted. Accordingly, it is possible to conduct temperature control upon concrete placing and apply temperature compensation for the measurement for stresses of the concretes and the reinforcing steels upon container pressure-proof. Further, during plant operation, if the temperature of the concretes rises due to thermal conduction of the temperature in the container, integrity of the concretes can be ensured by a countermeasures such as air conditioning. (I.S.)

  1. Travelling type monitoring and inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao; Maruki, Hideaki.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention sufficiently ensures video output images even if lenses of a television camera of a monitoring means are degraded to reduce the quantity of transmission light. That is, a light amount control mechanism capable of controlling the quantity of illumination light irradiated from an illumination device at an output level of a sensor of an inspection device main body. A test chart for measuring a luminance which is an output level of the sensor is disposed. During plant operation, the lenses of the television camera undergo influences of radioactivity and are degraded to reduce the quantity of transmission light on every periodical monitoring and inspection using a travelling type monitoring inspection device. In this case, the test chart disposed near the equipment to be monitored and inspected is caught by the television camera to measure a sensor output luminance. Then, the light amount control mechanism of the illumination device is controlled so as to provide a luminance which has been set at an initial stage of the plant inspection. With such procedures, video data of the objective equipment to be monitored and inspected can be obtained at a constant luminance during inspection. (I.S.)

  2. Monitoring Human Activity through Portable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sebestyen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring human activity may be useful for medical supervision and for prophylactic purposes. Mobile devices like intelligent phones or watches have multiple sensors and wireless communication capabilities which can be used for this purpose. This paper presents some integrated solutions for determining and continuous monitoring of a person’s state. Aspects taken into consideration are: activity detection and recognition based on acceleration sensors, wireless communication protocols for data acquisition, web monitoring, alerts generation and statistical processing of multiple sensorial data. As practical implementations two case studies are presented, one using an intelligent phone and another using a mixed signal processor integrated in a watch.

  3. Monitoring and life-support devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noback, C.R.; Murphy, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The radiographic and physical principles involved in interpreting films, and some of the altered anatomy and pathology that may be seen on such films, are discussed. This chapter considers the radiographic appearances of monitoring and life-support devices. Appropriate positioning and function are shown, as are some of the complications associated with their placement and/or function

  4. Monitoring device for the reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi; Tsuiki, Makoto

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable accurate monitoring for the power distribution in a short time, as well as independent detection for in-core neutron flux detectors in abnormal operation due to failures or like other causes to thereby surely provide reliable substitute values. Constitution: Counted values are inputted from a reactor core present status data detector by a power distribution calculation device to calculate the in-core neutron flux density and the power distribution based on previously stored physical models. While on the other hand, counted value from the in-core neutron detectors and the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution calculated from the power distribution calculation device are inputted from a BCF calculation device to compensate the counting errors incorporated in the counted value from the in-core neutron flux detectors and the calculation errors incorporated in the power distribution calculated in the power distribution calculation device respectively and thereby calculate the power distribution in the reactor core. Further, necessary data are inputted to the power distribution calculation device by an input/output device and the results calculated in the BCF calculation device are displayed. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. A method to synchronize signals from multiple patient monitoring devices through a single input channel for inclusion in list-mode acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Johnson, Karen; King, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This technical note documents a method that the authors developed for combining a signal to synchronize a patient-monitoring device with a second physiological signal for inclusion into list-mode acquisition. Our specific application requires synchronizing an external patient motion-tracking system with a medical imaging system by multiplexing the tracking input with the ECG input. The authors believe that their methodology can be adapted for use in a variety of medical imaging modalities including single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: The authors insert a unique pulse sequence into a single physiological input channel. This sequence is then recorded in the list-mode acquisition along with the R-wave pulse used for ECG gating. The specific form of our pulse sequence allows for recognition of the time point being synchronized even when portions of the pulse sequence are lost due to collisions with R-wave pulses. This was achieved by altering our software used in binning the list-mode data to recognize even a portion of our pulse sequence. Limitations on heart rates at which our pulse sequence could be reliably detected were investigated by simulating the mixing of the two signals as a function of heart rate and time point during the cardiac cycle at which our pulse sequence is mixed with the cardiac signal. Results: The authors have successfully achieved accurate temporal synchronization of our motion-tracking system with acquisition of SPECT projections used in 17 recent clinical research cases. In our simulation analysis the authors determined that synchronization to enable compensation for body and respiratory motion could be achieved for heart rates up to 125 beats-per-minute (bpm). Conclusions: Synchronization of list-mode acquisition with external patient monitoring devices such as those employed in motion-tracking can reliably be achieved using a simple method that can be implemented using

  6. A method to synchronize signals from multiple patient monitoring devices through a single input channel for inclusion in list-mode acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Johnson, Karen; King, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.King@umassmed.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This technical note documents a method that the authors developed for combining a signal to synchronize a patient-monitoring device with a second physiological signal for inclusion into list-mode acquisition. Our specific application requires synchronizing an external patient motion-tracking system with a medical imaging system by multiplexing the tracking input with the ECG input. The authors believe that their methodology can be adapted for use in a variety of medical imaging modalities including single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: The authors insert a unique pulse sequence into a single physiological input channel. This sequence is then recorded in the list-mode acquisition along with the R-wave pulse used for ECG gating. The specific form of our pulse sequence allows for recognition of the time point being synchronized even when portions of the pulse sequence are lost due to collisions with R-wave pulses. This was achieved by altering our software used in binning the list-mode data to recognize even a portion of our pulse sequence. Limitations on heart rates at which our pulse sequence could be reliably detected were investigated by simulating the mixing of the two signals as a function of heart rate and time point during the cardiac cycle at which our pulse sequence is mixed with the cardiac signal. Results: The authors have successfully achieved accurate temporal synchronization of our motion-tracking system with acquisition of SPECT projections used in 17 recent clinical research cases. In our simulation analysis the authors determined that synchronization to enable compensation for body and respiratory motion could be achieved for heart rates up to 125 beats-per-minute (bpm). Conclusions: Synchronization of list-mode acquisition with external patient monitoring devices such as those employed in motion-tracking can reliably be achieved using a simple method that can be implemented using

  7. A four lumen screwing device for multiparametric brain monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, T H; Langemann, H; Gratzl, O; Mendelowitsch, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe multiparametric monitoring in severe head trauma using a new screwing device. Our aim was to create a screw which would make the implantation of the probes and thus multiparametric monitoring easier. The new screw allows us to implant 3 probes (microdialysis, Paratrend and an intracranial pressure device) through one burr hole. The screw has four channels, the fourth being for ventricular drainage. We monitored 13 patients with severe head trauma (GCS = 3-8) for up to 7 days. Brain tissue pO2, pCO2, pH, and temperature were measured on-line with the Paratrend 7 machine. The microdialytic parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate were determined semi on-line with a CMA 600 enzymatic analyser. There were no complications in any of the patients that could be ascribed to the screw.

  8. Wireless physiological monitoring system for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademeyer, A J; Blanckenberg, M M; Scheffer, C

    2009-01-01

    Patients in psychiatric hospitals that are sedated or secluded are at risk of death or injury if they are not continuously monitored. Some psychiatric patients are restless and aggressive, and hence the monitoring device should be robust and must transmit the data wirelessly. Two devices, a glove that measures oxygen saturation and a dorsally-mounted device that measures heart rate, skin temperature and respiratory rate were designed and tested. Both devices connect to one central monitoring station using two separate Bluetooth connections, ensuring a completely wireless setup. A Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for signal processing and monitoring of the vital signs of the psychiatric patient. Detection algorithms were implemented to detect ECG arrhythmias such as premature ventricular contraction and atrial fibrillation. The prototypes were manufactured and tested in a laboratory setting on healthy volunteers.

  9. Radiation area monitor device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencelj, Matjaz; Stowe, Ashley C.; Petrovic, Toni; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Kosicek, Andrej

    2018-01-30

    A radiation area monitor device/method, utilizing: a radiation sensor; a rotating radiation shield disposed about the radiation sensor, wherein the rotating radiation shield defines one or more ports that are transparent to radiation; and a processor operable for analyzing and storing a radiation fingerprint acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor. Optionally, the radiation sensor includes a gamma and/or neutron radiation sensor. The device/method selectively operates in: a first supervised mode during which a baseline radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor; and a second unsupervised mode during which a subsequent radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor, wherein the subsequent radiation fingerprint is compared to the baseline radiation fingerprint and, if a predetermined difference threshold is exceeded, an alert is issued.

  10. Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe blunt head trauma: does the type of monitoring device matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiolfi, Alberto; Khor, Desmond; Cho, Jayun; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has become the standard of care in the management of severe head trauma. Intraventricular devices (IVDs) and intraparenchymal devices (IPDs) are the 2 most commonly used techniques for ICP monitoring. Despite the widespread use of these devices, very few studies have investigated the effect of device type on outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to compare outcomes between 2 types of ICP monitoring devices in patients with isolated severe blunt head trauma. METHODS This retrospective observational study was based on the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program database, which was searched for all patients with isolated severe blunt head injury who had an ICP monitor placed in the 2-year period from 2013 to 2014. Extracted variables included demographics, comorbidities, mechanisms of injury, head injury specifics (epidural, subdural, subarachnoid, intracranial hemorrhage, and diffuse axonal injury), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score for each body area, Injury Severity Score (ISS), vital signs in the emergency department, and craniectomy. Outcomes included 30-day mortality, complications, number of ventilation days, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay, and functional independence. RESULTS During the study period, 105,721 patients had isolated severe traumatic brain injury (head AIS score ≥ 3). Overall, an ICP monitoring device was placed in 2562 patients (2.4%): 1358 (53%) had an IVD and 1204 (47%) had an IPD. The severity of the head AIS score did not affect the type of ICP monitoring selected. There was no difference in the median ISS; ISS > 15; head AIS Score 3, 4, or 5; or the need for craniectomy between the 2 device groups. Unadjusted 30-day mortality was significantly higher in the group with IVDs (29% vs 25.5%, p = 0.046); however, stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the type of ICP monitoring was not an independent risk factor for death

  11. Monitoring device for local power peaking coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, Ishi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To determine and monitor the local power peaking coefficients by a method not depending on the combination of fuel types. Constitution: Representative values for the local power distribution can be obtained by determining corresponding burn-up degrees based on the burn-up degree of each of fuel assembly segments obtained in a power distribution monitor and by the interpolation and extrapolation of void coefficients. The typical values are multiplied with compensation coefficients for the control rod effect and coefficients for compensating the effect of adjacent fuel assemblies in a calculation device to obtain typical values for the present local power distribution compensated with all of the effects. Further, the calculation device compares them with typical values of the present local power distribution to obtain an aimed local power peaking coefficient as the maximum value thereof. According to the present invention, since the local power peaking coefficients can be determined not depending on the combination of the kind of fuels, if the combination of fuel assemblies is increased upon fuel change, the amount of operation therefor is not increased. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Plant operation monitoring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Tsugio; Matsuki, Tsutomu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for monitoring the operation of a nuclear power plant during operation, which improves the safety and reliability of operation without increasing an operator's burden. Namely, a chief in charge orally instruct an operation to an operator upon the operation of a plant constituent equipment. The operator points the equipment and calls the name. Actual operation instruction for the equipment is inputted after confirmation by oral response. The voices of theses series of operation instruction/point-calling/response confirmation are taken into a voice recognition processing device. The processing device discriminates each of the person who calls, and discriminates the content of the calls and objective equipments to be operated. Then, the series of procedures and contents of the operation for the equipments previously disposed in the data base are compared with the order of inputted calls, discriminated contents and the objective equipments to be operated. If they are not agreed with each other, the operation instruction is blocked even if actual operation instructions are inputted. (I.S.)

  13. Portable blood extraction device integrated with biomedical monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumpuang, S.; Horade, M.; Fujioka, K.; Sugiyama, S.

    2006-01-01

    Painless and portable blood extraction device has been immersed in the world of miniaturization on bio-medical research particularly in manufacturing point-of-care systems. The fabrication of a blood extraction device integrated with an electrolyte-monitoring system is reported in this paper. The device has advantages in precise controlled dosage of blood extracted including the slightly damaged blood vessels and nervous system. The in-house blood diagnostic will become simple for the patients. Main components of the portable system are; the blood extraction device and electrolyte-monitoring system. The monitoring system consists of ISFET (Ion Selective Field Effect Transistor) for measuring the concentration level of minerals in blood. In this work, we measured the level of 3 ions; Na+, K+ and Cl-. The mentioned ions are frequently required the measurement since their concentration levels in the blood can indicate whether the kidney, pancreas, liver or heart is being malfunction. The fabrication of the whole system and experimentation on each ISM (Ion Sensitive Membrane) will be provided. Taking the advantages of LIGA technology, the 100 hollow microneedles fabricated by Synchrotron Radiation deep X-ray lithography through PCT (Plane-pattern to Cross-section Transfer) technique have been consisted in 5x5 mm2 area. The microneedle is 300 μm in base-diameter, 500 μm-pitch, 800 μm-height and 50 μm hole-diameter. The total size of the blood extraction device is 2x2x2 cm 3. The package is made from a plastic socket including slots for inserting microneedle array and ISFET connecting to an electrical circuit for the monitoring. Through the dimensional design for simply handling and selection of disposable material, the patients can self-evaluate the critical level of the body minerals in anywhere and anytime.

  14. Calibration device for wide range monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodoku, Masaya; Sato, Toshifumi.

    1989-01-01

    The calibration device for a wide range monitor according to the present invention can continuously calibrate the entire counting regions of a wide range monitor. The wide range monitor detect the reactor power in the neutron source region by means of a pulse counting method and detects the reactor power in the intermediate region by means of a cambell method. A calibration signal outputting means is disposed for continuously outputting, as such calibration signals, pulse number varying signals in which the number of pulses per unit time varies depending on the reactor power in the neutron source region to be simulated and amplitude square means varying signal in which the mean square value of amplitude varies depending on the reactor power in the intermediate region to be simulated. By using both of the calibration signals, calibration can be conducted for the nuclear reactor power in the neutron source region and the intermediate region even if the calibration is made over two regions, further, calibration for the period present over the two region can be conducted easily as well. (I.S.)

  15. Device-Centric Monitoring for Mobile Device Management

    OpenAIRE

    Chircop, Luke; Colombo, Christian; Pace, Gordon J.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquity of computing devices has led to an increased need to ensure not only that the applications deployed on them are correct with respect to their specifications, but also that the devices are used in an appropriate manner, especially in situations where the device is provided by a party other than the actual user. Much work which has been done on runtime verification for mobile devices and operating systems is mostly application-centric, resulting in global, device-centri...

  16. Temperature monitoring device and thermocouple assembly therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Noel P.; Bauer, Frank I.; Bengel, Thomas G.; Kothmann, Richard E.; Mavretish, Robert S.; Miller, Phillip E.; Nath, Raymond J.; Salton, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature monitoring device for measuring the temperature at a surface of a body, composed of: at least one first thermocouple and a second thermocouple; support members supporting the thermocouples for placing the first thermocouple in contact with the body surface and for maintaining the second thermocouple at a defined spacing from the body surface; and a calculating circuit connected to the thermocouples for receiving individual signals each representative of the temperature reading produced by a respective one of the first and second thermocouples and for producing a corrected temperature signal having a value which represents the temperature of the body surface and is a function of the difference between the temperature reading produced by the first thermocouple and a selected fraction of the temperature reading provided by the second thermocouple.

  17. The UZPI ash content monitoring device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, E.P.; Bezverkhii, E.A.; Mozhaev, L.G.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes the results of industrial trials (in coal preparation plants) to establish the accuracy of the UZPI device which determines coal ash content using X-ray detection. It is designed to monitor ash content in the 4-40% range in coal with a grain size of 0-100 mm and a coal layer thickness of 50-150 mm (depending on the ash content and grain size). The ash frequently contains oxides, and although variations in magnesium, aluminium, silicon and sulfur oxides have virtually no effect on accuracy of the UZPI, changes in the levels of calcium oxides and particularly iron oxides have a considerable influence on measurement accuracy (caused by changes in their gamma ray scattering cross section values and atomic numbers). The overall sensitivity to ash content in coal varies from 1.6 to 2.4% abs./% while that to iron oxides in ash is 0.4% abs./%. Concludes that this device is suitable for use in coal preparation plants on thin layers of coal, but its efficiency is affected by external influences, e.g. fluctuations in conveyor loading.

  18. Evaluation of commercial self-monitoring devices for clinical purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Søren; Hansen, John; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe

    2017-01-01

    Commercial self-monitoring devices are becoming increasingly popular, and over the last decade, the use of self-monitoring technology has spread widely in both consumer and medical markets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate five commercially available self-monitoring devices for further...

  19. Device-Centric Monitoring for Mobile Device Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Chircop

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquity of computing devices has led to an increased need to ensure not only that the applications deployed on them are correct with respect to their specifications, but also that the devices are used in an appropriate manner, especially in situations where the device is provided by a party other than the actual user. Much work which has been done on runtime verification for mobile devices and operating systems is mostly application-centric, resulting in global, device-centric properties (e.g. the user may not send more than 100 messages per day across all applications being difficult or impossible to verify. In this paper we present a device-centric approach to runtime verify the device behaviour against a device policy with the different applications acting as independent components contributing to the overall behaviour of the device. We also present an implementation for Android devices, and evaluate it on a number of device-centric policies, reporting the empirical results obtained.

  20. Intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring during liver transplantation: goals and devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter; Frederiksen, H J; Secher, N H

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) almost 40 years ago, changes in the cardiovascular system that manifest during the different phases of the operation combined, sometimes with massive hemorrhage in likely critically ill patients have been a challenge. Here hemodynamic...... monitoring of the patients during OLT is addressed with focus on maintaining the patients' central blood volume (CBV) and methods and devices that can serve that purpose are listed. It is considered that a stable CBV maintains cerebral blood flow and oxygenation and thereby the well-being of the patient......, while even a small reduction in blood pressure affects cerebral blood flow and oxygenation if it reflects a reduced CBV and thereby cardiac output. In that regard it is accepted that for the patient going through OLT cardiac output (~8 L/min-1) and also venous oxygen saturation (~85%) are larger than...

  1. Remote monitoring of cardiovascular implanted electronic devices: a paradigm shift for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Edmond M; Varma, Niraj

    2012-07-01

    Traditional follow-up of cardiac implantable electronic devices involves the intermittent download of largely nonactionable data. Remote monitoring represents a paradigm shift from episodic office-based follow-up to continuous monitoring of device performance and patient and disease state. This lessens device clinical burden and may also lead to cost savings, although data on economic impact are only beginning to emerge. Remote monitoring technology has the potential to improve the outcomes through earlier detection of arrhythmias and compromised device integrity, and possibly predict heart failure hospitalizations through integration of heart failure diagnostics and hemodynamic monitors. Remote monitoring platforms are also huge databases of patients and devices, offering unprecedented opportunities to investigate real-world outcomes. Here, the current status of the field is described and future directions are predicted.

  2. Comparison of lancing devices for self-monitoring of blood glucose regarding lancing pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Serge; Tshiananga, J K Tshiang; Koubek, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose empowers diabetes patients to effectively control their blood glucose (BG) levels. A potential barrier to frequent BG controls is lancing pain, intrinsically linked to pricking the finger several times a day. In this study, we compared different state-of-the-art lancing devices from leading manufacturers regarding lancing pain, and we intended to identify lancing devices that are less painful. First, 165 subjects compared 6 different BG monitoring systems-consisting of a lancing device and a BG meter-at home for 36 days and at least 3 BG tests per day. Second, the subjects directly compared 6 different lancing devices-independent from a BG meter-in a laboratory setting. The test results were collected in questionnaires, and lancing pain was rated on a numerical rating scale. One hundred fifty-seven subjects were included in the analysis. Accu-Chek BG monitoring systems were significantly (p competitor BG monitoring systems and were rated by >50% of the subjects as "less painful" than competitor BG monitoring systems. Accu-Chek lancing devices were significantly (p competitor lancing devices and were rated by >60% of the subjects as "less painful" than competitor lancing devices. We found significant differences in lancing pain between lancing devices. Diabetes patients clearly preferred lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. In order to improve patient compliance with respect to an adequate glycemic control, the medical staff should preferentially prescribe lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  3. Remote patient monitoring in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Mishkin, Aaron; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kalra, Ankur; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a significant economic burden on our health-care resources with very high readmission rates. Remote monitoring has a substantial potential to improve the management and outcome of patients with HF. Readmission for decompensated HF is often preceded by a stage of subclinical hemodynamic decompensation, where therapeutic interventions would prevent subsequent clinical decompensation and hospitalization. Various methods of remote patient monitoring include structured telephone support, advanced telemonitoring technologies, remote monitoring of patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators, and implantable hemodynamic monitors. Current data examining the efficacy of remote monitoring technologies in improving outcomes have shown inconsistent results. Various medicolegal and financial issues need to be addressed before widespread implementation of this exciting technology can take place.

  4. Equipment abnormality monitoring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Asakura, Yamato; Uemura, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Oyamada, Osamu; Oyobe, Koji.

    1994-01-01

    In the present invention, it is judged whether the operation state of equipments used in a plant are normal or not by using learning performances. That is, a plurality of monitoring parameters are measured for an equipment. Previously determined monitoring parameters are extracted. A leaning mode or a monitoring mode is selected. In the leaning mode, based on the values of previously determined monitoring parameters, values of other monitoring parameters during normal states are learned. In the monitoring mode, based on the values of the previously determined monitoring parameters, typical values of other leaned monitoring parameters are outputted. The typical values of other normal monitoring parameters after learning and the values of other parameters at the present time are compared. If the values of the other parameters at the present time are out of normal range, it is judged as abnormal, and the result is alarmed and displayed. (I.S.)

  5. Usage monitoring of electrical devices in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Saba; Chan, Adrian D C; Goubran, Rafik A

    2011-01-01

    Profiling the usage of electrical devices within a smart home can be used as a method for determining an occupant's activities of daily living. A nonintrusive load monitoring system monitors the electrical consumption at a single electrical source (e.g., main electric utility service entry) and the operating schedules of individual devices are determined by disaggregating the composite electrical consumption waveforms. An electrical device's load signature plays a key role in nonintrusive load monitoring systems. A load signature is the unique electrical behaviour of an individual device when it is in operation. This paper proposes a feature-based model, using the real power and reactive power as features for describing the load signatures of individual devices. Experimental results for single device recognition for 7 devices show that the proposed approach can achieve 100% classification accuracy with discriminant analysis using Mahalanobis distances.

  6. Clinical evaluation of a new intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendel, R; Heidenreich, J; Schilling, A; Akhavan-Sigari, R; Kurth, R; Picht, T; Pietilä, T; Suess, O; Kern, C; Meisel, J; Brock, M

    2003-03-01

    Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) still plays a key role in the management of patients at risk from intracranial hypertension. Numerous ICP-measuring devices are available. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility of the recently developed Neurovent-P(REHAU AG+CO, REHAU, Germany) ICP monitoring device. In a prospective two-center study, a total of 98 patients with severe head injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage, and non-traumatic brain edema underwent intraparenchymal monitoring of ICP using the Neurovent-P. A control group comprising 50 patients underwent implantation of the Camino-OLM-110-4B ICP monitor. The zero drift of the probes was determined before and after the ICP recording period. Technical and medical complications were documented. The MRI compatibility of the Neurovent-P ICP probe was investigated by evaluating artifacts caused by the probe, probe function and temperature changes during MRI, and probe movement caused by the magnetic field. The mean zero drift was 0.2+/-0.41 mmHg (maximum 3 mmHg) for the Neurovent-P ICP probes and 0.4+/-0.57 mmHg (maximum 12 mmHg) for the Camino-OLM-110-4B ICP probes. No significant correlation was identified between the extent of zero drift following the removal of the probes and the length of monitoring. Intraparenchymal haemorrhage spatially related to the probe occurred in 1 out of 50 (2%) patients with a Camino-OLM-110-4B probe and in 1 out of 98 (1%) with a Neurovent-P. Damage of the probe due to kinking or overextension of the cable or glass fiber occurred in 4 of the 50 (8%) Camino-OLM-110-4B ICP probes and in 5 of the 98 (5%) Neurovent-P probes. On T2-weighted MR images, the Neurovent-P ICP probe induced only small artifacts with very good discrimination of the surrounding tissue. On T1-weighted MR images, there was a good imaging quality but artifact-related local disturbances

  7. Internet-Based Device-Assisted Remote Monitoring of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G; Ieraci, L; Kaulback, K

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) report was to conduct a systematic review of the available published evidence on the safety, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of Internet-based device-assisted remote monitoring systems (RMSs) for therapeutic cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. The MAS evidence-based review was performed to support public financing decisions. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of fatalities in developed countries. In the United States almost half a million people die of SCD annually, resulting in more deaths than stroke, lung cancer, breast cancer, and AIDS combined. In Canada each year more than 40,000 people die from a cardiovascular related cause; approximately half of these deaths are attributable to SCD. Most cases of SCD occur in the general population typically in those without a known history of heart disease. Most SCDs are caused by cardiac arrhythmia, an abnormal heart rhythm caused by malfunctions of the heart’s electrical system. Up to half of patients with significant heart failure (HF) also have advanced conduction abnormalities. Cardiac arrhythmias are managed by a variety of drugs, ablative procedures, and therapeutic CIEDs. The range of CIEDs includes pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices. Bradycardia is the main indication for PMs and individuals at high risk for SCD are often treated by ICDs. Heart failure (HF) is also a significant health problem and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in those over 65 years of age. Patients with moderate to severe HF may also have cardiac arrhythmias, although the cause may be related more to heart pump or haemodynamic failure. The presence of HF, however

  8. Wearable impedance monitoring system for dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, S; Bourgerette, A; Gharbi, S; Rubeck, C; Arkouche, W; Massot, B; McAdams, E; Montalibet, A; Jallon, P

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the development and the validation of a prototype wearable miniaturized impedance monitoring system for remote monitoring in home-based dialysis patients. This device is intended to assess the hydration status of dialysis patients using calf impedance measurements. The system is based on the low-power AD8302 component. The impedance calibration procedure is described together with the Cole parameter estimation and the hydric volume estimation. Results are given on a test cell to validate the design and on preliminary calf measurements showing Cole parameter variations during hemodialysis.

  9. BAKNET - Communication network for radiation monitoring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Y.; Wengrowicz, U.; Tirosh, D.; Barak, D.

    1997-01-01

    A system, based on a new concept of controlling and monitoring distributed radiation monitors, has been developed and approved at the NRCN. The system, named B AKNET Network , consists of a series of communication adapters connected to a main PC via an RS-485 communication network (see Fig. 1). The network's maximal length is 1200 meters and it enables connection of up to 128 adapters. The BAKNET adapters are designed to interface output signals of different types of stationary radiation monitors to a main PC. The BAKNET adapters' interface type includes: digital, analog, RS-232, and mixed output signals. This allows versatile interfacing of different stationary radiation monitors to the main computer. The connection to the main computer is via an RS-485 network, utilizing an identical communication protocol. The PC software, written in C ++ under MS-Windows, consists of two main programs. The first is the data collection program and the second is the Human Machine Interface (HMI). (authors)

  10. Evaluating clinical accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring devices: other methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentholt, Iris M. E.; Hart, August A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2008-01-01

    With more and more continuous glucose monitoring devices entering the market, the importance of adequate accuracy assessment grows. This review discusses pros and cons of Regression Analysis and Correlation Coefficient, Relative Difference measures, Bland Altman plot, ISO criteria, combined curve

  11. Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugurlan, Maria; Tuffner, Francis K; Chassin, David P.

    2016-09-13

    Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage device includes a reservoir configured to hold a thermal energy storage medium, a temperature control system configured to adjust a temperature of the thermal energy storage medium, and a state observation system configured to provide information regarding an energy state of the thermal energy storage device at a plurality of different moments in time.

  12. Patient benefit from seamless implant monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Wallbrück

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with electrostimulation devices visit the hospital regularly for follow-up. The workload of out-patient departments is ever increasing, but a less frequent check-up is unwanted, as it could impair reliability and effectiveness of the therapy. A system of remote patient monitoring might improve this situation by enabling identification of patients who benefit from a shortened time for corrective action after any undesired event. A completely automatic system for patient remote monitoring has been introduced (BIOTRONIK Home Monitoring, HM. Daily patient and device data are displayed on an internet site which allows authorized persons to follow the parameters trends. Several clinical studies are presently being conducted to investigate the benefit of HM in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter/defibrillator therapy. Preliminary results show the system’s ability to individualize implant therapy for the patients’ and the physicians’ benefits. Previous studies in heart failure (HF therapy have shown that hospital readmission rates, hospitalisation duration and also mortality can be reduced by patient monitoring programs. A recently started study investigating HM in heart failure therapy aims to define a HF-indicator that predicts a worsening of the patient’s status leading to hospitalisation. With such an indicator, the responsible physician could be alerted and the patient can be called in. Although several issues connected to Home Monitoring remain to be solved, the time has come for a more flexible patient management. The incorporation of modern information technology into cardiovascular implants offers a way to solve the conflict between limited resources and high quality medical therapy for an aging population.

  13. Device for contamination monitoring against radiation contamination of people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rische, U.W.; Gerlach, R.

    1986-01-01

    The monitor has detector devices at an angle to each other made as a rigid component which can be rotated around a vertical axis in the angle between the joined detector devices. A reset drive which can be tensioned is provided at the axis of rotation. If it is in its rest position, a platform is situated as floor plate with a foot detector between the vertical detector devices. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Evaluation of Commercial Self-Monitoring Devices for Clinical Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Soren; Hansen, John; Nielsen, Olav W

    2017-01-01

    Commercial self-monitoring devices are becoming increasingly popular, and over the last decade, the use of self-monitoring technology has spread widely in both consumer and medical markets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate five commercially available self-monitoring devices for further...... activity trackers and compared to gyroscope readings. Two trackers were also tested on nine subjects by comparing pulse readings to Holter monitoring. RESULTS: The lowest average systematic error in the walking tests was -0.2%, recorded on the Garmin Vivofit 2 at 3.5 km/h; the highest error was the Fitbit...... the current functionality and limitations of the five self-tracking devices, and point towards a need for future research in this area....

  16. Optically monitoring device in reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Kawamoto, Kikuo.

    1993-01-01

    In the device of the present invention, cable penetrations are necessary for transmission from a great number of electrical instrumentations disposed in a reactor container to the outside. Optical cables are passed through the cable penetrations to use optical signals for signal transmission. That is, pulses are injected from one end of the optical cable and a specific light (raman scattered light) among reflected lights, after elapse of a predetermined time, is measured. With such procedures, temperature at the reflection point can be measured. In this case, if emission and discrimination of the pulses are conducted in a time sharing fashion, the temperature is measured as an average value for the 1m length corresponding to the time determined by the limit. Accordingly, greater number of temperature measuring points than that in the prior art (there is a reactor which has about 170 points) are measured by a lesser number of cables (one at minimum). For instruments used for other than temperature, if the device is diagnosed by itself, by making the constitution intelligent and utilizing optical output, reliability for the measurement can be improved. (I.S.)

  17. Monitoring device for local power peaking coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Ishi

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the local power peaking coefficients obtained by the method not depending on the combination of fuel types. Method: A plurality of representative values for the local power distribution determined by the nuclear constant calculation for one fuel assembly are memorized regarding each of the burn-up degree and the void coefficient on every positions and fuel types in fuel rod assemblies. While on the other hand, the representative values for the local power distribution as described above are compensated by a compensation coefficient considering the effect of adjacent segments and a control rod compensation coefficient considering the effect due to the control rod insertion relative to the just-mentioned compensation coefficient. Then, the maximum value among them is selected to determine the local power peaking coefficient at each of the times and each of the segments, which is monitored. According to this system, the calculation and the working required for the fitting work depending on the combination of fuel types are no more required at all to facilitate the maintenance as well. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. A monitoring device for pressurised-air-driven diaphragm-based artificial heart assist devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Stokkink, J.S.D.; Stokkink, H.S.D.; Koelink, M.H.; Koelink, M.H.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    A non-invasive device has been developed to monitor the diaphragm position and the blood flow in artificial heart assist devices equipped with a pressurised-air-driven diaphragm. Light scattering from the diaphragm is used as a mechanism for measuring. Information about the position of several

  19. Remote monitoring of implantable cardiac devices: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Raj; Enriquez, Alan D; Freeman, James V

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated substantial benefits associated with remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), and treatment guidelines have endorsed the use of remote monitoring. Familiarity with the features of remote monitoring systems and the data supporting its use are vital for physicians' care for patients with CEIDs. Remote monitoring remains underutilized, but its use is expanding including in new practice settings including emergency departments. Patient experience and outcomes are positive, with earlier detection of clinical events such as atrial fibrillation, reductions in inappropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks and potentially a decrease in mortality with frequent remote monitoring utilizaiton. Rates of hospitalization are reduced among remote monitoring users, and the replacement of outpatient follow-up visits with remote monitoring transmissions has been shown to be well tolerated. In addition, health resource utilization is lower and remote monitoring has been associated with considerable cost savings. A dose relationship exists between use of remote monitoring and patient outcomes, and those with early and high transmission rates have superior outcomes. Remote monitoring provides clinicians with the ability to provide comprehensive follow-up care for patients with CIEDs. Patient outcomes are improved, and resource utilization is decreased with appropriate use of remote monitoring. Future efforts must focus on improving the utilization and efficiency of remote monitoring.

  20. Portable devices for monitoring radon and its progeny in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huaiqin; Yao Wanyuan; Su Jingling; Liu Jinhua

    1990-01-01

    We have developed two kinds of portable monitoring devices to measure the concentration and potential energy concentration of radon and its progeny in air. The thermoluminescence material CaSO4 (Tm) is used as the detection element. One of the devices is called passive radon monitor. The lowest detectable limit for radon in air is about 1.5 Bq/m 3 , as a sampling time being one week. Good reliability and ease to operate are its main advantages. The second kind of device is called a working level monitor which consists of a miniature remembrane pump and an integrating sampling probe. The lowest detectable limit is about 0.00043 WL (9x10 -9 J/m 3 ) for a sampling time of 6 hours. It weighs only 0.35 kg, but maintenance is necessary sometimes. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  1. Monitoring device for the reactor pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Akira.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable rapid and accurate operator's monitoring for the state of pipelines in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Specific symbols are attached respectively to a fluid supply source constituting the pipelines of a nuclear reactor facility, a plurality of fluid passing points and equipments to be supplied with the fluid, and a symmetrical matrix comprising these symbols in rows and columns is constituted. Then, a matrix is prepared based on detection signals for the states of the liquid supply source, equipments to be supplied with fluid and pipeline equipments by rendering the matrix elements between the signals expressing the state capable of passing the fluid as 1 and the matrix elements between the signals expressing the state incapable of passing the fluid as 0 . The matrix thus prepared in a signal procession circuit and a matrix in a memory circuit previously storing the matrix expressing the normal state of the pipelines are compared to judge the state of the pipelines in a short time and with no misjudging. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Mobile health devices: will patients actually use them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan J; Steinberg, Dori M; Bonnet, Jonathan; Modarai, Farhad; George, Aaron; Cunningham, Traven; Mason, Markedia; Shahsahebi, Mohammad; Grambow, Steven C; Bennett, Gary G; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2016-05-01

    Although mobile health (mHealth) devices offer a unique opportunity to capture patient health data remotely, it is unclear whether patients will consistently use multiple devices simultaneously and/or if chronic disease affects adherence. Three healthy and three chronically ill participants were recruited to provide data on 11 health indicators via four devices and a diet app. The healthy participants averaged overall weekly use of 76%, compared to 16% for those with chronic illnesses. Device adherence declined across all participants during the study. Patients with chronic illnesses, with arguably the most to benefit from advanced (or increased) monitoring, may be less likely to adopt and use these devices compared to healthy individuals. Results suggest device fatigue may be a significant problem. Use of mobile technologies may have the potential to transform care delivery across populations and within individuals over time. However, devices may need to be tailored to meet the specific patient needs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Hematological clozapine monitoring with a point-of-care device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Thode, Dorrit; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    for several reasons, perhaps most importantly because of the mandatory hematological monitoring. The Chempaq Express Blood Counter (Chempaq XBC) is a point-of-care device providing counts of white blood cells (WBC) and granulocytes based on a capillary blood sampling. A randomized cross-over trial design...

  4. Method and device for monitoring distortion in an optical network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and a device for monitoring of distortion in an optical network are provided, wherein at least one reference signal and at least one data signal are conveyed via an optical link and wherein a distortion of the at least one data signal is determined based on the at least one reference

  5. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  6. Signal Processing Device (SPD) for networked radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmapurikar, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Sawhney, A.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    A networked radiation and parameter monitoring system with three tier architecture is being developed. Signal Processing Device (SPD) is a second level sub-system node in the network. SPD is an embedded system which has multiple input channels and output communication interfaces. It acquires and processes data from first level parametric sensor devices, and sends to third level devices in response to request commands received from host. It also performs scheduled diagnostic operations and passes on the information to host. It supports inputs in the form of differential digital signals and analog voltage signals. SPD communicates with higher level devices over RS232/RS422/USB channels. The system has been designed with main requirements of minimal power consumption and harsh environment in radioactive plants. This paper discusses the hardware and software design details of SPD. (author)

  7. A portable ECG monitoring device with Bluetooth and Holter capabilities for telemedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucani, Daniel; Cataldo, Giancarlos; Cruz, Julio; Villegas, Guillermo; Wong, Sara

    2006-01-01

    A prototype of a portable ECG-monitoring device has been developed for clinical and non-clinical environments as part of a telemedicine system to provide remote and continuous surveillance of patients. The device can acquire, store and/or transmit ECG signals to computer-based platforms or specially configured access points (AP) with Intranet/Internet capabilities in order to reach remote monitoring stations. Acquired data can be stored in a flash memory card in FAT16 format for later recovery, or transmitted via Bluetooth or USB to a local station or AP. This data acquisition module (DAM) operates in two modes: Holter and on-line transmission.

  8. A spent fuel assemblies monitoring device by nondestructive analysis 'PYTHON'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.; Broeskamp, M.; Hahn, H.; Bignan, G.; Boisset, M.; Silie, P.

    1995-01-01

    The monitoring of spent fuel assemblies (16 x 16 UOX) in KWG-reactor pool with the use of non-destructive methods (total Gamma and neutron counting) allow the control of average burn-up and the extremity burn-up. The measurements allow a safety-criticality control before loading the fuel assemblies into the transport casks. A device called PYTHON has been tested and qualified in France. This paper presents a description of the industrial PYTHON device and the results of the measurements. (orig.)

  9. Non-invasive blood glucose monitoring with Raman spectroscopy: prospects for device miniaturization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wróbel, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with diabetes has reached over 350 million, and still continues to increase. The need for regular blood glucose monitoring sparks the interest in the development of modern detection technologies. One of those methods, which allows for noninvasive measurements, is Raman spectroscopy. The ability of infrared light to penetrate deep into tissues allows for obtaining measurements through the skin without its perforation. This paper presents the limitations and possibilities of non-invasive blood glucose monitoring with Raman spectroscopy. Especially focusing on the possibilities for device miniaturization. Such device incorporates a Raman spectrometer, a fiber-optical probe, and a computing device (microcontroller, smartphone, etc.) which calculates the glucose concentration using specialized algorithms. Simplification of device design, as well as turbidity correction technique and a new proposed method of synchronized detection are described

  10. A New Device to Automate the Monitoring of Critical Patients’ Urine Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Otero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urine output (UO is usually measured manually each hour in acutely ill patients. This task consumes a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, in the literature there is evidence that more frequent (minute-by-minute UO measurement could impact clinical decision making and improve patient outcomes. However, it is not feasible to manually take minute-by-minute UO measurements. A device capable of automatically monitoring UO could save precious time of the healthcare staff and improve patient outcomes through a more precise and continuous monitoring of this parameter. This paper presents a device capable of automatically monitoring UO. It provides minute by minute measures and it can generate alarms that warn of deviations from therapeutic goals. It uses a capacitive sensor for the measurement of the UO collected within a rigid container. When the container is full, it automatically empties without requiring any internal or external power supply or any intervention by the nursing staff. In vitro tests have been conducted to verify the proper operation and accuracy in the measures of the device. These tests confirm the viability of the device to automate the monitoring of UO.

  11. Cutting device for spent local power range monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Tsuji, Teruaki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent radioactive contamination of the reactor water and simplify the operation of transferring the spent local power range monitor to a pool and preparation of the space for storing the monitor in the pool by arranging it such that the monitor is cut in the reactor water and that its cut end is closed in the reactor water. Constitution: A device for clamping a spent local power range monitor disposed within the reactor core and for cutting the monitor such that the content will not be exposed are supported by support means such that they are spaced apart in the vertical direction, and the support means is suspended in the reactor water such that it is movable relative to the monitor. Thus, there is no need to mount the cutter in any separately provided support means, and there is no possibility of exposure of the content since the cut end of the monitor is closed by the outer frame. It is therefore possible to prevent contamination of the reactor water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Method of inspecting the function of reactor noise monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Hirohito.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to inspect the function of a reactor noise monitoring device used for monitoring the operation abnormality in coolant circuits during reactor operation. Constitution: A cylinder incorporating a steel ball moved laterally by a pneumatic pressure is disposed to the main body of a reactor coolant circuit. A three-way solenoid valve disposed to a central control room outside to a radiation controlled area is connected with the cylinder by way of pneumatic pipeways. The three-way solenoid valve is operated for a certain period of time by a timer in the central control room to thereby impinge the steel ball in the cylinder against the main body of the coolant circuit and it is inspected as to whether the reactor noise monitoring system can detect the impinging energy or not. Accordingly, the remote control is possible from out of the radiation controlled area and the inspection work can be simplified. (Seki, T.)

  13. Can validated wrist devices with position sensors replace arm devices for self-home blood pressure monitoring? A randomized crossover trial using ambulatory monitoring as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, George S; Christodoulakis, George R; Nasothimiou, Efthimia G; Giovas, Periklis P; Kalogeropoulos, Petros G

    2008-07-01

    Electronic devices that measure blood pressure (BP) at the arm level are regarded as more accurate than wrist devices and are preferred for home BP (HBP) monitoring. Recently, wrist devices with position sensors have been successfully validated using established protocols. This study assessed whether HBP values measured with validated wrist devices are sufficiently reliable to be used for making patient-related decisions in clinical practice. This randomized crossover study compared HBP measurements taken using validated wrist devices (wrist-HBP, Omron R7 with position sensor) with those taken using arm devices (arm-HBP, Omron 705IT), and also with measurements of awake ambulatory BP (ABP, SpaceLabs), in 79 subjects (36 men and 43 women) with hypertension. The mean age of the study population was 56.7 +/- 11.8 years, and 33 of the subjects were not under treatment for hypertension. The average arm-HBP was higher than the average wrist-HBP (mean difference, systolic 5.2 +/- 9.1 mm Hg, P or =10 mm Hg difference between systolic wrist-HBP and arm-HBP and twelve subjects (15%) showed similar levels of disparity in diastolic HBP readings. Strong correlations were found between arm-HBP and wrist-HBP (r 0.74/0.74, systolic/diastolic, P arm-HBP (r 0.73/0.76) than with wrist-HBP (0.55/0.69). The wrist-arm HBP difference was associated with systolic ABP (r 0.34) and pulse pressure (r 0.29), but not with diastolic ABP, sex, age, arm circumference, and wrist circumference. There might be important differences in HBP measured using validated wrist devices with position sensor vs. arm devices, and these could impact decisions relating to the patient in clinical practice. Measurements taken using arm devices are more closely related to ABP values than those recorded by wrist devices. More research is needed before recommending the widespread use of wrist monitors in clinical practice. American Journal of Hypertension doi:10.1038/ajh.2008.176American Journal of Hypertension (2008

  14. Monitoring of bedridden patients: development of a fall detection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, M; Silva, P; Cunha, S R; Correia, M V

    2013-01-01

    Falls of patients are an important issue in hospitals nowadays; it causes severe injuries, increases hospitalization time and treatment costs. The detection of a fall, in time, provides faster rescue to the patient, preventing more serious injuries, as well as saving nursing time. The MovinSense® is an electronic device designed for monitoring patients to prevent pressure sores, and the main goal of this work was to develop a new tool for this device, with the purpose of detecting if the patient has fallen from the hospital bed, without changing any of the device's original features. Experiments for gathering data samples of inertial signals of falling from the bed were obtained using the device. For fall detection a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 100% were reached. Another algorithm was developed to detect if the patient got out of his/her bed.

  15. Water sampling device for fuel rod failure monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oogami, Hideaki; Echigoya, Hironori; Matsuoka, Tesshi.

    1991-01-01

    The device of the present invention accurately samples coolants in a channel box as sampling water even if the upper end of the channel box of a fuel assembly is positioned at the same height or lower than the upper end of an upper lattice plate. An existent device comprises an outer cap, an inner cap, an air supply pipe and a water sampling tube. In addition, the device of the present invention comprises a sealing material disposed at the end of the outer cap for keeping liquid sealing with the upper lattice plate and a water level monitoring pipe extended to lower than the inner cap passing through the liquid sealing of the outer cap for sucking the atmosphere in the outer cap. Pressurized air is sent through the air supply pipe, to lower the water level of the coolants in the outer cap and the water level monitoring pipe sucks the pressurized air, by which the inside and the outside of the channel box are partitioned. Subsequently, if the sample water is sampled by a sampling tube, sampling water which enables accurate evaluation for radioactivity concentration in the fuel assembly can be obtained. (I.S.)

  16. Monitoring of Vital Signs with Flexible and Wearable Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yasser; Ostfeld, Aminy E; Lochner, Claire M; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C

    2016-06-01

    Advances in wireless technologies, low-power electronics, the internet of things, and in the domain of connected health are driving innovations in wearable medical devices at a tremendous pace. Wearable sensor systems composed of flexible and stretchable materials have the potential to better interface to the human skin, whereas silicon-based electronics are extremely efficient in sensor data processing and transmission. Therefore, flexible and stretchable sensors combined with low-power silicon-based electronics are a viable and efficient approach for medical monitoring. Flexible medical devices designed for monitoring human vital signs, such as body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure, pulse oxygenation, and blood glucose have applications in both fitness monitoring and medical diagnostics. As a review of the latest development in flexible and wearable human vitals sensors, the essential components required for vitals sensors are outlined and discussed here, including the reported sensor systems, sensing mechanisms, sensor fabrication, power, and data processing requirements. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Monitoring critical facilities by using advanced RF devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Shuler, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The ability to monitor critical environment parameters of nuclear plants at all times, particularly during and after a disruptive accident, is vital for the safety of plant personnel, rescue and recovery crews, and the surrounding communities. Conventional hard-wired assets that depend on supplied power may be decimated as a result of such events, as witnessed in the Japanese Fukushima nuclear power plant in March 2011. Self-powered monitoring devices operating on a wireless platform, on the other hand, may survive such calamity and remain functional. The devices would be pre-positioned at strategic locations, particularly where the dangerous build-up of contamination and radiation may preclude subsequent manned entrance and surveillance. Equipped with sensors for β-γ radiation, neutrons, hydrogen gas, temperature, humidity, pressure, and water level, as well as with criticality alarms and imaging equipment for heat, video, and other capabilities, these devices can provide vital surveillance information for assessing the extent of plant damage, mandating responses (e.g., evacuation before impending hydrogen explosion), and enabling overall safe and efficient recovery in a disaster. A radio frequency identification (RFID)-based system - called ARG-US - may be modified and adapted for this task. Developed by Argonne for DOE, ARG-US (meaning 'watchful guardian') has been used successfully to monitor and track sensitive nuclear materials packages at DOE sites. It utilizes sensors in the tags to continuously monitor the state of health of the packaging and promptly disseminates alarms to authorized users when any of the preset sensor thresholds is violated. By adding plant-specific monitoring sensors to the already strong sensor suite and adopting modular hardware, firmware, and software subsystems that are tailored for specific subsystems of a plant, a Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) system, built on a wireless sensor network (WSN) platform, is being

  18. Monitoring critical facilities by using advanced RF devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Shuler, James

    2013-01-01

    The ability to monitor critical environment parameters of nuclear plants at all times, particularly during and after a disruptive accident, is vital for the safety of plant personnel, rescue and recovery crews, and the surrounding communities. Conventional hard-wired assets that depend on supplied power may be decimated as a result of such events, as witnessed in the Japanese Fukushima nuclear power plant in March 2011. Self-powered monitoring devices operating on a wireless platform, on the other hand, may survive such calamity and remain functional. The devices would be pre-positioned at strategic locations, particularly where the dangerous build-up of contamination and radiation may preclude subsequent manned entrance and surveillance. Equipped with sensors for β-γ radiation, neutrons, hydrogen gas, temperature, humidity, pressure, and water level, as well as with criticality alarms and imaging equipment for heat, video, and other capabilities, these devices can provide vital surveillance information for assessing the extent of plant damage, mandating responses (e.g., evacuation before impending hydrogen explosion), and enabling overall safe and efficient recovery in a disaster. A radio frequency identification (RFID)-based system - called ARG-US - may be modified and adapted for this task. Developed by Argonne for DOE, ARG-US (meaning 'watchful guardian') has been used successfully to monitor and track sensitive nuclear materials packages at DOE sites. It utilizes sensors in the tags to continuously monitor the state of health of the packaging and promptly disseminates alarms to authorized users when any of the preset sensor thresholds is violated. By adding plant-specific monitoring sensors to the already strong sensor suite and adopting modular hardware, firmware, and software subsystems that are tailored for specific subsystems of a plant, a Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) system, built on a wireless sensor network (WSN) platform, is being

  19. Device for monitoring electron-ion ring parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyutyunnikov, S.I.; Shalyapin, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is classified as the method of collective ion acceleration. The device for electron-ion ring parameters monitoring is described. The invention is aimed at increasing functional possibilities of the device at the expense of the enchance in the number of the ring controlled parameters. The device comprises three similar plane mirrors installed over accelerating tube circumference and a mirror manufactured in the form of prism and located in the tube centre, as well as the system of synchrotron radiation recording and processing. Two plane mirrors are installed at an angle of 45 deg to the vertical axis. The angle of the third plane mirror 3 α and that of prismatic mirror 2 α to the vertical axis depend on geometric parameters of the ring and accelerating tube and they are determined by the expression α=arc sin R K /2(R T -L), where R K - ring radius, R T - accelerating tube radius, L - the height of segment, formed by the mirror and inner surface of the accelerating tube. The device suggested permits to determine longitudinal dimensions of the ring, its velocity and the number of electrons and ions in the ring

  20. Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis for an Antifalling Safety Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxiang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a constant need for the safe operation and reliability of antifalling safety device (AFSD of an elevator. This paper reports an experimental study on rotation speed and catching torque monitoring and fault diagnosis of an antifalling safety device in a construction elevator. Denoising the signal using wavelet transform is presented in this paper. Based on the denoising effects for several types of wavelets, the sym8 wavelet basis, which introduces the high order approximation and an adaptive threshold, is employed for denoising the signal. The experimental result shows a maximum data error reduction of 7.5% is obtained and SNRs (signal-to-noise ratio of rotation speed and catching torque are improved for 3.9% and 6.4%, respectively.

  1. Tritium contaminated surface monitoring with a solid - state device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culcer, Mihai; Iliescu, Mariana; Curuia, Marian; Enache, Adrian; Stefanescu, Ioan; Ducu, Catalin; Malinovschi, Viorel

    2004-01-01

    The low energy of betas makes tritium difficult to detect. However, there are several methods used in tritium detection, such as liquid scintillation and ionization chambers. Tritium on or near a surface can be also detected using proportional counters and, recently, solid state devices. The paper presents our results in the design and achievement of a surface tritium monitor using a PIN photodiode as a solid state charged particle detector to count betas emitted from the surface. That method allows continuous, real-time and non-destructively measuring of tritium. (authors)

  2. Improvement of a device for monitoring the contamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Albert.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this invention is to make it possible to monitor the contamination of surfaces by a light weight portable device and enabling the alpha, beta and gamma radiation contamination to be detected. The detection probe which is connected by a single lead to the box is adapted, in each particular case, to the radiation mode emitted by the contaminated surfaces and the box is provided with a special leak-proof socket for connecting the probe and includes means for assessing the counting rate of the radiation given off, depending on the mode of the radiations emitted by the contaminated surfaces and the intensity of the count rate [fr

  3. New monitoring technology to objectively assess adherence to prescribed footwear and assistive devices during ambulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans

    2012-11-01

    To assess the validity and feasibility of a new temperature-based adherence monitor to measure footwear use. Observational study. University medical center and participants' homes. Convenience sample of healthy subjects (n=11) and neuropathic diabetic patients at high risk for foot ulceration (n=14). In healthy subjects, the validity of the in-shoe attached adherence monitor was investigated by comparing its registrations of donning and doffing of footwear during 7 days to an accurately kept log registration. In diabetic patients, the feasibility of using the adherence monitor for 7 days in conjunction with a time-synchronized ankle-worn step activity monitor to register prescribed footwear use during walking was assessed. Furthermore, a usability questionnaire was completed. For validity, the mean time difference and 95% confidence interval (CI) between moments of donning/doffing footwear recorded with the adherence monitor and in the log were calculated. For feasibility, technical performance, usability, and the percentage of steps that the footwear was worn (adherence) were assessed. The mean time difference between the adherence monitor and log recordings was 0.4 minutes (95% CI, 0.2-0.6min). One erroneous recording and 2 incomplete recordings were obtained in diabetic patients. Three patients reported discomfort with the step activity monitor, and 4 patients would not favor repeated testing. Patients used their footwear for between 9% and 99% of their walking steps. The adherence monitor shows good validity in measuring when footwear is used or not, and is, together with instrumented monitoring of walking activity, a feasible and objective method to assess treatment adherence. This method can have wide application in clinical practice and research regarding prescribed footwear and other body-worn assistive devices. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Device for remote control of monitoring of a conveyor line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubin, N F; Rybak, Yu I

    1981-01-01

    The known device under mine conditions because of the decrease of resistance of the insulation of the current-carrying lines of the transfer line does not guarantee reliable protection from false triggering. The purpose of the invention is to improve the reliability of monitoring and control by improving interference-resistance of the device. This goal is achieved because the compensation block is equipped with a transistor, seven diodes, three stabilitrons and resistors united into two compensation circuits which are connected in parallel. The first of them is formed by two stabilitrons connected in series, where the cathode of one of them through a resistor and the counter-connected first diode is connected to a common lead and to the first pole of the block of monitoring and control. The anode of the other through the second counter-connected diode is connected to the second pole of the block of monitoring and control. The second compensation circuit is formed of a transistor, whose collector is connected to the common lead. The emitter is connected through the resistor to the cathode of the third diode whose anode is connected to the lead of the communications line and to the anodes of the fourth diode directly, and the fifth through the resistor, and with the cathode of the third stabilitron whose anode is connected to the transistor base and through the resistor to the common lead. The cathode of the fourth diode is connected to the common point of the first and second stabilitrons through the resistor, connected through the sixth diode, connected by cathode to the cathode of the fourth diode, parallel to the information block. The cathode of the fifth diode is connected to the anode of the second diode, and the second pole of the block of monitoring and control is connected to the communications lead through the seventh diode, connected counter to the fourth and fifth diodes.

  5. A review on remote monitoring technology applied to implantable electronic cardiovascular devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paulo Dias; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira; Reis, António Hipólito; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro

    2010-12-01

    Implantable electronic cardiovascular devices (IECD) include a broad spectrum of devices that have the ability to maintain rhythm, provide cardiac resynchronization therapy, and/or prevent sudden cardiac death. The incidence of bradyarrhythmias and other cardiac problems led to a broader use of IECD, which turned traditional follow-up into an extremely heavy burden for healthcare systems to support. Our aim was to assess the impact of remote monitoring on the follow-up of patients with IECD. We performed a review through PubMed using a specific query. The paper selection process included a three-step approach in which title, abstract, and cross-references were analyzed. Studies were then selected using previously defined inclusion criteria and analyzed according to the country of origin of the study, year, and journal of publication; type of study; and main issues covered. Twenty articles were included in this review. Eighty percent of the selected papers addressed clinical issues, from which 94% referred clinical events identification, clinical stability, time savings, or physician satisfaction as advantages, whereas 38% referred disadvantages that included both legal and technical issues. Forty-five percent of the papers referred patient issues, from which 89% presented advantages, focusing on patient acceptance/satisfaction, and patient time-savings. The main downsides were technical issues but patient privacy was also addressed. All the papers dealing with economic issues (20%) referred both advantages and disadvantages equally. Remote monitoring is presently a safe technology, widely accepted by patients and physicians, for its convenience, reassurance, and diagnostic potential. This review summarizes the principles of remote IECD monitoring presenting the current state-of-the-art. Patient safety and device interaction, applicability of current technology, and limitations of remote IECD monitoring are also addressed. The use of remote monitor should consider

  6. Biofeedback device for patients on axillary crutches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, E J; Goh, J C; Bose, K; Toh, S L; Choo, A

    1989-08-01

    The axillary crutch is commonly prescribed as an ambulatory aid to patients with temporal or permanent disability in the lower extremity. When fitting the axillary crutch, it is important that the user be instructed not to bear excessive weight on the axillary bar. Excessive weight bearing on the axillary bar can result in a sevenfold increase in the reaction force under the armpit. This force may be a contributory factor to crutch paralysis or thrombosis of the axillobrachial artery. In order to prevent this occurrence an electronic biofeedback device was designed and developed for use in the training of 3-point swing-through axillary crutch ambulation. It detects excessive weight bearing on the axillary bar during crutch ambulation and produces an audible signal which prompts the patient to make necessary adjustment to relieve load bearing on the axillary bar. The design and development of the biofeedback device is discussed in this paper.

  7. CAS-3 H - a device for tritium monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbu, N.; Popescu, I. V.; Bucur, C.

    2001-01-01

    The equipment for tritium monitoring is designed to continuous sampling of tritium from working places in nuclear power plants (NPP) or from plants' surroundings. Its construction allows continuous function in free atmosphere during 8 hours, it is protected against environment factors by support beg, while its components are made from stainless steel or corrosion resistant materials. Inside and surroundings of NPP tritium can exist in different form. The most important tritium quantity (over 90%) are in form of tritiated water, and in form of free hydrogen (less than 10% in closed rooms inside NPP), as well as, in a very small quantity in form of chemical organic tritiated combinations (less than 1%). Tritium sampling from indoor following a mixing phase is considered a simply and fast method. Even this method isn't too precise it requires short time for determination. This is a big advantage because inside NPP the momentary evolution of tritium concentration must be known to be able to take adequate measures. Constructive data for this device are: - dimensions, length x width x height, 470 x 410 x 130 mm; - supply, 2,5 V c.c.; - maxim power consumed, 5 W/h - weight, max. 6 kg. Device main components are: - dry mini-pump with double membrane that ensures a nominal debit upper then necessary, of 12 l/h air at a depression of least 20 mm Hg; - electrical engine with supply tension of 2.5 V c.c., and revolution of 500 rev/min, that acts the pump. Engine power is about 5 W; - filter used as device's shield against particles from air; - revmeter type ROTROM-I.D-PTFE, for air debit measurement by mixing vessels, with measure scale between 4 and 27 Nl/h air; - two mixing vessels made of glass with active capacity of 100 ml; - 28 photoelectric cells placed over support beg, that ensures accumulator charging, thus allowing an increased autonomy in time for device function; - two accumulators type R20 with tension of 1.25 V and minimum intensity of 4 A; - support beg

  8. Left ventricular assist device management in patients chronically supported for advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowger, Jennifer; Romano, Matthew A; Stulak, John; Pagani, Francis D; Aaronson, Keith D

    2011-03-01

    This review summarizes management strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in heart failure patients supported chronically with implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). As the population of patients supported with long-term LVADs has grown, patient selection, operative technique, and patient management strategies have been refined, leading to improved outcomes. This review summarizes recent findings on LVAD candidate selection, and discusses outpatient strategies to optimize device performance and heart failure management. It also reviews important device complications that warrant close outpatient monitoring. Managing patients on chronic LVAD support requires regular patient follow-up, multidisciplinary care teams, and frequent laboratory and echocardiographic surveillance to ensure optimal outcomes.

  9. See I told you I was taking it! - attitudes of adolescents with asthma towards a device monitoring their inhaler use: Implications for future design

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Sam; Lang, Alexandra. R.; Sharples, Sarah; Shaw, Dominick E.

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to treatment in asthma is often poor, particularly in adolescents and children where the condition is most prevalent. Electronic monitoring devices have shown potential for improving inhaler use, yet little research has considered the attitudes of patients towards these devices. We gave seven adolescents with asthma an electronic monitoring device to use for one month and collected their views on important issues including monitoring and data sharing. Our results showed that partici...

  10. MedMon: securing medical devices through wireless monitoring and anomaly detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Raghunathan, Anand; Jha, Niraj K

    2013-12-01

    Rapid advances in personal healthcare systems based on implantable and wearable medical devices promise to greatly improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment for a range of medical conditions. However, the increasing programmability and wireless connectivity of medical devices also open up opportunities for malicious attackers. Unfortunately, implantable/wearable medical devices come with extreme size and power constraints, and unique usage models, making it infeasible to simply borrow conventional security solutions such as cryptography. We propose a general framework for securing medical devices based on wireless channel monitoring and anomaly detection. Our proposal is based on a medical security monitor (MedMon) that snoops on all the radio-frequency wireless communications to/from medical devices and uses multi-layered anomaly detection to identify potentially malicious transactions. Upon detection of a malicious transaction, MedMon takes appropriate response actions, which could range from passive (notifying the user) to active (jamming the packets so that they do not reach the medical device). A key benefit of MedMon is that it is applicable to existing medical devices that are in use by patients, with no hardware or software modifications to them. Consequently, it also leads to zero power overheads on these devices. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal by developing a prototype implementation for an insulin delivery system using off-the-shelf components (USRP software-defined radio). We evaluate its effectiveness under several attack scenarios. Our results show that MedMon can detect virtually all naive attacks and a large fraction of more sophisticated attacks, suggesting that it is an effective approach to enhancing the security of medical devices.

  11. Device therapy in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naokata Sumitomo, MD, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Despite the limited experience, limitations of device implantations owing to the size of the devices, and necessity for nonendocardial electrode placement, device implantations are required in more pediatric and CHD patients than expected.

  12. Concept Generation Process for Patient Transferring Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandavate, A. L.; Sarje, S. H.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop concepts for patient transferring tasks. The concept generation process of patient transferring device (PTD), which includes interviews of the customers, interpretation of the needs, organizing the needs into a hierarchy, establishing relative importance of the needs, establishing target specifications, and conceptualization has been discussed in this paper. The authors conducted the interviews of customers at Mobilink NGO, St. John's Hospital, Bangalore in order to know the needs and wants for the PTD. AHP technique was used for establishing and evaluating relative importance of needs, and based on the importance of the customer needs, concepts were developed through brainstorming.

  13. Installation and sampling of vadose zone monitoring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, S.M.; Strickland, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    1987-10-01

    A vadose zone monitoring system was installed in a sanitary landfill near the Y-12 facility on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge, Tennessee Reservation. The work was completed as part of the LLWDDD program to develop, design, and demonstrate new low level radioactive waste disposal monitoring methods. The objective of the project was to evaluate the performance of three types of vadose zone samplers within a similar hydrogeologic environment for use as early detection monitoring devices. The three different types of samplers included the Soil Moisture Equipment Corporation Pressure-Vacuum samplers (Models 1920 and 1940), and the BAT Piezometer (Model MK II) manufactured by BAT Envitech, Inc. All three samplers are designed to remove soil moisture from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Five clusters of three holes each were drilled to maximum depths of 45 ft around part of the periphery of the landfill. Three samplers, one of each type, were installed at each cluster location. Water samples were obtained from 13 of the 15 samplers and submitted to Martin Marietta for analysis. All three samplers performed satisfactorily when considering ease of installation, required in-hole development, and ability to collect water samples from the vadose zone. Advantages and disadvantages of each sampler type are discussed in the main report

  14. Regulation E 69-14. Monitoring requirements for medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In the 'Regulations for the State Evaluation and Registration of Medical Equipment' force (Hereinafter Rules) set forth in Chapter VII, Articles 79 and 86, the monitoring activity as one of the programs necessary for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medical monitoring equipment. In the years 2008 and 2011 were approved and implemented by the Center for State Control of Medical Equipment (CCEEM) Regulations and -1.1 ER and ER-1 that support and regulatory requirements 'Control and monitoring of pacemakers and implantable defibrillators' and 'Assessment, recording and control after market surgical silicone implants,' which are specific to these products and have provided a useful result for the performance of the activity. Given the number and diversity of high-risk medical devices as implantable or sustain human life that are brought into our National Health System (SNS), a regulation establishing control over the behavior becomes necessary safety and effectiveness of this equipment during use, which provide inputs to risk management. The objective of this regulation is to establish the regulatory requirements for tracking medical equipment introduced in the NHS. The provisions of this Regulation is aimed at health institutions, to CECMED as manufacturers, suppliers, distributors and importers of medical equipment.

  15. Cutting device for a local power range monitor tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Tsuji, Teruaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a combination of a lifting device for a local power range monitor (LPRM) tube, a cutter and a transfer machine to safely and securely cut the LPRM tube under water. Structure: An LPRM tube is gripped by an LPRM tube gripper, which is moved up and down by a chain drive, through a flexture corrector, and the tip of the LPRM tube is held and released from the LPRM tube gripper so as to be threaded into an LPRM tube cutter to grip it by a transfer gripper of an LPRM tube transfer machine, after which the LPRM tube cutter is operated under pressure water to cut the LPRM tube with a cutter edge so that a cut portion is closed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  16. NASDA technician test real-time radiation monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A technician from the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) tests the real-time radiation monitoring device on SPACEHAB at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for the STS-89 mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  17. Devices for Ambulatory Monitoring of Sleep-Associated Disorders in Children with Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, Adriana; Tsuboyama, Melissa; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-12-25

    Good sleep quality is essential for a child's wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are frequent in the pediatric population, and even more so in children with neurological problems. Monitoring devices can help to better characterize sleep efficiency and sleep quality. They can also be helpful to better characterize paroxysmal nocturnal events and differentiate between nocturnal seizures, parasomnias, and obstructive sleep apnea, each of which has a different management. Overnight ambulatory detection devices allow for a tolerable, low cost, objective assessment of sleep quality in the patient's natural environment. They can also be used as a notification system to allow for rapid recognition and prompt intervention of events like seizures. Optimal monitoring devices will be patient- and diagnosis-specific, but may include a combination of modalities such as ambulatory electroencephalograms, actigraphy, and pulse oximetry. We will summarize the current literature on ambulatory sleep devices for detecting sleep disorders in children with neurological diseases.

  18. Automatic ingestion monitor: a novel wearable device for monitoring of ingestive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Juan M; Farooq, Muhammad; Sazonov, Edward

    2014-06-01

    Objective monitoring of food intake and ingestive behavior in a free-living environment remains an open problem that has significant implications in study and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. In this paper, a novel wearable sensor system (automatic ingestion monitor, AIM) is presented for objective monitoring of ingestive behavior in free living. The proposed device integrates three sensor modalities that wirelessly interface to a smartphone: a jaw motion sensor, a hand gesture sensor, and an accelerometer. A novel sensor fusion and pattern recognition method was developed for subject-independent food intake recognition. The device and the methodology were validated with data collected from 12 subjects wearing AIM during the course of 24 h in which both the daily activities and the food intake of the subjects were not restricted in any way. Results showed that the system was able to detect food intake with an average accuracy of 89.8%, which suggests that AIM can potentially be used as an instrument to monitor ingestive behavior in free-living individuals.

  19. Ambulatory stress monitoring with a wearable bluetooth electrocardiographic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungyoup; Yang, Youngmo; Lee, Jangyoung; Yang, Heebum; Park, Kyungnam; Lee, Suyeul; Lee, Inbum; Jang, Yongwon

    2010-01-01

    We tried to monitor stress by using a wearable one channel ECG device that can send ECG signals through Bluetooth wireless communication. Noxious physical and mental arithmetic stress was given three times repeatedly to healthy adults, and cortisol and catecholamines were measured serially from peripheral blood. At the same time, time domain and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV) were calculated by taking precordial electrocardiogram. The intensity of correlation between subjective visual analogue scale (VAS) and catecholamine, cortisol, and HRV parameters according to stress was analyzed by using concordance correlation coefficients. The HRV triangular index and LF/HF ratio had high concordance correlation with the degree of stress in the physical stress model. In mental arithmetic stress model, the HRV triangular index and LF/HF ratio had weak concordance correlation with the degree of stress, and it had lower predictability than epinephrine. In both models, cortisol had some correlation with catecholamine, but it had little correlation with HRV parameters. HRV parameters using wearable one channel ECG device can be useful in predicting acute stress and also in many other areas.

  20. A respiratory monitoring device based on clavicular motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, D G; Aspinall, R; Patel, M K; Lang, P-O; Sinclair, A J

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory rate is one of the key vital signs yet unlike temperature, heart rate or blood pressure, there is no simple and low cost measurement device for medical use. Here we discuss the development of a respiratory sensor based upon clavicular motion and the findings of a pilot study comparing respiratory rate readings derived from clavicular and thoracic motion with an expiratory breath flow reference sensor. Simultaneously sampled data from resting volunteers (n = 8) was analysed to determine the location of individual breaths in the data set and from these, breath periods and frequency were calculated. Clavicular sensor waveforms were found to be more consistent and of greater amplitude than those from the thoracic device, demonstrating good alignment with the reference waveform. On comparing breath by breath periods a close agreement was observed with the reference, with mean clavicular respiratory rate R 2 values of 0.89 (lateral) and 0.98 (longitudinal-axis). This pilot study demonstrates the viability of clavicular respiratory sensing. The sensor is unobtrusive, unaffected by bioelectrical or electrode problems and easier to determine and more consistent than thoracic motion sensing. With relatively basic signal conditioning and processing requirements, it could provide an ideal platform for a low-cost respiratory monitor. (note)

  1. eWALL Innovation for Smart e-Health Monitoring Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis

    2017-01-01

    E-health environments should be designed to provide personalized services and applications to their primary users (i.e. the patients) by breaking the barrier of technology acceptance and addressing their daily needs, under strict regulation and security constraints. A typical scenario would employ...... wireless and wired sensors and local or cloud-based processing units to collect, process, store and communicate data related to the patients’ needs and condition. E-health devices can be located on the patients’ bodies or immediate environments to monitor and interact with the patients, while they perform...

  2. Design of a tracking device for on-line dose monitoring in hadrontherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battistoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Faccini, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, “La Sapienza” Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Muraro, S., E-mail: silvia.muraro@mi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Paramatti, R. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Patera, V. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, “La Sapienza” Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Pinci, D. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Rucinski, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, “La Sapienza” Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Russomando, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, “La Sapienza” Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    Hadrontherapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits ion beams (mostly protons and carbons). A critical issue is the accuracy that is achievable when monitoring the dose released by the beam to the tumor and to the surrounding tissues. We present the design of a tracking device, developed in the framework of the INSIDE project , capable of monitoring in real time the longitudinal profile of the dose delivered in the patient. This is possible by detecting the secondary particles produced by the interaction of the beam in the tissues. The position of the Bragg peak can be correlated to the charged particles emission point distribution measurement. The tracking device will be able to provide a fast response on the dose pattern by tracking the secondary charged fragments. The tracks are detected using 6 planes of scintillating fibers, providing the 3D coordinates of the track intersection with each plane. The fibers planes are followed by a plastic scintillator and by a small calorimeter built with a pixelated Lutetium Fine Silicate (LFS) crystal. A complete detector simulation, followed by the event reconstruction, has been performed to determine the achievable monitoring spatial resolution. - Highlights: • On-line range monitoring in hadrontherapy. • New approach: detection of charged secondary particles escaping the patient. • Correlation of longitudinal emission profile of secondaries with the beam range. • New detector integrated in a multi-modal system to be tested in clinical operation.

  3. Development of a Whole Blood Paper-Based Device for Phenylalanine Detection in the Context of PKU Therapy Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Robinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-based testing does not allow for the sufficiently rapid return of data to enable optimal therapeutic monitoring of patients with metabolic diseases such as phenylketonuria (PKU. The typical turn-around time of several days for current laboratory-based testing is too slow to be practically useful for effective monitoring or optimizing therapy. This report describes the development of a rapid, paper-based, point-of-care device for phenylalanine detection using a small volume (40 μL of whole blood. The quantitative resolution and reproducibility of this device with instrumented readout are described, together with the potential use of this device for point-of-care monitoring by PKU patients.

  4. Transcranial Doppler monitoring during stenting of the carotid bifurcation: evaluation of two different distal protection devices in preventing embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubartelli, Paolo; Brusa, Giulia; Arrigo, Alessandro; Abbadessa, Francesco; Giachero, Corinna; Vischi, Massimo; Ricca, Maria Maddalena; Ottonello, Gian Andrea

    2006-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of 2 emboli protection devices in preventing embolization during carotid artery stenting (CAS). The GuardWire distal occlusion system (n=19) and the distal FilterWire EX (n=12) were compared in 31 consecutive patients (24 men; mean age 71+/-10 years) monitored with transcranial Doppler for microembolic signals before, during, and after CAS. The choice of the protection device was based on availability and on the patency of the contralateral carotid artery. The baseline characteristics were similar in the patients treated under protection from either device. Placement and retrieval of the protection device, stenting, and postdilation were technically successful in all patients. Two patients suffered a transient ischemic attack shortly after the procedure; no other adverse cardiovascular events occurred at 30 days. Compared to the GuardWire, the use of the FilterWire was associated with more microembolic signals during stent deployment (77.4+/-33.5 versus 1.07+/-1.94, pprotection device (21.4+/-15.4 versus 10.9+/-8.3, p=0.051). Consequently, the total amount of microembolic signals during the procedure was higher when the filter device was employed (183.0+/-42.1 versus 31.7+/-12.0, p<0.0001). The distal occlusion device appears to be more effective than the filter in reducing distal embolization detected by transcranial Doppler monitoring.

  5. Monitoring device for the thermal margin of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Tatsuo

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the operation region and insure the stability thereby significantly improve the operation performance of a nuclear reactor by properly calculating a limited value for the minimum critical power ratio (OLMCPR) reflecting the actual reactor core state. Constitution: The device comprises a nuclear constant calculator, an abnormal transient analyzer and a transient critical power calculator. The abnormal transient analyzer performs analysis for the abnormal transient phenomena with a large variation amount of the minimum critical power ratio using the nuclear constants calculated by the nuclear constant calculator, to thereby determine transient changes such as the flow rate, power, pressure and entrance enthalpy of the reactor core. The transient critical power calculator determines the limited value for the minimum critical power ratio reflecting the state of the reactor core at the time to be monitored based on the thus determined transient change and display the same. Even if the value of MCPR determined by the process computer is smaller than the value for the designed OLMCPR, if it is greater than the displayed OLMCPR, procession such as power distribution control is unnecessary. (Nakamoto, H.)

  6. Development and Application of Devices for Remote Monitoring of Gamma-Ray Contamination at RECOM Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Chesnokov, A.V.; Sudarkin, A.N.; Urutskoev, L.I.

    1999-01-01

    Devices for remote monitoring of gamma-ray contamination develop at RECOM Ltd. are described and typical examples of their application are show. The following devices are discussed: spectrum-sensitive collimated devices for mapping of radioactivity on contaminated surfaces- scanning collimated Gamma Locator, device for field Cs-137 contamination mapping-CORAD; devices for gamma-ray imaging computer-controlled High-Energy Radiation Visualizer (HERV) and Coded Mask Imager

  7. Secure and Efficient Reactive Video Surveillance for Patient Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Braeken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Video surveillance is widely deployed for many kinds of monitoring applications in healthcare and assisted living systems. Security and privacy are two promising factors that align the quality and validity of video surveillance systems with the caliber of patient monitoring applications. In this paper, we propose a symmetric key-based security framework for the reactive video surveillance of patients based on the inputs coming from data measured by a wireless body area network attached to the human body. Only authenticated patients are able to activate the video cameras, whereas the patient and authorized people can consult the video data. User and location privacy are at each moment guaranteed for the patient. A tradeoff between security and quality of service is defined in order to ensure that the surveillance system gets activated even in emergency situations. In addition, the solution includes resistance against tampering with the device on the patient’s side.

  8. A chest drainage system with a real-time pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Chang, Ho; Huang, Tung-Sung; Liu, Hung-Chang; Chen, Chao-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Tube thoracostomy is a common procedure. A chest bottle may be used to both collect fluids and monitor the recovery of the chest condition. The presence of the "tidaling phenomenon" in the bottle can be reflective of the extent of patient's recovery. However, current practice essentially depends on gross observation of the bottle. The device used here is designed for a real-time monitoring of change in pleural pressure to allow clinicians to objectively determine when the lung has recovered, which is crucially important in order to judge when to remove the chest tube. The device is made of a pressure sensor with an operating range between -100 to +100 cmH2O and an amplifying using the "Wheatstone bridge" concept. Recording and analysis was performed with LABview software. The data can be shown in real-time on screen and also be checked retrospectively. The device was connected to the second part of a three-bottle drain system by a three-way connector. The test animals were two 40-kg pigs. We used a thoracoscopic procedure to create an artificial lung laceration with endoscopic scissors. Active air leaks could result in vigorous tidaling phenomenon up to 20 cmH2O. In the absence of gross tidaling phenomenon, the pressure changes were around 0.25 cmH2O. This real-time pleural pressure monitoring device can help clinicians objectively judge the extent of recovery of the chest condition. It can be used as an effective adjunct with the current chest drain system.

  9. iAssist: a software framework for intelligent patient monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouse, Christopher; Dumont, Guy; Yang, Ping; Lim, Joanne; Ansermino, J Mark

    2007-01-01

    A software framework (iAssist) has been developed for intelligent patient monitoring, and forms the foundation of a clinical monitoring expert system. The framework is extensible, flexible, and interoperable. It supports plugins to perform data acquisition, signal processing, graphical display, data storage, and output to external devices. iAssist currently incorporates two plugins to detect change point events in physiological trends. In 38 surgical cases, iAssist detected 868 events, of which clinicians rated more than 50% as clinically significant and less than 7% as artifacts. Clinicians found iAssist intuitive and easy to use.

  10. [2011 after-service customer satisfaction survey of monitoring devices in Shanghai area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Bin; Qian, Jianguo; Cao, Shaoping; He, Dehua; Zheng, Yunxin

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, Shanghai Medical Equipment Management Quality Control Center launched the fifth after-sale service satisfaction survey for medical devices in Shanghai area. There are 8 classes medical devices involving in the survey. This paper demonstrates the investigation results of monitoring devices which are from different manufacturers.

  11. Using Commercial Activity Monitors to Measure Gait in Patients with Suspected iNPH: Implications for Ambulatory Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglani, Shiv; Moore, Jessica; Haynes, M Ryan; Hoffberger, Jamie B; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-11-17

    This study seeks to validate the use of activity monitors to detect and record gait abnormalities, potentially identifying patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) prior to the onset of cognitive or urinary symptoms. This study compared the step counts of four common activity monitors (Omron Step Counter HJ-113, New Lifestyles 2000, Nike Fuelband, and Fitbit Ultra) to an observed step count in 17 patients with confirmed iNPH. Of the four devices, the Fitbit Ultra (Fitbit, Inc., San Francisco, CA) provided the most accurate step count. The correlation with the observed step count was significantly higher (p<0.009) for the Fitbit Ultra than for any of the other three devices. These preliminary findings suggest that existing activity monitors have variable efficacy in the iNPH patient population and that the MEMS tri-axial accelerometer and algorithm of the Fitbit Ultra provides the most accurate gait measurements of the four devices tested.

  12. Development of gas-sampling device for 13N monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lihong; Gong Xueyu

    2003-01-01

    The 13 N monitoring system is used in the monitoring of the rate of leakage of the primary coolant circuit in nuclear power stations. The author introduces a gas-sampling device of the 13 Nmonitoring system. It is with a close-loop flow control system with intelligent control of Single Chip Micyoco (SCM), and has the ability to monitor and replace the filter paper automatically, to increase the automation of the device and stable operation in long time

  13. The Role of Patient Safety in the Device Purchasing Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Todd R; Zhang, Jiajie; Patel, Vimla L; Keselman, Alla; Tang, Xiaozhou; Brixey, Juliana J; Paige, Danielle; Turley, James P

    2005-01-01

    To examine how patient safety considerations are incorporated into medical device purchase decisions, individuals involved in recent infusion pump purchasing decisions at three different health care...

  14. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Om Prakash; Mekonnen, Dawit; Malarvili, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620) followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741). Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has ...

  15. Point-of-care coagulation monitoring: first clinical experience using a paper-based lateral flow diagnostic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegener, Michael A; Li, Hua; Han, Daewoo; Steckl, Andrew J; Pauletti, Giovanni M

    2017-09-01

    Vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin are the most widely used class of oral anticoagulants. Due to a narrow therapeutic window, patients on warfarin require regular monitoring. Self-testing using point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices is available, but cost makes this monitoring method beyond reach for many. The main objective of this research was to assess the clinical utility of a low-cost, paper-based lateral flow POC diagnostic device developed for anticoagulation monitoring without the need for a separate electronic reader. Custom-fabricated lateral flow assay (LFA) test strips comprised of a glass fiber sample pad, a nitrocellulose analytical membrane, a cellulose wicking pad, and a plastic backing card were assembled in a plastic cassette. Healthy volunteers and patients on warfarin therapy were recruited for this prospective study. For each participant, a whole blood sample was collected via fingerstick to determine: (1) international normalized ratio (INR) using the CoaguChek® XS coagulometer, (2) hematocrit by centrifugation, and (3) red blood cell (RBC) travel distance on the experimental LFA device after 240 s using digital image analysis. RBC travel distance measured on the LFA device using blood samples obtained from warfarin patients positively correlated with increasing INR value and the LFA device had the capability to statistically distinguish between healthy volunteer INR values and those for patients groups with INR ≥ 2.6. From these data, it is predicted that this low-cost, paper-based LFA device can have clinical utility for identifying anticoagulated patients taking vitamin K antagonists who are outside of the desired therapeutic efficacy window.

  16. A bendable and wearable cardiorespiratory monitoring device fusing two noncontact sensor principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Daniel; De Matteis, Dennis; Bartelt, Thorsten; Walter, Marian; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    A mobile device is presented for monitoring both respiration and pulse. The device is developed as a bendable/flexible inlay that can be placed in a shirt pocket or the inside pocket of a jacket. To achieve optimum monitoring performance, the device combines two sensor principles, which work in a safe noncontact way through several layers of cotton or other textiles. One sensor, based on magnetic induction, is intended for respiratory monitoring, and the other is a reflective photoplethysmography sensor intended for pulse detection. Because each sensor signal has some dependence on both physiological parameters, fusing the sensor signals allows enhanced signal coverage.

  17. Wearable Device for Objective Sleep Monitoring, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a critical requirement for a wearable device that can provide objective measures of sleep and activity for its crew during long duration spaceflight. In the...

  18. Commercial Smartphone-Based Devices and Smart Applications for Personalized Healthcare Monitoring and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Schneider, E Marion; Luong, John H T

    2014-08-18

    Smartphone-based devices and applications (SBDAs) with cost effectiveness and remote sensing are the most promising and effective means of delivering mobile healthcare (mHealthcare). Several SBDAs have been commercialized for the personalized monitoring and/or management of basic physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, weight, body analysis, pulse rate, electrocardiograph, blood glucose, blood glucose saturation, sleeping and physical activity. With advances in Bluetooth technology, software, cloud computing and remote sensing, SBDAs provide real-time on-site analysis and telemedicine opportunities in remote areas. This scenario is of utmost importance for developing countries, where the number of smartphone users is about 70% of 6.8 billion cell phone subscribers worldwide with limited access to basic healthcare service. The technology platform facilitates patient-doctor communication and the patients to effectively manage and keep track of their medical conditions. Besides tremendous healthcare cost savings, SBDAs are very critical for the monitoring and effective management of emerging epidemics and food contamination outbreaks. The next decade will witness pioneering advances and increasing applications of SBDAs in this exponentially growing field of mHealthcare. This article provides a critical review of commercial SBDAs that are being widely used for personalized healthcare monitoring and management.

  19. Commercial Smartphone-Based Devices and Smart Applications for Personalized Healthcare Monitoring and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Vashist

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone-based devices and applications (SBDAs with cost effectiveness and remote sensing are the most promising and effective means of delivering mobile healthcare (mHealthcare. Several SBDAs have been commercialized for the personalized monitoring and/or management of basic physiological parameters, such as blood pressure, weight, body analysis, pulse rate, electrocardiograph, blood glucose, blood glucose saturation, sleeping and physical activity. With advances in Bluetooth technology, software, cloud computing and remote sensing, SBDAs provide real-time on-site analysis and telemedicine opportunities in remote areas. This scenario is of utmost importance for developing countries, where the number of smartphone users is about 70% of 6.8 billion cell phone subscribers worldwide with limited access to basic healthcare service. The technology platform facilitates patient-doctor communication and the patients to effectively manage and keep track of their medical conditions. Besides tremendous healthcare cost savings, SBDAs are very critical for the monitoring and effective management of emerging epidemics and food contamination outbreaks. The next decade will witness pioneering advances and increasing applications of SBDAs in this exponentially growing field of mHealthcare. This article provides a critical review of commercial SBDAs that are being widely used for personalized healthcare monitoring and management.

  20. Industrial wireless monitoring with energy-harvesting devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brian Blake, M.; Das, Kallol; Zand, P.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    Vibration monitoring and analysis techniques are used increasingly for predictive maintenance. While traditional vibration monitoring relies on wired sensor networks, recent industrial technologies such as WirelessHART, ISA100.11a, and IEEE802.15.4e have brought a paradigm shift in the automation

  1. System for Collecting Biosignal Data from Multiple Patient Monitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dukyong; Lee, Sukhoon; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, JeongGil; Chung, Wou Young; Park, Rae Woong

    2017-10-01

    Biosignal data include important physiological information. For that reason, many devices and systems have been developed, but there has not been enough consideration of how to collect and integrate raw data from multiple systems. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a system for collecting and integrating biosignal data from two patient monitoring systems. We developed an interface to extract biosignal data from Nihon Kohden and Philips monitoring systems. The Nihon Kohden system has a central server for the temporary storage of raw waveform data, which can be requested using the HL7 protocol. However, the Philips system used in our hospital cannot save raw waveform data. Therefore, our system was connected to monitoring devices using the RS232 protocol. After collection, the data were transformed and stored in a unified format. From September 2016 to August 2017, we collected approximately 117 patient-years of waveform data from 1,268 patients in 79 beds of five intensive care units. Because the two systems use the same data storage format, the application software could be run without compatibility issues. Our system collects biosignal data from different systems in a unified format. The data collected by the system can be used to develop algorithms or applications without the need to consider the source of the data.

  2. Concordance of Adherence Measurement Using Self-Reported Adherence Questionnaires and Medication Monitoring Devices: An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnette, Alisha; Zhang, Yichen; Shao, Hui; Shi, Lizheng

    2018-01-01

    As medication adherence continues to be a prevalent issue in today's society, the methods used to monitor medication-taking behaviors are constantly being re-evaluated and compared in search of the 'gold standard' measure. Our review aimed to assess the current literature surrounding the correlation between self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and electronic monitoring devices to determine if these measures produce similar results. We performed a literature search from 2009 to 2017 using PubMed, PubMed In-Process and Non-Indexed, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, and Ovid MEDLINE In-Process. A keyword search using the terms 'patient compliance', 'treatment compliance', 'medication adherence', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance', and 'medications' was done to capture all articles. We included articles measuring adherence using both monitoring devices and SRQs. Thirty-five articles were included in this review. The average difference in measured adherence rates between the two measures was 9.2% (range -66.3 to 61.5). A majority (62.7%) of articles reported moderate (n = 12; 27.9%), high (n = 5, 11.6%), or significant (n = 10, 23.3%) correlations between SRQs and monitoring devices. Results from our review are consistent with previous studies, as we found that many of our studies produced moderate to high correlation between both SRQs and monitoring devices [Farmer, Clin Ther 21(6):1074-90 (1999), IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Avoidable costs in US health care (2012), Patel et al., Respirology 18(3):546-52 (2013), Siracusa et al., J Cyst Fibros 14(5):621-6 (2015), Smith et al., Int J Cardiol 145(1):122-3 (2010)]. Our findings demonstrate that self-reported adherence produces comparable results to electronic monitoring devices. As there is not yet a 'gold standard' measure for monitoring patient adherence, SRQs and Medication Event Monitoring Systems

  3. Patient monitoring in mobile health: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    In most countries chronic diseases lead to high health care costs and reduced productivity of people in society. The best way to reduce costs of health sector and increase the empowerment of people is prevention of chronic diseases and appropriate health activities management through monitoring of patients. To enjoy the full benefits of E-health, making use of methods and modern technologies is very important. This literature review articles were searched with keywords like Patient monitoring, Mobile Health, and Chronic Disease in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases without regard to the year of publications. Applying remote medical diagnosis and monitoring system based on mobile health systems can help significantly to reduce health care costs, correct performance management particularly in chronic disease management. Also some challenges are in patient monitoring in general and specific aspects like threats to confidentiality and privacy, technology acceptance in general and lack of system interoperability with electronic health records and other IT tools, decrease in face to face communication between doctor and patient, sudden interruptions of telecommunication networks, and device and sensor type in specific aspect. It is obvious identifying the opportunities and challenges of mobile technology and reducing barriers, strengthening the positive points will have a significant role in the appropriate planning and promoting the achievements of the health care systems based on mobile and helps to design a roadmap for improvement of mobile health.

  4. Autonomous profiling device to monitor remote water bodies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N.A.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Prabhudesai, S.P.

    implications to human health, and requires frequent and effective monitoring, particularly during summer months (March–May) when water consumption is highest. These water bodies are frequently located in remote areas away from human habitation, making...

  5. Monitoring device of the interior of a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirayama, Shinpei; Fujii, Isao.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To incorporate a sound detecting piezo-electric element into a container receiving therein an electrode, which serves as an ionization chamber for detecting neutron flux, to detect both the neutron flux and sound by means of one device. Structure: When a DC power source is closed and a conversion material is reacted as a result of irradiation of neutron between the electrode and the container in a detecting station, an ionization current is flown and a voltage drop is appeared between both ends of a resistor in a system of processing radioactive rays signal to detect the neutron flux which is displayed by a display device, and when a sound is produced within a reactor, the bottom wall is deformed and as a result, a power is produced between the opposite sides of the piezoelectric element, said power being removed through a filter in a system of processing sound signals, which is displayed by another display device. (Yoshino, H.)

  6. A distributed design for monitoring, logging, and replaying device readings at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.

    1992-01-01

    As control of the Los Alamos Meson Physics linear accelerator and Proton Storage Ring moves to a more distributed system, it has been necessary to redesign the software which monitors, logs, and replays device readings throughout the facility. The new design allows devices to be monitored and their readings logged locally on a network of computers. Control of the monitoring and logging process is available throughout the network from user interfaces which communicate via remote procedure calls with server processes running on each node which monitors and records device readings. Similarly, the logged data can be replayed from anywhere on the network. Two major requirements influencing the final design were the need to reduce the load on the CPU of the control machines, and the need for much faster replay of the logged device readings. (author)

  7. A distributed design for monitoring, logging, and replaying device readings at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.

    1991-01-01

    As control of the Los Alamos Meson Physics linear accelerator and Proton Storage Ring moves to a more distributed system, it has been necessary to redesign the software which monitors, logs, and replays device readings throughout the facility. The new design allows devices to be monitored and their readings logged locally on a network of computers. Control of the monitoring and logging process is available throughout the network from user interfaces which communicate via remote procedure calls with server processes running on each node which monitors and records device readings. Similarly, the logged data can be replayed from anywhere on the network. Two major requirements influencing the final design were the need to reduce the load on the CPU of the control machines, and the need for much faster replay of the logged device readings. 1 ref., 2 figs

  8. Preliminary Finding from a New Device for Monitoring Performance and Environmental Factors in the Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Harris

    2000-01-01

    .... This paper will introduce a new device, the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine vigilance monitor, which was developed for assessment of human performance in an automated, continuous manner in the field...

  9. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Monitoring Requirements for Control Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recorder b Combustion temperature Continuous. Condenser Temperature monitoring device installed at condenser exit and equipped with continuous recorder b Condenser exit (product side) temperature Continuous... intervals no greater than 20 percent of the design carbon replacement interval, whichever is greater...

  10. A Real-Time Audio Tele-Presence Device for Remote Acoustic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaudrey, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... At the end of the Phase I effort, ATI delivered to ARL a fully functional wired binaural hearing device capable of accurately monitoring remote acoustic environments as far as 50 feet from the listener/operator...

  11. Automatic cross-sectioning and monitoring system locates defects in electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G.; Slaughter, B.

    1971-01-01

    System consists of motorized grinding and lapping apparatus, sample holder, and electronic control circuit. Low power microscope examines device to pinpoint location of circuit defect, and monitor displays output signal when defect is located exactly.

  12. A Multi-Technique Reconfigurable Electrochemical Biosensor: Enabling Personal Health Monitoring in Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Alexander; Venkatesh, A G; Hall, Drew A

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a reconfigurable, multi-technique electrochemical biosensor designed for direct integration into smartphone and wearable technologies to enable remote and accurate personal health monitoring. By repurposing components from one mode to the next, the biosensor's potentiostat is able reconfigure itself into three different measurements modes to perform amperometric, potentiometric, and impedance spectroscopic tests all with minimal redundant devices. A [Formula: see text] PCB prototype of the module was developed with discrete components and tested using Google's Project Ara modular smartphone. The amperometric mode has a ±1 nA to [Formula: see text] measurement range. When used to detect pH, the potentiometric mode achieves a resolution of < 0.08 pH units. In impedance measurement mode, the device can measure 50 Ω-10 [Formula: see text] and has been shown to have of phase error. This prototype was used to perform several point-of-care health tracking assays suitable for use with mobile devices: 1) Blood glucose tests were conducted and shown to cover the diagnostic range for Diabetic patients (  ∼  200 mg/dL). 2) Lactoferrin, a biomarker for urinary tract infections, was detected with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ng/mL. 3) pH tests of sweat were conducted to track dehydration during exercise. 4) EIS was used to determine the concentration of NeutrAvidin via a label-free assay.

  13. A noninvasive monitoring device for anesthetics in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Deborah M.; Fuentes, Juan; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    A noninvasive device capable of recording both gill and lateral fin movements was assembled and used to analyze initial and post-treatment activity frequency (Hz) in fish exposed to anesthetics. Exposure of platy fish (Xiphosphorus maculatus) to saponins from quillaja bark (0.185 mM and 0.555 m...

  14. Review of passive accumulation devices for monitoring organic micropollutants in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank

    2005-08-01

    Over the past 15 years passive sampling devices have been developed that accumulate organic micropollutants and allow detection at ambient sub ng/l concentrations. Most passive accumulation devices (PADs) are designed for 1-4 weeks field deployment, where uptake is governed by linear first order kinetics providing a time weighted average of the exposure concentration. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are the most comprehensively studied PADs, but other samplers may also be considered for aquatic monitoring purposes. The applicability of the PADs is reviewed with respect to commonly monitored aqueous matrices and compounds, the detection limits, and for use in quantitative monitoring related to requirements embedded in the EU Water Framework Directive, the US and EU Water Quality Criteria, and the Danish monitoring aquatic programme. The PADs may monitor >75% of the organic micropollutants of the programmes. Research is warranted regarding the uptake in PADs in low flow environments and for the development of samplers for polar organic compounds.

  15. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Wearable Device for Monitoring Heart Rates in Hospital Inpatients: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Ryan R; Boyd, J Gordon; Maslove, David M

    2016-09-20

    As the sensing capabilities of wearable devices improve, there is increasing interest in their application in medical settings. Capabilities such as heart rate monitoring may be useful in hospitalized patients as a means of enhancing routine monitoring or as part of an early warning system to detect clinical deterioration. To evaluate the accuracy of heart rate monitoring by a personal fitness tracker (PFT) among hospital inpatients. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 stable patients in the intensive care unit who each completed 24 hours of heart rate monitoring using a wrist-worn PFT. Accuracy of heart rate recordings was compared with gold standard measurements derived from continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring. The accuracy of heart rates measured by pulse oximetry (Spo2.R) was also measured as a positive control. On a per-patient basis, PFT-derived heart rate values were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring (average bias of -1.14 beats per minute [bpm], with limits of agreement of 24 bpm). By comparison, Spo2.R recordings produced more accurate values (average bias of +0.15 bpm, limits of agreement of 13 bpm, P<.001 as compared with PFT). Personal fitness tracker device performance was significantly better in patients in sinus rhythm than in those who were not (average bias -0.99 bpm vs -5.02 bpm, P=.02). Personal fitness tracker-derived heart rates were slightly lower than those derived from cECG monitoring in real-world testing and not as accurate as Spo2.R-derived heart rates. Performance was worse among patients who were not in sinus rhythm. Further clinical evaluation is indicated to see if PFTs can augment early warning systems in hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02527408; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02527408 (Archived by WebCite at  http://www.webcitation.org/6kOFez3on).

  16. 40 CFR 60.714 - Installation of monitoring devices and recordkeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to the manufacturer's specifications, prior to the initial performance tests in locations such that... in § 60.713(b)(2), (3), (4), (5), or (6) (which include control device efficiency determinations... gas streams would be monitored if the percent control device efficiency is used as the basis for...

  17. Emerging role of digital technology and remote monitoring in the care of cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchs, Javier E; Scher, David Lee

    2015-07-01

    Current available mobile health technologies make possible earlier diagnosis and long-term monitoring of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Remote monitoring of patients with implantable devices and chronic diseases has resulted in better outcomes reducing health care costs and hospital admissions. New care models, which shift point of care to the outpatient setting and the patient's home, necessitate innovations in technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring device for the power distribution within a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzawa, Tomio; Kumanomido, Hironori; Toyoshi, Isamu.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a monitoring device for the power distribution in the reactor core that calculates the power distribution based on the measurement by instruments disposed within the reactor core of BWR type reactors. Constitution: The power distribution monitoring device in a reactor core comprises a signal correcting device, a signal normalizing device and a power distribution calculating device, in which the power distribution calculating device is constituted with an average power calculating device for four fuel assemblies and an average power calculating device for fuel assemblies. Gamma-ray signals corrected by the signal correcting device and signals from neutron detectors are inputted to the signal normalizing device, both of which are calibrated to determine the axial gamma-ray signal distribution in the central water gap region with the four fuel assemblies being as the unit. The average power from the four fuel assemblies are inputted to the fuel assembly average power calculating device to allocate to each of the fuel assembly average power thereby attaining the purpose. Further, thermal restriction values are calculated thereby enabling to secure the fuel integrity. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Remote patient monitoring: Information reliability challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of extramural applications in the personal healthcare domain pose new challenges regarding the security of medical data. In this paper, we focus on remote patient monitoring systems and the issues around information reliability. In these systems medical data is not collected by

  20. Developing an Anti-Xa-Based Anticoagulation Protocol for Patients with Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Adam; Mardis, B Andrew; Mardis, Caitlin R; Huber, Michelle R; New, James P; Meadows, Holly B; Cook, Jennifer L; Toole, J Matthew; Uber, Walter E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complexities associated with anticoagulation in temporary percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) recipients, a lack of standardization exists in their management. This retrospective analysis evaluates current anticoagulation practices at a single center with the aim of identifying an optimal anticoagulation strategy and protocol. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on pVAD implanted (CentriMag (Thoratec; Pleasanton, CA) / TandemHeart (CardiacAssist; Pittsburgh, PA) or Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA)), with each group individually analyzed for bleeding and thrombotic complications. Patients in the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort were subdivided based on the anticoagulation monitoring strategy (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or antifactor Xa unfractionated heparin (anti-Xa) values). In the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort, there were five patients with anticoagulation titrated based on anti-Xa values; one patient developed a device thrombosis and a major bleed, whereas another patient experienced major bleeding. Eight patients received an Impella pVAD. Seven total major bleeds in three patients and no thrombotic events were detected. Based on distinct differences between the devices, anti-Xa values, and outcomes, two protocols were created to guide anticoagulation adjustments. However, anticoagulation in patients who require pVAD support is complex with constantly evolving anticoagulation goals. The ideal level of anticoagulation should be individually determined using several coagulation laboratory parameters in concert with hemodynamic changes in the patient's clinical status, the device, and the device cannulation.

  1. Anesthesia for gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients with left ventricular assist devices: Initial experience with 68 procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana G Goudra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD have emerged as a reliable treatment option for heart failure. Because of bleeding secondary to anticoagulation, these patients present frequently for gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy. The presently available literature on perioperative management of these patients is extremely limited and is primarily based upon theoretical principles. Materials and Methods: Perioperative records of patients with LVAD undergoing (GI endoscopy between 2008 and 2012 were reviewed. Patient, device and procedure specific information was analyzed. Results: A total of 105 LVADs were implanted, and 68 procedures were performed in 39 patients. The most common indication was GI bleed (48/68, with yearly risk of 8.57% per patient. A total of 63 procedures were performed under deep sedation, with five procedures requiring general anesthesia. Intra-procedure hypotension was managed by fluids and (or vasopressors/inotropes (phenylephrine, ephedrine or milrinone guided by plethysmographic waveform, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP and LVADs pulsatility index (for HeartMate II/flow pulsatility (for HeartWare. No patient required invasive monitoring and both NIBP and pulse oximeter could be reliably used for monitoring (and guided management in all patients due to the presence of native heart′s pulsatile output. Conclusion: In the presence of residual heart function, with optimal device settings, non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring can be reliably used in these patients while undergoing GI endoscopy under general anesthesia or monitored anesthesia care. Transient hypotensive episodes respond well to fluids/vasopressors without the need of increasing device speed that can be detrimental.

  2. Water quality monitoring device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention measures quality of feedwater after heated in a regenerative heat exchanger device of a coolant cleanup system in a BWR type reactor, to detect ions generated from organic materials decomposed at high temperature and specify the position where impurities are formed. Namely, in a power plant having a reactor coolant cleanup pipeline connected to a feedwater pipeline, a water quality measuring portion is disposed to the feedwater system at the downstream of the junction to the feedwater system pipeline. A water quality sample is taken to measure the water quality in a state where the feedwater heated by a feedwater heater and flowing to the reactor, and the cleanup coolants heated by the regenerative heat exchanger are mixed. Thus, the impurities formed at the down stream of the feedwater system pipeline, as well as the water quality including impurities decomposed in a high temperature state can be measured. (I.S.)

  3. PhysioDroid: combining wearable health sensors and mobile devices for a ubiquitous, continuous, and personal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banos, Oresti; Villalonga, Claudia; Damas, Miguel; Gloesekoetter, Peter; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances on the development of mobile devices, medical sensors, and wireless communication systems support a new generation of unobtrusive, portable, and ubiquitous health monitoring systems for continuous patient assessment and more personalized health care. There exist a growing number of mobile apps in the health domain; however, little contribution has been specifically provided, so far, to operate this kind of apps with wearable physiological sensors. The PhysioDroid, presented in this paper, provides a personalized means to remotely monitor and evaluate users' conditions. The PhysioDroid system provides ubiquitous and continuous vital signs analysis, such as electrocardiogram, heart rate, respiration rate, skin temperature, and body motion, intended to help empower patients and improve clinical understanding. The PhysioDroid is composed of a wearable monitoring device and an Android app providing gathering, storage, and processing features for the physiological sensor data. The versatility of the developed app allows its use for both average users and specialists, and the reduced cost of the PhysioDroid puts it at the reach of most people. Two exemplary use cases for health assessment and sports training are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the PhysioDroid. Next technical steps include generalization to other mobile platforms and health monitoring devices.

  4. Monitor and control device in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and ensure monitor and control, as well as improve the operation efficiency and save man power, by render the operation automatic utilizing a process computer and centralizing the monitor and control functions. Constitution: All of the operations from the start up to stop in a nuclear power plant are conducted by way of a monitor and control board. The process data for the nuclear power plant are read into the process computer and displayed on a CRT display. Controls are carried out respectively for the control rod on a control rod panel, for the feedwater rate on a feedwater control panel, for the recycling flow rate on a recycling control panel and for the turbine generator on a turbine control panel. When the operation is conducted by an automatic console, operation signals from the console are imputted into the process computer and the state of the power plant is monitored and automatic operation is carried out based on the operation signals and from signals from each of the panels. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Device development for radioecology monitoring in Azerbaijan Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramov, Z.T.

    2002-01-01

    Last time in the territory of Azerbaijan Republic that's in the land and especially in Azerbaijan sector of Caspian Sea have observed the irreversible processes as result of anthropogenic influences to the environment. In the main these inclinations envelope following from signed oil contracts the boring works for prospecting and production, building works on the oil pipelines and increase of quantity of the wastes created by these kinds of an activity. But at the land these inclinations envelope the revealing of radioactive materials at not controlled sectors of military bases leave in inheritance by former Soviet Union. At the same time have observed sharp increase of the transit load transporting power on the 'Silk way' route restored within the frames of TRACEKA. And that, in its turn, demand the organization of corresponding control of these loads. For organization of above-mentioned works have proposed next devices and equipment: The device DRG-01Az designed for an exposure dose power measurements of gamma radiations. Air gamma spectrometer. Managed from scientific-research craft the gamma spectrometer for gamma removals of seabed. Stationary radiation post for continuous control of the transit trucks. Proposed devices have worked out by the group of Special Space Device Development Bureau of Azerbaijan National Aerospace Agency. It should be noted that this group had important achievements at the sphere of space device development still since 70-th years. So in 1981 within the frames of the Soviet-French combined experiment was make a multi-channel gamma spectrometer mounted on the aerostat flied on the large heights (30-40 km). In 1983 was work out an orbital device 'RS-17' located at the satellite 'Cosmos-1638'. In 1987 was make a gamma telescope 'Pulsar X-1' established on the orbital station 'Mir'. A telescope is working successfully till now. Above-mentioned devices establish on the basis of obtained achievements. For example, the constructional demands

  6. New Monitoring Technology to Objectively Assess Adherence to Prescribed Footwear and Assistive Devices During Ambulatory Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Bus SA, Waaijman R, Nollet F. New monitoring technology to objectively assess adherence to prescribed footwear and assistive devices during ambulatory activity. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2012;93:2075-9. Objective: To assess the validity and feasibility of a new temperature-based adherence monitor to

  7. Design of a low-cost microcontroller-based lightning monitoring device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamau, G.M.; Kang'ethe, S.; Kamau, S.I.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Lightning data is not only important for environment and weather monitoring but also for safety purposes. A device that monitors and keeps track of occurrences of lightning strikes has been developed. A communication interface is established between the sensors, data logging circuit and the

  8. Electronic device, system on chip and method for monitoring a data flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    An electronic device is provided which comprises a plurality of processing units (IP1-IP6), a network-based inter-connect (N) coupled to the processing units (IP1-IP6) and at least one monitoring unit (P1, P2) for monitoring a data flow of at least one first communication path between the processing

  9. Cerebrovascular accidents in patients with a ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukui, Hiroyuki; Abla, Adib; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; McNamara, Dennis M; Mathier, Michael A; Cadaret, Linda M; Kormos, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A cerebrovascular accident is a devastating adverse event in a patient with a ventricular assist device. The goal was to clarify the risk factors for cerebrovascular accident. Prospectively collected data, including medical history, ventricular assist device type, white blood cell count, thrombelastogram, and infection, were reviewed retrospectively in 124 patients. Thirty-one patients (25%) had 48 cerebrovascular accidents. The mean ventricular assist device support period was 228 and 89 days in patients with and without cerebrovascular accidents, respectively (P cerebrovascular accidents occurred within 4 months after implantation. Actuarial freedom from cerebrovascular accident at 6 months was 75%, 64%, 63%, and 33% with the HeartMate device (Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, Calif), Thoratec biventricular ventricular assist device (Thoratec Corp), Thoratec left ventricular assist device (Thoratec), and Novacor device (WorldHeart, Oakland, Calif), respectively. Twenty cerebrovascular accidents (42%) occurred in patients with infections. The mean white blood cell count at the cerebrovascular accident was greater than the normal range in patients with infection (12,900/mm3) and without infection (9500/mm3). The mean maximum amplitude of the thrombelastogram in the presence of infection (63.6 mm) was higher than that in the absence of infection (60.7 mm) (P = .0309). The risk of cerebrovascular accident increases with a longer ventricular assist device support period. Infection may activate platelet function and predispose the patient to a cerebrovascular accident. An elevation of the white blood cell count may also exacerbate the risk of cerebrovascular accident even in patients without infection. Selection of device type, prevention of infection, and meticulous control of anticoagulation are key to preventing cerebrovascular accident.

  10. HyPR Device: Mobile Support for Hybrid Patient Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2014-01-01

    The patient record is one of the central artifacts in medical work that is used to organize, communicate and coordinate important information related to patient care. In many hospitals a double record consisting of an electronic and paper part is maintained. This practice introduces a number of c......PR device decreases configuration work, supports mobility in clinical work and increases awareness on patient data.......The patient record is one of the central artifacts in medical work that is used to organize, communicate and coordinate important information related to patient care. In many hospitals a double record consisting of an electronic and paper part is maintained. This practice introduces a number...... introduce the HyPR Device, a device that merges the paper and electronic patient record into one system. We provide results from a clinical simulation with eight clinicians and discuss the functional, design and infrastructural requirements of such hybrid patient records. Our study suggests that the Hy...

  11. Labview Based ECG Patient Monitoring System for Cardiovascular Patient Using SMTP Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om Prakash; Mekonnen, Dawit; Malarvili, M B

    2015-01-01

    This paper leads to developing a Labview based ECG patient monitoring system for cardiovascular patient using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol technology. The designed device has been divided into three parts. First part is ECG amplifier circuit, built using instrumentation amplifier (AD620) followed by signal conditioning circuit with the operation amplifier (lm741). Secondly, the DAQ card is used to convert the analog signal into digital form for the further process. Furthermore, the data has been processed in Labview where the digital filter techniques have been implemented to remove the noise from the acquired signal. After processing, the algorithm was developed to calculate the heart rate and to analyze the arrhythmia condition. Finally, SMTP technology has been added in our work to make device more communicative and much more cost-effective solution in telemedicine technology which has been key-problem to realize the telediagnosis and monitoring of ECG signals. The technology also can be easily implemented over already existing Internet.

  12. Design, Manufacturing and Experimental Validation of Optical Fiber Sensors Based Devices for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela CORICCIATI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of optical fiber sensors is a promising and rising technique used for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM, because permit to monitor continuously the strain and the temperature of the structure where they are applied. In the present paper three different types of smart devices, that are composite materials with an optical fiber sensor embedded inside them during the manufacturing process, are described: Smart Patch, Smart Rebar and Smart Textile, which are respectively a plate for local exterior intervention, a rod for shear and flexural interior reinforcement and a textile for an external whole application. In addition to the monitoring aim, the possible additional function of these devices could be the reinforcement of the structures where they are applied. In the present work, after technology manufacturing description, the experimental laboratory characterization of each device is discussed. At last, smart devices application on medium scale masonry walls and their validation by mechanical tests is described.

  13. Practice parameters for the use of portable monitoring devices in the investigation of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Andrew L; Berry, Richard B; Pack, Allan

    2003-11-01

    A variety of devices are used to evaluate patients with a potential diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A committee comprised of members of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Thoracic Society, and American College of Chest Physicians systematically evaluated data on the use of these devices and developed practice parameters. Three categories of portable monitoring (PM) devices were reviewed with regard to assessing the probability of identifying an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of greater or less than 15 in attended and unattended settings. Type 2 (minimum of seven channels, including EEG, EOG, chin EMG, ECG or heart rate, airflow, respiratory effort, oxygen saturation), Type 3 (minimum of four channels, including ventilation or airflow (at least two channels of respiratory movement, or respiratory movement and airflow), heart rate or ECG and oxygen saturation) and Type 4 (most monitors of this type measure a single parameter or two parameters) devices were evaluated, and in-laboratory, attended polysomnography was used as a reference. (1) Insufficient evidence is available to recommend the use of Type 2 PM devices in attended or unattended settings. (2) Type 3 PM devices appear to be capable of being used in an attended setting to increase or to decrease the probability that a patient has an apnea-hypopnea index greater than 15. (3) The use of Type 3 PM devices in an unattended setting is not recommended to rule in, rule out, or both rule in and rule out a diagnosis of OSA. (4) There is some evidence that the use of Type 3 PM devices in an attended in-laboratory setting may be acceptable to both rule in and rule out a diagnosis of OSA if certain limitations are in place. These limitations include manually scoring the records, using the devices only in patients without significant comorbid conditions, having an awareness that symptomatic patients with a negative study should have a Type 1 study, and not using these devices for titrating positive

  14. Healthcare Blockchain System Using Smart Contracts for Secure Automated Remote Patient Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Kristen N; Ossipova, Olya; Kohlios, Christopher P; Baccarini, Alessandro N; Howson, Emily A; Hayajneh, Thaier

    2018-06-06

    As Internet of Things (IoT) devices and other remote patient monitoring systems increase in popularity, security concerns about the transfer and logging of data transactions arise. In order to handle the protected health information (PHI) generated by these devices, we propose utilizing blockchain-based smart contracts to facilitate secure analysis and management of medical sensors. Using a private blockchain based on the Ethereum protocol, we created a system where the sensors communicate with a smart device that calls smart contracts and writes records of all events on the blockchain. This smart contract system would support real-time patient monitoring and medical interventions by sending notifications to patients and medical professionals, while also maintaining a secure record of who has initiated these activities. This would resolve many security vulnerabilities associated with remote patient monitoring and automate the delivery of notifications to all involved parties in a HIPAA compliant manner.

  15. Devices for Self-Monitoring Sedentary Time or Physical Activity: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James P; Loveday, Adam; Pearson, Natalie; Edwardson, Charlotte; Yates, Thomas; Biddle, Stuart J H; Esliger, Dale W

    2016-05-04

    It is well documented that meeting the guideline levels (150 minutes per week) of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) is protective against chronic disease. Conversely, emerging evidence indicates the deleterious effects of prolonged sitting. Therefore, there is a need to change both behaviors. Self-monitoring of behavior is one of the most robust behavior-change techniques available. The growing number of technologies in the consumer electronics sector provides a unique opportunity for individuals to self-monitor their behavior. The aim of this study is to review the characteristics and measurement properties of currently available self-monitoring devices for sedentary time and/or PA. To identify technologies, four scientific databases were systematically searched using key terms related to behavior, measurement, and population. Articles published through October 2015 were identified. To identify technologies from the consumer electronic sector, systematic searches of three Internet search engines were also performed through to October 1, 2015. The initial database searches identified 46 devices and the Internet search engines identified 100 devices yielding a total of 146 technologies. Of these, 64 were further removed because they were currently unavailable for purchase or there was no evidence that they were designed for, had been used in, or could readily be modified for self-monitoring purposes. The remaining 82 technologies were included in this review (73 devices self-monitored PA, 9 devices self-monitored sedentary time). Of the 82 devices included, this review identified no published articles in which these devices were used for the purpose of self-monitoring PA and/or sedentary behavior; however, a number of technologies were found via Internet searches that matched the criteria for self-monitoring and provided immediate feedback on PA (ActiGraph Link, Microsoft Band, and Garmin Vivofit) and sedentary time (activPAL VT, the Lumo Back, and Darma

  16. Device for contamination monitoring against radiation contamination of people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rische, U.W.; Gerlach, R.

    1986-01-01

    The monitor has only two detector columns at an angle to one another and possibly divided in height, whose detectors are divided in the vertical direction in a middle range depending on a reference shape. The units formed by the subdivision equal the effect produced by the subdivision in approximation to the reference shape in evaluation. By including the detector columns divided into several detectors in height, a detector of about half the width is produced at a level above the threshold. Underarm boxes are provided at the outer edge of this detector, which are directed obliquely upwards. (orig./HP) [de

  17. 78 FR 28733 - Medical Devices; General Hospital and Personal Use Monitoring Devices; Classification of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... through intrabody communication to an external recorder which records the date and time of ingestion as... prior to marketing the device, which contains information about the ingestible event marker they intend... environment. Therefore, neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact statement is required...

  18. Validation of a new imaging device for telemedical ulcer monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Frøkjær, Johnny; Bisgaard Jørgensen, Line

    2015-01-01

    between the new portable camera and the iPhone images vs. clinical assessment as the 'gold standard'. The study included 36 foot ulcers. Four specialists rated the ulcers and filled out a questionnaire, which formed the basis of the evaluation. RESULTS: We found fair to very good intra-rater agreement...... for the new PID and iPhone, respectively. The gold standard was evaluated by assessing the ulcer twice by two different specialists. Kappa values were moderate to very good with respect to inter-rater agreement except for two variables. The agreement between standard and new equipment compared to the gold......PURPOSE: To clarify whether a new portable imaging device (PID) providing 3D images for telemedical use constitutes a more correct expression of the clinical situation compared to standard telemedical equipment in this case iPhone 4s. METHOD: We investigated intra- and interindividual variability...

  19. Monitoring device for the stability of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid unnecessary limitation on the operation conditions for maintaining the reactor stability. Constitution: The reactor stability is judged by taking notice of the axial power distribution of the reactor and monitoring the same online. Specifically, signals are received from a plurality of local power distribution detectors arranged axially in the reactor core to calculate the axial power distribution in computer. Further, a certain distance L is set from the lower end of the reactor core and the total value S1 for the power distribution in the region below the set value L and the total value S2 for the region above the set value L are determined based on the thus calculated power distribution, to thereby determine the ratio: R = S1/S2 between them. Separately, a certain value r is previously determined based on analysis or experiment such as the result of operation. Then, R and r are compared in a comparator and an alarm is generated, if R >r, with respect to the stability. Since monitoring is made based on the actual index, the applicable range of the operation region can be extended. (Ikeda, J.)

  20. Harnessing real world data from wearables and self-monitoring devices: feasibility, confounders and ethical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Barick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing usage of smart phones has compelled mobile technology to become a universal part of everyday life. From wearable gadgets to sophisticated implantable medical devices, the advent of mobile technology has completely transformed the healthcare delivery scenario. Self-report measures enabled by mobile technology are increasingly becoming a more time and cost efficient method of assessing real world health outcomes. But, amidst all the optimism, there are concerns also on adopting this technology as regulations and ethical considerations on privacy legislations of end users are unclear. In general, the healthcare industry functions on some stringent regulations and compliances to ensure the safety and protection of patient information. A couple of the most common regulations are Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act (HIPPA and Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH. To harness the true potential of mobile technology to empower stakeholders and provide them a common platform which seamlessly integrates healthcare delivery and research, it is imperative that challenges and drawbacks in the sphere are identified and addressed. In this age of information and technology, no stones should be left unturned to ensure that the human race has access to the best healthcare services without an intrusion into his/her confidentiality. This article is an overview of the role of tracking and self-monitoring devices in data collection for real world evidence/observational studies in context to feasibility, confounders and ethical considerations.

  1. Inspection frequency required to monitor measurement, recording, or surveillance devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaech, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    A problem encountered recently is identical from a mathematical viewpoint to certain types of problems encountered in nuclear materials safeguards. The general form of the solution to the problem in question is therefore of interest in safeguards applications. The specific problem which prompted the investigation is stated as follows. An automatic recording instrument is used in atmospheric monitoring. It is subject to randomly occurring breakdown. The question is, what should be the time interval between the routine checks to provide a specified probability that the recording instrument is functioning properly for at least a given percentage of the time over a specified interval of time. The stated problem is solved in general terms. An application is then made to the specific problem that prompted the study. Applications to specific safeguards problems are left to the reader. 4 refs

  2. Physical Fault Injection and Monitoring Methods for Programmable Devices

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00510096; Ferencei, Jozef

    A method of detecting faults for evaluating the fault cross section of any field programmable gate array (FPGA) was developed and is described in the thesis. The incidence of single event effects in FPGAs was studied for different probe particles (proton, neutron, gamma) using this method. The existing accelerator infrastructure of the Nuclear Physics Institute in Rez was supplemented by more sensitive beam monitoring system to ensure that the tests are done under well defined beam conditions. The bit cross section of single event effects was measured for different types of configuration memories, clock signal phase and beam energies and intensities. The extended infrastructure served also for radiation testing of components which are planned to be used in the new Inner Tracking System (ITS) detector of the ALICE experiment and for selecting optimal fault mitigation techniques used for securing the design of the FPGA-based ITS readout unit against faults induced by ionizing radiation.

  3. A Novel Wireless Wearable Volatile Organic Compound (VOC Monitoring Device with Disposable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Deng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel portable wireless volatile organic compound (VOC monitoring device with disposable sensors is presented. The device is miniaturized, light, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. Different field tests have been carried out to identify the operational, analytical, and functional performance of the device and its sensors. The device was compared to a commercial photo-ionization detector, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and carbon monoxide detector. In addition, environmental operational conditions, such as barometric change, temperature change and wind conditions were also tested to evaluate the device performance. The multiple comparisons and tests indicate that the proposed VOC device is adequate to characterize personal exposure in many real-world scenarios and is applicable for personal daily use.

  4. Use of Low-Cost Acquisition Systems with an Embedded Linux Device for Volcanic Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, David; Torres, Pedro; Casas, Benito; Toma, Daniel; Blanco, María José; Del Río, Joaquín; Manuel, Antoni

    2015-08-19

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost multiparameter acquisition system for volcanic monitoring that is applicable to gravimetry and geodesy, as well as to the visual monitoring of volcanic activity. The acquisition system was developed using a System on a Chip (SoC) Broadcom BCM2835 Linux operating system (based on DebianTM) that allows for the construction of a complete monitoring system offering multiple possibilities for storage, data-processing, configuration, and the real-time monitoring of volcanic activity. This multiparametric acquisition system was developed with a software environment, as well as with different hardware modules designed for each parameter to be monitored. The device presented here has been used and validated under different scenarios for monitoring ocean tides, ground deformation, and gravity, as well as for monitoring with images the island of Tenerife and ground deformation on the island of El Hierro.

  5. Rapid, low cost prototyping of transdermal devices for personal healthcare monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Sharma

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The next generation of devices for personal healthcare monitoring will comprise molecular sensors to monitor analytes of interest in the skin compartment. Transdermal devices based on microneedles offer an excellent opportunity to explore the dynamics of molecular markers in the interstitial fluid, however good acceptability of these next generation devices will require several technical problems associated with current commercially available wearable sensors to be overcome. These particularly include reliability, comfort and cost. An essential pre-requisite for transdermal molecular sensing devices is that they can be fabricated using scalable technologies which are cost effective.We present here a minimally invasive microneedle array as a continuous monitoring platform technology. Method for scalable fabrication of these structures is presented. The microneedle arrays were characterised mechanically and were shown to penetrate human skin under moderate thumb pressure. They were then functionalised and evaluated as glucose, lactate and theophylline biosensors. The results suggest that this technology can be employed in the measurement of metabolites, therapeutic drugs and biomarkers and could have an important role to play in the management of chronic diseases. Keywords: Microneedles, Minimally invasive sensors, Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM, Continuous lactate monitoring (CLM, Interstitial therapeutic drug monitoring (iTDM

  6. A novel quantitative light‑induced fluorescence device for monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-06

    Aug 6, 2015 ... Background: The FluoreCam system is based on an innovative approach to the ... In total, 11 patients with MIH were diagnosed on a visual MIH scale and ... sensitivity and specificity over traditional techniques .... clinician to record the subject's identification, date of visit, ... versus unaffected enamel.

  7. Assessment of three frequently used blood glucose monitoring devices in clinical routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueger, Thomas; Schuler, Vanessa; Stettler, Christoph; Diem, Peter; Christ, Emanuel R

    2012-07-12

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose plays an important role in the management of diabetes and has been shown to improve metabolic control. The use of blood glucose meters in clinical practice requires sufficient reliability to allow adequate treatment. Direct comparison of different blood glucose meters in clinical practice, independent of the manufactures is scarce. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate three frequently used blood glucose meters in daily clinical practice. Capillary blood glucose was measured simultaneous using the following glucose meters: Contour® (Bayer Diabetes Care, Zürich, Switzerland), Accu-Chek® aviva (Roche Diagnostics, Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Free-Style® lite (Abbott Diabetes Care, Baar, Switzerland). The reference method consisted of the HemoCue® Glucose 201+ System (HemoCue® AB, Ängelholm, Sweden) with plasma conversion. The devices were assessed by comparison of the Mean Absolute Relative Differences (MARD), the Clarke Error Grid Analysis (EGA) and the compliance with the International Organization of Standardization criteria (ISO 15197:2003). Capillary blood samples were obtained from 150 patients. MARD was 10.1 ± 0.65%, 7.0 ± 0.62% and 7.8 ± 0.48% for Contour®, Accu-Chek® and Free-Style®, respectively. EGA showed 99.3% (Contour®), 98.7% (Accu-Chek®) and 100% (Free-Style®) of all measurements in zone A and B (clinically acceptable). The ISO criteria were fulfilled by Accu-Chek® (95.3%) and Free-Style® (96%), but not by Contour® (92%). In the present study the three glucose meters provided good agreement with the reference and reliable results in daily clinical routine. Overall, the Free-Style® and Accu-Chek® device slightly outperformed the Contour® device.

  8. A Novel Pseudo-PMOS Integrated ISFET Device for Water Quality Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Whig

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a performance analysis of novel CMOS Integrated pseudo-PMOS ISFET (PP-ISFET having zero static power dissipation. The main focus is on simulation of power and performance analysis along with the comparison with existing devices, which is used for water quality monitoring. The conventional devices, generally used, consume high power and are not stable for long term monitoring. The conventional device has the drawbacks of low value of slew rate, high power consumption, and nonlinear characteristics, but in this novel design, due to zero static power, less load capacitance on input signals, faster switching, fewer transistors, and higher circuit density, the device exhibits a better slew rate and piecewise linear characteristics and is seen consuming low power of the order of 30 mW. The proposed circuit reduces total power consumption per cycle, increases the speed of operation, is fairly linear, and is simple to implement.

  9. BPcontrol. A Mobile App to Monitor Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Adrian; Pifarré, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Cuadrado, Josep; Solsona, Sara; Mateo, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc

    2016-12-07

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is on the rise. Not only does it affect the elderly but is also increasingly spreading to younger sectors of the population. Treating this condition involves exhaustive monitoring of patients. The current mobile health services can be improved to perform this task more effectively. To develop a useful, user-friendly, robust and efficient app, to monitor hypertensive patients and adapted to the particular requirements of hypertension. This work presents BPcontrol, an Android and iOS app that allows hypertensive patients to communicate with their health-care centers, thus facilitating monitoring and diagnosis. Usability, robustness and efficiency factors for BPcontrol were evaluated for different devices and operating systems (Android, iOS and system-aware). Furthermore, its features were compared with other similar apps in the literature. BPcontrol is robust and user-friendly. The respective start-up efficiency of the Android and iOS versions of BPcontrol were 2.4 and 8.8 times faster than a system-aware app. Similar values were obtained for the communication efficiency (7.25 and 11.75 times faster for the Android and iOS respectively). When comparing plotting performance, BPcontrol was on average 2.25 times faster in the Android case. Most of the apps in the literature have no communication with a server, thus making it impossible to compare their performance with BPcontrol. Its optimal design and the good behavior of its facilities make BPcontrol a very promising mobile app for monitoring hypertensive patients.

  10. The "Haptic Finger"- a new device for monitoring skin condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mami; Lévêque, Jean Luc; Tagami, Hachiro; Kikuchi, Katsuko; Chonan, Seifi

    2003-05-01

    Touching the skin is of great importance for the Clinician for assessing roughness, softness, firmness, etc. This type of clinical assessment is very subjective and therefore non-reproducible from one Clinician to another one or even from time to time for the same Clinician. In order to objectively monitor skin texture, we developed a new sensor, placed directly on the Clinician's finger, which generate some electric signal when slid over the skin surface. The base of this Haptic Finger sensor is a thin stainless steel plate on which sponge rubber, PVDF foil, acetate film and gauze are layered. The signal generated by the sensor was filtered and digitally stored before processing. In a first in vitro experiment, the sensor was moved over different skin models (sponge rubber covered by silicon rubber) of varying hardness and roughness. These experiments allowed the definition of two parameters characterizing textures. The first parameter is variance of the signal processed using wavelet analysis, representing an index of roughness. The second parameter is dispersion of the power spectrum density in the frequency domain, corresponding to hardness. To validate these parameters, the Haptic Finger was used to scan skin surfaces of 30 people, 14 of whom displayed a skin disorder: xerosis (n = 5), atopic dermatitis (n = 7), and psoriasis (n = 2). The results obtained by means of the sensor were compared with subjective, clinical evaluations by a Clinician who scored both roughness and hardness of the skin. Good agreement was observed between clinical assessment of the skin and the two parameters generated using the Haptic Finger. Use of this sensor could prove extremely valuable in cosmetic research where skin surface texture (in terms of tactile properties) is difficult to measure.

  11. Upgrade of of monitoring devices for radiation information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Won Man; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Bong Jae; Jae Yoo Kyung

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) in Hanaro of KAERI and NPPs of Korea, supplied by victoreen, sometimes has been stopped to use slow 486 PC (Personal computer) and not to be enough memory in main processing computer, IOCA and IOCB, for signal processing and storing. It is very difficult for operator to operate and maintain RMS, because of using an unfamiliar operating system, SCO Unix, of main computer. And also, ScanRad (TM) program for processing and storing radiation signal has Y2K problems and is able to lose and not to display measuring signals. Therefore it needs to upgrade the computer system in RMS. This study is upgrading the main computer, IOCA, in RMS of Hanaro to Pentium PC, and changing operating System to Window NT-based system. Therefore it needs to upgrade the computer system in RMS. This study is upgrading the main computer, IOCA, in RMS of Hanaro to Pentium PC, and changing Operating System to Window NT-based system. Therefore a performance of the computer system in RMS has been upgraded for operator to be useful. This study is going two steps. First, the main computer, IOCA a part of the whole computer system has been upgraded to Pentium PC, and changed to Window NT-based system. Second, all of the computer system in Hanaro RMS is going to be upgraded. This study has got the following results: a RS-232C serial communication program: between the upgraded IOCA and LCU (Local Control Unit) -- a serial communication test configurating two LCU serial --a parallel communication test configurating two LCU parallel: GUI program to present a radioactive information -- overview schematic display page -- detail display pages -- alarm and event pages -- trend pages and group trend pages.

  12. Upgrade of of monitoring devices for radiation information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Won Man; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Bong Jae; Jae Yoo Kyung

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) in Hanaro of KAERI and NPPs of Korea, supplied by victoreen, sometimes has been stopped to use slow 486 PC (Personal computer) and not to be enough memory in main processing computer, IOCA and IOCB, for signal processing and storing. It is very difficult for operator to operate and maintain RMS, because of using an unfamiliar operating system, SCO Unix, of main computer. And also, ScanRad (TM) program for processing and storing radiation signal has Y2K problems and is able to lose and not to display measuring signals. Therefore it needs to upgrade the computer system in RMS. This study is upgrading the main computer, IOCA, in RMS of Hanaro to Pentium PC, and changing operating System to Window NT-based system. Therefore it needs to upgrade the computer system in RMS. This study is upgrading the main computer, IOCA, in RMS of Hanaro to Pentium PC, and changing Operating System to Window NT-based system. Therefore a performance of the computer system in RMS has been upgraded for operator to be useful. This study is going two steps. First, the main computer, IOCA a part of the whole computer system has been upgraded to Pentium PC, and changed to Window NT-based system. Second, all of the computer system in Hanaro RMS is going to be upgraded. This study has got the following results: a RS-232C serial communication program: between the upgraded IOCA and LCU (Local Control Unit) -- a serial communication test configurating two LCU serial --a parallel communication test configurating two LCU parallel: GUI program to present a radioactive information -- overview schematic display page -- detail display pages -- alarm and event pages -- trend pages and group trend pages

  13. Optoelectronic sensor device for monitoring ethanol concentration in winemaking applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Márquez, F.; Vázquez, J.; Úbeda, J.; Rodríguez-Rey, J.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The supervision of key variables such as sugar, alcohol, released CO2 and microbiological evolution in fermenting grape must is of great importance in the winemaking industry. However, the fermentation kinetics is assessed by monitoring the evolution of the density as it varies during a fermentation, since density is an indicator of the total amount of sugars, ethanol and glycerol. Even so, supervising the fermentation process is an awkward and non-comprehensive task, especially in wine cellars where production rates are massive, and enologists usually measure the density of the extracted samples from each fermentation tank manually twice a day. This work aims at the design of a fast, low-cost, portable and reliable optoelectronic sensor for measuring ethanol concentration in fermenting grape must samples. Different sets of model solutions, which contain ethanol, fructose, glucose, glycerol dissolved in water and emulate the grape must composition at different stages of the fermentation, were prepared both for calibration and validation. The absorption characteristics of these model solutions were analyzed by a commercial spectrophotometer in the NIR region, in order to identify key wavelengths from which valuable information regarding the sample composition can be extracted. Finally, a customized optoelectronic prototype based on absorbance measurements at two wavelengths belonging to the NIR region was designed, fabricated and successfully tested. The system, whose optoelectronics is reduced after a thorough analysis to only two LED lamps and their corresponding paired photodiodes operating at 1.2 and 1.3 μm respectively, calculates the ethanol content by a multiple linear regression.

  14. An intelligent stand-alone ultrasonic device for monitoring local structural damage: implementation and preliminary experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsch, Alexander; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Wang, Yang; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2011-01-01

    Continuous structural health monitoring has the potential to significantly improve the safety management of aged, in-service civil structures. In particular, monitoring of local damage growth at hot-spot areas can help to prevent disastrous structural failures. Although ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) has proved to be effective in monitoring local damage growth, conventional equipment and devices are usually bulky and only suitable for scheduled human inspections. The objective of this research is to harness the latest developments in embedded hardware and wireless communication for developing a stand-alone, compact ultrasonic device. The device is directed at the continuous structural health monitoring of civil structures. Relying on battery power, the device possesses the functionalities of high-speed actuation, sensing, signal processing, and wireless communication. Integrated with contact ultrasonic transducers, the device can generate 1 MHz Rayleigh surface waves in a steel specimen and measure response waves. An envelope detection algorithm based on the Hilbert transform is presented for efficiently determining the peak values of the response signals, from which small surface cracks are successfully identified

  15. A programmable point-of-care device for external CSF drainage and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Jeffrey R; Subbian, Vignesh; Beyette, Fred R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of a programmable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) external drainage system that can accurately measure the dispensed fluid volume. It is based on using a miniature spectrophotometer to collect color data to inform drain rate and pressure monitoring. The prototype was machined with 1 μm dimensional accuracy. The current device can reliably monitor the total accumulated fluid volume, the drain rate, the programmed pressure, and the pressure read from the sensor. Device requirements, fabrication processes, and preliminary results with an experimental set-up are also presented.

  16. Implementation and reimbursement of remote monitoring for cardiac implantable electronic devices in Europe: a survey from the health economics committee of the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Georges H; Braunschweig, Frieder; Klersy, Katherine; Cowie, Martin R; Leyva, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) permits early detection of arrhythmias, device, and lead failure and may also be useful in risk-predicting patient-related outcomes. Financial benefits for patients and healthcare organizations have also been shown. We sought to assess the implementation and funding of RM of CIEDs, including conventional pacemakers (PMs), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices in Europe. Electronic survey from 43 centres in 15 European countries. In the study sample, RM was available in 22% of PM patients, 74% of ICD patients, and 69% of CRT patients. The most significant perceived benefits were the early detection of atrial arrhythmias in pacemaker patients, lead failure in ICD patients, and worsening heart failure in CRT patients. Remote monitoring was reported to lead a reduction of in-office follow-ups for all devices. The most important reported barrier to the implementation of RM for all CIEDs was lack of reimbursement (80% of centres). Physicians regard RM of CIEDs as a clinically useful technology that affords significant benefits for patients and healthcare organizations. Remote monitoring, however, is perceived as increasing workload. Reimbursement for RM is generally perceived as a major barrier to implementation. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Invasive and noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring of patients with cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmahos, G C; Wo, C C; Demetriades, D; Bishop, M H; Shoemaker, W C

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen patients with hemodynamic instability from acute cerebrovascular accidents were evaluated shortly after arrival at the emergency department of a university-run county hospital with both invasive Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheter placement and a new, noninvasive, thoracic electrical bioimpedance device. Values were recorded and temporal patterns of survivors and nonsurvivors were described. Cardiac indices obtained simultaneously by the 2 techniques were compared. Of the 17 patients, 11 (65%) died. Survivors had higher values than nonsurvivors for mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, and oxygen saturation, delivery, and consumption at comparable times. Cardiac index values, as measured by invasive and noninvasive methods, were correlated. We concluded that hemodynamic monitoring in an acute care setting may recognize temporal circulatory patterns associated with outcome. Noninvasive electrical bioimpedance technology offers a new method for early hemodynamic evaluation. Further research in this area is warranted. PMID:9682626

  18. Patient monitoring using infrastructure-oriented wireless LANs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Upkar

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using wireless and mobile technologies in patient monitoring in diverse environments including hospitals and nursing homes. However, there has not been much work in determining the requirements of patient monitoring and satisfying these requirements using infrastructure-oriented wireless networks. In this paper, we derive several requirements of patient monitoring and show how infrastructure-oriented wireless LANs, such as versions of IEEE 802.11, can be used to support patient monitoring in diverse environments.

  19. Stakeholder challenges in purchasing medical devices for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Saba; Dickerson, Terry; Clarkson, John

    2013-03-01

    This study identifies the stakeholders who have a role in medical device purchasing within the wider system of health-care delivery and reports on their particular challenges to promote patient safety during purchasing decisions. Data was collected through observational work, participatory workshops, and semi-structured qualitative interviews, which were analyzed and coded. The study takes a systems-based and engineering design approach to the study. Five hospitals took part in this study, and the participants included maintenance, training, clinical end-users, finance, and risk departments. The main stakeholders for purchasing were identified to be staff from clinical engineering (Maintenance), device users (Clinical), device trainers (Training), and clinical governance for analyzing incidents involving devices (Risk). These stakeholders display varied characteristics in terms of interpretation of their own roles, competencies for selecting devices, awareness and use of resources for purchasing devices, and attitudes toward the purchasing process. The role of "clinical engineering" is seen by these stakeholders to be critical in mediating between training, technical, and financial stakeholders but not always recognized in practice. The findings show that many device purchasing decisions are tackled in isolation, which is not optimal for decisions requiring knowledge that is currently distributed among different people within different departments. The challenges expressed relate to the wider system of care and equipment management, calling for a more systemic view of purchasing for medical devices.

  20. Safety of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Saman; Hansford, Rozann; Rahsepar, Amir A; Weltin, Valeria; McVeigh, Diana; Gucuk Ipek, Esra; Kwan, Alan; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Lardo, Albert C; Kraut, Michael A; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Halperin, Henry R

    2017-12-28

    Patients who have pacemakers or defibrillators are often denied the opportunity to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of safety concerns, unless the devices meet certain criteria specified by the Food and Drug Administration (termed "MRI-conditional" devices). We performed a prospective, nonrandomized study to assess the safety of MRI at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla in 1509 patients who had a pacemaker (58%) or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (42%) that was not considered to be MRI-conditional (termed a "legacy" device). Overall, the patients underwent 2103 thoracic and nonthoracic MRI examinations that were deemed to be clinically necessary. The pacing mode was changed to asynchronous mode for pacing-dependent patients and to demand mode for other patients. Tachyarrhythmia functions were disabled. Outcome assessments included adverse events and changes in the variables that indicate lead and generator function and interaction with surrounding tissue (device parameters). No long-term clinically significant adverse events were reported. In nine MRI examinations (0.4%; 95% confidence interval, 0.2 to 0.7), the patient's device reset to a backup mode. The reset was transient in eight of the nine examinations. In one case, a pacemaker with less than 1 month left of battery life reset to ventricular inhibited pacing and could not be reprogrammed; the device was subsequently replaced. The most common notable change in device parameters (>50% change from baseline) immediately after MRI was a decrease in P-wave amplitude, which occurred in 1% of the patients. At long-term follow-up (results of which were available for 63% of the patients), the most common notable changes from baseline were decreases in P-wave amplitude (in 4% of the patients), increases in atrial capture threshold (4%), increases in right ventricular capture threshold (4%), and increases in left ventricular capture threshold (3%). The observed changes in lead parameters

  1. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  2. Distributed Smart Device for Monitoring, Control and Management of Electric Loads in Domotic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Perez-Vidal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753 to measure the consumption of electrical energy and thento transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600 has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user’s program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  3. Distributed smart device for monitoring, control and management of electric loads in domotic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Ricardo; Badesa, Francisco J; García-Aracil, Nicolas; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Sabater, Jose María

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket) has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron) used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753) to measure the consumption of electrical energy and then to transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600) has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user's program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  4. Review of passive accumulation devices for monitoring organic micropollutants in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 15 years passive sampling devices have been developed that accumulate organic micropollutants and allow detection at ambient sub ng/l concentrations. Most passive accumulation devices (PADs) are designed for 1-4 weeks field deployment, where uptake is governed by linear first order kinetics providing a time weighted average of the exposure concentration. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are the most comprehensively studied PADs, but other samplers may also be considered for aquatic monitoring purposes. The applicability of the PADs is reviewed with respect to commonly monitored aqueous matrices and compounds, the detection limits, and for use in quantitative monitoring related to requirements embedded in the EU Water Framework Directive, the US and EU Water Quality Criteria, and the Danish monitoring aquatic programme. The PADs may monitor >75% of the organic micropollutants of the programmes. Research is warranted regarding the uptake in PADs in low flow environments and for the development of samplers for polar organic compounds. - Major developments in the passive sampling of organic contaminants in aquatic environments will support future monitoring, compliance and research

  5. Patients´ Use of Self-Monitored Readings for Managing Everyday Life with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, L.; Dinesen, B.; Nielsen, Carl

    2013-01-01

    exercise and other health behavior. Self-monitoring can produce a sense of security as readings provide grounds for explaining symptoms and widen the scope of possibilities for taking action. Patients experienced readings as encouraging, reassuring, depressing, worrisome, and at times disturbing. A few......OBJECTIVE: Effects of self-monitoring depend on how patients engage with readings and how this engagement is used for managing chronic disease. This article reports on a study of how chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients made use of readings during 16 weeks of self......-monitoring. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 COPD patients three times each: at the beginning, halfway through, and after the monitoring device was collected. Spouses of nine interviewees were present during one or more interviews. The analysis of how patients used self...

  6. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  7. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar [Madurai Medical College ' Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  8. Hysteroscopic sterilization of patient with intrauterine device Mirena®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depes, Daniella De Batista; Pereira, Ana Maria Gomes; Yatabe, Salete; Lopes, Reginaldo Guedes Coelho

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tubal sterilization is the definitive procedure most often used worldwide to control fecundity. Laparoscopic ligature is safe, but invasive and with possible surgical and anesthetic risks. The hysteroscopic approach enables tubal occlusion at outpatient's setting without the need of incisions or anesthesia. A microdevice (Essure®) is inserted directly into the tubes and its polyethelene fibers cause obstruction of tubes in about three months. During this period, it is recommended that patients continue the use of a temporary birth control method. Several women use the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, which is called in the market as Mirena®. This report evaluated the possibility of inserting Essure® without remove the intrauterine device; patient tolerance to the procedure was also assessed. The tubal device was successfully placed in the patient without the need to remove Mirena®. After three months the intrauterine device was removed with no intercurrent events. PMID:23579753

  9. Mobile devices for community-based REDD+ monitoring: a case study for Central Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratihast, Arun Kumar; Herold, Martin; Avitabile, Valerio; de Bruin, Sytze; Bartholomeus, Harm; Souza, Carlos M; Ribbe, Lars

    2012-12-20

    Monitoring tropical deforestation and forest degradation is one of the central elements for the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in developing countries (REDD+) scheme. Current arrangements for monitoring are based on remote sensing and field measurements. Since monitoring is the periodic process of assessing forest stands properties with respect to reference data, adopting the current REDD+ requirements for implementing monitoring at national levels is a challenging task. Recently, the advancement in Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) and mobile devices has enabled local communities to monitor their forest in a basic resource setting such as no or slow internet connection link, limited power supply, etc. Despite the potential, the use of mobile device system for community based monitoring (CBM) is still exceptional and faces implementation challenges. This paper presents an integrated data collection system based on mobile devices that streamlines the community-based forest monitoring data collection, transmission and visualization process. This paper also assesses the accuracy and reliability of CBM data and proposes a way to fit them into national REDD+ Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) scheme. The system performance is evaluated at Tra Bui commune, Quang Nam province, Central Vietnam, where forest carbon and change activities were tracked. The results show that the local community is able to provide data with accuracy comparable to expert measurements (index of agreement greater than 0.88), but against lower costs. Furthermore, the results confirm that communities are more effective to monitor small scale forest degradation due to subsistence fuel wood collection and selective logging, than high resolution remote sensing SPOT imagery.

  10. Leaving patients to their own devices? Smart technology, safety and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita; Quick, Oliver

    2018-03-06

    This debate article explores how smart technologies may create a double-edged sword for patient safety and effective therapeutic relationships. Increasing utilization of health monitoring devices by patients will likely become an important aspect of self-care and preventive medicine. It may also help to enhance accurate symptom reports, diagnoses, and prompt referral to specialist care where appropriate. However, the development, marketing, and use of such technology raise significant ethical implications for therapeutic relationships and patient safety. Drawing on lessons learned from other direct-to-consumer health products such as genetic testing, this article explores how smart technology can also pose regulatory challenges and encourage overutilization of healthcare services. In order for smart technology to promote safer care and effective therapeutic encounters, the technology and its utilization must be safe. This article argues for unified regulatory guidelines and better education for both healthcare providers and patients regarding the benefits and risks of these devices.

  11. Understanding and meeting injection device needs in multiple sclerosis: a survey of patient attitudes and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdun di Cantogno, Elisabetta; Russell, Susan; Snow, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Background: All established disease-modifying drugs for multiple sclerosis require parenteral administration, which can cause difficulties for some patients, sometimes leading to suboptimal adherence. A new electronic autoinjection device has been designed to address these issues. Methods: Patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis currently receiving subcutaneous or intramuscular interferon beta-1a, interferon beta-1b, or glatiramer acetate completed an online questionnaire (July 4–25, 2008) that surveyed current injection practices, experiences with current injection methods, and impressions and appeal of the new device. Results: In total, 422 patients completed the survey, of whom 44% used autoinjectors, 43% prefilled syringes, and 13% syringes and vials; overall, 66% currently self-injected. Physical and psychological barriers to self-injection included difficulty with injections, needle phobia, and concerns over correct injection technique. Only 40% of respondents were “very satisfied” with their current injection method. The new electronic autoinjector was rated as “very appealing” by 65% of patients. The benefits of the new device included the ability to customize injection settings and to review dosing history. Conclusion: New technologies may help patients overcome physical and psychological barriers to self-injection. The combination of a reliable and flexible autoinjection device with dose-monitoring technology may improve communication between health care professionals and patients, and improve treatment adherence. PMID:21573048

  12. Design of a prototype device for remote patient care with mild cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ocampo, M.; Segura-Giraldo, B.; Floréz-Hurtado, R.; Cortés-Aguirre, C.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the design of a prototype telecare system, which allows to provide home care to patients with mild cognitive impairment and thus ensures their permanence in their usual environment. Telecare is oriented towards people who require constant attention due to conditions of advanced age, illness, physical risk or limited capabilities. Telecare offers these people a greater degree of independence. QFD methodology is used to develop electronic devices intended to monitor the environment and physiological state of the user continuously, providing communication between the telecare system and a monitoring center in order to take the most appropriate actions in any abnormal event.

  13. Design of a prototype device for remote patient care with mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Ocampo, M; Segura-Giraldo, B; Floréz-Hurtado, R; Cortés-Aguirre, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a prototype telecare system, which allows to provide home care to patients with mild cognitive impairment and thus ensures their permanence in their usual environment. Telecare is oriented towards people who require constant attention due to conditions of advanced age, illness, physical risk or limited capabilities. Telecare offers these people a greater degree of independence. QFD methodology is used to develop electronic devices intended to monitor the environment and physiological state of the user continuously, providing communication between the telecare system and a monitoring center in order to take the most appropriate actions in any abnormal event. (paper)

  14. Use of passive sampling devices for monitoring and compliance checking of POP concentrations in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, R.; Booij, K.; Smedes, F.; Vrana, B.

    2012-01-01

    The state of the art of passive water sampling of (nonpolar) organic contaminants is presented. Its suitability for regulatory monitoring is discussed, with an emphasis on the information yielded by passive sampling devices (PSDs), their relevance and associated uncertainties. Almost all persistent

  15. Hematological clozapine monitoring with a point-of-care device: A randomized cross-over trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Thode, Dorrit; Stenager, Elsebeth

    for several reasons, perhaps most importantly because of the mandatory hematological monitoring. The Chempaq Express Blood Counter (Chempaq XBC) is a point-of-care device providing counts of white blood cells (WBC) and granulocytes based on a capillary blood sampling. A randomized cross-over trial design...

  16. Development and Validation of a Novel Cuff-Less Blood Pressure Monitoring Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Watanabe, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ordinary cuff-based blood pressure–monitoring devices remain a technical limitation that disturbs activities of daily life. Here we report a novel system for the cuff-less blood pressure estimation (CLB that requires only 1 sensor for photoplethysmography. The present study is the first report to validate and assess the clinical application of the CLB in accordance with the latest wearable device standard (issued by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, standard 1708-2014. Our CLB is expected to offer a flexible and wearable device that permits blood pressure monitoring in more continuous and stress-free settings.

  17. "Periodic-table-style" paper device for monitoring heavy metals in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaosi; Cao, Rong; Nilghaz, Azadeh; Guan, Liyun; Zhang, Xiwang; Shen, Wei

    2015-03-03

    If a paper-based analytical device (μ-PAD) could be made by printing indicators for detection of heavy metals in chemical symbols of the metals in a style of the periodic table of elements, it could be possible for such μ-PAD to report the presence and the safety level of heavy metal ions in water simultaneously and by text message. This device would be able to provide easy solutions to field-based monitoring of heavy metals in industrial wastewater discharges and in irrigating and drinking water. Text-reporting could promptly inform even nonprofessional users of the water quality. This work presents a proof of concept study of this idea. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Cr(VI) were chosen to demonstrate the feasibility, specificity, and reliability of paper-based text-reporting devices for monitoring heavy metals in water.

  18. Utilizing information technologies for lifelong monitoring in diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Davide; Lanzola, Giordano

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have long been acknowledged to support information sharing along the whole chain of care, from the clinic to the homes of patients and their relatives. Thus they are increasingly being considered for improving the delivery of health care services also in light of clinical and technological achievements that propose new treatments requiring a tighter interaction among patients and physicians. The multiagent paradigm has been utilized within an architecture for delivering telemedicine services to chronic outpatients at their domiciles and enforcing cooperation among patients, caregivers, and different members of the health care staff. The architecture sees each communication device such as a palmtop, smart phone, or personal digital assistant as a separate agent upon which different services are deployed, including telemetry, reminders, notifications, and alarms. Decoupling services from agents account for a highly configurable environment applicable to almost any context that can be customized as needed. The architecture has been used for designing and implementing a prototypical software infrastructure, called LifePhone, that runs on several communication devices. A basic set of services has been devised with which we were able to configure two different applications that address long-term and short-term monitoring scenarios for diabetes patients. The long-term scenario encompasses telemetry and reminder services for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, which is a treatment for chronic renal failure, a diabetes complication. The short-term scenario incorporates telemetry and remote alarms and is applicable for training patients to use an artificial pancreas. Our experiments proved that an infrastructure such as LifePhone can be used successfully for bridging the interaction gap that exists among all the components of a health care delivery process, improving the quality of service and possibly reducing the overall

  19. Symptom monitoring in treatment of cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Wanxia; Lin Miao; Lü Ye; Yang Biao; Yao Cong; Liu Juan; Wang Wenru

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine self-reported symptoms by the patients receiving cancer therapy, and find out the symptoms that should be coped with and managed during the treatment. Methods A pilot study was conducted on self-reported symptoms on 185 patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for different cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptoms Checklist (TRSC) was used. Results Severe symptoms on the TRSC subscales: loss of appetite,feeling sluggish, weight loss, nausea and hair loss, were reported by the patients. The frequently reported symptoms by those on chemotherapy were nausea, feeling sluggish, weight loss, vomiting, and taste change. The frequently reported symptoms by those on radiotherapy were feeling sluggish, weight loss, loss of appetite, difficult sleeping, and changing taste. The symptoms of loss of appetite, feeling sluggish, weight loss, hair loss, and nausea were both frequently reported by those on radiotherapy and those on chemotherapy. Conclusion Symptom monitoring may be facilitated by TRSC, based on the severity and frequency of reported symptoms, more patients and caregivers could know which symptoms should be preferential interventions.

  20. Designing a Patient Monitoring System Using Cloud and Semantic Web Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Chryssa Thermolia; Ekaterini S. Bei; Stelios Sotiriadis; Kostas Stravoskoufos; Euripides G.M. Petrakis

    2015-01-01

    Moving into a new era of healthcare, new tools and devices are developed to extend and improve health services, such as remote patient monitoring and risk prevention. In this concept, Internet of Things (IoT) and Cloud Computing present great advantages by providing remote and efficient services, as well as cooperation between patients, clinicians, researchers and other health professionals. This paper focuses on patients suffering from bipolar disorder, a brain disorder ...

  1. Smart home design for electronic devices monitoring based wireless gateway network using cisco packet tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihombing, Oloan; Zendrato, Niskarto; Laia, Yonata; Nababan, Marlince; Sitanggang, Delima; Purba, Windania; Batubara, Diarmansyah; Aisyah, Siti; Indra, Evta; Siregar, Saut

    2018-04-01

    In the era of technological development today, the technology has become the need for the life of today's society. One is needed to create a smart home in turning on and off electronic devices via smartphone. So far in turning off and turning the home electronic device is done by pressing the switch or remote button, so in control of electronic device control less effective. The home smart design is done by simulation concept by testing system, network configuration, and wireless home gateway computer network equipment required by a smart home network on cisco packet tracer using Internet Thing (IoT) control. In testing the IoT home network wireless network gateway system, multiple electronic devices can be controlled and monitored via smartphone based on predefined configuration conditions. With the Smart Ho me can potentially increase energy efficiency, decrease energy usage costs, control electronics and change the role of residents.

  2. Readability of "Dear Patient" device advisory notification letters created by a device manufacturer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Luke A; Sharma, Arjun; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Mueller, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    In 2006, the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) recommended that cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) manufacturers use advisory notification letters to communicate with affected patients. To evaluate the readability of the HRS sample "patient device advisory notification" letter and those created by 1 CIED manufacturer. The HRS sample letter and 25 Boston Scientific Corporation letters dated from 2005 through 2011 were evaluated by using 6 readability tests. Readability (Flesch-Kincaid score) of the HRS sample letter was grade level 12.5, and median readability of the device manufacturer letters was grade level 12.8 (range 10.8-18.9). Similar results were obtained by using other readability scales. No letters had readability scores at the National Work Group on Literacy and Health's recommended reading level-fifth grade; the letters' readability exceeded this recommended level by an average of 7.7 grades (95% confidence interval 6.9-8.5; Preadability scores at the average reading level of US adults-eighth grade; the letters' readability exceeded this level by an average of 4.7 grades (95% confidence interval 3.9-5.5; Preadability of the HRS sample letter and those created by a CIED manufacturer significantly exceeded the recommended and average US adults' reading skill levels. Such letters are unlikely to be informative to many patients. CIED manufacturers should ensure that advisory letters are comprehensible to most affected patients. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient-centered activity monitoring in the self-management of chronic health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Rodarte, Carlos; DasMahapatra, Pronabesh

    2015-04-09

    As activity tracking devices become smaller, cheaper, and more consumer-accessible, they will be used more extensively across a wide variety of contexts. The expansion of activity tracking and personal data collection offers the potential for patient engagement in the management of chronic diseases. Consumer wearable devices for activity tracking have shown promise in post-surgery recovery in cardiac patients, pulmonary rehabilitation, and activity counseling in diabetic patients, among others. Unfortunately, the data generated by wearable devices is seldom integrated into programmatic self-management chronic disease regimens. In addition, there is lack of evidence supporting sustained use or effects on health outcomes, as studies have primarily focused on establishing the feasibility of monitoring activity and the association of measured activity with short-term benefits. Monitoring devices can make a direct and real-time impact on self-management, but the validity and reliability of measurements need to be established. In order for patients to become engaged in wearable data gathering, key patient-centered issues relating to usefulness in care, motivation, the safety and privacy of information, and clinical integration need to be addressed. Because the successful usage of wearables requires an ability to comprehend and utilize personal health data, the user experience should account for individual differences in numeracy skills and apply evidence-based behavioral science principles to promote continued engagement. Activity monitoring has the potential to engage patients as advocates in their personalized care, as well as offer health care providers real world assessments of their patients' daily activity patterns. This potential will be realized as the voice of the chronic disease patients is accounted for in the design of devices, measurements are validated against existing clinical assessments, devices become part of the treatment 'prescription', behavior

  4. Advanced Materials for Health Monitoring with Skin-Based Wearable Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Han; Abu-Raya, Yasmin Shibli; Haick, Hossam

    2017-06-01

    Skin-based wearable devices have a great potential that could result in a revolutionary approach to health monitoring and diagnosing disease. With continued innovation and intensive attention to the materials and fabrication technologies, development of these healthcare devices is progressively encouraged. This article gives a concise, although admittedly non-exhaustive, didactic review of some of the main concepts and approaches related to recent advances and developments in the scope of skin-based wearable devices (e.g. temperature, strain, biomarker-analysis werable devices, etc.), with an emphasis on emerging materials and fabrication techniques in the relevant fields. To give a comprehensive statement, part of the review presents and discusses different aspects of these advanced materials, such as the sensitivity, biocompatibility and durability as well as the major approaches proposed for enhancing their chemical and physical properties. A complementary section of the review linking these advanced materials with wearable device technologies is particularly specified. Some of the strong and weak points in development of each wearable material/device are highlighted and criticized. Several ideas regarding further improvement of skin-based wearable devices are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. In-situ photopolymerization and monitoring device for controlled shaping of tissue fillers, replacements, or implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique; Moser, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Photopolymerization is a common tool to harden materials initially in a liquid state. A surgeon can directly trigger the solidification of a dental implant or a bone or tissue filler simply by illumination. Traditionally, photopolymerization has been used mainly in dentistry. Over the last decade advances in material development including a wide range of biocompatible gel- and cement-systems open up a new avenue for in-situ photopolymerization. However, at the device level, surgical endoscopic probes are required. We present a miniaturized light probe where a photoactive material can be 1) mixed, pressurized and injected 2) photopolymerized or photoactivated and 3) monitored during the chemical reaction. The device enables surgeries to be conducted through a hole smaller than 1 mm in diameter. Beside basic injection mechanics, the tool consists of an optical fiber guiding the light required for photopolymerization and for chemical analysis. Combining photorheology and fluorescence spectroscopy, the current state of the photopolymerization is inferred and monitored in real time. Biocompatible and highly tuneable Poly-Ethylene-Glycol (PEG) hydrogels were used as the injection material. The device was tested on a model for intervertebral disc replacement. Gels were successfully implanted into a bovine caudal model and mechanically tested in-vitro during two weeks. The photopolymerized gel was evaluated at the tissue level (adherence and mechanical properties of the implant), at the cellular level (biocompatibility and cytotoxicity) and ergonomic level (sterilization procedure and feasibility study). This paper covers the monitoring aspect of the device.

  6. Monitoring system of hydraulic lifting device based on the fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Novak, Martin; Martinek, Radek; Vanus, Jan; Mec, Pavel; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    This article deals with the description of the monitoring system of hydraulic lifting device based on the fiber-optic sensors. For minimize the financial costs of the proposed monitoring system, the power evaluation of measured signal has been chosen. The solution is based on an evaluation of the signal obtained using the single point optic fiber sensors with overlapping reflective spectra. For encapsulation of the sensors was used polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. To obtain a information of loading is uses the action of deformation of the lifting device on the pair single point optic fiber sensors mounted on the lifting device of the tested car. According to the proposed algorithm is determined information of pressure with an accuracy of +/- 5 %. Verification of the proposed system was realized on the various types of the tested car with different loading. The original contribution of the paper is to verify the new low-cost system for monitoring the hydraulic lifting device based on the fiber-optic sensors.

  7. Nuclear medicine procedures for monitoring patient therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobuty, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    The demands of present biomedical technology are not trivial. Such technology has placed unaccustomed demands on clinicians. NM has been no exception. A large number of new tests which have the potential for contributing to patient management in ways unknown until recently are available. This chapter was designed to provide assistance in test assessment with the following temporal sequence: (a) What questions can these test answer? (b) Which test appears to be most appropriate for the question at hand? (c) Is the selected test cost effective? (d) Does the selected test stand on solid experiential and/or factual ground? (e) How can the data obtained best be handled? The widespread acceptance of these monitoring tests indicates that the available rewards are greater than the demands placed on us in using them. Judiciously used, these tests should continue to be important for both the provider and the recipient of health care

  8. 16 CFR Figures 1 and 2 to Part 1204 - Suggested Instrumentation for Current Monitoring Device and High Voltage Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suggested Instrumentation for Current Monitoring Device and High Voltage Facility 1 Figures 1 and 2 to Part 1204 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Instrumentation for Current Monitoring Device and High Voltage Facility EC03OC91.008 ...

  9. Portable formaldehyde monitoring device using porous glass sensor and its applications in indoor air quality studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Yasuko Yamada; Nakamura, Jiro

    2011-09-30

    We have developed a portable device for formaldehyde monitoring with both high sensitivity and high temporal resolution, and carried out indoor air formaldehyde concentration analysis. The absorbance difference of the sensor element was measured in the monitoring device at regular intervals of, for example, one hour or 30 min, and the result was converted into the formaldehyde concentration. This was possible because we found that the lutidine derivative that was formed as a yellow product of the reaction between 1-phenyl-1,3-butandione and formaldehyde was stable in porous glass for at least six months. We estimated the reaction rate and to be 0.049 min(-1) and the reaction occurred quickly enough for us to monitor hourly changes in the formaldehyde concentration. The detection limit was 5 μg m(-3) h. We achieved hourly formaldehyde monitoring using the developed device under several indoor conditions, and estimated the air exchange rate and formaldehyde adsorption rate, which we adopted as a new term in the mass balance equation for formaldehyde, in one office. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary assessment and self-monitoring with nutrition applications for mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieffers, Jessica R L; Hanning, Rhona M

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition applications for mobile devices (e.g., personal digital assistants, smartphones) are becoming increasingly accessible and can assist with the difficult task of intake recording for dietary assessment and self-monitoring. This review is a compilation and discussion of research on this tool for dietary intake documentation in healthy populations and those trying to lose weight. The purpose is to compare this tool with conventional methods (e.g., 24-hour recall interviews, paper-based food records). Research databases were searched from January 2000 to April 2011, with the following criteria: healthy or weight loss populations, use of a mobile device nutrition application, and inclusion of at least one of three measures, which were the ability to capture dietary intake in comparison with conventional methods, dietary self-monitoring adherence, and changes in anthropometrics and/or dietary intake. Eighteen studies are discussed. Two application categories were identified: those with which users select food and portion size from databases and those with which users photograph their food. Overall, positive feedback was reported with applications. Both application types had moderate to good correlations for assessing energy and nutrient intakes in comparison with conventional methods. For self-monitoring, applications versus conventional techniques (often paper records) frequently resulted in better self-monitoring adherence, and changes in dietary intake and/or anthropometrics. Nutrition applications for mobile devices have an exciting potential for use in dietetic practice.

  11. [A design and study of a novel electronic device for cuff-pressure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shupeng; Li, Wei; Li, Wen; Song, Dejing; Chen, Desheng; Duan, Jun; Li, Chen; Li, Gang

    2017-06-01

    To design a novel electronic device for measuring the pressure in the cuff of the artificial airway; and to study the advantage of this device on continuous and intermittent cuff pressure monitoring. (1) a portable electronic device for cuff pressure measurement was invented, which could turn pressure signal into electrical signal through a pressure transducer. Meantime, it was possible to avoid pressure leak from the joint and the inside of the apparatus by modified Luer taper and sophisticated design. If the cuff pressure was out of the normal range, the apparatus could release a sound and light alarm. (2) Six traditional mechanical manometers were used to determine the cuff pressure in 6 tracheal tubes. The cuff pressure was maintain at 30 cmH 2 O (1 cmH 2 O = 0.098 kPa) by the manometer first, and repeated every 30 seconds for 4 times. (3) Study of continuous cuff pressure monitoring: We used a random number generator to randomize 6 tracheal tubes, 6 mechanical manometers and 6 our products by number 1-6, which has the same number of a group. Every group was further randomized into two balanced groups, one group used the mechanical manometer first, and the other used our product first. The baseline pressure was 30 cmH 2 O, measurement was performed every 4 hours for 6 times. When traditional mechanical manometer was used for cuff pressure monitoring, cuff pressure was decreased by an average of 2.9 cmH 2 O for each measurement (F = 728.2, P = 0.000). In study of continually monitoring, at each monitoring point, the pressure measured by electronic manometer was higher than the mechanical manometer. All the pressures measured by mechanical manometer were dropped below 20 cmH 2 O at 8th hour, and there was no pressure decrease below 20 cmH 2 O measured by electronic manometer in 24 hours by contrast. In study of intermittent monitoring, the same result was found. The pressure was dropped significantly with time when measured by mechanical manometer (F = 61.795, P

  12. Blood Pressure Home Monitoring in Hypertensive Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood Pressure Home Monitoring in Hypertensive Patients Attending a Tertiary ... Sixty percent of the patients were aged 50 - 69 years. ... Patients with high BP readings reported that they exercise more and reduced their daily salt intake.

  13. Automatic Detection of Childhood Absence Epilepsy Seizures: Toward a Monitoring Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Madsen, Rasmus E.; Remvig, Line S.

    2012-01-01

    Automatic detections of paroxysms in patients with childhood absence epilepsy have been neglected for several years. We acquire reliable detections using only a single-channel brainwave monitor, allowing for unobtrusive monitoring of antiepileptic drug effects. Ultimately we seek to obtain optimal...... long-term prognoses, balancing antiepileptic effects and side effects. The electroencephalographic appearance of paroxysms in childhood absence epilepsy is fairly homogeneous, making it feasible to develop patient-independent automatic detection. We implemented a state-of-the-art algorithm...

  14. Characteristics of a new fully programmable blood sampling device for monitoring blood radioactivity during PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, R.; Lingen, A. van; Balen, S.C.M. van; Hoving, B.G.; Lammertsma, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The first performance tests of a new fully programmable blood sampling device for monitoring blood radioactivity during positron emission tomography (PET) are described. Blood is withdrawn through 1-mm internal diameter tubing using an infusion pump which can be operated at rates varying from 0 to 600 ml/h. Activity in blood is measured by a 6-cm-thick bismuth germanate crystal connected to a photomultiplier tube and multichannel analyser (MCA) which are positioned within 6 cm lead shielding. Positioning of the tubing is an exact and simple procedure. The minimal readout time of the MCA is 1 s. Two independent energy windows can be set. Operation of the pump and MCA is fully controlled by a PC, i.e. sampling time, interval time and pump rate can be varied at any time during the PET scan by user-defined scripts. A number of characteristics of the new system were studied, such as sensitivity, dead time, linearity, effect of background radiation and pump rate as a function of input pressure. In addition, dispersion was measured as a function of pump rate. Finally, first clinical results were compared with manual samples. The sensitivity equalled 0.7 and 0.2 cps/Bq for 511- and 1022-keV 30% energy windows, respectively, and the system dead time was 500 ns. The system remained linear within 2% with activity concentrations up to 2.5 MBq/cc. Short-term reproducibility was better than 3% for a 1-h period. Long-term reproducibility was about 5% (1SD), which was mainly caused by variation in the diameter of the tubing. If the device was positioned in such a way that maximum shielding was directed towards the patient, the effects of background radiation from the patient on the measured activity concentration for clinically relevant conditions was minimal ( -1 were observed for pump rates higher than 300 ml/h, indicating that the system dispersion is small. Clinical data showed an excellent agreement to within 3% (1SD) between the results obtained with the new system and

  15. Device-based monitoring in physical activity and public health research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, David R

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of physical activity is important, given the vital role of this behavior in physical and mental health. Over the past quarter of a century, the use of small, non-invasive, wearable monitors to assess physical activity has become commonplace. This review is divided into three sections. In the first section, a brief history of physical activity monitoring is provided, along with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of different devices. In the second section, recent applications of physical activity monitoring in physical activity and public health research are discussed. Wearable monitors are being used to conduct surveillance, and to determine the extent and distribution of physical activity and sedentary behaviors in populations around the world. They have been used to help clarify the dose–response relation between physical activity and health. Wearable monitors that provide feedback to users have also been used in longitudinal interventions to motivate research participants and to assess their compliance with program goals. In the third section, future directions for research in physical activity monitoring are discussed. It is likely that new developments in wearable monitors will lead to greater accuracy and improved ease-of-use. (paper)

  16. A Wave Power Device with Pendulum Based on Ocean Monitoring Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui; Guan, Wanchun; Wan, Xiaozheng; Li, Xuanqun; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Shixuan

    2018-01-01

    The ocean monitoring buoy usually exploits solar energy for power supply. In order to improve power supply capacity, this paper proposes a wave power device according to the structure and moving character of buoy. The wave power device composes of pendulum mechanism that converts wave energy into mechanical energy and energy storage mechanism where the mechanical energy is transferred quantitatively to generator. The hydrodynamic equation for the motion of buoy system with generator devise is established based on the potential flow theory, and then the characteristics of pendulum motion and energy conversion properties are analysed. The results of this research show that the proposed wave power devise is able to efficiently and periodically convert wave energy into power, and increasing the stiffness of energy storage spring is benefit for enhancing the power supply capacity of the buoy. This study provides a theory reference for the development of technology on wave power generator for ocean monitoring buoy.

  17. Dietary self-monitoring in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Megan M; Nackers, Lisa M; Kleinman, Brighid; Corsica, Joyce; Katterman, Shawn N

    2014-01-01

    Self-monitoring of food intake is a cornerstone of behavioral weight loss interventions, but its use has not been evaluated in the treatment of obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This pilot study described patterns of adherence to dietary self-monitoring in obese patients with OSA and determined associations between self-monitoring and weight loss, psychosocial functioning, and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Participants completed a 6-week behavioral weight loss intervention focused on dietary self-monitoring. Approximately one-third of participants were adherent to self-monitoring throughout the course of the intervention and experienced more weight loss than those who did not self-monitor regularly. More frequent dietary self-monitoring also appeared to be associated with adherence to other health behaviors. These preliminary data suggest that use of dietary self-monitoring may be beneficial for promoting weight loss and adherence to other important health behaviors in OSA patients.

  18. Medical Device Integrated Vital Signs Monitoring Application with Real-Time Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqeem, Aasia; Baig, Mirza; Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This research involves the design and development of a novel Android smartphone application for real-time vital signs monitoring and decision support. The proposed application integrates market available, wireless and Bluetooth connected medical devices for collecting vital signs. The medical device data collected by the app includes heart rate, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograph (ECG). The collated data is streamed/displayed on the smartphone in real-time. This application was designed by adopting six screens approach (6S) mobile development framework and focused on user-centered approach and considered clinicians-as-a-user. The clinical engagement, consultations, feedback and usability of the application in the everyday practices were considered critical from the initial phase of the design and development. Furthermore, the proposed application is capable to deliver rich clinical decision support in real-time using the integrated medical device data.

  19. Production of Inorganic Thin Scintillating Films for Ion Beam Monitoring Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Re, Maurizio; Cosentino, Luigi; Cuttone, Giacomo; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Hermanne, Alex; Lojacono, Pietro A; Ma, YingJun; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jurgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Volckaerts, Bart; Vynck, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    In this work we present the development of beam monitoring devices consisting of thin CsI(Tl) films deposited on Aluminium support layers. The light emitted by the scintillating layer during the beam irradiation is measured by a CCD-camera. In a first prototype a thin Aluminium support layer of 6 micron allows the ion beam to easily pass through without significant energy loss and scattering effects. Therefore it turns out to be a non-destructive monitoring device to characterize on-line beam shape and beam position without interfering with the rest of the irradiation process. A second device consists of an Aluminium support layer which is thick enough to completely stop the impinging ions allowing to monitor at the same time the beam profile and the beam current intensity. Some samples have been coated by a 100 Å protective layer to prevent the film damage by atmosphere exposition. In this contribution we present our experimental results obtained by irradiating the samples with proton beams at 8.3 and 62 Me...

  20. Remote device control and monitor system for the LHD deuterium experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hideya, E-mail: nakanisi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohsuna, Masaki; Ito, Tatsuki; Nonomura, Miki; Imazu, Setsuo; Emoto, Masahiko; Iwata, Chie; Yoshida, Masanobu; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Maeno, Hiroya; Aoyagi, Miwa; Ogawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Osamu; Morita, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Kiyomasa [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Seiji; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Device remote control will be significant for the LHD deuterium experiments. • A central management GUI to control the power distribution for devices. • For safety, power management is separated from operational commanding. • Wi-Fi was tested and found to be not reliable with fusion plasmas. - Abstract: Upon beginning the LHD deuterium experiment, the opportunity for maintenance work in the torus hall will be conspicuously reduced such that all instruments must be controlled remotely. The LHD data acquisition (DAQ) and archiving system have been using about 110 DAQ front-end, and the DAQ central control and monitor system has been implemented for their remote management. This system is based on the “multi-agent” model whose communication protocol has been unified. Since DAQ front-end electronics would suffer from the “single-event effect” (SEE) of D-D neutrons, software-based remote operation might become ineffective, and then securely intercepting or recycling the electrical power of the device would be indispensable for recovering from a non-responding fault condition. In this study, a centralized control and monitor system has been developed for a number of power distribution units (PDUs). This system adopts the plug-in structure in which the plug-in modules can absorb the differences among the commercial products of numerous vendors. The combination of the above-mentioned functionalities has led to realizing the flexible and highly reliable remote control infrastructure for the plasma diagnostics and the device management in LHD.

  1. Multilayer mirror based monitors for impurity controls in large fusion reactor type devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, S.P.; May, M.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Multilayer Mirror (MLM) based monitors are compact, high throughput diagnostics capable of extracting XUV emissions (the wavelength range including the soft-x-ray and the extreme ultraviolet, 10 angstrom to 304 angstrom) of impurities from the harsh environment of large fusion reactor type devices. For several years the Plasma Spectroscopy Group at Johns Hopkins University has investigated the application of MLM based XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. MLM based monitors have been constructed for and extensively used on DIII-D, Alcator C-mod, TEXT, Phaedrus-T, and CDX-U tokamaks to study the impurity behavior of elements ranging from He to Mo. On ITER MLM based devices would be used to monitor the spectral line emissions from Li I-like to F I-like charge states of Fe, Cr, and Ni, as well as extractors for the bands of emissions from high Z elements such as Mo or W for impurity controls of the fusion plasma. In addition to monitoring the impurity emissions from the main plasma, MLM based devices can also be adapted for radiation measurements of low Z elements in the divertor. The concepts and designs of these MLM based monitors for impurity controls in ITER will be presented. The results of neutron irradiation experiments of the MLMs performed in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will also be discussed. These preliminary neutron exposure studies show that the dispersive and reflective qualities of the MLMs were not affected in a significant manner

  2. Radiofrequency and microwave tumor ablation in patients with implanted cardiac devices: Is it safe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skonieczki, Brendan D., E-mail: bskonieczki@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); Wells, Catherine, E-mail: cwells1@bidmc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wasser, Elliot J., E-mail: ewasser@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States); Dupuy, Damian E., E-mail: ddupuy@lifespan.org [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: To identify malfunction of implanted cardiac devices during or after thermal ablation of tumors in lung, kidney, liver or bone, using radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) energy. Materials and methods: After providing written consent, 19 patients (15 men and 4 women; mean age 78 years) with pacemakers or pacemaker/defibrillators underwent 22 CT image-guided percutaneous RF or MW ablation of a variety of tumors. Before and after each procedure, cardiac devices were interrogated and reprogrammed by a trained cardiac electrophysiology fellow. Possible pacer malfunctions included abnormalities on electrocardiographic (EKG) monitoring and alterations in device settings. Our institutional review board approved this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study. Informed consent for participation in this retrospective study was deemed unnecessary by our review board. Results: During 20 of 22 sessions, no abnormalities were identified in continuous, EKG tracings or pacemaker functions. However, in two sessions significant changes, occurred in pacemaker parameters: inhibition of pacing during RF application in one, session and resetting of mode by RF energy in another session. These changes did not, result in hemodynamic instability of either patient. MW ablation was not associated with, any malfunction. In all 22 sessions, pacemakers were undamaged and successfully reset to original parameters. Conclusion: RF or MW ablation of tumors in liver, kidney, bone and lung can be performed safely in patients with permanent intra-cardiac devices, but careful planning between radiology and cardiology is essential to avoid adverse outcomes.

  3. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

    2005-11-01

    The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

  4. Method of exchanging cables of neutron monitoring instrumentation tube and folding device of the cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a wide range monitor (WRNM) is used instead of a conventional neutron source range monitor (SRM) or an intermediate range monitor (IRM). The WRNM is always fixed to a predetermined position in a reactor core while containing a detection section in a dry tube, different from a conventional monitor. Accordingly, driving devices for the conventional detection section such as in SRM and IRM are not necessary but, when the reactor is operated for a long period of time, it is sometimes necessary to be replaced with new WRNM. According to the present invention, the cable of the detector placed in a neutron instrumentation tube is connected to a cable take-up drum in a take-up device passing through a cask. Then, the cable is taken-up by driving the take-up drum by a driving motor and the WRNM detection section attached to the top end of the cable is contained in the cask. With this constitution, replacing and processing operation for the detection section can be facilitated and operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.S.)

  5. Affordable Remote Health Monitoring System for the Elderly Using Smart Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew CLARK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging population has been growing as life expectancy increases. In the years to come a much larger percentage of the population will be dependent on others for their daily care. According to a recent report more than 11 million seniors live alone in the USA. These seniors may face serious consequences when they have an emergency situation. However health-monitoring systems are often not affordable for many seniors. The remote health monitoring system presented in this paper addresses the challenge to provide caregivers an emergency alert system for the elderly based on monitoring of their heart rates, breathing activities, and room temperature measurements. The device also allows the dependents to make on demand request for assistance. The remote communication is enabled through the cellular telephone services; so there is no special or additional subscription services needed. This is essential to make the device more affordable for the elderly. We expect that this affordable remote health-monitoring system can be used to help seniors who live alone be safer and healthier.

  6. Predicting patient exposure to nickel released from cardiovascular devices using multi-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, David M; Craven, Brent A; Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Simon, David D; Brown, Ronald P; Sussman, Eric M

    2018-04-01

    Many cardiovascular device alloys contain nickel, which if released in sufficient quantities, can lead to adverse health effects. However, in-vivo nickel release from implanted devices and subsequent biodistribution of nickel ions to local tissues and systemic circulation are not well understood. To address this uncertainty, we have developed a multi-scale (material, tissue, and system) biokinetic model. The model links nickel release from an implanted cardiovascular device to concentrations in peri-implant tissue, as well as in serum and urine, which can be readily monitored. The model was parameterized for a specific cardiovascular implant, nitinol septal occluders, using in-vitro nickel release test results, studies of ex-vivo uptake into heart tissue, and in-vivo and clinical measurements from the literature. Our results show that the model accurately predicts nickel concentrations in peri-implant tissue in an animal model and in serum and urine of septal occluder patients. The congruity of the model with these data suggests it may provide useful insight to establish nickel exposure limits and interpret biomonitoring data. Finally, we use the model to predict local and systemic nickel exposure due to passive release from nitinol devices produced using a wide range of manufacturing processes, as well as general relationships between release rate and exposure. These relationships suggest that peri-implant tissue and serum levels of nickel will remain below 5 μg/g and 10 μg/l, respectively, in patients who have received implanted nitinol cardiovascular devices provided the rate of nickel release per device surface area does not exceed 0.074 μg/(cm 2  d) and is less than 32 μg/d in total. The uncertainty in whether in-vitro tests used to evaluate metal ion release from medical products are representative of clinical environments is one of the largest roadblocks to establishing the associated patient risk. We have developed and validated a multi

  7. 21 CFR 868.2450 - Lung water monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lung water monitor. 868.2450 Section 868.2450 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2450 Lung water monitor. (a) Identification. A lung water monitor is a device used to monitor the trend of fluid volume changes in a patient's lung by...

  8. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Real-Time Adherence Device among HIV-Positive IDU Patients in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Bachman DeSilva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We collected data on feasibility and acceptability of a real-time web-linked adherence monitoring container among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU in China. “Wisepill” uses wireless technology to track on-time medication dosing. Ten patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART at the Guangxi CDC HIV clinic in Nanning, China, used Wisepill for one ART medication for one month. We monitored device use and adherence and explored acceptability of the device among patients. Mean adherence was 89.2% (SD 10.6%. Half of the subjects reported a positive overall experience with Wisepill. Seven said that it was inconvenient, supported by comments that it was large and conspicuous. Five worried about disclosure of HIV status due to the device; no disclosures were reported. Twelve signal lapses occurred (5.4% of prescribed doses, of which one was due to technical reasons, nine to behavioral reasons (both intentional and unintentional, and two to unclear reasons. Although the technical components must be monitored carefully, and acceptability to patients presents challenges which warrant further exploration, the Wisepill device has potential for adherence interventions that deliver rapid adherence-support behavioral feedback directly to patients, including IDU. The use of wireless technology appears uniquely promising for providing time-sensitive communication on patient behavior that can be harnessed to maximize the benefits of HIV treatment.

  9. Feasibility study of patient motion monitoring using tactile array sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk; Kim, Si Yong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate patient pretreatment set-up error and intra-fraction motion using the tactile array sensors (Pressure Profile Systems Inc, Los Angeles, CA) which could measure distributed pressure profiles along the contacting surface and to check a feasibility of the sensor (tactile array sensor) in the patient motion monitoring. Laser alignment and optical camera based monitoring system are very useful for reduce patient set-up error but these systems could not monitor the blind area like patient's back position. Actually after patient alignment using laser or optical monitoring system, it was assumed that there is no error in the patient's back position (pressure profile distribution). But if an error occurs in the patient's back position, it will affect the radiation therapy accuracy. In spite of optical motion monitoring or using the immobilization tool, distributed pressure profiles of patient's back position was changed during inter and intra-fraction. For more accurate patient set-up, blind area (patient's back) monitoring was necessary. We expect that the proposed method will be very useful for make up for the weakness of optical monitoring method

  10. Feasibility study of patient motion monitoring using tactile array sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Dong Su; Cho, Min Seok; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate patient pretreatment set-up error and intra-fraction motion using the tactile array sensors (Pressure Profile Systems Inc, Los Angeles, CA) which could measure distributed pressure profiles along the contacting surface and to check a feasibility of the sensor (tactile array sensor) in the patient motion monitoring. Laser alignment and optical camera based monitoring system are very useful for reduce patient set-up error but these systems could not monitor the blind area like patient's back position. Actually after patient alignment using laser or optical monitoring system, it was assumed that there is no error in the patient's back position (pressure profile distribution). But if an error occurs in the patient's back position, it will affect the radiation therapy accuracy. In spite of optical motion monitoring or using the immobilization tool, distributed pressure profiles of patient's back position was changed during inter and intra-fraction. For more accurate patient set-up, blind area (patient's back) monitoring was necessary. We expect that the proposed method will be very useful for make up for the weakness of optical monitoring method.

  11. Understanding and meeting injection device needs in multiple sclerosis: a survey of patient attitudes and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Elisabetta Verdun di Cantogno1, Susan Russell2, Tom Snow21Global Clinical Development Unit, Merck Serono S.A. – Geneva, Switzerland; 2Global Marketing, Merck Serono S.A. – Geneva, SwitzerlandBackground: All established disease-modifying drugs for multiple sclerosis require parenteral administration, which can cause difficulties for some patients, sometimes leading to suboptimal adherence. A new electronic autoinjection device has been designed to address these issues.Methods: Patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis currently receiving subcutaneous or intramuscular interferon beta-1a, interferon beta-1b, or glatiramer acetate completed an online questionnaire (July 4–25, 2008 that surveyed current injection practices, experiences with current injection methods, and impressions and appeal of the new device.Results: In total, 422 patients completed the survey, of whom 44% used autoinjectors, 43% prefilled syringes, and 13% syringes and vials; overall, 66% currently self-injected. Physical and psychological barriers to self-injection included difficulty with injections, needle phobia, and concerns over correct injection technique. Only 40% of respondents were “very satisfied” with their current injection method. The new electronic autoinjector was rated as “very appealing” by 65% of patients. The benefits of the new device included the ability to customize injection settings and to review dosing history.Conclusion: New technologies may help patients overcome physical and psychological barriers to self-injection. The combination of a reliable and flexible autoinjection device with dose-monitoring technology may improve communication between health care professionals and patients, and improve treatment adherence.Keywords: adherence, autoinjection, subcutaneous interferon beta-1a, multiple sclerosis 

  12. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Poenisch, Falk; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Sheu, Tommy; Chang, Joe Y.; Memon, Nada; Mohan, Radhe; Rozner, Marc A.; Dougherty, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving

  13. Energy monitoring device for 1.5-2.4 MeV electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuochi, P.G., E-mail: fuochi@isof.cnr.i [CNR-ISOF, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Lavalle, M.; Martelli, A. [CNR-ISOF, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Kovacs, A. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, P.O.Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Mehta, K. [Arbeiterstrandbad Strasse 72, Vienna, A-1210 (Austria); Kuntz, F.; Plumeri, S. [Aerial, Parc d' Innovation Rue Laurent Fries F-67400 Illkirch (France)

    2010-03-11

    An easy-to-use and robust energy monitoring device has been developed for reliable detection of day-to-day small variations in the electron beam energy, a critical parameter for quality control and quality assurance in industrial radiation processing. It has potential for using on-line, thus providing real-time information. Its working principle is based on the measurement of currents, or charges, collected by two aluminium absorbers of specific thicknesses (dependent on the beam energy), insulated from each other and positioned within a faraday cup-style aluminium cage connected to the ground. The device has been extensively tested in the energy range of 4-12 MeV under standard laboratory conditions at Institute of Isotopes and CNR-ISOF using different types of electron accelerators; namely, a TESLA LPR-4 LINAC (3-6 MeV) and a L-band Vickers LINAC (7-12 MeV), respectively. This device has been also tested in high power electron beam radiation processing facilities, one equipped with a 7-MeV LUE-8 linear accelerator used for crosslinking of cables and medical device sterilization, and the other equipped with a 10 MeV Rhodotron TT100 recirculating accelerator used for in-house sterilization of medical devices. In the present work, we have extended the application of this method to still lower energy region, i.e. from 1.5 to 2.4 MeV. Also, we show that such a device is capable of detecting deviation in the beam energy as small as 40 keV.

  14. Energy monitoring device for 1.5-2.4 MeV electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuochi, P. G.; Lavalle, M.; Martelli, A.; Kovács, A.; Mehta, K.; Kuntz, F.; Plumeri, S.

    2010-03-01

    An easy-to-use and robust energy monitoring device has been developed for reliable detection of day-to-day small variations in the electron beam energy, a critical parameter for quality control and quality assurance in industrial radiation processing. It has potential for using on-line, thus providing real-time information. Its working principle is based on the measurement of currents, or charges, collected by two aluminium absorbers of specific thicknesses (dependent on the beam energy), insulated from each other and positioned within a faraday cup-style aluminium cage connected to the ground. The device has been extensively tested in the energy range of 4-12 MeV under standard laboratory conditions at Institute of Isotopes and CNR-ISOF using different types of electron accelerators; namely, a TESLA LPR-4 LINAC (3-6 MeV) and a L-band Vickers LINAC (7-12 MeV), respectively. This device has been also tested in high power electron beam radiation processing facilities, one equipped with a 7-MeV LUE-8 linear accelerator used for crosslinking of cables and medical device sterilization, and the other equipped with a 10 MeV Rhodotron TT100 recirculating accelerator used for in-house sterilization of medical devices. In the present work, we have extended the application of this method to still lower energy region, i.e. from 1.5 to 2.4 MeV. Also, we show that such a device is capable of detecting deviation in the beam energy as small as 40 keV.

  15. 40 CFR 63.497 - Back-end process provisions-monitoring provisions for control and recovery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... flame is required. (3) Where a boiler or process heater of less than 44 megawatts design heat input... continuous recorder. (5) For a condenser, a condenser exit (product side) temperature monitoring device...

  16. A wireless intraocular pressure monitoring device with a solder-filled microchannel antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varel, Çağdaş; Shih, Yi-Chun; Otis, Brian P; Böhringer, Karl F; Shen, Tueng S

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the prototype of an intraocular pressure sensor as a major step toward building a device that can be permanently implanted during cataract surgery. The implantation will proceed through an incision of 2–3 mm using an injector, during which the complete device must be folded into a cross-section of 2 mm × 1 mm. The device uses radio frequency (RF) for wireless power and data transfer. The prototype includes an antenna, an RF chip and a pressure sensor assembled on a printed circuit board with several circuit components used for testing and calibration. The antenna is fabricated and integrated with the circuit using a fabrication method employing solder-filled microchannels embedded in an elastomer. The monitoring device is powered at 2.716 GHz from a distance of 1–2 cm. The prototype has undergone electrical and mechanical tests for antenna and sensor performance. The flexible antenna can withstand a stress of 33.4 kPa without any electrical disconnection. It did not show a significant increase in electrical resistance after 50 bending cycles with a maximum applied stress of 116 kPa. Transmitted pressure data shows an averaged sensitivity of 16.66 Hz (mm-Hg) –1 . (paper)

  17. Advanced laser-based tracking device for motor vehicle lane position monitoring and steering assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachalo, William D.; Inenaga, Andrew; Schuler, Carlos A.

    1995-12-01

    Aerometrics is developing an innovative laser-diode based device that provides a warning signal when a motor-vehicle deviates from the center of the lane. The device is based on a sensor that scans the roadway on either side of the vehicle and determines the lateral position relative to the existing painted lines marking the lane. No additional markings are required. A warning is used to alert the driver of excessive weaving or unanticipated departure from the center of the lane. The laser beams are at invisible wavelengths to that operation of the device does not pose a distraction to the driver or other motorists: When appropriate markers are not present on the road, the device is capable of detecting this condition and warn the driver. The sensor system is expected to work well irrespective of ambient light levels, fog and rain. This sensor has enormous commercial potential. It could be marketed as an instrument to warn drivers that they are weaving, used as a research tool to monitor driving patterns, be required equipment for those previously convicted of driving under the influence, or used as a backup sensor for vehicle lateral position control. It can also be used in storage plants to guide robotic delivery vehicles. In this paper, the principles of operation of the sensor, and the results of Aerometrics ongoing testing will be presented.

  18. The Role of Device Diagnostic Algorithms in the Assessment and Management of Patients with Systolic Heart Failure: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. T. Ha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization due to heart failure (HF exacerbation represents a major burden in health care and portends a poor long-term prognosis for patients. As a result, there is considerable interest to develop novel tools and strategies to better detect onset of volume overload, as HF hospitalizations may be reduced if appropriate interventions can be promptly delivered. One such innovation is the use of device-based diagnostic parameters in HF patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT devices. These diagnostic algorithms can effectively monitor and detect changes in patients' HF status, as well as predict one's risk of HF hospitalization. This paper will review the role of these device diagnostics parameters in the assessment and management of HF patients in ambulatory settings. In addition, the integration of these novel algorithms in existing HF disease management models will be discussed.

  19. Development of on-line monitoring device to detect the presence/absence of sodium vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.; Kremesec, V.J.; Kolba, V.M.

    1983-03-01

    A process is being developed by the Sodium Waste Technology Program at ANL-W to remove metallic sodium from scrap and waste. The final step in the process is the removal of residual metallic sodium by evaporation at temperatures up to 482 0 C (900 0 F) and at pressures of about 10 - 2 torr (1.3 Pa). Efficient operation of this process requires that the operators have a method to indicate the completion of the evaporation. This end point would signify when the chamber and scrap and waste is free of metallic sodium. It was determined that a measure of the vacuum was not sufficiently sensitive, and a research effort was undertaken to select an on-line monitoring device. In this effort, three promising methods were reviewed. The use of quadrupole mass spectrometer was recommended and an on-line device was designed for use in a Sodium Process Demonstration (SPD) Plant

  20. A versatile passive and active non-destructive device for spent fuel assemblies monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, R.; Bignan, G.; Andrieu, G.; Dethan, B.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring of spent fuel assemblies in reactor pools or in reprocessing plants with NDA methods is interesting (non-destructivity, non-intrusivity) for process control, safety-criticality and/or nuclear material management. In this context, the authors present the results of the development and design of a prototype device (physical methods used, qualification...) called PYTHON. The aim of PYTHON is to check the declared characteristic values of an irradiated assembly before taking it into a transport cask for safety criticality control. The PYTHON device consists of a detector head in two sections and a 252 Cf source if active neutron counting is to be used. Each section of the detection head consists of two detectors: one fission chamber and one ionization chamber

  1. Home Monitoring of Blood Pressure: Patients' Perception and Role ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measuring devices, patients' emotional response to their blood pressure readings and actions taken in response. ... pressure, their response regarding different readings, and the .... pivotal position for providing pharmaceutical care services ...

  2. Randomized trial of the ForeseeHome monitoring device for early detection of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. The HOme Monitoring of the Eye (HOME) study design - HOME Study report number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Emily Y; Clemons, Traci E; Bressler, Susan B; Elman, Michael J; Danis, Ronald P; Domalpally, Amitha; Heier, Jeffrey S; Kim, Judy E; Garfinkel, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a home-monitoring device with tele-monitoring compared with standard care in detection of progression to choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the US. Participants, aged 55 to 90 years, at high risk of developing CNV associated with AMD were recruited to the HOme Monitoring of Eye (HOME) Study, an unmasked, multi-center, randomized trial of the ForeseeHome (FH) device plus standard care vs. standard care alone. The FH device utilizes preferential hyperacuity perimetry and tele-monitoring to detect changes in vision function associated with development of CNV, potentially prior to symptom and visual acuity loss. After establishing baseline measurements, subsequent changes on follow-up are detected by the device, causing the monitoring center to alert the clinical center to recall participants for an exam. Standard care consists of instructions for self-monitoring visual changes with subsequent self-report to the clinical center. The primary objective of this study is to determine whether home monitoring plus standard care in comparison with standard care alone, results in earlier detection of incident CNV with better present visual acuity. The primary outcome is the decline in visual acuity at CNV diagnosis from baseline. Detection of CNV prior to substantial vision loss is critical as vision outcome following anti-angiogenic therapy is dependent on the visual acuity at initiation of treatment. HOME Study is the first large scale study to test the use of home tele-monitoring system in the management of AMD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Design and validation of a microfluidic device for blood-brain barrier monitoring and transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Giovanni Stefano; Occhetta, Paola; Saccani, Alessandra; Re, Francesca; Krol, Silke; Rasponi, Marco; Redaelli, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier models are highly relevant for drug screening and drug development studies, due to the challenging task of understanding the transport mechanism of drug molecules through the blood-brain barrier towards the brain tissue. In this respect, microfluidics holds potential for providing microsystems that require low amounts of cells and reagent and can be potentially multiplexed for increasing the ease and throughput of the drug screening process. We here describe the design, development and validation of a microfluidic device for endothelial blood-brain barrier cell transport studies. The device comprises of two microstructured layers (top culture chamber and bottom collection chamber) sandwiching a porous membrane for the cell culture. Microstructured layers include two pairs of physical electrodes, embedded into the device layers by geometrically defined guiding channels with computationally optimized positions. These electrodes allow the use of commercial electrical measurement systems for monitoring trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER). We employed the designed device for performing preliminary assessment of endothelial barrier formation with murine brain endothelial cells (Br-bEnd5). Results demonstrate that cellular junctional complexes effectively form in the cultures (expression of VE-Cadherin and ZO-1) and that the TEER monitoring systems effectively detects an increase of resistance of the cultured cell layers indicative of tight junction formation. Finally, we validate the use of the described microsystem for drug transport studies demonstrating that Br-bEnd5 cells significantly hinder the transport of molecules (40 kDa and 4 kDa dextran) from the top culture chamber to the bottom collection chamber.

  4. Patient satisfaction and suggestions for improvement of remote ICD monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helen Høgh; Larsen, Mie Christa Jensen; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study aim was to evaluate patient acceptance and content with remote follow-up (FU) of their implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and to estimate patients' wish for changes in remote follow-up routines. METHODS: Four hundred seventy-four ICD patients at the device follow-up c...

  5. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  6. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, David P [Pasco, WA; Donnelly, Matthew K [Kennewick, WA; Dagle, Jeffery E [Richland, WA

    2011-12-06

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  7. Mobile patient monitoring: The MobiHealth system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wac, K.E.; Bults, Richard G.A.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Widya, I.A.; Jones, Valerie M.; Konstantas, D.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of high bandwidth public wireless networks and miniaturized personal mobile devices give rise to new mobile healthcare services. To this end, the MobiHealth system provides highly customizable vital signs tele-monitoring and tele-treatment system based on a body area network (BAN) and

  8. Evaluating and Predicting Patient Safety for Medical Devices With Integral Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    323 Evaluating and Predicting Patient Safety for Medical Devices with Integral Information Technology Jiajie Zhang, Vimla L. Patel, Todd R...errors are due to inappropriate designs for user interactions, rather than mechanical failures. Evaluating and predicting patient safety in medical ...the users on the identified trouble spots in the devices. We developed two methods for evaluating and predicting patient safety in medical devices

  9. Vibration monitoring of long bridges and their expansion joints and seismic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islami Kleidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a number of recently installed Structural Health Monitoring (SHM systems: a on a 2km double suspension bridge; b on a long railway viaduct that has experienced cracking; and c on a steel arch bridge in a seismically active area. Damage detection techniques have been applied based on high-frequency measurements of vibrations, pressure and strain, enabling a proper understanding of the structures’ behaviour to be gained. The diverse range of applications presented, designed in collaboration with structure owners and design engineers, includes damage detection on expansion joints of suspension bridges, crack analysis and correlation with accelerations of high-speed trains, and high-frequency performance monitoring of seismic devices. These case studies, based on both static and dynamic approaches, demonstrate the usefulness and ease of use of such systems, and the enormous gains in efficiency they offer.

  10. Air alpha monitoring device and system for the calibration of the track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danis, A; Oncescu, M.; Ciubotariu, M.

    2001-01-01

    The radon measurement plays a critical role: - in monitoring the human health and safety, due to radon destructive health effects. Sustained exposures of humans to high concentration of radon, in fact to high concentrations of its decay products, can produce lung cancer; - in a variety of geophysical, geochemical, hydrological and atmospheric investigations, such as exploring resources of uranium or hydrocarbons. The transport of radon within the earth, waters and atmosphere makes it a useful tracer in these purposes. in both cases, the reliable long-term measurements are required because usual short-term variations in concentration need to be averaged. These variations are caused by factors such as relative humidity, temperature, atmospheric pressure and their seasonal variations, moisture content in the air, or ventilation in the dwelling or working places. The integrating measurement methods meet these requirements. Among them, the alpha track method is one of the adequate and useful method and it is used by authors in radon measurements in dwelling and working places including mines and house cellars. The best etched track alpha detector for radon measurements proved to be the detector CR-39 due to: - its sensitivity to alpha particles emitted by radon decay products; - its stability against various environmental factors; - its high degree of optical clarity, was used in a proper device for alpha monitoring in air. Its calibration for radon measurements was performed in the proper calibration system. The general descriptions and specifications were given previously. Only some characteristics of these devices are given here. For air alpha monitoring device: i) equipped with filter, during alpha exposure, the alpha particles of radon are registered in the etched track detector mounted inside (ρ Rn - track density); ii) without filter, the alpha particles emitted by radon + its alpha decay products/their aerosols are registered in the detector (ρ tot - track

  11. DEVICE FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF AVIATION FUEL PURITY IN THE TECHNOLOGICAL SCHEME OF AIRCRAFT FUEL SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Brailko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, special attention is paid to the aircraft fuel quality as a component of safety to ensure trouble-free operation of the fuel system. The existing system of quality control involves periodic sampling of the fuel in the container and their subsequent control by the normalized quality indicators that do not identify possible reasons for the deterioration of these indicators to remove them for trouble-free operation and do not identify the factors of pollution sources. The monitoring system generally ensures the implementation of measures to preserve the quality of aviation fuel and flight safety of serviced civil aviation airlines at current level according to regulatory requirements. The article describes the mathematical model for calculation parameters of indicator filtering partitions based on cascade filtration theoretical studies of mechanical impurities. Pores of indicator filtering partitions calculated by means of mathematical model have been experimentally tested on simulator stand and showed a good convergence of calculated and experimental results. The use of cascade filtration of fuel with different indicator partitions parameters made it possible to develop a device for fuel purity monitoring, allowing continuous (inline monitoring the level of liquid flow contamination at various points of technological equipment (for example, after the pump, at the inlet and outlet of tanks and units, the output of the filter, etc. and to carry out functional diagnostics of units condition process equipment by monitoring changes of particle parameters and the wear occurrence.

  12. Radiation leakage monitoring method and device from primary to secondary coolant systems in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Yoshiaki; Umehara, Toshihiro; Yamada, Masataka.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention monitors radiation leaked from any one of primary cooling systems to secondary cooling systems in a plurality of steam generators. That is, radiation monitoring means each corresponding to steam each generators are disposed to the upstream of a position where main steam pipes are joined. With such a constitution, since the detection object of each of radiation monitoring means is secondary coolants before mixing with secondary coolants of other secondary loops or dilution, lowering of detection accuracy can be avoided. Except for the abnormal case, that is, a case neither of radiation leakage nor of background change, the device is adapted as a convenient measuring system only with calculation performance. Once abnormality occurs, a loop having a value exceeding a standard value is identified by a single channel analyzer function. The amount of radiation leakage from the steam generator belonging to the specified loop is monitored quantitatively by a multichannel analyzer function. According to the method of the present invention, since specific spectrum analysis is conducted upon occurrence of abnormality, presence of radiation leakage and the scale thereof can be judged rapidly. (I.S.)

  13. Use of a consumer market activity monitoring and feedback device improves exercise capacity and activity levels in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Brian; Kaljo, Indira; Donnelly, Seamas

    2014-01-01

    COPD is associated with a gradual decline in physical activity, which itself contributes to a worsening of the underlying condition. Strategies that improve physical activity levels are critical to halt this cycle. Wearable sensor based activity monitoring and persuasive feedback might offer a potential solution. However it is not clear just how much intervention might be needed in this regard - i.e. whether programmes need to be tailored specifically for the target clinical population or whether more simple activity monitoring and feedback solutions, such as that offered in consumer market devices, might be sufficient. This research was carried out to investigate the impact of 4 weeks of using an off the shelf consumer market activity monitoring and feedback application on measures of physical activity, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life in a population of 10 Stage I and II COPD patients. Results demonstrate a significant and positive effect on exercise capacity (measured using a 6-minute walk test) and activity levels (measured in terms of average number of steps per hour) yet no impact on health related quality of life (St Georges Respiratory Disease Questionnaire).

  14. Analysis of patient setup accuracy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onogi, Yuzo; Aoki, Yukimasa; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy is performed in many fractions, and accurate patient setup is very important. This is more significant nowadays because treatment planning and radiation therapy are more precisely performed. Electronic portal imaging devices and automatic image comparison algorithms let us analyze setup deviations quantitatively. With such in mind we developed a simple image comparison algorithm. Using 2459 electronic verification images (335 ports, 123 treatment sites) generated during the past three years at our institute, we evaluated the results of the algorithm, and analyzed setup deviations according to the area irradiated, use of a fixing device (shell), and arm position. Calculated setup deviation was verified visually and their fitness was classified into good, fair, bad, and incomplete. The result was 40%, 14%, 22%, 24% respectively. Using calculated deviations classified as good (994 images), we analyzed setup deviations. Overall setup deviations described in 1 SD along axes x, y, z, was 1.9 mm, 2.5 mm, 1.7 mm respectively. We classified these deviations into systematic and random components, and found that random error was predominant in our institute. The setup deviations along axis y (cranio-caudal direction) showed larger distribution when treatment was performed with the shell. Deviations along y (cranio-caudal) and z (anterior-posterior) had larger distribution when treatment occurred with the patient's arm elevated. There was a significant time-trend error, whose deviations become greater with time. Within all evaluated ports, 30% showed a time-trend error. Using an electronic portal imaging device and automatic image comparison algorithm, we are able to analyze setup deviations more precisely and improve setup method based on objective criteria. (author)

  15. A new device for continuous monitoring the CO2 dissolved in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gregorio, S.; Camarda, M.; Cappuzzo, S.; Giudice, G.; Gurrieri, S.; Longo, M.

    2009-04-01

    The measurements of dissolved CO2 in water are common elements of industrial processes and scientific research. In order to perform gas dissolved measurements is required to separate the dissolved gaseous phase from water. We developed a new device able to separate the gases phase directly in situ and well suitable for continuous measuring the CO2 dissolved in water. The device is made by a probe of a polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) tube connected to an I.R. spectrophotometer (I.R.) and a pump. The PTFE is a polymeric semi-permeable membrane and allows the permeation of gas in the system. Hence, this part of the device is dipped in water in order to equilibrate the probe headspace with the dissolved gases. The partial pressure of the gas i in the headspace at equilibrium (Pi) follows the Henry's law: Pi=Hi•Ci, where Hi is the Henry's constant and Ci is the dissolved concentration of gas i. After the equilibrium is achieved, the partial pressure of CO2 inside the tube is equal to the partial pressure of dissolved CO2. The concentration of CO2 is measured by the I.R. connected to the tube. The gas is moved from the tube headspace to the I.R. by using the pump. In order to test the device and assess the best operating condition, several experimental were performed in laboratory. All the test were executed in a special apparatus where was feasible to create controlled atmospheres. Afterward the device has been placed in a draining tunnel sited in the Mt. Etna Volcano edifice (Italy). The monitored groundwater intercepts the Pernicana Fault, along which degassing phenomena are often observed. The values recorded by the station result in agreement with monthly directly measurements of dissolved CO2 partial pressure.

  16. Development of patient support devices for execution of clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper illustrates our attempt to design and test the reproducibility of low-cost patient positioning devices prepared in-house in our radiotherapy department. Rigid thermocole boards with angulations, scales and support were designed as breast, pelvis and head positioning devices. Reproducibility and accuracy were tested by serial electronic portal imaging detector imaging. The positioning devices (with or without superimposed moulds showed variations within 2-3 mm on serial treatment days which were within acceptable limits. It is therefore concluded that low-cost patient positioning devices for head, breast and pelvis (the common sites of treatments in radiotherapy can be fabricated from available materials in-house. These have been shown to be resulting in accurate immobilization, can be customized for particular techniques and are considerably cheaper than commercially available solutions.

  17. A reliable transmission protocol for ZigBee-based wireless patient monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shyr-Kuen; Kao, Tsair; Chan, Chia-Tai; Huang, Chih-Ning; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Lai, Chin-Yu; Tung, Tse-Hua; Wang, Pi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Patient monitoring systems are gaining their importance as the fast-growing global elderly population increases demands for caretaking. These systems use wireless technologies to transmit vital signs for medical evaluation. In a multihop ZigBee network, the existing systems usually use broadcast or multicast schemes to increase the reliability of signals transmission; however, both the schemes lead to significantly higher network traffic and end-to-end transmission delay. In this paper, we present a reliable transmission protocol based on anycast routing for wireless patient monitoring. Our scheme automatically selects the closest data receiver in an anycast group as a destination to reduce the transmission latency as well as the control overhead. The new protocol also shortens the latency of path recovery by initiating route recovery from the intermediate routers of the original path. On the basis of a reliable transmission scheme, we implement a ZigBee device for fall monitoring, which integrates fall detection, indoor positioning, and ECG monitoring. When the triaxial accelerometer of the device detects a fall, the current position of the patient is transmitted to an emergency center through a ZigBee network. In order to clarify the situation of the fallen patient, 4-s ECG signals are also transmitted. Our transmission scheme ensures the successful transmission of these critical messages. The experimental results show that our scheme is fast and reliable. We also demonstrate that our devices can seamlessly integrate with the next generation technology of wireless wide area network, worldwide interoperability for microwave access, to achieve real-time patient monitoring.

  18. Electronic monitoring of patient adherence to oral antihypertensive medical treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Arne; Osterberg, Lars G; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2009-08-01

    Poor patient adherence is often the reason for suboptimal blood pressure control. Electronic monitoring is one method of assessing adherence. The aim was to systematically review the literature on electronic monitoring of patient adherence to self-administered oral antihypertensive medications. We searched the Pubmed, Embase, Cinahl and Psychinfo databases and websites of suppliers of electronic monitoring devices. The quality of the studies was assessed according to the quality criteria proposed by Haynes et al. Sixty-two articles were included; three met the criteria proposed by Haynes et al. and nine reported the use of electronic adherence monitoring for feedback interventions. Adherence rates were generally high, whereas average study quality was low with a recent tendency towards improved quality. One study detected investigator fraud based on electronic monitoring data. Use of electronic monitoring of patient adherence according to the quality criteria proposed by Haynes et al. has been rather limited during the past two decades. Electronic monitoring has mainly been used as a measurement tool, but it seems to have the potential to significantly improve blood pressure control as well and should be used more widely.

  19. Development of a device for continuous automatic monitoring of consolidation of fresh concrete. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.L.; Eggert, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    Quality of portland cement concrete can be increased if water/cement ratios are reduced; however, this increase is only achieved if concrete is adequately consolidated. This study was conducted to develop a device to permit continuous automatic monitoring of the degree of consolidation during pavement construction. A literature search identified several candidate techniques, the most feasible being a nuclear backscatter technique to measure concrete density. A prototype instrument was developed with a 500mCi source of Cesium (137) and a sodium iodide/photomultiplier sensing unit. The sensor head is located 1 inch (25.4 mm) above the concrete. It is moved back and forth across the width of the pavement by a traversing mechanism mounted to the back of a slip-form paver. Density is recorded on chart paper. The CMD (Consolidation Monitoring Device) is capable of sensing and displaying changes in density while traversing over the pavement surface at 17 fpm (0.086 m/s). It can duplicate core density measurements within a + or -2-1 pcf (+ or -36 kg cu m) confidence range

  20. Development of a calibration system for airborne "1"3"1I monitoring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C.; Tang, F.; He, L.; Xu, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype calibration system for airborne "1"3"1I monitoring devices was developed at the Shanghai Institute of Measurement and Testing Technology (SIMT). This system consists of a gaseous "1"3"1I_2 generator, an airborne storage chamber, an airborne iodine sampler, and an HPGe spectrometer. With this system, "1"3"1I reference samples in the form of charcoal filters and charcoal cartridges, with activities ranging from 100 to 10,000 Bq, were produced with overall relative standard uncertainties of 2.8% (for filter samples) and 3.5% (for cartridge samples); the activities range could be extended according to need. - Highlights: • Original calibration system for airborne "1"3"1I monitoring devices was developed. • Two types of "1"3"1I reference samples was prepared. • The activity of the produced "1"3"1I reference sample could be easily controlled. • The influence of uneven distribution of "1"3"1I in cartridge samples was considered.

  1. A Textile-Based Wearable Sensing Device Designed for Monitoring the Flexion Angle of Elbow and Knee Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Wei Shyr

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work a wearable gesture sensing device consisting of a textile strain sensor, using elastic conductive webbing, was designed for monitoring the flexion angle of elbow and knee movements. The elastic conductive webbing shows a linear response of resistance to the flexion angle. The wearable gesture sensing device was calibrated and then the flexion angle-resistance equation was established using an assembled gesture sensing apparatus with a variable resistor and a protractor. The proposed device successfully monitored the flexion angle during elbow and knee movements.

  2. Remote Patient Monitoring in IBD: Current State and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreja, Ashish; Otobo, Emamuzo; Ramireddy, Karthik; Deorocki, Allyssa

    2018-03-07

    Mobile apps are now increasingly used in conjunction with telemedicine and wearable devices to support remote patient monitoring (RPM). The goal of this paper is to review the available evidence and assess the scope of RPM integration into standard practices for care and management of chronic disease in general and, more specifically, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). RPM has been associated with improvements in health outcomes and indicators across a broad range of chronic diseases. However, there is limited data on the effectiveness of RPM in IBD care. From the emerging literature and body of research, we found promising results about the feasibility of integrating RPM in IBD care and RPM's capacity to support IBD improvement in key process and outcome metrics. Concerns regarding privacy and provider acceptability have limited the mass integration of RPM to date. However, with the healthcare industry's move toward value-based population care and the advent of novel payment models for RPM reimbursement, the adoption of RPM into standard IBD care practices will likely increase as the technology continues to improve and become a mainstream tool for healthcare delivery in the near future.

  3. Control and monitoring of doses to patients in a team of digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agulla Otero, M.; Torres Cabrera, R.; Hernando Gonzalez, I.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years is widespread use of imaging devices digital mammography. One of the advantages associated with this scanning is the ability to access a large amount of information contained in the headwaters of own digital images. The exploitation of this information allows the calculation of doses received by patients. This paper describes the methodology employed for this purpose and are presented the results of the control and monitoring of doses given in a digital mammography equipment. (Author)

  4. Validation of the VERT wearable jump monitor device in elite youth volleyball players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Thiago O.; Moreira, Alexandre; Bacchi, Renato; Finotti1, Ronaldo L.; Ramos, Mayara; Lopes, Charles R.

    2017-01-01

    This technical report aims to determine the validity and the accuracy of the VERT Wearable Jump Monitor. The participants of this study were all experienced volleyball players from the U18 category from the Brazilian National team. To assess jump performance, the VERT scores were compared to the VERTEC (jump and reach device). Each athlete performed 3 attack and 3 block jumps in a random, counterbalanced order, and the average score was registered. In the attack jumps, the VERTEC and VERT mean ± SD scores were 70.9±8.2 and 76.3±7.5 cm, respectively, and the typical error of the estimate (TEE) as a coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% (90% CL 7.0 to 8.9%). VERTEC and VERT devices presented a very large Pearson’s correlation for attack jumps (r=0.75; 90% CL 0.68 to 0.81). In addition, the mean±SD block jumps were 53.7±6.1 and 58.5±5.7 cm for the VERTEC and VERT, respectively and the TEE as a CV was 7.9% (90% CL 7.1 to 8.9%). Pearson’s correlation coefficient was very large for block jumps (r=0.75; 90% CL 0.67 to 0.81). The VERT device was found to be a very practical tool to quantify jump performance in volleyball players. PMID:29158616

  5. Thermal monitoring as a method for estimation of technical state of digital devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrich Yu. N.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Requirements to the reliability level of modern element base are so high that traditional methods of assessing the technical condition of electronics become ineffective, the modern theory of reliability has almost no practical applications [1], and reliability index does not reflect the true state of an electronic device due to an insufficient amount of information received during testing of electronic devices. The majority of modern electronics are limitedly easy-to-test. They are equipped with small number of tools for direct measurement that leads to a delayed troubleshooting and the inability to take measures efficiently. Despite the fact that new generations of electronics use modern components and new design technologies, their performance is still defined by two states — serviceability or failure, and the failure still happens unexpectedly. We may note, that failure is an uncontrolled result of an irreversible degradation process, taking place in time and having appropriate time parameters, but it's not the critical act. Research of various structural and hierarchical levels of functional units of digital electronics show that temperature control can be used for automatic condition monitoring of such devices in real time. As a generalized control parameter, it is advisable to use the temperature of the case of the element, and the case itself — as a generalized point.

  6. Study and development of a PET device dedicated to cancer monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbussche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging first began at the end of the 19. century with the discover of X-rays by Roentgen. Then, numerous imaging modalities have been developed and are used now for a wide range of cases. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has a high sensitivity, is functional and quantitative, thus being of high interest in cancer monitoring. Nevertheless, PET is not as much spread in hospitals as magnetic resonance imaging and scanner. In this context, this work aims to prove the feasibility of PET dedicated for cancer monitoring. Thanks to instrumental developments such as light sharing in scintillating crystals, use of Silicon Photomultipliers, and an original geometry, cost is expected to be reduced while having same performances as commercial devices. An extensive study of light sharing within scintillating barrels has been made, through many parameters (crystal length, coating, data analysis...). An intrinsic spatial resolution of 4 mm has been measured over a 75 mm long crystal of LYSO, coated with teflon. From such a configuration, a first image has been reconstructed using two modules in coincidence. A spatial resolution of 5 mm has been measured in the image. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations has been made with experimental data as input, in order to measure the performances of the final PET device. Thanks to NEMA standard protocol, performances has been measured and compared to other systems. A spatial resolution of 4 mm has been reached, for a sensitivity of 2.5 cps/kBq. Quantification problem has been assessed, providing results similar to existing devices. (author) [fr

  7. GNSS-based operational monitoring devices for forest logging operation chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondo Gallo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first results of a new approach for implementing operational monitoring tool to control the performance of forest mechanisation chains are proposed and discussed. The solution is based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS tools that are the core of a datalogging system that, in combination with a specific inference-engine, is able to analyse process times, work distances, forward speeds, vehicle tracking and number of working cycles in forest operations. As a consequence the operational monitoring control methods could provide an evaluation of the efficiency of the investigated forest operations. The study has monitored the performance of a tower yarder with crane and processor-head, during logging operations. The field surveys consisted on the installation of the GNSS device directly on the forest equipment for monitoring its movements. Simultaneously the field survey considered the integration of the GNSS information with a time study of work elements based on the continuous time methods supported by a time study board. Additionally, where possible, the onboard computer of the forest machine was also used in order to obtain additional information to be integrated to the GNSS data and the time study. All the recorded GNSS data integrated with the work elements study were thus post-processed through GIS analysis. The preliminary overview about the application of this approach on harvesting operations has permitted to assess a good feasibility of the use of GNSS in the relief of operative times in high mechanised forest chains. Results showed an easy and complete identification of the different operative cycles and elementary operations phases, with a maximum difference between the two methodologies of 10.32%. The use of GNSS installed on forest equipment, integrated with the inferenceengine and also with an interface for data communication or data storage, will permit an automatic or semi-automatic operational monitoring, improving

  8. Trends in monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal-care products in the aquatic environment by use of passive sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, G.A.; Vrana, B.; Allan, I.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Greenwood, R.

    2007-01-01

    The use of passive sampling in monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal-care products (PPCPs) in the aquatic environment is discussed. The utility of passive sampling methods for monitoring the fraction of heavy metals and the biologically available fraction of non-polar organic priority pollutants is recognized and these technologies are being used in surveys of water quality. These devices are used to measure the dissolved fraction and they can yield information that can be used in the development of risk assessments models. These devices can also be used to locate illegal dumping and to monitor specific sources of input of PPCPs into the environment, or to monitor the effectiveness of water treatment processes in the removal of these compounds from wastewater. These devices can provide representative information at low cost which necessitate a combination of laboratory calibration and field studies for emerging pollutants.

  9. Demonstration of the Use of Remote Temperature Monitoring Devices in Vaccine Refrigerators in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F; Francois, Jeannot; Jacques, Roody; Mentor, Derline; Yalcouye, Idrissa; Wilkins, Karen; Mueller, Nathan; Turner, Rebecca; Wallace, Aaron; Tohme, Rania A

    After the 2010 earthquake, Haiti committed to introducing 4 new antigens into its routine immunization schedule, which required improving its cold chain (ie, temperature-controlled supply chain) and increasing vaccine storage capacity by installing new refrigerators. We tested the feasibility of using remote temperature monitoring devices (RTMDs) in Haiti in a sample of vaccine refrigerators fueled by solar panels, propane gas, or electricity. We analyzed data from 16 RTMDs monitoring 24 refrigerators in 15 sites from March through August 2014. Although 5 of the 16 RTMDs exhibited intermittent data gaps, we identified typical temperature patterns consistent with refrigerator door opening and closing, propane depletion, thermostat insufficiency, and overstocking. Actual start-up, annual maintenance, and annual electricity costs for using RTMDs were $686, $179, and $9 per refrigerator, respectively. In Haiti, RTMD use was feasible. RTMDs could be prioritized for use with existing refrigerators with high volumes of vaccines and new refrigerators to certify their functionality before use. Vaccine vial monitors could provide additional useful information about cumulative heat exposure and possible vaccine denaturation.

  10. Practical experience of monitoring patient dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonnell, C.; Shrimpton, P. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)); O' Mahoney, M. (National Radiological Protection Board, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Foster, J. (Nuffield Hospitals, Surbiton (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    NRPB recommends the use of reference dose levels for diagnostic medical exposures as an aid to patient dose reduction, but is this approach effective This article describes the broadly encouraging experiences of one large group of hospitals in carrying out measurements of entrance surface dose on patients undergoing some common types of x-ray examination. (author).

  11. Adherence to HAART therapy measured by electronic monitoring in newly diagnosed HIV patients in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesendorp, Reinout; Cohen, Adam; Kristanto, Paulus; Vrijens, Bernard; Rakesh, Pande; Anand, Bene; Iwebor, Henry Uchechukwaka; Stiekema, Jacobus

    2007-12-01

    This pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of electronic adherence monitoring of antiretroviral medications in HIV patients who recently started Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) in Francistown, Botswana and to compare this with self-reporting. Dosing histories were compiled electronically using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) monitors to evaluate adherence to prescribed therapies. Thirty patients enrolled in the antiretroviral treatment program were monitored over 6 weeks. These patients were all antiretroviral (ARV) naïve. After each visit (mean three times) to the pharmacy, the data compiled by the monitors were downloaded. Electronic monitoring of adherence was compared to patient self-reports of adherence. The mean individual medication adherence level measured with the electronic device was 85% (range 21-100%). The mean adherence level measured by means of self-reporting was 98% (range 70-100%). Medication prescribed on a once-a-day dose base was associated with a higher adherence level (97.9% for efavirenz) compared with a twice-a-day regimen (88.4% for Lamivudine/Zidovudine). It is feasible to assess treatment adherence of patients living in a low resource setting on HAART by using electronic monitors. Adherence, even in the early stages of treatment, appears to be insufficient in some patients and may be below the level required for continuous inhibition of viral replication. This approach may lead to improved targeting of counselling about their medication intake of such patients in order to prevent occurrence of resistant viral strains due to inadequate inhibition of viral replication. In this pilot study a significant difference between the data recorded through the electronic monitors and those provided by self-reporting was observed.

  12. Design of a prospective clinical study on the agreement between the Continuous GlucoseMonitor, a novel device for CONTinuous ASSessment of blood GLUcose levels, and the RAPIDLab® 1265 blood gas analyser: The CONTASSGLU study

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann Johannes B; Lehmann Monika; Hofer Stefan; Hüsing Johannes; Alles Catharina; Werner Jens; Stiller Jürgen; Künnecke Wolfgang; Luntz Steffen; Motsch Johann; Weigand Markus A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although a device is needed to continuously measure blood glucose levels within an intensive care setting, and several large-scale prospective studies have shown that patients might benefit from intensive insulin, potassium, or glucose therapy during intensive care, no devices are currently available to continuously assess blood glucose levels in critically ill patients. We conceived the study described here to evaluate the clinical use of the Continuous Glucose Monitor (C...

  13. Cytomorphological monitoring in multimodality therapy of endometral cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galil-Ogly, G.A.; Titova, V.A.; Yarovaya, N.Yu.; Ingberman, Ya.Kh.; Bershchanskaya, A.M.; Pukhlikov, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    The paper is devoted to analysis of clinicomorphological data on the status of a primary endometrial tumor in 209 endometrial cancer patients, treated by radical and palliative radiation therapy (112 patients) and the combined method (88 patients) including preoperative intensive concentrated intracavitary irradiation and hormonotherapy. Dynamic cytological monitoring was performed during radiation therapy and in a period up to 12 mos. after the discontinuation of antitumor therapy. Dynamic cytomorphological monitoring is an important stage in patients who cannot be operated upon as a result of tumor spreading or somatic contraindications

  14. Stroke Risk and Mortality in Patients With Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neal S; Cool, Joséphine; Karas, Maria G; Boehme, Amelia K; Kamel, Hooman

    2016-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have advanced the management of end-stage heart failure. However, these devices are associated with hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications, including stroke. We assessed the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke after VAD placement. Using administrative claims data from acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013, we identified patients who underwent VAD placement, defined by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 37.66. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were identified by previously validated coding algorithms. We used survival statistics to determine the incidence rates and Cox proportional hazard analyses to examine the associations. Among 1813 patients, we identified 201 ischemic strokes and 116 hemorrhagic strokes during 3.4 (±2.0) years of follow-up after implantation of a VAD. The incidence of stroke was 8.7% per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.7-9.7). The annual incidence of ischemic stroke (5.5%; 95% CI, 4.8-6.4) was nearly double that of hemorrhagic stroke (3.1%; 95% CI, 2.6-3.8). Women faced a higher hazard of stroke than men (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1), particularly hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.4). Stroke was strongly associated with subsequent in-hospital mortality (hazard ratio, 6.1; 95% CI, 4.6-7.9). The incidence of stroke after VAD implantation was 8.7% per year, and incident stroke was strongly associated with subsequent in-hospital mortality. Notably, ischemic stroke occurred at nearly twice the rate of hemorrhagic stroke. Women seemed to face a higher risk for hemorrhagic stroke than men. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Antipsychotic treatment dosing profile in patients with schizophrenia evaluated with electronic monitoring (MEMS®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Francisco J; Ramallo-Fariña, Yolanda; Bosch, Esperanza; Mayans, Teresa; Rodríguez, Carlos J; Caravaca, Ana

    2013-05-01

    Although the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®) device offers accurate information on treatment dosing profile, such profile has never been studied in patients with schizophrenia. Enhancing our knowledge on this issue would help in developing intervention strategies to improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment in these patients. 74 outpatients with schizophrenia were monitored with the MEMS device for a 3-month period, for evaluation of antipsychotic treatment dosing profile, possible influence of medication schedule-related variables, adherence to treatment--considering dose intake within prescribed timeframes--and possible Hawthorne's effect of using the MEMS device. Dose-omission gaps occurred in 18.7% of monitoring days, most frequently during weekends, almost significantly. Almost one-third of prescribed doses were taken out of prescribed time. Neither the prescribed number of daily doses nor the indicated time of the day for dose intake (breakfast, dinner), were associated with correct antipsychotic dosing. Excess-dose was rare in general, and more frequent out of prescribed dose timeframe. No Hawthorne's effect was found for the MEMS device. Adherence reached only 35% according to a definition that included dose intake within prescribed timeframes. Antipsychotic treatment dosing was considerably irregular among patients with schizophrenia. Strategies to reduce dose-omission gaps and increase dosing within prescribed timeframes seem to be necessary. Gaining knowledge on precise oral antipsychotic dosing profiles or the influence of schedule-related variables may be useful to design strategies towards enhancing adherence. There appears to be no Hawthorne's effect associated with the use of MEMS devices in outpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ubiquitous computing for remote cardiac patient monitoring: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kambhatla, Kashyap; Hu, Fei; Lifson, Mark; Xiao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    New wireless technologies, such as wireless LAN and sensor networks, for telecardiology purposes give new possibilities for monitoring vital parameters with wearable biomedical sensors, and give patients the freedom to be mobile and still be under continuous monitoring and thereby better quality of patient care. This paper will detail the architecture and quality-of-service (QoS) characteristics in integrated wireless telecardiology platforms. It will also discuss the current promising hardware/software platforms for wireless cardiac monitoring. The design methodology and challenges are provided for realistic implementation.

  17. Multi-signal Visualization of Physiology (MVP): a novel visualization dashboard for physiological monitoring of Traumatic Brain Injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Kevin; Sari, Vivian; Loy, Liang Yu; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zhuo; Feng, Mengling

    2012-01-01

    To prevent Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients from secondary brain injuries, patients' physiological readings are continuously monitored. However, the visualization dashboards of most existing monitoring devices cannot effectively present all physiological information of TBI patients and are also ineffective in facilitating neuro-clinicians for fast and accurate diagnosis. To address these shortcomings, we proposed a new visualization dashboard, namely the Multi-signal Visualization of Physiology (MVP). MVP makes use of multi-signal polygram to collate various physiological signals, and it also utilizes colors and the concept of "safe/danger zones" to assist neuro-clinicians to achieve fast and accurate diagnosis. Moreover, MVP allows neuro-clinicians to review historical physiological statuses of TBI patients, which can guide and optimize clinicians' diagnosis and prognosis decisions. The performance of MVP is tested and justified with an actual Philips monitoring device.

  18. Validation of Contact-Free Sleep Monitoring Device with Comparison to Polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Asher; Shinar, Zvika; Shaki, David; Codish, Shlomi; Goldbart, Aviv

    2017-03-15

    To validate a contact-free system designed to achieve maximal comfort during long-term sleep monitoring, together with high monitoring accuracy. We used a contact-free monitoring system (EarlySense, Ltd., Israel), comprising an under-the-mattress piezoelectric sensor and a smartphone application, to collect vital signs and analyze sleep. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), body movement, and calculated sleep-related parameters from the EarlySense (ES) sensor were compared to data simultaneously generated by the gold standard, polysomnography (PSG). Subjects in the sleep laboratory underwent overnight technician-attended full PSG, whereas subjects at home were recorded for 1 to 3 nights with portable partial PSG devices. Data were compared epoch by epoch. A total of 63 subjects (85 nights) were recorded under a variety of sleep conditions. Compared to PSG, the contact-free system showed similar values for average total sleep time (TST), % wake, % rapid eye movement, and % non-rapid eye movement sleep, with 96.1% and 93.3% accuracy of continuous measurement of HR and RR, respectively. We found a linear correlation between TST measured by the sensor and TST determined by PSG, with a coefficient of 0.98 (R = 0.87). Epoch-by-epoch comparison with PSG in the sleep laboratory setting revealed that the system showed sleep detection sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 92.5%, 80.4%, and 90.5%, respectively. TST estimates with the contact-free sleep monitoring system were closely correlated with the gold-standard reference. This system shows good sleep staging capability with improved performance over accelerometer-based apps, and collects additional physiological information on heart rate and respiratory rate. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  19. Quality and Safety of Home ICP Monitoring Compared with In-Hospital Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne; Munch, Tina Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is usually conducted in-hospital using stationary devices. Modern mobile ICP monitoring systems present new monitoring possibilities more closely following the patients' daily life. We reviewed patient safety, quality of technical data...

  20. Validation of Omron RS8, RS6, and RS3 home blood pressure monitoring devices, in accordance with the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hakuo; Yoshika, Masamichi; Yokoi, Toyohiko

    2013-01-01

    Allowing patients to measure their blood pressure at home is recognized as being of clinical value. However, it is not known how often these measurements are taken correctly. Blood pressure monitors for home use fall into two types based on the position of the cuff, ie, at the upper arm or the wrist. The latter is particularly convenient, as measurements can be taken fully clothed. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the wrist-type blood pressure monitors Omron RS8 (HEM-6310F-E), Omron RS6 (HEM-6221-E), and Omron RS3 (HEM-6130-E). A team of three trained doctors validated the performance of these devices by comparing the measurements obtained from these devices with those taken using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. All the devices met the validation requirements of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. The difference in blood pressure readings between the tested device and the standard mercury sphygmomanometer was within 3 mmHg, which is acceptable according to the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. All the home devices tested were found to be suitable for measuring blood pressure at home because their performance fulfilled the requirement of the guidelines.

  1. The complications and the position of the Codman MicroSensor™ ICP device: an analysis of 549 patients and 650 Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Lars-Owe D; Grayson, David; Olivecrona, Magnus

    2013-11-01

    Complications of and insertion depth of the Codman MicroSensor ICP monitoring device (CMS) is not well studied. To study complications and the insertion depth of the CMS in a clinical setting. We identified all patients who had their intracranial pressure (ICP) monitored using a CMS device between 2002 and 2010. The medical records and post implantation computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed for occurrence of infection, hemorrhage and insertion depth. In all, 549 patients were monitored using 650 CMS. Mean monitoring time was 7.0 ± 4.9 days. The mean implantation depth was 21.3 ± 11.1 mm (0-88 mm). In 27 of the patients, a haematoma was identified; 26 of these were less than 1 ml, and one was 8 ml. No clinically significant bleeding was found. There was no statistically significant increase in the number of hemorrhages in presumed coagulopathic patients. The infection rate was 0.6 % and the calculated infection rate per 1,000 catheter days was 0.8. The risk for hemorrhagic and infectious complications when using the CMS for ICP monitoring is low. The depth of insertion varies considerably and should be taken into account if patients are treated with head elevation, since the pressure is measured at the tip of the sensor. To meet the need for ICP monitoring, an intraparenchymal ICP monitoring device should be preferred to the use of an external ventricular drainage (EVD).

  2. Laser Transcutaneous Bilirubin Meter: A New Device For Bilirubin Monitoring In Neonatal Jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Mostafa; Hamza, Mohammad

    1988-06-01

    Neonates with jaundice require monitoring of serum bilirubin which should be repeated at frequent intervals. However, taking blood samples from neonates is not always an easy job, plus being an invasive and traumatising procedure with the additional risk of blood loss. In this paper the authors present the theory and design of a new noninvasive device for transcutaneous bilirubinometry, using a differential absorption laser system. The new technique depends upon illuminating the skin of the neonate with radiation from a two wave-length oscillation laser. The choice of the wavelengths follows the principles of optical bilirubinometry. For obtaining more accurate measurements, different pairs of two wave-lengths are incorporated in the design. The presence of hemoglobin is corrected for by appropriate selection of the laser wavelengths. The new design was tested for accuracy and precision using an argon ion laser. Correlation study between serum bilirubin determination by laser transcutaneous bilirubinometry and by American optical bilirubinometer was highly significant.

  3. Smart home-based health platform for behavioral monitoring and alteration of diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Abdelsalam; Cook, Diane J; Schmalz, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers and medical practitioners have long sought the ability to continuously and automatically monitor patients beyond the confines of a doctor's office. We describe a smart home monitoring and analysis platform that facilitates the automatic gathering of rich databases of behavioral information in a manner that is transparent to the patient. Collected information will be automatically or manually analyzed and reported to the caregivers and may be interpreted for behavioral modification in the patient. Our health platform consists of five technology layers. The architecture is designed to be flexible, extensible, and transparent, to support plug-and-play operation of new devices and components, and to provide remote monitoring and programming opportunities. The smart home-based health platform technologies have been tested in two physical smart environments. Data that are collected in these implemented physical layers are processed and analyzed by our activity recognition and chewing classification algorithms. All of these components have yielded accurate analyses for subjects in the smart environment test beds. This work represents an important first step in the field of smart environment-based health monitoring and assistance. The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patients and evaluate the effects of alternative medicine and behavior regimens. We believe these technologies are essential for providing accessible, low-cost health assistance in an individual's own home and for providing the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. © Diabetes Technology Society

  4. Feasibility and efficacy of wearable devices for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Fong; Lin, Yi-Jia; Lin, Zi-Hao; Chuang, Li-Yun; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Lin, Yuan-Hsiang

    2017-06-19

    Wearable devices based on inertial measurement units through wireless sensor networks have many applications such as real-time motion monitoring and functional outcome assessment of stroke rehabilitation. However, additional investigations are warranted to validate their clinical value, particularly in detecting the synergy patterns of movements after stroke. To explore the feasibility and efficacy of wearable devices for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with chronic stroke and to compare the intervention effects (e.g., neurological recovery, active range of motion, and deviation angle) with those in a control group. A single-blind, randomized-controlled pilot study. Rehabilitation ward. A total of 18 patients with chronic stroke were randomly distributed into a device group and control group. Both groups received conventional rehabilitation; nevertheless, the device group was additionally subjected to 15 daily sessions at least three times a week for 5 weeks. The outcome measures included the upper extremity subscores of the Fugl-Meyer assessment, active range of motion, and deviation angle. These measurements were performed pre- and post-treatment. All five Fugl-Meyer assessment subscores improved in both the device and control groups after intervention; in particular, the "shoulder/elbow/forearm" subscore (p = 0.02, 0.03) and "total score" (p = 0.03, 0.03) substantially improved. The active range of motion of shoulder flexion and abduction substantially improved at pre-post treatment in both the device (p = 0.02, 0.03) and control (p = 0.02, 0.03) groups. The deviation angle of shoulder external rotation during shoulder abduction substantially improved in the device group (p = 0.02), but not in the control group. The designed wearable devices are practical and efficient for use in chronic patients with stroke. Wearable devices are expected to be useful for future internet-of-things rehabilitation clinical trials at home and in long-term care institutions.

  5. Use of mobile device technology to continuously collect patient-reported symptoms during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: A prospective feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchook, Aaron D; Tracton, Gregg; Stravers, Lori; Fleming, Mary E; Snavely, Anna C; Noe, Jeanne F; Hayes, David N; Grilley-Olson, Juneko E; Weiss, Jared M; Reeve, Bryce B; Basch, Ethan M; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of toxicity allows for timely delivery of supportive measures during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The current paradigm requires weekly evaluation of patients by a provider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring patient reported symptoms via mobile devices. We developed a mobile application for patients to report symptoms in 5 domains using validated questions. Patients were asked to report symptoms using a mobile device once daily during treatment or more often as needed. Clinicians reviewed patient-reported symptoms during weekly symptom management visits and patients completed surveys regarding perceptions of the utility of the mobile application. The primary outcome measure was patient compliance with mobile device reporting. Compliance is defined as number of days with a symptom report divided by number of days on study. There were 921 symptom reports collected from 22 patients during treatment. Median reporting compliance was 71% (interquartile range, 45%-80%). Median number of reports submitted per patient was 34 (interquartile range, 21-53). Median number of reports submitted by patients per week was similar throughout radiation therapy and there was significant reporting during nonclinic hours. Patients reported high satisfaction with the use of mobile devices to report symptoms. A substantial percentage of patients used mobile devices to continuously report symptoms throughout a course of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future studies should evaluate the impact of mobile device symptom reporting on improving patient outcomes.

  6. Coagulation monitoring of the bleeding traumatized patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I

    2012-01-01

    Death due to trauma is the leading cause of lost life years worldwide, with haemorrhage being responsible for 30-40% of trauma mortality and accounting for almost 50% of the deaths in the initial 24 h. On admission, 25-35% of trauma patients present with coagulopathy, which is associated with a s...

  7. pH monitoring in patients with benign voice disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, A M; West, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare oesophageal pH-metry with laryngeal signs and symptoms in patients suspected of laryngeal reflux disease. A total of 60 patients with voice disorders, who were suspected of laryngeal reflux, were tested by single probe oesophageal pH monitoring. Thirty...

  8. A Framework for the Comparison of Mobile Patient Monitoring Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawar, P.; Jones, Valerie M.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    A mobile patient monitoring system makes use of mobile computing and wireless communication technologies for continuous or periodic measurement and analysis of biosignals of a mobile patient. In a number of trials these systems have demonstrated their user-friendliness, convenience and effectiveness

  9. Distributed Computing and Monitoring Technologies for Older Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonovs, Juris; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Krueger, Volker

    This book summarizes various approaches for the automatic detection of health threats to older patients at home living alone. The text begins by briefly describing those who would most benefit from healthcare supervision. The book then summarizes possible scenarios for monitoring an older patient...

  10. Motion compensation for MRI-compatible patient-mounted needle guide device: estimation of targeting accuracy in MRI-guided kidney cryoablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Chauvin, Laurent; Ninni, Brian; Kato, Takahisa; King, Franklin; Tuncali, Kemal; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Patient-mounted needle guide devices for percutaneous ablation are vulnerable to patient motion. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a software system for an MRI-compatible patient-mounted needle guide device that can adaptively compensate for displacement of the device due to patient motion using a novel image-based automatic device-to-image registration technique. We have developed a software system for an MRI-compatible patient-mounted needle guide device for percutaneous ablation. It features fully-automated image-based device-to-image registration to track the device position, and a device controller to adjust the needle trajectory to compensate for the displacement of the device. We performed: (a) a phantom study using a clinical MR scanner to evaluate registration performance; (b) simulations using intraoperative time-series MR data acquired in 20 clinical cases of MRI-guided renal cryoablations to assess its impact on motion compensation; and (c) a pilot clinical study in three patients to test its feasibility during the clinical procedure. FRE, TRE, and success rate of device-to-image registration were mm, mm, and 98.3% for the phantom images. The simulation study showed that the motion compensation reduced the targeting error for needle placement from 8.2 mm to 5.4 mm (p  <  0.0005) in patients under general anesthesia (GA), and from 14.4 mm to 10.0 mm () in patients under monitored anesthesia care (MAC). The pilot study showed that the software registered the device successfully in a clinical setting. Our simulation study demonstrated that the software system could significantly improve targeting accuracy in patients treated under both MAC and GA. Intraprocedural image-based device-to-image registration was feasible.

  11. A Wireless Fully Passive Neural Recording Device for Unobtrusive Neuropotential Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiourti, Asimina; Lee, Cedric W L; Chae, Junseok; Volakis, John L

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel wireless fully passive neural recording device for unobtrusive neuropotential monitoring. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring emulated brain signals in a wireless fully passive manner. In this paper, we propose a novel realistic recorder that is significantly smaller and much more sensitive. The proposed recorder utilizes a highly efficient microwave backscattering method and operates without any formal power supply or regulating elements. Also, no intracranial wires or cables are required. In-vitro testing is performed inside a four-layer head phantom (skin, bone, gray matter, and white matter). Compared to our former implementation, the neural recorder proposed in this study has the following improved features: 1) 59% smaller footprint, 2) up to 20-dB improvement in neuropotential detection sensitivity, and 3) encapsulation in biocompatible polymer. For the first time, temporal emulated neuropotentials as low as 63 μVpp can be detected in a wireless fully passive manner. Remarkably, the high-sensitivity achieved in this study implies reading of most neural signals generated by the human brain. The proposed recorder brings forward transformational possibilities in wireless fully passive neural detection for a very wide range of applications (e.g., epilepsy, Alzheimer's, mental disorders, etc.).

  12. Fully automatic flow-based device for monitoring of drug permeation across a cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, Lucie; Marques, Sara S; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel; Pávek, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A novel flow-programming setup based on the sequential injection principle is herein proposed for on-line monitoring of temporal events in cell permeation studies. The permeation unit consists of a Franz cell with its basolateral compartment mixed under mechanical agitation and thermostated at 37 °C. The apical compartment is replaced by commercially available Transwell inserts with a precultivated cell monolayer. The transport of drug substances across epithelial cells genetically modified with the P-glycoprotein membrane transporter (MDCKII-MDR1) is monitored on-line using rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent marker. The permeation kinetics of the marker is obtained in a fully automated mode by sampling minute volumes of solution from the basolateral compartment in short intervals (10 min) up to 4 h. The effect of a P-glycoprotein transporter inhibitor, verapamil as a model drug, on the efficiency of the marker transport across the cell monolayer is thoroughly investigated. The analytical features of the proposed flow method for cell permeation studies in real time are critically compared against conventional batch-wise procedures and microfluidic devices.

  13. The design of a wireless portable device for personalized ultraviolet monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Navid; Matthews, Jerrid E.; Vahdatpour, Alireza; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2009-08-01

    The skin care product market is growing due to the threat of ultraviolet (UV) radiation caused by the destruction of the ozone layer, increasing demand for tanning, and the tendency to wear less clothing. Accordingly, there is a potential demand for a personalized UV monitoring system, which can play a fundamental role in skin cancer prevention by providing measurements of UV radiation intensities and corresponding recommendations. Furthermore, the need for such device becomes more vital since it has turned out that in some places (e.g., on snowy mountains) the UV exposure gets doubled, while individuals are unaware of this fact. This paper highlights the development and initial validation of a wireless and portable embedded system for personalized UV monitoring which is based on a novel software architecture, a high-end UV sensor, and conventional PDA (or a cell phone). In terms of short-term applications, by calculating the UV index, it informs the users about their maximum recommended sun exposure time by taking their skin type and sun protection factor (SPF) of the applied sunscreen into consideration. As for long-term applications, given that the damage caused by UV light is accumulated over days, it is able to keep a record of the amount of UV received over a certain course of time, from a single day to a month. Low energy consumption and high accuracy in estimating the UV index are salient features of this system.

  14. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system.

  15. Evaluating the Consistency of Current Mainstream Wearable Devices in Health Monitoring: A Comparison Under Free-Living Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dong; Zhang, Xingting; Liu, Xingyu; Lei, Jianbo

    2017-03-07

    Wearable devices are gaining increasing market attention; however, the monitoring accuracy and consistency of the devices remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the consistency of the monitoring measurements of the latest wearable devices in the state of normal activities to provide advice to the industry and support to consumers in making purchasing choices. Ten pieces of representative wearable devices (2 smart watches, 4 smart bracelets of Chinese brands or foreign brands, and 4 mobile phone apps) were selected, and 5 subjects were employed to simultaneously use all the devices and the apps. From these devices, intact health monitoring data were acquired for 5 consecutive days and analyzed on the degree of differences and the relationships of the monitoring measurements ​​by the different devices. The daily measurements by the different devices fluctuated greatly, and the coefficient of variation (CV) fluctuated in the range of 2-38% for the number of steps, 5-30% for distance, 19-112% for activity duration, .1-17% for total energy expenditure (EE), 22-100% for activity EE, 2-44% for sleep duration, and 35-117% for deep sleep duration. After integrating the measurement data of 25 days among the devices, the measurements of the number of steps (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC=.89) and distance (ICC=.84) displayed excellent consistencies, followed by those of activity duration (ICC=.59) and the total EE (ICC=.59) and activity EE (ICC=.57). However, the measurements for sleep duration (ICC=.30) and deep sleep duration (ICC=.27) were poor. For most devices, there was a strong correlation between the number of steps and distance measurements (R 2 >.95), and for some devices, there was a strong correlation between activity duration measurements and EE measurements (R 2 >.7). A strong correlation was observed in the measurements of steps, distance and EE from smart watches and mobile phones of the same brand, Apple or Samsung (r>.88

  16. In situ monitoring using Lab on Chip devices, with particular reference to dissolved silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. S. C.; Loucaides, S.; Slavik, G. J.; Owsianka, D. R.; Beaton, A.; Nightingale, A.; Mowlem, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    In situ sensors are attractive alternatives to discrete sampling of natural waters, offering the potential for sustained long term monitoring and eliminating the need for sample handling. This can reduce sample contamination and degradation. In addition, sensors can be clustered into multi-parameter observatories and networked to provide both spatial and time series coverage. High resolution, low cost, and long term monitoring are the biggest advantages of these technologies to oceanographers. Microfluidic technology miniaturises bench-top assay systems into portable devices, known as a `lab on a chip' (LOC). The principle advantages of this technology are low power consumption, simplicity, speed, and stability without compromising on quality (accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity). We have successfully demonstrated in situ sensors based on this technology for the measurement of pH, nitrate and nitrite. Dissolved silica (dSi) is an important macro-nutrient supporting a major fraction of oceanic primary production carried out by diatoms. The biogeochemical Si cycle is undergoing significant modifications due to human activities, which affects availability of dSi, and consequently primary production. Monitoring dSi concentrations is therefore critical in increasing our understanding of the biogeochemical Si cycle to predict and manage anthropogenic perturbations. The standard bench top air segmented flow technique utilising the reduction of silicomolybdic acid with spectrophotometric detection has been miniaturised into a LOC system; the target limit of detection is 1 nM, with ± 5% accuracy and 3% precision. Results from the assay optimisation are presented along with reagent shelf life to demonstrate the robustness of the chemistry. Laboratory trials of the sensor using ideal solutions and environmental samples in environmentally relevant conditions (temperature, pressure) are discussed, along with an overview of our current LOC analytical capabilities.

  17. Patient Posture Monitoring System Based on Flexible Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsu Cha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring patients using vision cameras can cause privacy intrusion problems. In this paper, we propose a patient position monitoring system based on a patient cloth with unobtrusive sensors. We use flexible sensors based on polyvinylidene fluoride, which is a flexible piezoelectric material. Theflexiblesensorsareinsertedintopartsclosetothekneeandhipoftheloosepatientcloth. We measure electrical signals from the sensors caused by the piezoelectric effect when the knee and hip in the cloth are bent. The measured sensor outputs are transferred to a computer via Bluetooth. We use a custom-made program to detect the position of the patient through a rule-based algorithm and the sensor outputs. The detectable postures are based on six human motions in and around a bed. The proposed system can detect the patient positions with a success rate over 88 percent for three patients.

  18. Patient- and Technician-Oriented Attitudes Toward Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, Brady; Nguyen, Eliza; Lembo, Cara; Hinchman, Carrie; Morales, Oscar G; Press, Daniel Z; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Stern, Adam P

    2018-01-25

    Four transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices are currently approved for use in treatment-resistant depression. The authors present the first data-driven study examining the patient- and technician-experience using three of these distinct devices. A retrospective survey design with both patient and technician arms was utilized. The study population included patients who received TMS for treatment-resistant depression at the Berenson Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for the first time between 2013 and 2016 and technicians who worked in the program from 2009 to 2017. Statistical analysis included t tests and analyses of variance to assess differences between and across the multiple groups, respectively. Patients treated with the NeuroStar device reported greater confidence that the treatment was being performed correctly compared with those treated with the Magstim device. Conversely, with regard to tolerability, patients treated with the Magstim device reported less pain in the last week and less pain on average compared with those treated with the NeuroStar device. On average, technicians reported feeling that both the Magstim and NeuroStar devices were significantly easier to use than the Brainsway Deep TMS H-Coil device. Additionally, they found the former two devices to be more reliable and better tolerated. Furthermore, the technicians reported greater confidence in the Magstim and NeuroStar devices compared with the Brainsway Deep TMS H-Coil device and indicated that they would be more likely to recommend the two former devices to other treatment centers.

  19. Development of a Hard X-ray Beam Position Monitor for Insertion Device Beams at the APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Glenn; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Singh, Om

    2006-11-01

    Long-term pointing stability requirements at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are very stringent, at the level of 500 nanoradians peak-to-peak or better over a one-week time frame. Conventional rf beam position monitors (BPMs) close to the insertion device source points are incapable of assuring this level of stability, owing to mechanical, thermal, and electronic stability limitations. Insertion device gap-dependent systematic errors associated with the present ultraviolet photon beam position monitors similarly limit their ability to control long-term pointing stability. We report on the development of a new BPM design sensitive only to hard x-rays. Early experimental results will be presented.

  20. Transmitting patient and device data via GSM--central management for decentral mobile medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmor, T; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    Equipping medical devices with long range telemetry opens completely new possibilities for emergency response, home care and remote diagnosis. Mobile communications nowadays seem to be a generally accepted part of our modern world, but bridging the gap between new (consumer-) technologies and medical devices still is a challenge today. Providing a telemetry link (GSM) is just the trivial part--ensuring security, reliability and service management are the more critical tasks that need to be addressed. Therefore, a complete system concept consists of an automatic fleet management (e.g. periodic device-initiated service calls) as well as customer relationship management (CRM), including technical service and a trouble-ticket system.

  1. DEGRO/DGK guideline for radiotherapy in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Steil, Volker; Wenz, Frederik; Israel, Carsten W.; Dorenkamp, Marc; Dunst, Juergen; Roser, Mattias; Schimpf, Rainer; Schaefer, Joerg; Hoeller, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) have cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIEDs, cardiac pacemakers (PMs) and implanted cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs)]. Ionizing radiation can cause latent and permanent damage to CIEDs, which may result in loss of function in patients with asystole or ventricular fibrillation. Reviewing the current literature, the interdisciplinary German guideline (DEGRO/DGK) was developed reflecting patient risk according to type of CIED, cardiac condition, and estimated radiation dose to the CIED. Planning for RT should consider the CIED specifications as well as patient-related characteristics (pacing-dependent, previous ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation). Antitachyarrhythmia therapy should be suspended in patients with ICDs, who should be under electrocardiographic monitoring with an external defibrillator on stand-by. The beam energy should be limited to 6 (to 10) MV CIEDs should never be located in the beam, and the cumulative scatter radiation dose should be limited to 2 Gy. Personnel must be able to respond adequately in the case of a cardiac emergency and initiate basic life support, while an emergency team capable of advanced life support should be available within 5 min. CIEDs need to be interrogated 1, 3, and 6 months after the last RT due to the risk of latent damage. (orig.) [de

  2. Dose patient verification during treatment using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Today, amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (aSi EPID) are currently used to check the accuracy of patient positioning. However, they are not use for dose reconstruction yet and more investigations are required to allow the use of an aSi EPID for routine dosimetric verification. The aim of this work is first to study the dosimetric characteristics of the EPID available at the Institut Curie and then, to check patient dose during treatment using these EPID. First, performance optimization of the Varian aS500 EPID system is studied. Then, a quality assurance system is set up in order to certify the image quality on a daily basis. An additional study on the dosimetric performance of the aS500 EPID is monitored to assess operational stability for dosimetry applications. Electronic portal imaging device is also a useful tool to improve IMRT quality control. The validation and the quality assurance of a portal dose image prediction system for IMRT pre-treatment quality control are performed. All dynamic IMRT fields are verified in clinical routine with the new method based on portal dosimetry. Finally, a new formalism for in vivo dosimetry using transit dose measured with EPID is developed and validated. The absolute dose measurement issue using aSi EPID is described and the midplane dose determination using in vivo dose measurements in combination with portal imaging is used with 3D-conformal-radiation therapy. (author) [fr

  3. A New Electronic Monitoring Device to Measure Medication Adherence: Usability of the Helping Hand™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina De Geest

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the user performance, satisfaction and acceptability of the Helping Hand™ (B&O Medicom electronic medication adherence monitor. Using a mixed-method design, we studied 11 kidney transplant patients and 10 healthy volunteers during three weeks. Although testing showed positive usability aspects, several areas requiring technical improvement were identified: the most important obstacles to usability and acceptability were the weak sound signal, problems loading the medication, and the fact that only one medication could be used at a time.

  4. Monitoring of the Adult Patient on Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO provides mechanical support to the patient with cardiac or cardiopulmonary failure. This paper reviews the physiology of VA ECMO including the determinants of ECMO flow and gas exchange. The efficacy of this therapy may be determined by assessing patient hemodynamics and device flow, overall gas exchange support, markers of adequate oxygen delivery, and pulsatility of the arterial blood pressure waveform.

  5. Reliability of Sleep Measures from Four Personal Health Monitoring Devices Compared to Research-Based Actigraphy and Polysomnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Mantua

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Polysomnography (PSG is the “gold standard” for monitoring sleep. Alternatives to PSG are of interest for clinical, research, and personal use. Wrist-worn actigraph devices have been utilized in research settings for measures of sleep for over two decades. Whether sleep measures from commercially available devices are similarly valid is unknown. We sought to determine the validity of five wearable devices: Basis Health Tracker, Misfit Shine, Fitbit Flex, Withings Pulse O2, and a research-based actigraph, Actiwatch Spectrum. We used Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests to assess differences between devices relative to PSG and correlational analysis to assess the strength of the relationship. Data loss was greatest for Fitbit and Misfit. For all devices, we found no difference and strong correlation of total sleep time with PSG. Sleep efficiency differed from PSG for Withings, Misfit, Fitbit, and Basis, while Actiwatch mean values did not differ from that of PSG. Only mean values of sleep efficiency (time asleep/time in bed from Actiwatch correlated with PSG, yet this correlation was weak. Light sleep time differed from PSG (nREM1 + nREM2 for all devices. Measures of Deep sleep time did not differ from PSG (SWS + REM for Basis. These results reveal the current strengths and limitations in sleep estimates produced by personal health monitoring devices and point to a need for future development.

  6. Urine Creatinine Concentrations in Drug Monitoring Participants and Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Seegmiller, Jesse C; Kloss, Julie; Apple, Fred S

    2016-10-01

    Urine drug testing is commonly performed in both clinical and forensic arenas for screening, monitoring and compliance purposes. We sought to determine if urine creatinine concentrations in monitoring program participants were significantly different from hospital in-patients and out-patients undergoing urine drug testing. We retrospectively reviewed urine creatinine submitted in June through December 2015 for all specimens undergoing urine drug testing. The 20,479 creatinine results were categorized as hospitalized patients (H) and monitoring/compliance groups for pain management (P), legal (L) or recovery (R). Median creatinine concentrations (interquartile range, mg/dL) were significantly different (P creatinine concentrations were significantly lower in the R vs. L group (Pcreatinine concentration and may indicate participants' attempts to tamper with their drug test results through dilution means. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Titration effectiveness of two autoadjustable continuous positive airway pressure devices driven by different algorithms in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Mario Francesco; Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Tedeschi, Ersilia; Drigo, Riccardo; Ranieri, Teresa; Carratù, Pierluigi; Resta, Onofrio

    2013-08-01

    Nocturnal application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Determination of the therapeutic pressure (CPAP titration) is usually performed by a technician in the sleep laboratory during attended polysomnography. One possible alternative to manual titration is automated titration. Indeed, during the last 15 years, devices have been developed that deliver autoadjustable CPAP (A-CPAP). The aim of the present study was to compare the titration effectiveness of two A-CPAP devices using different flow-based algorithms in patients with OSA. This is a randomized study; 79 subjects underwent two consecutive unattended home A-CPAP titration nights with two different devices (Autoset Resmed; Remstar Auto Respironics); during the third and the fourth night, patients underwent portable monitoring in the sleep laboratory during fixed CPAP at the A-CPAP recommended pressure. Bland Altman plots showed good agreement between the recommended median and maximal pressure levels obtained with the two devices. A significant improvement was observed in all the sleep parameters by both A-CPAP machines to a similar degree. It was observed that the two A-CPAP devices using different algorithms are equally effective in initial titration of CPAP. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  8. Wireless Patient Monitoring System Using Point to Multi Point Zigbee Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Soe Phyo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A ZigBee sensor network for data acquisition and monitoring is presented in this paper. A ZigBee module is connected via a USB interface to a Microsoft Windows PC which works as a base station in the network. Data collected by sensor devices are sent to the base station PC which is set as Wireless sensorNetwork WSN. ZigBee is low power consumption built-in security method and ratified specifications make it very suitable to be used with medical sensor devices.This application of Zigbee based network consists of two transmitter sections and a receiver section.Each transmitter section consists of heartbeat sensor body temperature sensor microcontroller Zigbee and LCD module.In the proposed system the patients health is continuously monitored and theacquired data is analyzed at a personal computer using Graphical User InterfaceGUI. If a particular patients health parameter is higher or lower the threshold values an alarm system is used to alert the doctor. The aim of this system is to know the condition of patients health by the doctor immediately and to reduce the load of the staff taking care of the patient in the hospitals. In this paper wireless point to multipoint system is used between doctor and patient.

  9. ESUMS: a mobile system for continuous home monitoring of rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strisland, Frode; Svagård, Ingrid; Seeberg, Trine M; Mathisen, Bjørn Magnus; Vedum, Jon; Austad, Hanne O; Liverud, Anders E; Kofod-Petersen, Anders; Bendixen, Ole Christian

    2013-01-01

    The pressure on the healthcare services is building up for several reasons. The ageing population trend, the increase in life-style related disease prevalence, as well as the increased treatment capabilities with associated general expectation all add pressure. The use of ambient healthcare technologies can alleviate the situation by enabling time and cost-efficient monitoring and follow-up of patients discharged from hospital care. We report on an ambulatory system developed for monitoring of physical rehabilitation patients. The system consists of a wearable multisensor monitoring device; a mobile phone with client application aggregating the data collected; a service-oriented-architecture based server solution; and a PC application facilitating patient follow-up by their health professional carers. The system has been tested and verified for accuracy in controlled environment trials on healthy volunteers, and also been usability tested by 5 congestive heart failure patients and their nurses. This investigation indicated that patients were able to use the system, and that nurses got an improved basis for patient follow-up.

  10. Patient experiences with self-monitoring renal function after renal transplantation: results from a single-center prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lint, Céline L; van der Boog, Paul Jm; Wang, Wenxin; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Rövekamp, Ton Jm; Neerincx, Mark A; Rabelink, Ton J; van Dijk, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    After a kidney transplantation, patients have to visit the hospital often to monitor for early signs of graft rejection. Self-monitoring of creatinine in addition to blood pressure at home could alleviate the burden of frequent outpatient visits, but only if patients are willing to self-monitor and if they adhere to the self-monitoring measurement regimen. A prospective pilot study was conducted to assess patients' experiences and satisfaction. For 3 months after transplantation, 30 patients registered self-measured creatinine and blood pressure values in an online record to which their physician had access to. Patients completed a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up to assess satisfaction, attitude, self-efficacy regarding self-monitoring, worries, and physician support. Adherence was studied by comparing the number of registered with the number of requested measurements. Patients were highly motivated to self-monitor kidney function, and reported high levels of general satisfaction. Level of satisfaction was positively related to perceived support from physicians (Pself-efficacy (Pmonitoring of creatinine and blood pressure after transplantation offers a promising strategy. Important prerequisites for safe implementation in transplant care seem to be support from physicians and patients' confidence in both their own self-monitoring skills and the accuracy of the devices used.

  11. Energy expenditure prediction via a footwear-based physical activity monitor: Accuracy and comparison to other devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannecker, Kathryn

    2011-12-01

    Accurately estimating free-living energy expenditure (EE) is important for monitoring or altering energy balance and quantifying levels of physical activity. The use of accelerometers to monitor physical activity and estimate physical activity EE is common in both research and consumer settings. Recent advances in physical activity monitors include the ability to identify specific activities (e.g. stand vs. walk) which has resulted in improved EE estimation accuracy. Recently, a multi-sensor footwear-based physical activity monitor that is capable of achieving 98% activity identification accuracy has been developed. However, no study has compared the EE estimation accuracy for this monitor and compared this accuracy to other similar devices. Purpose . To determine the accuracy of physical activity EE estimation of a footwear-based physical activity monitor that uses an embedded accelerometer and insole pressure sensors and to compare this accuracy against a variety of research and consumer physical activity monitors. Methods. Nineteen adults (10 male, 9 female), mass: 75.14 (17.1) kg, BMI: 25.07(4.6) kg/m2 (mean (SD)), completed a four hour stay in a room calorimeter. Participants wore a footwear-based physical activity monitor, as well as three physical activity monitoring devices used in research: hip-mounted Actical and Actigraph accelerometers and a multi-accelerometer IDEEA device with sensors secured to the limb and chest. In addition, participants wore two consumer devices: Philips DirectLife and Fitbit. Each individual performed a series of randomly assigned and ordered postures/activities including lying, sitting (quietly and using a computer), standing, walking, stepping, cycling, sweeping, as well as a period of self-selected activities. We developed branched (i.e. activity specific) linear regression models to estimate EE from the footwear-based device, and we used the manufacturer's software to estimate EE for all other devices. Results. The shoe

  12. Semipermeable membrane devices in monitoring of organic pollutants in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabaliunas, D

    1999-03-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are passive samplers capable of concentrating hydrophobic chemicals from water, sediments, soil and air. They consist of layflat polymeric membrane such as polyethylene containing a thin film of synthetic lipid such as triolein. The transport of hydrophobic chemicals through the membrane into the lipid is governed by the process of passive diffusion. Therefore, SPMDs sample chemicals in a way similar to organisms. This thesis deals with the application of SPMDs in the monitoring of concentrations and effects of organic pollutants in the aquatic environment. SPMDs were exposed to various pesticides (organochlorines, synthetic pyrethroids, dinitroanilines, amides) in laboratory flow-through experiments to study the uptake kinetics of organic chemicals from water. To compare the uptake of model compounds by SPMDs and aquatic organisms, the membrane samplers were exposed to chemicals side-by-side with bivalves. Mixtures of chemicals accumulated by SPMDs and mussels were tested in standard toxicity and genotoxicity assays (Microtox, Mutatox, invertebrate toxicity tests, the Ames test, sister chromatid exchange test). These studies showed that the uptake pattern of organic compounds by SPMDs and aquatic organisms was similar, and the passive samplers accumulated levels of chemicals sufficient for standard bioassays. To further validate the method, SPMDs were deployed in a number of polluted water sources in Lithuania. Bioassay-directed fractionation and chemical analytical methods were used to identify pollutants sampled (PAHs, PCBs, organochlorines) and their effects were evaluated in bioassays. SPMDs proved to be useful tools in monitoring of organic pollutants under the field conditions. Criteria for bioassays to be integrated with the SPMD technique were defined based on the results of these studies. Some important factors in the integration of SPMDs and bioassays (toxicity of SPMD-inherent oleic and sediment

  13. Monitoring Global Precipitation through UCI CHRS's RainMapper App on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P.; Huynh, P.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Water and Development Information for Arid Lands-a Global Network (G-WADI) Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks—Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) GeoServer has been developed through a collaboration between the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and the UNESCO's International Hydrological Program (IHP). G-WADI PERSIANN-CCS GeoServer provides near real-time high resolution (0.04o, approx 4km) global (60oN - 60oS) satellite precipitation estimated by the PERSIANN-CCS algorithm developed by the scientists at CHRS. The G-WADI PERSIANN-CCS GeoServer utilizes the open-source MapServer software from the University of Minnesota to provide a user-friendly web-based mapping and visualization of satellite precipitation data. Recent efforts have been made by the scientists at CHRS to provide free on-the-go access to the PERSIANN-CCS precipitation data through an application named RainMapper for mobile devices. RainMapper provides visualization of global satellite precipitation of the most recent 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72-hour periods overlaid with various basemaps. RainMapper uses the Google maps application programing interface (API) and embedded global positioning system (GPS) access to better monitor the global precipitation data on mobile devices. Functionalities include using geographical searching with voice recognition technologies make it easy for the user to explore near real-time precipitation in a certain location. RainMapper also allows for conveniently sharing the precipitation information and visualizations with the public through social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. RainMapper is available for iOS and Android devices and can be downloaded (free) from the App Store and Google Play. The usefulness of RainMapper was demonstrated through an application in tracking the evolution of the recent Rammasun Typhoon over the

  14. 40 CFR 63.7927 - What are my inspection and monitoring requirements for closed vent systems and control devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are my inspection and monitoring... Pollutants: Site Remediation Closed Vent Systems and Control Devices § 63.7927 What are my inspection and... temperature at the inlet of the catalyst bed, the hourly average temperature at the outlet of the catalyst bed...

  15. Using Colony Monitoring Devices to Evaluate the Impacts of Land Use and Nutritional Value of Forage on Honey Bee Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Smart

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Colony monitoring devices used to track and assess the health status of honey bees are becoming more widely available and used by both beekeepers and researchers. These devices monitor parameters relevant to colony health at frequent intervals, often approximating real time. The fine-scale record of hive condition can be further related to static or dynamic features of the landscape, such as weather, climate, colony density, land use, pesticide use, vegetation class, and forage quality. In this study, we fit commercial honey bee colonies in two apiaries with pollen traps and digital scales to monitor floral resource use, pollen quality, and honey production. One apiary was situated in low-intensity agriculture; the other in high-intensity agriculture. Pollen traps were open for 72 h every two weeks while scales recorded weight every 15 min throughout the growing season. From collected pollen, we determined forage quantity per day, species identity using DNA sequencing, pesticide residues, amino acid content, and total protein content. From scales, we determined the accumulated hive weight change over the growing season, relating to honey production and final colony weight going into winter. Hive scales may also be used to identify the occurrence of environmental pollen and nectar dearth, and track phenological changes in plant communities. We provide comparisons of device-derived data between two apiaries over the growing season and discuss the potential for employing apiary monitoring devices to infer colony health in the context of divergent agricultural land use conditions.

  16. Using colony monitoring devices to evaluate the impacts of land use and nutritional value of forage on honey bee health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Matthew; Otto, Clint R.; Cornman, Robert S.; Iwanowicz, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    Colony monitoring devices used to track and assess the health status of honey bees are becoming more widely available and used by both beekeepers and researchers. These devices monitor parameters relevant to colony health at frequent intervals, often approximating real time. The fine-scale record of hive condition can be further related to static or dynamic features of the landscape, such as weather, climate, colony density, land use, pesticide use, vegetation class, and forage quality. In this study, we fit commercial honey bee colonies in two apiaries with pollen traps and digital scales to monitor floral resource use, pollen quality, and honey production. One apiary was situated in low-intensity agriculture; the other in high-intensity agriculture. Pollen traps were open for 72 h every two weeks while scales recorded weight every 15 min throughout the growing season. From collected pollen, we determined forage quantity per day, species identity using DNA sequencing, pesticide residues, amino acid content, and total protein content. From scales, we determined the accumulated hive weight change over the growing season, relating to honey production and final colony weight going into winter. Hive scales may also be used to identify the occurrence of environmental pollen and nectar dearth, and track phenological changes in plant communities. We provide comparisons of device-derived data between two apiaries over the growing season and discuss the potential for employing apiary monitoring devices to infer colony health in the context of divergent agricultural land use conditions.

  17. Sedation and patient monitoring in vascular and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, V G.M.; Chapman, M E; Gillespie, I [Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1993-08-01

    A postal survey of British and Irish interventional radiologists was carried out in 1991 to assess current practice with respect to sedation and monitoring of patients during angiography and interventional procedures. The response rate was 65%, 49% of patients are fasted prior to angiography and 68% prior to interventional procedures. Radiologists participate in obtaining consent in 60% of cases. Patients are often (50%) sedated for angiography and usually (62-94% depending on the procedure) sedated for interventional procedures. Nurses are present for most procedures, but are given the task of monitoring the patient's vital signs in only 49% of cases. Anaesthetists are present for less than 10% of interventional procedures. The findings indicate a wide variation in practice and a need to standardize practice at a uniform high level. (author).

  18. Design and development of an impedimetric-based system for the remote monitoring of home-based dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalibet, Amalric; Arkouche, Walid; Bogónez Franco, Paco; Bonnet, Stéphane; Clarion, Antoine; Delhomme, Georges; Géhin, Claudine; Gharbi, Sadok; Guillemaud, Régis; Jallon, Pierre; Massot, Bertrand; Pham, Pascale; Ribbe-Cornet, Eva; McAdams, Eric

    2016-01-01

    A key clinical challenge is to determine the desired 'dry weight' of a patient in order to terminate the dialysis procedure at the optimal moment and thus avoid the effects of over- and under-hydration. It has been found that the effects of haemodialysis on patients can be conveniently monitored using whole-body bioimpedance measurements. The identified need of assessing the hydrational status of patients undergoing haemodialysis at home gave rise to the present Dialydom (DIALYse à DOMicile) project. The aim of the project is to develop a convenient miniaturised impedance monitoring device for localised measurements (on the calf) in order to estimate an impedimetric hydrational index of the home-based patient, and to transmit this and other parameters to a remote clinical site. Many challenges must be overcome to develop a robust and valid home-based device. Some of these are presented in the paper.

  19. Flex Sensor Based Biofeedback Monitoring for Post-Stroke Fingers Myopathy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garda, Y. R.; Caesarendra, W.; Tjahjowidodo, T.; Turnip, A.; Wahyudati, S.; Nurhasanah, L.; Sutopo, D.

    2018-04-01

    Hands are one of the crucial parts of the human body in carrying out daily activities. Accidents on the hands decreasing in motor skills of the hand so that therapy is necessary to restore motor function of the hand. In addition to accidents, hand disabilities can be caused by certain diseases, e.g. stroke. Stroke is a partial destruction of the brain. It occurs if the arteries that drain blood to the brain are blocked, or if torn or leak. The purpose of this study to make biofeedback monitoring equipment for post-stroke hands myopathy patients. Biofeedback is an alternative method of treatment that involves measuring body functions measured subjects such as skin temperature, sweat activity, blood pressure, heart rate and hand paralysis due to stroke. In this study, the sensor used for biofeedback monitoring tool is flex sensor. Flex sensor is a passive resistive device that changes its resistance as the sensor is bent. Flex sensor converts the magnitude of the bend into electrical resistance, the greater the bend the greater the resistance value. The monitoring used in this biofeedback monitoring tool uses Graphical User Interface (GUI) in C# programming language. The motivation of the study is to monitor and record the progressive improvement of the hand therapy. Patients who experienced post-stroke can see the therapy progress quantitatively.

  20. Evaluation of an oil-debris monitoring device for use in helicopter transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; Blanchette, Donald M.; Biron, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on an OH-58A helicopter main-rotor transmission to evaluate an oil-debris monitoring device (ODMD). The tests were performed in the NASA 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Five endurance tests were run as part of a U.S. Navy/NASA/Army advanced lubricants program. The tests were run at 100 percent design speed, 117-percent design torque, and 121 C (250 F) oil inlet temperature. Each test lasted between 29 and 122 hr. The oils that were used conformed to MIL-L-23699 and DOD-L-85734 specifications. One test produced a massive sun-gear fatigue failure; another test produced a small spall on one sun-gear tooth; and a third test produced a catastrophic planet-bearing cage failure. The ODMD results were compared with oil spectroscopy results. The capability of the ODMD to detect transmission component failures was not demonstrated. Two of the five tests produced large amounts of debris. For these two tests, two separate ODMD sensors failed, possibly because of prolonged exposure to relatively high oil temperatures. One test produced a small amount of debris and was not detected by the ODMD or by oil spectroscopy. In general, the ODMD results matched the oil spectroscopy results. The ODMD results were extremely sensitive to oil temperature and flow rate.

  1. A Cs2LiYCl6:Ce-based advanced radiation monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budden, B.S.; Stonehill, L.C.; Dallmann, N.; Baginski, M.J.; Best, D.J.; Smith, M.B.; Graham, S.A.; Dathy, C.; Frank, J.M.; McClish, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cs 2 LiYCl 6 :Ce 3+ (CLYC) scintillator has gained recent interest because of its ability to perform simultaneous gamma spectroscopy and thermal neutron detection. Discrimination between the two incident particle types owes to the fundamentally unique emission waveforms, a consequence of the interaction and subsequent scintillation mechanisms within the crystal. Due to this dual-mode detector capability, CLYC was selected for the development of an Advanced Radiation Monitoring Device (ARMD), a compact handheld instrument for radioisotope identification and localization. ARMD consists of four 1 in.-right cylindrical CLYC crystals, custom readout electronics including a suitable multi-window application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), battery pack, proprietary software, and Android-based tablet for high-level analysis and display. We herein describe the motivation of the work and engineering design of the unit, and we explain the software embedded in the core module and for radioisotope analysis. We report an operational range of tens of keV to 8.5 MeV with approximately 5.3% gamma energy resolution at 662 keV, thermal neutron detection efficiency of 10%, battery lifetime of up to 10 h, manageable rates of 20 kHz; further, we describe in greater detail time to identify specific gamma source setups

  2. A Sandwiched/Cracked Flexible Film for Multi-Thermal Monitoring and Switching Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Chen, Tao; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based flexible films have substantiated advantages in various sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate the highly sensitive and programmable thermal-sensing capability (thermal index, B, up to 126 × 103 K) of flexible films with tunable sandwiched microstructures (PDMS/cracked single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film/PDMS) when a thermal stimulus is applied. We found that this excellent performance results from the following features of the film's structural and material design: (1) the sandwiched structure allows the film to switch from a three-dimensional to a two-dimensional in-plane deformation and (2) the stiffness of the SWCNT film is decreased by introducing microcracks that make deformation easy and that promote the macroscopic piezoresistive behavior of SWCNT crack islands and the microscopic piezoresistive behavior of SWCNT bundles. The PDMS layer is characterized by a high coefficient of thermal expansion (α = 310 × 10-6 K-1) and low stiffness (∼2 MPa) that allow for greater flexibility and higher temperature sensitivity. We determined the efficacy of our sandwiched, cracked, flexible films in monitoring and switching flexible devices when subjected to various stimuli, including thermal conduction, thermal radiation, and light radiation.

  3. Development of corrosion condition sensing and monitoring system using radio-frequency identification devices (RFID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.P.; Zheng, W. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2008-05-15

    This study discussed the development of a corrosion sensing and monitoring system for military land vehicles. Radio-frequency identification device (RFID) technology uses radio waves to identify individual masses with RFID tags attached. A corrosion-sensing element was integrated with the RFID technology, which incorporated a galvanic corrosion cell designed to trigger RFID tags. Corrosion severity was then related to the galvanic current. The tag recorded the sensor reading and transmitted the data to an RFID reader. The tags consisted of a microchip and an antenna. A software development kit has also been developed to interface RFID data with existing applications. While it is currently not possible to modify the RFID tags to prevent security risks, further research is being conducted to assemble a data-logger system with corrosion probes to measure humidity, electrical resistance, and linear polarization resistance. Studies will also be conducted to assemble an active tag reader system and investigate potential modifications. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 appendix.

  4. Organic Crystal Growth Facility (OCGF) and Radiation Monitoring Container Device (RMCD) Groups in

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities of the Organic Crystal Growth Facility (OCGF) and Radiation Monitoring Container Device (RMCD) groups in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  5. A Sandwiched/Cracked Flexible Film for Multi-Thermal Monitoring and Switching Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-08-30

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based flexible films have substantiated advantages in various sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate the highly sensitive and programmable thermal-sensing capability (thermal index, B, up to 126 × 103 K) of flexible films with tunable sandwiched microstructures (PDMS/cracked single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film/PDMS) when a thermal stimulus is applied. We found that this excellent performance results from the following features of the film\\'s structural and material design: (1) the sandwiched structure allows the film to switch from a three-dimensional to a two-dimensional in-plane deformation and (2) the stiffness of the SWCNT film is decreased by introducing microcracks that make deformation easy and that promote the macroscopic piezoresistive behavior of SWCNT crack islands and the microscopic piezoresistive behavior of SWCNT bundles. The PDMS layer is characterized by a high coefficient of thermal expansion (α = 310 × 10-6 K-1) and low stiffness (∼2 MPa) that allow for greater flexibility and higher temperature sensitivity. We determined the efficacy of our sandwiched, cracked, flexible films in monitoring and switching flexible devices when subjected to various stimuli, including thermal conduction, thermal radiation, and light radiation.

  6. Wearable dry sensors with bluetooth connection for use in remote patient monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Cost reduction has become the primary theme of healthcare reforms globally. More providers are moving towards remote patient monitoring, which reduces the length of hospital stays and frees up their physicians and nurses for acute cases and helps them to tackle staff shortages. Physiological sensors are commonly used in many human specialties e.g. electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes, for monitoring heart signals, and electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes, for sensing the electrical activity of the brain, are the most well-known applications. Consequently there is a substantial unmet need for physiological sensors that can be simply and easily applied by the patient or primary carer, are comfortable to wear, can accurately sense parameters over long periods of time and can be connected to data recording systems using Bluetooth technology. We have developed a small, battery powered, user customizable portable monitor. This prototype is capable of recording three-axial body acceleration, skin temperature, and has up to four bio analogical front ends. Moreover, it is also able of continuous wireless transmission to any Bluetooth device including a PDA or a cellular phone. The bio-front end can use long-lasting dry electrodes or novel textile electrodes that can be embedded in clothes. The device can be powered by a standard mobile phone which has a Ni-MH 3.6 V battery, to sustain more than seven days continuous functioning when using the Bluetooth Sniff mode to reduce TX power. In this paper, we present some of the evaluation experiments of our wearable personal monitor device with a focus on ECG applications.

  7. Space-Proven Medical Monitor: The Total Patient-Care Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of the Gemini Program was to develop techniques that would allow for advanced, long-duration space travel, a prerequisite of the ensuing Apollo Program that would put man safely on the Moon before the end of the decade. In order to carry out this objective, NASA worked with a variety of innovative companies to develop propulsion systems, onboard computers, and docking capabilities that were critical to the health of Gemini spacecraft, as well as life-support systems and physiological-monitoring devices that were critical to the health of Gemini astronauts. One of these companies was Spacelabs Medical, Inc., the pioneer of what is commonly known today as medical telemetry. Spacelabs Medical helped NASA better understand man s reaction to space through a series of bioinstrumentation devices that, for the first time ever, were capable of monitoring orbiting astronauts physical conditions in real time, from Earth. The company went on to further expand its knowledge of monitoring and maintaining health in space, and then brought it down to Earth, to dramatically change the course of patient monitoring in the field of health care.

  8. Patient Health Monitoring Using Wireless Body Area Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Myat Thwe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowadays remote patient health monitoring using wireless technology plays very vigorous role in a society. Wireless technology helps monitoring of physiological parameters like body temperature heart rate respiration blood pressure and ECG. The main aim of this paper is to propose a wireless sensor network system in which both heart rate and body temperature ofmultiplepatients can monitor on PC at the same time via RF network. The proposed prototype system includes two sensor nodes and receiver node base station. The sensor nodes are able to transmit data to receiver using wireless nRF transceiver module.The nRF transceiver module is used to transfer the data from microcontroller to PC and a graphical user interface GUI is developed to display the measured data and save to database. This system can provide very cheaper easier and quick respondent history of patient.

  9. Permitting product liability litigation for FDA-approved drugs and devices promotes patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, A S

    2010-06-01

    In 2008 and 2009, the Supreme Court reviewed the question of whether patients injured by dangerous prescription drugs or medical devices can bring tort lawsuits against pharmaceutical and device manufacturers. The Court ruled that claims against device manufacturers were preempted while claims against pharmaceutical manufacturers were not. The threat of product liability lawsuits promotes patient safety by encouraging manufacturers to take greater responsibility in providing clear warnings about known adverse effects of their products.

  10. 77 FR 32642 - Medical Devices; Exemption From Premarket Notification: Powered Patient Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ...] Medical Devices; Exemption From Premarket Notification: Powered Patient Transport AGENCY: Food and Drug... received a petition requesting exemption from the premarket notification requirements for powered patient... necessary to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness. Under the Medical Device Amendments...

  11. Patient Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Monitoring With an Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-01

    Dec 1, 2012 ... an Alert System Using the Omron 790it Blood Pressure. Monitor ... detailed medical information on the vital signs of patients and will save many lives that may be lost. Keywords: Omron .... at rest, in beats per minute (BPM):.

  12. Home monitoring of blood pressure: patients' perception and role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the use of the blood pressure monitors by hypertensive patients in Jordanian homes and investigate their effect on emotional status and disease management, and the role of the pharmacist in this regard. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted over two months in 2012, in Amman, Jordan.

  13. Perioperative management and monitoring of a super-obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Tommaso; Leykin, Yigal; Albano, Giovanni; Zannier, Gianfederico; Di Capua, Gabriella; Marzano, Bernardo; Gullo, Antonino

    2004-01-01

    Anesthetic management of super-obese patients is inferred from evidence which has been based on obese or morbidly obese patients. We present the perioperative management and monitoring of a 44-year-old 232-kg patient (BMI 70) admitted for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation preceded induction with propofol and rocuronium. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and remifentanil. Desflurane was titrated on BIS values, whereas remifentanil was based on hemodynamic monitoring (invasive arterial pressure and HemoSonic). Rocuronium was administered based on ideal body weight and recovery of twitch tension. Safe and rapid extubation in the operating theatre was made possible by the use of short-acting agents coupled with continuous intraoperative monitoring. Recovery in the post-anesthesia care unit was uneventful, pain was managed with meperidine, and after 5 hours the patient was discharged to the surgical ward. Oxygen therapy and SpO2 monitoring were continued overnight. No desaturation episodes were recorded. Pain was managed with I.V. drip of ketorolac and tramadole.

  14. Long-term blood glucose monitoring with implanted telemetry device in conscious and stress-free cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Sun, G; Qiao, W; Liu, Y; Qiao, J; Ye, W; Wang, H; Wang, X; Lindquist, R; Wang, Y; Xiao, Y-F

    2017-09-01

    Continuous blood glucose monitoring, especially long-term and remote, in diabetic patients or research is very challenging. Nonhuman primate (NHP) is an excellent model for metabolic research, because NHPs can naturally develop Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) similarly to humans. This study was to investigate blood glucose changes in conscious, moving-free cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) during circadian, meal, stress and drug exposure. Blood glucose, body temperature and physical activities were continuously and simultaneously recorded by implanted HD-XG telemetry device for up to 10 weeks. Blood glucose circadian changes in normoglycemic monkeys significantly differed from that in diabetic animals. Postprandial glucose increase was more obvious after afternoon feeding. Moving a monkey from its housing cage to monkey chair increased blood glucose by 30% in both normoglycemic and diabetic monkeys. Such increase in blood glucose declined to the pre-procedure level in 30 min in normoglycemic animals and >2 h in diabetic monkeys. Oral gavage procedure alone caused hyperglycemia in both normoglycemic and diabetic monkeys. Intravenous injection with the stress hormones, angiotensin II (2 μg/kg) or norepinephrine (0.4 μg/kg), also increased blood glucose level by 30%. The glucose levels measured by the telemetry system correlated significantly well with glucometer readings during glucose tolerance tests (ivGTT or oGTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT), graded glucose infusion (GGI) and clamp. Our data demonstrate that the real-time telemetry method is reliable for monitoring blood glucose remotely and continuously in conscious, stress-free, and moving-free NHPs with the advantages highly valuable to diabetes research and drug discovery.

  15. On the matter of the reliability of the chemical monitoring system based on the modern control and monitoring devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriushin, A. V.; Dolbikova, N. S.; Kiet, S. V.; Merzlikina, E. I.; Nikitina, I. S.

    2017-11-01

    The reliability of the main equipment of any power station depends on the correct water chemistry. In order to provide it, it is necessary to monitor the heat carrier quality, which, in its turn, is provided by the chemical monitoring system. Thus, the monitoring system reliability plays an important part in providing reliability of the main equipment. The monitoring system reliability is determined by the reliability and structure of its hardware and software consisting of sensors, controllers, HMI and so on [1,2]. Workers of a power plant dealing with the measuring equipment must be informed promptly about any breakdowns in the monitoring system, in this case they are able to remove the fault quickly. A computer consultant system for personnel maintaining the sensors and other chemical monitoring equipment can help to notice faults quickly and identify their possible causes. Some technical solutions for such a system are considered in the present paper. The experimental results were obtained on the laboratory and experimental workbench representing a physical model of a part of the chemical monitoring system.

  16. Racial/ethnic variation in devices used to access patient portals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eva; Blondon, Katherine; Lyles, Courtney R; Jordan, Luesa; Ralston, James D

    2018-01-01

    We examined racial/ethnic variation in the devices used by patients to access medical records through an online patient portal. Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis. Using data from 318,700 adults enrolled in an integrated delivery system between December 2012 and November 2013, we examined: 1) online patient portal use that directly engages the electronic health record and 2) portal use over desktops/laptops only, mobile devices only, or both device types. The primary covariate was race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian). Other covariates included age, sex, primary language, and neighborhood-level income and education. Portal use and devices used were assessed with multiple and multinomial logistic models, respectively. From December 2012 to November 2013, 56% of enrollees used the patient portal. Of these portal users, 62% used desktops/laptops only, 6% used mobile devices only, and 32% used both desktops/laptops and mobile devices. Black, Hispanic, and Asian enrollees had significantly lower odds of portal use than whites. Black and Hispanic portal users also were significantly more likely to use mobile devices only (relative risk ratio, 1.73 and 1.44, respectively) and both device types (1.21 and 1.07, respectively) than desktops/laptops only compared with whites. Although racial/ethnic minority enrollees were less likely to access the online patient portal overall, a greater proportion of black and Hispanic users accessed the patient portal with mobile devices than did non-Hispanic white users. The rapid spread of mobile devices among racial/ethnic minorities may help reduce variation in online patient portal use. Mobile device use may represent an opportunity for healthcare organizations to further engage black and Hispanic enrollees in online patient portal use.

  17. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    disease activity, less disability and radiographic damage. By 2013, 19% of csDMARD (15% of bDMARD) patients were in ACR/Boolean remission. Coverage had increased to between 41% and 79% for patients with RA, for the bDMARD group it was 94%. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic monitoring of RA patients with real....../moderate/high disease activity (i.e. DAS28 (CRP-based, 4 variables) was calculated for each calendar year. RESULTS: From 2006-2013 the number of patients increased from 2,395 to 14,249. By 2013, 29.8% of patients were receiving bDMARD. Patients in the csDMARD group were older, had shorter disease duration, lower...

  18. Electronic monitoring of patients with bipolar affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Vinberg, Maj

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a great challenge to patients, relatives and clinicians, and there is a need for development of new methods to identify prodromal symptoms of affective episodes in order to provide efficient preventive medical and behavioural intervention. Clinical trials prove that electronic...... monitoring is a feasible, valid and acceptable method. Hence it is recommended, that controlled trials on the effect of electronic monitoring on patients' course of illness, level of function and quality of life are conducted.......Bipolar disorder is a great challenge to patients, relatives and clinicians, and there is a need for development of new methods to identify prodromal symptoms of affective episodes in order to provide efficient preventive medical and behavioural intervention. Clinical trials prove that electronic...

  19. 40 CFR 63.3350 - If I use a control device to comply with the emission standards, what monitoring must I do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true If I use a control device to comply with the emission standards, what monitoring must I do? 63.3350 Section 63.3350 Protection of... for Monitoring and Performance Tests § 63.3350 If I use a control device to comply with the emission...

  20. Desgin of On-line Monitoring Device for MOA (Metal Oxide Arrestor Based on FPGA and C8051F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong YAO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of metal oxide surge arresters (MOA due to aging, moisture and other components cause increased resistive current. Through a lot of practices, it has been proved that in the early days, MOA insulation damage and current increase is not obvious. The accurate working conditions of the MOA are also not obvious but it can reflect the aging or moisture of MOA. When the resistive current of the fundamental component increases, there is no increment in the harmonic components that is the general performance of a serious or moisture contamination. In the same way when the resistive current of harmonic components increases, the fundamental component is not increased and it is the general performance of aging. Therefore, this paper designed an experiment-based FPGA and C8051F-line monitoring device. This device uses resistive current as a detection target. The main monitoring parameters are the fundamental and peak value of resistive current, third harmonic content of the leakage current, phase angle difference and power consumption. Through laboratory tests, the device can be used with a network arrester line monitoring, maintenance, reduce the economic losses caused by power outages and improve the distribution network reliability.

  1. A Laboratory Experimental Study: An FBG-PVC Tube Integrated Device for Monitoring the Slip Surface of Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Chen, Jiang; Teng, Pengxiao; Wei, Fangqiang; Chen, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    A new detection device was designed by integrating fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube in order to monitor the slip surface of a landslide. Using this new FBG-based device, a corresponding slope model with a pre-set slip surface was designed, and seven tests with different soil properties were carried out in laboratory conditions. The FBG sensing fibers were fixed on the PVC tube to measure strain distributions of PVC tube at different elevation. Test results indicated that the PVC tube could keep deformation compatible with soil mass. The new device was able to monitor slip surface location before sliding occurrence, and the location of monitored slip surface was about 1–2 cm above the pre-set slip surface, which basically agreed with presupposition results. The monitoring results are expected to be used to pre-estimate landslide volume and provide a beneficial option for evaluating the potential impact of landslides on shipping safety in the Three Gorges area. PMID:29084157

  2. Development of a robust and cost-effective 3D respiratory motion monitoring system using the kinect device: Accuracy comparison with the conventional stereovision navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Myungsoo; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Namkug

    2018-07-01

    To develop and validate a robust and cost-effective 3D respiratory monitoring system based on a Kinect device with a custom-made simple marker. A 3D respiratory monitoring system comprising the simple marker and the Microsoft Kinect v2 device was developed. The marker was designed for simple and robust detection, and the tracking algorithm was developed using the depth, RGB, and infra-red images acquired from the Kinect sensor. A Kalman filter was used to suppress movement noises. The major movements of the marker attached to the four different locations of body surface were determined from the initially collected tracking points of the marker while breathing. The signal level of respiratory motion with the tracking point was estimated along the major direction vector. The accuracy of the results was evaluated through a comparison with those of the conventional stereovision navigation system (NDI Polaris Spectra). Sixteen normal volunteers were enrolled to evaluate the accuracy of this system. The correlation coefficients between the respiratory motion signal from the Kinect device and conventional navigation system ranged from 0.970 to 0.999 and from 0.837 to 0.995 at the abdominal and thoracic surfaces, respectively. The respiratory motion signal from this system was obtained at 27-30 frames/s. This system with the Kinect v2 device and simple marker could be used for cost-effective, robust and accurate 3D respiratory motion monitoring. In addition, this system is as reliable for respiratory motion signal generation and as practically useful as the conventional stereovision navigation system and is less sensitive to patient posture. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Real-Time Health Monitoring System for Remote Cardiac Patients Using Smartphone and Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kakria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Online telemedicine systems are useful due to the possibility of timely and efficient healthcare services. These systems are based on advanced wireless and wearable sensor technologies. The rapid growth in technology has remarkably enhanced the scope of remote health monitoring systems. In this paper, a real-time heart monitoring system is developed considering the cost, ease of application, accuracy, and data security. The system is conceptualized to provide an interface between the doctor and the patients for two-way communication. The main purpose of this study is to facilitate the remote cardiac patients in getting latest healthcare services which might not be possible otherwise due to low doctor-to-patient ratio. The developed monitoring system is then evaluated for 40 individuals (aged between 18 and 66 years using wearable sensors while holding an Android device (i.e., smartphone under supervision of the experts. The performance analysis shows that the proposed system is reliable and helpful due to high speed. The analyses showed that the proposed system is convenient and reliable and ensures data security at low cost. In addition, the developed system is equipped to generate warning messages to the doctor and patient under critical circumstances.

  4. A Real-Time Health Monitoring System for Remote Cardiac Patients Using Smartphone and Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakria, Priyanka; Tripathi, N K; Kitipawang, Peerapong

    2015-01-01

    Online telemedicine systems are useful due to the possibility of timely and efficient healthcare services. These systems are based on advanced wireless and wearable sensor technologies. The rapid growth in technology has remarkably enhanced the scope of remote health monitoring systems. In this paper, a real-time heart monitoring system is developed considering the cost, ease of application, accuracy, and data security. The system is conceptualized to provide an interface between the doctor and the patients for two-way communication. The main purpose of this study is to facilitate the remote cardiac patients in getting latest healthcare services which might not be possible otherwise due to low doctor-to-patient ratio. The developed monitoring system is then evaluated for 40 individuals (aged between 18 and 66 years) using wearable sensors while holding an Android device (i.e., smartphone under supervision of the experts). The performance analysis shows that the proposed system is reliable and helpful due to high speed. The analyses showed that the proposed system is convenient and reliable and ensures data security at low cost. In addition, the developed system is equipped to generate warning messages to the doctor and patient under critical circumstances.

  5. MowA®: A simple and economic way of monitoring chronic wounds outcome with your mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, Francesco; Portincasa, Aurelio; Parisi, Domenico; Innocenti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of skin ulcers of the lower extremities is a difficult challenge for surgeons as demonstrated in the literature 1,2. Furthermore objective monitoring of skin ulcers represts an important necessity for the plastic surgeon who has to update the treatment over time. In the past we had to write about systems and applications designed to catalog and manage digital libraries 3, so we have gone looking for a system to catalog and manage date related skin in ulcers. I present an application for mobile devices that allows to calculate , evaluate and analyze, the both surface area and tissue quality of skin ulcers m in a fast and practical way. The application is called "Mowa®"and it is available both for Apple and Android devices. Often we have to treat chronic injuries to the skin for several weeks and the evaluation needs to takes place in a periodic manner. An important problem for a surgeon, in the treatment of chronic wounds of the skin, is to evaluate the effectiveness of the cure in terms of "reduction of the lesion" and "quality of tissue". That is, it would be useful having s way to assess the size(area) of the wound an quality if tissues inside the lesion. This would make it objectively easier to measure the progress if the treatment in the past there have been many proposed systems 4-6. We tried in the past, to use theVisa-track system (smith & Nephew) with good outcomes, but this is limited because it can be used by a single patient at atime. The need to find a more affordable way led us to experience Mora application in our devices. This simple application allows, through a photograph, to quantify in quare centimeters the surface of the lesion. Furtermore Mowa® provides a system for detecting the fibrin percentage of granulation and necrotic tissue. The analysis of the chronic lesion of the skin is also completed by the insertion of the main characteristics of the qound, for esample, the exudate (in small quantities,moderate or a lot). The

  6. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Intrarectal Device for Management of Fecal Incontinence in Bedridden Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Bhargava, Balram; Vasantha, Padma; Bhatia, Rohit; Sharma, Hanish; Pal, Sujoy; Sahni, Peush; Makharia, Govind K

    The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a stool management kit (SMK) for containment of fecal incontinence in hospitalized bedridden patients. A single-group quasi-experimental study. Twenty bedridden adults who had at least 1 episode of fecal incontinence in the prior 24 hours participated in the study. The study setting was the neurological unit of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi, India. The study was carried out in 2 phases. The device was placed in situ for up to 24 hours in 10 patients during phase I of the study and up to 120 hours in an additional 10 patients during phase II. Participants were assessed for anorectal injury and peripheral device leakage on a 4- to 6-hourly basis. Sigmoidoscopy was performed to evaluate for any mucosal trauma or alteration of anorectal pathology after retrieval of the device. The device was successfully placed in all patients following the first attempt to place the device; 80% of patients retained the device until planned removal. The SMK diverted fecal matter without anal leakage in 174 (93.5%) out of 186 assessment points in a group of 20 patients. The devices remained in situ for 21 ± 0.2 and 84.5 ± 38.9 hours during phase I and phase II, respectively. None experienced anorectal bleeding, sphincter injury, or mucosal ulceration with device usage. Post-device sigmoidoscopy revealed erythema at the site of diverter placement in 2 participants. Study findings suggest that the SMK successfully diverted liquid to semiformed fecal exudate without peripheral device leakage in 93.5% of bedridden patients. No serious adverse events occurred. Additional research is needed to compare its effectiveness with that of currently available intrarectal balloon devices.

  7. Wireless Monitoring for Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases and Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefaliakos, Antonios; Pliakos, Ioannis; Charalampidou, Martha; Diomidous, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The use of applications for mobile devices and wireless sensors is common for the sector of telemedicine. Recently various studies and systems were developed in order to help patients suffering from severe diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and Parkinson's disease. They present a challenge for the sector because such systems demand the flow of accurate data in real time and the use of specialized sensors. In this review will be presented some very interesting applications developed for patients with cardiovascular diseases and Parkinson's disease.

  8. Automated integration of wireless biosignal collection devices for patient-centred decision-making in point-of-care systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menychtas, Andreas; Tsanakas, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    The proper acquisition of biosignals data from various biosensor devices and their remote accessibility are still issues that prevent the wide adoption of point-of-care systems in the routine of monitoring chronic patients. This Letter presents an advanced framework for enabling patient monitoring that utilises a cloud computing infrastructure for data management and analysis. The framework introduces also a local mechanism for uniform biosignals collection from wearables and biosignal sensors, and decision support modules, in order to enable prompt and essential decisions. A prototype smartphone application and the related cloud modules have been implemented for demonstrating the value of the proposed framework. Initial results regarding the performance of the system and the effectiveness in data management and decision-making have been quite encouraging. PMID:27222731

  9. Automated integration of wireless biosignal collection devices for patient-centred decision-making in point-of-care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menychtas, Andreas; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2016-03-01

    The proper acquisition of biosignals data from various biosensor devices and their remote accessibility are still issues that prevent the wide adoption of point-of-care systems in the routine of monitoring chronic patients. This Letter presents an advanced framework for enabling patient monitoring that utilises a cloud computing infrastructure for data management and analysis. The framework introduces also a local mechanism for uniform biosignals collection from wearables and biosignal sensors, and decision support modules, in order to enable prompt and essential decisions. A prototype smartphone application and the related cloud modules have been implemented for demonstrating the value of the proposed framework. Initial results regarding the performance of the system and the effectiveness in data management and decision-making have been quite encouraging.

  10. Protocol updated for the treatment of patients in radiotherapy with implanted cardiac devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Martin, G.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Sotoca Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment can be safely performed in patients with pacemakers or implanted defibrillators, however, it is very important to ensure that the patient receives the minimum dose possible in your heart device. Is considered essential good coordination with the cardiology service before, during and after radiotherapy treatment for the patient safety. Finally we present a protocol updated to treat these patients in radiotherapy. (Author)

  11. Trends in monitoring patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Frederiksen, H-J; Eskesen, V

    2005-01-01

    After aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), the clinical outcome depends upon the primary haemorrhage and a number of secondary insults in the acute post-haemorrhagic period. Some secondary insults are potentially preventable but prevention requires prompt recognition of cerebral or systemic...... implemented monitoring system provides answers but it also raises valuable new questions challenging our current understanding of the brain injury after SAH....... complications. Currently, several neuro-monitoring techniques are available; this review describes the most frequently used techniques and discusses indications for their use, and their value in diagnosis and prognosis. None of the techniques, when considered in isolation, has proved sufficient after SAH...... with the conventional monitoring systems, for example intracranial pressure measurements, transcranial Doppler ultrasound and modern neuro-imaging, direct assessment of biochemical markers by intracerebral microdialysis is promising in the advancement of neurointensive care of patients with SAH. A successfully...

  12. Patient restraining device for the pinhole collimator and gamma scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, T.D.

    1977-01-01

    A patient restraining device for use with the pinhole collimator of a conventional Gamma Scintillation Camera, the restraining device being made of an adapter ring and a patient holder. The adapter ring is secured directly to the pinhole collimator while the holder is adjustably mounted on the adapter. The adapter ring is so designed to accommodate a variety of holders so as to enable the scanning of many different areas of a patient's anatomy by the scintillation camera

  13. Monitoring of awareness level in dispensary patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiianov, Vladyslav; Witczak, Izabela; Smiianova, Olga; Rudenko, Lesia

    2017-01-01

    Results of monitoring of awareness level in dispensary patients with arterial hypertension (AH) are given in the article. The objective of the study was to investigate awareness level of dispensary patients with hypertension in Sumy as for the course of their disease, implementation of preventive measures, diagnosis and treatment, and to use the obtained information in the process of management of healthcare quality. The results of close-ended questionnaires were used in the capacity of materials. A total of 2019 patients were surveyed. Despite the high level of patients' awareness of AH course and possible complications, the survey showed insufficient level of their own responsibility for their health. The main reasons for poor adherence to doctor's recommendations are forgetfulness, lack of time, reluctance. Measures were developed to increase awareness level in patients with AH by means of strengthening awareness-raising activities and communications, as well as creation and implementation of effective targeted health-and-social programs.

  14. Self-Monitoring Kidney Function Post Transplantation: Reliability of Patient-Reported Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lint, Céline; Wang, Wenxin; van Dijk, Sandra; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Rövekamp, Ton Jm; Neerincx, Mark A; Rabelink, Ton J; van der Boog, Paul Jm

    2017-09-26

    The high frequency of outpatient visits after kidney transplantation is burdensome to both the recovering patient and health care capacity. Self-monitoring kidney function offers a promising strategy to reduce the number of these outpatient visits. The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is safe to rely on patients' self-measurements of creatinine and blood pressure, using data from a self-management randomized controlled trial. For self-monitoring creatinine, each participant received a StatSensor Xpress-i Creatinine Meter and related test material. For self-monitoring blood pressure, each participant received a Microlife WatchBP Home, an oscillometric device for blood pressure self-measurement on the upper arm. Both devices had a memory function and the option to download stored values to a computer. During the first year post transplantation, 54 patients registered their self-measured creatinine values in a Web-based Self-Management Support System (SMSS) which provided automatic feedback on the registered values (eg, seek contact with hospital). Values registered in the SMSS were compared with those logged automatically in the creatinine device to study reliability of registered data. Adherence to measurement frequency was determined by comparing the number of requested with the number of performed measurements. To study adherence to provided feedback, SMSS-logged feedback and information from the electronic hospital files were analyzed. Level of adherence was highest during months 2-4 post transplantation with over 90% (42/47) of patients performing at least 75% of the requested measurements. Overall, 87.00% (3448/3963) of all registered creatinine values were entered correctly, although values were often registered several days later. If (the number of) measured and registered values deviated, the mean of registered creatinine values was significantly lower than what was measured, suggesting active selection of lower creatinine values

  15. Patient monitoring in Polish assisted reproductive technology centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krawczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Polish non-governmental patient association ‘Our Stork’ (Nasz Bocian introduced the ‘Patient monitoring in ART centres’ research project to gather previously unrecorded information on the situation of infertile people and the provision of assisted reproductive treatment in Poland. When the research project began, assisted reproductive treatment centres were unregulated by the state, a situation that had existed for more than 28 years following the birth of the first Polish test-tube baby in 1987. Patients signed civil contracts, remaining unprotected in terms of safety of treatment and recognition of their rights, and their presumed social position was described by doctors as ‘disciplined patients’ – a reflection of what Michele Foucault described as biopolitics. The research project comprised patient questionnaires (responses from 722 patients provided the basis for the document ‘Patient Recommendations in Infertility Treatment’, analysis of civil contracts and their accuracy in the context of patients’ legal rights in Poland, and in-depth interviews with assisted reproductive treatment centres’ owners, doctors, midwives, and patients to explore patient care. The data reveal that there is a lack of patient-centred care among doctors and medical staff in Poland and that following the passing into law of the 2015 Infertility Act, which introduced state regulation of assisted reproductive treatment centres, the situation for patients worsened.

  16. Fluid Status in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: The European Body Composition Monitoring (EuroBCM) Study Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biesen, Wim; Williams, John D.; Covic, Adrian C.; Fan, Stanley; Claes, Kathleen; Lichodziejewska-Niemierko, Monika; Verger, Christian; Steiger, Jurg; Schoder, Volker; Wabel, Peter; Gauly, Adelheid; Himmele, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Background Euvolemia is an important adequacy parameter in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. However, accurate tools to evaluate volume status in clinical practice and data on volume status in PD patients as compared to healthy population, and the associated factors, have not been available so far. Methods We used a bio-impedance spectroscopy device, the Body Composition Monitor (BCM) to assess volume status in a cross-sectional cohort of prevalent PD patients in different European countries. The results were compared to an age and gender matched healthy population. Results Only 40% out of 639 patients from 28 centres in 6 countries were normovolemic. Severe fluid overload was present in 25.2%. There was a wide scatter in the relation between blood pressure and volume status. In a multivariate analysis in the subgroup of patients from countries with unrestricted availability of all PD modalities and fluid types, older age, male gender, lower serum albumin, lower BMI, diabetes, higher systolic blood pressure, and use of at least one exchange per day with the highest hypertonic glucose were associated with higher relative tissue hydration. Neither urinary output nor ultrafiltration, PD fluid type or PD modality were retained in the model (total R2 of the model = 0.57). Conclusions The EuroBCM study demonstrates some interesting issues regarding volume status in PD. As in HD patients, hypervolemia is a frequent condition in PD patients and blood pressure can be a misleading clinical tool to evaluate volume status. To monitor fluid balance, not only fluid output but also dietary input should be considered. Close monitoring of volume status, a correct dialysis prescription adapted to the needs of the patient and dietary measures seem to be warranted to avoid hypervolemia. PMID:21390320

  17. System theory in industrial patient monitoring: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baura, G D

    2004-01-01

    Patient monitoring refers to the continuous observation of repeating events of physiologic function to guide therapy or to monitor the effectiveness of interventions, and is used primarily in the intensive care unit and operating room. Commonly processed signals are the electrocardiogram, intraarterial blood pressure, arterial saturation of oxygen, and cardiac output. To this day, the majority of physiologic waveform processing in patient monitors is conducted using heuristic curve fitting. However in the early 1990s, a few enterprising engineers and physicians began using system theory to improve their core processing. Applications included improvement of signal-to-noise ratio, either due to low signal levels or motion artifact, and improvement in feature detection. The goal of this mini-symposium is to review the early work in this emerging field, which has led to technologic breakthroughs. In this overview talk, the process of system theory algorithm research and development is discussed. Research for industrial monitors involves substantial data collection, with some data used for algorithm training and the remainder used for validation. Once the algorithms are validated, they are translated into detailed specifications. Development then translates these specifications into DSP code. The DSP code is verified and validated per the Good Manufacturing Practices mandated by FDA.

  18. An acoustic sensor for monitoring airflow in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, Thomas; Wicks Phd, Alexandrina; Muelenaer Md, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Without proper monitoring, patients with artificial airways in the trachea are at high risk for complications or death. Despite routine maintenance of the tube, dislodged or copious mucus can obstruct the airway. Young children ( 3yrs) have difficulty tending to their own tubes and are particularly vulnerable to blockages. They require external respiratory sensors. In a hospital environment, ventilators, end-tidal CO2 monitors, thermistors, and other auxiliary equipment provide sufficient monitoring of respiration. However, outpatient monitoring methods, such as thoracic impedance and pulse oximetry, are indirect and prone to false positives. Desensitization of caregivers to frequent false alarms has been cited in medical literature as a contributing factor in cases of child death. Ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) is a technique used in specialized industrial applications to non-invasively measure liquid and gas flow. Two transducers are oriented at a diagonal across a flow channel. Velocity measurement is accomplished by detecting slight variations in transit time of contra-propagating acoustic signals with a directional component parallel to air flow. Due to the symmetry of acoustic pathway between sensors, velocity measurements are immune to partial fouling in the tube from mucus, saliva, and condensation. A first generation proof of concept prototype was constructed to evaluate the ultrasonic TOF technique for medical tracheostomy monitoring. After successful performance, a second generation prototype was designed with a smaller form factor and more advanced electronics. This prototype was tested and found to measure inspired volume with a root-mean-square error < 2% during initial trials.

  19. Trends in the Management of Patients With Left Ventricular Assist Devices Presenting for Noncardiac Surgery: A 10-Year Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marc; Hinchey, Joseph; Sattler, Christopher; Evans, Adam

    2016-09-01

    In our institution, the vast majority of patients presenting for noncardiac surgery (NCS) while supported by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are now cared for by noncardiac-trained anesthesiologists as the result of a decade of educational intervention to effect this transition. This represents a significant departure from the published experiences of other institutions. With institutional review board approval, we queried the database of our anesthesia record keeping system (CompuRecord) to determine various aspects of the perioperative management of these patients from July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2013, during which time 271 NCS procedures were performed on adult patients supported by LVADs. Over the entire study period (2003-2013), anesthetic care was provided by a cardiac anesthesiologist 47% of the time and by a noncardiac anesthesiologist 53% of the time. However, by the time period 2012-2013, 88% of the NCS procedures were staffed by a noncardiac anesthesiologist. Despite the prevalence of continuous flow devices in this series, the use of invasive blood pressure monitoring decreased dramatically by the later years of the study. Vasoactive and inotropic medications were rarely required intraoperatively. No intraoperative cardiac arrests, thromboembolic complications, or device malfunctions occurred. Our conclusion is that NCS procedures on LVAD-supported patients can be safely managed by educated noncardiac anesthesiologists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Development of corrosion condition sensing and monitoring system using radio-frequency identification devices (RFID) : progress report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, G.P.; Li, J.; Liu, P.; Bibby, D.; Zheng, W.; Lo, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory

    2008-12-15

    The development of a corrosion severity monitoring system that used radio-frequency identification device (RIFD) technology was discussed. A corrosion monitoring sensor was integrated with a tag modified to partially block the radio frequency signal. The metallic coating caused a frequency shift of the device's reader antenna in order to allow for the accurate characterization of metal coatings. Communications between the tag and the reader were re-established as the corrosion process gradually deteriorated the coating. The method was tested experimentally with 3 RFID systems using both active and passive tags were assembled. A passive tag was covered in aluminum foil. Results of the experiment showed that the metallic coating interfered with RFID signals. A cold-spray technology was used to coat tags with metal alloys. The surface morphology of the coatings was tested to determine optimum coating parameters. Further studies are being conducted to develop software for the technology. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Application of Devices and Systems Designed for Power Quality Monitoring and Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Gil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the problems associated with increasing demands on the equipment and systems for power quality assessment (PQ, installed at power substations. Difficulties are signaled due to current lack of standards defining the test methodology of measuring devices. The necessary device properties and the structure of a large system operated in real time and designed to assess the PQ are discussed. The usefulness of multi-channel analyzers featuring the identification and registration of transients is pointed out. The desirability of synchrophasor assessment implementation and device integration by standard PN-EN 61850 with other SAS devices is also justified.

  2. Development of immobilization devices for patients with pelvic malignancies and a feasibility evaluation during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Min; Park, Yang Kyun; Cho, Woong; Park, Charn Il; Ha, Sung Whan

    2007-01-01

    Immobilization devices that improve the setup reproducibility of pelvic cancer patients and that provide comfort to patients during radiotherapy were designed and the feasibility of the devices was evaluated. A customized device was designed to immobilize a knee, thigh, and foot of a patient. Sixty-one patients with prostate cancer were selected and were divided into two groups-with or without devices. The setup errors were measured with respect to bony landmarks. The difference between digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and simulation films, and the differences between DRR and portal films were measured. The left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP) and craniocaudal (CC) errors between the DRR and simulation films were 1.5 ± 0.9 mm, 3.0 ± 3.6 mm, and 1.6 ± 0.9 mm, respectively without devices. The errors were reduced to 1.3 ± 1.9 mm, 1.8 ± 1.5 mm and 1.1 ± 1.1 mm, respectively with the devices. The errors between DRR and portal films were 1.6 ± 1.2 mm, 4.0 ± 4.1 mm, and 4.2 ± 5.5 mm, respectively without the devices and were reduced to 1.0 ± 1.8 mm, 1.2 ± 0.9 mm, and 1.2 ± 0.8 mm, respectively, with the devices. The standard deviations among the portal films were 1.1 mm, 2.1 mm, and 1.0 mm at each axis without the devices and 0.9 mm, 1.6 mm and 0.8 mm with the devices. The percentage of setup errors larger than 3 mm and 5 mm were significantly reduced by use of the immobilization devices. The designed devices improved the setup reproducibility for all three directions and significantly reduced critical setup errors

  3. Accessory device fixation for voice rehabilitation in laryngectomised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallers, Egbert Jan Olivier ten

    2006-01-01

    Summary In most patients with advanced or recurrent laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer, total laryngectomy is indicated. This means the loss of the three main laryngeal functions: phonation; respiration; and the prevention of aspiration during deglutition. Laryngectomy patients have various options

  4. Medication adherence monitoring: implications for patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, Bobby; Nayani, Seema

    2018-05-01

    Non-adherence to medication is a key worldwide issue and can lead to adverse patient outcomes and increased health system costs. Would a process facilitating notification of non-adherence infringe upon the autonomy of individuals or breach expectations of privacy? In contrast, patients who are not taking their medication could unknowingly be putting themselves at risk and all the while prescribers are unaware and without the opportunity to intervene. With the advent of electronic methods of medication adherence monitoring, this ethical dilemma now involves a new layer of complexity. We present two scenarios encountered in clinical practice that reflect issues occurring regularly in the Canadian healthcare system.

  5. Monitoring carbon dioxide in mechanically ventilated patients during hyperbaric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregård, Asger; Jansen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the arterial carbon dioxide (P(a)CO(2)) is an established part of the monitoring of mechanically ventilated patients. Other ways to get information about carbon dioxide in the patient are measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide (PTCCO2......). Carbon dioxide in the blood and cerebral tissue has great influence on vasoactivity and thereby blood volume of the brain. We have found no studies on the correlation between P(ET)CO(2) or P(TC)CO(2), and P(a)CO(2) during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT)....

  6. Angelcare mobile system: homecare patient monitoring using bluetooth and GPRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Anna G D; Maitelli, Andre L; Valentim, Ricardo A M; Brandao, Glaucio B; Guerreiro, Ana M G

    2010-01-01

    The quick progress in technology has brought new paradigms to the computing area, bringing with them many benefits to society. The paradigm of ubiquitous computing brings innovations applying computing in people's daily life without being noticed. For this, it has used the combination of several existing technologies like wireless communications and sensors. Several of the benefits have reached the medical area, bringing new methods of surgery, appointments and examinations. This work presents telemedicine software that adds the idea of ubiquity to the medical area, innovating the relation between doctor and patient. It also brings security and confidence to a patient being monitored in homecare.

  7. Response monitoring in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Willemssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is accompanied by dysfunctions in a variety of cognitive processes. One of these is error processing, which depends upon phasic decreases of medial prefrontal dopaminergic activity. Until now, there is no study evaluating these processes in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD ("de novo PD". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report large changes in performance monitoring processes using event-related potentials (ERPs in de novo PD-patients. The results suggest that increases in medial frontal dopaminergic activity after an error (Ne are decreased, relative to age-matched controls. In contrast, neurophysiological processes reflecting general motor response monitoring (Nc are enhanced in de novo patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It may be hypothesized that the Nc-increase is at costs of dopaminergic activity after an error; on a functional level errors may not always be detected and correct responses sometimes be misinterpreted as errors. This pattern differs from studies examining patients with a longer history of PD and may reflect compensatory processes, frequently occurring in pre-manifest stages of PD. From a clinical point of view the clearly attenuated Ne in the de novo PD patients may prove a useful additional tool for the early diagnosis of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD.

  8. PINP as an aid for monitoring patients treated with teriparatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Mika; Chen, Peiqi; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Sowa, Hideaki; Krege, John H

    2011-04-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover may be useful aids for managing patients with osteoporosis. A 12-month, phase 3, multicenter trial of Japanese patients at high risk of fracture was conducted to assess the effects of teriparatide 20 μg/day on BMD, serum markers of bone turnover, and safety. Two-hundred and seven subjects (93% female; median age 70 years) were randomized in double-blind fashion 2:1 to teriparatide versus placebo. Bone turnover markers including procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP) and type I collagen cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) were collected at baseline, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total hip BMD were measured at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Increases in PINP at 1 month correlated best with increases in lumbar spine BMD at 12 months (r=0.76; P10 μg/L at 1, 3, and 6 months were 3%, 0%, and 2% in the placebo, and 93%, 87%, and 83% in the teriparatide group. The proportions of patients with an increase in PINP >10 μg/L at either 1 or 3 months were 3% in the placebo and 95% in the teriparatide group (P10 μg/L at 1 or 3 months and an increase in lumbar spine BMD ≥3% at 12 months was 0% of placebo group patients and 92% of teriparatide group patients (P<0.001). These data confirm a strong relationship between early change in PINP and later change in lumbar spine BMD during teriparatide therapy. Also, these results suggest that monitoring with PINP and lumbar spine BMD successfully identifies positive responses in most patients taking teriparatide and negative responses in most patients not taking teriparatide. PINP monitoring may be a useful aid in the management of patients with osteoporosis during teriparatide treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Electronic device, system on chip ad method of monitoring data traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Therefore, an electronic device is provided which comprises a plurality of processing units (IP1-IP6), and a network-based interconnect (N) coupling the processing units (IP1-IP6) for enabling at least one first communication path (C) between the processing units (IP1-IP6). The electronic device

  10. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martina, Jerson R; Westerhof, Berend E; de Jonge, Nicolaas; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Westers, Paul; Chamuleau, Steven; van Dijk, Diederik; Rodermans, Ben F M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Lahpor, Jaap R

    2014-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and echocardiography may provide useful physiological information regarding cardiac support in patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). We investigated the accuracy and characteristics of noninvasive blood pressure during cf-LVAD support. Noninvasive arterial pressure waveforms were recorded with Nexfin (BMEYE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). First, these measurements were validated simultaneously with invasive arterial pressures in 29 intensive care unit patients. Next, the association between blood pressure responses and measures derived by echocardiography, including left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions (LVEDDs), left ventricular end-systolic dimensions (LVESDs), and left ventricular shortening fraction (LVSF) were determined during pump speed change procedures in 30 outpatients. Noninvasive arterial blood pressure waveforms by the Nexfin monitor slightly underestimated invasive measures during cf-LVAD support. Differences between noninvasive and invasive measures (mean ± SD) of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressures were -7.6 ± 5.8, -7.0 ± 5.2, -6.9 ± 5.1, and -0.6 ± 4.5 mm Hg, respectively (all blood pressure responses did not correlate with LVEDD, LVESD, or LVSF, while LVSF correlated weakly with both pulse pressure (r = 0.24; p = 0.005) and (dP(art)/dt)max (r = 0.25; p = 0.004). The dicrotic notch in the pressure waveform was a better predictor of aortic valve opening (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.87) than pulse pressure (AUC = 0.64) and (dP(art)/dt)max (AUC = 0.61). Patients with partial support rather than full support at 9,000 rpm had a significant change in systolic pressure, pulse pressure, and (dP(art)/dt)max during ramp studies, while echocardiographic measures did not change. Blood pressure measurements by Nexfin were reliable and may thereby act as a compliment to the assessment of the cf-LVAD patient.

  11. A new energy-harvesting device system for wireless sensors, adaptable to on-site monitoring of MR damper motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Miao; Peng, Youxiang; Wang, Siqi; Fu, Jie; Choi, S B

    2014-01-01

    Under extreme service conditions in vehicle suspension systems, some defects exist in the hardening, bodying, and poor temperature stability of magnetorheological (MR) fluid. These defects can cause weak and even invalid performance in the MR fluid damper (MR damper for short). To ensure the effective validity of the practical applicability of the MR damper, one must implement an online state-monitoring sensor to monitor several performance factors, such as acceleration. In this empirical work, we propose a new energy-harvesting device system for the wireless sensor system of an MR damper. The monitoring sensor system consists of several components, such as an energy-harvesting device, energy-management circuit, and wireless sensor node. The electrical energy harvested from the kinetic energy of the MR fluid that flows within the MR damper can be automatically charged and discharged with the help of an energy-management circuit for the wireless sensor node. After verifying good performance from each component, an experimental apparatus is built to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed self-powered wireless sensor system. The measured results of pressure, temperature, and acceleration data within the MR damper clearly demonstrate the practical applicability of monitoring the operating work states of the MR damper when it is subjected to sinusoidal excitation. (technical note)

  12. Reflection in Learning through a Self-monitoring Device: Design Research on EEG Self-Monitoring during a Study Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Durall

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of self-monitoring technologies has created opportunities for gaining awareness about one’s own behavior and reflecting on it. In teaching and learning, there is interest in using self-monitoring technologies, but very few studies have explored the possibilities. In this paper, we present a design study that investigates a technology (called Feeler that guides students to follow a specific learning script, monitors changes in their electroencephalogram (EEG while studying, and later provides visualization of the EEG data. The results are two-fold: (1 the hardware/software prototype and (2 the conclusions from the proof-of-concept research conducted with the prototype and six participants. In the research, we collected qualitative data from interviews to identify whether the prototype supported students to develop their reflective skills. The thematic analysis of the interviews showed that the Feeler’s learning script and visualization of the EEG data supported greater levels of reflection by fostering students’ curiosity, puzzlement, and personal inquiry. The proof-of-concept research also provided insights into several factors, such as the value of personal experience, the challenge of assumptions, and the contextualization of the data that trigger reflective thinking. The results validate the design concept and the role of the prototype in supporting awareness of and reflection about students’ mental states when they perform academic tasks.

  13. Psychological distress in patients with a left ventricular assist device and their partners : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, C.J.; Denollet, J.; Caliskan, K.; de Jonge, N.; Constantinescu, A.; Young, Q.; Kaan, A.; Pedersen, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy is increasingly used in patients with advanced heart failure,and may have a significant psychological impact on both patients and their partners. Hence, we examined the distress levels of LVAD patients and their partners. Methods: Anxiety,

  14. Psychological distress in patients with a left ventricular assist device and their partners : an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Corline; Denollet, Johan; Caliskan, Kadir; de Jonge, N; Constantinescu, Alina; Young, Quincy; Kaan, Annemarie; Pedersen, Susanne S

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy is increasingly used in patients with advanced heart failure, and may have a significant psychological impact on both patients and their partners. Hence, we examined the distress levels of LVAD patients and their partners. METHODS: Anxiety,

  15. Patient views on financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Mark W; Gross, Allan E; McKneally, Martin F

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decade, revelations of inappropriate financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers have challenged the presumption that surgeons can collaborate with surgical device manufacturers without damaging public trust in the surgical profession. We explored postoperative Canadian patients' knowledge and opinions about financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers. This complex issue was explored using qualitative methods. We conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with postoperative patients in follow-up arthroplasty clinics at an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed. Patient-derived concepts and themes were uncovered. We interviewed 33 patients. Five major themes emerged: 1) many patients are unaware of the existence of financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers; 2) patients approve of financial relationships that support innovation and research but are opposed to relationships that involve financial incentives that benefit only the surgeon and the manufacturer; 3) patients do not support disclosure of financial relationships during the consent process as it may shift focus away from the more important risks; 4) patients support oversight at the professional level but reject the idea of government involvement in oversight; and 5) patients entrust their surgeons to make appropriate patient-centred choices. This qualitative study deepens our understanding of financial relationships between surgeons and industry. Patients support relationships with industry that provide potential benefit to current or future patients. They trust our ability to self-regulate. Disclosure combined with appropriate oversight will strengthen public trust in professional collaboration with industry.

  16. Cardiac implantable electronic device and associated risk of infective endocarditis in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lauge; Valeur, Nana; Bundgaard, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) are at increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) as are patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED). However, few data exist on the IE risk after AVR surgery in patients with a CIED. Methods and results: Using the Danish...

  17. The Trauma Patient Tracking System: implementing a wireless monitoring infrastructure for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Jonathan; C Ng, Thomas; Li, Dustin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Kang; Bergeron, William; Martin, Ron; Budinger, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In mass trauma situations, emergency personnel are challenged with the task of prioritizing the care of many injured victims. We propose a trauma patient tracking system (TPTS) where first-responders tag all patients with a wireless monitoring device that continuously reports the location of each patient. The system can be used not only to prioritize patient care, but also to determine the time taken for each patient to receive treatment. This is important in training emergency personnel and in identifying bottlenecks in the disaster response process. In situations where biochemical agents are involved, a TPTS may be employed to determine sites of cross-contamination. In order to track patient location in both outdoor and indoor environments, we employ both Global Positioning System (GPS) and Television/ Radio Frequency (TVRF) technologies. Each patient tag employs IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi)/TCP/IP networking to communicate with a central server via any available Wi-Fi basestation. A key component to increase TPTS fault-tolerance is a mobile Wi-Fi basestation that employs redundant Internet connectivity to ensure that tags at the disaster scene can send information to the central server even when local infrastructure is unavailable for use. We demonstrate the robustness of the system in tracking multiple patients in a simulated trauma situation in an urban environment.

  18. A randomized trial of standardized nursing patient assessment using wireless devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Benoit, Angela; Coakley, Amanda; Chang, Frank; Empoliti, Joanne; Gallagher, Joan; Lasala, Cynthia; O'Malley, Rosemary; Rath, Greg; Silva, Judy; Li, Qi

    2007-10-11

    A complete and accurate patient assessment database is essential for effective communication, problem identification, planning and evaluation of patient status. When employed consistently for point-of-care documentation, information systems are associated with completeness and quality of documentation. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a randomized, cross-over study conducted to evaluate the adequacy of a standard patient assessment module to support problem identification, care planning and tracking of nursing sensitive patient outcomes. The feasibility of wireless devices to support patient assessment data collection at the point-of-care was evaluated using wireless PDAs and tablet PCs. Seventy-nine (79) nurses from two patient care units at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA) were recruited into the study and randomized to complete patient assessment using wireless or paper devices. At the end of six weeks, nurses who where randomized to the paper assessment module were assigned to a device and those who used a device were assigned to paper for an additional six weeks. Impact was evaluated with regard to data capture, workflow implications and nurse satisfaction. Findings suggest that a standard patient assessment set promotes patient sensitive and quality data capture, which is augmented by the use of wireless devices.

  19. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  20. Influence of Insulation Monitoring Devices on the Operation of DC Control Circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszowiec, Piotr, E-mail: olpio@o2.pl [Erea Polaniec (Poland)

    2017-03-15

    The insulation level of DC control circuits is an important safety-critical factor and, thus, should be subject to continuous and periodic monitoring. The methods used for monitoring the insulation in live circuits may, however, disturb the reliable operation of control relays. The risks of misoperation and failure to reset of relays posed by the operation of various insulation monitoring and fault location systems are evaluated.

  1. The influence of ergonomic devices on mechanical load during patient handling activities in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelaar, Elin; Knibbe, Hanneke J J; Miedema, Harald S; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical load during patient handling activities is an important risk factor for low back pain among nursing personnel. The aims of this study were to describe required and actual use of ergonomic devices during patient handling activities and to assess the influence of these ergonomic devices on mechanical load during patient handling activities. For each patient, based on national guidelines, it was recorded which specific ergonomic devices were required during distinct patient handling activities, defined by transferring a patient, providing personal care, repositioning patients in the bed, and putting on and taking off anti-embolism stockings. During real-time observations over ~60 h among 186 nurses on 735 separate patient handling activities in 17 nursing homes, it was established whether ergonomic devices were actually used. Mechanical load was assessed through observations of frequency and duration of a flexed or rotated trunk >30° and frequency of pushing, pulling, lifting or carrying requiring forces 230 N from start to end of each separate patient handling activity. The number of patients and nurses per ward and the ratio of nurses per patient were used as ward characteristics with potential influence on mechanical load. A mixed-effect model for repeated measurements was used to determine the influence of ergonomic devices and ward characteristics on mechanical load. Use of ergonomic devices was required according to national guidelines in 520 of 735 (71%) separate patient handling activities, and actual use was observed in 357 of 520 (69%) patient handling activities. A favourable ratio of nurses per patient was associated with a decreased duration of time spent in awkward back postures during handling anti-embolism stocking (43%), patient transfers (33%), and personal care of patients (24%) and also frequency of manually lifting patients (33%). Use of lifting devices was associated with a lower frequency of forces exerted (64%), adjustable bed and

  2. [Hematological Evaluation and Monitoring in Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Ávila, Mauricio J; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Arenas González, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    To guide the clinician in taking decisions on the best strategies for assessing and monitoring the risk of blood disorders in adults diagnosed with schizophrenia in pharmacological treatment. A clinical practice guideline was developed following the guidelines of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection to collect evidence and grade recommendations. De novoliterature researchwas performed. With the use of antipsychotics there isriskofreducción in the leukocyte count and the risk of agranulocytosis,the later associated with the use of clozapine, although it is a rare event(0.8%) can be fatal; this effect occurs most frequently in the first twelve weeks of treatment and the risk is maintained aroundthe first year of it. The recommendations were considered strongin all hematologic related monitoring.A blood count should be taken at the start of pharmacological treatment. If the patient is started on clozapine one shouldbe taken weekly during the first three months, monthly until completing one year and every six months thereafter. If there is a decrease in white blood cell count the patient should be monitored regularly, stopping if is a less than 3,500 cells/mm(3) and consider referral if is less than 2,000 cells/mm(3). Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Maskless X-Ray Writing of Electrical Devices on a Superconducting Oxide with Nanometer Resolution and Online Process Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Bonino, Valentina; Agostino, Angelo; Prestipino, Carmelo; Borfecchia, Elisa; Lamberti, Carlo; Operti, Lorenza; Fretto, Matteo; De Leo, Natascia; Truccato, Marco

    2017-08-22

    X-ray nanofabrication has so far been usually limited to mask methods involving photoresist impression and subsequent etching. Herein we show that an innovative maskless X-ray nanopatterning approach allows writing electrical devices with nanometer feature size. In particular we fabricated a Josephson device on a Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (Bi-2212) superconducting oxide micro-crystal by drawing two single lines of only 50 nm in width using a 17.4 keV synchrotron nano-beam. A precise control of the fabrication process was achieved by monitoring in situ the variations of the device electrical resistance during X-ray irradiation, thus finely tuning the irradiation time to drive the material into a non-superconducting state only in the irradiated regions, without significantly perturbing the crystal structure. Time-dependent finite element model simulations show that a possible microscopic origin of this effect can be related to the instantaneous temperature increase induced by the intense synchrotron picosecond X-ray pulses. These results prove that a conceptually new patterning method for oxide electrical devices, based on the local change of electrical properties, is actually possible with potential advantages in terms of heat dissipation, chemical contamination, miniaturization and high aspect ratio of the devices.

  4. Wireless sensor and data transmission needs and technologies for patient monitoring in the operating room and intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksuniemi, M; Sorvoja, H; Alasaarela, E; Myllyla, R

    2005-01-01

    In the intensive care unit, or during anesthesia, patients are attached to monitors by cables. These cables obstruct nursing staff and hinder the patients from moving freely in the hospital. However, rapidly developing wireless technologies are expected to solve these problems. To this end, this study revealed problem areas in current patient monitoring and established the most important medical parameters to monitor. In addition, usable wireless techniques for short-range data transmission were explored and currently employed wireless applications in the hospital environment were studied. The most important parameters measured of the patient include blood pressures, electrocardiography, respiration rate, heart rate and temperature. Currently used wireless techniques in hospitals are based on the WMTS and WLAN standards. There are no viable solutions for short-range data transmission from patient sensors to patient monitors, but potentially usable techniques in the future are based on the WPAN standards. These techniques include Bluetooth, ZigBee and UWB. Other suitable techniques might be based on capacitive or inductive coupling. The establishing of wireless techniques depends on ensuring the reliability of data transmission, eliminating disturbance by other wireless devices, ensuring patient data security and patient safety, and lowering the power consumption and price.

  5. Heart Failure Patients Monitored With Telemedicine : Patient Satisfaction, a Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, Imke H.; Luttik, Marie Louise; de Jong, Richard M.; de Vries, Arjen E.; van Dijk, Rene B.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillige, Hand L.

    Background: Remote monitoring of the clinical status of heart failure patients has developed rapidly and is the subject of several trials. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome, as recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to use in clinical research, and should be included in

  6. Prosthetic vision: devices, patient outcomes and retinal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjinicolaou, Alex E; Meffin, Hamish; Maturana, Matias I; Cloherty, Shaun L; Ibbotson, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Retinal disease and its associated retinal degeneration can lead to the loss of photoreceptors and therefore, profound blindness. While retinal degeneration destroys the photoreceptors, the neural circuits that convey information from the eye to the brain are sufficiently preserved to make it possible to restore sight using prosthetic devices. Typically, these devices consist of a digital camera and an implantable neurostimulator. The image sensor in a digital camera has the same spatiotopic arrangement as the photoreceptors of the retina. Therefore, it is possible to extract meaningful spatial information from an image and deliver it via an array of stimulating electrodes directly to the surviving retinal circuits. Here, we review the structure and function of normal and degenerate retina. The different approaches to prosthetic implant design are described in the context of human and preclinical trials. In the last section, we review studies of electrical properties of the retina and its response to electrical stimulation. These types of investigation are currently assessing a number of key challenges identified in human trials, including stimulation efficacy, spatial localisation, desensitisation to repetitive stimulation and selective activation of retinal cell populations. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  7. The eCOMBAT: Energy consumption monitoring tool for battery powered communication device

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olwal, TO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available computing, communication and networking applications. One of the best ways to obtain energy-efficient communication and networking is to invest in the renewable energy sources to charge batteries for communication devices and to develop smart energy...

  8. Phloem-sap-dynamics sensor device for monitoring photosynthates transportation in plant shoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yuya; Ono, Akihito; Terao, Kyohei; Suzuki, Takaaki; Takao, Hidekuni; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Ikuo; Shimokawa, Fusao

    2018-06-01

    We propose a microscale phloem-sap-dynamics sensor device to obtain the index of an internal plant condition regarding the transportation of primary photosynthates in phloem, which is an essential indicator of stable crop production under controlled-growth environments. In detail, we integrated a conventional Granier sensor with a thermal-flow sensor and devised an improved sensor device to quantify such index, including the information on velocity and direction of the phloem-sap flow using the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The experimental results showed that although the proposed sensor device was approximately only 1/10 the size of the conventional Granier sensor, it could generate an output nearly equal to that of the conventional sensor. Furthermore, experiments using mimicked plants demonstrated that the proposed device could measure minute flow velocities in the range of 0–200 µm/s, which are generally known as the phloem-sap flow velocity, and simultaneously detect the flow direction.

  9. Low-cost, portable open-source gas monitoring device based on chemosensory technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotor, Raúl; Gaviña, Pablo; Costero, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the construction of an electronic device to perform the real-time digitalization of the color state of the optical chemosensors used in the detection of dangerous gases. To construct the device, we used open-source modular electronics, such as Arduino and Sparkfun components, as well as free and open-source software (FOSS). The basic principle of the operation of this device is the continuous color measurement of a chemosensor-doped sensing film, whose color changes in the presence of a specific gas. The chemosensor-sensing film can be prepared by using any of the widely available chemosensors for the desired gas. Color measurement is taken by two TCS230 color sensor ICs, reported to the microcontroller, and the results are displayed on an LCD display and pushed through a USB serial port. By using a cyanide optical chemosensor, we demonstrated the operation of the device as a HCN gas detector at low concentrations. (paper)

  10. Testing of Monitoring Devices for JP-4 Releases in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    tests conducted to study the effectiveness, advantages , and limitations of a set of devices. All of the devices (except FiberChem) evaluated are...1,000 ppm and 1 percent butane standards ( Alltech Associates, Inc., Deerfield, Illinois). b. Temperature Program Analysis Two different temperature...in place. The advantage of having the probe is that we did not have to calculate or measure the liquid volume displaced by the probe. The accuracy of

  11. Intra- and interfractional patient motion for a variety of immobilization devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsman, Martijn; Rosenthal, Stanley J.; Michaud, Susan L.; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Robert J.; Bradley, Stephen G.; Flanz, Jacob B.; Kooy, Hanne M.

    2005-01-01

    The magnitude of inter- and intrafractional patient motion has been assessed for a broad set of immobilization devices. Data was analyzed for the three ordinal directions - left-right (x), sup-inf (y), and ant-post (z) - and the combined spatial displacement. We have defined 'rigid' and 'nonrigid' immobilization devices depending on whether they could be rigidly and reproducibly connected to the treatment couch or not. The mean spatial displacement for intrafractional motion for rigid devices is 1.3 mm compared to 1.9 mm for nonrigid devices. The modified Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame performed best at controlling intrafractional patient motion, with a 95% probability of observing a three-dimensional (3D) vector length of motion (v 95 ) of less than 1.8 mm, but could not be evaluated for interfractional motion. All other rigid and nonrigid immobilization devices had a v 95 of more than 3 mm for intrafractional patient motion. Interfractional patient motion was only evaluated for the rigid devices. The mean total interfractional displacement was at least 3.0 mm for these devices while v 95 was at least 6.0 mm

  12. Predictive Factors for Patients Undergoing ASD Device Occlusion Who "Crossover" to Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulukutla, Venkatachalam; Qureshi, Athar M; Pignatelli, Ricardo; Ing, Frank F

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to define characteristics of those patients who are referred for device closure of an Atrial septal defect (ASD), but identified to "crossover" surgery. All patients who underwent surgical and device (Amplatzer or Helex occluder) closures of secundum ASDs from 2001 to 2010 were reviewed and organized into three groups: surgical closure, device closure, and "crossover" group. 369 patients underwent ASD closure (265 device, 104 surgical). 42 of the 265 patients referred for device closure "crossed over" to the surgical group at various stages of the catheterization procedure. The device group had defect size measuring 14.2 mm (mean) and an ASD index (Defect Size (mm)/BSA) of 14.0 compared to the corresponding values in the surgical group (20.1 mm, ASD index 25.9) (P ASD index) (P ASD index of 14.7 compared with the crossover group ASD index of 23.8 (P ASD index greater than 23.7 had a 90% specificity in "crossing over" to surgery. The crossover and surgical groups had statistically larger ASD defect size indexes compared with the device group. Deficient rim in the posterior/inferior rim is associated with a large ASD size index which is a predictive factor for crossing over to surgery. Catheterization did not negatively impact surgical results in the "crossover" group.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Monitoring Devices for Particulate Content in Exhaust Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The installation and operation of continuous particulate emission monitors in industrial processes has become well developed and common practice in industrial stacks and ducts over the past 30 years, reflecting regulatory monitoring requirements. Continuous emissions monitoring equipment is installed not only for regulatory compliance, but also for the monitoring of plant performance, calculation of emissions inventories and compilation of environmental impact assessments. Particulate matter (PM entrained in flue gases is produced by the combustion of fuels or wastes. The size and quantity of particles released depends on the type of fuel and the design of the plant. The present work provides an overview of the main industrial emission sources, a description of the main types of monitoring systems offered by manufacturers and a comparative analysis of the currently available technologies for measuring dust releases to atmosphere.

  14. Developing a tool to preserve eye contact with patients undergoing colonoscopy for pain monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Y

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Yaron Niv, Yossi TalDepartment of Gastroenterology, Rabin Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, IsraelAbstract: Colonoscopy has become the leading procedure for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer. Patients’ experience of colonic endoscopic procedures is scarcely reported, even though it is considered a major factor in colorectal cancer screening participation. Pain due to air inflation or stretching the colon with an endoscope is not rare during examination and may be the main obstacle to cooperation and participation in a screening program. We propose a four-stage study for developing a tool dedicated to pain monitoring during colonoscopy, as follows: (1 comparison of patient, nurse, and endoscopist questionnaire responses about patient pain and technical details of the procedure using the PAINAD tool during colonoscopy; (2 observation of the correlation between patients’ facial expressions and other parameters (using the short PAINAD; (3 development of a device for continuous monitoring of the patient’s facial expression during the procedure; (4 assessment of the usability of such a tool and its contribution to the outcomes of colonoscopy procedures. Early intervention by the staff performing the procedure, in reaction to alerts encoded by this tool, may prevent adverse events during the procedure.Keywords: pain scoring, colonoscopy, pain monitoring, facial expression

  15. 77 FR 7584 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Heparin for Drug and Medical Device Use; Monitoring Crude Heparin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... strategies to ensure that the heparin supply chain is not contaminated with OSCS or any non- porcine origin... device manufacturers of finished products, and others to the potential risk of crude heparin...) among patients injected with heparin sodium in 2008, FDA identified the contaminant OSCS in heparin API...

  16. Central hemodynamic responses during serial exercise tests in heart failure patients using implantable hemodynamic monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, A; Steinhaus, D; Kjellström, B; Ryden, L; Bennett, T

    2003-06-01

    Exercise testing is commonly used in patients with congestive heart failure for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Such testing may be even more valuable if invasive hemodynamics are acquired. However, this will make the test more complex and expensive and only provides information from isolated moments. We studied serial exercise tests in heart failure patients with implanted hemodynamic monitors allowing recording of central hemodynamics. Twenty-one NYHA Class II-III heart failure patients underwent maximal exercise tests and submaximal bike or 6-min hall walk tests to quantify their hemodynamic responses and to study the feasibility of conducting exercise tests in patients with such devices. Patients were followed for 2-3 years with serial exercise tests. During maximal tests (n=70), heart rate increased by 52+/-19 bpm while S(v)O(2) decreased by 35+/-10% saturation units. RV systolic and diastolic pressure increased 29+/-11 and 11+/-6 mmHg, respectively, while pulmonary artery diastolic pressure increased 21+/-8 mmHg. Submaximal bike (n=196) and hall walk tests (n=172) resulted in S(v)O(2) changes of 80 and 91% of the maximal tests, while RV pressures ranged from 72 to 79% of maximal responses. An added potential value of implantable hemodynamic monitors in heart failure patients may be to quantitatively determine the true hemodynamic profile during standard non-invasive clinical exercise tests and to compare that to hemodynamic effects of regular exercise during daily living. It would be of interest to study whether such information could improve the ability to predict changes in a patient's clinical condition and to improve tailoring patient management.

  17. Innovative postmarket device evaluation using a quality registry to monitor thoracic endovascular aortic repair in the treatment of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Adam W; Lombardi, Joseph V; Abel, Dorothy B; Morales, J Pablo; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Wang, Grace; Azizzadeh, Ali; Kern, John; Fillinger, Mark; White, Rodney; Cronenwett, Jack L; Cambria, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-mandated postapproval studies have long been a mainstay of the continued evaluation of high-risk medical devices after initial marketing approval; however, these studies often present challenges related to patient/physician recruitment and retention. Retrospective single-center studies also do not fully represent the spectrum of real-world performance nor are they likely to have a sufficiently large enough sample size to detect important signals. In recent years, The FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health has been promoting the development and use of patient registries to advance infrastructure and methodologies for medical device investigation. The FDA 2012 document, "Strengthening the National System for Medical Device Post-market Surveillance," highlighted registries as a core foundational infrastructure when linked to other complementary data sources, including embedded unique device identification. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) thoracic endovascular aortic repair for type B aortic dissection project is an innovative method of using quality improvement registries to meet the needs of device evaluation after market approval. Here we report the organization and background of this project and highlight the innovation facilitated by collaboration of physicians, the FDA, and device manufacturers. This effort used an existing national network of VQI participants to capture patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair for acute type B aortic dissection within a registry that aligns with standard practice and existing quality efforts. The VQI captures detailed patient, device, and procedural data for consecutive eligible cases under the auspices of a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). Patients were divided into a 5-year follow-up group (200 acute; 200 chronic dissections) and a 1-year follow-up group (100 acute; 100 chronic). The 5-year cohort required additional imaging details, and the 1-year

  18. What are the benefits and risks of fitting patients with radiofrequency identification devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Levine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved a radiofrequency identification (RFID device that is implanted under the skin of the upper arm of patients and that stores the patient's medical identifier. When a scanner is passed over the device, the identifier is displayed on the screen of an RFID reader. An authorized health professional can then use the identifier to access the patient's clinical information, which is stored in a separate, secure database. Such RFID devices may have many medical benefits--such as expediting identification of patients and retrieval of their medical records. But critics of the technology have raised several concerns, including the risk of the patient's identifying information being used for nonmedical purposes.

  19. What are the benefits and risks of fitting patients with radiofrequency identification devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mark; Adida, Ben; Mandl, Kenneth; Kohane, Isaac; Halamka, John

    2007-11-27

    In 2004, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved a radiofrequency identification (RFID) device that is implanted under the skin of the upper arm of patients and that stores the patient's medical identifier. When a scanner is passed over the device, the identifier is displayed on the screen of an RFID reader. An authorized health professional can then use the identifier to access the patient's clinical information, which is stored in a separate, secure database. Such RFID devices may have many medical benefits--such as expediting identification of patients and retrieval of their medical records. But critics of the technology have raised several concerns, including the risk of the patient's identifying information being used for nonmedical purposes.

  20. Electromyography tests in patients with implanted cardiac devices are safe regardless of magnet placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Masayuki; Silcox, Jade; Haygood, Deavin; Harper-King, Valerie; Alsharabati, Mohammad; Lu, Liang; Morgan, Marla B; Young, Angela M; Claussen, Gwen C; King, Peter H; Oh, Shin J

    2013-01-01

    We compared the problems or complications associated with electrodiagnostic testing in 77 patients with implanted cardiac devices. Thirty tests were performed after magnet placement, and 47 were performed without magnet application. All electrodiagnostic tests were performed safely in all patients without any serious effect on the implanted cardiac devices with or without magnet placement. A significantly higher number of patient symptoms and procedure changes were reported in the magnet group (P magnet group patients had an approximately 11-fold greater risk of symptoms than those in the control group. Our data do not support a recommendation that magnet placement is necessary for routine electrodiagnostic testing in patients with implanted cardiac devices, as long as our general and specific guidelines are followed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A protocol for patients with cardiovascular implantable devices undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): should defibrillation threshold testing be performed post-(MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Peter Thomas; Ghanbari, Hamid; Alexander, Patrick B; Shaw, Michael K; Daccarett, Marcos; Machado, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIED) has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Recent data suggests MRI as a relative rather than absolute contraindication in CIED patients. Recently, the American Heart Association has recommended defibrillation threshold testing (DFTT) in implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients undergoing MRI. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of a protocol for MRI in CIED patients, incorporating the new recommendations on DFTT. Consecutive patients with CIED undergoing MRI were included. The protocol consisted of continuous monitoring during imaging, device interrogation pre- and post-MRI, reprogramming of the pacemaker to an asynchronous mode in pacemaker-dependent (PMD) patients and a non-tracking/sensing mode for non-PMD patients. All tachyarrhythmia therapies were disabled. Devices were interrogated for lead impedance, battery life, pacing, and sensing thresholds. All patients with ICD underwent DFTT/defibrillator safety margin testing (DSMT) post-MRI. A total of 92 MRI's at 1.5 Tesla were performed in 38 patients. A total of 13 PMD patients, ten ICD patients, four cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) patients, and 11 non-PMD patients were scanned from four major manufacturers. No device circuitry damage, programming alterations, inappropriate shocks, failure to pace, or changes in sensing, pacing, or defibrillator thresholds were found on single or multiple MRI sessions. Our protocol for MRI in CIED patients appears safe, feasible, and reproducible. This is irrespective of the type of CIED, pacemaker dependancy or multiple 24-h scanning sessions. Our protocol addresses early detection of potential complications and establishes a response system for potential device-related complications. Our observation suggests that routine DFTT/DSMT post-MRI may not be necessary.

  2. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Remote auscultatory patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Hök, B; Wiklund, L

    1992-01-01

    A system for patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The system is based on remote auscultation of heart sounds and respiratory sounds using specially developed pickup heads that are positioned on the precordium or at the nostrils and connected to microphones via...... can be simultaneously auscultated both inside and outside the shielded MRI room by infrared transmission through a metal mesh window. Bench tests of the system show that common mode acoustic noise is suppressed by approximately 30 dB in the frequency region of interest (100-1,000 Hz), and that polymer...

  4. Durability of central aortic valve closure in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Deo, Salil; Daly, Richard C; Durham, Lucian A; Joyce, Lyle D; Stulak, John M; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    A competent aortic valve is essential to providing effective left ventricular assist device support. We have adopted a practice of central aortic valve closure by placing a simple coaptation stitch at left ventricular assist device implantation in patients with significant aortic insufficiency. We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate the efficacy and durability of this procedure. The study included patients who had undergone continuous flow left ventricular assist device implantation. The patients were divided into 2 groups, those who did not require any aortic procedure because the valve was competent and those who underwent central aortic valve closure for mild or greater aortic regurgitation. The clinical endpoints were mortality, progression or recurrence of aortic insufficiency, and reoperation for aortic valve pathologic features. Aortic insufficiency was measured qualitatively from mild to severe on a scale of 0 to 5. A total of 123 patients received continuous flow left ventricular assist devices from February 2007 to August 2011. Of those, 18 (15%) underwent central aortic valve closure at left ventricular assist device implantation because of significant aortic insufficiency (1.8 ± 1.4) and 105 who did not (competent aortic valve, 0.15 ± 0.43; P assist device-supported patients, with follow-up extending into 2 years. Although aortic insufficiency progressed over time in those with minimal native valve regurgitation initially, no such progression was noted in those with central aortic valve closure. Additional investigation is needed to evaluate whether prophylactic central aortic valve closure should be performed at left ventricular assist device implantation to avoid problematic aortic regurgitation developing over time, in particular in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation for life-long (destination therapy) support. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  5. A difficult decision: what should we do when malignant tumours are diagnosed in patients supported by left ventricular assist devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Hassiba; Pfister, Christian; Baste, Jean-Marc; Nafeh-Bizet, Catherine; Gay, Arnaud; Barbay, Virginie; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Peillon, Christophe; Litzler, Pierre-Yves

    2015-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used as a bridge to heart transplantation. During the preimplantation or pretransplantation screening, malignant tumours can be discovered. Owing to the lack of guidelines, the management is difficult. We describe our perioperative approach and the patients' outcomes. Between 2006 and 2014, 55 patients underwent implantation of HeartMate II LVAD. Five were diagnosed with malignant tumours: 2 renal, 2 lung and 1 breast tumours. The renal tumours were diagnosed during the preimplantation screening. An LVAD was implanted in both followed by partial nephrectomies 8 and 9 months later. The lung cancers were diagnosed after device implantation, a left pulmonary segmentectomy and a right upper sleeve lobectomy were performed. The breast cancer was diagnosed few months after support and a tumourectomy with lymphadenectomy was performed. Tumour resection was performed successfully in all patients. Prior to surgery haemostasis, device and heart function were evaluated. During surgery, haemodynamics and anticoagulation were monitored. Reoperations were necessary to evacuate haemothorax after lobectomy and an abdominal haematoma post-nephrectomy. After discussion with oncologists, 3 patients were relisted for heart transplantation. Two were successfully transplanted 2 and 3 years after partial nephrectomy with an actual survival of 56 and 59 months after the cancer diagnosis. The follow-up revealed no cancer recurrences. Malignant tumours during support with LVAD can be successfully resected. A multidisciplinary evaluation in these high-risk patients is mandatory. After careful evaluation, regaining the patient's heart transplant candidacy is possible. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring the capability of wireless near infrared spectroscopy as a portable seizure detection device for epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sándor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has proved useful in measuring significant hemodynamic changes in the brain during epileptic seizures. The advance of NIRS-technology into wireless and portable devices raises the possibility of using the NIRS-technology for portable seizure detection. This study used NIRS to measure changes in oxygenated (HbO), deoxygenated (HbR), and total hemoglobin (HbT) at left and right side of the frontal lobe in 33 patients with epilepsy undergoing long-term video-EEG monitoring. Fifteen patients had 34 focal seizures (20 temporal-, 11 frontal-, 2 parietal-lobe, one unspecific) recorded and analyzed with NIRS. Twelve parameters consisting of maximum increase and decrease changes of HbO, HbR and HbT during seizures (1 min before- to 3 min after seizure-onset) for left and right side, were compared with the patients' own non-seizure periods (a 2-h period and a 30-min exercise-period). In both non-seizure periods 4 min moving windows with maximum overlapping were applied to find non-seizure maxima of the 12 parameters. Detection was defined as positive when seizure maximum change exceeded non-seizure maximum change. When analyzing the 12 parameters separately the positive seizure detection was in the range of 6-24%. The increase in hemodynamics was in general better at detecting seizures (15-24%) than the decrease in hemodynamics (6-18%) (P=0.02). NIRS did not seem to be a suitable technology for generic seizure detection given the device, settings, and methods used in this study. There are still several challenges to overcome before the NIRS-technology can be used as a home-monitoring seizure detection device. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. On-line Monitoring Device for High-voltage Switch Cabinet Partial Discharge Based on Pulse Current Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Tao, S.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cai, H. W.; Li, P.; Feng, Y.; Zhang, T. C.; Li, J.; Wang, W. S.; Zhang, X. K.

    2017-12-01

    The pulse current method for partial discharge detection is generally applied in type testing and other off-line tests of electrical equipment at delivery. After intensive analysis of the present situation and existing problems of partial discharge detection in switch cabinets, this paper designed the circuit principle and signal extraction method for partial discharge on-line detection based on a high-voltage presence indicating systems (VPIS), established a high voltage switch cabinet partial discharge on-line detection circuit based on the pulse current method, developed background software integrated with real-time monitoring, judging and analyzing functions, carried out a real discharge simulation test on a real-type partial discharge defect simulation platform of a 10KV switch cabinet, and verified the sensitivity and validity of the high-voltage switch cabinet partial discharge on-line monitoring device based on the pulse current method. The study presented in this paper is of great significance for switch cabinet maintenance and theoretical study on pulse current method on-line detection, and has provided a good implementation method for partial discharge on-line monitoring devices for 10KV distribution network equipment.

  8. Monitoring of patients treated with lithium for bipolar disorder: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederlof, M; Heerdink, E R; Egberts, A C G; Wilting, I; Stoker, L J; Hoekstra, R; Kupka, R W

    2018-04-14

    Adequate monitoring of patients using lithium is needed for optimal dosing and for early identification of patients with (potential) ADEs. The objective was to internationally assess how health care professionals monitor patients treated with lithium for bipolar disorder. Using networks of various professional organizations, an anonymous online survey was conducted among health care professionals prescribing lithium. Target lithium serum levels and frequency of monitoring was assessed together with monitoring of physical and laboratory parameters. Reasons to and not to monitor and use of guidelines and institutional protocols, and local monitoring systems were investigated. The survey was completed by 117 health care professionals incorporating responses from twenty-four countries. All prescribers reported to monitor lithium serum levels on a regular basis, with varying target ranges. Almost all (> 97%) monitored thyroid and renal function before start and during maintenance treatment. Reported monitoring of other laboratory and physical parameters was variable. The majority of respondents (74%) used guidelines or institutional protocols for monitoring. In general, the prescriber was responsible for monitoring, had to request every monitoring parameter separately and only a minority of patients was automatically invited. Lithium serum levels, renal and thyroid function were monitored by (almost) all physicians. However, there was considerable variation in other monitoring parameters. Our results help to understand why prescribers of lithium monitor patients and what their main reasons are not to monitor patients using lithium.

  9. Patient dose monitoring systems: A new way of managing patient dose and quality in the radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitousi, N

    2017-12-01

    Due to the upcoming European Directive (2013/59/EURATOM) and the increased focus on patient safety in international guidelines and regulations, Patient Dose Monitoring Systems, also called Dose Management Systems (DMS), are introduced in medical imaging departments. This article focusses on the requirements for a DMS, its benefits and the necessary implementation steps. The implementation of a DMS can be perceived as a lengthy, yet worthy, procedure: users have to select the appropriate system for their applications, prepare data collection, validate, perform configuration, and start using the results in quality improvement projects. A state of the art DMS improves the quality of service, ensures patient safety and optimizes the efficiency of the department. The gain is multifaceted: the initial goal is compliance monitoring against diagnostic reference levels. At a higher level, the user gets an overview of the performance of the devices or centers that are under his supervision. Error identification, generation of alerts and workflow analysis are additional benefits. It can also enable a more patient-centric approach with personalized dosimetry. Skin dose, size-specific dose estimates and organ doses can be calculated and evaluated per patient. A DMS is a powerful tool and essential for improved quality and patient care in a radiology department. It can be configured to the needs of medical physicists, radiologists, technologists, even for the management of the hospital. Collaboration between all health professionals and stakeholders, input-output validation and communication of findings are key points in the process of a DMS implementation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Machine learning-based patient specific prompt-gamma dose monitoring in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueth, P.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Létang, J. M.; Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Sarrut, D.

    2013-07-01

    Online dose monitoring in proton therapy is currently being investigated with prompt-gamma (PG) devices. PG emission was shown to be correlated with dose deposition. This relationship is mostly unknown under real conditions. We propose a machine learning approach based on simulations to create optimized treatment-specific classifiers that detect discrepancies between planned and delivered dose. Simulations were performed with the Monte-Carlo platform Gate/Geant4 for a spot-scanning proton therapy treatment and a PG camera prototype currently under investigation. The method first builds a learning set of perturbed situations corresponding to a range of patient translation. This set is then used to train a combined classifier using distal falloff and registered correlation measures. Classifier performances were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves and maximum associated specificity and sensitivity. A leave-one-out study showed that it is possible to detect discrepancies of 5 mm with specificity and sensitivity of 85% whereas using only distal falloff decreases the sensitivity down to 77% on the same data set. The proposed method could help to evaluate performance and to optimize the design of PG monitoring devices. It is generic: other learning sets of deviations, other measures and other types of classifiers could be studied to potentially reach better performance. At the moment, the main limitation lies in the computation time needed to perform the simulations.

  11. Machine learning-based patient specific prompt-gamma dose monitoring in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueth, P; Freud, N; Létang, J M; Sarrut, D; Dauvergne, D; Ray, C; Testa, E

    2013-01-01

    Online dose monitoring in proton therapy is currently being investigated with prompt-gamma (PG) devices. PG emission was shown to be correlated with dose deposition. This relationship is mostly unknown under real conditions. We propose a machine learning approach based on simulations to create optimized treatment-specific classifiers that detect discrepancies between planned and delivered dose. Simulations were performed with the Monte-Carlo platform Gate/Geant4 for a spot-scanning proton therapy treatment and a PG camera prototype currently under investigation. The method first builds a learning set of perturbed situations corresponding to a range of patient translation. This set is then used to train a combined classifier using distal falloff and registered correlation measures. Classifier performances were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves and maximum associated specificity and sensitivity. A leave-one-out study showed that it is possible to detect discrepancies of 5 mm with specificity and sensitivity of 85% whereas using only distal falloff decreases the sensitivity down to 77% on the same data set. The proposed method could help to evaluate performance and to optimize the design of PG monitoring devices. It is generic: other learning sets of deviations, other measures and other types of classifiers could be studied to potentially reach better performance. At the moment, the main limitation lies in the computation time needed to perform the simulations. (paper)

  12. Diurnal patterns of salivary cortisol and DHEA using a novel collection device: electronic monitoring confirms accurate recording of collection time using this device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudenslager, Mark L; Calderone, Jacqueline; Philips, Sam; Natvig, Crystal; Carlson, Nichole E

    2013-09-01

    The accurate indication of saliva collection time is important for defining the diurnal decline in salivary cortisol as well as characterizing the cortisol awakening response. We tested a convenient and novel collection device for collecting saliva on strips of filter paper in a specially constructed booklet for determination of both cortisol and DHEA. In the present study, 31 healthy adults (mean age 43.5 years) collected saliva samples four times a day on three consecutive days using filter paper collection devices (Saliva Procurement and Integrated Testing (SPIT) booklet) which were maintained during the collection period in a large plastic bottle with an electronic monitoring cap. Subjects were asked to collect saliva samples at awakening, 30 min after awakening, before lunch and 600 min after awakening. The time of awakening and the time of collection before lunch were allowed to vary by each subjects' schedule. A reliable relationship was observed between the time recorded by the subject directly on the booklet and the time recorded by electronic collection device (n=286 observations; r(2)=0.98). However, subjects did not consistently collect the saliva samples at the two specific times requested, 30 and 600 min after awakening. Both cortisol and DHEA revealed diurnal declines. In spite of variance in collection times at 30 min and 600 min after awakening, the slope of the diurnal decline in both salivary cortisol and DHEA was similar when we compared collection tolerances of ±7.5 and ±15 min for each steroid. These unique collection booklets proved to be a reliable method for recording collection times by subjects as well as for estimating diurnal salivary cortisol and DHEA patterns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of bispectral index and entropy monitoring in patients undergoing internalisation of deep brain stimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparna Bharadwaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depth of anaesthesia (DOA monitors are shown to reduce the intra-operative dose of anaesthetic agents, provide haemodynamic stability and shorten emergence times. Electroencephalography (EEG based DOA monitors such as bispectral index (BIS and entropy have been calibrated and validated in healthy subjects. Hence the clinical effectiveness of these monitors may be affected when monitoring patients with neurological disorders (e.g., epilepsy, dystonia, dementia and Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether BIS and entropy correlate with each other and with clinical indices of DOA in patients with movement disorders under general anaesthesia (GA. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study in patients with movement disorders undergoing internalization of deep brain stimulators. All patients received standard GA with age-adjusted mean alveolar concentration (aaMAC of an inhalational agent between 0.7 and 1.1. BIS and entropy sensors were applied on the patient's left forehead. Data collected included clinical parameters and EEG-based DOA indices. Correlation analysis was performed between entropy, BIS and the clinical indices of DOA. Bland Altman analysis was performed to determine the agreement between BIS and entropy. Results: Thirty patients were studied (mean age was 58.4 ± 11 years, male: female 18:12 and weight 79.2 ± 17 kg. Indications for deep brain stimulation were Parkinson's disease (n = 25, essential tremors (n = 2 and dystonia (n = 3. There was a very strong positive correlation between BIS and response entropy (RE (r = 0.932 and BIS and state entropy (SE (r = 0.950 and a strong negative correlation among aaMAC and BIS, RE and SE with r values of −0.686, −0.788 and −0.732, respectively. However, there was no correlation between BIS, RE, SE and haemodynamic values. Conclusion: Our study showed that BIS and entropy perform well in patients with movement disorders

  14. Monitoring device for radioactive leakage from steam system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tateo; Sato, Kohei

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability for the monitor of radio-active leakage by accumulating small quantity of radioactivities each lower than the detectable level and increasing their dose rate. Constitution: Even if the steam system radiation monitor in the nuclear power plant is disposed for the detection of in-leak radioactivity, radioactive leakage can be monitored at high reliability by increasing the small quantity of radioactivities in the drains to a detectable sensitivity range of the monitor upon detection. In view of the above, in the present invention, radioactive material catching medium is incorporated to a radio-activity monitor spool piece for accumulating small quantity of radioactivities. Specifically as the catching medium, an ion exchange resin is used for the leakage of ionic radioactive material, while an ion exchange resin increased with the mixing ratio of a cationic resin or hollow thread membrane filter is used for crud-like radioactive material leakage. These catching media are incorporated into the spool piece, thereby enabling to catch even small quantity of radioactive leakage lower than the detectable sensitivity of the radiation monitor, if should occur, in the spool piece and enabling radioactive detection for the accumulated dose rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Breath-hold monitoring and visual feedback for radiotherapy using a charge-coupled device camera and a head-mounted display. System development and feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the technical aspects of the breath-hold technique with respiratory monitoring and visual feedback and to evaluate the feasibility of this system in healthy volunteers. To monitor respiration, the vertical position of the fiducial marker placed on the patient's abdomen was tracked by a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. Five healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this study. They held their breath at the end-inspiration and the end-expiration phases. They performed five repetitions of the same type of 15-s breath-holds with and without a head-mounted display, respectively. A standard deviation of five mean positions of the fiducial marker during a 15-s breath-hold in each breath-hold type was used as the reproducibility value of breath-hold. All five volunteers well tolerated the breath-hold maneuver. For the inspiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 1.74 mm and 0.84 mm, respectively (P=0.20). For the expiration breath-hold, the standard deviations with and without visual feedback were 0.63 mm and 0.96 mm, respectively (P=0.025). Our newly developed system might help the patient achieve improved breath-hold reproducibility. (author)

  16. Microcirculatory monitoring in septic patients: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Ince, C

    Microcirculatory alterations play a pivotal role in sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. However, since the microcirculation has been a "black box", current hemodynamic management of septic patients is still guided by macrocirculatory parameters. In the last decades, the development of several technologies has shed some light on microcirculatory evaluation and monitoring, and the possibility of incorporating microcirculatory variables to clinical practice no longer seems to be beyond reach. The present review provides a brief summary of the current technologies for microcirculatory evaluation, and attempts to explore the potential role and benefits of their integration to the resuscitation process in critically ill septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of general surgical problems in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Stephen H; Morris, David S; Mauermann, William J; Park, Soon J; Zietlow, Scott P

    2012-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly used to treat patients with end-stage heart failure. These patients may develop acute noncardiac surgical problems around the time of LVAD implantation or, as survival continues to improve, chronic surgical problems as ambulatory patients remote from the LVAD implant. Previous reports of noncardiac surgical problems in LVAD patients included patients with older, first-generation devices and do not address newer, second-generation devices. We describe the frequency and management of noncardiac surgical problems encountered during LVAD support with these newer-generation devices to assist noncardiac surgeons involved in the care of patients with LVADs. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients receiving LVADs at our institution. We collected data for any consultation by noncardiac surgeons within the scope of general surgery during LVAD support and subsequent treatment. Ninety-nine patients received implantable LVADs between 2003 and 2009 (first-generation, n = 19; second-generation, n = 80). Excluding intestinal hemorrhage, general surgical opinions were rendered for 34 patients with 49 problems, mostly in the acute recovery phase after LVAD implantation. Of those, 27 patients underwent 28 operations. Respiratory failure and intra-abdominal pathologies were the most common problems addressed, and LVAD rarely precluded operation. Patients with second-generation LVADs were more likely to survive hospitalization (P = .04) and develop chronic, rather than emergent, surgical problems. Patients with LVADs frequently require consultation from noncardiac surgeons within the scope of general surgeons and often require operation. Patients with second-generation LVADs are more likely to become outpatients and develop more elective surgical problems. Noncardiac surgeons will be increasingly involved in caring for patients with LVADs and should anticipate the problems unique to this patient

  18. Reproducibility for Heart Rate Variability Analysis during 6-Min Walk Test in Patients with Heart Failure and Agreement between Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Lays Magalhães; Prado, Gustavo Faibischew; Umeda, Iracema Ioco Kikuchi; Kawauchi, Tatiana Satie; Taboada, Adriana Marques Fróes; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Pereira Filho, Horacio Gomes; Grupi, César José; Souza, Hayala Cristina Cavenague; Moreira, Dalmo Antônio Ribeiro; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a useful method to assess abnormal functioning in the autonomic nervous system and to predict cardiac events in patients with heart failure (HF). HRV measurements with heart rate monitors have been validated with an electrocardiograph in healthy subjects but not in patients with HF. We explored the reproducibility of HRV in two consecutive six-minute walk tests (6MW), 60-minute apart, using a heart rate monitor (PolarS810i) and a portable electrocardiograph (called Holter) in 50 HF patients (mean age 59 years, NYHA II, left ventricular ejection fraction ~35%). The reproducibility for each device was analysed using a paired t-test or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Additionally, we assessed the agreement between the two devices based on the HRV indices at rest, during the 6MW and during recovery using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), 95% confidence intervals and Bland-Altman plots. The test-retest for the HRV analyses was reproducible using Holter and PolarS810i at rest but not during recovery. In the second 6MW, patients showed significant increases in rMSSD and walking distance. The PolarS810i measurements had remarkably high concordance correlation [0.86patients.

  19. A device for fully automated on-site process monitoring and control of trihalomethane concentrations in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Aaron W.; Simone, Paul S.; York, J.C.; Emmert, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Commercial device for on-line monitoring of trihalomethanes in drinking water. • Method detection limits for individual trihalomethanes range from 0.01–0.04 μg L –1 . • Rugged and robust device operates automatically for on-site process control. • Used for process mapping and process optimization to reduce treatment costs. • Hourly measurements of trihalomethanes made continuously for ten months. - Abstract: An instrument designed for fully automated on-line monitoring of trihalomethane concentrations in chlorinated drinking water is presented. The patented capillary membrane sampling device automatically samples directly from a water tap followed by injection of the sample into a gas chromatograph equipped with a nickel-63 electron capture detector. Detailed studies using individual trihalomethane species exhibited method detection limits ranging from 0.01–0.04 μg L −1 . Mean percent recoveries ranged from 77.1 to 86.5% with percent relative standard deviation values ranging from 1.2 to 4.6%. Out of more than 5200 samples analyzed, 95% of the concentration ranges were detectable, 86.5% were quantifiable. The failure rate was less than 2%. Using the data from the instrument, two different treatment processes were optimized so that total trihalomethane concentrations were maintained at acceptable levels while reducing treatment costs significantly. This ongoing trihalomethane monitoring program has been operating for more than ten months and has produced the longest continuous and most finely time-resolved data on trihalomethane concentrations reported in the literature

  20. Eight-Week Remote Monitoring Using a Freely Worn Device Reveals Unstable Gait Patterns in Older Fallers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Matthew A; Lord, Stephen R; Coppens, Milou J; Annegarn, Janneke; Delbaere, Kim

    2015-11-01

    Develop algorithms to detect gait impairments remotely using data from freely worn devices during long-term monitoring. Identify statistical models that describe how gait performances are distributed over several weeks. Determine the data window required to reliably assess an increased propensity for falling. 1085 days of walking data were collected from eighteen independent-living older people (mean age 83 years) using a freely worn pendant sensor (housing a triaxial accelerometer and pressure sensor). Statistical distributions from several accelerometer-derived gait features (encompassing quantity, exposure, intensity, and quality) were compared for those with and without a history of falling. Participants completed more short walks relative to long walks, as approximated by a power law. Walks less than 13.1 s comprised 50% of exposure to walking-related falls. Daily-life cadence was bimodal and step-time variability followed a log-normal distribution. Fallers took significantly fewer steps per walk and had relatively more exposure from short walks and greater mode of step-time variability. Using a freely worn device and wavelet-based analysis tools allowed long-term monitoring of walks greater than or equal to three steps. In older people, short walks constitute a large proportion of exposure to falls. To identify fallers, mode of variability may be a better measure of central tendency than mean of variability. A week's monitoring is sufficient to reliably assess the long-term propensity for falling. Statistical distributions of gait performances provide a reference for future wearable device development and research into the complex relationships between daily-life walking patterns, morbidity, and falls.

  1. A device for fully automated on-site process monitoring and control of trihalomethane concentrations in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Aaron W. [The University of Memphis, Department of Chemistry, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Simone, Paul S. [The University of Memphis, Department of Chemistry, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Foundation Instruments, Inc., Collierville, TN 38017 (United States); York, J.C. [City of Lebanon, TN Water Treatment Plant, 7 Gilmore Hill Rd., Lebanon, TN 37087 (United States); Emmert, Gary L., E-mail: gemmert@memphis.edu [The University of Memphis, Department of Chemistry, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Foundation Instruments, Inc., Collierville, TN 38017 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Commercial device for on-line monitoring of trihalomethanes in drinking water. • Method detection limits for individual trihalomethanes range from 0.01–0.04 μg L{sup –1}. • Rugged and robust device operates automatically for on-site process control. • Used for process mapping and process optimization to reduce treatment costs. • Hourly measurements of trihalomethanes made continuously for ten months. - Abstract: An instrument designed for fully automated on-line monitoring of trihalomethane concentrations in chlorinated drinking water is presented. The patented capillary membrane sampling device automatically samples directly from a water tap followed by injection of the sample into a gas chromatograph equipped with a nickel-63 electron capture detector. Detailed studies using individual trihalomethane species exhibited method detection limits ranging from 0.01–0.04 μg L{sup −1}. Mean percent recoveries ranged from 77.1 to 86.5% with percent relative standard deviation values ranging from 1.2 to 4.6%. Out of more than 5200 samples analyzed, 95% of the concentration ranges were detectable, 86.5% were quantifiable. The failure rate was less than 2%. Using the data from the instrument, two different treatment processes were optimized so that total trihalomethane concentrations were maintained at acceptable levels while reducing treatment costs significantly. This ongoing trihalomethane monitoring program has been operating for more than ten months and has produced the longest continuous and most finely time-resolved data on trihalomethane concentrations reported in the literature.

  2. Patient perceptions regarding the use of smart devices for medical photography: results of a patient-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Potdar, Nayana A; Dadia, Suchit; Aulakh, Simranjeet; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Shinde, Chhaya A

    2018-03-06

    To assess patient perceptions regarding medical photography and the use of smart devices, namely mobile phones and tablets for medical photography. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among 280 consecutive adult patients who presented to the oculoplastics clinic at a tertiary eye care centre. The responses were tabulated and analysed. Of the 280 patients surveyed, 68% felt that medical photography had a positive impact on their understanding of their illnesses and 72% felt that the use of smartphones for medical photography was acceptable. Respondents below the age of 40 years were more likely to approve of the use of mobile phones for photography as compared to those over 40. Most patients (74%) preferred a doctor to be the person photographing them. While a majority approved of doctors and trainee physicians having access to their photographs, they felt non-physician healthcare personnel should not have access to clinical photographs. Also, 72% of the respondents felt that the patient's consent should be taken before using their photographs. It was noted that patient identification and breach of confidentiality could be some of the potential issues with using smart devices as cameras in the clinic. Clinical photography in general and, specifically, using smart devices for clinical photographs have gained acceptance among patients. The outcomes of this study may be utilized to create policy guidelines for the use of smart devices as photography tools in the clinics. The findings of this survey can also help to create standardized, uniform patient consent forms for clinical photography.

  3. Ventricular assist device implantation in a young patient with non-compaction cardiomyopathy and hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenges, Katharina; Panholzer, Bernd; Cremer, Jochen; Haneya, Assad

    2018-04-01

    A case of a 15-year-old female patient with acute heart failure due to non-compaction cardiomyopathy and hereditary anaemia (hereditary spherocytic elliptocytosis) requiring ventricular assist device implantation as a bridge to transplantation is presented. The possible effects of mechanical stress on erythrocytes potentially induced by mechanical circulatory support remains unclear, but it may lead to haemolytic crisis in patients suffering from hereditary anaemia. In our case, ventricular assist device therapy was feasible, and haematological complications did not occur within 6 weeks of bridging our patient to heart transplantation.

  4. Bioartificial liver assist devices in support of patients with liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer II, John F; Lopez, Roberto C; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Zi-Fa; Mazariegos, George V; Fung, John J

    2002-02-01

    Bioartificial liver assist devices (BALs) offer an opportunity for critical care physicians and transplant surgeons to stabilize patients prior to orthotopic liver transplantation. Such devices may also act as a bridge to transplant, providing liver support to patients awaiting transplant, or as support for patients post living-related donor transplant. Four BAL devices that rely on hepatocytes cultured in hollow fiber membrane cartridges (Circe Biomedical HepatAssist(r), Vitagen ELADTM, Gerlach BELS, and Excorp Medical BLSS) are currently in various stages of clinical evaluation. Comparison of the four devices shows that several unique approaches based upon the same overall system architecture are possible. Preliminary results of the Excorp Medical BLSS Phase I safety evaluation at the University of Pittsburgh, after treating four patients (F, 41, acetominophen-induced, two support periods; M, 50, Wilson's disease, one support period; F, 53, acute alcoholic hepatitis, two support periods; F, 24, chemotherapy-induced, one support period, are presented. All patients presented with hypoglycemia and transient hypotension at the start of extracorporeal perfusion. Hypoglycemia was treated by IV dextrose and the transient hypotension responded positively to IV fluid bolus. Heparin anticoagulation was used only in the second patient. No serious or adverse events were noted in the four patients. Moderate Biochemical response to support was noted in all patients. More complete characterization of the safety of the BLSS requires completion of the Phase I safety evaluation.

  5. Method for reducing x-ray background signals from insertion device x-ray beam position monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Decker

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available A method is described that provides a solution to the long-standing problem of stray radiation-induced signals on photoemission-based x-ray beam position monitors (BPMs located on insertion device x-ray beam lines. The method involves the introduction of a chicane into the accelerator lattice that directs unwanted x radiation away from the photosensitive x-ray BPM blades. This technique has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source, and experimental confirmation of the technique is provided.

  6. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or less. In the case of a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) product specification in the pressurized liquid state, the gas phase sulfur content should be evaluated assuming complete vaporization of the LPG... for fuel gas combustion devices. 60.107a Section 60.107a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  7. A multimodal optical and electrochemical device for monitoring surface reactions: redox active surfaces in porous silicon Rugate filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampi, Simone; Guan, Bin; Darwish, Nadim A; Zhu, Ying; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2012-12-21

    Herein, mesoporous silicon (PSi) is configured as a single sensing device that has dual readouts; as a photonic crystal sensor in a Rugate filter configuration, and as a high surface area porous electrode. The as-prepared PSi is chemically modified to provide it with stability in aqueous media and to allow for the subsequent coupling of chemical species, such as via Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions between 1-alkynes and azides ("click" reactions). The utility of the bimodal capabilities of the PSi sensor for monitoring surface coupling procedures is demonstrated by the covalent coupling of a ferrocene derivative, as well as by demonstrating ligand-exchange reactions (LER) at the PSi surface. Both types of reactions were monitored through optical reflectivity measurements, as well as electrochemically via the oxidation/reduction of the surface tethered redox species.

  8. Long-term Compliance and Satisfaction With Percutaneous Bone Conduction Devices in Patients With Congenital Unilateral Conductive Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Rik C; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hol, Myrthe K S; Snik, Ad F M

    2015-06-01

    Patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL) can either be watchful monitored or treated surgically through the fitting of a percutaneous bone conduction device (BCD) or, in some cases, atresia repair. The current study evaluated the long-term compliance and satisfaction with a percutaneous BCD in this specific population. Fifty-three consecutive patients with congenital UCHL treated with a percutaneous BCD in our tertiary referral center between 1998 and 2011 were identified. Clinical and audiological data were retrospectively gathered from the patients' files. The patients were interviewed by telephone about their current device usage status and were asked to complete the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ). Compliance with the BCD was 56.6% after a mean follow-up of 7 years. The mean age at implantation of the users (22 years) was significantly higher than that of the nonusers (10 years). The mean time of device usage before the patients stopped using the BCD was 5 years. The primary reasons mentioned for quitting the BCD were experiencing excess background noise and/or subjectively not receiving enough benefit. Objectively measured features of binaural processing affected by the BCD were found to correlate with long-term BCD usage. The SSQ revealed significant improvement in the aided condition compared with the nonaided condition in the users, in contrast to the nonusers. The current disappointing long-term compliance figures indicate the need for an even more careful and individualized approach with life-long follow-up when fitting BCDs in this specific population, especially in children.

  9. Safety, efficacy, and performance of implanted recycled cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices in underprivileged patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Reema; Ghanbari, Hamid; Feldman, Dustin; Menesses, Daniel; Rivas, Daniel; Zakhem, Nicole C; Duarte, Carlos; Machado, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Patients in underdeveloped nations have limited access to life-saving medical technology including cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices. We evaluated alternative means to provide such technology to this patient population while assessing the safety and efficacy of such a practice. Patients in the United States with clinical indications for extraction of CRM devices were consented. Antemortem CRM devices were cleaned and sterilized following a protocol established at our institution. Surveillance in vitro cultures were performed for quality assurance. The functional status of pulse generators was tested with a pacing system analyzer to confirm at least 70% battery life. Most generators were transported, in person, to an implanting institution in Nicaragua. Recipients with a Class I indication for CRM implantation, and meeting economical criteria set forth, were consented for implantation of a recycled device. Between 2003 and 2009, implantation was performed in 17 patients with an average age of 42.1 ± 20.3 years. Of the 17 patients, nine were male and eight were female. Mean follow-up was 68 ± 38 months. Device evaluation occurred prior to discharge, 4 weeks post implantation, and every 6 months thereafter. There were three deaths during the follow-up period secondary to myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure. Hematoma formation occurred in one patient. No infections, early battery depletion, or device malfunction were identified during follow-up. Our case series is the longest follow-up of recipients of recycled antemortem CRM devices. Our findings support the feasibility and safety of this alternative acquisition of life-saving technology. ©2011, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Design evolution enhances patient compliance for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound device usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pounder NM

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neill M Pounder, John T Jones, Kevin J Tanis Bioventus LLC, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Poor patient compliance or nonadherence with prescribed treatments can have a significant unfavorable impact on medical costs and clinical outcomes. In the current study, voice-of-the-customer research was conducted to aid in the development of a next-generation low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS bone healing product. An opportunity to improve patient compliance reporting was identified, resulting in the incorporation into the next-generation device of a visual calendar that provides direct feedback to the patient, indicating days for which they successfully completed treatment. Further ­investigation was done on whether inclusion of the visual calendar improved patient adherence to the prescribed therapy (20 minutes of daily treatment over a 6-month period. Thus, 12,984 data files were analyzed from patients prescribed either the earlier- or the next-generation LIPUS device. Over the 6-month period, overall patient compliance was 83.8% with the next-generation LIPUS device, compared with 74.2% for the previous version (p<0.0001. Incorporation of the calendar feature resulted in compliance never decreasing below 76% over the analysis period, whereas compliance with the earlier-generation product fell to 51%. A literature review on the LIPUS device shows a correlation between clinical effectiveness and compliance rates more than 70%. Incorporation of stakeholder feedback throughout the design and innovation process of a next-generation LIPUS device resulted in a measurable improvement in patient adherence, which may help to optimize clinical outcomes. Keywords: LIPUS, ultrasound, compliance, patient adherence, medical device design

  11. Estimating Accuracy at Exercise Intensities: A Comparative Study of Self-Monitoring Heart Rate and Physical Activity Wearable Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Erin E; Golaszewski, Natalie M; Bartholomew, John B

    2017-03-16

    Physical activity tracking wearable devices have emerged as an increasingly popular method for consumers to assess their daily activity and calories expended. However, whether these wearable devices are valid at different levels of exercise intensity is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine heart rate (HR) and energy expenditure (EE) validity of 3 popular wrist-worn activity monitors at different exercise intensities. A total of 62 participants (females: 58%, 36/62; nonwhite: 47% [13/62 Hispanic, 8/62 Asian, 7/62 black/ African American, 1/62 other]) wore the Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, and Garmin Forerunner 225. Validity was assessed using 2 criterion devices: HR chest strap and a metabolic cart. Participants completed a 10-minute seated baseline assessment; separate 4-minute stages of light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity treadmill exercises; and a 10-minute seated recovery period. Data from devices were compared with each criterion via two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and Bland-Altman analysis. Differences are expressed in mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). For the Apple Watch, HR MAPE was between 1.14% and 6.70%. HR was not significantly different at the start (P=.78), during baseline (P=.76), or vigorous intensity (P=.84); lower HR readings were measured during light intensity (P=.03), moderate intensity (P=.001), and recovery (P=.004). EE MAPE was between 14.07% and 210.84%. The device measured higher EE at all stages (PApple Watch, and Garmin Forerunner 225. An advantage and novel approach of the study is the examination of HR and EE at specific physical activity intensities. Establishing validity of wearable devices is of particular interest as these devices are being used in weight loss interventions and could impact findings. Future research should investigate why differences between exercise intensities and the devices exist. ©Erin E Dooley, Natalie M Golaszewski, John B Bartholomew. Originally published in JMIR

  12. Heart failure patients monitored with telemedicine: patient satisfaction, a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraai, I H; Luttik, M L A; de Jong, R M; Jaarsma, T; Hillege, H L

    2011-08-01

    Remote monitoring of the clinical status of heart failure patients has developed rapidly and is the subject of several trials. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome, as recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to use in clinical research, and should be included in studies concerning remote monitoring. The objective of this review is to describe the current state of the literature on patient satisfaction with noninvasive telemedicine, regarding definition, measurement, and overall level of patient satisfaction with telemedicine. The Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane, and Cinahl databases were searched using heart failure-, satisfaction-, and telemedicine-related search terms. The literature search identified 193 publications, which were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Fourteen articles were included. None of the articles described a clear definition or concept of patient satisfaction with telemedicine. Patient satisfaction with telemedicine was measured with self-developed questionnaires or face-to-face or telephonic interviews. None of the articles used the same questionnaire or telephonic survey to measure patient satisfaction. Only one questionnaire was assessed for validity and reliability. In general, patients seemed to be satisfied or very satisfied with the use of telemedicine. Measurement of patient satisfaction is still underexposed in telemedicine research and the measurement of patient satisfaction with telemedicine underappreciated with poorly constructed questionnaires. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pain-only complaint about cochlear implant device: A five-patient pediatric experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Norman Wendell; Fainberg, Jolie C; Ukatu, CeIsha Chinwe; Venable, Claudia Y; Segel, Phil

    2015-09-01

    To present the case histories and management of five pediatric patients who experienced pain at the receiver-stimulator site, but no other indication that the device was failing. Patients were from a sole-surgeon pediatric practice (600 + implant surgeries before June 2013; about even proportions of Advanced Bionics, Cochlear Corporation, and MED-EL devices). The University Institutional Review Board-approved review of sole-surgeon pediatric case series. The onset of pain ranged from 2 to 16 years post implantation. Pain, not amenable to conventional medical therapy, was present regardless of whether or not the external appliance was 'on', or even being worn on the head. Four of the five patients were bilaterally implanted, but pain was only at one receiver-stimulator package. Clinical management ultimately included revision surgery in all five cases, with immediate resolution of the pain in four. For those four, the replacement cochlear implant (CI) performed well; the other patient fears pain if her replacement device is used, but continues enjoying her contralateral implant. At analysis by the company, two of five explanted devices exhibited problems: loss of hermeticity; insulation failure. Though infrequently reported, pain-only complaint by a CI user is a challenging dilemma. Pain may be the sole clinical manifestation of cochlear implant device failure. We offer a flowchart for the care of CI patients with pain, encourage a worldwide registry of such cases, and offer ideas to try to understand better the problem.

  14. Awareness Enhancing and Monitoring Device plus Habit Reversal in the Treatment of Trichotillomania: An Open Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himle, Joseph A; Bybee, Deborah; O'Donnell, Lisa A; Weaver, Addie; Vlnka, Sarah; DeSena, Daniel T; Rimer, Jessica M

    2018-01-01

    Habit Reversal Therapy (HRT) is helpful for many persons suffering from trichotillomania. However successful habit reversal therapy requires awareness of hair pulling behaviors. Available methods to monitor hair pulling behaviors are less than ideal, particularly when sufferers are unaware of their pulling-related behaviors. This open feasibility trial included 20 persons with trichotillomania who were treated with nine weeks of HRT with experienced clinicians following a well-established HRT protocol. HRT was augmented with an electronic Awareness Enhancing and Monitoring Device (AEMD) designed to alert users of hand to head contact and to monitor the frequency of pulling-related behaviors. The AEMD included a neck unit and two wrist units, each equipped with vibrating alert functions. The results of the open trial revealed significant improvements in trichotillomania symptoms as measured by clinician and self-report rating scales. Most participants met study criteria for HRT completion and treatment effects were large. Participants reported that the AEMD, when operational, was effective in alerting participants to TTM-related behaviors. The monitoring function of the AEMD did not operate as designed. Subjective feedback focused on the AEMD concept was positive but AEMD reliability problems and complaints about the wearability the units were common. Recommendations for AEMD design modifications were included.

  15. Leadless Cardiac Pacemaker Implantation After Lead Extraction in Patients With Severe Device Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Kammler, Juergen; Lambert, Thomas; Lichtenauer, Michael; Brandstaetter, Walter; Gabriel, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    Conventional pacemaker therapy is limited by short- and long-term complications, most notably device infection. Transcatheter pacing systems (TPS) may be beneficial in this kind of patients as they eliminate the need for a device pocket and leads and thus may reduce the risk of re-infection. We assessed a novel procedure in 6 patients with severe device infection who were pacemaker dependent. After lead extraction a single chamber TPS was implanted into the right ventricle. Of the 6 patients who underwent lead extraction due to severe device infection at our institution, 3 were diagnosed with a pocket infection only, whereas the other 3 showed symptoms of both pocket and lead infection. Successful lead extraction and TPS implantation was accomplished in all patients. Four patients were bridged with a temporary pacemaker between 2 hours and 2 days after lead extraction, whereas 2 patients had the TPS implanted during the same procedure just before traditional pacemaker system removal. All patients stayed free of infection during the follow-up period of 12 weeks. An additional positron emission tomography scan was performed in each patient and indicated no signs of an infection around the TPS. Transcather pacemaker implantation was safe and feasible in 6 patients and did not result in re-infection even if implanted before removal of the infected pacemaker system within the same procedure. Therefore, implantation of a TPS may be an option for patients with severe device infection, especially in those with blocked venous access or who are pacemaker dependent. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Transantral distraction devices in correction of severe maxillary deformity in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokirov, Shokhruh; Wangerin, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Maxillary advancement by Le Fort I osteotomy in cleft patients has an average relapse of about 40-60 percent. With extraoral distraction devices it is possible to obtain an almost unlimited advancement of the upper jaw. Due to the social problems the retention period is normally reduced to some monthes. A relapse of 10-25 % can be seen in these cases. Le Fort I internal distraction osteogenesis offers an alternative to one-step orthognathic advancement, with advantages of gradual lengthening through scar and earlier treatment in growing patients. The objective of this study was to present our experience in the treatment of maxillary deficiency in cleft patients using transantral internal distraction devices. The distraction procedure was successfully accomplished in seventeen patients. For all the seventeen patients maxillary distraction device designed by Konrad Wangerin was used. The distraction distances were 8 to 24 mm. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up (12 and 24 months) lateral cephalogram measurements were compared including angular and linear changes. A good new bone was found that was formed in distraction pitch between lines of osteotomy. After distraction of median facial zone, occlusion and profile of soft tissues were considerably improved. All patients after postoperative time required final orthodontic treatment and their final occlusal relationships were satisfactory. The transantral distraction device is a new option for the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft patients.

  17. Ethical considerations in providing an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulboacă, Adriana E; Bolboacă, Sorana D; Bulboacă, Angelo C

    2017-04-01

    The health care system needs to face new and advanced medical technologies that can improve the patients' quality of life by replacing lost or decreased functions. In stroke patients, the disabilities that follow cerebral lesions may impair the mandatory daily activities of an independent life. These activities are dependent mostly on the patient's upper limb function so that they can carry out most of the common activities associated with a normal life. Therefore, an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients can contribute a real improvement of quality of their life. The ethical problems that need to be considered are linked to the correct adjustment of the upper limb skills in order to satisfy the patient's expectations, but within physiological limits. The debate regarding the medical devices dedicated to neurorehabilitation is focused on their ability to be beneficial to the patient's life, keeping away damages, injustice, and risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring of Postoperative Bone Healing Using Smart Trauma-Fixation Device With Integrated Self-Powered Piezo-Floating-Gate Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchani, Wassim; Aono, Kenji; Lajnef, Nizar; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2016-07-01

    Achieving better surgical outcomes in cases of traumatic bone fractures requires postoperative monitoring of changes in the growth and mechanical properties of the tissue and bones during the healing process. While current in-vivo imaging techniques can provide a snapshot of the extent of bone growth, it is unable to provide a history of the healing process, which is important if any corrective surgery is required. Monitoring the time evolution of in-vivo mechanical loads using existing technology is a challenge due to the need for continuous power while maintaining patient mobility and comfort. This paper investigates the feasibility of self-powered monitoring of the bone-healing process using our previously reported piezo-floating-gate (PFG) sensors. The sensors are directly integrated with a fixation device and operate by harvesting energy from microscale strain variations in the fixation structure. We show that the sensors can record and store the statistics of the strain evolution during the healing process for offline retrieval and analysis. Additionally, we present measurement results using a biomechanical phantom comprising of a femur fracture fixation plate; bone healing is emulated by inserting different materials, with gradually increasing elastic moduli, inside a fracture gap. The PFG sensor can effectively sense, compute, and record continuously evolving statistics of mechanical loading over a typical healing period of a bone, and the statistics could be used to differentiate between different bone-healing conditions. The proposed sensor presents a reliable objective technique to assess bone-healing progress and help decide on the removal time of the fixation device.

  19. Construction of a remote controlled monitoring system with GPIB devices and EPICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Noboru.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been used for the accelerator control system in recent years. EPICS has rich set of tools to create application with Graphical User Interface (GUI). It reduces the load of complex programming for GUI and shortens the application development period. This paper will describe the remote temperature monitoring system using EPICS. (author)

  20. The evaluation for usefulness of the custom made immobilization device for the anteroperitoneal resection patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Oh Nam; Lee, Woo Seok; Hong, Tae Kyun; Jo, Young Pih; Yun, Hwa Ryong; Kim, Jung Man

    2003-01-01

    Patient immobilization is essential factor for successful radiation therapy and major problem is reproducibility to maintain patient position during total radiation therapy period. Purpose of this study is evaluation for usefulness of the custom made immobilization device for the anteroperitoneal resection patients with rectal cancer. The object of this study were patients who underwent anteroperitoneal resection and undergo radiation therapy at present with rectal cancer. We made immobilization device for patient individually and analyzed its set up reproducibility, patient position deviation and errors. There was 5 mm-10 mm deviation in patient position without individual immobilization device, but we improved the deviation within few mm limitation with individual immobilization device. Custom made immobilization device was very helpful for anteroperitoneal resection patient with rectal cancer. We improved the patient position deviation within few mm limitation, shorten the set up time and we could give the comfort to patients.

  1. Focused review on transthoracic echocardiographic assessment of patients with continuous axial left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topilsky, Yan; Maltais, Simon; Oh, Jae K; Atchison, Fawn W; Perrault, Louis P; Carrier, Michel; Park, Soon J

    2011-02-08

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are systems for mechanical support for patients with end-stage heart failure. Preoperative, postoperative and comprehensive followup with transthoracic echocardiography has a major role in LVAD patient management. In this paper, we will present briefly the hemodynamics of axial-flow LVAD, the rationale, and available data for a complete and organized echocardiographic assessment in these patients including preoperative assessment, postoperative and long-term evaluation.

  2. MIMIC II: a massive temporal ICU patient database to support research in intelligent patient monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M.; Lieu, C.; Raber, G.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Development and evaluation of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) decision-support systems would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a large-scale ICU patient database. Following our previous efforts with the MIMIC (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care) Database, we have leveraged advances in networking and storage technologies to develop a far more massive temporal database, MIMIC II. MIMIC II is an ongoing effort: data is continuously and prospectively archived from all ICU patients in our hospital. MIMIC II now consists of over 800 ICU patient records including over 120 gigabytes of data and is growing. A customized archiving system was used to store continuously up to four waveforms and 30 different parameters from ICU patient monitors. An integrated user-friendly relational database was developed for browsing of patients' clinical information (lab results, fluid balance, medications, nurses' progress notes). Based upon its unprecedented size and scope, MIMIC II will prove to be an important resource for intelligent patient monitoring research, and will support efforts in medical data mining and knowledge-discovery.

  3. A communication and information technology infrastructure for real time monitoring and management of type 1 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skevofilakas, Marios; Mougiakakou, Stavroula G; Zarkogianni, Konstantia; Aslanoglou, Erika; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris A; Vazeou, Andriani; Bartsocas, Christos S; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2007-01-01

    This paper is focused on the integration of state-of-the-art technologies in the fields of telecommunications, simulation algorithms, and data mining in order to develop a Type 1 diabetes patient's semi to fully-automated monitoring and management system. The main components of the system are a glucose measurement device, an insulin delivery system (insulin injection or insulin pumps), a mobile phone for the GPRS network, and a PDA or laptop for the Internet. In the medical environment, appropriate infrastructure for storage, analysis and visualizing of patients' data has been implemented to facilitate treatment design by health care experts.

  4. General and acute care surgical procedures in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; Bittle, Gregory J; Allen, Jeremiah G; Weiss, Eric S; Alejo, Jennifer; Baumgartner, William A; Shah, Ashish S; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Efron, David T; Conte, John V

    2014-04-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become common as a bridge to heart transplant as well as destination therapy. Acute care surgical (ACS) problems in this population are prevalent but remain ill-defined. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with ACS interventions in LVAD patients. A total of 173 patients who received HeartMate(®) XVE or HeartMate(®) II (HMII) LVADs between December 2001 and March 2010 were studied. Patient demographics, presentation of ACS problem, operative intervention, co-morbidities, transplantation, complications, and survival were analyzed. A total of 47 (27 %) patients underwent 67 ACS procedures at a median of 38 days after device implant (interquartile range 15-110), with a peri-operative mortality rate of 5 % (N = 3). Demographics, device type, and acuity were comparable between the ACS and non-ACS groups. A total of 21 ACS procedures were performed emergently, eight were urgent, and 38 were elective. Of 29 urgent and emergent procedures, 28 were for abdominal pathology. In eight patients, the cause of the ACS problem was related to LVADs or anticoagulation. Cumulative survival estimates revealed no survival differences if patients underwent ACS procedures (p = 0.17). Among HMII patients, transplantation rates were unaffected by an ACS intervention (p = 0.2). ACS problems occur frequently in LVAD patients and are not associated with adverse outcomes in HMII patients. The acute care surgeon is an integral member of a comprehensive approach to effective LVAD management.

  5. Hearing devices for children with unilateral hearing loss: Patient- and parent-reported perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Patricia L; Jones-Goodrich, Rose; Wisneski, Meghan; Edwards, Todd C; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2016-11-01

    Management of children with unilateral hearing loss is not standardized. The primary goal of this study was to elicit patient- and parent-reported perspectives regarding usage of hearing devices in pediatric UHL and to suggest a basic algorithmic approach to management. Our tertiary care center recruited families of youth ages 5-19 years with unilateral hearing loss from January 2014 through October 2015. Parents of all youths completed a 36-item survey, and some youth ages 11-19 years participated in hour-long interviews. We assessed patterns of hearing device usage among participants, and performed qualitative data analysis to understand factors considered by youths when deciding whether or not to use a hearing device. Survey information was collected for 50 patients. Distribution of hearing loss severity in affected ear was mild 14%, moderate 26%, severe 22%, and profound 38%. The majority of children had sensorineural hearing loss (57%), followed by mixed (32%), and then conductive (11%). 34 children (68%) had tried a hearing device; 20 continued to use the device. Retention rates were similar among children with different degrees of hearing loss: mild 66%, moderate 50%, severe 60%, profound 64%. Sixteen children tried a wireless contralateral routing of signal (CROS) device, and 15 tried a behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid. Retention rates for CROS and BTE devices were 69% and 47%, respectively. The most common reason for cessation of use was discomfort, followed by lack of benefit. A majority of children with unilateral hearing loss who tried a hearing device continued to use it, and retention rates were similar across all degrees of hearing loss. These findings suggest that personal hearing devices should be included in management protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of the Omron M6 (HEM-7001-E) upper arm blood pressure measuring device according to the International Protocol in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunkan, Sekip; Iliman, Nevzat; Altunkan, Erkan

    2008-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of automated self-measurement monitors, there is limited published evidence on their accuracy and reliability on different patient groups. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the Omron M6 (HEM-7001-E) upper-arm blood pressure (BP) device against mercury sphygmomanometer on elderly patients according to the criteria of the International Protocol. Thirty-three patients above 65 years of age, who were classified based on the BP categories of the International Protocol, were recruited for the study. BP measurements at the upper arm with the Omron M6 were compared with the results obtained by two trained observers using a mercury sphygmomanometer. Nine sequential BP measurements were taken. During the validation study, 99 measurements were obtained from 33 patients for comparison. The first phase was carried out on 15 patients and if the device passed this phase, 18 more patients were selected. Mean discrepancies and standard deviations of the device sphygmomanometer were 1.4+/-5.3 mmHg for systolic BP (SBP) and -1.4+/-4.5 mmHg for diastolic BP (DBP) in the study group. The device passed phase 1 in 15 patients. In phase 2.1, from the total 99 comparisons, 76, 92, and 97 for SBP and 77, 94, and 99 for DBP were less than 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively. The Omron M6 passed phases 2.1 and 2.2 in the elderly group of patients. The Omron M6 (HEM-7001-E) upper-arm BP monitor passed according to the International Protocol criteria and can be recommended for use in elderly patients.

  7. Prospective randomized evaluation of the watchman left atrial appendage closure device in patients with atrial fibrillation versus long-term warfarin therapy: The PREVAIL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgaid, Djouhar Roufeida; Khan, Zara; Zaidi, Mariam; Hobbs, Adrian

    2016-09-15

    Assessing the safety and effectiveness of left atrial appendage (LAA) (pouch found in the upper chambers of the heart) occlusion, using the Watchman device compared to long term warfarin therapy (drug that reduces clot formation), in preventing the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (most common type of irregular heart beat). 90% of strokes in atrial fibrillation arise from clots forming in this pouch. By mechanically blocking it using the device less clots are suggested to be formed. This is an alternative to taking warfarin especially in patients who cannot take it. 50 sites in the United States enrolled 407 participants. After being randomly allocated, the device group had 269 participants and warfarin group (comparator)had 138 participants. Patients with atrial fibrillation and at high risk of stroke were randomly allocated a group after they were deemed eligible. Patients in the device group had to take warfarin and aspirin for 45days till the complete closure of the LAA. The oral anticoagulant was followed by dual antiplatelet therapy until 6months and then ASA. Patients in the warfarin group have to take it for life and were continually monitored. The study ran for 26months. The trial assessed the rate of adverse events using three endpoints: The PREVAIL trial was not designed to show superiority, but non-inferiority. It met the safety endpoint and one efficacy endpoint for the watchman device compared to long term warfarin for overall efficacy of the device. The results established that LAA occlusion is not worse than warfarin intake for the prevention of stroke more than 1week after randomization. Compared to previous trials, the safety of the device has also improved. LAA occlusion is a reasonable alternative to chronic warfarin therapy in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adult patient decision-making regarding implantation of complex cardiac devices: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki-Ketchell, Alison; Marshall, Paul; Maclean, Joan

    2017-10-01

    Complex cardiac rhythm management device (CRMD) therapy provides an important treatment option for people at risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite the survival benefit, device implantation is associated with significant physical and psychosocial concerns presenting considerable challenges for the decision-making process surrounding CRMD implantation for patients and physicians. The purpose of this scoping review was to explore what is known about how adult (>16 years) patients make decisions regarding implantation of CRMD therapy. Published, peer reviewed, English language studies from 2000 to 2016 were identified in a search across eight healthcare databases. Eligible studies were concerned with patient decision-making for first time