WorldWideScience

Sample records for patient emphasizing imaging

  1. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, Diane S.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  2. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, Diane S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisvieux, A.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and normal subjects were investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. To evaluate the NMR scanner possibilities, the results were compared with the echocardiographic investigation of the same patients. The capabilities of NMR imaging to provide information about intracardiac anatomy are emphasized. This study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of the techniques used to obtain NMR images and a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging for cardiac diagnosis [fr

  4. Radiation levels and image quality in patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio; Carmo Santana, Priscila do; Sousa Lacerda, Marco Aurélio de; Silva, Teógenes Augusto da

    2017-01-01

    Patient dose monitoring for different radiographic procedures has been used as a parameter to evaluate the performance of radiology services; skin entrance absorbed dose values for each type of examination were internationally established and recommended aiming patient protection. In this work, a methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services: one with a conventional film and two with digital computerized radiography processing techniques. The x-ray beam parameters were selected and “doses” (specifically the entrance surface and incident air kerma) were evaluated based on images approved in European criteria during postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) incidences. Data were collected from 200 patients related to 200 PA and 100 LAT incidences. Results showed that doses distributions in the three diagnostic services were very different; the best relation between dose and image quality was found in the institution with the chemical film processing. This work contributed for disseminating the radiation protection culture by emphasizing the need of a continuous dose reduction without losing the quality of the diagnostic image. - Highlights: • A methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services. • The doses in patients were evaluated when the images were adequate. • Data were collected from 200 patients. • Is possible doses optimization with digital system without an image quality reduction. • The best dose and image quality was found in chemical film processing.

  5. Radiation levels and image quality in patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio Campos; do Carmo Santana, Priscila; de Sousa Lacerda, Marco Aurélio; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2017-11-01

    Patient dose monitoring for different radiographic procedures has been used as a parameter to evaluate the performance of radiology services; skin entrance absorbed dose values for each type of examination were internationally established and recommended aiming patient protection. In this work, a methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services: one with a conventional film and two with digital computerized radiography processing techniques. The x-ray beam parameters were selected and "doses" (specifically the entrance surface and incident air kerma) were evaluated based on images approved in European criteria during postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) incidences. Data were collected from 200 patients related to 200 PA and 100 LAT incidences. Results showed that doses distributions in the three diagnostic services were very different; the best relation between dose and image quality was found in the institution with the chemical film processing. This work contributed for disseminating the radiation protection culture by emphasizing the need of a continuous dose reduction without losing the quality of the diagnostic image.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

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    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2000-03-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando

    2000-01-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APPENZELLER SIMONE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis.METHOD: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. RESULTS: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weighted images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behçet´s disease or systemic lupus erythematosus. After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSION: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients.

  9. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef; Hernandez Filho, Guinel; Dirim, Berna; Wangwinyuvirat, Mani; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald; Haghigi, Parvitz

    2012-01-01

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  10. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hernandez Filho, Guinel [Santa Casa de Sao Paulo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dirim, Berna [Izmir Atatuerk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Karsiyaka, izmir (Turkey); Wangwinyuvirat, Mani [Rajavithi Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States); Haghigi, Parvitz [University of California, San Diego, Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  11. Bone tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeod, R.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of this chapter is on the contribution of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the care of patients with bone neoplasms. These modalities are emphasized because of their relative newness and not because they are considered more significant than the other more established examinations. Routine radiographs remain the most informative and essential imaging procedures for the diagnosis of bone tumors

  12. Markerless registration for image guided surgery. Preoperative image, intraoperative video image, and patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yuko

    1998-01-01

    Real-time and volumetric acquisition of X-ray CT, MR, and SPECT is the latest trend of the medical imaging devices. A clinical challenge is to use these multi-modality volumetric information complementary on patient in the entire diagnostic and surgical processes. The intraoperative image and patient integration intents to establish a common reference frame by image in diagnostic and surgical processes. This provides a quantitative measure during surgery, for which we have been relied mostly on doctors' skills and experiences. The intraoperative image and patient integration involves various technologies, however, we think one of the most important elements is the development of markerless registration, which should be efficient and applicable to the preoperative multi-modality data sets, intraoperative image, and patient. We developed a registration system which integrates preoperative multi-modality images, intraoperative video image, and patient. It consists of a real-time registration of video camera for intraoperative use, a markerless surface sampling matching of patient and image, our previous works of markerless multi-modality image registration of X-ray CT, MR, and SPECT, and an image synthesis on video image. We think these techniques can be used in many applications which involve video camera like devices such as video camera, microscope, and image Intensifier. (author)

  13. The spectrum of Castleman's disease: Mimics, radiologic pathologic correlation and role of imaging in patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madan, Rachna; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice; Jacobson, Francine; Hunsaker, Andetta

    2012-01-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare benign lymphoid disorder with variable clinical course. The two principal histologic subtypes of CD are hyaline-vascular and plasma cell variants and the major clinicoradiological entities are unicentric and multicentric CD. Management of CD is tailored to clinicoradiologic subtype. In this review, we describe the CT, MR and PET/CT findings in Castleman's disease which can help suggest a diagnosis of CD as well as emphasize role of imaging in management of patients with CD.

  14. MR imaging of degenerative lumbar disc disease emphasizing on signal intensity changes in vertebral body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Keiko; Ida, Masahiro; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shimpei

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 400 patients with degenerative disc disease. Signal changes and their sites in the vertebral body were classified and referred to narrowing of the intervertebral disc space. MR findings were compared with those of plain roentgenograms of the lumbar spine. Signal changes in the vertebral body were noted in 83 cases (102 vertebral bodies). Low-intensity abnormality on both T1- and T2-weighted images (WI) was the most common finding, and was most frequently seen at the end plate and/or the angle. These changes were correlated with narrowing of the disc space and osteosclerosis on the plain roentgenogram of the lumbar spine. Signal changes occasionally occurred in the inner region of the vertebral body, and these lesions tended to show a high-intensity abnormality on T1-WI. We conclude that signal changes in degenerative disc disease are not specific, but are sometimes difficult to distinguish from the signal changes in other conditions such as spinal tumor or bone marrow disorder. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate patients after a palatoplasty to evaluate the nasopharyngeal results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroto [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Kadomatsu, Koichi; Hori, Shigeru; Miyata, Masayuki; Kozono, Kikuo; Onizuka, Takuya

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cleft palate patients was undertaken after a palatoplasty to evaluate the postoperative status of the nasopharyngeal soft tissue, the soft palate, and a pharyngeal flap. As MRI revealed no abnormal findings in the nasopharyngeal muscle of all 16 patients, we concluded that the palatoplasty had normalized the positioning and volume of the levator veli muscle and the muscle sling of the palate. Further, although most of the pharyngeal flaps had an adequate inner muscle volume, some flaps had shrunk and 1 flap was found to have more mucous tissue than muscle. These pharyngeal flap deficits may have been due to rough flap handling during the surgical intervention. Therefore, gentle manipulation of such flaps during the course of surgery is emphasized. (author).

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate patients after a palatoplasty to evaluate the nasopharyngeal results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroto; Kadomatsu, Koichi; Hori, Shigeru; Miyata, Masayuki; Kozono, Kikuo; Onizuka, Takuya.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 cleft palate patients was undertaken after a palatoplasty to evaluate the postoperative status of the nasopharyngeal soft tissue, the soft palate, and a pharyngeal flap. As MRI revealed no abnormal findings in the nasopharyngeal muscle of all 16 patients, we concluded that the palatoplasty had normalized the positioning and volume of the levator veli muscle and the muscle sling of the palate. Further, although most of the pharyngeal flaps had an adequate inner muscle volume, some flaps had shrunk and 1 flap was found to have more mucous tissue than muscle. These pharyngeal flap deficits may have been due to rough flap handling during the surgical intervention. Therefore, gentle manipulation of such flaps during the course of surgery is emphasized. (author)

  17. MR imaging of normal bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajgis, M.; Paprzycki, W.

    1994-01-01

    Principles of MR bone marrow imaging on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations of bone marrow in different anatomic sites in 200 patients have been discussed. Significance of different physiologic factors and processes such as age, steatosis, osteoporosis, conversion and reconversion, which influence on MR bone marrow images, have been emphasized. T1-weighted images obtained with spin-echo sequences give the most of information about bone marrow structure in MR. Thorough knowledge of bone marrow physiology and clinical status of the patient is indispensable in correct interpretation of hypointensive lesions on T1-weighted images. When presence of disseminated bone marrow disease is suspected, authors propose routine imaging of lumbar vertebral column, pelvis and proximal parts of femoral bones. (author)

  18. Initial patient imaging with an optimised radiotherapy beam for portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flampouri, Stella; McNair, Helen A.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Evans, Philip M.; Partridge, Mike; Verhaegen, Frank; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the feasibility and the advantages of a portal-imaging mode on a medical accelerator, consisting of a thin low-Z bremsstrahlung target and a thin Gd 2 O 2 S/film detector, for patient imaging. Patients and methods: The international code of practice for high-energy photon dosimetry was used to calibrate dosimetry instruments for the imaging beam produced by 4.75 MeV electrons hitting a 6 mm thick aluminium target. Images of the head and neck of a humanoid phantom were taken with a mammography film system and the dose in the phantom was measured with TLDs calibrated for this beam. The first head and neck patient images are compared with conventional images (taken with the treatment beam on a film radiotherapy verification detector). Visibility of structures for six patients was evaluated. Results: Images of the head and neck of a humanoid phantom, taken with both imaging systems showed that the contrast increased dramatically for the new system while the dose required to form an image was less than 10 -2 Gy. The patient images taken with the new and the conventional systems showed that air-tissue interfaces were better defined in the new system image. Anatomical structures, visible on both films, are clearer with the new system. Additionally, bony structures, such as vertebrae, were clearly visible only with the new system. The system under evaluation was significantly better for all features in lateral images and most features in anterior images. Conclusions: This pilot study of the new portal imaging system showed the image quality is significantly improved

  19. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography.

  20. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography

  1. Incompatible Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sassene, Michel J.; Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    is, however, based on a taken-for-granted image of asthmatics as, per se, striving to be symptom-free. This image is incompatible with interviewed asthmatics' day-to-day performances of their asthma, and renders invisible (a) that their asthma performances emphasize an economy of good passages...... and of feeling capable, (b) that they achieve the objective of feeling capable in quite different ways, and (c) that feeling capable does not per se equal being symptom-free all the time. To attain long-term use of self-management systems and other patient-centred e-health systems, such systems must acknowledge...

  2. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksomaa, Marko; Kapanen, Mika; Tulijoki, Tapio; Peltola, Seppo; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ≤ 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ≤ 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients

  3. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  4. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang [Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou (China) and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou 510510 (China); Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  5. Imaging findings of sacral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The various pathologic conditions detected at CT and MRI and subsumed by the term 'sacral tumor' include primary bone tumors, sacral canal tumors and metastases. Among these, metastases are much more common than primary bone tumors, of which chordoma is the most common. Although the imaging findings of sacral tumors are nonspecific, a patient's age and sex, and specific findings such as calcification or fluid-fluid levels, can help radiologists in their differential diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of primary sacral tumors, emphasizing the MRI findings

  6. Infratentorial oligodendrogliomas: Imaging findings in six patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik (Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: femidas@naver.com; Suh, Yeon-Lim (Dept. of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Oligodendrogliomas are primarily supratentorial tumors. However, infrequently, they can also arise from infratentorial structures. There are only limited numbers of radiological articles on the specific imaging findings of this entity. Purpose: To investigate the imaging findings of infratentorial oligodendrogliomas. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical records of six patients with pathologically proven infratentorial oligodendrogliomas between December 1994 and April 2008. Tumor location, circumscription, signal intensity (SI), enhancement pattern, the presence of restricted diffusion, and the change of the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) on MRI were evaluated. Results: In total, six patients (three male, three female; mean age 65 years, range 51-75 years) were included. The pathology revealed anaplastic oligodendrogliomas in all six patients. The location was cerebellum in four patients, medulla in one patient, and fourth ventricle and tegmentum in one patient. Three of them were of the infiltrative type, and the other three of the mass-forming type. The solid component of the tumors showed high SI (n=6) on FLAIR and T2-weighted images, and low (n=5) or iso (n=1) SI on T1-weighted images. All infiltrative lesions showed multifocal patchy enhancement, and mass-forming lesions showed heterogeneous enhancement (n=2) and diffuse homogeneous enhancement (n=1). Three patients had restricted diffusion, and one had leptomeningeal seeding. There was markedly increased rCBV on perfusion-weighted image (PWI) in one patient. Calcification or hemorrhage was not found. Tumor progression after operation, radiation therapy, gamma-knife surgery, or chemotherapy developed in five patients. Conclusion: Although infratentorial oligodendrogliomas did not show characteristic imaging findings, there was a tendency toward multifocal heterogeneous enhancement and absent or mild mass effect of

  7. Diagnostic imaging in intensive care patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afione, Cristina; Binda, Maria del C.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of imaging diagnostic methods in the location of infection causes of unknown origin in the critical care patient. Material and methods: A comprehensive medical literature search has been done. Recommendations for the diagnostic imaging of septic focus in intensive care patients are presented for each case, with analysis based on evidence. The degree of evidence utilized has been that of Oxford Center for Evidence-based Medicine. Results: Nosocomial infection is the most frequent complication in the intensive care unit (25 to 33%) with high sepsis incidence rate. In order to locate the infection focus, imaging methods play an important role, as a diagnostic tool and to guide therapeutic procedures. The most frequent causes of infection are: ventilation associated pneumonia, sinusitis, intra-abdominal infections and an acute acalculous cholecystitis. This paper analyses the diagnostic imaging of hospital infection, with the evaluation of choice methods for each one and proposes an algorithm to assess the septic patient. Conclusion: There are evidences, with different degrees of recommendation, for the use of diagnostic imaging methods for infectious focuses in critical care patients. The studies have been selected based on their diagnostic precision, on the capacity of the medical team and on the availability of resources, considering the risk-benefit balance for the best safety of the patient. (author)

  8. MRI, CT and TRUS imaging of seminal vesicle metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, P.; Blomqvist, L.; Norming, U.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of a testicular germ-cell metastasis in the seminal vesicle. Diagnostic imaging with transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI was performed. This case emphasizes the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with pathology in the pelvic region. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  10. SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. Long-term prognostic value in diabetic patients with and without coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehli, M.; Monbaron, D.; Gaillard, R.C.; Ruiz, J.; Prior, J.O.; Bischof Delaloye, A.; Calcagni, M.L.; Fivaz-Arbane, M.; Stauffer, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the long-term prognostic value of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for the occurrence of cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. Patients, methods: SPECT MPI of 210 consecutive Caucasian diabetic patients were analysed using Kaplan-Meier event-free survival curve and independent predictors were determined by Cox multivariate analyses. Results: Follow-up was complete in 200 (95%) patients with a median period of 3.0 years (0.8-5.0). The population was composed of 114 (57%) men, age 65 ± 10 years, 181 (90.5%) type 2 diabetes mellitus, 50 (25%) with a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 98 (49%) presenting chest pain prior to MPI. The prevalence of abnormal MPI was 58%. Patients with a normal MPI had neither cardiac death, nor myocardial infarction, independently of a history of coronary artery disease or chest pain. Among the independent predictors of cardiac death and myocardial infarction, the strongest was abnormal MPI (p 5-fold increase in cardiovascular events. This emphasizes the value of SPECT MPI in predicting and risk-stratifying cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. (orig.)

  11. Thallium-201 stress imaging in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, D.S.; Francis, C.K.; Black, H.R.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    To assess the potential effect of hypertension on the results of thallium-201 stress imaging in patients with chest pain, 272 thallium-201 stress tests performed in 133 hypertensive patients and 139 normotensive patients over a 1-year period were reviewed. Normotensive and hypertensive patients were similar in age, gender distribution, prevalence of cardiac risk factors (tobacco smoking, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus), medications, and clinical symptoms of coronary disease. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy were present in 16 hypertensive patients. Stepwise probability analysis was used to determine the likelihood of coronary artery disease for each patient. In patients with mid to high likelihood of coronary disease (greater than 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 54 of 60 (90%) hypertensive patients compared with 51 of 64 (80%) normotensive patients. However, in 73 patients with a low likelihood of coronary disease (less than or equal to 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 21 patients (29%) of the hypertensive group compared with only 5 of 75 (7%) of the normotensive patients (p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that in patients with a mid to high likelihood of coronary artery disease, coexistent hypertension does not affect the results of thallium-201 exercise stress testing. However, in patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, abnormal thallium-201 stress images are obtained more frequently in hypertensive patients than in normotensive patients

  12. Patient doses in digital cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Ogden, K.M.; Roskopf, M.L.; Phadke, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this pilot study, we obtained estimates of entrance skin doses and the corresponding effective doses to patients undergoing digital cardiac imaging procedures on a GE Advantx LC/LP Plus system. Data were obtained for six patients undergoing diagnostic examinations and six patients who had interventional procedures. For each patient examination, radiographic techniques for fluoroscopic and digital cine imaging were recorded, together with the irradiation geometry. The projection with the highest exposure resulted in an average skin dose of 0.64 ± 0.41 Gy (maximum of 1.6 Gy). The average patient skin doses taking into account overlapping projections was 1.1 ± 0.8 Gy (maximum of 3.0 Gy). The exposure area product (EAP) incident on the patient was converted into the energy imparted to the patient and the corresponding effective dose. The average patient effective dose was 28 ± 14 mSv (maximum 62 mSv), with the resultant average fatal cancer risk estimated to be of the order of 8x10 -3 . Average doses for interventional procedures in cardiac imaging are higher than those associated with diagnostic examinations by approximately 50%. (author)

  13. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated

  14. TH-CD-207A-08: Simulated Real-Time Image Guidance for Lung SBRT Patients Using Scatter Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redler, G; Cifter, G; Templeton, A; Lee, C; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Zhen, H; Turian, J; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive Monte Carlo-based model for the acquisition of scatter images of patient anatomy in real-time, during lung SBRT treatment. Methods: During SBRT treatment, images of patient anatomy can be acquired from scattered radiation. To rigorously examine the utility of scatter images for image guidance, a model is developed using MCNP code to simulate scatter images of phantoms and lung cancer patients. The model is validated by comparing experimental and simulated images of phantoms of different complexity. The differentiation between tissue types is investigated by imaging objects of known compositions (water, lung, and bone equivalent). A lung tumor phantom, simulating materials and geometry encountered during lung SBRT treatments, is used to investigate image noise properties for various quantities of delivered radiation (monitor units(MU)). Patient scatter images are simulated using the validated simulation model. 4DCT patient data is converted to an MCNP input geometry accounting for different tissue composition and densities. Lung tumor phantom images acquired with decreasing imaging time (decreasing MU) are used to model the expected noise amplitude in patient scatter images, producing realistic simulated patient scatter images with varying temporal resolution. Results: Image intensity in simulated and experimental scatter images of tissue equivalent objects (water, lung, bone) match within the uncertainty (∼3%). Lung tumor phantom images agree as well. Specifically, tumor-to-lung contrast matches within the uncertainty. The addition of random noise approximating quantum noise in experimental images to simulated patient images shows that scatter images of lung tumors can provide images in as fast as 0.5 seconds with CNR∼2.7. Conclusions: A scatter imaging simulation model is developed and validated using experimental phantom scatter images. Following validation, lung cancer patient scatter images are simulated. These simulated

  15. Imaging spectrum in sclerotic myelomas: an experience of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Dhar, A.

    2000-01-01

    The classic radiographic presentation of multiple myeloma is lytic skeletal lesions. Primary sclerotic manifestations are rare and occur only in 3 % of cases. The imaging spectrum in three cases of multiple myeloma with primary osteosclerosis is described. The first patient had spiculated sclerosis of the orbit, which is an uncommon site for myeloma. The second patient with POEMS syndrome had multiple, scattered, skeletal lesions with sclerotic margins. The third patient presented with a chest wall mass and had an expansile thick spiculated sclerosis in the rib. The wide imaging spectrum possible in sclerotic myelomas and their relevant differential diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with medial epicondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Smet, Arthur A. De [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison (United States)

    2005-04-01

    To compare the MR imaging findings of 13 patients with clinically diagnosed medial epicondylitis with the MR imaging findings of 26 patients of similar age with no clinical evidence of medial epicondylitis. The study group consisted of 13 patients with clinically diagnosed medial epicondylitis. The control group consisted of 26 patients of similar age with no clinical evidence of medial epicondylitis. The medical records and MR imaging findings of these patients were retrospectively reviewed by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists. Eleven of the 13 patients in the study group had thickening and increased signal intensity of the common flexor tendon on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. The remaining two patients in the study group had soft tissue edema around a normal-appearing common flexor tendon. Twenty-one of the 26 patients in the control group had a normal-appearing common flexor tendon on MR imaging. Three patients in the control group had a thickened common flexor tendon which was of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images but of uniform low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Two patients in the control group had a thickened common flexor tendon which was of intermediate signal intensity on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. None of the patients in the control group had soft tissue edema around the common flexor tendon. MR imaging findings of patients with clinically diagnosed medial epicondylitis included thickening and increased T1 and T2 signal intensity of the common flexor tendon and soft tissue edema around the common flexor tendon. The presence of intermediate to high T2 signal intensity or high T2 signal intensity within the common flexor tendon and the presence of paratendinous soft tissue edema were the most specific findings of medial epicondylitis on MR imaging. (orig.)

  17. Sacrococcygeal chordoma: MR imaging in 30 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook; Chung, Myung Hee [Catholic University of Korea, Holy Family Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pucheon (Korea); Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taejun (Korea); Park, Jin Gyoon [Chunnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kwangju (Korea); Suh, Jin Suk [Yonsei University, Severans Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Cho, Gil Ho [Yeungnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taegu (Korea); Lee, Sung Moon [Kaemyung University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taeku (Korea); Resnick, Donald [VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate MR imaging of sacrococcygeal chordoma. Thirty patients (age range 22-80 years) underwent MR imaging for the diagnosis and preoperative evaluation of sacrococcygeal chordomas. Eight patients had follow-up MR examination after treatment. The MR images were performed with T1- and T2-weighted imaging, and gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced imaging. The MR images were analyzed for the signal intensity, enhancing pattern, tumor size, growth pattern of the soft tissue component, and tumor extension. T1-weighted images showed low signal masses with foci of high signal intensity in 73% of cases. Tumors enhanced in a variety of patterns after the administration of Gd. Soft tissue masses extending anteriorly were seen in all cases with posterior extension in 77% of cases. The posterior masses involved the surrounding muscles and extended toward the greater sciatic notch, appearing with pseudopodia (87%). Sacroiliac joints were involved in 23% of cases. Four lesions showed intraspinal extension and involvement of the posterior spinal muscles above the level of bony involvement. In 6 patients recurrent tumors were found at or around the surgical margin of the tumor 6 months to 5 years after resection of the sacral tumor. In two of the patients, nodular metastases to the pelvic bones and femur were found 1-4 years after initial examination. In conclusion, MR imaging is useful in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of sacrococcygeal chordoma. Characteristic findings included sacral mass with heterogeneously high signal intensity with crisscrossing septa on long-repetition-time imaging, well-encapsulated pseudopodia-like or lobulated appearance, and gluteal muscle infiltration. Follow-up MR imaging is helpful to assess for recurrent or metastatic lesions of chordomas. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundley, Kshama; Chowdhury, D.; Lele, V.R.; Lele, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Twelve human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients were studied by SPECT cerebral perfusion imaging 1 hour post injection of 15 mCi of 99m Tc-ECD under ideal conditions with a triple head gamma camera (Prism 3000 X P LEUHR), fanbeam collimators followed by Folstein Mini Mental Status Examination (FMMSE) and AIDS dementia complex (ADC) staging on the same day. All 12 patients were male, in the age range of 23-45 y (mean 31 y). The infected status was diagnosed by ELISA (10 patients) or Western blot (5 patients). The interval between diagnosis and imaging ranged from 1 month - 35 months (mean 15.3 months). Two patients were alcoholic and 2 were smokers. None of them had CNS disorder clinically. ADC staging and FMMSE could be performed in 4 patients. Two patients were normal (stage 0) and 2 were subclinical (stage 0.5) on ADC staging. FMMSE revealed normal or near normal status (mean score 35; maximum score 36). Cerebral perfusion images were interpreted simultaneously by 3 observers blind towards history and examination using semi-quantitative and quantitative methods by consensus. It revealed multiple areas of hypoperfusion, viz. temporal (11 patients (91 %), parietal 10 patients (83%), frontal 9 patients (75%, pre and post central gyrus 7 patients (58%), occipital 6 patients (50%) cingulate gyrus and cerebellum 5 patients (41%) and thalamic in 2 patients (16%). Hyper perfusion in caudate nuclei was noted in 10 patients (83%). The study reveals presence of multiple perfusion abnormalities on cerebral perfusion imaging in HIV positive patients who have normal/near normal mental status suggesting precedence of perfusion abnormality over clinically apparent mental deficit

  19. MR imaging of normal bone marrow; Obraz MR prawidlowego szpiku kostnego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stajgis, M.; Paprzycki, W. [Osrodek Diagnostyki Obrazowej IR, Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Principles of MR bone marrow imaging on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations of bone marrow in different anatomic sites in 200 patients have been discussed. Significance of different physiologic factors and processes such as age, steatosis, osteoporosis, conversion and reconversion, which influence on MR bone marrow images, have been emphasized. T1-weighted images obtained with spin-echo sequences give the most of information about bone marrow structure in MR. Thorough knowledge of bone marrow physiology and clinical status of the patient is indispensable in correct interpretation of hypointensive lesions on T1-weighted images. When presence of disseminated bone marrow disease is suspected, authors propose routine imaging of lumbar vertebral column, pelvis and proximal parts of femoral bones. (author) 7 refs, 7 figs

  20. Structured diagnostic imaging in patients with multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsenmaier, U.; Rieger, J.; Rock, C.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.; Kanz, K.G.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. Development of a concept for structured diagnostic imaging in patients with multiple trauma.Material and methods. Evaluation of data from a prospective trial with over 2400 documented patients with multiple trauma. All diagnostic and therapeutic steps, primary and secondary death and the 90 days lethality were documented.Structured diagnostic imaging of multiple injured patients requires the integration of an experienced radiologist in an interdisciplinary trauma team consisting of anesthesia, radiology and trauma surgery. Radiology itself deserves standardized concepts for equipment, personnel and logistics to perform diagnostic imaging for a 24-h-coverage with constant quality.Results. This paper describes criteria for initiation of a shock room or emergency room treatment, strategies for documentation and interdisciplinary algorithms for the early clinical care coordinating diagnostic imaging and therapeutic procedures following standardized guidelines. Diagnostic imaging consists of basic diagnosis, radiological ABC-rule, radiological follow-up and structured organ diagnosis using CT. Radiological trauma scoring allows improved quality control of diagnosis and therapy of multiple injured patients.Conclusion. Structured diagnostic imaging of multiple injured patients leads to a standardization of diagnosis and therapy and ensures constant process quality. (orig.) [de

  1. Exercise thallium imaging in patients with diabetes mellitus. Prognostic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsher, J.; Meissner, M.D.; Hakki, A.H.; Heo, J.; Kane-Marsch, S.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    We used exercise thallium 201 imaging in 123 patients with diabetes mellitus (77 men and 46 women, aged 56 +/- 8 years), 75% of whom had angina pectoris (typical or atypical). During exercise testing, 18 patients (15%) had angina pectoris, 28 (23%) had ischemic ST changes, and 69 (56%) had abnormal thallium images. During follow-up (up to 36 months), there were 12 cardiac events; four patients died of cardiac causes and eight had nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis identified two independent predictors of cardiac events: the event rate was significantly less in patients with normal images and exercise heart rate over 120 beats per minute than in patients with abnormal images and exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less (0% vs 22%). The patients with abnormal images or exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less had an intermediate event rate (11.5%). Furthermore, two of the 54 patients with normal images and ten of 69 patients with abnormal images had subsequent cardiac events. Thus, exercise thallium imaging is useful in risk stratification in patients with diabetes mellitus

  2. Abdominal imaging in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Yuan Chunwang; Jia Cuiyu; Zhao Xuan; Zhang Tong; Ma Daqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate abdominal imaging in AIDS. Methods: The imaging examinations (including US, CT and MR) of 6 patients with AIDS associated abdominal foci were analysed retrospectively. All the cases were performed US, and CT scan, of which 4 performed enhanced CT scan and 1 with MR. Results: Abdominal tuberculosis were found in 4 patients, including abdominal lymph nodes tuberculosis (3 cases) and pancreatic tuberculosis (1 case). The imaging of lymph nodes tuberculosis typically showed enlarged peripheral tim enhancement with central low-attenuation on contrast-enhanced CT. Pancreatic tuberculosis demonstrated low-attenuation area in pancreatic head and slightly peripheral enhancement. Disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 1 case: CT and MRI scan demonstrated tumour infiltrated along hepatic portal vein and bronchovascular bundles. Pelvic tumor was observed in 1 case: CT scan showed large mass with thick and irregular wall and central low attenuation liquefacient necrotic area in the pelvic cavity. Conclusion: The imaging findings of AIDS with abdominal foci is extraordinarily helpful to the diagnosis of such disease. Tissue biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. (authors)

  3. Body image and self-esteem in somatizing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoz, Ozen O; Doganavsargil, Ozge; Elbi, Hayriye

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine dissatisfaction with body appearance and bodily functions and to assess self-esteem in somatizing patients. Body image and self-esteem were investigated in 128 women; 34 of those had diagnosed somatoform disorders, 50 were breast cancer patients with total mastectomy surgery alone, and 44 were healthy subjects. Body image and self-esteem were assessed using the Body Cathexis Scale and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The two clinical groups did not differ from one another (z = -1.832, P = 0.067), but differed from healthy controls in terms of body image (somatizing patients vs healthy controls, z = -3.628, P self-esteem (z = -0.936, P = 0.349) when depressive symptoms were controlled. No statistically significant difference was observed between total mastectomy patients and healthy controls in terms of self-esteem (z = -1.727, P = 0.084). The lower levels of self-esteem in somatizing patients were largely mediated by depressive symptoms. Depressed and non-depressed somatizing patients differed significantly from healthy controls with respect to their self-esteem and body image. Somatizing patients who were dissatisfied with their bodily functions and appearance had lower levels of self-esteem and high comorbidity of depression. In clinical practice it is suggested that clinicians should take into account psychiatric comorbidity, self-esteem, and body image in somatizing patients when planning treatment approaches.

  4. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Nikdokht; Bruce, Dean; Chung, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis

  5. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Nikdokht [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); Bruce, Dean [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis.

  6. Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with myocardial bridging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Wei; Qiu Hong; Yang Weixian; Wang Feng; He Zuoxiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Stress myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging was used to assess myocardial ischemia in patients with myocardial bridging. Methods: Ninety-six patients with myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery documented by coronary angiography were included in this study. All under- went exercise or pharmacological stress myocardial perfusion SPECT assessing myocardial ischemia. None had prior myocardial infarction. One year follow-up by telephone interview was performed in all patients. Results The mean stenotic severity of systolic phase on angiography was (65 ± 19)%. In the SPECT study, 20 of 96 (20.8%) patients showed abnormal perfusion. This percentage was significantly higher than that of stress electrocardiogram (ECG). The higher positive rate of SPECT perfusion images was showed in the group of patients with severe systolic narrowing (≥75%) than that with mild-to-moderate systolic narrowing (50% vs 6.3%, P<0.001). The prevalence of abnormal image was significantly higher in ELDERLY PEOPLE; patients with STT change on rest ECG than in those with normal rest ECG (54.2% vs 9.7%, P<0.001). During follow-up, one patient with abnormal SPECT perfusion image sustained angina and accepted percutaneous coronary intervention, and no cardiac event occurred in patients with normal images. Conclusions: Stress myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can be used effectively for assessing myocardial ischemia and has potential prognostic value for patients with myocardial bridging. (authors)

  7. Radioaerosol ventilation imaging in ventilator-dependent patients. Technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezina, W.; Chamberlain, M.; Vinitski, S.; King, M.; Nicholson, R.; Morgan, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The differentiation of pulmonary embolism (PE) from regional ventilatory abnormalities accompanied by reduced perfusion requires contemporary perfusion and ventilation studies. Distinguishing these conditions in ventilator-dependent patients is aided by administering a Tc-99m aerosol to characterize regional ventilation, and by performing a conventional Tc-99m MAA perfusion study. The technique uses a simple in-house constructed apparatus. Simple photographic techniques suffice, but computer subtraction of perfusion from the combined perfusion-ventilation image renders interpretation easier if aerosol administration follows perfusion imaging. Multiple defects can be examined in a single study. Excluding normal or near-normal perfusion studies, PE was thought to be present in eight of 16 patients after perfusion imaging alone, but in only one of eight after added aerosol imaging. Angiography confirmed the diagnosis in that patient. Of the eight patients who had abnormal perfusion but were thought unlikely to have PE from the perfusion study alone, two had normal ventilation, and subsequently were shown to have PE by angiography. Because angiography was only performed on patients who were thought to have a high probability of PE on sequential perfusion-ventilation imaging, the true incidence of PE may have been higher. Aerosol ventilation imaging is a useful adjunct to perfusion imaging in patients on ventilators. It requires an efficient delivery system, particularly if aerosol administration follows perfusion imaging, as it does in this study

  8. Body image concerns amongst massive weight loss patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Jo

    2013-05-01

    To explore body image matters amongst patients following massive weight loss. In contemporary health care, a growing number of morbidly obese patients are seeking surgical solutions such as bariatric surgery or in other cases engaging with radical lifestyle changes. Massive weight loss can leave patients with a huge excess of lax overstretched skin that in some cases can trigger major body image dissatisfaction or depression. There is a scarcity of research about the needs of this group of patients and this is important for nursing practice. A qualitative design using in-depth interviews was employed. Twenty white adults (18 women and two men) were recruited retrospectively amongst patients who had massive weight loss by undergoing bariatric surgery or radical lifestyle changes, aged 29-63 years. All of the participants gave signed informed consent. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. One core theme focusing on body image ugliness and three associated subthemes were identified: the subthemes included feeling socially marginalised, feeling depressed and sexual and intimacy difficulties. Body image matters are hugely significant and appear to have a lasting effect on emotional well-being and function, contributing to psychological distress and social isolation. Greater sensitivity is required in enabling patients to work through emotional isolation and shame that has been a part of their childhood. Furthermore more, treatments need to be accessible to this growing patient population such as reconstructive surgery. Nurses who care for massive weight loss patients need to be mindful of their psychodynamic needs and be non-judgemental and accepting. Moreover, nurses need to be aware of treatment options and be able to assess body image matters and implement quality care for this particular patient group including body image acceptance programmes and support groups. © 2013 Blackwell

  9. Reverse Redistribution in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Revisited with 64-slice MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choi, In Suck; Choi, Soo Jin; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Min Ki [Good Samaritan Hospital, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The authors report myocardial perfusion imaging of a patient showing reverse redistribution (RR) and a 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) with corresponding findings. The patient had subendocardial myocardial infarction (MI) with positive electrocardiogram (EMG) findings and elevated levels of cardiac isoenzymes. Experiencing this case emphasizes the importance of complementary correlation of a new diagnostic modality that helps us to understand the nature of RR.

  10. Patient Dose From Megavoltage Computed Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Langen, Katja M.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Cox, Andrea; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) can be used daily for imaging with a helical tomotherapy unit for patient alignment before treatment delivery. The purpose of this investigation was to show that the MVCT dose can be computed in phantoms, and further, that the dose can be reported for actual patients from MVCT on a helical tomotherapy unit. Methods and Materials: An MVCT beam model was commissioned and verified through a series of absorbed dose measurements in phantoms. This model was then used to retrospectively calculate the imaging doses to the patients. The MVCT dose was computed for five clinical cases: prostate, breast, head/neck, lung, and craniospinal axis. Results: Validation measurements in phantoms verified that the computed dose can be reported to within 5% of the measured dose delivered at the helical tomotherapy unit. The imaging dose scaled inversely with changes to the CT pitch. Relative to a normal pitch of 2.0, the organ dose can be scaled by 0.67 and 2.0 for scans done with a pitch of 3.0 and 1.0, respectively. Typical doses were in the range of 1.0-2.0 cGy, if imaged with a normal pitch. The maximal organ dose calculated was 3.6 cGy in the neck region of the craniospinal patient, if imaged with a pitch of 1.0. Conclusion: Calculation of the MVCT dose has shown that the typical imaging dose is approximately 1.5 cGy per image. The uniform MVCT dose delivered using helical tomotherapy is greatest when the anatomic thickness is the smallest and the pitch is set to the lowest value

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Cesar Higa; Lima, Eduardo Carneiro; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Rosemberg, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome. We evaluated eight patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome using magnetic resonance imaging. The protocol included at least sagittal and axial T1-weighted images and axial and coronal T2-weighted images. Intravenous gadolinium was administered in a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Post-enhanced images were obtained at least in the axial and coronal planes. The results were: all patients presented a bilateral and symmetrical 'tiger-eye signal' on T2-weighted images, corresponding to central hyperintensity and peripheral hypointensity in the globi pallidus. FLAIR and diffusion images showed similar abnormalities. There was no gadolinium enhancement in any of the cases. We concluded that magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome are very typical and allow the diagnosis of the disease. (author)

  12. 201Tl myocardial imaging in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, H.A.; Baird, M.G.; Rouleau, J.R.; Fuhrmann, C.F.; Bailey, I.K.; Summer, W.R.; Strauss, H.W.; Pitt, B.

    1976-01-01

    The appearance of the right ventricular myocardium on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion images was evaluated in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension and compared to patients without pulmonary hypertension. Four groups of patients were studied: (1) eight normals, (2) five patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease and normal pulmonary artery pressures, (3) ten patients with moderate to severe pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease and documented pulmonary hypertension and (4) eight patients with chronic left ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension discovered during cardiac catheterization. The right ventricular free wall was visualized on the thallium 201 myocardial perfusion image in only one of eight normals (group 1) and in only one of the five patients with coronary artery disease (group 2) and measured 0.5 cm and 0.9 cm in thickness, respectively. In patients with documented pulmonary hypertension the right ventricle was visualized on low contrast thallium 201 myocardial perfusion image in all patients. The apparent right ventricular free wall thickness measured from the ungated thallium 201 myocardial perfusion images was 1.7 +- 0.3 cm in group 3 and 1.5 +- 0.2 cm in group 4. Right ventricular hypertrophy was detected by electrocardiography in only five of ten patients in group 3 and only one of eight patients in group 4. Thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging appears to be a useful technique for assessing the effects of chronic pulmonary hypertension on the right ventricular myocardium

  13. Imaging of pannus formation in patients with mechanical heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Sabahattin; Özkan, Mehmet; Yesin, Mahmut

    2015-11-26

    Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) should be recognized in patients with elevated transprosthetic gradients but without leaflet immobility, since the treatment strategy may differ in either etiology. However, thrombus and/or pannus formation should be excluded before a diagnosis of PPM is made. Particularly, pannus formation may not be diagnosed with 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. Electrocardiographically gated 64-section multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) may be a promising tool in diagnosing or excluding pannus formation. Our report underlines the utility of MDCT in this regard and also emphasizes the importance of recognition of PPM as a differential diagnosis in such patients.

  14. Imaging features of mycobacterium in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jun; Sun Yue; Wei Liangui; Xu Yunliang; Li Xingwang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the imaging features of mycobacterium in AIDS patients. Methods: Twenty-three cases of mycobacterium tuberculosis and 13 patients of non-tuberculous mycobacteria were proved etiologically and included in this study. All patients underwent X-ray and CT examinations, imaging data were analyzed and compared. Results: The imaging findings of mycobacterium tuberculosis in AIDS patients included consolidation (n = 11), pleural effusion (n = 11), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (n = 11). Pulmonary lesions were always diffuse distribution, and 14 patients of extrapulmonary tuberculosis were found. Pulmonary lesions in non-tuberculous mycobacteria tend to be circumscribed. Conclusions: Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in AIDS patients is more common and usually combined with other infections. Imaging features are atypical. (authors)

  15. MR imaging findings in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Sperling, M.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; O'Connor, M.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Gonatas, N.

    1987-01-01

    Eleven patients (aged 19-37) with temporal lobe epilepsy were evaluated by 1.5-T MR imaging. The MR imaging followed a negative CT examination. All patients underwent ictal and interictal, depth electrode EEG recording, carotid arteriography with amytol test, neuropsychological testing, subsequent unilateral temporal lobectomy, and pathologic correlation. MR images were retrospectively reviewed and correlated. MR images in ten patients showed a small temporal lobe on the abnormal side. Abnormal signal intensity was not found within the temporal lobe despite the use of coronal and axial long TR (2,500 msec) and short and long TE(30 and 80 msec) studies

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating workers' compensation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbel, Daniel; Rayan, Ghazi

    2012-04-01

    We studied the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies for workers' compensation patients with hand conditions in which the referring doctor obtained the images. We compared the MRI findings with the eventual clinical findings. We also investigated the approximate cost of these MRI studies. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all workers' compensation patients seen in a hand and upper extremity practice over the course of 3 years. We selected patients who had MRI studies of the affected upper extremities before referral to the senior author (G.R.). We reviewed the charts for information regarding demographics, referral diagnoses, MRI diagnoses made by the radiologist, the area of the upper extremity studied, and eventual clinical diagnoses by the senior author. We made a determination as to whether a hand surgeon could have adequately diagnosed and treated the patients' conditions without the imaging studies. We also investigated the cost associated with these MRIs. We included 62 patients with a total of 67 MRI scans in this study. The MRI studies did not contribute to clinically diagnosing the patients' conditions in any of the cases we reviewed. The hand surgeon's clinical diagnosis disagreed with the radiologist's MRI diagnosis in 63% of patients. The MRI was unnecessary to arrive at the clinical diagnosis and did not influence the treatment offered for any of the 62 patients. The total cost for the 67 non-contrast MRI studies was approximately $53,000. Costly imaging studies are frequently done to determine the validity of a patient's reported problems; unfortunately, these tests are frequently unnecessary and waste resources. Magnetic resonance imaging scans may not be the standard for accurate diagnosis and can misdirect care. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Towards exaggerated image stereotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Igel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Given a training set of images and a binary classifier,we introduce the notion of an exaggerated image stereotype forsome image class of interest, which emphasizes/exaggerates thecharacteristic patterns in an image and visualizes which visualinformation the classification relies on. This is useful...

  18. Application of video imaging for improvement of patient set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Frenay, Michel; Betgen, Anja; Bois, Josien A. de; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: For radiotherapy of prostate cancer, the patient is usually positioned in the left-right (LR) direction by aligning a single marker on the skin with the projection of a room laser. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a room-mounted video camera in combination with previously acquired CT data to improve patient set-up along the LR axis. Material and methods: The camera was mounted in the treatment room at the caudal side of the patient. For 22 patients with prostate cancer 127 video and portal images were acquired. The set-up error determined by video imaging was found by matching video images with rendered CT images using various techniques. This set-up error was retrospectively compared with the set-up error derived from portal images. It was investigated whether the number of corrections based on portal imaging would decrease if the information obtained from the video images had been used prior to irradiation. Movement of the skin with respect to bone was quantified using an analysis of variance method. Results: The measurement of the set-up error was most accurate for a technique where outlines and groins on the left and right side of the patient were delineated and aligned individually to the corresponding features extracted from the rendered CT image. The standard deviations (SD) of the systematic and random components of the set-up errors derived from the portal images in the LR direction were 1.5 and 2.1 mm, respectively. When the set-up of the patients was retrospectively adjusted based on the video images, the SD of the systematic and random errors decreased to 1.1 and 1.3 mm, respectively. From retrospective analysis, a reduction of the number of set-up corrections (from nine to six corrections) is expected when the set-up would have been adjusted using the video images. The SD of the magnitude of motion of the skin of the patient with respect to the bony anatomy was estimated to be 1.1 mm. Conclusion: Video

  19. Characteristics and predictors for gastrointestinal hemorrhage among adult patients with dengue virus infection: Emphasizing the impact of existing comorbid disease(s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chi Huang

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is a leading cause of death in dengue. This study aims to identify predictors for GI bleeding in adult dengue patients, emphasizing the impact of existing comorbid disease(s.Of 1300 adults with dengue virus infection, 175 (mean age, 56.5±13.7 years patients with GI bleeding and 1,125 (mean age, 49.2±15.6 years without GI bleeding (controls were retrospectively analyzed.Among 175 patients with GI bleeding, dengue hemorrhagic fever was found in 119 (68% patients; the median duration from onset dengue illness to GI bleeding was 5 days. Gastric ulcer, erythematous gastritis, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, and hemorrhagic gastritis were found in 52.3%, 33.3%, 28.6%, 28.6%, and 14.3% of 42 patients with GI bleeding who had undergone endoscopic examination, respectively. Overall, nine of the 175 patients with GI bleeding died, giving an in-hospital mortality rate of 5.1%. Multivariate analysis showed age ≥60 years (cases vs. controls: 48% vs. 28.3% (odds ratio [OR]: 1.663, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.128-2.453, end stage renal disease with additional comorbidities (cases vs. controls: 1.7% vs. 0.2% (OR: 9.405, 95% CI: 1.4-63.198, previous stroke with additional comorbidities (cases vs. controls: 7.4% vs. 0.6% (OR: 9.772, 95% CI: 3.302-28.918, gum bleeding (cases vs. controls: 27.4% vs. 11.5% (OR: 1.732, 95% CI: 1.1-2.727, petechiae (cases vs. controls: 56.6% vs. 29.1% (OR: 2.109, 95% CI: 1.411-3.153, and platelet count <50×109 cells/L (cases vs. controls: 53.1% vs. 25.8% (OR: 3.419, 95% CI: 2.103-5.558 were independent predictors of GI bleeding in patients with dengue virus infection.Our study is the first to disclose that end stage renal disease and previous stroke, with additional comorbidities, were strongly significant associated with the risk of GI bleeding in patients with dengue virus infection. Identification of these risk factors can be incorporated into the patient assessment and management protocol

  20. The changing emphases in health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.H.; Kathren, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    This paper explores the changing emphases in health physics as evidenced by the subject matter of published papers in four primary English language journals of interest to health physicists. Articles from each journal were first grouped by subject and date of publication and were then compiled according to the list of professional domains practiced by health physicists. Five domains of practice were examined, measurements including dosimetry and environmental monitoring; regulations and standards; facilities and equipment including shielding, ventilation, and instrumentation; operations and procedures; and education and training. 2 tabs

  1. Brain MR imaging finding in patients with central vertigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chun Keun; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, You Me; Cha, Min Jung; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Geun Ho; Rhee, Chung Koo; Park, Hyun Min [Dankook Univ. College of Medicine, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-01

    To investigate brain lesions and their locations in patients with central vertigo, as seen on MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed MR images of 85 patients with central type vertigo diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and vestibular function test(VFT), and analyzed lesions fand their locations. Those located along the known central vestibular pathway were included in our study. In 29 of 85 patients(34%), lesions considered to be associated with central vertigo were detected on MR imaging. These included infarction(18 patients), hemorrhage(5), tumor(2), cavernous angioma(1), cerebellopontine angle cyst(1), tuberous sclerosis(1) and olivopontocerebellar atrophy (1);they were located in the parietal lobe(6 patients), the lateral medulla(5), the pons(5), the middle cerebellar peduncle(4), the corona radiata(3), and the cerebellar vermis(3). Thirty-eight cases showed high signal intensity lesions in deep cerebral matter, the basal ganglia, and pons but these were considered to be unrelated to central vertigo. MR imaging could be a useful tool for the evaluation of patients with central vertigo.=20.

  2. Brain MR imaging finding in patients with central vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chun Keun; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, You Me; Cha, Min Jung; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Geun Ho; Rhee, Chung Koo; Park, Hyun Min

    1998-01-01

    To investigate brain lesions and their locations in patients with central vertigo, as seen on MR imaging. We retrospectively reviewed MR images of 85 patients with central type vertigo diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms and vestibular function test(VFT), and analyzed lesions fand their locations. Those located along the known central vestibular pathway were included in our study. In 29 of 85 patients(34%), lesions considered to be associated with central vertigo were detected on MR imaging. These included infarction(18 patients), hemorrhage(5), tumor(2), cavernous angioma(1), cerebellopontine angle cyst(1), tuberous sclerosis(1) and olivopontocerebellar atrophy (1);they were located in the parietal lobe(6 patients), the lateral medulla(5), the pons(5), the middle cerebellar peduncle(4), the corona radiata(3), and the cerebellar vermis(3). Thirty-eight cases showed high signal intensity lesions in deep cerebral matter, the basal ganglia, and pons but these were considered to be unrelated to central vertigo. MR imaging could be a useful tool for the evaluation of patients with central vertigo.=20

  3. Quality Control in Mammography: Image Quality and Patient Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj Bjelac, O.; Arandjic, D.; Boris Loncar, B.; Kosutic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Mammography is method of choice for early detection of breast cancer. The purpose of this paper is preliminary evaluation the mammography practice in Serbia, in terms of both quality control indicators, i.e. image quality and patient doses. The survey demonstrated considerable variations in technical parameters that affect image quality and patients doses. Mean glandular doses ranged from 0.12 to 2.8 mGy, while reference optical density ranged from 1.2 to 2.8. Correlation between image contrast and mean glandular doses was demonstrated. Systematic implementation of quality control protocol should provide satisfactory performance of mammography units and maintain satisfactory image quality and keep patient doses as low as reasonably practicable. (author)

  4. Effects of music on patient anxiety and discomfort during MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slifer, K.J.; Jones, K.P.; Zerhouni, E.A.; Cataldo, M.F.; Connor, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports patient comfort during MR imaging investigated by comparing patients listening to music via air-tube earphones (n=35) with no music controls (n=63). Patients provided ratings before and after imaging. On all measures, the music group more often gave positive ratings. They experienced significantly less anxiety (t=1.74, P = .0479) and greater comfort (t = 3.95, P = .0002) than they had predicted, and they less often worried about medical problems during imaging (Fisher's exact test, P = .02). Music during MR imaging, therefore, may facilitate patient cooperation and throughput. Savings in staff time and revenue lost because of anxious patients would make audio equipment a cost-effective addition to imaging facilities

  5. Advertising energy saving programs: The potential environmental cost of emphasizing monetary savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Fischhoff, Baruch; Lave, Lester

    2015-06-01

    Many consumers have monetary or environmental motivations for saving energy. Indeed, saving energy produces both monetary benefits, by reducing energy bills, and environmental benefits, by reducing carbon footprints. We examined how consumers' willingness and reasons to enroll in energy-savings programs are affected by whether advertisements emphasize monetary benefits, environmental benefits, or both. From a normative perspective, having 2 noteworthy kinds of benefit should not decrease a program's attractiveness. In contrast, psychological research suggests that adding external incentives to an intrinsically motivating task may backfire. To date, however, it remains unclear whether this is the case when both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations are inherent to the task, as with energy savings, and whether removing explicit mention of extrinsic motivation will reduce its importance. We found that emphasizing a program's monetary benefits reduced participants' willingness to enroll. In addition, participants' explanations about enrollment revealed less attention to environmental concerns when programs emphasized monetary savings, even when environmental savings were also emphasized. We found equal attention to monetary motivations in all conditions, revealing an asymmetric attention to monetary and environmental motives. These results also provide practical guidance regarding the positioning of energy-saving programs: emphasize intrinsic benefits; the extrinsic ones may speak for themselves. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Patients radiation protection in medical imaging. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference organised by the French society of radiation protection about patients radiation protection in medical imaging. Twelve presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Medical exposure of the French population: methodology and results (Bernard Aubert, IRSN); 2 - What indicators for the medical exposure? (Cecile Etard, IRSN); 3 - Guidebook of correct usage of medical imaging examination (Philippe Grenier, Pitie-Salpetriere hospital); 4 - Radiation protection optimization in pediatric imaging (Hubert Ducou-Le-Pointe, Aurelien Bouette (Armand-Trousseau children hospital); 5 - Children's exposure to image scanners: epidemiological survey (Marie-Odile Bernier, IRSN); 6 - Management of patient's irradiation: from image quality to good practice (Thierry Solaire, General Electric); 7 - Dose optimization in radiology (Cecile Salvat (Lariboisiere hospital); 8 - Cancer detection in the breast cancer planned screening program - 2004-2009 era (Agnes Rogel, InVS); 9 - Mammographic exposures - radiobiological effects - radio-induced DNA damages (Catherine Colin, Lyon Sud hospital); 10 - Breast cancer screening program - importance of non-irradiating techniques (Anne Tardivon, Institut Curie); 11 - Radiation protection justification for the medical imaging of patients over the age of 50 (Michel Bourguignon, ASN); 12 - Search for a molecular imprint for the discrimination between radio-induced and sporadic tumors (Sylvie Chevillard, CEA)

  7. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in young patients with testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, C.J.; Twomey, M.; O'Regan, K.N.; Murphy, K.P.; Maher, M.M.; O'Connor, O.J.; McLaughlin, P.D.; Power, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    Risks associated with high cumulative effective dose (CED) from radiation are greater when imaging is performed on younger patients. Testicular cancer affects young patients and has a good prognosis. Regular imaging is standard for follow-up. This study quantifies CED from diagnostic imaging in these patients. Radiological imaging of patients aged 18-39 years, diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2001 and 2011 in two tertiary care centres was examined. Age at diagnosis, cancer type, dose-length product (DLP), imaging type, and frequency were recorded. CED was calculated from DLP using conversion factors. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS. In total, 120 patients with a mean age of 30.7 ± 5.2 years at diagnosis had 1,410 radiological investigations. Median (IQR) surveillance was 4.37 years (2.0-5.5). Median (IQR) CED was 125.1 mSv (81.3-177.5). Computed tomography accounted for 65.3 % of imaging studies and 98.3 % of CED. We found that 77.5 % (93/120) of patients received high CED (>75 mSv). Surveillance time was associated with high CED (OR 2.1, CI 1.5-2.8). Survivors of testicular cancer frequently receive high CED from diagnostic imaging, mainly CT. Dose management software for accurate real-time monitoring of CED and low-dose CT protocols with maintained image quality should be used by specialist centres for surveillance imaging. (orig.)

  8. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in young patients with testicular cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, C.J.; Twomey, M.; O' Regan, K.N. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Murphy, K.P.; Maher, M.M.; O' Connor, O.J. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); University College Cork, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); McLaughlin, P.D. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Emergency and Trauma Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Power, D.G. [Cork and Mercy University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-04-01

    Risks associated with high cumulative effective dose (CED) from radiation are greater when imaging is performed on younger patients. Testicular cancer affects young patients and has a good prognosis. Regular imaging is standard for follow-up. This study quantifies CED from diagnostic imaging in these patients. Radiological imaging of patients aged 18-39 years, diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2001 and 2011 in two tertiary care centres was examined. Age at diagnosis, cancer type, dose-length product (DLP), imaging type, and frequency were recorded. CED was calculated from DLP using conversion factors. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS. In total, 120 patients with a mean age of 30.7 ± 5.2 years at diagnosis had 1,410 radiological investigations. Median (IQR) surveillance was 4.37 years (2.0-5.5). Median (IQR) CED was 125.1 mSv (81.3-177.5). Computed tomography accounted for 65.3 % of imaging studies and 98.3 % of CED. We found that 77.5 % (93/120) of patients received high CED (>75 mSv). Surveillance time was associated with high CED (OR 2.1, CI 1.5-2.8). Survivors of testicular cancer frequently receive high CED from diagnostic imaging, mainly CT. Dose management software for accurate real-time monitoring of CED and low-dose CT protocols with maintained image quality should be used by specialist centres for surveillance imaging. (orig.)

  9. Imaging assessment of osteitis pubis; Avaliacao por imagem da osteite pubica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Ferreira, Ana Paula Alves; Leite, Ana Rachel Albuquerque de Moura; Guido, Daniela Araujo; Rodrigues, Rogeria Nobre [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: ce@cidbh.com.br; Araujo, Rodrigo Otavio Dias [Minas Tenis Clube, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Fisioterapia

    2005-10-15

    Objective: to assess the physiopathological aspects of osteitis pubis and the findings seen on imaging methods, emphasizing the usefulness of Flamingo view radiographs and the diagnostic aspects of Magnetic resonance images. Material and Method: magnetic resonance images of ten patients (eight of them professional athletes) referring symptoms in the inguinal regional were retrospectively evaluated. For some of these patients Flaming view radiographs were performed. Results: in all studied patients magnetic resonance imaging was the only diagnostic method capable of showing the different phases os osteitis pubis, from acute cases with pubic bone marrow edematous changes to chronic cases with involvement of other pelvic joints. Flamingo view radiographs were performed in six patients and three of them were diagnosed with vertical pubis symphyseal instability greater than 2 mm of vertical displacement. This diagnosis was confirmed by instability tests using orthopedic manoeuvres. Conclusion: magnetic resonance imaging was the most helpful method for the diagnosis of different phases of osteitis pubis whereas conventional X-ray was inconclusive in the initial phases. Flamingo view radiographs were extremely important to show vertical instability of the pubic symphysis, which in combination with osteitis pubis can be the cause of failure of nonoperative treatment. (author)

  10. Avulsion fractures of the anterior inferior iliac spine: spectrum of imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao Luiz; Viana, Sergio Lopes; Mendonca, Jose Luiz Furtado de; Freitas, Flavia Mendes Oliveira; Lima, Gylse-Anne de Souza; Vila, Ana Fabiola da; Ribeiro, Nelmar

    2005-01-01

    Avulsive injuries of the pelvic aphophyses are relatively common among 13-18 year old athletes, particularly among soccer players in Brazil. Diagnosis is made upon clinical and imaging findings. These lesions show three distinct phases: acute, repair and consolidation phases. Although acute and consolidation phases usually represent no diagnostic challenge, the repair phase may appear as an aggressive process on diagnostic images simulating neoplasic lesions. In this paper, the authors present the imaging findings of patients with avulsion of the anterior inferior iliac spine on plain radiographs, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the typical features of the three evolutive phases of these lesions. (author)

  11. Fast-flow lingual vascular anomalies in the young patient: is imaging diagnostic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, Pek-Lan; Burrows, Patricia E.; Kozakewich, Harry P.; Mulliken, John B.

    2003-01-01

    To describe the imaging findings (MR imaging and angiography) of high-flow vascular anomalies of the tongue, hemangiomas and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), with emphasis on the discrepant imaging findings in lingual AVMs. Retrospective review of clinical records, histologic reports and imaging studies of five consecutive patients with high-flow lingual vascular anomalies. One patient had hemangioma (aged 1 month) and four patients had AVMs (aged 15 months, 6, 24, and 33 years). Diagnosis was made on the basis of histology in four lesions and was based on typical clinical history in one lesion. MR imaging and angiographic findings of the hemangioma were typical, but similar findings of focal hyperintense mass on T2-weighted images and angiographic stain were seen in three AVMs (patients aged 15 months, 6 and 33 years). On angiography, there was no nidus or direct arteriovenous (AV) shunting in one AVM (patient aged 15 months). The fourth AVM had typical MR imaging and angiographic findings. The imaging findings in lingual AVMs can be atypical or inconclusive and can mimic hemangiomas, especially in the young patient. Since treatment depends on accurate diagnosis, biopsy may be necessary for lesions with inconclusive imaging findings. (orig.)

  12. Image analysis and modeling in medical image computing. Recent developments and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, H; Deserno, T M; Meinzer, H-P; Tolxdorff, T

    2012-01-01

    Medical image computing is of growing importance in medical diagnostics and image-guided therapy. Nowadays, image analysis systems integrating advanced image computing methods are used in practice e.g. to extract quantitative image parameters or to support the surgeon during a navigated intervention. However, the grade of automation, accuracy, reproducibility and robustness of medical image computing methods has to be increased to meet the requirements in clinical routine. In the focus theme, recent developments and advances in the field of modeling and model-based image analysis are described. The introduction of models in the image analysis process enables improvements of image analysis algorithms in terms of automation, accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Furthermore, model-based image computing techniques open up new perspectives for prediction of organ changes and risk analysis of patients. Selected contributions are assembled to present latest advances in the field. The authors were invited to present their recent work and results based on their outstanding contributions to the Conference on Medical Image Computing BVM 2011 held at the University of Lübeck, Germany. All manuscripts had to pass a comprehensive peer review. Modeling approaches and model-based image analysis methods showing new trends and perspectives in model-based medical image computing are described. Complex models are used in different medical applications and medical images like radiographic images, dual-energy CT images, MR images, diffusion tensor images as well as microscopic images are analyzed. The applications emphasize the high potential and the wide application range of these methods. The use of model-based image analysis methods can improve segmentation quality as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of quantitative image analysis. Furthermore, image-based models enable new insights and can lead to a deeper understanding of complex dynamic mechanisms in the human body

  13. Patient-specific estimation of detailed cochlear shape from clinical CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, H Martin; Fagertun, Jens; Wimmer, Wilhelm

    2018-01-01

    of the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape from CT images. From a collection of temporal bone [Formula: see text]CT images, we build a cochlear statistical deformation model (SDM), which is a description of how a human cochlea deforms to represent the observed anatomical variability. The model is used...... for regularization of a non-rigid image registration procedure between a patient CT scan and a [Formula: see text]CT image, allowing us to estimate the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape. We test the accuracy and precision of the predicted cochlear shape using both [Formula: see text]CT and CT images...

  14. Usefulness of biological fingerprint in magnetic resonance imaging for patient verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Junji; Kudomi, Shohei; Ueda, Katsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the feasibility of automated patient verification using multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images generated from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain. Several anatomy-related MPR images generated from three-dimensional fast scout scan of each MR examination were used as biological fingerprint images in this study. The database of this study consisted of 730 temporal pairs of MR examination of the brain. We calculated the correlation value between current and prior biological fingerprint images of the same patient and also all combinations of two images for different patients to evaluate the effectiveness of our method for patient verification. The best performance of our system were as follows: a half-total error rate of 1.59 % with a false acceptance rate of 0.023 % and a false rejection rate of 3.15 %, an equal error rate of 1.37 %, and a rank-one identification rate of 98.6 %. Our method makes it possible to verify the identity of the patient using only some existing medical images without the addition of incidental equipment. Also, our method will contribute to patient misidentification error management caused by human errors.

  15. Imaging of patients with hippocampal sclerosis at 7 Tesla: initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Tobias; Wanke, Isabel; Maderwald, Stefan; Woermann, Friedrich G; Kraff, Oliver; Theysohn, Jens M; Ebner, Alois; Forsting, Michael; Ladd, Mark E; Schlamann, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Focal epilepsies potentially can be cured by neurosurgery; other treatment options usually remain symptomatic. High-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the central imaging strategy in the evaluation of focal epilepsy. The most common substrate of temporal epilepsies is hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which cannot always be sufficiently characterized with current MR field strengths. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging at 7 Tesla in patients with focal epilepsy resulting from a HS and to improve image resolution at 7 Tesla in patients with HS. Six patients with known HS were investigated with T1-, T2-, T2(*)-, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery-weighted sequences at 7 Tesla with an eight-channel transmit-receive head coil. Total imaging time did not exceed 90 minutes per patient. High-resolution imaging at 7 Tesla is feasible and reveals high resolution of intrahippocampal structures in vivo. HS was confirmed in all patients. The maximum non-interpolated in-plane resolution reached 0.2 x 0.2 mm(2) in T2(*)-weighted images. The increased susceptibility effects at 7 Tesla revealed identification of intrahippocampal structures in more detail than at 1.5 Tesla, but otherwise led to stronger artifacts. Imaging revealed regional differences in hippocampal atrophy between patients. The scan volume was limited because of specific absorption rate restrictions, scanning time was reasonable. High-resolution imaging at 7 Tesla is promising in presurgical epilepsy imaging. "New" contrasts may further improve detection of even very small intrahippocampal structural changes. Therefore, further investigations will be necessary to demonstrate the potential benefit for presurgical selection of patients with various lesion patterns in mesial temporal epilepsies resulting from a unilateral HS. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anesthesia Experiences During Magnetic Imaging Process on Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Öztürk, Ömür; Üstebay, Sefer; Bilge, Ali

    2017-01-01

    We aim to study the quality of sedation and complications ratios during anesthesia applied with sodium thiopental and propofol and the reason of the magnetic imaging requests on pediatric patients retrospectively according to the hospital data. Material and Method: In this study, 109 patients, aged from 3 months to 5 years, that have been applied magnetic imaging process under anesthesia, have been examined retrospectively. Results: Pentotal sodium has been applied to 53 patients and propofol...

  17. Relations of image quality in on-line portal images and individual patient parameters for pelvic field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, F. van den; Neve, W. de; Coghe, M.; Verellen, D.; Storme, G.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the present study involving 566 pelvic fields on 13 patients were: 1. To study the machine- and patient-related factors influencing image quality. 2. To study the factors related to machine, patient and patient set-up, influencing the errors of field set-up. 3. To develop a method for predicting the camera settings. The OPI device consisted of a fluorescent screen scanned by a video camera. An image quality score on a scale 0-5 was given for 546/566 fields. In a univariate analysis, open field subtraction adversely affected the score. The image score of anterior fields was significantly better than that of posterior fields. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression showed that, in addition to anterior or posterior field and subtraction, gender was also a significant predictor of image score. Errors requiring field adjustments were detected on 289/530 (54.5%) evaluable fields or 229/278 (82.4%) evaluable patient set-ups. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the probability of performing an adjustment was significantly related to gender, image quality and AP-PA diameter. The magnitude of adjustments made in the lateral direction correlated significantly with patient bulk. The camera kV level with gain held constant showed an exponential dependency on dose rate at the image detector plate and can thus be predicted by treatment planning. (orig.)

  18. Imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Charleston, D.; Metz, C.

    1980-01-01

    This project deals with imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation and is presented as four subprojects. The goal of the first subproject is to improve diagnositc image quality by development of a general computer code for optimizing collimator design. The second subproject deals with a secondary emission and fluorescence technique for thyroid scanning while the third subproject emphasizes the need for more sophisticated image processing systems such as coherent optical spatial filtering systems and digital image processing. The fourth subproject presents a new approach for processing image data by taking into account the energy of each detected gamma-ray photon

  19. MR imaging findings of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with Kikuchi disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Zenichiro; Teramoto, Takahide; Kondo, Naomi; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with Kikuchi disease (histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis). Materials and methods: Nine patients with Kikuchi disease underwent MR imaging with a 1.5 T unit including diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging and five of nine underwent gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. MR images were reviewed for numbers, sizes, locations, focal hypointense areas on T2-weighted images, focal non-enhancing areas on gadolinium-enhanced MR images, and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of enlarged lymph nodes. Results: 52 enlarged nodes (range, 2–11 nodes; mean, 5.8 nodes per patients) were identified. Lymphadenopathy was unilateral in 7 patients (78%) and bilateral in 2 (22%). Enlarged nodes were located at level IIA in 7 nodes, IIB in 23, III in 8, IV in 4, VA in 2, and VB in 8. Focal hypointense areas on T2-weighted images were found in 7 patients (78%) and 21 nodes (40%), and had a peripheral distribution in 19 nodes (90%) and had clear margins in 16 nodes (76%). Focal non-enhancing areas were seen in 3 patients (60%) and 6 nodes (23%). ADCs were variable (range, 0.69–1.78 [×10 −3 mm 2 /s]; mean, 1.01 ± 0.28). Conclusion: Cervical lymphadenopathy in Kikuchi disease showed predominantly a unilateral distribution at levels II–V. Furthermore, Kikuchi disease should be considered when T2-weighted images demonstrate hypointensity areas at the peripheries of enlarged cervical nodes, which corresponded to histopathological findings of coagulative necrosis in paracortical areas.

  20. Usefulness of MR imaging for diseases of the small intestine: comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Sohn, Min Jae; Shin, Byung Suck; Lee, Young Suk; Chung, Soo Yoon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging for diseases of the small intestine, emphasizing a comparison with CT. Thirty-four patients who underwent both CT and MR imaging using FLASH 2D and HASTE sequences were analyzed. All patients had various small bowel diseases with variable association of peritoneal lesions. We compared the detectabilities of CT and MR imaging using different MR pulse sequences. The capability for analyzing the characteristics of small intestinal disease was also compared. MR imaging was nearly equal to CT for detecting intraluminal or peritoneal masses, lesions in the bowel and mesentery, and small bowel obstruction, but was definitely inferior for detecting omental lesions. The most successful MR imaging sequence was HASTE for demonstrating bowel wall thickening, coronal FLASH 2D for mesenteric lesions, and axial FLASH 2D for omental lesions. MR imaging yielded greater information than CT in six of 12 inflammatory bowel diseases, while it was equal to CT in six of seven neoplasms and inferior in five of seven mesenteric ischemia. In determining the primary causes of 15 intestinal obstructions, MR imaging was correct in 11 (73%) and CT in nine (60%) patients. MR imaging can serve as an alternative diagnostic tool for patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal neoplasm or obstruction.

  1. Performance of a video-image-subtraction-based patient positioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliken, Barrett D.; Rubin, Steven J.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Johnson, L. Scott; Chen, George T.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We have developed and tested an interactive video system that utilizes image subtraction techniques to enable high precision patient repositioning using surface features. We report quantitative measurements of system performance characteristics. Methods and Materials: Video images can provide a high precision, low cost measure of patient position. Image subtraction techniques enable one to incorporate detailed information contained in the image of a carefully verified reference position into real-time images. We have developed a system using video cameras providing orthogonal images of the treatment setup. The images are acquired, processed and viewed using an inexpensive frame grabber and a PC. The subtraction images provide the interactive guidance needed to quickly and accurately place a patient in the same position for each treatment session. We describe the design and implementation of our system, and its quantitative performance, using images both to measure changes in position, and to achieve accurate setup reproducibility. Results: Under clinical conditions (60 cm field of view, 3.6 m object distance), the position of static, high contrast objects could be measured with a resolution of 0.04 mm (rms) in each of two dimensions. The two-dimensional position could be reproduced using the real-time image display with a resolution of 0.15 mm (rms). Two-dimensional measurement resolution of the head of a patient undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer was 0.1 mm (rms), using a lateral view, measuring the variation in position of the nose and the ear over the course of a single radiation treatment. Three-dimensional repositioning accuracy of the head of a healthy volunteer using orthogonal camera views was less than 0.7 mm (systematic error) with an rms variation of 1.2 mm. Setup adjustments based on the video images were typically performed within a few minutes. The higher precision achieved using the system to measure objects than to reposition

  2. Body Image and Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders should be understood in a multidimensional perspective, emphasizing a biopsicossocial context. In these pathologies it`s the body, in the first instance, that reveals the disease, being in this way the target of the conflict, revealing a disturbed body experience and as a consequence a weak conception of their personal body image. The body image is conceptualised as a subjective image that the individuals form in their own mind, about their body, in relation with differ- ent contexts of life. The intent of the studies is to comprehend the level of body image disturbance, which have concluded that in the majority of the cases, significant changes on perceptive capacity of the patients do not exist. In this way it`s important to study in a more effective and qualitative way the affective and personal factors. The authors pretend with this bibliographic revision, make a research of body image assessment to the Eating Disorders (Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa, and to reflect which are the best ones to adapt for Portuguese reality.

  3. Whole heart cine MR imaging of pulmonary veins in patients with congenital heart disease. Comparison with Spin Echo MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hideaki; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of Whole Heart Cine (WHC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared to that of spin echo (SE) MR imaging. Among our 35 patients, 4 patients had anomalous PV return. Detectability of four PVs on each MR examination images were evaluated. MR imaging is an effective modality for the clarification of PVs, and WHC MR imaging is more useful in delineating PV anomalies than SE MR imaging. (author)

  4. PET imaging in patients with Modic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, H.B.; Manniche, C.; Petersen, H.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was via PET imaging to reveal if any highly metabolic processes were occurring in Modic changes type 1 and/or in the adjacent discs. Modic changes (MC) are signal changes in the vertebral endplate and body visualised by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MC are strongly associated with low back pain (LBP). MC type 1 appear to be inflammation on MRI, and histological and biochemical findings make it highly likely that an inflammation is present. Though MC is painful no known treatment is available, and it is unknown which entities affect the progress or regress of MC. The changes observed on MRI are slow and take months to develop, but faster changes in the metabolism might provide a platform for monitoring patients. Patients from The Back Centre Funen, with low back pain in the area of L1 to S1, MC type 1 in L1 to L5, and a previous herniated lumbar disc. All patients had a PET scan using FDG ( 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose) as tracer. Included in the study were 11 patients, 4 women and 7 men, mean age 48.1 year (range 20-65). All MC were situated in the vertebrae both above and below the previously herniated disc/discs. Ten patients had MC at 1 level, and 1 had MC at 2 levels. The affected levels were 1 at L2/L3, 6 at L4 /L5, and 5 at L5/S1. All had a previous disc herniation and MC larger than 4 mm in diameter. Technically satisfactory PET scans were obtained. However, PET imaging showed no increases in metabolism in any vertebra or disc of any patient. Modic type 1 changes do not reveal themselves by showing increased metabolism with ordinary FDG PET imaging. PET tracers illuminating inflammation are being developed and hopefully may become more successful. (orig.)

  5. Retroperitoneal schwannoma: diagnostic imaging findings in 5 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltazar, Alberto; Santamarina, Mario; Scalise, Gabriela; Ponce de Leon, Valeria; Bello, Lorena

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the different imaging findings (US, CT and MRI) in retroperitoneal schwannoma. Materials and methods: 5 patients (3 male and 2 females) with a diagnosis of retroperitoneal schwannoma were retrospectively evaluated. Ages ranged from 33 to 63 years (means 54 years). The images (US, CT and MR) were analyzed and correlated to histopathologic results. Results: The most frequent clinical finding was abdominal pain (60%). A presumptive diagnosis prior to surgery was suggested in 3/5 cases that had well-defined masses with a predominant cystic appearance. All patients underwent surgery with tumoral resection. Only 2 patients (40%) had recurrence within a three years period of follow-up. Conclusion: Retroperitoneal schwannoma is an infrequent tumor. In our series, no pathognomotic features were observed on US, CT or MRI. However, 3/5 tumors showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images due to cystic areas. (author)

  6. SU-F-J-114: On-Treatment Imagereconstruction Using Transit Images of Treatment Beams Through Patient and Thosethrough Planning CT Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H; Cho, S; Cheong, K; Jung, J; Jung, S; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically, represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.

  7. SU-F-J-114: On-Treatment Imagereconstruction Using Transit Images of Treatment Beams Through Patient and Thosethrough Planning CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H; Cho, S [KAIST, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, K [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, S [Samsung Medical Cener, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J [Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, I [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically, represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.

  8. Tuberculosis of the sternum and clavicle: imaging findings in 15 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.; Patkar, D.; Parikh, B.; Parmar, H.; Varma, R.; Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To describe the imaging findings in sterno-clavicular tubercular involvement.Design and patients. Fifteen patients with pathologically proven tuberculosis of the sternum and clavicle were retrospectively evaluated. Routine radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used in some or all of the patients. Clinical information and imaging features were evaluated in each case.Results. Eight patients had sterno-clavicular joint (SCJ) involvement, five had isolated sternal involvement and two had isolated clavicular involvement. Seven patients were evaluated with only CT, six with only MRI and two with both. There were eight male and seven female patients, varying in age between 16 and 78 years. Fever, swelling and pain were common presenting symptoms. Two patients were HIV positive. Radiographs were positive in only eight patients. Destruction and signal intensity (SI) changes of the sternum and clavicle, destruction of the cartilage, soft tissue changes representing granulation tissue/abscess, displacement of the adjacent structures (vessels, trachea, etc.) and inflammatory changes in the adjacent structures in the form of cellulitis and myositis were common imaging features.Conclusions. All imaging methods can provide complementary information regarding sterno-clavicular tubercular involvement that is helpful for determination of the therapy. MRI is useful in determining the extent of the lesion, particularly marrow involvement and soft tissue extent. (orig.)

  9. Tuberculosis of the sternum and clavicle: imaging findings in 15 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, J.; Patkar, D.; Parikh, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Nanavati Hospital, Mumbai (India); Parmar, H.; Varma, R.; Patankar, T.; Prasad, S. [Department of Radiology, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2000-08-01

    Objective. To describe the imaging findings in sterno-clavicular tubercular involvement.Design and patients. Fifteen patients with pathologically proven tuberculosis of the sternum and clavicle were retrospectively evaluated. Routine radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used in some or all of the patients. Clinical information and imaging features were evaluated in each case.Results. Eight patients had sterno-clavicular joint (SCJ) involvement, five had isolated sternal involvement and two had isolated clavicular involvement. Seven patients were evaluated with only CT, six with only MRI and two with both. There were eight male and seven female patients, varying in age between 16 and 78 years. Fever, swelling and pain were common presenting symptoms. Two patients were HIV positive. Radiographs were positive in only eight patients. Destruction and signal intensity (SI) changes of the sternum and clavicle, destruction of the cartilage, soft tissue changes representing granulation tissue/abscess, displacement of the adjacent structures (vessels, trachea, etc.) and inflammatory changes in the adjacent structures in the form of cellulitis and myositis were common imaging features.Conclusions. All imaging methods can provide complementary information regarding sterno-clavicular tubercular involvement that is helpful for determination of the therapy. MRI is useful in determining the extent of the lesion, particularly marrow involvement and soft tissue extent. (orig.)

  10. WE-G-207-06: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Physical Phantom and Clinical Patient Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhou, S; Cai, W; Hurwitz, M; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Cifter, F; Berbeco, R; Lewis, J; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Ionascu, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images acquired immediately prior to treatment have the potential to represent patient motion patterns and anatomy during treatment, including both intra- and inter-fractional changes. We develop a method to generate patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images acquired with existing clinical equipment and used to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) representing motion during treatment delivery. Methods: Motion models are derived by deformably registering each 4DCBCT phase to a reference phase, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated by optimizing the resulting PCA coefficients iteratively through comparison of the cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging and digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the motion model. Patient and physical phantom datasets are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization error compared to manually defined ground truth positions. Results: 4DCBCT-based motion models were derived and used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time. For the patient datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.57 and 3.13 respectively in subsets of four patient datasets. For the physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.14 and 2.78 respectively in two datasets. 4DCBCT motion models are shown to perform well in the context of generating 3D fluoroscopic images due to their ability to reproduce anatomical changes at treatment time. Conclusion: This study showed the feasibility of deriving 4DCBCT-based motion models and using them to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time in real clinical settings. 4DCBCT-based motion models were found to account for the 3D non-rigid motion of the patient anatomy during treatment and have the potential

  11. Clinical impacts of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2004-01-01

    The progress of the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the cerebral stroke patients was remarkable, and it became possible to evaluate a brain perfusion or function. Here, we describe about the clinical application of the neuronal tracts and brain perfusion evaluation using 3.0 Tesla MR imaging. The subjects were patients with internal cerebral hemorrhage and major cerebral occlusive diseases. Three dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were accepted to estimate the damages of neurnal tracts. Perfusion weighted images with the contrast medium were performed for a quantitative evaluation. The pyramidal tracts were depicted well with 3DAC imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value generated from DTI can predict the outcome of the motor dysfunction in each patient at early stage. Cerebral blood volume calculated from perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) was correlated with and cerebral vascular reserve capacity. 3.0 Tesla MR imaging may develop in cerebral stroke patients in near future. (author)

  12. Spectral CT imaging in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome: investigation of image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lei; Dong, Junqiang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Lv, Peijie; Hu, Lili; Yan, Liangliang; Gao, Jianbo

    2014-11-01

    To assess the image quality of monochromatic imaging from spectral CT in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), fifty patients with BCS underwent spectral CT to generate conventional 140 kVp polychromatic images (group A) and monochromatic images, with energy levels from 40 to 80, 40 + 70, and 50 + 70 keV fusion images (group B) during the portal venous phase (PVP) and the hepatic venous phase (HVP). Two-sample t tests compared vessel-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the portal vein (PV), hepatic vein (HV), inferior vena cava. Readers' subjective evaluations of the image quality were recorded. The highest SNR values in group B were distributed at 50 keV; the highest CNR values in group B were distributed at 40 keV. The higher CNR values and SNR values were obtained though PVP of PV (SNR 18.39 ± 6.13 vs. 10.56 ± 3.31, CNR 7.81 ± 3.40 vs. 3.58 ± 1.31) and HVP of HV (3.89 ± 2.08 vs. 1.27 ± 1.55) in the group B; the lower image noise for group B was at 70 keV and 50 + 70 keV (15.54 ± 8.39 vs. 18.40 ± 4.97, P = 0.0004 and 18.97 ± 7.61 vs. 18.40 ± 4.97, P = 0.0691); the results show that the 50 + 70 keV fusion image quality was better than that in group A. Monochromatic energy levels of 40-70, 40 + 70, and 50 + 70 keV fusion image can increase vascular contrast and that will be helpful for the diagnosis of BCS, we select the 50 + 70 keV fusion image to acquire the best BCS images.

  13. A study of MR imaging of proximal femur injury in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, Jun; Hamasaki, Naoto; Nakasone, Satoshi; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2002-01-01

    MR imaging is useful in the diagnosis of occult fractures and bone bruises. MR imaging at an early stage after injury was performed in 17 elderly patients with a clinical suspicion of hip fracture who had normal radiograms. Ten patients had positive findings on the MR imaging. In these ten patients, follow-up radiograms were taken three months later, and we compared early-stage MR images and radiographic findings at three months. Three patients showed geographic areas of low intensity on T1 and high intensity on T2-weighted images, also referred to as bone bruise, but one of them had osteosclerotic findings in radiograms. Seven patients showed linear areas on T1 or T2-weighted images. One of them received compression hip screw because of the displacement of the fracture. Three showed osteosclerotic findings and the other three showed normal findings in radiograms. Our results suggested that MR imaging at an early stage of the injury was useful to detect occult fractures and bone bruises; however, differentiation between the two was difficult. (author)

  14. A study of MR imaging of proximal femur injury in elderly patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, Jun; Hamasaki, Naoto; Nakasone, Satoshi [Okinawa Rehabilitation Center Hospital (Japan); Kanaya, Fuminori [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    MR imaging is useful in the diagnosis of occult fractures and bone bruises. MR imaging at an early stage after injury was performed in 17 elderly patients with a clinical suspicion of hip fracture who had normal radiograms. Ten patients had positive findings on the MR imaging. In these ten patients, follow-up radiograms were taken three months later, and we compared early-stage MR images and radiographic findings at three months. Three patients showed geographic areas of low intensity on T1 and high intensity on T2-weighted images, also referred to as bone bruise, but one of them had osteosclerotic findings in radiograms. Seven patients showed linear areas on T1 or T2-weighted images. One of them received compression hip screw because of the displacement of the fracture. Three showed osteosclerotic findings and the other three showed normal findings in radiograms. Our results suggested that MR imaging at an early stage of the injury was useful to detect occult fractures and bone bruises; however, differentiation between the two was difficult. (author)

  15. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, B.P.; Sakas, G.; Stilla, U.; Groch, W.-D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera sel calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not. (author)

  16. Time-motion analysis of factors affecting patient throughput in an MR imaging center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donohue, J.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The high cost of MR imaging makes efficient use essential. In an effort to increase patient throughput, attention has been focused on shortening the imaging time through reductions in matrix size and number of excitations, and through the use of newer ''fast imaging'' techniques. Less attention has been given to other time-consuming aspects not directly related to imaging time. The authors undertook a time-motion study using a daily log of minute-by-minute activities associated with an MR imaging examination. The times required for the following components of the examination were measured: total study time, examination set-up time, intrastudy physician ''image review'' time, and interstudy patient turnover time. The time lost to claustrophobic reactions, patients' failure to appear for scheduled examinations, unanticipated patient care (sedation, reassurance), and equipment malfunction was also analyzed. Actual imaging time accounted for a relatively small proportion (42%) of total study time. Other factors such as intrastudy image review time (15%), interstudy patient turnover time (11%), and time lost due to claustrophobic reactions, patients' failure to appear for scheduled examinations, and equipment malfunction contributed significantly to the total study time. Simple solutions to these problems can contribute greatly to increasing patient throughput

  17. Persistent Drug-Induced Parkinsonism in Patients with Normal Dopamine Transporter Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yong Hong

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging for the dopamine transporter (DAT is used to distinguish drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP from subclinical Parkinson's disease (PD. Although DIP patients who show a normal DAT image are expected to recover completely, some do not. We investigated whether these patients showed changes in striatal DAT activity using semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FP-CIT PET data. DIP patients with visually normal DAT images were selected from medical records. The subjects were classified as patients who recovered partially (PR or completely within 12 months (CR. The 18F-FP-CIT uptake in each striatal subregion was compared between the CR and the PR groups. In total, 41 and 9 patients of the CR and PR groups were assessed, respectively. The two patient groups were comparable in terms of clinical characteristics including age, sex, and severity of parkinsonism. From semi-quantitative analysis of the PET image, the PR patients showed a relatively lower ligand uptake in the ventral striatum, the anterior putamen and the posterior putamen compared with the CR patients. This result suggests that persistent DIP in patients with visually normal DAT imaging may be associated with subtle decrement of DAT activity.

  18. MR imaging of the spine: trauma and degenerative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmink, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the capabilities and drawbacks of MR imaging in patients with trauma to the spine and degenerative spinal conditions. In spinal trauma MR imaging is secondary to plain X-ray films and CT because of the greater availability and ease of performance of these techniques and their superior capability for detecting vertebral fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting ligamentous ruptures and intraspinal mass lesions such as hematoma, and for assessing the state of the spinal cord and prognosis of a cord injury. In degenerative spinal disease the necessity is emphasized of critically evaluating the clinical relevance of any abnormal feature detected, as findings of degenerative pathology are common in individuals without symptoms. Magnetic resonance myelography permits rapid and accurate assessment of the state of the lumbar nerve roots (compressed or not). In the cervical region the quality of the myelographic picture is often degraded in patients with a narrow spinal canal. (orig.)

  19. MR imaging of the spine: trauma and degenerative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, J.T. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the capabilities and drawbacks of MR imaging in patients with trauma to the spine and degenerative spinal conditions. In spinal trauma MR imaging is secondary to plain X-ray films and CT because of the greater availability and ease of performance of these techniques and their superior capability for detecting vertebral fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting ligamentous ruptures and intraspinal mass lesions such as hematoma, and for assessing the state of the spinal cord and prognosis of a cord injury. In degenerative spinal disease the necessity is emphasized of critically evaluating the clinical relevance of any abnormal feature detected, as findings of degenerative pathology are common in individuals without symptoms. Magnetic resonance myelography permits rapid and accurate assessment of the state of the lumbar nerve roots (compressed or not). In the cervical region the quality of the myelographic picture is often degraded in patients with a narrow spinal canal. (orig.) With 10 figs., 14 refs.

  20. Diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging in patients with recent myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deux, Jean-Francois; Maatouk, Mezri; Luciani, Alain; Lenczner, Gregory; Mayer, Julie; Kobeiter, Hicham; Rahmouni, Alain; Vignaud, Alexandre; Lim, Pascal; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate a diffusion-weighted (DW) black blood MR sequence for the detection of myocardium signal abnormalities in patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI). A DW black blood EPI sequence was acquired at 1.5 T in 12 patients with recent MI. One slice per patient was acquired with b = 0 and b = 50 s/mm 2 . A standard short tau inversion recovery (STIR) T2-weighted sequence was acquired at the same level. Viability was assessed with delayed-enhancement sequences. Images were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. A non parametric Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of P <.05. The mean quality of blood suppression was higher on DW EPI images than on STIR T2-weighted images (3.9 ± 0.3 and 3.0 ± 0.7, respectively; P = 0.01). Myocardial high signal areas were detected in respectively 100% (12/12) and 67% (8/12) of the patients on DW EPI and STIR T2-weighted images. The four patients (33%) with false-negative STIR T2 findings all had high signal areas on DW EPI images corresponding to the location of the MI on the delayed-enhanced images. DW EPI sequences are a feasible alternative to standard STIR T2-weighted sequences for detecting myocardium high signal areas in patients with recent MI. (orig.)

  1. Clinical studies on myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with right ventricular overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo, Kenji; Yamagata, Takashi; Nakajima, Masao; Fujita, Kimiaki; Morita, Nobuo

    1979-01-01

    Patients with heart disease which had been clinically diagnosed underwent 201 Tl myocardial perfusion imaging. The thickness of right ventricular wall measured from original images was directly proportional to systolic pressure of the right ventricle measured by cardiac catheterization, and 201 Tl activity in the right ventricle was more directly proportional to systolic pressure of the right ventricle. Imaging patterns of various diseases were also described. Images of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed that right ventricular wall was thin and right ventricular cavity was small, but the thickness of septal wall and left ventricular wall were maximal. Images of patients with mitral insufficiency revealed that the thickness of right ventricular wall, septal wall, and left ventricular wall was medium, and the right ventricular cavity was smaller than the left ventricular cavity. Images of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy and congestive cardiac failure showed that enlargement of both ventricular cavities was disproportionate to the thickness of each wall. Images of patients with arterial septal defect revealed that the thickness of each wall was comparatively normal, the right ventricular cavity was maximal, and the left ventricular cavity was minimal. Images of patients with primary pulmonary hypertention, pulmonary stenosis and tetralogy of Fallot in whom pressure overload was recognized revealed severe thickenings of right ventricular wall, moderate enlargement of the right ventricle, small left ventricle, and thin left ventricular wall. (Tsunoda, M.)

  2. Bio-imaging and visualization for patient-customized simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2013 workshop Bio-Imaging and Visualization for Patient-Customized Simulations (MWBIVPCS 2013). MWBIVPCS 2013 brought together researchers representing several fields, such as Biomechanics, Engineering, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Statistic. The contributions included in this book present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques, including the finite element method, similarity metrics, optimization processes, graphs, hidden Markov models, sensor calibration, fuzzy logic, data mining, cellular automation, active shape models, template matching and level sets. These serve as tools to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modelling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis.  This boo...

  3. Patient-directed Internet-based Medical Image Exchange: Experience from an Initial Multicenter Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Giampaolo; Patel, Anand S; Lewis, Sara C; Shi, Wei; Rasul, Rehana; Torosyan, Mary; Erickson, Bradley J; Hiremath, Atheeth; Moskowitz, Alan J; Tellis, Wyatt M; Siegel, Eliot L; Arenson, Ronald L; Mendelson, David S

    2016-02-01

    Inefficient transfer of personal health records among providers negatively impacts quality of health care and increases cost. This multicenter study evaluates the implementation of the first Internet-based image-sharing system that gives patients ownership and control of their imaging exams, including assessment of patient satisfaction. Patients receiving any medical imaging exams in four academic centers were eligible to have images uploaded into an online, Internet-based personal health record. Satisfaction surveys were provided during recruitment with questions on ease of use, privacy and security, and timeliness of access to images. Responses were rated on a five-point scale and compared using logistic regression and McNemar's test. A total of 2562 patients enrolled from July 2012 to August 2013. The median number of imaging exams uploaded per patient was 5. Most commonly, exams were plain X-rays (34.7%), computed tomography (25.7%), and magnetic resonance imaging (16.1%). Of 502 (19.6%) patient surveys returned, 448 indicated the method of image sharing (Internet, compact discs [CDs], both, other). Nearly all patients (96.5%) responded favorably to having direct access to images, and 78% reported viewing their medical images independently. There was no difference between Internet and CD users in satisfaction with privacy and security and timeliness of access to medical images. A greater percentage of Internet users compared to CD users reported access without difficulty (88.3% vs. 77.5%, P Internet-based image-sharing system is feasible and surpasses the use of CDs with respect to accessibility of imaging exams while generating similar satisfaction with respect to privacy. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Whole Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Parsonage Turner Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.; Twair, A.; Nelson, E.; Brennan, D.; Eustace, S.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with suspected Parsonage Turner syndrome and to emphasize the value of an additional whole body MR scan to improve specificity of this diagnosis. Material and Methods: Three patients with proven Parsonage Turner syndrome referred for conventional MRI of the shoulder girdle and additional whole body turboSTIR MRI were included for study. Results: In each case, imaging revealed edema in the muscles of the shoulder girdle. Whole body turboSTIR MRI scan confirmed localized unilateral changes in each case improving specificity and confidence in the diagnosis of Parsonage Turner syndrome in each case. Conclusion: Whole body turboSTIR MR imaging is a useful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected Parsonage Turner syndrome. Inclusion of the brain, neck, brachial plexus, and extremity musculature at whole body imaging allows differentiation from polymyositis and elimination of additional causes of shoulder girdle pain and weakness including gross lesions in the brain, neck, and brachial plexus by a single non-invasive study

  5. Frequency of referral of patients with safety-related contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Departments of Radiology, Charite, Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: marc.dewey@charite.de; Schink, Tania [Medical Biometry, Charite, Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: tania.schink@charite.de; Dewey, Charles F. [Radiology, Outpatient Centre Loebau, Poststr. 20, 02738 Loebau (Germany)]. E-mail: dewey@t-online.de

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To analyse the frequency of patients with absolute and relative contraindications to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging who were actually referred to an outpatient imaging centre for an MR examination Materials and methods: Altogether a total of 51,547 consecutive patients were included between November 1997 and December 2005. Reasons preventing MR imaging were classified into the following categories: absolute and relative contraindications. Results: The referral frequency of patients with absolute contraindications to MR imaging was 0.41% (211 of 51,547 patients; 95% CI, 0.36-0.47%). The absolute contraindications were shrapnels located in biologically sensitive areas (121 patients, 0.23%; 95% CI, 0.20-0.28%), cardiac pacemakers (42 patients, 0.08%; 95% CI, 0.06-0.11%), and other unsafe implants (48 patients, 0.09%; 95% CI, 0.07-0.12%). Also patients with a relative contraindication to MR imaging were referred such as women with a first-trimester pregnancy (13 patients, 0.03%; 95% CI, 0.01-0.04%). Conclusion: Surprisingly, a considerable number of patients (0.41%) with cardiac pacemakers, other metallic implants (not approved for MR), or shrapnels are referred to MR facilities despite the well-known recommendations not to examine such patients. Thus, absolute contraindications to MR imaging are commonly found among patients referred for MR examinations and every effort needs to be made to screen patients prior to MR imaging for such contraindications to avoid detrimental results. Also, institutions placing implants (approved and unapproved for MR) should become legally responsible for providing the required information to the patients and their physicians.

  6. Frequency of referral of patients with safety-related contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Schink, Tania; Dewey, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyse the frequency of patients with absolute and relative contraindications to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging who were actually referred to an outpatient imaging centre for an MR examination Materials and methods: Altogether a total of 51,547 consecutive patients were included between November 1997 and December 2005. Reasons preventing MR imaging were classified into the following categories: absolute and relative contraindications. Results: The referral frequency of patients with absolute contraindications to MR imaging was 0.41% (211 of 51,547 patients; 95% CI, 0.36-0.47%). The absolute contraindications were shrapnels located in biologically sensitive areas (121 patients, 0.23%; 95% CI, 0.20-0.28%), cardiac pacemakers (42 patients, 0.08%; 95% CI, 0.06-0.11%), and other unsafe implants (48 patients, 0.09%; 95% CI, 0.07-0.12%). Also patients with a relative contraindication to MR imaging were referred such as women with a first-trimester pregnancy (13 patients, 0.03%; 95% CI, 0.01-0.04%). Conclusion: Surprisingly, a considerable number of patients (0.41%) with cardiac pacemakers, other metallic implants (not approved for MR), or shrapnels are referred to MR facilities despite the well-known recommendations not to examine such patients. Thus, absolute contraindications to MR imaging are commonly found among patients referred for MR examinations and every effort needs to be made to screen patients prior to MR imaging for such contraindications to avoid detrimental results. Also, institutions placing implants (approved and unapproved for MR) should become legally responsible for providing the required information to the patients and their physicians

  7. Bone marrow NMR imaging and scintigraphy in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, P.; Waters, W.; Schicha, H.; Rasokat, H.; Steigleder, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    The examinations were carried out in order to ascertain whether bone marrow abnormalities can be detected in AIDS patients by means of magnetic resonance imaging or scintiscanning. In 16 of the 19 patients the NMR image and/or the scintiscan distinctly revealed bone marrow abnormalities, but there was no exact correlation to be found to immunological parameters, the peripheral blood picture, or the clinical stage of the HIV infection. (orig.) [de

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Tanja [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomalla, Goetz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Piotrowski, Anna [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, David Mark [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanja; Thomalla, Götz; Goebell, Einar; Piotrowski, Anna; Yousem, David Mark

    2015-06-01

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis.

  10. Transneuronal degeneration in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: evaluation by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Fumiko; Ogawa, Toshihide; Sugihara, Shuji; Kamba, Masayuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine' ' Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, 683-8504, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Kohaya, Norimasa; Kondo, Shinji [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine' ' Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, 683-8504, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the MR imaging findings of transneuronal degeneration of limbic system in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, and to detect the influence of surgery on the anatomy of the limbic system. Axial and coronal T1- and T2-weighted MR images were retrospectively analyzed in 34 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, focusing on transneuronal degeneration. In 17 of the 34 patients, MR images were also analyzed after selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Atrophy of the fornix, mamillary body, mamillothalamic tract (MTT), and thalamus ipsilateral to the epileptic focus was demonstrated on MR images in 14.7, 17.6, 8.8, and 11.8% of the 34 patients, respectively. Focal hyperintensity of the thalamus was found on T2-weighted images in 8.8% of the 34 patients. In 17 patients who were evaluated before and after surgery, transneuronal degeneration was seen more frequently after surgery: fornix (11.8 vs 29.4%), mamillary body (11.8 vs 52.9%), MTT (5.9 vs 11.8%), and thalamus (11.8 vs 11.8%). Transneuronal degeneration of the limbic system is clearly demonstrated by MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, and surgical intervention induces transneuronal degeneration more frequently. (orig.)

  11. Transneuronal degeneration in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: evaluation by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Fumiko; Ogawa, Toshihide; Sugihara, Shuji; Kamba, Masayuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Kohaya, Norimasa; Kondo, Shinji

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the MR imaging findings of transneuronal degeneration of limbic system in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, and to detect the influence of surgery on the anatomy of the limbic system. Axial and coronal T1- and T2-weighted MR images were retrospectively analyzed in 34 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, focusing on transneuronal degeneration. In 17 of the 34 patients, MR images were also analyzed after selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Atrophy of the fornix, mamillary body, mamillothalamic tract (MTT), and thalamus ipsilateral to the epileptic focus was demonstrated on MR images in 14.7, 17.6, 8.8, and 11.8% of the 34 patients, respectively. Focal hyperintensity of the thalamus was found on T2-weighted images in 8.8% of the 34 patients. In 17 patients who were evaluated before and after surgery, transneuronal degeneration was seen more frequently after surgery: fornix (11.8 vs 29.4%), mamillary body (11.8 vs 52.9%), MTT (5.9 vs 11.8%), and thalamus (11.8 vs 11.8%). Transneuronal degeneration of the limbic system is clearly demonstrated by MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, and surgical intervention induces transneuronal degeneration more frequently. (orig.)

  12. New patient-controlled abdominal compression method in radiography: radiation dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piippo-Huotari, Oili; Norrman, Eva; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Geijer, Håkan

    2018-05-01

    The radiation dose for patients can be reduced with many methods and one way is to use abdominal compression. In this study, the radiation dose and image quality for a new patient-controlled compression device were compared with conventional compression and compression in the prone position . To compare radiation dose and image quality of patient-controlled compression compared with conventional and prone compression in general radiography. An experimental design with quantitative approach. After obtaining the approval of the ethics committee, a consecutive sample of 48 patients was examined with the standard clinical urography protocol. The radiation doses were measured as dose-area product and analyzed with a paired t-test. The image quality was evaluated by visual grading analysis. Four radiologists evaluated each image individually by scoring nine criteria modified from the European quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images. There was no significant difference in radiation dose or image quality between conventional and patient-controlled compression. Prone position resulted in both higher dose and inferior image quality. Patient-controlled compression gave similar dose levels as conventional compression and lower than prone compression. Image quality was similar with both patient-controlled and conventional compression and was judged to be better than in the prone position.

  13. MR imaging follow-up studies in patients with aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscholakoff, D.; Herold, C.; Pongracz, I.; Hinterberger, W.; Kier, P.; Chott, A.; Imhof, H.

    1988-01-01

    Eight patients with aplastic anemia underwent MR imaging of the pelvis and thoracolumbar spine before and during treatment. Bone marrow patterns on MR images were correlated with stem-cell and peripheral-blood cell counts and Prussian blue stain of bone marrow (to estimate iron overload). Before treatment, two different bone marrow patterns were observed. Three patients had diffuse, homogeneous high signal intensity throughout the bone marrow, indicating fatty replacement of hematopoietic bone marrow. Bone marrow stains were negative for iron overload. Follow-up studies in these three patients showed multiple areas of hypointense foci in the bone marrow at the time when stem cell and blood cell counts returned to normal. The remaining five patients displayed inhomogeneous signal distribution (hypointense foci on T1-weighted images) in the bone marrow on the first and following MR studies. All five patients did not respond to therapy and had multiple transfusions. Bone marrow signal intensities (correlated to a phantom) were similar in patients with recovery of hematopoietic bone marrow and patients with hemochromatosis

  14. Phase Image Analysis in Conduction Disturbance Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwark, Byeng Su; Choi, Si Wan; Kang, Seung Sik; Park, Ki Nam; Lee, Kang Wook; Jeon, Eun Seok; Park, Chong Hun [Chung Nam University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    It is known that the normal His-Purkinje system provides for nearly synchronous activation of right (RV) and left (LV) ventricles. When His-Purkinje conduction is abnormal, the resulting sequence of ventricular contraction must be correspondingly abnormal. These abnormal mechanical consequences were difficult to demonstrate because of the complexity and the rapidity of its events. To determine the relationship of the phase changes and the abnormalities of ventricular conduction, we performed phase image analysis of Tc-RBC gated blood pool scintigrams in patients with intraventricular conduction disturbances (24 complete left bundle branch block (C-LBBB), 15 complete right bundle branch block (C-RBBB), 13 Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), 10 controls). The results were as follows; 1) The ejection fraction (EF), peak ejection rate (PER), and peak filling rate (PFR) of LV in gated blood pool scintigraphy (GBPS) were significantly lower in patients with C-LBBB than in controls (44.4 +- 13.9% vs 69.9 +- 4.2%, 2.48 +- 0.98 vs 3.51 +- 0,62, 1.76 +- 0.71 vs 3.38 +- 0.92, respectively, p<0.05). 2) In the phase angle analysis of LV, Standard deviation (SD), width of half maximum of phase angle (FWHM), and range of phase angle were significantly increased in patients with C-LBBB than in controls (20.6 + 18.1 vs S.6 + I.8, 22. 5 + 9.2 vs 16.0 + 3.9, 95.7 + 31.7 vs 51.3 + 5.4, respectively, p<0.05). 3) There was no significant difference in EF, PER, PFR between patients with the WolffParkinson-White syndrome and controls. 4) Standard deviation and range of phase angle were significantly higher in patients with WPW syndrome than in controls (10.6 + 2.6 vs 8.6 + 1.8, p<0.05, 69.8 + 11.7 vs 51.3 + 5 4, p<0.001, respectively), however, there was no difference between the two groups in full width of half maximum. 5) Phase image analysis revealed relatively uniform phase across the both ventriles in patients with normal conduction, but markedly delayed phase in the left ventricle

  15. Changing Body Image and Well-Being: Following the Experience of Massive Weight Loss and Body Contouring Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Gilmartin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the perception of changing body image and well-being for patients who had undergone plastic surgery following massive weight loss. The exploratory, qualitative study was undertaken with 20 patients from one teaching hospital in the south of England. Semi-structured interviews were carried out and a thematic analysis of the data undertaken. The results provide important insights regarding body contouring influencing body image change and the adjustment process involved. The ability to pursue self-esteem and the accruing social benefits is emphasized in the interrelated sub themes including social acceptance, undoing depression and sexual vitality. Body contouring surgery following massive weight loss appears to facilitate improvement in body image and well-being. Adjustment to the changing body image is both empowering and challenging. Supportive educational programmes need to be developed to assist this transition to a more positive body image and appreciation; these could usefully include access to and involvement with patient support groups.

  16. Nuclear imaging: Advances and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herk, G. van

    1986-01-01

    In this article, nuclear imaging instruments that are likely to be of interest to the nuclear medicine community of developing countries are emphasized. The advances, trends, developments, and future directions in the field of nuclear imaging are mentioned

  17. MR imaging of multiple sclerosis in patients with negative cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooms, G.C.; Mathurin, P.; Cornelis, G.; Laterre, E.C.; Demeure, R.

    1986-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to assess the value of MR imaging for detecting demyelinating disease of the brain in 50 patients with clinically suspected multiple sclerosis but negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The MR imaging examinations were performed with a superconducting magnet (Philips Gyroscan S15) operating at 0.5T. A multisection, double spin-echo technique was used in all cases (TR = 2,100 msec, TE = 50 and 100 msec). No abnormality was demonstrated in eight patients. In the others, lesions were usually located in the periventricular white matter (rounded masses and/or high signal intensity bands along the lateral ventricles), the brain stem and thalami (12 patients), and the cerebellum (6 patients). In conclusion, MR imaging appears to be an exquisite imaging modality for confirmation of clinically suspected multiple sclerosis in patients with negative CSF. However, it must include examination of the spinal cord when the brain examination is negative

  18. Patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome: MR imaging in 42 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.B.; Skaf, A.; Campos, J.; Stump, X.; Resnick, D.; Roger, B.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the MR imaging findings that occur between the posterior inferolateral patellar tendon and the lateral femoral condyle in patients with chronic anterior and or lateral knee pain. Patients and design: A retrospective review of the MR images in 42 patients who presented with chronic anterior or lateral knee pain was performed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. In 15 patients, post-contrast images were available. Results: Sagittal and axial imaging planes best demonstrated the patellar tendon and its relationship with the lateral femoral condyle. In 40 patients, there was obliteration of the fat planes and abnormal signal intensity in the lateral soft tissues of the inferior patellofemoral joint. Enhancement after administration of gadolinium was noted in all cases in which contrast was administered. Eighteen patients showed cystic changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the lateral femoral condyle in addition to fat plane obliteration. In two patients, only cystic changes were noted in the lateral soft tissues. Abnormal patellar alignment was noted in 37 patients. Patellar tendon pathology was seen in nine patients. Conclusion: In evaluating anterior knee symptoms, MR imaging allows identification of changes that may be related to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and that should be distinguished from other causes of anterior or lateral knee pain. (orig.)

  19. Patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome: MR imaging in 42 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, C.B.; Skaf, A.; Campos, J.; Stump, X.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, University of California, San Diego (United States); Roger, B. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the MR imaging findings that occur between the posterior inferolateral patellar tendon and the lateral femoral condyle in patients with chronic anterior and or lateral knee pain. Patients and design: A retrospective review of the MR images in 42 patients who presented with chronic anterior or lateral knee pain was performed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. In 15 patients, post-contrast images were available. Results: Sagittal and axial imaging planes best demonstrated the patellar tendon and its relationship with the lateral femoral condyle. In 40 patients, there was obliteration of the fat planes and abnormal signal intensity in the lateral soft tissues of the inferior patellofemoral joint. Enhancement after administration of gadolinium was noted in all cases in which contrast was administered. Eighteen patients showed cystic changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the lateral femoral condyle in addition to fat plane obliteration. In two patients, only cystic changes were noted in the lateral soft tissues. Abnormal patellar alignment was noted in 37 patients. Patellar tendon pathology was seen in nine patients. Conclusion: In evaluating anterior knee symptoms, MR imaging allows identification of changes that may be related to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome and that should be distinguished from other causes of anterior or lateral knee pain. (orig.)

  20. Bone scintigraphy in post-SARS patients and compared with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qian; Huang Lili; Qin Shuling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics of bone scintigraphy in post-SARS patients and evaluate the usefulness of bone scintigraphy in the prediction of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) comparing with the MR imaging.. Methods: Our study included 66 patients who were diagnosed as SARS based on the diagnostic criteria issued by the Ministry of Health of China (MHC), including 46 women and 20 men. Their ages ranged from 19 to 63 years (mean, 31.6±0.1 years). All of the patients were treated with methyprednisonlone, rabavirin, broad spectrum antimicrobials and supportive therapy. Dosage of methyprednisonlone was 80∼800 mg/d for 4-72 days. Of them, varied seat of joint pain occurred in 47 patients 3 to 18 weeks after the onset of SARS. Since multiple joints were involved in many patients, bone scintigraphy was performed for screening AVN. The other 19 patients without of evident joint pain were also examined as their demand. Informed consents were obtained in all of the examined patients. No previously joint pain or trauma history was found in this group of patients. Of the 66 patients, planer X-ray was performed in 34 of the symptomatic patients previous to the scintigraphy, but it was negative in all. MR examination was performed in 54 patients before or after the scintigraphy, and the interval between two the tests was average of 8 days (range, 0 to 30 days). In addition, 27 consecutive cases aged lower than 45 years (mean, 40.4±0.8 years) with breast cancer who underwent bone scintigraphy for screening metastastic disease and had negative results were also involved as a control group. Whole body skeletal scintigraphy was performed 3 hours after intravenous administration of technetium-99m methylene-diphosphonate 740 MBq. Increased uptake lesion seen in the limb joints was defined as positive, but 'hot patella' sign was considered to be non diagnostic value. When a lesion was found in the whole body imaging, corresponding regional image was further taken. Two

  1. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  2. Patient Complaints Emphasize Non-Technical Aspects of Care at a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John King

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Patient concerns represent opportunities for improvement in orthopaedic care. Thisstudy’s objectiveis to identify the nature and prevalence of unsolicited patient complaints regarding orthopaedic care ata tertiary referral hospital. The primary null hypothesis that there are no demographic factors associatedwith complaint types was tested. Secondarily we determined if the overall complaint number and typesdifferedby year.Methods:Complaints to the hospital ombudsperson by orthopaedic patients between January 1997 and June 2013 werereviewed. All 1118 complaints were categorized: access and availability, humaneness and disrespect, communication,expectations of care and treatment, distrust, billing and research.Results:Patients between 40 and 60 years of age filed the most complaints in all categories except distrust(more common in patients over age 80 and research. Women were slightly more likely to address access andavailability, humaneness, disrespect, and billing compared to men. The overall number of complaints peakedin 1999. The most common issue was access and availability followed by communication, and humaneness/disrespect.Conclusion:Half of concerns voiced by patients addressed interpersonal issues. The largest category was related toaccess and availability. Quality improvement efforts can address technology to improve access and availability as wellas empathy and communication strategies.

  3. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with heart valve prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, R.; Juengehuelsing, M.; Schicha, H.; Deutsch, H.J.; Sechtem, U.; Hilger, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    Artifical valve prostheses are often regarded as a contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although preliminary in vitro studies suggested, that patients with these metallic implants might safely undergo MR examination. This study reports on the experience with a group of 89 patients with 100 heart valve prostheses who were examined by spin-echo MR and gradient-echo MR. MR examination was performed in all patients without complications. The spin-echo sequence showed advantages in the depiction of anatomical structures like paravalvular abcesses. Anatomical structures adjacent to the artificial valve were clearly visivle and the metal components of the valves showes no or only small artifacts. Artifacts were accentuated when using gradient-echo sequences. Gradient-echo sequences provided valuable information regarding the presence of valvular insufficiency. Physiological valvular regurgitation was easy to differentiate from pathological paravalvular or transvalvular regurgitation. These results demonstrate that patients with artificial valve prostheses can be imaged by MR without risk and that prosthesis-induced artifacts do no interfere with image interpretation. (orig.) [de

  5. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in musculoskeletal infections: Current perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Khaleel, Mohammad; Boothe, Ethan; Awdeh, Haitham; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and prompt therapy of musculoskeletal infections are important prognostic factors. In most cases, clinical history, examination and laboratory findings help one make the diagnosis, and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to identify the extent of the disease process. However, in many situations, a routine MRI may not be specific enough especially if the patient cannot receive contrast intravenously, thereby delaying the appropriate treatment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help in many such situations by providing additional information, accurate characterization and defining the extent of the disease, so that prompt treatment can be initiated. In this article, we illustrate the imaging findings of the spectrum of musculoskeletal infections, emphasizing the role of DWI in this domain. (orig.)

  6. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in musculoskeletal infections: Current perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Yogesh [Yale New Haven Health System at Bridgeport Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Khaleel, Mohammad [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Boothe, Ethan; Awdeh, Haitham [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Accurate diagnosis and prompt therapy of musculoskeletal infections are important prognostic factors. In most cases, clinical history, examination and laboratory findings help one make the diagnosis, and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to identify the extent of the disease process. However, in many situations, a routine MRI may not be specific enough especially if the patient cannot receive contrast intravenously, thereby delaying the appropriate treatment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help in many such situations by providing additional information, accurate characterization and defining the extent of the disease, so that prompt treatment can be initiated. In this article, we illustrate the imaging findings of the spectrum of musculoskeletal infections, emphasizing the role of DWI in this domain. (orig.)

  7. Importance of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with fibrocystic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, G; Asik, E; Yazgan, A

    2011-01-01

    A proper detection of atypical epithelial hyperplasia (component of FCC) without missing the coexistent malign disease is the main problem in evaluating the FCC-affected patients. For some patients, it is not enough to use only mammography and ultrasonography in pursuit or decision biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be important in these patients. Nevertheless, the MRI features of FCC are not clearly known because there are very few studies specifically focused on FCC. Studies reporting on MRI of breast fibrocystic changes are very scarce and their MRI findings are not clearly known. The aim of this study was to determine the MRI characteristics of fibrocystic changes. Twenty-six patients with pathologically proven fibrocystic changes of the breast were retrospectively reviewed. The MRI study was performed using 1.5 T MR scanner with a phase array bilateral breast coil. The imaging protocol consisted of pre-contrast T1-weighted imaging and bilateral dynamic 3D contrast-enhanced imaging. The morphologic and kinetic features of fibrocystic changes on MRI were evaluated. Twenty-four patients showed benign enhancement kinetics (type 1), while 2 patients showed malignant enhancement kinetics (type 2). To our knowledge, the analysis of enhancement kinetics may be more useful in identifying atypical epithelial hyperplasia and cancer from other breast lesions provided that corrections are made for the true phase of menstrual cycle (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 10).

  8. Implementing Protocols to Improve Patient Safety in the Medical Imaging Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizales, Gwen; Clark, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a focal point in healthcare because of recent changes issued by CMS. Hospital reimbursement rates have fallen, and these reimbursement rates are governed by CMS mandates regarding patient safety procedures. Reimbursement changes are reflected in the National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs) administered annually by The Joint Commission. Medical imaging departments have multiple areas of patient safety concerns including effective handoff communication, proper patient identification, and safe medication/contrast administration. This literature review examines those areas of patient safety within the medical imaging department and reveals the need for continued protocol and policy changes to keep patients safe.

  9. Non-traumatic acute abdomen in the adult: a critical review of imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buitrago-Tellez, C.; Boos, S.; Heinemann, F.; Wenz, W.

    1992-01-01

    Two different series collected at the University Hospital of Freiburg are presented as a basis for the critical appraisal of available imaging tests and their correlation with anatomic pain sites. The first series comprises 284 patients of non-traumatic acute abdomen admitted to the emergency department during 1990. The radiological approach revealed an increased use of immediate ultrasound (58%) followed by plain film radiography (53%), contrast studies (15%), and computed tomography (9.8%). Five groups of entities were identified according to the diagnostic imaging procedure prior to surgery. In a second series, the clinical presentation, the distribution and the efficacy of imaging studies for the confirmation of acute mesenteric ischemia were evaluated in 55 patients over a period of 14 years. A reduced mortality rate emphasizes the value of early and agressive diagnosis and angiographic management. (orig.)

  10. Imaging diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, F.; Ohkawa, Y.; Sato, N.; Uchino, J.; Hata, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We review the imaging findings in seven children with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. Calcification was seen on plain abdominal films in five of seven patients (66.6 %); the calcifications were small or coarse with irregular margins. Ultrasound was performed in four cases, identifying the lesions in all four as small calcifications with or without cysts. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in four cases and showed small calcifications, calcifications surrounding a cyst, or an aggregate of calcifications. Angiography was performed in all seven patients and showed changes of intrahepatic arterial stretching, overgrowth of small arteries, and a honeycomb pattern in the capillary phase. Venography revealed compression of the inferior vena cava in two patients. Serum screening together with ultrasonography and CT are useful for diagnostic imaging of alveolar echinococcosis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. CT and MR imaging features in patients with intracranial dolichoectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tien, Kuang Lung; Yu, In Kyu; Yoon, Sook Ja; Yoon, Yong Kyu [Eulji College of Medicine, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    To describe the CT and MR imaging features in patients with intracranial dolichoectasia. The CT (n=3D21), MR (n=3D20) and MRA (n=3D11) imaging features seen in 28 patients (M:F=3D12:16 aged between 65 and 82 (mean, 65) years) with intracranial dolichoectasia were retrospectively reviewed with regard to involved sites, arterial changes (maximum diameter, wall calcification, high signal intensity in the involved artery, as seen on T1-weighted MR images), infarction, hemorrhagic lesion, compression of brain parenchyma or cranial nerves, hydrocephalus and brain atrophy. Involved sites were classified as either type 1 (involvement of only the posterior circulation), type 2 (only the anterior circulation), or type 3 (both). In order of frequency, involved sites were type 1 (43%), type 3 (36%) and type 2 (22%). Dolichoectasia was more frequently seen in the posterior circulation (79%) than in the anterior (57%). Arterial changes as seen on T1-weighted MR images, included dolichoectasia (mean maximum diameter 7.4 mm in the distal internal carotid artery, and 6.7 mm in the basilar artery), wall calcification (100% in involved arteries) and high signal intensity in involved. Cerebral infarction in the territory of the involved artery was found in all patients, and a moderate degree of infarct was 87%. Hemorrhagic lesions were found in 19 patients (68%); these were either lobar (53%), petechial (37%), or subarachnoid (16%), and three patients showed intracranial aneurysms, including one case of dissecting aneurysm. In 19 patients (68%), lesions were compressed lesions by the dolichoectatic arteries, and were found-in order of descending frequency-in the medulla, pons, thalamus, and cerebellopontine angle cistern. Obstructive hydrocephalus was found in two patients (7%), and 23 (82%) showed a moderate degree of brain atrophy. In patients with intracranial dolichoectasia, moderate degrees of cerebral infarction and brain atrophy in the territory of involved arteries, as well as

  12. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose

  13. Two-Dimensional Image Fusion of Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Radiographs in Patients with Clinical Scaphoid Fracture: An Imaging Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Jensen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    . Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation......Background: Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now considered the gold standard in second-line imaging of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative radiographs, bone scintigraphy can be used in patients with pacemakers, metallic implants, or other contraindications to MRI....... Conclusion: Image fusion of planar bone scintigrams and radiographs has a significant influence on image interpretation and increases both diagnostic confidence and interobserver agreement Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/3...

  14. Two-dimensional fusion imaging of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs in patients with clinical scaphoid fracture: an imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Jensen, T D

    2009-01-01

    . Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation......BACKGROUND: Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now considered the gold standard in second-line imaging of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative radiographs, bone scintigraphy can be used in patients with pacemakers, metallic implants, or other contraindications to MRI....... CONCLUSION: Image fusion of planar bone scintigrams and radiographs has a significant influence on image interpretation and increases both diagnostic confidence and interobserver agreement....

  15. Guidelines on oncologic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present issue of European Journal of Radiology is devoted to guidelines on oncologic imaging. 9 experts on imaging in suspected or evident oncologic disease have compiled a broad survey on strategies as well as techniques on oncologic imaging. The group gives advice for detecting tumours at specific tumour sites and use modern literature to emphasize their recommendations. All recommendations are short, comprehensive and authoritative. (orig./MG)

  16. Building Imaging Institutes of Patient Care Outcomes: Imaging as a Nidus for Innovation in Clinical Care, Research, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Myria; Cronin, Paul; Altaee, Duaa K; Kelly, Aine M; Foerster, Bradley R

    2018-05-01

    Traditionally, radiologists have been responsible for the protocol of imaging studies, imaging acquisition, supervision of imaging technologists, and interpretation and reporting of imaging findings. In this article, we outline how radiology needs to change and adapt to a role of providing value-based, integrated health-care delivery. We believe that the way to best serve our specialty and our patients is to undertake a fundamental paradigm shift in how we practice. We describe the need for imaging institutes centered on disease entities (eg, lung cancer, multiple sclerosis) to not only optimize clinical care and patient outcomes, but also spur the development of a new educational focus, which will increase opportunities for medical trainees and other health professionals. These institutes will also serve as unique environments for testing and implementing new technologies and for generating new ideas for research and health-care delivery. We propose that the imaging institutes focus on how imaging practices-including new innovations-improve patient care outcomes within a specific disease framework. These institutes will allow our specialty to lead patient care, provide the necessary infrastructure for state-of-the art-education of trainees, and stimulate innovative and clinically relevant research. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Uhrmeister, P.; Neumann, K.; Langer, M.; Kempis, J. von

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate functional MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involving the cervical spine. Material and Methods: We used a device that allows MR examination to be made of the cervical spine in infinitely variable degrees of flexion and extension. Dynamic functional MR imaging was performed on 25 patients with RA. Results: Functional MR imaging was able to show the degree of vertebral instability of the occipito-atlantal or atlanto-axial level as well as the subaxial level. By performing functional MR imaging, we were able to demonstrate the extent of synovial tissue around the dens, and the impingement and displacement of the spinal cord during flexion and extension. The basilar impression, the cord impingement into the foramen magnum, the cord compression, the slipping of vertebrae, and the angulation of the cord were all much more evident in functional than in static MR imaging. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging provided additional information in patients with RA, and is valuable in patients who have a normal MR study in the neutral position and yet have signs of a neurological deficit. Functional MR imaging is important in the planning of stabilizing operations of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  18. Phase Image Analysis in Conduction Disturbance Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwark, Byeng Su; Choi, Si Wan; Kang, Seung Sik; Park, Ki Nam; Lee, Kang Wook; Jeon, Eun Seok; Park, Chong Hun

    1994-01-01

    It is known that the normal His-Purkinje system provides for nearly synchronous activation of right (RV) and left (LV) ventricles. When His-Purkinje conduction is abnormal, the resulting sequence of ventricular contraction must be correspondingly abnormal. These abnormal mechanical consequences were difficult to demonstrate because of the complexity and the rapidity of its events. To determine the relationship of the phase changes and the abnormalities of ventricular conduction, we performed phase image analysis of Tc-RBC gated blood pool scintigrams in patients with intraventricular conduction disturbances (24 complete left bundle branch block (C-LBBB), 15 complete right bundle branch block (C-RBBB), 13 Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW), 10 controls). The results were as follows; 1) The ejection fraction (EF), peak ejection rate (PER), and peak filling rate (PFR) of LV in gated blood pool scintigraphy (GBPS) were significantly lower in patients with C-LBBB than in controls (44.4 ± 13.9% vs 69.9 ± 4.2%, 2.48 ± 0.98 vs 3.51 ± 0,62, 1.76 ± 0.71 vs 3.38 ± 0.92, respectively, p<0.05). 2) In the phase angle analysis of LV, Standard deviation (SD), width of half maximum of phase angle (FWHM), and range of phase angle were significantly increased in patients with C-LBBB than in controls (20.6 + 18.1 vs S.6 + I.8, 22. 5 + 9.2 vs 16.0 + 3.9, 95.7 + 31.7 vs 51.3 + 5.4, respectively, p<0.05). 3) There was no significant difference in EF, PER, PFR between patients with the WolffParkinson-White syndrome and controls. 4) Standard deviation and range of phase angle were significantly higher in patients with WPW syndrome than in controls (10.6 + 2.6 vs 8.6 + 1.8, p<0.05, 69.8 + 11.7 vs 51.3 + 5 4, p<0.001, respectively), however, there was no difference between the two groups in full width of half maximum. 5) Phase image analysis revealed relatively uniform phase across the both ventriles in patients with normal conduction, but markedly delayed phase in the left ventricle

  19. Emotional distress in patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzolillo, R.; Ercolani, P.; Giovagnoni, A.; Denigris, E.; Barbini, N.; Mariani, L.; Nardi, B.; Cotani, P.; Marchesi, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    MR imaging, like other imaging techniques, can cause emotional and psychological reactions in the patients. Although reversible, these reactions sometimes lead the patient to absolutely refuse the examination or to make it impossible to carry it through. To investigate the patients' emotional distress, a study group pf 28 subjects was examinated. They were heterogeneous in sex, age, and pathologic condition. The main psycological reactions were analyzed, and anxiety-both of state and of trait. The anxiety parameter was evaluated as a specific index in the psycho-behavioral modifications induced by MR examination. The influence was also considered of the 'fantasies' related to examination results on the patients' psyche. Talks and STAI X1 and STAI X2 were employed to this purpose, to identifi possible disturbing elements related to both patients' character and examination situations. Our results point to anxiety as the mayor reaction observed in the subjects undergoing MR examination; it seems to be related to different parameters, which are difficult to identify. Claustrophobia, pathophobia, and the fear of an unknown examination play a mayor role. Talking to the patients and informing them of the characteristics of the examination proved useful to significantly reduce their emotional distress

  20. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Tekin, Nilgun Solak [Department of Dermatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Sarikaya, Selda [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot.

  1. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Tekin, Nilgun Solak; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot

  2. SU-E-J-15: Automatically Detect Patient Treatment Position and Orientation in KV Portal Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, J; Yang, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In the course of radiation therapy, the complex information processing workflow will Result in potential errors, such as incorrect or inaccurate patient setups. With automatic image check and patient identification, such errors could be effectively reduced. For this purpose, we developed a simple and rapid image processing method, to automatically detect the patient position and orientation in 2D portal images, so to allow automatic check of positions and orientations for patient daily RT treatments. Methods: Based on the principle of portal image formation, a set of whole body DRR images were reconstructed from multiple whole body CT volume datasets, and fused together to be used as the matching template. To identify the patient setup position and orientation shown in a 2D portal image, the 2D portal image was preprocessed (contrast enhancement, down-sampling and couch table detection), then matched to the template image so to identify the laterality (left or right), position, orientation and treatment site. Results: Five day’s clinical qualified portal images were gathered randomly, then were processed by the automatic detection and matching method without any additional information. The detection results were visually checked by physicists. 182 images were correct detection in a total of 200kV portal images. The correct rate was 91%. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect patient setup and orientation quickly and automatically. It only requires the image intensity information in KV portal images. This method can be useful in the framework of Electronic Chart Check (ECCK) to reduce the potential errors in workflow of radiation therapy and so to improve patient safety. In addition, the auto-detection results, as the patient treatment site position and patient orientation, could be useful to guide the sequential image processing procedures, e.g. verification of patient daily setup accuracy. This work was partially supported by research grant from

  3. SU-E-J-15: Automatically Detect Patient Treatment Position and Orientation in KV Portal Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, J [Washington University in St Louis, Taian, Shandong (China); Yang, D [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In the course of radiation therapy, the complex information processing workflow will Result in potential errors, such as incorrect or inaccurate patient setups. With automatic image check and patient identification, such errors could be effectively reduced. For this purpose, we developed a simple and rapid image processing method, to automatically detect the patient position and orientation in 2D portal images, so to allow automatic check of positions and orientations for patient daily RT treatments. Methods: Based on the principle of portal image formation, a set of whole body DRR images were reconstructed from multiple whole body CT volume datasets, and fused together to be used as the matching template. To identify the patient setup position and orientation shown in a 2D portal image, the 2D portal image was preprocessed (contrast enhancement, down-sampling and couch table detection), then matched to the template image so to identify the laterality (left or right), position, orientation and treatment site. Results: Five day’s clinical qualified portal images were gathered randomly, then were processed by the automatic detection and matching method without any additional information. The detection results were visually checked by physicists. 182 images were correct detection in a total of 200kV portal images. The correct rate was 91%. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect patient setup and orientation quickly and automatically. It only requires the image intensity information in KV portal images. This method can be useful in the framework of Electronic Chart Check (ECCK) to reduce the potential errors in workflow of radiation therapy and so to improve patient safety. In addition, the auto-detection results, as the patient treatment site position and patient orientation, could be useful to guide the sequential image processing procedures, e.g. verification of patient daily setup accuracy. This work was partially supported by research grant from

  4. Clinical usefulness of cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakakura, Kazuyoshi; Anno, Hirofumi; Kondo, Takeshi [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan); and others

    1993-05-01

    We studied the clinical usefulness of cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) from aspects of image quality and cardiac function. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the myocardium was significantly (p<0.05) lower in patients with AF than those with normal sinus rhythm. Two radiologists who did not know any patient's information evaluated the image quality visually by marking method on a scale of 12 points. There was no difference of image quality between the two groups. The standard deviation of R-R interval was significantly (r=-0.92, p<0.001) correlated with the S/N ratio in myocardium. Consequently, it was not favorable to estimate visually cardiac cine MR image in patients with AF, when standard deviation of R-R interval was large. The left ventricular (LV) end diastolic, end systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction were closely (r=0.82[approx]0.95, p<0.05[approx]0.001) correlated between MR imaging and M-mode echocardiography, respectively. The ability to detect left side valvular regurgitation was almost equal in both MR imaging and color Doppler echocardiography. This result was coincided to previous papers in patients with normal sinus rhythm. In conclusion, cine mode MR imaging was also useful to analyze cardiac function and detect valvular regurgitation in patients with AF. (author).

  5. Analysis of chest image performance in patients with acute chlorine poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liangqing; Zheng Jiangang; Yang Keyu; Wu Honglin; Tang Qingfang; Wu Huiming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore chest image features of patients with acute chlorine poisoning and their clinical values. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by chest image features of 117 patients with acute chlorine poisoning. All the patients were classified according to Chinese management of occupational acute chlorine poisoning diagnosis standard. Results: Sixty-five patients presented with stimulus response, and normal or both lungs had a little more white on their chest images. Thirty-one cases presented with minor poisoning, and without or the texture of both lungs was increased, and grew hazy and coarse.seventeen cases were moderate, and small sample vague shadows or single or multiple limitations lamellar shadow. Four cases were serious,and two lungs had extensive and density homogeneous consolidation shadow. Conclusions: It would make the diagnosis and assessment of chlorine poisoning more easier based on the combination of chest image features, the clear history of acute chlorine poisoning and relevant clinical performance. (authors)

  6. Patient repositioning in prostate conformal radiotherapy by image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betrouni, Nacim

    2004-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes an overview of imaging modalities which are generally used in radiotherapy, and briefly presents operation principles for ultrasound scans, scanners and MRI. The issue of patient repositioning in radiotherapy is then introduced, and already proposed solutions are presented. In the next part, the author addresses space location and ultrasound-based location, with a brief overview of methods used to track the displacements of a mobile object, in this case an ultrasound probe, and calibration. Then, after a presentation of the adopted method, and a discussion of published works related to contour extraction and to filtering and noise reduction methods in ultrasound imagery, the author addresses the issue of prostate segmentation based on ultrasound images. The next part deals with image registration with an overview of available methods and tools. A method of registration of pre-operation images obtained by MRI or scanner, and of intra-operation ultrasound images is proposed for a real-time registration. This method is aimed at supporting patient repositioning during prostate conformal radiotherapy

  7. Intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockett, J.F.; Wood, W.C.; Moinuddin, M.; Loveless, V.; Parrish, B.

    1990-01-01

    Tl-201 exercise imaging in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) has proven to be indeterminate for significant left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery stenosis because of the presence of immediate septal perfusion defects with redistribution on delayed images in almost all cases. Tl-201 redistribution occurs regardless of the presence or absence of LAD stenosis. Nineteen patients having LBBB were evaluated with dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT. Fourteen of these subjects had normal dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT imaging. Three patients had normal coronary angiograms. None of the remaining 11 patients with normal dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT images was found to have clinical coronary artery disease in a 5-11 month follow-up period. Five patients had abnormal septal perfusion. Four underwent coronary angiography. One had a significant LAD stenosis. The single patient with septal redistribution who refused to undergo coronary angiography died shortly thereafter of clinical coronary artery disease. This preliminary work suggests that dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT may be more useful for excluding LAD stenosis in patients with LBBB than Tl-201 exercise imaging

  8. SU-E-J-225: CEST Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J; Hwang, K; Fuller, C; Mohamed, A; Ding, Y; Frank, S; Hazle, J; Zhou, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging is an MRI technique enables the detection and imaging of metabolically active compounds in vivo. It has been used to differentiate tumor types and metabolic characteristics. Unlike PET/CT,CEST imaging does not use isotopes so it can be used on patient repeatedly. This study is to report the preliminary results of CEST imaging in Head and Neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods: A CEST imaging sequence and the post-processing software was developed on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. Ten patients with Human papilloma virus positive oropharyngeal cancer were imaged in their immobilized treatment position. A 5 mm slice CEST image was acquired (128×128, FOV=20∼24cm) to encompass the maximum dimension of tumor. Twenty-nine off-set frequencies (from −7.8ppm to +7.8 ppm) were acquired to obtain the Z-spectrum. Asymmetry analysis was used to extract the CEST contrasts. ROI at the tumor, node and surrounding tissues were measured. Results: CEST images were successfully acquired and Zspectrum asymmetry analysis demonstrated clear CEST contrasts in tumor as well as the surrounding tissues. 3∼5% CEST contrast in the range of 1 to 4 ppm was noted in tumor as well as grossly involved nodes. Injection of glucose produced a marked increase of CEST contrast in tumor region (∼10%). Motion and pulsation artifacts tend to smear the CEST contrast, making the interpretation of the image contrast difficult. Field nonuniformity, pulsation in blood vesicle and susceptibility artifacts caused by air cavities were also problematic for CEST imaging. Conclusion: We have demonstrated successful CEST acquisition and Z-spectrum reconstruction on HNC patients with a clinical scanner. MRI acquisition in immobilized treatment position is critical for image quality as well as the success of CEST image acquisition. CEST images provide novel contrast of metabolites in HNC and present great potential in the pre- and post-treatment assessment

  9. SU-E-J-225: CEST Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Hwang, K; Fuller, C; Mohamed, A; Ding, Y; Frank, S; Hazle, J; Zhou, J [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging is an MRI technique enables the detection and imaging of metabolically active compounds in vivo. It has been used to differentiate tumor types and metabolic characteristics. Unlike PET/CT,CEST imaging does not use isotopes so it can be used on patient repeatedly. This study is to report the preliminary results of CEST imaging in Head and Neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods: A CEST imaging sequence and the post-processing software was developed on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. Ten patients with Human papilloma virus positive oropharyngeal cancer were imaged in their immobilized treatment position. A 5 mm slice CEST image was acquired (128×128, FOV=20∼24cm) to encompass the maximum dimension of tumor. Twenty-nine off-set frequencies (from −7.8ppm to +7.8 ppm) were acquired to obtain the Z-spectrum. Asymmetry analysis was used to extract the CEST contrasts. ROI at the tumor, node and surrounding tissues were measured. Results: CEST images were successfully acquired and Zspectrum asymmetry analysis demonstrated clear CEST contrasts in tumor as well as the surrounding tissues. 3∼5% CEST contrast in the range of 1 to 4 ppm was noted in tumor as well as grossly involved nodes. Injection of glucose produced a marked increase of CEST contrast in tumor region (∼10%). Motion and pulsation artifacts tend to smear the CEST contrast, making the interpretation of the image contrast difficult. Field nonuniformity, pulsation in blood vesicle and susceptibility artifacts caused by air cavities were also problematic for CEST imaging. Conclusion: We have demonstrated successful CEST acquisition and Z-spectrum reconstruction on HNC patients with a clinical scanner. MRI acquisition in immobilized treatment position is critical for image quality as well as the success of CEST image acquisition. CEST images provide novel contrast of metabolites in HNC and present great potential in the pre- and post-treatment assessment

  10. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan were ...

  11. Towards adapting a normal patient database for SPECT brain perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, N D; Soleimani, M; Mitchell, C N; Holmes, R B; Evans, M J; Cade, S C

    2012-01-01

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) is a tool which can be used to image perfusion in the brain. Clinicians can use such images to help diagnose dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. Due to the intrinsic stochasticity in the photon imaging system, some form of statistical comparison of an individual image with a 'normal' patient database gives a clinician additional confidence in interpreting the image. Due to the variations between SPECT camera systems, ideally a normal patient database is required for each individual system. However, cost or ethical considerations often prohibit the collection of such a database for each new camera system. Some method of adapting existing normal patient databases to new camera systems would be beneficial. This paper introduces a method which may be regarded as a 'first-pass' attempt based on 2-norm regularization and a codebook of discrete spatially stationary convolutional kernels. Some preliminary illustrative results are presented, together with discussion on limitations and possible improvements

  12. Clinical potential for imaging in patients with asthma and other lung disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Emily M; Spielberg, David R; Brody, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    The ability of lung imaging to phenotype patients, determine prognosis, and predict response to treatment is expanding in clinical and translational research. The purpose of this perspective is to describe current imaging modalities that might be useful clinical tools in patients with asthma and other lung disorders and to explore some of the new developments in imaging modalities of the lung. These imaging modalities include chest radiography, computed tomography, lung magnetic resonance imaging, electrical impedance tomography, bronchoscopy, and others. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)]. E-mail: nboutry@chru-lille.fr; Khalil, Chadi [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Jaspart, Matthieu [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Marie-Helene, Vieillard [Department of Rheumatology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Demondion, Xavier [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Cotten, Anne [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)

    2007-07-15

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  14. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Khalil, Chadi; Jaspart, Matthieu; Marie-Helene, Vieillard; Demondion, Xavier; Cotten, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  15. Imaging and neuropsychologic study of Alzheimer's disease and multiple infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tsutomu; Fukatsu, Ryo; Takabatake, Naohiko; Takahashi, Sadaichiro; Morita, Kazuo; Akino, Minoru.

    1987-01-01

    Iodine-123 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were undertaken in 8 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 7 patients with multiple infarct dementia (MID). Imaging features and their relationship to neuropsychologic findings were examined. The group of AD patients had markedly decreased activity in the bilateral parietal-occipital areas on SPECT and relatively marked atrophy in the corresponding area and thinning in the posterior part of callosal stem on MRI. The group of MID patients had a widespread and inhomogeneously decreased activity in the frontal lobe and mottled decrease of activity in the other cortical areas on SPECT. Neuropsychologic symptoms steming from the parietal-occipital area, which is considered as an causative area for AD, were frequently observed in the AD group, as opposed to the lack of these symptoms in the MID group. In both AD and MID groups, there was a good correlation between the areas with decreased activity on SPECT and atrophy on MRI. These imaging appearances were correlated with the occurrence of neuropsychologic symptoms as well. The importance of the parietal-occipital lobe that is likely responsible for the pathogenesis of dementia for AD is emphasized. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. MR imaging of the knee in patients with rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Winalski, C.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Kikinis, R.; Shortkroff, S.; Sledge, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the MR appearances of the knees in patients with rheumatic diseases, including the grading of changes, quantification of changes, and the role of intravenous gadolinium. MR imaging of the knee was performed in 19 patients with arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis (n = 11), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), Reiter syndrome (n = 2), Crohn arthritis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 3). Spin-echo images (T1, T2, and proton density weighted) were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. T1-weighted axial images were obtained before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA

  17. Functional Imaging Signature of Patients Presenting with Polycythemia/Paraganglioma Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ingo; Chen, Clara C; Zhuang, Zhenping; Millo, Corina M; Wolf, Katherine I; Ling, Alexander; Lin, Frank I; Adams, Karen T; Herscovitch, Peter; Feelders, Richard A; Fojo, Antonio T; Taieb, David; Kebebew, Electron; Pacak, Karel

    2017-08-01

    Pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PPGL) syndromes associated with polycythemia have previously been described in association with mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau gene. Recently, mutations in the prolyl hydroxylase gene ( PHD ) 1 and 2 and in the hypoxia-inducible factor 2 α ( HIF2A ) were also found to be associated with multiple and recurrent PPGL. Such patients also presented with PPGL and polycythemia, and later on, some presented with duodenal somatostatinoma. In additional patients presenting with PPGL and polycythemia, no further mutations have been discovered. Because the functional imaging signature of patients with PPGL-polycythemia syndromes is still unknown, and because these tumors (in most patients) are multiple, recurrent, and metastatic, the goal of our study was to assess the optimal imaging approach using 4 different PET radiopharmaceuticals and CT/MRI in these patients. Methods: Fourteen patients (10 women, 4 men) with confirmed PPGL and polycythemia prospectively underwent 68 Ga-DOTATATE (13 patients), 18 F-FDG (13 patients), 18 F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ( 18 F-FDOPA) (14 patients), 18 F-fluorodopamine ( 18 F-FDA) (11 patients), and CT/MRI (14 patients). Detection rates of PPGL lesions were compared between all imaging studies and stratified between the underlying mutations. Results: 18 F-FDOPA and 18 F-FDA PET/CT showed similar combined lesion-based detection rates of 98.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.7%-99.8%) and 98.3% (95% CI, 90.9%-99.7%), respectively. The detection rates for 68 Ga-DOTATATE (35.3%; 95% CI, 25.0%-47.2%), 18 F-FDG (42.3; 95% CI, 29.9%-55.8%), and CT/MRI (60.3%; 95% CI, 48.8%-70.7%) were significantly lower ( P < 0.01), irrespective of the mutation status. Conclusion: 18 F-FDOPA and 18 F-FDA are superior to 18 F-FDG, 68 Ga-DOTATATE, and CT/MRI and should be the radiopharmaceuticals of choice in this rare group of patients. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  18. Aberrant resting-state corticostriatal functional connectivity in cirrhotic patients with hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Qi Zhu

    Full Text Available Neurobiological and neuroimaging studies have emphasized the structural and functional alterations in the striatum of cirrhotic patients, but alterations in the functional connections between the striatum and other brain regions have not yet been explored. Of note, manganese accumulation in the nervous system, frequently reflected by hyperintensity at the bilateral globus pallidus (GP on T1-weighted imaging, has been considered a factor affecting the striatal and cortical functions in hepatic decompensation. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to analyze the temporal correlation between the striatum and the remaining brain regions using seed-based correlation analyses. The two-sample t-test was conducted to detect the differences in corticostriatal connectivity between 44 cirrhotic patients with hyperintensity at the bilateral GP and 20 healthy controls. Decreased connectivity of the caudate was detected in the anterior/middle cingulate gyrus, and increased connectivity of the caudate was found in the left motor cortex. A reduction in functional connectivity was found between the putamen and several regions, including the anterior cingulate gyrus, right insular lobe, inferior frontal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, and anterior lobe of the right cerebellum; increased connectivity was detected between the putamen and right middle temporal gyrus. There were significant correlations between the corticostriatal connectivity and neuropsychological performances in the patient group, but not between the striatal connectivity and GP signal intensity. These alterations in the corticostriatal functional connectivity suggested the abnormalities in the intrinsic brain functional organiztion among the cirrhotic patients with manganese deposition, and may be associated with development of metabolic encephalopathy. The manganese deposition in nervous system, however, can not be an independent factor predicting the resting

  19. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  20. Medical image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Dougherty, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This book is designed for end users in the field of digital imaging, who wish to update their skills and understanding with the latest techniques in image analysis. This book emphasizes the conceptual framework of image analysis and the effective use of image processing tools. It uses applications in a variety of fields to demonstrate and consolidate both specific and general concepts, and to build intuition, insight and understanding. Although the chapters are essentially self-contained they reference other chapters to form an integrated whole. Each chapter employs a pedagogical approach to e

  1. Significance of MR imaging in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.; Globits, S.; Mayr, H.; Lang, I.; Kneussl, M.; Glogar, D.; Miczoch, J.; Neuhold, A.; Imhof, H.

    1989-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic impact of MR imaging in pulmonary hypertension (PH), the authors have examined 12 PH patients with a 0.5- or 1.5-T magnet in a double-angulation projection with multisection, multiphase technique and a gradient-echo sequence. MR data were evaluated for right ventricular volumes or function and compared with data from 10 control subjects. In PH patients, MR imaging showed right ventricular enlargement with hypertrophy, right atrial enlargement, and abnormal septal motion. Right ventricular (RV) function was compromised, with reduced RV circumferential shortening. PH patients had a severe reduction of long-axis shortening and variable reduction of short-axis shortening that correlated with the degree of PH (r = .68, P <.01)

  2. Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging of Lymph Nodes in Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Hong; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2010-01-01

    The accurate identification and characterization of lymph nodes by modern imaging modalities has important therapeutic and prognostic significance for patients with newly diagnosed cancers. The presence of nodal metastases limits the therapeutic options, and it generally indicates a worse prognosis for the patients with nodal metastases. Yet anatomic imaging (CT and MR imaging) is of limited value for depicting small metastatic deposits in normal-sized nodes, and nodal size is a poor criterion when there is no extracapsular extension or focal nodal necrosis to rely on for diagnosing nodal metastases. Thus, there is a need for functional methods that can be reliably used to identify small metastases. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of lymph nodes is a non-invasive method for the analysis of the lymphatic system after the interstitial or intravenous administration of contrast media. Moreover, some lymphotrophic contrast media have been developed and used for detecting lymph node metastases, and this detection is independent of the nodal size. This article will review the basic principles, the imaging protocols, the interpretation and the accuracies of contrast-enhanced MR imaging of lymph nodes in patients with malignancies, and we also focus on the recent issues cited in the literature. In addition, we discuss the results of several pre-clinical studies and animal studies that were conducted in our institution

  3. Individual patient dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Oliva, J.; Baum, R.; Fisher, S.

    2002-01-01

    An approach is described to provide individual patient dosimetry for routine clinical use. Accurate quantitative SPECT imaging was achieved using appropriate methods. The volume of interest (VOI) was defined semi-automatically using a fixed threshold value obtained from phantom studies. The calibration factor to convert the voxel counts from SPECT images into activity values was determine from calibrated point source using the same threshold value as in phantom studies. From selected radionuclide the dose within and outside a sphere of voxel dimension at different distances was computed through dose point-kernels to obtain a discrete absorbed dose kernel representation around the volume source with uniform activity distribution. The spatial activity distribution from SPECT imaging was convolved with this kernel representation using the discrete Fourier transform method to yield three-dimensional absorbed dose rate distribution. The accuracy of dose rates calculation was validated by software phantoms. The absorbed dose was determined by integration of the dose rate distribution for each volume of interest (VOI). Parameters for treatment optimization such as dose rate volume histograms and dose rate statistic are provided. A patient example was used to illustrate our dosimetric calculations

  4. Spontaneous cerebral microbleeds on gradient echo MR imaging in the stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Seong Ho; Song, Chang June; Kim, Dae Bong; Jeong, Geum Chae

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the spontaneous cerebral microbleeding occurring at gradient-echo MRI, and its relationship with associated stroke lesions and risk factors. Between September 2001 and December, 2002, 32 patients (21 men and 11 women; mean age 63 years) in whom cerebral microbleeding occurred at gradient-echo MRI were retrospectively investigated. Using a 1.5T MR imager, spin-echo T1-weighted, fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and gradient-echo images were obtained. The number and location of microbleeds seen on gradient echo images, patients data, and associated stroke lesions such as intracerebral hemorrhage and lacunar and territorial infarction were assessed. Among the 32 patients, 563 microbleeds and between 1 and 66 (mean, 17.6) were noted at gradient-echo imaging. Microbleeding occurred in the cortical/subcortical area (n=216), the basal ganglia (n=173), thalamus (n=92), cerebellum (n=41), brainstem (n=36) and corpus callosum (n=1), and in 20 patients was bilateral. Patients had a history of hypertension (n=26), hypertriglycemia (n=12), heart disease (n=4), and diabetes mellitus (n=3). Stroke lesions were seen in 27 patients, intracerebral hemorrhage in ten, lacunar infarction in 24, and territorial infarction in four. The incidence and number of microbleeds was greater in older patients and in those with hypertension, hypertriglycemia, and stroke lesions such as intracerebral hemorrhage or lacunar infarction. The detection of microbleeding at gradient-echo imaging is helpful, since it predicts the possibility of cerebral hemorrhage in these patients

  5. MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho [School of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging findings of 116 patients diagnosed by MRI as suffering from mesial temporal sclerosis. In 18 of these, the condition was also histologically proven. Among the 116 patients, volume loss of the hippocampus was found in 95 (81.9%) and signal changes of the hippocampus in 53 (45.7%). Decreased signal intensity in the hippocampus on T1-weighted images was found in 13 (11.2%) and increased signal on T2-weighted images in 50 (43.1%). Signal abnormality in the hippocampus on both T1- and T2-weighted images was found in ten, and associated extrahippocampal abnormalities, as follows, in 20 (17.2%): atrophy of fornix (n=3D10), atrophy of the mammillary body (n=3D8), atrophy of the amygdala (n=3D10), atrophy or increased T2 signal intensity of the anterior thalamic nuclei (n=3D2), atrophy of the cingulate gyrus (n=3D2), atrophy or increased signal intensity of the anterior temporal lobe (n=3D8), and cerebral hemiatrophy (n=3D4). A high T2 signal and atrophy of the hippocampus are the most common and important MRI findings of mesial temporal sclerosis. Other abnormal findings, if any, which may be found in extrahippocampal structures such as the fornix, mammillary body and temporal lobe, should, however, also be carefully observed. (author)

  6. Brain MRI diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with classical phenylketonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manara, Renzo; Citton, Valentina; Carollo, Carla [University Hospital of Padua, Neuroradiologic Unit, Padua (Italy); Burlina, Alessandro P.; Ermani, Mario [University Hospital of Padua, Neurological Clinic, Department of Neuroscience, Padua (Italy); Vespignani, Francesco; Burlina, Alberto B. [University Hospital of Padua, Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Padua (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this study was to grade magnetic resonance white matter abnormalities (WMAs) of classical phenylketonuria (cPKU) patients treated from birth and to compare sensitivity and specificity of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). Twenty early-treated cPKU patients still on a low-phenylalanine diet (12 males; mean age 21.2 years) and 26 normal subjects (ten males; mean age 25.1 years) were enrolled. Typical T2- and diffusion-weighted WMAs were semiquantitatively graded according to Thompson score (TS). Besides, a regional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) score (mTS) was developed according to extension and intensity of WMAs. Phenylalanine and tyrosine plasma concentrations before performing MRI and the amino acid mean levels collected the year before MRI (Tyr{sub year} and Phe{sub year}) were measured. No patient with Phe{sub year} concentration below 460 {mu}mol/L showed WMAs. In cPKU patients, TS and mTS were significantly higher on DWI than on T2 images (3.50 vs 2.65 and 23.65 vs 15.85, respectively, p<0.002, Wilcoxon test). All controls were scored 0 on DWI, while in T2 images, TS and mTS were 0.19 and 1.70. DWI evaluated by mTS disclosed a frontotemporal, occipital, and parietal WM progressive involvement. TS and mTS, both on T2 images and on DWI, showed no correlation with tyrosine while they proved to have a strong correlation with phenylalaninemia and an excellent one with Phe{sub year} levels. Among the different MR sequences, DWI seems to be the most sensitive and reliable in detecting and grading the typical WMAs of cPKU patients. (orig.)

  7. Indications for and clinical procedures resulting from magnetic resonance imaging of the knee in older patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marc-Etienne; Vézina, François; Carrier, Nathalie; Masetto, Ariel

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze the indications for and clinical procedures resulting from knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in older patients. Design We retrospectively analyzed 215 medical records of patients 50 years of age and older who had undergone a unilateral knee MRI in 2009. Setting Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke in Quebec. Participants Patients 50 years of age and older who underwent a knee MRI in 2009. Main outcome measures The main outcome measure was an invasive procedure in the same knee that underwent an MRI. Medical charts were reviewed up to 2014 for patient characteristics, MRI indication, ordering physician specialty, radiography before MRI, MRI findings, and clinical procedures resulting from the MRI. Results The patients’ mean (SD) age was 60.6 (7.5) years. The main MRI indications were meniscopathy (148 [68.8%]) and chronic pain (92 [42.8%]). The main MRI findings were osteoarthritis (OA) (185 [86.0%]) and meniscal lesions (170 [79.1%]). Only 82 (38.1%) patients had a plain radiograph in the 24 months preceding the MRI, usually without a standing anteroposterior view. Findings on pre-MRI radiography (n = 201) demonstrated OA in 144 (71.6%) patients. Overall, 87 (40.5%) patients were seen by an orthopedic surgeon and 27 (31.0%) of these patients underwent an invasive intervention. Among the 81 patients with moderate to severe OA on MRI, 36 (44.4%) had radiographic evidence of moderate to severe OA and only 3 (3.7%) underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Conclusion Our study reproduces the known association between OA and degenerative meniscal changes in older patients. We have found a surprising underuse of the standing anteroposterior view on radiography. Most patients in our cohort could have been appropriately diagnosed and treated based on such radiographic information, as demonstrated by pre-MRI findings, thus avoiding the MRI and subsequent evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. Meniscectomy was rarely performed

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiner, L.; Demaerel, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes simplex meningoencephalitis is one of the most common viral central nervous system infection in adults. Early diagnosis is essential for treatment. Case report: We present a case of a 68-year-old female patient with herpes simplex infection. On admission, she was in severe clinical condition. Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging detected brain involvement better than conventional sequences. After acyclovir therapy, the patient fully recovered. Conclusion: DW magnetic resonance imaging is expected to provide a more sensitive imaging in herpes simplex patients than conventional sequences

  9. Patients setup verification tool for RT (PSVTs): DRR, simulation, portal and digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk; Seong, Jin Sil; Chu, Sung Sil; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok; Kwon, Soo Il

    2003-01-01

    To develop a patients' setup verification tool (PSVT) to verify the alignment of the machine and the target isocenters, and the reproducibility of patients' setup for three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (MRT). The utilization of this system is evaluated through phantom and patient case studies. We developed and clinically tested a new method for patients' setup verification, using digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR), simulation, portal and digital images. The PSVT system was networked to a Pentium PC for the transmission of the acquired images to the PC for analysis. To verify the alignment of the machine and target isocenters, orthogonal pairs of simulation images were used as verification images. Errors in the isocenter alignment were measured by comparing the verification images with DRR of CT images. Orthogonal films were taken of all the patients once a week. These verification films were compared with the DRR were used for the treatment setup. By performing this procedure every treatment, using humanoid phantom and patient cases, the errors of localization can be analyzed, with adjustments made from the translation. The reproducibility of the patients' setup was verified using portal and digital images. The PSVT system was developed to verify the alignment of the machine and the target isocenters, and the reproducibility of the patients' setup for 3DCRT and IMRT The results show that the localization errors are 0.8±0.2 mm (AP) and 1.0±0.3 mm (Lateral) in the cases relating to the brain and 1.1± 0.5 mm (AP) and 1.0±0.6 mm (Lateral) in the cases relating to the pelvis. The reproducibility of the patients' setup was verified by visualization, using real-time image acquisition, leading to the practical utilization of our software. A PSVT system was developed for the verification of the alignment between machine and the target isocenters, and the reproducibility of the patients' setup in 3DCRT and IMRT

  10. Imaging manifestations and its clinical significance in patients with oncogenic osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Lin Qiang; Zhang Yunqing; Jiang Bo; Jin Jin; Jiang Yan; Li Mei; Li Fang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare images from different modality for detecting lesions in patients with oncogenic osteomalacia. Methods: Eight patients with oncogenic osteomalacia were recruited in this study. The age ranged from 28 to 69 years (mean age 44.1, 5 men and 3 women). All patients were diagnosed as osteomalacia according to their clinical and radiographic manifestations. Main laboratory tests included serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase activity, parathyroid hormone, urinary phosphorus as well as liver and renal functions. Octreotide scans were performed for all patients according to clinical request for confirming the oncogenic osteomalacia. Further examinations of MR imaging in 8 patients, spiral CT in four patients and conventional radiography in four patients were obtained after the octreotide scans respectively. All patients had operation for their tumor resections and for the pathologic diagnostic findings. Results: Abnormal laboratory findings in all patients included low serum phosphorus level (ranged from 0.29 to 0.65 mmol·L -1 ), elevated alkaline phosphatase activity (ranged from 36. 6 to 310.6 μmol·s -1 ·L -1 ) as well as urinary phosphorus level (ranged from 11.5 to 40. 9 mmol·L -1 ). Normal results included parathyroid hormone level, liver and renal functions. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of 4 soft tissue tumors including 1 hemangiomas, 1 giant-cell tumor of tendon sheath, 1 hemangiopericytoma and 1 mesenchymal tumor, as well as 4 bone tumors including 1 malignant neurofibroma, 2 mesenchymal tumors and 1 fibroblastoma. All lesions were shown abnormal region of increasing uptake tracer on octreotide scans. However, the octreotide scans could not determine where (bone or soft tissues) the lesions located. MR imaging could differentiate the lesions within the bone or within the soft tissues in all patients. All lesions had hypo- or iso- signal intensity on T 1 WI and high signal intensity on T 2 WI with heterogeneous in 6 tumors and

  11. In vivo NMR imaging of sodium-23 in the human head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, S K; Maudsley, A A; Ra, J B; Simon, H E; Roschmann, P; Wittekoek, S; Cho, Z H; Mun, S K

    1985-01-01

    We report the first clinical nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images of cerebral sodium distribution in normal volunteers and in patients with a variety of pathological lesions. We have used a 1.5 T NMR magnet system. When compared with proton distribution, sodium shows a greater variation in its concentration from tissue to tissue and from normal to pathological conditions. Image contrast calculated on the basis of sodium concentration is 7 to 18 times greater than that of proton spin density. Normal images emphasize the extracellular compartments. In the clinical studies, areas of recent or old cerebral infarction and tumors show a pronounced increase of sodium content (300-400%). Actual measurements of image density values indicate that there is probably a further accentuation of the contrast by the increased "NMR visibility" of sodium in infarcted tissue. Sodium imaging may prove to be a more sensitive means for early detection of some brain disorders than other imaging methods.

  12. A practical approach to magnetic resonance imaging of normal and injured tendons: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, B.B.; Khan, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The imaging of tendon injury can be troublesome from a number of perspectives. First, tendon injuries are extremely common, accounting for 30%-50% of all sports injuries, and are, therefore, seen frequently at imaging centers. Second, tendons have a unique histology and ultra-structure with a number of normal variations that can mimic pathologic conditions, of which the radiologist should be aware. Finally, although full-thickness tears are easily diagnosed both clinically and with imaging, imaging findings for partial tears overlap those of tendinosis and those of normal tendons, and this can be very troublesome for radiologists, clinicians and patients alike. The objective of this article is to develop a practical approach to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analysis of tendons, both normal and pathologic, emphasizing the common features at different anatomic locations. (author)

  13. A practical approach to magnetic resonance imaging of normal and injured tendons: pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B. [UBC Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Khan, K.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Family Practice, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2003-10-01

    The imaging of tendon injury can be troublesome from a number of perspectives. First, tendon injuries are extremely common, accounting for 30%-50% of all sports injuries, and are, therefore, seen frequently at imaging centers. Second, tendons have a unique histology and ultra-structure with a number of normal variations that can mimic pathologic conditions, of which the radiologist should be aware. Finally, although full-thickness tears are easily diagnosed both clinically and with imaging, imaging findings for partial tears overlap those of tendinosis and those of normal tendons, and this can be very troublesome for radiologists, clinicians and patients alike. The objective of this article is to develop a practical approach to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analysis of tendons, both normal and pathologic, emphasizing the common features at different anatomic locations. (author)

  14. Cerebral and meningeal manifestations of AIDS: comparison of plain T2-weighted images and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images in 105 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochens, R.; Henkes, H.; Steinkamp, H.J.; Terstegge, K.; Hosten, N.; Ruf, B.; Schoerner, W.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of T1-weighted Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging in the diagnosis of cerebral manifestations of AIDS. 105 patients with AIDS were imaged with plain T2-weighted images as well as with Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequences. Our study revealed comparable sensitivities in the detection of morphological changes as shown on plain T2-weighted images and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images in 55% of patients (normal and pathologic findings). Plain T2-weighted images were superior in 28.5% and provided significantly better results in 8.5% of patients. Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images were superior in only 5% cases and revealed significantly better results in 3%. As a result, T2-weighted plain images were superior in approximately 40% of patients concerning detection of morphologic changes. In almost 10% of patients with parechymal and meningeal lesions, Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images, however, were superior or even significantly better compared to T2-weighted plain images. The detection of morphologic changes in MR imaging can be further increased with Gd-DTPA. With regard to differential diagnosis and diesease activity, plain T2-weighted images and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images revealed comparable results in 42% of patients (normal and pathologic findings). T2-weighted plain images were superior in 2% of cases whereas Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images were superior in as much as 56% of patient. MR imaging enhanced with Gd-DTPA yielded additional information on disease activity in 73% of patients with pathologic findings in the cerebral parechyma and the meninges. The surplus of information also refers to the etiology of cerebral pathology and differential diagnosis. Because of the frequency of cerebral manifestations in AIDS, early diagnosis for initiation of therapy and follow-up studies to monitor therapy are crucial. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma: imaging analysis of seven patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Moreira, Paulo de Tarso Barbosa; Paes Junior, Ademar Jose de Oliveira; Pacheco Netto, Mario C.; Rapoport, Abrao; Soares, Aldemir Humberto

    2003-01-01

    The authors studied seven patients with gingival carcinoma attended at the Head and Neck Surgery and Otorrhinolaryngology Service and the Diagnostic Imaging Service of 'Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis', Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, between 1985 and 1996. Squamous cell type carcinomas were identified in all cases. All patients were male (100%) aged 48-72 years. Computed tomography was performed in six patients (85.6%). Four patients (57.1%) had not received any treatment before imaging examination whereas three patients (42.8%) had already been submitted to surgery or radiotherapy. The authors analyzed the primary site of the tumor and its extension to the mandible (5/7 cases; 71.4%), the floor of the mouth (3/7 cases; 42.8%), the floor of the maxillary sinus (1/7 cases; 14.2%) and the retromolar trigonum (1/7 cases; 14.2%). Metastatic lymph nodes were observed in five patients (71.4%). Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and histopathological examination in all cases. Comparison with surgical findings was possible in five cases (71.4%). (author)

  16. The significance of 123I-BMIPP delayed scintigraphic imaging in cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kae; Inoue, Koji; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Musha, Haruki; Anker, Stefan D

    2007-04-25

    Earlier studies have not fully investigated the significance of radionuclide planar imaging in cardiac patients using the fatty acid analogue 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (123I-BMIPP). This study was to clarify the effectiveness of 123I-BMIPP in assessing the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M) and myocardial washout rate (WR) in patients with heart disease. Myocardial 123I-BMIPP imaging was performed in 33 patients (20 with chronic heart failure [CHF] and 13 with stable angina pectoris [AP]) and 11 control subjects. Myocardial 123I-BMIPP planner images were obtained 30 min (early image) and 4 h (delayed image) after tracer injection. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured by quantitative gated single photon emission computed tomography. The concentration of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) was measured before the scintigraphic study. (1) Delayed H/M was much lower in CHF than in AP (1.93 +/- 0.37 vs. 2.21 +/- 0.38, p acid metabolism disorders in patients with heart disease in both masked and unmasked conditions.

  17. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  18. Patient positioning method based on binary image correlation between two edge images for proton-beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Akira; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Numano, Masumi; Futami, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Haruo; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Tsugami, Hironobu

    2005-01-01

    A new technique based on normalized binary image correlation between two edge images has been proposed for positioning proton-beam radiotherapy patients. A Canny edge detector was used to extract two edge images from a reference x-ray image and a test x-ray image of a patient before positioning. While translating and rotating the edged test image, the absolute value of the normalized binary image correlation between the two edge images is iteratively maximized. Each time before rotation, dilation is applied to the edged test image to avoid a steep reduction of the image correlation. To evaluate robustness of the proposed method, a simulation has been carried out using 240 simulated edged head front-view images extracted from a reference image by varying parameters of the Canny algorithm with a given range of rotation angles and translation amounts in x and y directions. It was shown that resulting registration errors have an accuracy of one pixel in x and y directions and zero degrees in rotation, even when the number of edge pixels significantly differs between the edged reference image and the edged simulation image. Subsequently, positioning experiments using several sets of head, lung, and hip data have been performed. We have observed that the differences of translation and rotation between manual positioning and the proposed method were within one pixel in translation and one degree in rotation. From the results of the validation study, it can be concluded that a significant reduction in workload for the physicians and technicians can be achieved with this method

  19. SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. Long-term prognostic value in diabetic patients with and without coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehli, M. [Dept. of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Univ. Hospital Lausanne (Switzerland); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Lausanne (Switzerland); Monbaron, D.; Gaillard, R.C.; Ruiz, J. [Dept. of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Univ. Hospital Lausanne (Switzerland); Prior, J.O.; Bischof Delaloye, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Lausanne (Switzerland); Calcagni, M.L. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Lausanne (Switzerland); Dept. of Cardiology, Univ. Hospital Lausanne (Switzerland); Fivaz-Arbane, M.; Stauffer, J.C. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: To determine the long-term prognostic value of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for the occurrence of cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. Patients, methods: SPECT MPI of 210 consecutive Caucasian diabetic patients were analysed using Kaplan-Meier event-free survival curve and independent predictors were determined by Cox multivariate analyses. Results: Follow-up was complete in 200 (95%) patients with a median period of 3.0 years (0.8-5.0). The population was composed of 114 (57%) men, age 65 {+-} 10 years, 181 (90.5%) type 2 diabetes mellitus, 50 (25%) with a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 98 (49%) presenting chest pain prior to MPI. The prevalence of abnormal MPI was 58%. Patients with a normal MPI had neither cardiac death, nor myocardial infarction, independently of a history of coronary artery disease or chest pain. Among the independent predictors of cardiac death and myocardial infarction, the strongest was abnormal MPI (p < 0.0001), followed by history of CAD (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 15.9; p = 0.0001), diabetic retinopathy (HR = 10.0; p = 0.001) and inability to exercise (HR = 7.7; p = 0.02). Patients with normal MPI had a low revascularisation rate of 2.4% during the follow-up period. Compared to normal MPI, cardiovascular events increased 5.2 fold for reversible defects, 8.5 fold for fixed defects and 20.1 fold for the association of both defects. Conclusion: Diabetic patients with normal MPI had on excellent prognosis independently of history of CAD. On the opposite, an abnormal MPI led to a > 5-fold increase in cardiovascular events. This emphasizes the value of SPECT MPI in predicting and risk-stratifying cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. (orig.)

  20. Abnormalities on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with transient ischemic attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tomomi; Shibagaki, Yasuro [Ushiku Aiwa General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Iwata, Makoto [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    We studied abnormalities on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA). Out of 18 consecutive TIA patients, 9 patients had relevant focal abnormalities on DWI. Among TIA patients, six patients were associated with atrial fibrillation (Af), and all of these patients had focal abnormalities on DWI as well. TIA patients with Af had significantly more frequent focal abnormalities on DWI than those without Af (p=0.009; Fisher's exact probability test). In addition, the duration of TIA symptoms was not related to the presence of focal abnormalities on DWI. These results indicate that embolic mechanism may cause focal abnormalities on DWI. DWI was more sensitive to detect responsible ischemic lesions in these patients than T2-weighted image or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image. (author)

  1. Abnormalities on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with transient ischemic attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tomomi; Shibagaki, Yasuro; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Iwata, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    We studied abnormalities on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA). Out of 18 consecutive TIA patients, 9 patients had relevant focal abnormalities on DWI. Among TIA patients, six patients were associated with atrial fibrillation (Af), and all of these patients had focal abnormalities on DWI as well. TIA patients with Af had significantly more frequent focal abnormalities on DWI than those without Af (p=0.009; Fisher's exact probability test). In addition, the duration of TIA symptoms was not related to the presence of focal abnormalities on DWI. These results indicate that embolic mechanism may cause focal abnormalities on DWI. DWI was more sensitive to detect responsible ischemic lesions in these patients than T2-weighted image or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image. (author)

  2. Dipyridamole thallium imaging for detecting cardiac involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Matsubara, Noboru; Tani, Akihiro; Morozumi, Takakazu; Hori, Masatsugu; Kitabatake, Akira; Kamada, Takenobu; Kimura, Kazufumi; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-02-01

    Dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging was carried out in 21 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) to assess its value in detecting impaired myocardium and coronary microcirculation associated with PSS. Depending upon the degree of cardiac function, the patients were classified as having either ejection fraction of 50% or more (Group I, n=17) or less than 50% (Group II, n=4). In Group I, four patients had transient defect in which perfusion defects were seen on early images but not seen on delayed images; three had reverse redistribution in which defects were not seen on early images but seen on delayed images; and three had persistent defects which were seen on both early and delayed images. A decreased washout of thallium-201 was seen in 9 patients. In an analysis of both perfusion defects and washout rate, 13 patients (76%) in Group I were found to have abnormal findings. This suggests that disturbed coronary microcirculation or impaired myocardium may frequently develop even when EF is normal. All of the patients categorized as having a decreased cardiac function (Group II) had perfusion defect, suggesting the presence of myocardial fibrosis. In PSS, deterioration of cardiac function seemed to be associated with progression of myocardial fibrosis. Dipyridamole thallium imaging may be a sensitive method for detecting cardiac lesions in PSS. It also has the potential for detecting decreased coronary flow reserve or slightly impaired myocardium even without decreased EF. (N.K.).

  3. Diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosottini, M. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy); Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Tavarelli, C.; De Cori, S.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Del Bono, L.; Doria, G. [Unit of Infectious Diseases AO, Pisa (Italy); Giannelli, M. [Unit of Medical Physics, Pisa (Italy); Michelassi, M.C. [Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Murri, L. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the central nervous system due to JC polyoma virus infection of oligodendrocytes. PML develops in patients with impaired T-cell function as occurs in HIV, malignancy or immunosuppressive drugs users. Until now no imaging methods have been reported to correlate with clinical status. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a robust MRI tool in investigating white matter architecture and diseases. The aim of our work was to assess diffusion abnormalities in focal white matter lesions in patients with PML and to correlate the lesion load measured with conventional MRI and DWI to clinical variables. We evaluated eight patients with a biopsy or laboratory-supported diagnosis of PML. All patients underwent MRI including conventional sequences (fluid attenuated inversion recovery-FLAIR) and DWI. Mean diffusivity (MD) maps were used to quantify diffusion on white matter lesions. Global lesion load was calculated by manually tracing lesions on FLAIR images, while total, central core and peripheral lesion loads were calculated by manually tracing lesions on DWI images. Lesion load obtained with the conventional or DWI-based methods were correlated with clinical variables such as disease duration, disease severity and survival. White matter focal lesions are characterized by a central core with low signal on DWI images and high MD (1.853 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s), surrounded by a rim of high signal intensity on DWI and lower MD (1.1 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). The MD value of normal-appearing white matter is higher although not statistically significant (0.783 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s) with respect to control subjects (0.750 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). Inter-rater correlations of global lesion load between FLAIR (3.96%) and DWI (3.43%) was excellent (ICC =0.87). Global lesion load on FLAIR and DWI correlates with disease duration and severity (respectively, p = 0.037, p = 0.0272 with Karnofsky scale and p = 0.0338 with

  4. Predictors of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery outcome in acromegaly: patient and tumor characteristics evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bunderen, Christa C.; van Varsseveld, Nadège C.; Baayen, Johannes C.; van Furth, Wouter R.; Aliaga, Esther Sanchez; Hazewinkel, Marieke J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Freling, Nicole J. M.; Lips, Paul; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H.; Drent, Madeleine L.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of various first-line treatment modalities for acromegaly and evolving surgical techniques emphasize the need for accurately defined predictors of surgical outcome. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of 30 patients with acromegaly after initial endoscopic transsphenoidal

  5. Body Image in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury During Inpatient Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diemen, Tijn; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Nes, Ilse; Geertzen, Jan; Post, Marcel

    Objectives: (1) To investigate the course of body image in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) during their first inpatient rehabilitation stay; and (2) to explore the association between demographic and injury-related variables and body image and the association between body image and

  6. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon: clinical and imaging findings, with anatomic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Saint Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Demondion, Xavier [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Department of Bone Radiology and Laboratory of Anatomy, Lille (France); Leemrijse, Thibaut [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Saint Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Rheumatology, Saint Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-11-01

    We report the clinical and imaging findings in two elderly female patients with spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon from the lesser trochanter of the femur. We emphasize the key contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to this diagnosis and provide an anatomic correlation. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute groin pain in the elderly. MR imaging enables positive diagnosis, by showing mass effect on the anterior aspect of the hip joint, proximal muscle thickening, and abnormal signal intensity, and by demonstrating interruption of the psoas tendon, whereas the distal insertion of the lateral portion of the iliacus muscle remains muscular and is preserved. (orig.)

  7. Accuracy of pre-contrast imaging in abdominal magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zaki, Faizah; Moineddin, Rahim; Grant, Ronald; Chavhan, Govind B.

    2016-01-01

    Safety concerns are increasingly raised regarding the use of gadolinium-based contrast media for MR imaging. To determine the accuracy of pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging for lesion detection and characterization in pediatric oncology patients. We included 120 children (37 boys and 83 girls; mean age 8.94 years) referred by oncology services. Twenty-five had MRI for the first time and 95 were follow-up scans. Two authors independently reviewed pre-contrast MR images to note the following information about the lesions: location, number, solid vs. cystic and likely nature. Pre- and post-contrast imaging reviewed together served as the reference standard. The overall sensitivity was 88% for the first reader and 90% for the second; specificity was 94% and 91%; positive predictive value was 96% and 94%; negative predictive value was 82% and 84%; accuracy of pre-contrast imaging for lesion detection as compared to the reference standard was 90% for both readers. The difference between mean number of lesions detected on pre-contrast imaging and reference standard was not significant for either reader (reader 1, P = 0.072; reader 2, P = 0.071). There was substantial agreement (kappa values of 0.76 and 0.72 for readers 1 and 2) between pre-contrast imaging and reference standard for determining solid vs. cystic lesion and likely nature of the lesion. The addition of post-contrast imaging increased confidence of both readers significantly (P < 0.0001), but the interobserver agreement for the change in confidence was poor (kappa 0.12). Pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging has high accuracy in lesion detection in pediatric oncology patients and shows substantial agreement with the reference standard for characterization of lesions. Gadolinium-based contrast media administration cannot be completely eliminated but can be avoided in many cases, with the decision made on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration location and type of tumor. (orig.)

  8. Accuracy of pre-contrast imaging in abdominal magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric oncology patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Zaki, Faizah [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grant, Ronald [University of Toronto, Department of Hematology and Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chavhan, Govind B. [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Safety concerns are increasingly raised regarding the use of gadolinium-based contrast media for MR imaging. To determine the accuracy of pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging for lesion detection and characterization in pediatric oncology patients. We included 120 children (37 boys and 83 girls; mean age 8.94 years) referred by oncology services. Twenty-five had MRI for the first time and 95 were follow-up scans. Two authors independently reviewed pre-contrast MR images to note the following information about the lesions: location, number, solid vs. cystic and likely nature. Pre- and post-contrast imaging reviewed together served as the reference standard. The overall sensitivity was 88% for the first reader and 90% for the second; specificity was 94% and 91%; positive predictive value was 96% and 94%; negative predictive value was 82% and 84%; accuracy of pre-contrast imaging for lesion detection as compared to the reference standard was 90% for both readers. The difference between mean number of lesions detected on pre-contrast imaging and reference standard was not significant for either reader (reader 1, P = 0.072; reader 2, P = 0.071). There was substantial agreement (kappa values of 0.76 and 0.72 for readers 1 and 2) between pre-contrast imaging and reference standard for determining solid vs. cystic lesion and likely nature of the lesion. The addition of post-contrast imaging increased confidence of both readers significantly (P < 0.0001), but the interobserver agreement for the change in confidence was poor (kappa 0.12). Pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging has high accuracy in lesion detection in pediatric oncology patients and shows substantial agreement with the reference standard for characterization of lesions. Gadolinium-based contrast media administration cannot be completely eliminated but can be avoided in many cases, with the decision made on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration location and type of tumor. (orig.)

  9. The clinical study of cerebral blood flow imaging in patients with early syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengli; Shi Xin; Wu Jinchang; Tang Jun; Zhong Jijun

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of cerebral blood flow imaging for evaluation of patients with early syphilis. Methods: Fifty-three patients with early syphilis underwent cerebral blood flow imaging using 99 Tc m -ethylenecysteinate dimer(ECD). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes were analyzed. Results: The acquired images of 53 patients were graded as 5 types. The rCBF was significantly depressed in 48 of 53 patients mainly in the areas dominated by anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery. Conclusion: Treponema pallidum (TP) could start invading central nervous system at the early stage of infection

  10. Patients radiation protection in medical imaging. Conference proceedings; Radioprotection des patients en imagerie medicale. Recueil des presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the conference organised by the French society of radiation protection about patients radiation protection in medical imaging. Twelve presentations (slides) are compiled in this document and deal with: 1 - Medical exposure of the French population: methodology and results (Bernard Aubert, IRSN); 2 - What indicators for the medical exposure? (Cecile Etard, IRSN); 3 - Guidebook of correct usage of medical imaging examination (Philippe Grenier, Pitie-Salpetriere hospital); 4 - Radiation protection optimization in pediatric imaging (Hubert Ducou-Le-Pointe, Aurelien Bouette (Armand-Trousseau children hospital); 5 - Children's exposure to image scanners: epidemiological survey (Marie-Odile Bernier, IRSN); 6 - Management of patient's irradiation: from image quality to good practice (Thierry Solaire, General Electric); 7 - Dose optimization in radiology (Cecile Salvat (Lariboisiere hospital); 8 - Cancer detection in the breast cancer planned screening program - 2004-2009 era (Agnes Rogel, InVS); 9 - Mammographic exposures - radiobiological effects - radio-induced DNA damages (Catherine Colin, Lyon Sud hospital); 10 - Breast cancer screening program - importance of non-irradiating techniques (Anne Tardivon, Institut Curie); 11 - Radiation protection justification for the medical imaging of patients over the age of 50 (Michel Bourguignon, ASN); 12 - Search for a molecular imprint for the discrimination between radio-induced and sporadic tumors (Sylvie Chevillard, CEA)

  11. Bilateral Pulvinar Signal Intensity Decrease on T2-Weighted Images in Patients with Aspartylglucosaminuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autti, T.; Loennqvist, T.; Joensuu, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disease caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase. A thalamic T2 signal intensity decrease is associated with lysosomal diseases. Purpose: To investigate thalamic signal intensity in AGU by performing a retrospective review of brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of AGU patients. Material and Methods: A total of 25 MR examinations were available for 11 patients aged between 3 and 32 years (four patients underwent bone marrow transplantation). Of these, 13 examinations were performed after bone marrow transplantation. Five patients had from two to six examinations, and six patients had one examination each. In every patient, the diagnosis of AGU was confirmed by blood and urine tests. Eighteen examinations were performed with a 1.0T imager including dual spin-echo T2 and proton density (PD) axial and coronal images, and 10 examinations also included T1-weighted images. Seven examinations were performed with a 1.5T imager including turbo spin-echo axial and coronal T2-weighted images and axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images; three examinations included T1-weighted three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (3D MPRAGE) images. The signal intensity of the thalamus and pulvinar in every sequence was compared to that of the putamina. Results: In AGU, thalamic alterations were first detectable on T2-weighted images (25 examinations in 11 patients) from the age of 3 years 6 months, showing decreased signal intensity in 21 of 24 examinations. T1-weighted images (13 examinations) showed slightly increased thalamic signal intensity in five out of seven examinations from the age of 7 years, and PD images (19 examinations) showed decreased signal intensity from the age of 16 years (three examinations). The pulvinar showed decreased signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images for 14 of 18 examinations or on FLAIR sequences for seven

  12. Image management and communication in patient care: perspectives on implementation and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greberman, M; Mun, S K

    1989-02-01

    Image management and communication (IMAC) systems are automated and integrated systems that capture digital medical images and related patient information and transmit them electronically, display them for interpretation, and store them for future retrieval. The IMAC system concept includes images and relevant information from all clinical sources. The First International Conference on Image Management and Communication in Patient Care (IMAC 89) provides a forum for expert presentations, poster sessions, and discussion and debate among all attendees interested in the implementation and impact of IMAC systems. Plenary sessions provide an international perspective and explore the role of image-based information in patient care, approaches to improved IMAC systems, current technical barriers, quality of care issues, evaluation approaches, and scenarios for the future. Invited participants are from North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, and the WHO. Conference organizers are working with numerous professional organizations and representatives of meetings which focus on IMAC-related technology to complement, and not duplicate, the contribution of other groups.

  13. Imaging Features of Patients Undergoing Active Surveillance for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Lars J; Ghate, Sujata V; Hwang, E Shelley; Soo, Mary Scott

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the imaging appearance of patients undergoing active surveillance for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We retrospectively identified 29 patients undergoing active surveillance for DCIS from 2009 to 2014. Twenty-two patients (group 1) refused surgery or were not surgical candidates. Seven patients (group 2) enrolled in a trial of letrozole and deferred surgical excision for 6-12 months. Pathology and imaging results at the initial biopsy and follow-up were recorded. In group 1, the median follow-up was 2.7 years (range: 0.6-13.9 years). Fifteen patients (68%) remained stable. Seven patients (32%) underwent additional biopsies with invasive ductal carcinoma diagnosed in two patients after 3.9 and 3.6 years who developed increasing calcifications and new masses. In group 2, one patient (14%) was upstaged to microinvasive ductal carcinoma at surgery. Among the patients in both groups with calcifications (n = 26), there was no progression to invasive disease among those with stable (50%, 13/26) or decreased (19%, 5/26) calcifications. Among a DCIS active surveillance cohort, invasive disease progression presented as increasing calcifications and a new mass following more than 3.5 years of stable imaging. In contrast, there was no progression to invasive disease among cases of DCIS with stable or decreasing calcifications. Close imaging is a key follow-up component in active surveillance. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Brain MRI diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with classical phenylketonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manara, Renzo; Citton, Valentina; Carollo, Carla; Burlina, Alessandro P.; Ermani, Mario; Vespignani, Francesco; Burlina, Alberto B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to grade magnetic resonance white matter abnormalities (WMAs) of classical phenylketonuria (cPKU) patients treated from birth and to compare sensitivity and specificity of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). Twenty early-treated cPKU patients still on a low-phenylalanine diet (12 males; mean age 21.2 years) and 26 normal subjects (ten males; mean age 25.1 years) were enrolled. Typical T2- and diffusion-weighted WMAs were semiquantitatively graded according to Thompson score (TS). Besides, a regional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) score (mTS) was developed according to extension and intensity of WMAs. Phenylalanine and tyrosine plasma concentrations before performing MRI and the amino acid mean levels collected the year before MRI (Tyr year and Phe year ) were measured. No patient with Phe year concentration below 460 μmol/L showed WMAs. In cPKU patients, TS and mTS were significantly higher on DWI than on T2 images (3.50 vs 2.65 and 23.65 vs 15.85, respectively, p year levels. Among the different MR sequences, DWI seems to be the most sensitive and reliable in detecting and grading the typical WMAs of cPKU patients. (orig.)

  15. Optimization of image quality and patient dose in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafqat Faaruq; Jaferi, R.A.; Nafeesa Nazlee

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Optimization of patient dose and image quality can be defined as to get the best image quality with minimum possible radiation dose to the patient by setting various parameters and modes of operation available in mammography machines. The optimization procedures were performed on two mammography units from M/S GE and Metaltronica, available at NORI, using standard mammographic accreditation phantom (Model: BR-156) and acrylic sheets of variable thicknesses. Quality assurance and quality control (QC) tests being the essential part of optimization. The QC tests as recommended by American College of Radiology, were first performed on both machines as well as X-ray film processor. In the second step, different affecting the image quality and radiation dose to patient, like film screen combination (FSC), phantom optical density (PD), kVp, mAs etc, were adjusted for various phantom thicknesses ranging from 3 cm to 6.5 cm in various modes of operation in the machines (semi-auto- and manual in GE, Auto-, semi-auto- and manual mode in Metaltronica). The image quality was studied for these optimized parameters on the basis of the number of test objects of the phantom visible in these images. Finally the linear relationship between mAs and skin entrance dose (mGy) was verified using ionization chamber with the phantom and the actual patients. Despite some practical limitations, the results of the quality assurance tests were within acceptable limits defined by ACR. The dose factor for GE was 68.0 y/mAs, while 76.0 mGy/mAs for Metaltronica at 25 kVp. Before the start of this study the only one mammography unit GE, was routinely used at NORI and normal mode of operation of this unit was semi-auto mode with fixed kVp independent of compressed breast thickness, but in this study it was concluded that selecting kVp according to beast thickness result in an appreciable dose reduction (4-5 times less) without any compromise in image quality. The

  16. Dosimetry of FDG PET/CT and other molecular imaging applications in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfand, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Effective doses for PET and SPECT imaging of molecular imaging agents depend on the radiopharmaceutical, administered activity and the weight of the patient. Effective doses for the accompanying CT scan depend on the CT protocol being used. CT protocols can be designed to produce diagnostic quality images, localization images or attenuation correction data without imaging. In each case, the co-registered molecular imaging examination (PET or SPECT) and the CT study must be acquired without patient movement. For PET/CT, attention to the respiratory phase during the CT study is also of critical importance. In addition to the molecular imaging agents 18 F-FDG and 123 I-MIBG that are frequently used in children, additional PET and SPECT imaging agents may have promise for molecular imaging in children. (orig.)

  17. No-gold-standard evaluation of image-acquisition methods using patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Frey, Eric

    2017-02-11

    Several new and improved modalities, scanners, and protocols, together referred to as image-acquisition methods (IAMs), are being developed to provide reliable quantitative imaging. Objective evaluation of these IAMs on the clinically relevant quantitative tasks is highly desirable. Such evaluation is most reliable and clinically decisive when performed with patient data, but that requires the availability of a gold standard, which is often rare. While no-gold-standard (NGS) techniques have been developed to clinically evaluate quantitative imaging methods, these techniques require that each of the patients be scanned using all the IAMs, which is expensive, time consuming, and could lead to increased radiation dose. A more clinically practical scenario is where different set of patients are scanned using different IAMs. We have developed an NGS technique that uses patient data where different patient sets are imaged using different IAMs to compare the different IAMs. The technique posits a linear relationship, characterized by a slope, bias, and noise standard-deviation term, between the true and measured quantitative values. Under the assumption that the true quantitative values have been sampled from a unimodal distribution, a maximum-likelihood procedure was developed that estimates these linear relationship parameters for the different IAMs. Figures of merit can be estimated using these linear relationship parameters to evaluate the IAMs on the basis of accuracy, precision, and overall reliability. The proposed technique has several potential applications such as in protocol optimization, quantifying difference in system performance, and system harmonization using patient data.

  18. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of bone cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, F M; Algra, P R; Maas, M; Dijkstra, P F; Falke, T H

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the contents of intraosseous cysts in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the signal intensity characteristics on gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS--The hand or foot joints of nine patients with the cystic form of RA (where the initial radiological abnormality consisted of intraosseous cysts without erosions) were imaged before and after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. A 0.6 unit, T1 weighted spin echo and T2* weighted gradient echo were used to obtain images in at least two perpendicular planes. RESULTS--Most cysts showed a low signal intensity on the non-enhanced T1 weighted (spin echo) images and a high signal intensity on the T2* weighted (gradient echo) images, consistent with a fluid content. No cyst showed an enhancement of signal intensity on the T1 weighted images after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA, whereas synovium hyperplasia at the site of bony erosions did show an increased signal intensity after Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging detected more cysts (as small as 2 mm) than plain films, and the cysts were located truly intraosseously. In six patients no other joint abnormalities were identified by magnetic resonance imaging; the three other patients also showed, after Gd-DTPA administration, an enhanced synovium at the site of bony erosions. CONCLUSIONS--It is suggested that intraosseous bone cysts in patients with RA do not contain hyperaemic synovial proliferation. The bone cysts in patients with the cystic form of RA may be the only joint abnormality. Images PMID:8257207

  19. Images created in a model eye during simulated cataract surgery can be the basis for images perceived by patients during cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; Uchida, A; Shinoda, K; Taira, Y; Noda, T; Ohnuma, K; Bissen-Miyajima, H; Hirakata, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the images created in a model eye during simulated cataract surgery. Patients and methods This study was conducted as a laboratory investigation and interventional case series. An artificial opaque lens, a clear intraocular lens (IOL), or an irrigation/aspiration (I/A) tip was inserted into the ‘anterior chamber' of a model eye with the frosted posterior surface corresponding to the retina. Video images were recorded of the posterior surface of the model eye from the rear during simulated cataract surgery. The video clips were shown to 20 patients before cataract surgery, and the similarity of their visual perceptions to these images was evaluated postoperatively. Results The images of the moving lens fragments and I/A tip and the insertion of the IOL were seen from the rear. The image through the opaque lens and the IOL without moving objects was the light of the surgical microscope from the rear. However, when the microscope light was turned off after IOL insertion, the images of the microscope and operating room were observed by the room illumination from the rear. Seventy percent of the patients answered that the visual perceptions of moving lens fragments were similar to the video clips and 55% reported similarity with the IOL insertion. Eighty percent of the patients recommended that patients watch the video clip before their scheduled cataract surgery. Conclusions The patients' visual perceptions during cataract surgery can be reproduced in the model eye. Watching the video images preoperatively may help relax the patients during surgery. PMID:24788007

  20. Imaging manifestations and its clinical significance in patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Lin Qiang; Yao Jinpeng; Chang Yinjuan; Zhou Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and imaging manifestations of patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis (SAPHO) syndrome, and to analyze the diagnostic importance of different clinical and imaging manifestations for SAPHO syndrome. Methods: Seventeen patients (7 males and 10 females) with SAPHO syndrome were recruited in this study. Age ranged from 36 to 67 years with a mean age of (48 ± 8) years. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Benhamou. Serum HLA B27 antigen records were reviewed for all patients. Imaging data of the abnormal bone sites were collected by conventional radiograph in all patients, CT in 13 patients as well as MR in 3 patients. Average time to take for a definite diagnosis of the syndrome was 3.7 years (ranged from O.5 to 13 years). Results: Serum HLA B27 antigen was positive in all patients. Both skin and bone abnormalities were found in all patients. Ten patients had skin palmoplantar pustulosis and two patients had acne. Involving sites of bone and joints include sacroiliac joints, anterior chest and limbs. Sacroiliac joints were asymmetrically involved with imaging features in all patients. Eight patients exhibited anterior chest wall involvement. Five patients had osteomyelitis at limbs. For all images of 17 patients, CT was superior to conventional radiography in detecting abnormal changes of bone erosion and soft tissue swelling. MR imaging was able to depict edema changes that was not detectable by CT and radiography. Conclusion: SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease, but for patients with skin and bone-joint abnormalities, especially with skin palmoplantar pustulosis, acne as well as with imaging features at the sacroiliac joint and anterior chest wall, SAPHO syndrome should be taken into a diagnostic consideration. (authors)

  1. Occupational and patient exposure as well as image quality for full spine examinations with the EOS imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damet, J.; Fournier, P.; Monnin, P.; Sans-Merce, M.; Verdun, F. R.; Baechler, S.; Ceroni, D.; Zand, T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: EOS (EOS imaging S.A, Paris, France) is an x-ray imaging system that uses slot-scanning technology in order to optimize the trade-off between image quality and dose. The goal of this study was to characterize the EOS system in terms of occupational exposure, organ doses to patients as well as image quality for full spine examinations. Methods: Occupational exposure was determined by measuring the ambient dose equivalents in the radiological room during a standard full spine examination. The patient dosimetry was performed using anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adolescent and a five-year-old child. The organ doses were measured with thermoluminescent detectors and then used to calculate effective doses. Patient exposure with EOS was then compared to dose levels reported for conventional radiological systems. Image quality was assessed in terms of spatial resolution and different noise contributions to evaluate the detector's performances of the system. The spatial-frequency signal transfer efficiency of the imaging system was quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The use of a protective apron when the medical staff or parents have to stand near to the cubicle in the radiological room is recommended. The estimated effective dose to patients undergoing a full spine examination with the EOS system was 290μSv for an adult and 200 μSv for a child. MTF and NPS are nonisotropic, with higher values in the scanning direction; they are in addition energy-dependent, but scanning speed independent. The system was shown to be quantum-limited, with a maximum DQE of 13%. The relevance of the DQE for slot-scanning system has been addressed. Conclusions: As a summary, the estimated effective dose was 290μSv for an adult; the image quality remains comparable to conventional systems

  2. Occupational and patient exposure as well as image quality for full spine examinations with the EOS imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damet, J., E-mail: jerome.damet@chuv.ch; Fournier, P.; Monnin, P.; Sans-Merce, M.; Verdun, F. R.; Baechler, S. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1007 (Switzerland); Ceroni, D. [Department of Paediatrics, Division of paediatric orthopaedic, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland); Zand, T. [Department of Radiology, Division of paediatric radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: EOS (EOS imaging S.A, Paris, France) is an x-ray imaging system that uses slot-scanning technology in order to optimize the trade-off between image quality and dose. The goal of this study was to characterize the EOS system in terms of occupational exposure, organ doses to patients as well as image quality for full spine examinations. Methods: Occupational exposure was determined by measuring the ambient dose equivalents in the radiological room during a standard full spine examination. The patient dosimetry was performed using anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adolescent and a five-year-old child. The organ doses were measured with thermoluminescent detectors and then used to calculate effective doses. Patient exposure with EOS was then compared to dose levels reported for conventional radiological systems. Image quality was assessed in terms of spatial resolution and different noise contributions to evaluate the detector's performances of the system. The spatial-frequency signal transfer efficiency of the imaging system was quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The use of a protective apron when the medical staff or parents have to stand near to the cubicle in the radiological room is recommended. The estimated effective dose to patients undergoing a full spine examination with the EOS system was 290μSv for an adult and 200 μSv for a child. MTF and NPS are nonisotropic, with higher values in the scanning direction; they are in addition energy-dependent, but scanning speed independent. The system was shown to be quantum-limited, with a maximum DQE of 13%. The relevance of the DQE for slot-scanning system has been addressed. Conclusions: As a summary, the estimated effective dose was 290μSv for an adult; the image quality remains comparable to conventional systems.

  3. The impact of exercise myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging on the selection of patients for coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liping; He Zuoxiang; Liu Xiujie; Shi Rongfang; Liu Yunzhong; Tian Yueqin; Zhang Xiaoli; Qin Xuewen; Chen Jilin; Gao Runlin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Exercise 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT is accurate for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). This study assessed the impact of exercise myocardial perfusion imaging on the selection of patients for coronary angiography. Methods: 2188 consecutive patients who underwent exercise myocardial perfusion SPECT in authors' department in 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 1807 were men, 381 women (average age: 53.5 +- 7.2 years). Overall, exercise myocardial SPECT was normal in 1731 patients, abnormal in 359 cases, and equivocal in 98 patients. There were 141 patients who underwent CAG within 60 days after myocardial SPECT. Results: Overall, 12% of the patients with abnormal SPECT imaging underwent coronary angiography, but only 5% of the patients with a normal SPECT imaging did (P < 0.001). Among these 141 patients who underwent coronary angiography, significant coronary stenosis was present in 91% of the patients who had had an abnormal SPECT imaging, but only 8% of those who had had a normal SPECT imaging (P < 0.001). In those patients who underwent coronary angiography, revascularization rate was 25% for the patients with abnormal SPECT imaging, but only 1% for the patients with a normal SPECT imaging. Conclusion: The results of exercise myocardial perfusion SPECT have a significant impact on the selection of patients for coronary angiography and revascularization

  4. Texture analysis of computed tomography images of acute ischemic stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.S.; Castellano, G.; Fernandes, P.T.; Avelar, W.M.; Santos, S.L.M.; Li, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images are routinely used to assess ischemic brain stroke in the acute phase. They can provide important clues about whether to treat the patient by thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator. However, in the acute phase, the lesions may be difficult to detect in the images using standard visual analysis. The objective of the present study was to determine if texture analysis techniques applied to CT images of stroke patients could differentiate between normal tissue and affected areas that usually go unperceived under visual analysis. We performed a pilot study in which texture analysis, based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix, was applied to the CT brain images of 5 patients and of 5 control subjects and the results were compared by discriminant analysis. Thirteen regions of interest, regarding areas that may be potentially affected by ischemic stroke, were selected for calculation of texture parameters. All regions of interest for all subjects were classified as lesional or non-lesional tissue by an expert neuroradiologist. Visual assessment of the discriminant analysis graphs showed differences in the values of texture parameters between patients and controls, and also between texture parameters for lesional and non-lesional tissue of the patients. This suggests that texture analysis can indeed be a useful tool to help neurologists in the early assessment of ischemic stroke and quantification of the extent of the affected areas. (author)

  5. Analysing patient queue system in an imaging department: a step toward total quality management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pratik; Pandey, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    Medical imaging has become an inevitable part of any diagnosis and/or management of the disease. This has put tremendous work-load on the medical imaging machines. The crowd of waiting patients at any busy imaging centre or rooms has become a common scene. This is especially true for any Government hospital or medical college in India since they cater to bulk of patients. As a part of total quality management we attempted to record, investigate, analyse and suggest on the state of patients' queue system at radiological imaging rooms

  6. Clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging in patients with suspected head and neck paragangliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Dietlein, Markus; Weber, Kerstin; Moka, Detlef; Schicha, Harald [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaet zu Koeln, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany); Fischer, Eva; Michel, Olaf; Stennert, Eberhard [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Paragangliomas or glomus tumours of the head and neck region are rare somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumours. Precise preoperative diagnosis is of special importance in order to adequately weigh the potential benefit of the operation against the inherent risks of the procedure. In this study, the clinical value of somatostatin receptor imaging was assessed in 19 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy because of known or suspected paraganglioma of the head and neck region. The results were compared with the results of computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, histology and clinical follow-up. [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide scintigraphy was performed 4-6 and 24 h after i.v. injection of 140-220 MBq {sup 111}In-octreotide. Whole-body and planar images as well as single-photon emission tomography images were acquired and lesions were graded according to qualitative tracer uptake. Somatostatin receptor imaging was positive in nine patients, identifying paragangliomas for the first time in three patients and recurrent disease in six patients. In one patient, a second, previously unknown paraganglioma site was identified. Negative results were obtained in ten patients. These patients included one suffering from chronic hyperplastic otitis externa, one with granuloma tissue and an organised haematoma, one with an acoustic neuroma, one with an asymmetric internal carotid artery, two with ectasia of the bulbus venae jugularis and one with a jugular vein thrombosis. In two patients with a strong family history of paraganglioma, individual involvement could be excluded. In only one patient did somatostatin receptor imaging and magnetic resonance imaging yield false negative results in respect of recurrent paraganglioma tissue. It is concluded that somatostatin receptor scintigraphy provides important information in patients with suspected paragangliomas of the head and neck region and has a strong impact on further

  7. Image/patient registration from (partial) projection data by the Fourier phase matching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiguo Lu; You, J.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for 2D or 3D image/patient registration, PFPM (projection based Fourier phase matching method), is proposed. This technique provides image/patient registration directly from sequential tomographic projection data. The method can also deal with image files by generating 2D Radon transforms slice by slice. The registration in projection space is done by calculating a Fourier invariant (FI) descriptor for each one-dimensional projection datum, and then registering the FI descriptor by the Fourier phase matching (FPM) method. The algorithm has been tested on both synthetic and experimental data. When dealing with translated, rotated and uniformly scaled 2D image registration, the performance of the PFPM method is comparable to that of the IFPM (image based Fourier phase matching) method in robustness, efficiency, insensitivity to the offset between images, and registration time. The advantages of the former are that subpixel resolution is feasible, and it is more insensitive to image noise due to the averaging effect of the projection acquisition. Furthermore, the PFPM method offers the ability to generalize to 3D image/patient registration and to register partial projection data. By applying patient registration directly from tomographic projection data, image reconstruction is not needed in the therapy set-up verification, thus reducing computational time and artefacts. In addition, real time registration is feasible. Registration from partial projection data meets the geometry and dose requirements in many application cases and makes dynamic set-up verification possible in tomotherapy. (author)

  8. Usefulness of spinal magnetic resonance imaging in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska-Pamuła, Anna; Ziółko, Ewa; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Podwińska, Ewa; Adamczyk, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome is a rare, chronic hematological disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentations. Subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome are characterized by different survival times and ability to transform into acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the study included the assessment of the relationship between the images obtained by magnetic resonance scans of lumbar spine and the clinical symptoms of the disease in patients diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, as well as the assessment of the correlation of the images with the phase of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. The study-related tests were carried out in Specialist Hospital No. 1 in Bytom between 2006 and 2011 and involved 53 patients aged 55÷77, divided into groups according to the diagnosed subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. The study also included the prognosis of overall survival and time to transformation into AML on the basis of valid classifications. The spinal magnetic resonance scans were obtained from medical documentation. The analysis included images obtained using T1- and T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, transverse and frontal planes in all patients, images obtained using the STIR sequence from 21 patients as well as 40 images obtained after contrast administration. The statistical analysis of the results was carried out using STATISTICA software. The obtained results demonstrated that the magnetic resonance scans revealed statistically significant changes in the images of bone marrow in vertebral body scans; with a decrease in the intensity of MRI signals correlated with the RAEB subtype, particularly with transformation into acute myeloid leukemia as well as with the high IPSS risk score with regard to the time of survival and transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. The research-related test results indicate the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics and the assessment of the disease dynamics

  9. A Classroom Research Skills Development Emphasizing Data Analysis and Result of SSRU Students by RBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waree, Chaiwat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is the learning using research as a base. To strengthen the skills of classroom research Emphasizing Data Analysis and Result and to study the development of research skills in the class Emphasizing Data Analysis and Result of SSRU' Students by learning using research base. The target group are students in the 2nd semester…

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with peroneal tendinopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Smet, Arthur de; Mukharjee, Rajat

    2007-01-01

    To compare the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a group of patients with clinically diagnosed peroneal tendonopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis with the MR imaging findings of a control group of patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder. The MR examinations of 24 patients with symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis and 70 patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder were retrospectively reviewed to determine the presence or absence of four MR imaging findings: 1) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on one or more axial proton density-weighted images, 2) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images, 3) intermediate T2 signal intensity within the peroneal tendons, and 4) circumferential fluid within the common peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width. The sensitivity and specificity of these MR imaging findings for determining the presence or absence or symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were calculated. The sensitivity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the presence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 92%, 92%, 50%, and 17% respectively. The specificity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the absence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 57%, 79%, 93%, and 100% respectively. The presence of predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images is a highly sensitive and moderately specific indicator of symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy. The presence of intermediate T2 signal within the peroneal tendons, and the presence of circumferential fluid within the peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width, are highly specific indicators of peroneal

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with peroneal tendinopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Smet, Arthur de [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Mukharjee, Rajat [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2007-02-15

    To compare the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a group of patients with clinically diagnosed peroneal tendonopathy and peroneal tenosynovitis with the MR imaging findings of a control group of patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder. The MR examinations of 24 patients with symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis and 70 patients with no clinical evidence of peroneal tendon disorder were retrospectively reviewed to determine the presence or absence of four MR imaging findings: 1) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on one or more axial proton density-weighted images, 2) predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images, 3) intermediate T2 signal intensity within the peroneal tendons, and 4) circumferential fluid within the common peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width. The sensitivity and specificity of these MR imaging findings for determining the presence or absence or symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were calculated. The sensitivity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the presence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 92%, 92%, 50%, and 17% respectively. The specificity of MR imaging findings 1, 2, 3, and 4 for determining the absence of peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tenosynovitis were 57%, 79%, 93%, and 100% respectively. The presence of predominantly or uniform intermediate signal intensity within the peroneal tendons on three consecutive axial proton density-weighted images is a highly sensitive and moderately specific indicator of symptomatic peroneal tendinopathy. The presence of intermediate T2 signal within the peroneal tendons, and the presence of circumferential fluid within the peroneal tendon sheath greater than 3 mm in maximal width, are highly specific indicators of peroneal

  12. Intra-articular gouty tophi of the knee: CT and MR imaging in 12 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.H.; Yeh Lee Ren; Pan Huay-Ben; Yang Chien-Fang; National Yang-Ming Univ., Taipei; Lu Yih-Chau; Wang Jyh-Seng; Resnick, D.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To define the imaging characteristics of intra-articular tophi of the knee. Design and patients. Twelve patients with intra-articular tophi in the knee were studied with routine MR imaging, gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging, and CT over a 4-year period. There were 11 men and one woman, 25-82 years of age (mean age 48 years). Four patients did not have a documented history of gout at the time of the MR examination. The diagnosis of intra-articular tophi was provided by arthroscopy and histological examination (5 patients), by microscopic study of joint fluid (5 patients), or by characteristic clinical, laboratory and imaging findings (2 patients). Results. In 15 MR examinations the tophi were located purely intra-articularly in 10 knees. In the remaining five MR studies, periarticular soft tissues or bone, or both, were involved. All the intra-articular tophi manifested low to intermediate signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images. All five Gd-enhanced MR examinations demonstrated a heterogeneous peripheral enhancement. All 10 CT scans showed varying degrees of stippled calcifications within the tophi. The nature of the calcifications was confirmed on histological examination in three patients. Conclusion. Presenting clinical manifestations of gout may relate to intra-articular tophaceous deposits. Such deposits present as masses on MR images with low to intermediate signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images and a characteristic enhancement pattern following intravenous Gd administration. These features relate primarily to internal calcifications, which are most evident on CT images. MR evaluation (including Gd administration) supplemented, in some cases, with CT scanning allows accurate diagnosis of intra-articular tophaceous deposits. (orig.)

  13. Assessment of the value of joint imaging in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Weibing; Wu Jing; Lin Haoxue; Ye Defu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of 99 Tc m -human immunoglobulin G(HIgG) and 99 Tc m -methylene diphosphonic acid (MDP) joint imaging in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Whole body imaging with 99 Tc m -HIgG was performed on 21 patients with AS and 18 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Among them, 12 cases of AS were studied in comparison with 99 Tc m -MDP. Results: 1) 20 of 21 cases of AS showed increased uptake of 99 Tc m -HIgG in Art. sacro-iliac were negative. 3) The comparison between 99 Tc m -HIgG and 99 Tc m -MDP imaging demonstrated: abnormal sacro-iliac, and there were 32 surrounding joints with abnormal images in 44 clinically positive joints. The rate of coincidence was 75%. The image of the hand was normal in every patient. 2) All images of the hand were abnormal in RA, while images of Art. sacro-iliac images were found in 11 cases with 99 Tc m -HIgG, while in 7 with 99 Tc m -MDP. Among 31 clinically involved surrounding joints, 24 showed increased uptake of 99 Tc m -HIgG, but only 16 were 99 Tc m -MDP positive. Significant difference was found between the two modalities (P 99 Tc m -HIgG joint imaging can more objectively detect inflammatory lesions of AS than 99 Tc m -MDP. It can also be helpful to the early diagnosis of AS

  14. Effects of cognitive behavioral counseling on body Image following mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, Simin; Janighorban, Mojgan; Mehrabi, Tayebe; Ahmadi, Sayed Ahmadi; Mokaryan, Fariborz; Gukizade, Abbas

    2011-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Surgical treatment of breast cancer may cause body image alterations. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral counseling on body image among Iranian women with primary breast cancer. In this quasi-experimental designed study, 72 patients diagnosed as breast cancer and surgically treated were enrolled in Isfahan, Iran. The patients were entered the study by convenience sampling method and were randomly divided in two groups of intervention (n = 32) and control (n = 40). The intervention group received consultation based on Ellis rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) method for 6 sessions during 3 weeks. The control group did not receive any consultation Paired t-test was used to compare the changes in groups and independent t-test was conducted to compare two groups. The average values represented as mean ± standard deviation. Before the study, the body image score was not significantly different between the intervention (16 97 ± 5 44) and control (15 95 ± 4 66) groups (t = 0 86, P = 0 395). The body image score was significantly lower in the interven-tion group (9 03 ± 6 11) compared to control group (17 18 ± 5 27) after the intervention (t = -6 07, P influences her breast cancer treatment decision, oncology professionals need to recognize the value of a woman's favorite about appearance and body image. This study emphasizes the importance of offering consultation in breast cancer patients.

  15. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Lewis, J H; Mishra, P; Li, R; Ionascu, D

    2015-01-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery. (paper)

  16. Cerebral microbleeds, cognitive impairment, and MRI in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Yang, Juan; Xie, Peihan; Dong, Yulan; You, Yong; Liu, Jincai

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), a typical imaging manifestation marker of sporadic cerebral small vessel disease, play a critical role in vascular cognitive impairment, which is often accompanied by diabetes mellitus (DM). Hence, CMBs may, in part, be responsible for the occurrence and development of cognitive impairment in patients with diabetes. Novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, such as susceptibility-weighted imaging and T2*-weighted gradient-echo, have the capability of noninvasively revealing CMBs in the brain. Moreover, a correlation between CMBs and cognitive impairment in patients with diabetes has been suggested in applications of functional MRI (fMRI). Since pathological changes in the brain occur prior to observable decline in cognitive function, neuroimaging may help predict the progression of cognitive impairment in diabetic patients. In this article, we review the detection of CMBs using MRI in diabetic patients exhibiting cognitive impairment. Future studies should emphasize the development and establishment of a novel MRI protocol, including fMRI, for diabetic patients with cognitive impairment to detect CMBs. A reliable MRI protocol would also be helpful in understanding the pathological mechanisms of cognitive impairment in this important patient population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The correlation between lacunes and microbleeds on magnetic resonance imaging in consecutive 180 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajitsu, Kenichiro; Yokoyama, Shunichi; Taguci, Yuichiro; Kusumoto, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Microbleeds on T2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent a hemorrhagic type of small vessel disease. Small vessel disease causes both intracerebral hemorrhages and lacunar infarctions. We studied clinical background and MRI findings of the patients to clarify the correlation between microbleeds and lacunes. This study consisted of 180 consecutive patients who underwent brain MRI using 1.5T system in our hospital for a year. We obtained T2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging as well as T1 and T2-weighted images. We statistically identified the factors related to the presence of microbleeds in all patients. The distribution of lacunes and microbleeds on MRI was compared to clarify the correlation of the lesions in the patients who had both lesions. The overall prevalence of microbleeds was 41.1% (74 of 180 patients). Logistic regression analysis indicated that previous stroke, leukoaraiosis and lacunes were significantly correlated with microbleeds. In the patients who have both microbleeds and lacunes, lesions are tended to locate in thalamus and basal ganglia, especially incidence of lacunes are significantly greater compared with other regions. Thirty-six of 398 lesions (9.05%) diagnosed as lacunes with T1- and T2-weighted imaging were demonstrated as microbleeds with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging. Lacunes, leukoaraiosis as a hypertensive change on MRI had statistically significant correlation with the presence of microbleeds. T2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging should be included in the imaging protocol for cerebrovascular disease, because T1- and T2-weighted imaging recognizing some of the microbleeds as lacunar infarction. (author)

  18. Evaluation of usefulness of portal image using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) in the patients who received pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Heon Jong; Park, Seong Young; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John J. K.; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device through objective compare of the images acquired using an EPID and a conventional port film. From Apr. to Oct. 1997, a total of 150 sets of images from 20 patients who received radiation therapy in the pelvis area were evaluated in the Inha University Hospital and Severance Hospital. A dual image recording technique was devised to obtain both electronic portal images and port film images simultaneously with one treatment course. We did not perform double exposure. Five to ten images were acquired from each patient. All images were acquired from posteroanterior (PA) view except images from two patients. A dose rate of 100-300 MU/min and a 10-MV X-ray beam were used and 2-10 MUs were required to produce a verification image during treatment. Kodak diagnostic film with metal/film imaging cassette which was located on the top of the EPID detector was used for the port film. The source to detector distance was 140 cm. Eight anatomical landmarks (pelvic brim, sacrum, acetabulum, iliopectineal line, symphysis, ischium, obturator foramen, sacroiliac joint) were assessed. Four radiation oncologist joined to evaluate each image. The individual landmarks in the port film or in the EPID were rated-very clear (1), clear (2), visible (3), notclear (4), not visible (5). Using an video camera based EPID system, there was no difference of image quality between no enhanced EPID images and port film images. However, when we provided some change with window level for the portal image, the visibility of the sacrum and obturator foramen was improved in the portal images than in the port film images. All anatomical landmarks were more visible in the portal images than in the port film when we applied the CLAHE mode enhancement. The images acquired using an matrix ion chamber type EPID were also improved image quality after window level adjustment. The quality of image acquired using an electronic portal imaging device was

  19. Time Dependence of Intrafraction Patient Motion Assessed by Repeat Stereoscopic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify intrafraction patient motion and its time dependence in immobilized intracranial and extracranial patients. The data can be used to optimize the intrafraction imaging frequency and consequent patient setup correction with an image guidance and tracking system, and to establish the required safety margins in the absence of such a system. Method and Materials: The intrafraction motion of 32 intracranial patients, immobilized with a thermoplastic mask, and 11 supine- and 14 prone-treated extracranial spine patients, immobilized with a vacuum bag, were analyzed. The motion was recorded by an X-ray, stereoscopic, image-guidance system. For each group, we calculated separately the systematic (overall mean and SD) and the random displacement as a function of elapsed intrafraction time. Results: The SD of the systematic intrafraction displacements increased linearly over time for all three patient groups. For intracranial-, supine-, and prone-treated patients, the SD increased to 0.8, 1.2, and 2.2 mm, respectively, in a period of 15 min. The random displacements for the prone-treated patients were significantly higher than for the other groups, namely 1.6 mm (1 SD), probably caused by respiratory motion. Conclusions: Despite the applied immobilization devices, patients drift away from their initial position during a treatment fraction. These drifts are in general small if compared with conventional treatment margins, but will significantly contribute to the margin for high-precision radiation treatments with treatment times of 15 min or longer

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechtem, U.; Welslau, R.; Hilger, H.H.; Theissen, P.; Jungehuelsing, M.; Schicha, H.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of the great number of imaging procedures available, it is still difficult to quantify the severity of valvular heart disease. Dynamic MRI offers new approaches to visualize the turbulent blood flow through stenosed or insufficient heart valves. In addition, it is possible to assess the severity of valvular insufficiency based on precise measurements of rigth- and left-ventricular stroke volumes or of systemic and pulmonary flow. Valvular stenoses are difficult to quantify by MRI because flow velocity measurements based on phase analysis can only be made at low flow rates at present. Some progress may be achieved by further shortening of echo times. In patients with cardiac valve replacement MRI is often superior to other imaging procedures because variable imaging planes facilitate differentiation between transvalvular and paravalvular leaks. Additionally, the severity of valvular incompetence can be assessed in such cases in the same way as in patients with insufficiency of the native heart valve. (orig.) [de

  1. Body image, self-esteem, and quality of life in patients with psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hulya Nazik; Selcuk Nazik; Feride C Gul

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that may affect the visible areas of body. Hence, the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image can be affected in psoriasis patients. Objectives: We aimed in the present study to assess the effects of psoriasis on the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. Materials and Methods: The study included 92 patients with psoriasis, along with 98 control participants. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patient...

  2. Image processing and recognition for biological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target. © 2013 The Author Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  3. Image-based electronic patient records for secured collaborative medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen; Yao, Yihong; Cai, Weihua; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Guozhen; Sun, Kun

    2005-01-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for secured intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). In the EPR-GW and EPR-Viewer, the security modules of Digital Signature and Authentication are integrated to perform the security processing on the EPR data with integrity and authenticity. The privacy of EPR in data communication and exchanging is provided by SSL/TLS-based secure communication. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications.

  4. Self-image and perception of mother and father in psychotic and borderline patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelius, K; Granberg

    2000-02-01

    Psychotic and borderline patients rated their self-image and their perception of their mother and father using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior model (SASB). The borderline patients had more negative images of themselves and their parents, especially their fathers, than did the psychotic patients and the normal subjects, while the psychotic patients' ratings did not differ much from those of the normal subjects. The self-image was related to the images of both parents for borderline patients and normal subjects, while for the psychotic patients only the image of the mother was important for the self-image. In addition, the psychotic patients did not differentiate between the poles of control and autonomy in the introjected self-image. It was concluded that borderline patients are characterized by negative attachment, while psychotic patients are characterized by poor separation from the mother and poor differentiation between autonomy and control. The paper also discusses how this may influence the patients' relations to others. Psychotische und Borderline Patienten beurteilten ihr Selbstbild und ihre Wahrnehmung von Mutter und Vater mit Hilfe der strukturalen Analyse sozialen Verhaltens (SASB). Die Borderline Patienten hattten negativere Selbstbilder und Elternbilder (speziell Vaterbilder) als die psychotischen Patienten und gesunde Personen. Die Beurteilungen der psychotischen Patienten unterschieden sich dagegen nicht besonders von jenen Gesunder. Das Selbstbild stand in Beziehung zu beiden Elternbildern bei den Borderline Patienten und den Gesunden, während bei den psychotischen Patienten nur das Mutterbild für das Selbstbild bedeutsam war. Außerdem konnte bei den psychotischen Patienten nicht zwischen den Polen der Kontrolle und Autonomie bzgl. der introjizierten Selbstbilder differenziert werden. Aus den Ergebnissen wird gefolgert, dass Borderline Patienten durch eine negative Bindung charackterisiert sind, psychotische Patienten dagegen durch

  5. Using a patient image archive to diagnose retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Abramoff, M.D. [University of Iowa; Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Govindaswamy, Priya [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Tennant, M [University of Alberta; Swainson, Stephen [University of Alberta

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes has become an epidemic that is expected to impact 365 million people worldwide by 2025. Consequently, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the industrialized world today. If detected early, treatments can preserve vision and significantly reduce debilitating blindness. Through this research we are developing and testing a method for automating the diagnosis of retinopathy in a screening environment using a patient archive and digital fundus imagery. We present an overview of our content-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach and provide performance results for a dataset of 98 images from a study in Canada when compared to an archive of 1,355 patients from a study in the Netherlands. An aggregate performance of 89% correct diagnosis is achieved, demonstrating the potential of automated, web-based diagnosis for a broad range of imagery collected under different conditions and with different cameras.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging validation of pituitary gland compression and distortion by typical sellar pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Charles H; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Hsu, Liangge; Bi, Wenya Linda; Zamani, Amir A; Laws, Edward R

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the normal pituitary gland is an important component of presurgical planning, defining many aspects of the surgical approach and facilitating normal gland preservation. Magnetic resonance imaging is a proven imaging modality for optimal soft-tissue contrast discrimination in the brain. This study is designed to validate the accuracy of localization of the normal pituitary gland with MRI in a cohort of surgical patients with pituitary mass lesions, and to evaluate for correlation between presurgical pituitary hormone values and pituitary gland characteristics on neuroimaging. Fifty-eight consecutive patients with pituitary mass lesions were included in the study. Anterior pituitary hormone levels were measured preoperatively in all patients. Video recordings from the endoscopic or microscopic surgical procedures were available for evaluation in 47 cases. Intraoperative identification of the normal gland was possible in 43 of 58 cases. Retrospective MR images were reviewed in a blinded fashion for the 43 cases, emphasizing the position of the normal gland and the extent of compression and displacement by the lesion. There was excellent agreement between imaging and surgery in 84% of the cases for normal gland localization, and in 70% for compression or noncompression of the normal gland. There was no consistent correlation between preoperative pituitary dysfunction and pituitary gland localization on imaging, gland identification during surgery, or pituitary gland compression. Magnetic resonance imaging proved to be accurate in identifying the normal gland in patients with pituitary mass lesions, and was useful for preoperative surgical planning.

  7. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: chronic imaging findings and review of the medical literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigle, Jeffrey P.; Broome, Dale R.

    2008-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a systemic fibrosing disorder which has been strongly associated with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast media (GBCM) in the setting of renal insufficiency. Although this disorder primarily affects the skin, it can result in severe joint contractures, disabilities and even death. However, to date, there have been no published studies reporting chronic imaging findings of NSF. In this report we present three biopsy-proven cases of NSF with the associated chronic MRI, radiographic and bone scintigraphy findings. Two of the patients had been exposed to gadodiamide, and one had been exposed to gadopentetate dimeglumine prior to the onset of NSF. Two are newly reported cases. One patient's subacute imaging findings have previously been reported, but significant chronic images will now be presented. This patient became severely disabled from contractures and developed long bone smooth periosteal reaction, extensive intra-articular and periarticular calcifications, musculotendinous heterotopic ossification and ankylosis of several joints. One of the patients underwent renal transplantation 6 months after GBCM exposure, with near complete resolution of the skin fibrosis. The third patient had persistent MRI findings of skin thickening, with low T1 and high T2 signal intensity 5 years after exposure to gadodiamide. A review of the medical literature is provided, emphasizing the association of NSF with various GBCM. These cases broaden our understanding of the long-term imaging findings and complications of NSF and the stratified risk of NSF with various GBCM. (orig.)

  8. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, K.; Matsui, N.; Nohira, K.

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of labeled leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 33 patients, the incidence of pain and swelling in 66 wrist joints and 66 knee joints was compared with the accumulation of [ 111 In]leukocytes. No accumulation of [ 111 In]leukocytes was seen in any of the patients' wrists (0/12) or knee joints (0/14) when both pain and swelling were absent. In contrast, 93% (25/27) of wrist joints and 80% (24/30) of knee joints with both pain and swelling were positive by [ 111 In]leukocyte scintigraphy. There was little correlation between the stage of the disease, as determined by radiography, and [ 111 In]leukocyte accumulation. This study suggests that [ 111 In]leukocyte imaging may be a reliable procedure for monitoring the activity of rheumatoid arthritis, especially for confirming the lack of an ongoing inflammatory response

  9. Neuromuscular ultrasound imaging in low back pain patients with radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Lydia R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-02-01

    Patients suffering from chronic low back pain with associated radiculopathy (LBP-R), or sciatica, experience neuromuscular symptoms in the lower back and leg; however, research to date has focussed solely on the lower back. To expand neuromuscular research of LBP-R patients into the lower limb, using ultrasound imaging. Case control study comparing LBP-R patients to matched healthy controls. LBP-R patients with disc bulge or herniation (L3/L4 to L5/S1) resulting in unilateral radiculopathy (n = 17) and healthy matched controls (n = 17) were recruited. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was used to investigate sciatic nerve structure, as well as the quality (relative magnitude of fat/fibrosis infiltration) and contraction (muscle thickening) of associated musculature in the lower back (paraspinals) and lower limb (biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, soleus). LBP-R patients had swollen sciatic nerves (increased cross sectional area), but this was not associated with evidence of reduced lower limb muscle quality. As compared to controls, LBP-R patients demonstrated less soleus muscle thickening during submaximal contraction; however, there were no impairments in the hamstring or lower back musculature. Ultrasound imaging was an effective method to detect sciatic nerve swelling in mild to moderately affected LBP-R patients. Nerve swelling was not associated with poorer muscle quality, nor consistently impaired muscle contraction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Limited utility of routine surveillance imaging for classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients in first complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingali, Sai Ravi; Jewell, Sarah W; Havlat, Luiza; Bast, Martin A; Thompson, Jonathan R; Eastwood, Daniel C; Bartlett, Nancy L; Armitage, James O; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D; Vose, Julie M; Fenske, Timothy S

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) who achieved complete remission with frontline therapy and then underwent either clinical surveillance or routine surveillance imaging. In total, 241 patients who were newly diagnosed with cHL between January 2000 and December 2010 at 3 participating tertiary care centers and achieved complete remission after first-line therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, there were 174 patients in the routine surveillance imaging group and 67 patients in the clinical surveillance group, based on the intended mode of surveillance. In the routine surveillance imaging group, the intended plan of surveillance included computed tomography and/or positron emission tomography scans; whereas, in the clinical surveillance group, the intended plan of surveillance was clinical examination and laboratory studies, and scans were obtained only to evaluate concerning signs or symptoms. Baseline patient characteristics, prognostic features, treatment records, and outcomes were collected. The primary objective was to compare overall survival for patients in both groups. For secondary objectives, we compared the success of second-line therapy and estimated the costs of imaging for each group. After 5 years of follow-up, the overall survival rate was 97% (95% confidence interval, 92%-99%) in the routine surveillance imaging group and 96% (95% confidence interval, 87%-99%) in the clinical surveillance group (P = .41). There were few relapses in each group, and all patients who relapsed in both groups achieved complete remission with second-line therapy. The charges associated with routine surveillance imaging were significantly higher than those for the clinical surveillance strategy, with no apparent clinical benefit. Clinical surveillance was not inferior to routine surveillance imaging in patients with cHL who achieved complete remission with frontline therapy. Routine

  11. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging in a teaching hospital on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hailey, D M; Crowe, B L [Australian Inst. of Health, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Health Technology Div.; Burgess, I A [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia); Khangure, M S; Morris, I [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1993-05-01

    An observational study was undertaken to obtain measures of the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on diagnosis, patient management and patient outcome. A minimum data set at the time of examination was used for 1119 consecutive patients referred by specialists for MRI of the brain or spine. Three months follow up of 707 brain examinations and 235 spinal examinations were undertaken using a questionnaire on diagnosis and patient management. Magnetic resonance imaging made a dominant contribution to final diagnoses of neoplasia and vascular disorders, but was less significant for white matter disease. In a high proportion of cases other types of examination also influenced the final diagnosis. It was concluded that magnetic resonance imaging affected patient management in a high proportion of spinal examinations and in cases of cerebral neoplasm, with lesser contributions to cases of cerebrovascular disorder and white matter disease. While MRI was considered superior to other imaging methods, which it could often replace, in practice it will form only one input to the diagnostic decision. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging in a teaching hospital on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hailey, D.M.; Crowe, B.L.; Khangure, M.S.; Morris, I.

    1993-01-01

    An observational study was undertaken to obtain measures of the impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on diagnosis, patient management and patient outcome. A minimum data set at the time of examination was used for 1119 consecutive patients referred by specialists for MRI of the brain or spine. Three months follow up of 707 brain examinations and 235 spinal examinations were undertaken using a questionnaire on diagnosis and patient management. Magnetic resonance imaging made a dominant contribution to final diagnoses of neoplasia and vascular disorders, but was less significant for white matter disease. In a high proportion of cases other types of examination also influenced the final diagnosis. It was concluded that magnetic resonance imaging affected patient management in a high proportion of spinal examinations and in cases of cerebral neoplasm, with lesser contributions to cases of cerebrovascular disorder and white matter disease. While MRI was considered superior to other imaging methods, which it could often replace, in practice it will form only one input to the diagnostic decision. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  13. Complications of rotator cuff surgery—the role of post-operative imaging in patient care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, R S; Thakkar, S C; Srikumaran, U; Fayad, L M

    2014-01-01

    When pain or disability occurs after rotator cuff surgery, post-operative imaging is frequently performed. Post-operative complications and expected post-operative imaging findings in the shoulder are presented, with a focus on MRI, MR arthrography (MRA) and CT arthrography. MR and CT techniques are available to reduce image degradation secondary to surgical distortions of native anatomy and implant-related artefacts and to define complications after rotator cuff surgery. A useful approach to image the shoulder after surgery is the standard radiography, followed by MRI/MRA for patients with low “metal presence” and CT for patients who have a higher metal presence. However, for the assessment of patients who have undergone surgery for rotator cuff injuries, imaging findings should always be correlated with the clinical presentation because post-operative imaging abnormalities do not necessarily correlate with symptoms. PMID:24734935

  14. Investigation of eating disorders in cancer patients and its relevance with body image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Abbas Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eating disorder is one of the most common health problems with clinical and psychological consequences, which can affect body image in cancer patients. Similar studies in this area for checking the status of this disorder and its relevance with body image in patients with cancer are limited. Therefore, this study was designed with the aim of determination of eating disorders in patients with cancer and their relevance with body image. Materials and Methods: The research was a cross-correlation study. It was carried out in Sayed-Al-Shohada Hospital affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Two hundred and ten patients with cancer were selected and were asked tocomplete the demographic and disease characteristics questionnaire, the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ, and eating disorders questionnaire. SPSS statistical software, version 14 was used for statistical analysis′-Test, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for analyzing the obtained data. Results: The mean values of age, body mass index (BMI, and duration of illness were 48.2 ± 13.20 years, 24.6 ± 4.6kg/m 2 , and 25.64 ± 21.24months, respectively. Most patients were married (87%, without university education (96%, unemployed (67%, and with incomes below their requirement (52%. Most patients were diagnosed with breast cancer (36.5%. They received chemotherapy as the main treatment (56.2%. In addition, mean ± SD of eating disorders and body image were 12.84 ± 4.7 and184.40 ± 43.68, respectively. Also, 49.7% of patients with cancer had an eating disorder. Among these, 29% had experiences of anorexia and 20.7% had bulimia. There was a significant negative correlation between the score of body image and eating disorders (r = −0.47, P = 0.01. Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that most patients with cancer had experienced symptoms of eating disorders. This may lead to a negative

  15. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lee, Jong Min; Sung, Yeong Soon; Kang, Duk Sik [Kyungpook Natioanl University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ok Hwoa [Dongkang general Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections.

  16. Hypereosinophilic syndrome: Clinical, laboratory, and imaging manifestations in patients with hepatic involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gi Beom; Lee, Jong Min; Sung, Yeong Soon; Kang, Duk Sik; Kim, Ok Hwoa

    1993-01-01

    The hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) commonly involves liver and spleen but only a few literature has reported the imaging features. In this article, we present the imaging features of the liver and spleen in HES patients together with clinical and laboratory features. This study included 5 HES patients with hepatic involvement. Extensive laboratory tests including multiple hematologic, serologic, parasitological, and immunologic examinations were performed. Imaging studies included CT, ultrasound (US)of upper abdomen and hepatosplenic scintigraphy. All patients were periodically examined by laboratory and imaging studies for 4 to 24 months. The common clinical presentations were weakness, mild fever, and dry cough. All patients revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia of 40 to 80% and benign eosinophilic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. The percutaneous biopsy of the hepatic focal lesions performed in 2 patients showed numerous benigin eosinophilic infiltrates and one of them revealed combined calibration necrosis of hepatocytes. All cases revealed hepatomegaly with multiple focal lesions on at least on of CT, US, or scintigraphy. These findings completely disappeared in 2 to 6 months following medication of corticosteroid or antihistamines. The HES involved the liver and CT, US, or scintigraphic studies showed hepatic multifocal lesions with hepatomegaly. Differential diagnosis of these findings should include metastatic disease, lymphoma, leukemia, candidiasis or other opportunistic infections

  17. Differences in body image between anorexics and in-vitro-fertilization patients - a study with Body Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkenhagen, Ada; Klapp, Burghard F.; Schoeneich, Frank; Brähler, Elmar

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the investigation was to explore the body image disturbance of anorexics and in-vitro-fertilization patients (IvF-patients) with Body Grid and Body Identity Plot. Methods: The paper reports on an empirical study conducted with 32 anorexic patients and 30 IvF-patients. The structure of the body image was derived from the Body Grid, an idiographic approach following the Role Repertory Grid developed by George A. Kelly [17]. The representation of the body image and the degree of body-acceptance is represented graphically. Results: By the Body Grid and Body Identity Plot measures we were able to identify important differences in body image between anorexics and IvF-patients. Conclusion: The tendencies of dissociation in the body image of anorexics which we found must be seen in the sense of a specific body image disturbance which differs significantly from the body-experience profile of IvF-patients. With the grid approach it was possible to elicit the inner structure of body image and determine the acceptance of the body and integration of single body parts. PMID:19742059

  18. Fundus autofluorescence and colour fundus imaging compared during telemedicine screening in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeyer, Anton M; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Szirth, Bernard C; Shahid, Khadija; Khouri, Albert S

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the use of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in screening the eyes of patients with diabetes. Images were obtained from 50 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing telemedicine screening with colour fundus imaging. The colour and FAF images were obtained with a 15.1 megapixel non-mydriatic retinal camera. Colour and FAF images were compared for pathology seen in nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and PDR, respectively). A qualitative assessment was made of the ease of detecting early retinopathy changes and the extent of existing retinopathy. The mean age of the patients was 47 years, most were male (82%) and most were African American (68%). Their mean visual acuity was 20/45 and their mean intraocular pressure was 14.3 mm Hg. Thirty-eight eyes (76%) did not show any diabetic retinopathy changes on colour or FAF imaging. Seven patients (14%) met the criteria for NPDR and five (10%) for severe NPDR or PDR. The most common findings were microaneurysms, hard exudates and intra-retinal haemorrhages (IRH) (n = 6 for each). IRH, microaneurysms and chorioretinal scars were more easily visible on FAF images. Hard exudates, pre-retinal haemorrhage and fibrosis, macular oedema and Hollenhorst plaque were easier to identify on colour photographs. The value of FAF imaging as a complementary technique to colour fundus imaging in detecting diabetic retinopathy during ocular screening warrants further investigation.

  19. Oncology Patient Perceptions of the Use of Ionizing Radiation in Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, Aaron K; Clarke, Ryan K; Giordano, Sharon H; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2016-07-01

    To measure the knowledge of oncology patients regarding use and potential risks of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging. A 30-question survey was developed and e-mailed to 48,736 randomly selected patients who had undergone a diagnostic imaging study at a comprehensive cancer center between November 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. The survey was designed to measure patients' knowledge about use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging and attitudes about radiation. Nonresponse bias was quantified by sending an abbreviated survey to patients who did not respond to the original survey. Of the 48,736 individuals who were sent the initial survey, 9,098 (18.7%) opened it, and 5,462 (11.2%) completed it. A total of 21.7% of respondents reported knowing the definition of ionizing radiation; 35.1% stated correctly that CT used ionizing radiation; and 29.4% stated incorrectly that MRI used ionizing radiation. Many respondents did not understand risks from exposure to diagnostic doses of ionizing radiation: Of 3,139 respondents who believed that an abdominopelvic CT scan carried risk, 1,283 (40.9%) believed sterility was a risk; 669 (21.3%) believed heritable mutations were a risk; 657 (20.9%) believed acute radiation sickness was a risk; and 135 (4.3%) believed cataracts were a risk. Most patients and caregivers do not possess basic knowledge regarding the use of ionizing radiation in oncologic diagnostic imaging. To ensure health literacy and high-quality patient decision making, efforts to educate patients and caregivers should be increased. Such education might begin with information about effects that are not risks of diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, E.R.; Gregorio, M.A. de; Mateo, P.; Esco, R.; Bascon, N.; Morales, F.; Bellosta, R.; Lopez, P.; Gimeno, M.; Roca, M.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the ''open-neck'' (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase (< 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, E.R. [Radiology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Gregorio, M.A. de [Radiology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Mateo, P. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Esco, R. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Bascon, N. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Morales, F. [Neurology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Bellosta, R. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez, P. [Radiation Oncology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain); Gimeno, M. [Hospital Miguel Servet, Zaragoza (Spain); Roca, M. [Radiology Service, Hospital Miguel Servet, E-50 009 Zaragoza (Spain); Villavieja, J.L. [Radiology Service, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Zaragoza (Spain)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the ``open-neck`` (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase (< 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients with diagnostic and nondiagnostic exercise electrocardiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The role of exercise imaging with thallium-201 in the evaluation of patients suspected of having coronary artery disease was studied in 194 patients undergoing diagnostic coronary arteriography. Ninety-eight patients had 70 percent or more narrowing of one or more coronary vessels and 96 patients had either no or insignificant coronary artery disease. One hundren twenty-three of the 194 patients had conclusive treadmill exercise electrocardiograms (either positive or negative), and 71 had inconclusive exercise electrocardiograms. The specificity of exercise imaging (97 percent) was higher than that of exercise electrocardiograms (86 percent, p less than 0.02). The specificity of both tests combined was not significantly different from that of exercise electrocardiograms alone. The sensitivity (79 percent) and specificity (95 percent) of exercise imaging were not significantly different in patients with inconclusive exercise electrocardiograms when compared with those in patients whose exercise electrocardiograms were conclusive. These data indicate that exercise imaging is sensitive and specific in diagnosing coronary artery disease in the presence of diagnostic as well as nondiagnostic exercise electrocardiograms and that propranolol therapy does not affect the results

  3. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (Pdynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  4. Images of god in relation to coping strategies of palliative cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Schilderman, Johannes; Vissers, Kris C; Verhagen, Constans A H H V M; Prins, Judith

    2010-10-01

    Religious coping is important for end-of-life treatment preferences, advance care planning, adjustment to stress, and quality of life. The currently available religious coping instruments draw on a religious and spiritual background that presupposes a very specific image of God, namely God as someone who personally interacts with people. However, according to empirical research, people may have various images of God that may or may not exist simultaneously. It is unknown whether one's belief in a specific image of God is related to the way one copes with a life-threatening disease. To examine the relation between adherence to a personal, a nonpersonal, and/or an unknowable image of God and coping strategies in a group of Dutch palliative cancer patients who were no longer receiving antitumor treatments. In total, 68 palliative care patients completed and returned the questionnaires on Images of God and the COPE-Easy. In the regression analysis, a nonpersonal image of God was a significant positive predictor for the coping strategies seeking advice and information (β=0.339, PGod was a significant positive predictor for the coping strategy turning to religion (β=0.608, PGod is a more relevant predictor for different coping strategies in Dutch palliative cancer patients than a personal or an unknowable image of God. Copyright © 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Coronary artery imaging with 64-slice spiral CT in atrial fibrillation patients: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xuhui; Yan Chaogui; Xie Hongbo; Li Xiangmin; Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei; Chen Xing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of coronary artery imaging using 64-slice spiral CT in patient with atrial fibrillation. Methods: The images of 31 patients with atrial fibrillation who underwent contrast-enhanced CT coronary angiography were evaluated. The presence of stenosis on each segment of coronary arteries was recorded and their degree of stenosis was measured using the vessel analysis software. Ten patients additionally underwent conventional coronary angiography. The results of conventional coronary angiography were compared with CT coronary angiography of the 10 patients. Results: Image reconstruction was based on absolute timing. The image quality of 364 coronary vessel segments on the images from 31 patients was evaluated and defined as excellent, fine, moderate or poor. The image quality was excellent, fine, moderate and poor in 85, 41, 5, and 8 vessel segments respectively in patient group with heart rate between 47 beat per minent (bpm) and 69 bpm; and in 63, 16, 13, and 15 vessel segments respectively in patent group with heart rate between 70 bpm and 79 bpm;and in 46, 25, 23, and 24 vessel segments in patient group with heart rate between 80 bpm and 105 bpm. There was significant difference among the three patient groups (H=22.08, P<0.01). Comparison was carried out between CT angiographic findings and conventional angiographic findings of the 125 segments of the coronary arteries in the 10 patients who underwent conventional coronary angiography. The sensitivity and specificity of CT angiography for diagnosing vessel with significant coronary stenosis (≥50% narrowing) was 85.0% (17/20) and 95.2% (100/105), respectively. Positive predictive value was 77.3% (17/22), and negative predictive value was 97.1% (100/103). Coronary CTA underestimated the lesions of 3 vessel segments and overestimated the lesions of 5 vessel segments. Conclusion: Coronary artery imaging with 64-slice row CT had clinical value for patients with atrial fibrillation

  6. Body image dissatisfaction in patients undergoing breast reconstruction: Examining the roles of breast symmetry and appearance investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Irene; Reece, Gregory P; Huang, Sheng-Cheng; Mahajan, Kanika; Andon, Johnny; Khanal, Pujjal; Sun, Clement; Nicklaus, Krista; Merchant, Fatima; Markey, Mia K; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2018-03-01

    Reconstruction as part of treatment for breast cancer is aimed at mitigating body image concerns after mastectomy. Although algorithms have been developed to objectively assess breast reconstruction outcomes, associations between objectively quantified breast aesthetic appearance and patient-reported body image outcomes have not been examined. Further, the role of appearance investment in explaining a patient's body image is not well understood. We investigated the extent to which objectively quantified breast symmetry and patient-reported appearance investment were associated with body image dissatisfaction in patients undergoing cancer-related breast reconstruction. Breast cancer patients in different stages of reconstruction (n = 190) completed self-report measures of appearance investment and body image dissatisfaction. Vertical extent and horizontal extent symmetry values, which are indicators of breast symmetry, were calculated from clinical photographs. Associations among breast symmetry, appearance investment, body image dissatisfaction, and patient clinical factors were examined. Multi-variable regression was used to evaluate the extent to which symmetry and appearance investment were associated with body image dissatisfaction. Vertical extent symmetry, but not horizontal extent symmetry, was associated with body image dissatisfaction. Decreased vertical extent symmetry (β = -.19, P image dissatisfaction while controlling for clinical factors. Breast symmetry and patient appearance investment both significantly contribute to an understanding of patient-reported body image satisfaction during breast reconstruction treatment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Pituitary imaging findings in male patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Dania; Benbassat, Carlos; Toledano, Yoel; S'chigol, Irena; Tsvetov, Gloria; Shraga-Slutzky, Ilana; Eizenberg, Yoav; Shimon, Ilan

    2015-08-01

    Data on pituitary imaging in adult male patients presenting with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HH) and no known pituitary disease are scarce. To assess the usefulness of pituitary imaging in the evaluation of men presenting with HH after excluding known pituitary disorders and hyperprolactinemia. A historical prospective cohort of males with HH. Men who presented for endocrine evaluation from 2011 to 2014 with testosterone levels pituitary disease. Seventy-five men were included in the analysis. Their mean age and BMI were 53.4 ± 14.8 years and 30.7 ± 5.2 kg/m2, respectively. Mean total testosterone, LH, and FSH were 6.2 ± 1.7 nmol/L, 3.4 ± 2 and 4.7 ± 3.1 mIU/L, respectively. Prolactin level within the normal range was obtained in all men (mean 161 ± 61, range 41-347 mIU/L). Sixty-two men had pituitary MRI and 13 performed CT. In 61 (81.3%) men pituitary imaging was normal. Microadenoma was found in 8 (10.7%), empty sella and thickened pituitary stalk in one patient (1.3%) each. In other four patients (5.3%) a small or mildly asymmetric pituitary gland was noted. No correlation was found between testosterone level and the presence of pituitary anomalies. This study suggests that the use of routine hypothalamic-pituitary imaging in the evaluation of IHH, in the absence of clinical characteristics of other hormonal loss or sellar compression symptoms, will not increase the diagnostic yield of sellar structural abnormalities over that reported in the general population.

  8. An Example Emphasizing Mass-Volume Relationships for Problem Solving in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, J. L.; Vepraskas, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass-volume relationships are a useful tool emphasized for problem solving in many geo-science and engineering applications. These relationships also have useful applications in soil science. Developing soils students' ability to utilize mass-volume relationships through schematic diagrams of soil phases (i.e., air, water, and solid) can help to…

  9. MR imaging and radiography of patients with cervical hyperextension-flexion injuries after car accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchgrevink, G E [The Emergency Clinic, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Smevik, O [MR-Centre Medical Section, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Nordby, A [Dept. of Radiology, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Rinck, P A [MR-Centre Medical Section, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway); Stiles, T C [Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine, Trondheim Univ. (Norway); Lereim, I [The Emergency Clinic, Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway)

    1995-07-01

    Fifty-two patients underwent MR imaging and conventional radiography of the neck within 4 days after a hyperextension-flexion injury. The patients also had follow-up investigations during the first 2 years. The images did not reveal any serious lesions in any of them. Based on the main MR and radiographical findings the patients were divided into 4 groups; no findings, posture abnormalities, spondylosis and disc pathology (from MR images) or reduced intervertebral space (from the radiographs). The outcomes of the different groups were compared with reference to neck stiffness, neck pain and headache during a 2-year follow-up period. The patient groups did not correspond completely when diagnosed from MR imaging and radiography. However, patients with pre-existing spondylosis had more symptoms when examined by both modalities. Based on the radiographs, the group with posture abnormalities had significant fewer symptoms than the other groups. (orig.).

  10. Evaluation of cardiac involvement using radionuclide myuocardial imaging in patients with Takayasu arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Minfu; Guo Xinhua; He Zuoxiang; Jiang Xiongjing; Dou Kefei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the value of radionuclide myocardial imaging in the evaluation of cardiac involvement in patients with Takayasu arteritis (TA). Methods: The 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile myocardial perlusion imaging (MIBI-MPI) and (or) 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging findings in 12 TA patients [3 men and 9 women, mean age (35 ± 15) years] with coronary lesions (CL; n=8) or aortic insufficiency (AI; n=4) were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Of the 4 AI-TA patients, 1 underwent exercise MIBI-MPI, 1 underwent pharmacologic stress MIBI-MPI and 2 un- derwent resting MIBI-MPI. Of the 8 CL-TA patients, 4 pnderwent MIBI-MPI (2 stress and 2 rest) and 4 un- derwent a dual-isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT protocol after injection of MIBI and FDG. Results: All 4 AI-TA patients showed left ventricular enlargement but no peffusion abnormalities. In 3 CL- TA patients with no documented infarct, MPI or DISA showed stress ischemia (n=2) or mismatched perfusion-metabolism defects (n=1). In the remaining 5 CL-TA patients with documented infarcts, 2 showed large perfusion defects on resting MIBI and 3 showed matched perfusion-metabolism defects on DISA SPECT. Conclusion: Radionuclide imaging is useful in providing a comprehensive functional evaluation for TA patients with cardiac involvement. (authors)

  11. Body Image, Self-esteem, and Quality of Life in Patients with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hulya; Nazik, Selcuk; Gul, Feride C

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that may affect the visible areas of body. Hence, the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image can be affected in psoriasis patients. We aimed in the present study to assess the effects of psoriasis on the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. The study included 92 patients with psoriasis, along with 98 control participants. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patients were assessed, their Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) scores were calculated to determine the clinical severity of the psoriasis, and the values were recorded. In addition, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Body Image Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale results were evaluated. When the control and psoriasis groups were evaluated regarding the DLQI, self-esteem, and body image, quality of life was found to be more negatively affected in the psoriasis group than the controls, which was statistically significant ( P self-esteem ( P self-esteem ( P self-esteem ( r = 0.448), however, it was negatively correlated with the body image ( r = -0.423). Psoriasis may negatively affect quality of life, self-esteem, and body image, and may also cause psychosocial problems. An assessment of new approaches on this issue may contribute to developments in the treatment of and rehabilitation from this disease.

  12. Audit of a policy of magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging as first-line neuroimaging for in-patients with clinically suspected acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, B.T.; Wainwright, A.; Meagher, T.; Briley, D.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To audit the feasibility and use of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as initial neuroimaging for in-patients with clinically suspected acute stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In April 2000, MRI with DW and T2-weighted sequence was locally instituted as initial neuroimaging for patients with clinically suspected acute stroke. This retrospective study reviewed imaging performed for in-patients with suspected acute stroke over a 9-month period. Data were collected on image type, result and need for repeat imaging. RESULTS: During the study period, 124 patients had neuroimaging for suspected cerebrovascular accident, and 119 were MRI safe. Eighty-eight (73.9%) patients underwent DW MRI as first-line investigation. Five patients were not MRI safe and 31 had computed tomography (CT) as first-line imaging due to lack of available MRI capacity. Repeat neuroimaging was performed in 16 (12.9%) patients. Study times were comparable for both types of neuroimaging: a mean of 13 min for MRI and 11 min for CT. CONCLUSION: The audit standard was achieved in 88 (73.9%) patients. The use of DW MRI as a first-line investigation for patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke is achievable in a district general hospital setting

  13. Audit of a policy of magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging as first-line neuroimaging for in-patients with clinically suspected acute stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, B.T.; Wainwright, A.; Meagher, T.; Briley, D

    2003-03-01

    AIM: To audit the feasibility and use of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as initial neuroimaging for in-patients with clinically suspected acute stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In April 2000, MRI with DW and T2-weighted sequence was locally instituted as initial neuroimaging for patients with clinically suspected acute stroke. This retrospective study reviewed imaging performed for in-patients with suspected acute stroke over a 9-month period. Data were collected on image type, result and need for repeat imaging. RESULTS: During the study period, 124 patients had neuroimaging for suspected cerebrovascular accident, and 119 were MRI safe. Eighty-eight (73.9%) patients underwent DW MRI as first-line investigation. Five patients were not MRI safe and 31 had computed tomography (CT) as first-line imaging due to lack of available MRI capacity. Repeat neuroimaging was performed in 16 (12.9%) patients. Study times were comparable for both types of neuroimaging: a mean of 13 min for MRI and 11 min for CT. CONCLUSION: The audit standard was achieved in 88 (73.9%) patients. The use of DW MRI as a first-line investigation for patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke is achievable in a district general hospital setting.

  14. Postcontrast T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric patients: comparison between postcontrast fat-suppression imaging and conventional T1-weighted or magnetization transfer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choong Wook; Goo, Hyun Woo

    2004-01-01

    We wished to assess the merits and weaknesses of postcontrast fat-suppression (FS) brain MR imaging in children for the evaluation of various enhancing lesions as compared with postcontrast conventional T1-weighted or magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. We reviewed the records of those patients with enhancing lesions on brain MR imaging who had undergone both FS imaging and one of the conventional T1-weighted or MT imaging as a post-contrast T1-weighted brain MR imaging. Thirty-one patients (21 male, 10 female; mean age, 8.7 years) with 38 enhancing lesions (18 intra-axial, 16 extra-axial and 4 orbital locations) were included in this study. There were 27 pairs of FS and conventional imagings, and 13 pairs of FS and MT imagings available for evaluation. Two radiologists visually assessed by consensus the lesions' conspicuity, and they also looked for the presence of flow or susceptibility artifacts in a total of 40 pairs of MR imagings. For 19 measurable lesions (14 pairs of FS and conventional T1-weighted imagings, 5 pairs of FS and MT imagings), the contrast ratios between the lesion and the normal brain ([SIlesion-SIwater]/[SInormal brain-SIwater]) were calculated and compared. Compared with conventional imaging, the lesion conspicuity on FS imaging was better in 10 cases (7 extra-axial lesions, 2 orbital lesions and 1 fat-containing intra-axial lesion), equal in 16 cases, and worse in one case. Compared with MT imaging, the lesion conspicuity on FS imaging was better in 3 cases (2 extra-axial lesions and 1 intra-axial lesion), equal in 8 cases, and worse in 2 cases. Image quality of FS imaging was compromised by flow or susceptibility artifacts for 7 patients. The contrast ratios for FS imaging were not significantly different from those for conventional imaging (2.2±0.7 vs. 2.2±0.6, respectively, p=0.914) and they were significantly lower than those for MT imaging (2.4±0.8 vs. 4.5±1.5, respectively, p=0.018). Postcontrast FS brain MR imaging appears to be

  15. Imaging in oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist

  16. Thallium imaging in management of post-revascularization patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.; Krawczynska, E.

    1996-01-01

    The role of myocardial perfusion imaging in the evaluation of post revascularization patients has not been well defined. Published data with special emphasis on the results from the Emory Angioplasty versus Surgery Trial (EAST) indicate that the frequency of adverse cardiac events (death, MI, repeat revascularization) following PTCA or CABG is equal in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with ischemic thallium defects. Current American Heart Association Guidelines recommend radionuclide studies only in symptomatic patients. Recently reported data support the need for non invasive testing in asymptomatic as well as symptomatic patients at 1 year postrevascularization. Prognostic variables including transient and permanent left ventricular dilatation and thallium lung uptake in addition to stress perfusion defect reversibility on myocardial thallium SPECT scans are important prognostic indicators in post revascularization patients

  17. Pulmonary Cryptococcosis: Imaging Findings in 23 Non-AIDS Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Yi, Chin A; Chung, Myung Jin [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Man Pyo Chung; O Jung Kwon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We aimed to review the patterns of lung abnormalities of pulmonary cryptococcosis on CT images, position emission tomography (PET) findings of the disease, and the response of lung abnormalities to the therapies in non-AIDS patients. We evaluated the initial CT (n = 23) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (n = 10), and follow-up (n = 23) imaging findings of pulmonary cryptococcosis in 23 non-AIDS patients. Lung lesions were classified into five patterns at CT: single nodular, multiple clustered nodular, multiple scattered nodular, mass-like, and bronchopneumonic patterns. The CT pattern analyses, PET findings, and therapeutic responses were recorded. A clustered nodular pattern was the most prevalent and was observed in 10 (43%) patients. This pattern was followed by solitary pulmonary nodular (n = 4, 17%), scattered nodular (n = 3, 13%), bronchopneumonic (n = 2, 9%), and single mass (n = 1, 4%) patterns. On PET scans, six (60%) of 10 patients showed higher FDG uptake and four (40%) demonstrated lower FDG uptake than the mediastinal blood pool. With specific treatment of the disease, a complete clearance of lung abnormalities was noted in 15 patients, whereas a partial response was noted in seven patients. In one patient where treatment was not performed, the disease showed progression. Pulmonary cryptococcosis most commonly appears as clustered nodules and is a slowly progressive and slowly resolving pulmonary infection. In two-thirds of patients, lung lesions show high FDG uptake, thus simulating a possible malignant condition

  18. Contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Na, Dong Gyu; Ryoo, Wook Jae; Byun Hong Sik; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Jong hyun

    2000-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced fast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) MR imaging in patients with brain tumors. This study involved 31 patients with pathologically proven brain tumors and nine with clinically diagnosed metastases. In all patients, T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, images were visual contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images were obtained. Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were visually compared with other MR sequences in terms of tumor conspicuity. In order to distinguish tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR images were compared with fast FLAIR and T2-weighted images. The tumor-to- white matter contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), as demonstrated by T2-weighted, fast FLAIR, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, were quantitatively assessed and compared. For the visual assessment of tumor conspicuity, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image imaging superior to fast FLAIR in 60% of cases (24/40), and superior to T2-weighted in 70% (28/40). Contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was inferior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted in 58% of cases (23/40). For distinguishing between tumor and surrounding edema, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging was superior to fast FLAIR or T2-weighted in 22 of 27 tumors with peritumoral edema (81%). Quantitatively, CNR was the highest on contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR image and the lowest on fast FLAIR. For the detection of leptomeningeal metastases, contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR was partially superior to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging in two of three high-grade gliomas. Although contrast-enhanced fast FLAIR imaging should not be seen as a replacement for conventional modalities, it provides additional informaton for assessment of the extent of glial cell tumors and leptomeningeal metastases in patients with brain tumors. (author)

  19. Image-guided radiotherapy for fifty-eight patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Zhang Tao; Wang Wenqin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in lung cancer. Methods: From Mar. 2007 to Dec. 2007,58 patients with lung cancer were treated with IGRT. Set-up errors in each axial direction was calculated based on IGRT images of each patient. The change of GTV was evaluated on both cone-beam CT and CT simulator images. Results: Twenty-two patients with left lung cancer,30 with right lung cancer, 5 with mediastinal lymphanode metastasis and one with vertebra metastasis were included. The set-up error in x, y and z axes was (0.02±0.26) cm, (0.14±0.49) cm and ( -0.13± 0.27) cm, respectively,while the rotary set-up error in each axis was -0.15 degree ± 1.59 degree, -0.01 degree ± 1.50 degree and 0.12 degree ±1.08 degree, respectively. The set-up errors were significantly decreased by using of IGRT. GTV movement was observed in 15 patients (25.9%) ,including 5 with left upper lung cancer. GTV moving to the anterior direction was observed in 9 patients,including 4 with]eft upper lung cancer. GTV reduced in 23 (44.2%) patients during treatment. Asymmetric GTV reduction of 22 lesions was observed,with a mean reductive volume of 4.9 cm 3 . When GTV began to shrink,the irradiation dose was 4 -46 Gy, with 20 -30 Gy in 9 patients. Conclusions: The use of IGRT can significantly reduce set-up errors. GTV movement and reduction are observed in some cases. The time to modify the target volume needs to be further studied. (authors)

  20. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  1. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Seifert, Burkhardt; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1±16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1±6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56±9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291±65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334±93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285±66 HU and 268±67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  2. MR imaging of the thoracic aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommerhoff, B.A.; Sechtem, U.P.; Schiller, N.B.; Higgins, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Gated MR imaging was used to evaluate the thoracic aorta in 11 with Marfan syndrome, eight patients with aneurysm of the ascending aorta, and 20 healthy subjects. The aortic diameter was measured on transverse and sagittal images at the levels of the sinuses of Valsalva, the caudal portion of the ascending aorta, the prearch region, the middle arch, and the descending aorta. The sinus of Valsalva-prearch region aortic diameter ratio in patients with Marfan syndrome was significantly greater than in the two other groups, indicating the characteristic shape of the Maranoid aorta. MR imaging allows definitive measurements' of aortic dimensions and is a valuable noninvasive method for monitoring the course of aortic enlargement

  3. Role of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of intramuscular cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Department of Orthopedics, Chandigarh (India); Friarage Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Northallerton (United Kingdom); Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Akkina, Narendranadh; Hampannavar, Aravind; Tahasildar, Naveen [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Department of Orthopedics, Chandigarh (India); Limaye, Rajiv [Friarage Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Northallerton (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Nonspecific clinical presentations often lead to misdiagnosis of focal cysticercal myositis. This report emphasizes the role of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of solitary intramuscular cysticercosis. Six patients with persistent post-traumatic isolated muscular swelling were treated with analgesic and antibiotics, but the swelling did not subside. Radiographs showed soft tissue swelling with no bony abnormalities. Laboratory markers were inconclusive. Ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed typical features of intramuscular cysticercosis. Clinical, radiological, and fundoscopic evaluation of brain and eyes could not isolate any cysticercosis focus in these organs. Patients were treated with 3 weeks albendazole therapy. The identifying sonographic features of intramuscular cysticercosis, as evident from this case series, included an intramuscular elliptical or oval anechoic lesion with echogenic intralesional focus likely to be scolex. Magnetic resonance images showed orientation of the cyst along the direction of muscle fibers with T2W hyperintense signal and post-contrast perilesional enhancement. All patients responded to medical treatment. Cysticercosis may manifest as isolated muscular swelling without neurological or ocular involvement. Clinicians should be aware of this clinical condition to avoid misdiagnosis. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are good diagnostic aids to establish soft tissue cysticercosis. (orig.)

  4. Role of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of intramuscular cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Akkina, Narendranadh; Hampannavar, Aravind; Tahasildar, Naveen; Limaye, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Nonspecific clinical presentations often lead to misdiagnosis of focal cysticercal myositis. This report emphasizes the role of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of solitary intramuscular cysticercosis. Six patients with persistent post-traumatic isolated muscular swelling were treated with analgesic and antibiotics, but the swelling did not subside. Radiographs showed soft tissue swelling with no bony abnormalities. Laboratory markers were inconclusive. Ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed typical features of intramuscular cysticercosis. Clinical, radiological, and fundoscopic evaluation of brain and eyes could not isolate any cysticercosis focus in these organs. Patients were treated with 3 weeks albendazole therapy. The identifying sonographic features of intramuscular cysticercosis, as evident from this case series, included an intramuscular elliptical or oval anechoic lesion with echogenic intralesional focus likely to be scolex. Magnetic resonance images showed orientation of the cyst along the direction of muscle fibers with T2W hyperintense signal and post-contrast perilesional enhancement. All patients responded to medical treatment. Cysticercosis may manifest as isolated muscular swelling without neurological or ocular involvement. Clinicians should be aware of this clinical condition to avoid misdiagnosis. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are good diagnostic aids to establish soft tissue cysticercosis. (orig.)

  5. Cerebellopontine angle lipomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Rafael S. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Brito, Cecilia Castelo Branco [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Carvalho, Gustavo A. [Clinica Bambina, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Neurocirurgia; Hospital Silvestre, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinicas CDPI e Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson L. [Clinicas CDPI e Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas are the most common lesions of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), accounting for approximately 85-90% of the tumors seen in this location. Lipomas are rare at this topography, representing about 0.15% of the CPA lesions. These tumors are mal developmental masses that arise from abnormal differentiation of the meninx primitive. Clinically, CPA lipomas can cause slowly progressive neurological symptoms and signs affecting cranial nerves or brain stem. Because these lesions usually are strongly attached to the surrounding structures, any surgical attempts of complete resection can result in neural or vascular damage, reinforcing the importance of the pre-operative imaging diagnosis. Although the CT findings of CPA lipomas can be typical, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, especially the fat suppression sequences, had improved the identification of these lesions. We aimed to report two patients with a CPA lipoma, emphasizing the MR imaging findings. (author)

  6. Cerebellopontine angle lipomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Rafael S.; Domingues, Romeu C.; Gasparetto, Emerson L.

    2009-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas are the most common lesions of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), accounting for approximately 85-90% of the tumors seen in this location. Lipomas are rare at this topography, representing about 0.15% of the CPA lesions. These tumors are mal developmental masses that arise from abnormal differentiation of the meninx primitive. Clinically, CPA lipomas can cause slowly progressive neurological symptoms and signs affecting cranial nerves or brain stem. Because these lesions usually are strongly attached to the surrounding structures, any surgical attempts of complete resection can result in neural or vascular damage, reinforcing the importance of the pre-operative imaging diagnosis. Although the CT findings of CPA lipomas can be typical, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, especially the fat suppression sequences, had improved the identification of these lesions. We aimed to report two patients with a CPA lipoma, emphasizing the MR imaging findings. (author)

  7. Transient bone marrow edema of the talus: MR imaging findings in five patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigena, Leopoldo M.; Chung, Christine B.; Lektrakul, Nittaya; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sung, Mi Sook; Resnick, Donald

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the MR findings of transient bone marrow edema (TBME) of the talus and to address the differential diagnostic considerations. Design and patients: The imaging findings of TBME of six tali were retrospectively reviewed in five patients with a clinical history of pain without trauma. Inclusion criteria were MR imaging findings that, when compared with clinical data and results of follow-up assessment, allowed the diagnosis of TBME. MR imaging, standard radiography, and bone scintigraphy were performed. The images were reviewed with particular attention to the pattern and distribution of abnormal marrow signal intensity as well as associated findings. Results: In four cases the entire talus was involved, and in two cases only a portion of the bone was affected. No fractures were detected. MR imaging demonstrated diffuse decreased signal intensity of the marrow on T1-weighted images with corresponding increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In all six cases MR imaging detected associated findings, which included joint effusion and soft tissue edema. All patients improved clinically with conservative therapy over a period of 6 months to 1 year. Conclusions: Although unusual, TBME can involve the talus. Marrow edema without evidence of a fracture and in the absence of history of trauma is a characteristic MR imaging feature, allowing confident diagnosis and institution of conservative therapy. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of the patient doses form megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging in the image-guided radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Mingxuan; Zou Huawei; Ji Tianlong; Zhang Xu; Han Chengbo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and estimate the patient doses from megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging system in the image-guided radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: 8 MU protocol of the MV CBCT system was selected for the head-and -neck region. The absorbed doses at the different positions in the phantom were measured using a 0.65 cm 3 ion chamber and the cylindrical acrylic phantom. The absorbed doses at the measurement positions of the phantom were calculated and the patient doses to the tumor and critical organs were derived from dose-volume histogram by the TPS mimicking the MV CBCT scanning with 8 MU protocol. Results: The error between the measured dose and the calculated dose was less than 3.5%. The average doses to the tumor target, brain stem, spinal cord and chiasm were 6.43, 6.36, 6.83 and 6.90 cGy, respectively, while those to left and right of both optic nerve and parotid were 7.70 and 7.53 cGy, 7.70 and 7.53 cGy, respectively. Conclusions: The patient doses estimated using the TPS mimicking the MV CBCT image acquiring procedure are accurate and reliable. The patient doses from the MV CBCT imaging must be considered when treatment plan of the patient is designed. (authors)

  9. Combined FDG PET/CT imaging for restaging of colorectal cancer patients: impact of image fusion on staging accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunk, H.; Jaeger, U.; Flacke, S.; Hortling, N.; Bucerius, J.; Joe, A.; Reinhardt, M.; Palmedo, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic impact of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-labeled deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) combined with non-contrast computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT modality in restaging colorectal cancer patients. Material and methods: In this retrospective study, 29 consecutive patients with histologically proven colorectal cancer (17 female, 12 male, aged 51-76 years) underwent whole body scans in one session on a dual modality PET-CT system (Siemens Biograph) 90 min. after i.v. administration of 370 MBq 18 F-FDG. The CT imaging was performed with 40 mAs, 130 kV, slice-thickness 5 mm and without i.v. contrast administration. PET and CT images were reconstructed with a slice-thickness of 5 mm in coronal, sagittal and transverse planes. During a first step of analysis, PET and CT images were scored blinded and independently by a group of two nuclear medicine physicians and a group of two radiologists, respectively. For this purpose, a five-point-scale was used. The second step of data-analysis consisted of a consensus reading by both groups. During the consensus reading, first a virtual (meaning mental) fusion of PET and CT images and afterwards the 'real' fusion (meaning coregistered) PET-CT images were also scored with the same scale. The imaging results were compared with histopathology findings and the course of disease during further follow-up. Results: The total number of malignant lesions detected with the combined PET/CT were 86. For FDG-PET alone it was n=68, and for CT alone n=65. Comparing PET-CT and PET, concordance was found in 81 of 104 lesions. Discrepancies predominantly occurred in the lung, where PET alone often showed true positive results in lymph nodes and soft tissue masses, where CT often was false negative. Comparing mental fusion and 'real' co-registered images, concordance was found in 94 of 104 lesions. In 13 lesions or, respectively, in 7 of 29 patients, a relevant information was gathered using fused images

  10. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  11. Information-efficient spectral imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatt, William C.; Gentry, Stephen M.; Boye, Clinton A.; Grotbeck, Carter L.; Stallard, Brian R.; Descour, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A programmable optical filter for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging. The filter splits the light collected by an optical telescope into two channels for each of the pixels in a row in a scanned image, one channel to handle the positive elements of a spectral basis filter and one for the negative elements of the spectral basis filter. Each channel for each pixel disperses its light into n spectral bins, with the light in each bin being attenuated in accordance with the value of the associated positive or negative element of the spectral basis vector. The spectral basis vector is constructed so that its positive elements emphasize the presence of a target and its negative elements emphasize the presence of the constituents of the background of the imaged scene. The attenuated light in the channels is re-imaged onto separate detectors for each pixel and then the signals from the detectors are combined to give an indication of the presence or not of the target in each pixel of the scanned scene. This system provides for a very efficient optical determination of the presence of the target, as opposed to the very data intensive data manipulations that are required in conventional hyperspectral imaging systems.

  12. High incidence of microbleeds in hemodialysis patients detected by T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shunichi; Uomizu, Kenji; Kajiya, Yoriko; Tajitsu, Kenichiro; Kusumoto, Kazuhiro; Hirano, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    The incidence and characteristics of microbleeds in hemodialysis (HD) patients were investigated to elucidate the clinical significance with T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The 57 patients with chronic renal failure maintained by HD had no previous history of stroke. The control group consisted of 53 patients without previous history of stroke or chronic renal failure. The incidence and the number of microbleeds were assessed in the HD and control groups. The findings of microbleeds with T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo MR imaging were compared with those of T 1 - and T 2 -weighted MR imaging in HD patients. The incidence of microbleeds was significantly greater in the HD patients compared with the control patients. T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo imaging revealed a total of 44 microbleeds in 11 HD patients. T 2 -weighted imaging demonstrated 13 of 44 microbleeds as hyperintensity, whereas T 1 -weighted imaging demonstrated 12 lesions as hypointensity. T 2 - and T 1 -weighted imagings did not demonstrate any findings in 31 and 32 lesions, respectively. T 2 * -weighted gradient-echo MR imaging is effective to detect microbleeds which may be a predictor of intracerebral hemorrhage in HD patients and should be included in the protocol for the study of cerebrovascular disease, because T 2 - and T 1 -weighted MR imaging recognizes microbleeds as lacunar infarction. (author)

  13. Imaging in Patients with Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzenhofer, E.; Ubl, P.; Czerny, C.; Erovic, B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin with a mortality rate of approximately 25% (Peloschek et al., 2010). Accurate assessment of nodal involvement in patients with MCC predicts significantly overall outcome (Smith et al., 2012 and Ortin-Perez et al., 2007). Due to the rarity of this highly aggressive disease, only a few imaging reports on MCC were published, and subsequently still to date no accepted imaging algorithm for MCC is available. For primary staging of MCC, general recommendations have included ultrasonography, chest X-ray CT, and MRI, but recent articles show that the use of sentinel node and FDG-PET/PET-CT is gaining more and more importance

  14. The diagnostic value of adding dynamic scintigraphy to standard delayed planar imaging for sentinel node identification in melanoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Nielsen, Michael B.; Chakera, Annette H.; Hesse, Birger; Oturai, Peter S.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Stretch, Jonathan F.; Thompson, John F.; Uren, Roger F.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare early dynamic imaging combined with delayed static imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT with delayed, planar, static imaging alone for sentinel node (SN) identification in melanoma patients. Three hundred and seven consecutive melanoma patients referred for SN biopsy (SNB) were examined using combined imaging. Secondary interpretation of only the delayed static images was subsequently performed. In 220 patients (72%), complete surgical and pathological information relating to the SNB was available. The number of SNs identified and number of patients with positive SNs were compared between the two interpretations of the imaging studies and, when available, related to pathology data. A slightly higher number of SNs (mean 0.12/patient) was identified when interpreting only delayed static images compared to combined imaging. In a direct patient-to-patient comparison, the number of SN(s) identified on the combined vs static images only showed moderate agreement (kappa value 0.56). In 38 patients (17%), positive SNs were identified by the combined procedure compared to 35 (16%) by static imaging only. Thus by static imaging only, tumour-positive SNs were not identified in 3 of 38 patients (8%). For SN identification in melanoma patients, dynamic imaging combined with delayed static imaging and SPECT/CT is superior to delayed static imaging only because the latter is more likely to fail to identify SNs containing metastases. (orig.)

  15. Imaging Surveillance of Patients with Breast Cancer after Primary Treatment: Current Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Women who have been treated for breast cancer are at risk for second breast cancers, such as ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral metachronous breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, interest in patient management and surveillance after treatment has also increased. However, post-treatment surveillance programs for patients with breast cancer have not been firmly established. In this review, we focus on the imaging modalities that have been used in post-treatment surveillance for patients with breast cancer, such as mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, the effectiveness of each modality for detecting recurrence, and how they can be applied to manage patients.

  16. Imaging Surveillance of Patients with Breast Cancer after Primary Treatment: Current Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2015-01-01

    Women who have been treated for breast cancer are at risk for second breast cancers, such as ipsilateral recurrence or contralateral metachronous breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, interest in patient management and surveillance after treatment has also increased. However, post-treatment surveillance programs for patients with breast cancer have not been firmly established. In this review, we focus on the imaging modalities that have been used in post-treatment surveillance for patients with breast cancer, such as mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography, the effectiveness of each modality for detecting recurrence, and how they can be applied to manage patients

  17. Advertising, patient decision making, and self-referral for computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Judy; Kann, Dylan; Karetsky, Kim; Letourneau, Phillip; Raffin, Thomas A; Schraedley-Desmond, Pamela; Koenig, Barbara A; Atlas, Scott W

    Self-referred imaging is one of the latest health care services to be marketed directly to consumers. Most aspects of these services are unregulated, and little is known about the messages in advertising used to attract potential consumers. We conducted a detailed analysis of print advertisements and informational brochures for self-referred imaging with respect to themes, content, accuracy, and emotional valence. Forty print advertisements from US newspapers around the country and 20 informational brochures were analyzed by 2 independent raters according to 7 major themes: health care technology; emotion, empowerment, and assurance; incentives; limited supporting evidence; popular appeal; statistics; and images. The Fisher exact test was used to identify significant differences in information content. Both the advertisements and the brochures emphasized health care and technology information and provided assurances of good health and incentives to self-refer. These materials also encouraged consumers to seek further information from company resources; virtually none referred to noncomplying sources of information or to the risks of having a scan. Images of people commonly portrayed European Americans. We found statistical differences between newspaper advertisements and mailed brochures for references to "prevalence of disease" (Padvertisements (n = 15) and 25% of the brochures (n = 5). Direct-to-consumer marketing of self-referred imaging services, in both print advertisements and informational brochures, fails to provide prospective consumers with comprehensive balanced information vital to informed autonomous decision making. Professional guidelines and oversight for advertising and promotion of these services are needed.

  18. Avulsion fractures of the anterior inferior iliac spine: spectrum of imaging findings; Avulsao da espinha iliaca antero-inferior: espectro dos achados de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Joao Luiz [Hospital Santa Lucia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Dept. de Ressonancia Magnetica; Viana, Sergio Lopes; Mendonca, Jose Luiz Furtado de; Freitas, Flavia Mendes Oliveira; Lima, Gylse-Anne de Souza; Vila, Ana Fabiola da; Ribeiro, Nelmar [Clinica Radiologica Vila Rica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Dept. de Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: radiolog@uol.com.br

    2005-07-15

    Avulsive injuries of the pelvic aphophyses are relatively common among 13-18 year old athletes, particularly among soccer players in Brazil. Diagnosis is made upon clinical and imaging findings. These lesions show three distinct phases: acute, repair and consolidation phases. Although acute and consolidation phases usually represent no diagnostic challenge, the repair phase may appear as an aggressive process on diagnostic images simulating neoplasic lesions. In this paper, the authors present the imaging findings of patients with avulsion of the anterior inferior iliac spine on plain radiographs, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the typical features of the three evolutive phases of these lesions. (author)

  19. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Sorantin, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  20. Feasibility of Stereo-Infrared Tracking to Monitor Patient Motion During Cardiac SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Richard D.; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Boening, Guido; Bruyant, Philippe P.; Feng, Bing; Fulton, Roger R.; Gennert, Michael A.; Nadella, Suman; King, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Patient motion during cardiac SPECT imaging can cause diagnostic imaging artifacts. We investigated the feasibility of monitoring patient motion using the Polaris motion-tracking system. This system uses passive infrared reflection from small spheres to provide real-time position data with vendor stated 0.35 mm accuracy and 0.2 mm repeatability. In our configuration, the Polaris system views through the SPECT gantry toward the patient's head. List-mode event data was temporally synchronized w...

  1. Use of myocardial imaging in the evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, B.; Strauss, H.W.; Trhall, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The role of radioisotope tracer techniques in the evaluation of patients with congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, suspected myocardial infarction, ischemia or suspected ventricular dysfunction is reviewed. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging and exercise blood pool imaging and Technetium-88m pyrophosphate imaging of myocardial infarction are most commonly used.

  2. Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

    2004-01-01

    This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area

  3. Patient body image, self-esteem, and cosmetic results of minimally invasive robotic cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İyigün, Taner; Kaya, Mehmet; Gülbeyaz, Sevil Özgül; Fıstıkçı, Nurhan; Uyanık, Gözde; Yılmaz, Bilge; Onan, Burak; Erkanlı, Korhan

    2017-03-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures reveal the quality of surgical care from the patient's perspective. We aimed to compare body image, self-esteem, hospital anxiety and depression, and cosmetic outcomes by using validated tools between patients undergoing robot-assisted surgery and those undergoing conventional open surgery. This single-center, multidisciplinary, randomized, prospective study of 62 patients who underwent cardiac surgery was conducted at Hospital from May 2013 to January 2015. The patients were divided into two groups: the robotic group (n = 33) and the open group (n = 29). The study employed five different tools to assess body image, self-esteem, and overall patient-rated scar satisfaction. There were statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of self-esteem scores (p = 0.038), body image scores (p = 0.026), overall Observer Scar Assessment Scale (p = 0.013), and overall Patient Scar Assessment Scale (p = 0.036) scores in favor of the robotic group during the postoperative period. Robot-assisted surgery protected the patient's body image and self-esteem, while conventional open surgery decreased these levels but without causing pathologies. Preoperative depression and anxiety level was reduced by both robot-assisted surgery and conventional open surgery. The groups did not significantly differ on Patient Satisfaction Scores and depression/anxiety scores. The results of this study clearly demonstrated that a minimally invasive approach using robotic-assisted surgery has advantages in terms of body image, self-esteem, and cosmetic outcomes over the conventional approach in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Whole body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, Firas; Laurell, Anna; Ahlström, Håkan

    2015-11-01

    Whole body (WB) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become increasingly utilized in cancer imaging, yet the clinical utility of these techniques in follow-up of testicular cancer patients has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of WB MRI with continuous table movement (CTM) technique, including multistep DWI in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer. WB MRI including DWI was performed in follow-up of 71 consecutive patients (median age, 37 years; range 19-84) with histologically confirmed testicular cancer. WB MRI protocol included axial T1-Dixon and T2-BLADE sequences using CTM technique. Furthermore, multi-step DWI was performed using b-value 50 and 1000 s/mm(2). One criterion for feasibility was patient tolerance and satisfactory image quality. Another criterion was the accuracy in detection of any pathological mass, compared to standard of reference. Signal intensity in DWI was used for evaluation of residual mass activity. Clinical, laboratory and imaging follow-up were applied as standard of reference for the evaluation of WB MRI. WB MRI was tolerated in nearly all patients (69/71 patients, 97%) and the image quality was satisfactory. Metal artifacts deteriorated the image quality in six patients, but it did not influence the overall results. No case of clinical relapse was observed during the follow-up time. There was a good agreement between conventional WB MRI and standard of reference in all patients. Three patients showed residual masses and DWI signal was not restricted in these patients. Furthermore, DWI showed abnormally high signal intensity in a normal-sized retroperitoneal lymph node indicating metastasis. The subsequent (18)F-FDG PET/CT could verify the finding. WB MRI with CTM technique including multi-step DWI is feasible in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer. DWI may contribute to important added-value data to conventional MRI sequences

  5. Patient dose with quality image under diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akula, Suresh Kumar; Singh, Gurvinder; Chougule, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Need to set Diagnostic Reference Level (DRL) for locations for all diagnostic procedures in local as compared to National. The review of DRL's should compare local with national or referenced averages and a note made of any significant variances to these averages and the justification for it. To survey and asses radiation doses to patient and reduce the redundancy in patient imaging to maintain DRLs

  6. Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle: MR imaging findings in 17 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puente, R. de la; Boutin, R.D.; Theodorou, D.J.; Hooper, A.; Resnick, D.; Schweitzer, M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To describe the MR imaging findings in patients with osteolysis of the distal clavicle and to compare the MR imaging appearance of clavicular osteolysis following acute injury with that related to chronic stress. Design and patients. MR imaging examinations were reviewed in 17 patients (14 men, 3 women; ages 16-55 years) with the diagnosis of post-traumatic or stress-induced osteolysis of the clavicle. A history of a single direct injury was present in seven patients and a history of weight-lifting, participation in sports, or repetitive microtrauma was present in 10 patients. Results. MR imaging showed edema in the distal clavicle in 17 patients and, of these, eight also had edema in the acromion. The edema was most evident in STIR and fat-suppressed T2-weighted pulse sequences. Other findings about the acromioclavicular (AC) joint were prominence of the joint capsule in 14, joint fluid in eight, cortical irregularity in 12, and bone fragmentation in six patients. No differences in the MR imaging features of post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle were observed. Conclusion. Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle have similar appearances on MR imaging, the most common and conspicuous MR imaging feature being increased T2 signal intensity in the distal clavicle. (orig.)

  7. Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle: MR imaging findings in 17 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puente, R. de la [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)]|[Servicio de Radioloxia, CXH Cristal Pinor, Ourense (Spain); Boutin, R.D. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Theodorou, D.J.; Hooper, A.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Schweitzer, M. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To describe the MR imaging findings in patients with osteolysis of the distal clavicle and to compare the MR imaging appearance of clavicular osteolysis following acute injury with that related to chronic stress. Design and patients. MR imaging examinations were reviewed in 17 patients (14 men, 3 women; ages 16-55 years) with the diagnosis of post-traumatic or stress-induced osteolysis of the clavicle. A history of a single direct injury was present in seven patients and a history of weight-lifting, participation in sports, or repetitive microtrauma was present in 10 patients. Results. MR imaging showed edema in the distal clavicle in 17 patients and, of these, eight also had edema in the acromion. The edema was most evident in STIR and fat-suppressed T2-weighted pulse sequences. Other findings about the acromioclavicular (AC) joint were prominence of the joint capsule in 14, joint fluid in eight, cortical irregularity in 12, and bone fragmentation in six patients. No differences in the MR imaging features of post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle were observed. Conclusion. Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle have similar appearances on MR imaging, the most common and conspicuous MR imaging feature being increased T2 signal intensity in the distal clavicle. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 19 refs.

  8. Effects of cognitive behavioral counseling on body Image following mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Fadaei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Surgical treatment of breast cancer may cause body image alterations. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavioral counseling on body image among Iranian women with primary breast cancer. Methods: In this quasi-experimental designed study, 72 patients diagnosed as breast cancer and surgically treated were enrolled in Isfahan, Iran. The patients were entered the study by convenience sampling method and were randomly di-vided in two groups of intervention (n = 32 and control (n = 40. The intervention group received consultation based on Ellis rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT method for 6 sessions during 3 weeks. The control group did not re-ceive any consultation Paired t-test was used to compare the changes in groups and independent t-test was conducted to compare two groups. The average values represented as mean ± standard deviation. Results: Before the study, the body image score was not significantly different between the intervention (16 97 ± 5 44 and control (15 95 ± 4 66 groups (t = 0 86, P = 0 395. The body image score was significantly lower in the interven-tion group (9 03 ± 6 11 compared to control group (17 18 ± 5 27 after the intervention (t = -6 07, P < 0 001. Conclusions: Since a woman′s body image influences her breast cancer treatment decision, oncology professionals need to recognize the value of a woman′s favorite about appearance and body image. This study emphasizes the impor-tance of offering consultation in breast cancer patients.

  9. [Body image disorder in 100 Tunisian female breast cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faten, Ellouze; Nader, Marrakchi; Raies, Hend; Sana, Masmoudi; Amel, Mezlini; Fadhel, M'rad Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed at tracking the prevalence of body image disorder in a population of Tunisian women followed for breast cancer and the factors associated with it. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Salah-Azaiez Institute in Tunis, over a period of four months. One hundred outpatients followed for confirmed breast cancer were recruited. The questionnaire targeted the women's sexuality and their couple relationships, along with their socio-demographic, clinical, and therapeutic characteristics. The scales used were BIS, HADS, and FSFI. The prevalence of body image disorder according to BIS was 45% with an average of 11.5±11.2 among the interrogated patients, 24.7% of which reported an alteration in their couple relationships and 47% in their sexual relations. In univariate analysis, body image disorder was associated with family support, change in couple relationship, depression and anxiety. Body image disorder and sexual dysfunction were interrelated: each of them fostered the prevalence of the other. Multivariate analysis showed that occupational activity was an independent predictor and the absence of anxiety an independent protective factor. Body image disorder was an independent predictive factor of depression and anxiety. The quality of couple relation and sexuality, along with the impact of the patient's surrounding are decisive for the protection or alteration of her body image. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. MR imaging findings in patients with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honghan, Gong; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Matsuoka, Takae

    1994-01-01

    We retrospectively examined the MR imaging (MRI) findings in 144 patients with epilepsy (31 with temporal lobe epilepsy and 113 with other epilepsies). 110 cases (76.4%) showed abnormal findings such as spotty lesions in white matter, hippocampal atrophy and/or signal change, ventricular dilatation and/or deformity, developmental lesions, brain tumors and so on. Hippocampal atrophy and/or signal change was shown in 74.1% of temporal lobe epilepsy, a remarkably high percentage (p<0.01) compared with the other types of epilepsies (18.1%). This finding means that hippocampal lesions may play a large part in the cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. Investigation of the relationship between clinical term and abnormal findings revealed that the longer the clinical term, the large the number of hippocampal lesions, regardless of whether it is temporal lobe epilepsy or not. Thus hippocampal lesions may occur as a result of hypoxia accompanied with seizure. Therefore we recommend horizontal and/or vertical sections of hippocampus in MR imaging of all patients with epilepsy. Even though MR finding may reflect some secondary lesions, MRI will shed some light on the proper understanding of epilepsy. (author)

  11. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit

  12. Phenotypic feature quantification of patient derived 3D cancer spheroids in fluorescence microscopy image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Rhee, Seon-Min; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2017-03-01

    Patients' responses to a drug differ at the cellular level. Here, we present an image-based cell phenotypic feature quantification method for predicting the responses of patient-derived glioblastoma cells to a particular drug. We used high-content imaging to understand the features of patient-derived cancer cells. A 3D spheroid culture formation resembles the in vivo environment more closely than 2D adherent cultures do, and it allows for the observation of cellular aggregate characteristics. However, cell analysis at the individual level is more challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate image-based phenotypic screening of the nuclei of patient-derived cancer cells. We first stitched the images of each well of the 384-well plate with the same state. We then used intensity information to detect the colonies. The nuclear intensity and morphological characteristics were used for the segmentation of individual nuclei. Next, we calculated the position of each nucleus that is appeal of the spatial pattern of cells in the well environment. Finally, we compared the results obtained using 3D spheroid culture cells with those obtained using 2D adherent culture cells from the same patient being treated with the same drugs. This technique could be applied for image-based phenotypic screening of cells to determine the patient's response to the drug.

  13. God image and happiness in chronic pain patients: the mediating role of disease interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezutter, Jessie; Luyckx, Koen; Schaap-Jonker, Hanneke; Büssing, Arndt; Corveleyn, Jozef; Hutsebaut, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    The present study explored the role of the emotional experience of God (i.e., positive and negative God images) in the happiness of chronic pain (CP) patients. Framed in the transactional model of stress, we tested a model in which God images would influence happiness partially through its influence on disease interpretation as a mediating mechanism. We expected God images to have both a direct and an indirect (through the interpretation of disease) effect on happiness. A cross-sectional questionnaire design was adopted in order to measure demographics, pain condition, God images, disease interpretation, and happiness. One hundred thirty-six CP patients, all members of a national patients' association, completed the questionnaires. Correlational analyses showed meaningful associations among God images, disease interpretation, and happiness. Path analyses from a structural equation modeling approach indicated that positive God images seemed to influence happiness, both directly and indirectly through the pathway of positive interpretation of the disease. Ancillary analyses showed that the negative influence of angry God images on happiness disappeared after controlling for pain severity. The results indicated that one's emotional experience of God has an influence on happiness in CP patients, both directly and indirectly through the pathway of positive disease interpretation. These findings can be framed within the transactional theory of stress and can stimulate further pain research investigating the possible effects of religion in the adaptation to CP.

  14. Coronary artery imaging with 64-slice CT in atrial fibrillation patients: scanning method and post-processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongbo; Li Xiangmin; Peng Zhenpeng; Zhou Xuhui; Yan Chaogui; Li Ziping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of coronary artery imaging using 64-slice CT in patient with atrial fibrillation. Methods: All the cardiac volume data of 31 patients with atrial fibrillation were reconstructed using absolute time method. The images of 12 patients. The images of 31 patients who undeiwent contrast-enhanced CT coronary angiography were evaluated. The presence of stenosis on each segment of coronary arteries was recorded and their degree of stenosis was measured using the vessel analysis software.. The results of conventional coronary angiography (CAG) of the 10 patients were compared with CT coronary angiography. Results: The image quality of 364 coronary vessel segments on the images from 31 patients was evaluated and defined as excellent, fine, moderate or poor. The image quality was excellent, fine, moderate and poor in 194(53.3%), 82(22.5%), 41(11.3%) and 47(12.9%) vessel segments. Comparison was carried out between CTA findings and CAG findings of the 125 segments of the coronary arteries in the 10 patients who underwent CAG. The sensitivity and specificity of CTA for diagnosing vessel with stenosis (≥ 50% narrowing) was 85%(17/20) and 95.2% (100/105). Conclusion: Coronary artery imaging using 64-slice CT is useful in patient with atrial fibrillation. (authors)

  15. Prognostic significance of myocardial imaging with iodine-123 beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid in patients with angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Tsuguhisa; Chikamori, Taishiro; Kamada, Tatsuya; Morishima, Takayuki; Hida, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Hidefumi; Iino, Hitoshi; Yamashina, Akira

    2001-01-01

    To assess the clinical significance of iodine-123 beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the predictive value of BMIPP imaging in patients with angina pectoris was evaluated. One hundred seventy-four patients who underwent BMIPP imaging in our institution were aged 61.8±11 years. One hundred thirty-five patients had stable angina and 39 had unstable angina at the time of examination. Patients with previous myocardial infarction or myocardial disorders were excluded. Early and delayed images were acquired in BMIPP SPECT, and the images were analyzed visually. Cardiac events were classified into hard and soft events: the former consisted of cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction, and the latter included coronary revascularization and heart failure. The findings of BMIPP imaging were normal in 82 patients and abnormal in 92. During follow-up of 15.5±9.5 months, hard events were observed in 4 patients and soft events in 53. In patients with normal BMIPP imaging, soft events were observed in nine patients, but no hard event was encountered. Furthermore, in patients with both normal BMIPP and stress thallium imagings, no cardiac event was observed during 2 years. In contrast, 4 hard events and 44 soft events occurred in patients with abnormal BMIPP imaging. Patients with abnormal BMIPP imaging had a higher incidence of soft events than those with normal BMIPP imaging, regardless of the type of angina (16/62 vs 3/73, p<0.0005 for stable angina; 28/30 vs 6/9, p<0.0001 for unstable angina). The finding of BMIPP imaging correlates well with the mid-term prognosis of patients with angina pectoris. Since BMIPP SPECT is performed without stress to the patient, this imaging modality is important in evaluating patients with stable or unstable angina. (author)

  16. LSD treatment in Scandinavia: emphasizing indications and short-term treatment outcomes of 151 patients in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jens Knud

    2017-10-01

    New research has suggested the clinical use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin in selected patient populations. However, concerns about the clinical use of LSD were advanced in a large Danish follow-up study that assessed 151 LSD-treated psychiatric patients approximately 25 years after their treatment in the 1960s. The purpose of the present study was to give a retrospective account of the short-term outcome of LSD treatment in these 151 Danish psychiatric patients. The LSD case material in the Danish State Archives consists of medical case records of 151 LSD-treated patients, who complained and received economic compensation with the LSD Damages Law. The author carefully read and reviewed the LSD case material. LSD was used to treat a wide spectrum of mental disorders. Independent of diagnoses, 52 patients improved, and 48 patients worsened acutely with the LSD treatment. In a subgroup of 82 neurotic patients, the LSD dose-index (number of treatments multiplied by the maximal LSD dose) indicated the risk of acute worsening. In another subgroup of 19 patients with obsessive-compulsive neurosis, five patients later underwent psychosurgery. A small subgroup of 12 patients was treated with psilocybin. The long-term outcome was poor in most of the patients. Despite the significant limitations to a retrospective design, this database warrants caution in mental health patients. The use of LSD and psilocybin in mental health patients may be associated with serious short- and long-term side effects. Until further trials with rigorous designs have cleared these drugs of their potential harms, their clinical utility in these groups of patients has not been fully clarified.

  17. Clinical and imaging characteristics of 16 patients with autoimmune neuronal synaptic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, N; Netravathi, M; Saini, J; Mahadevan, A; Yadav, R; Nalini, A; Pal, P K; Satishchandra, P

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune neuronal synaptic encephalitis (AIE) encompasses a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by immune-mediated neuronal cell destruction. In this study, we aim to study the clinical features, imaging profile and treatment outcome of patients with AIE. This is a chart review of 16 (M: F-3:13) patients with AIE from 2011 to 2015. Among the patients, 10 had anti-NMDA, 4 had anti-TPO, and 2 had anti-VGKC antibody positivity. Cognitive impairment and seizures were the predominant symptoms present in nearly all patients, followed by psychiatric disturbances (87.5%), mutism (62.5%), movement disorders (62.5%), myoclonic jerks (37.5%) and visual hallucinations (18.75%). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was available in 15 patients; it was abnormal in 53.3% patients. Abnormalities were seen in all patients with anti-VGKC positivity; and, 60% of patients with anti-NMDA positivity. Imaging was normal in 26.7% of the patients (3: anti-NMDA; and, 1: anti-TPO positivity); and, diffuse cerebral atrophy was noted in rest of the 20% (3: anti-TPO positivity) patients. All patients improved gradually with immunomodulation. All patients with anti-VGKC, anti-NMDA and anti-TPO antibody positivity presented with a triad of behavioral changes, impaired cognition and seizures. Mutism was a predominant symptom in patients with an anti-NMDA antibody positivity, which may help in the early identification of this disorder. MRI brain showed changes restricted to limbic structures in anti-NMDA and anti-VGKC antibody positivity. An early diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis is essential for a better outcome and for prevention of long-term sequel.

  18. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging-assisted transsphenoidal pituitary surgery in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellut, David; Hlavica, Martin; Schmid, Christoph; Bernays, René L

    2010-10-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease, usually caused by a growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary adenoma. If untreated, severe cardiovascular, metabolic, cosmetic, and orthopedic disturbances will result. Surgery is generally recommended as the first-line treatment. Transsphenoidal surgical techniques were recently extended by the introduction of intraoperative MR (iMR) imaging. In the present study, the contribution of ultra-low-field (0.15-T) iMR imaging to tumor resection, complication avoidance, and endocrinological and neurological outcome was analyzed. A series of 39 consecutive transsphenoidal iMR imaging-guided (using the PoleStar N20 device) surgical procedures performed between September 2005 and August 2009 for GH-producing pituitary adenomas was retrospectively analyzed. In addition to the patients' clinical data, the following criteria were evaluated independently: duration of surgery; length of hospital stay; endocrinological parameters; results of neurological examinations; and pre-, post-, and intraoperative MR imaging results. Thirty-seven patients with acromegaly underwent 39 transsphenoidal surgeries for pituitary adenomas. During a median follow-up period of 30 months (range 9-56 months), the remission rate was 73.5% in 34 patients with primary surgery and 20% in 5 cases with previous surgery; overall the remission rate was 66.7%. There were no serious postoperative complications. Detection of tumor remnant on iMR imaging led to a 5.1% increase in remission rate. In this largest study to date of GH-producing pituitary adenomas in which iMR imaging-guided transsphenoidal surgery was analyzed, the results suggest that this method is a highly effective and safe treatment modality, even compared with previously published surgical series in which high-field iMR imaging was used. Limitations of iMR imaging are the detection of small residual tumor in the cavernous sinus and persisting disease that could not be observed, even on diagnostic high-field follow

  19. Role of T2 weighted magnetic resonance image in chronic phase of head injured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzura, Masahiko; Taguchi, Yoshio; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Syunmei; Matsuzawa, Motoshi

    2002-01-01

    In neuroimaging studies of head injury, addition of echo planar imaging (EPI) T2-weighted images (WI) to routine MR images has been useful in demonstrating small hemorrhagic lesions as magnetic susceptibility artifacts (MSAs). MSAs are often found in the acute or subacute phases of head injured patients with diffuse axonal injury. We studied MSAs in follow-up MR images of patients with diffuse brain injury and discuss the role of EPI T2-WI in patients with chronic phase of head injured patients. This series consisted of 20 patients with diffuse brain injury diagnosed clinically. Their head CT findings were classified into Diffuse Injury I or II according to the CT classification of Marshall et al. All patients underwent long-term follow-up MR examinations. MR findings in chronic phase were divided into three categories in terms of MSAs: group A, MSAs remaining even after disappearance of small traumatic lesions in both T2-WI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images (11 cases); group B, MSA (s) that disappeared in association with disappearance of small traumatic lesions (4 cases); and group C, MSAs that remained but could not be differentiated from non-traumatic lesions such as hemorrhagic lacunae or cavernoma (5 cases). Adding EPI T2-WI to routine MR images can provide useful information in visualizing old traumatic lesions of the brain in patients with diffuse brain injury even if no neuroimaging studies in acute or subacute phase. (author)

  20. Usefulness of true FISP cine MR imaging in patients with poor cardiac function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Motooka, Makoto; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Maeshima, Isamu; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Urayama, Shinichi; Ikeo, Miki [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This study was done to assess the value of True FISP cine in patients with poor cardiac function. True FISP cine and FLASH cine imaging were performed on a 1.5 T machine. Both short axis and horizontal long axis imaging sections were used. The imaging sections used a Matrix (120 x 128), FOV (24 x 32 cm), and had a slice thickness of 8 mm. The imaging time for True FISP cine was 8 heart beats and 17 heart beats for FLASH cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the blood and myocardium (CNR) was measured at enddiastole and endsystole. The subjects in the study were 10 healty volunteers (average age 26.5{+-}3.2 years) and 12 patients with hypofunction (average age 53.9{+-}13.2 years). In the volunteers, the CNR of the short axis imaging was similar in both True FISP (24.6{+-}3.7) and FLASH (23.4{+-}5.9). In the patients with poor cardiac function however, the CNR of True FISP was larger than FLASH in both the short and long axis. In the short axis (22.7{+-}6.1 vs. 17.9{+-}5.3, P<0.01) and in the long axis (17.4{+-}4.3 vs. 9.3{+-}4.0, P<0.01). We conclude that True FISP cine has a higher contrast in a shorter imaging time than FLASH cine. True FISP cine is especially useful in patients with poor cardiac function. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of sella turcica: evaluation of patients with galactorrhea, amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alair Augusto Sarmet M.D. dos; Moreira, Denise Madeira; Andreiuolo, Pedro Angelo

    1999-01-01

    We have selected 135 cases of patients who have done magnetic resonance imaging of sella region, carried out from September, 1991 to August, 1996, who had galactorrhea (G), amenorrhea(A), and hyperprolactinemia (H), isolated or in association. The patients were divided in seven groups, according to the presence of these symptoms and signs. All examinations were made in a private clinic in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Correlating these patients with the results of the magnetic resonance images, we found 57 micro adenomas, 31 normal examinations, 22 macro adenomas, 11 pituitary hyperplasias, 7 empty sella and 7 cases included in other aspects. The micro adenoma predominated in groups 1 (GAH), 2 (GH), 3 (HA) and 5 (H), that is, in all groups whose patients had hyperprolactinemia. In macro adenomas, a bright signal on T 1-weighted images indicates pituitary apoplexy with intratumoral hemorrhage. All in all, the magnetic resonance imaging is excellent method to be used in the evaluation of patients with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. (author)

  2. Online patient dosimetry and an image quality audit system in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J. M.; Vano, E.; Ten, J. I.; Prieto, C.; Martinez, D.

    2006-01-01

    The present work describes an online patient dosimetry and an image quality audit system in digital radiology. the system allows auditing of different parameters depending on contents of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) header. For the patient dosimetry audit, current mean values of entrance surface dose (ESD) were compared with local and national reference values (RVs) for the specific examination type evaluated. Mean values exceeding the RV trigger an alarm signal and then an evaluation of the technical parameters, operational practice and image quality starts, using data available in the DICOM header to derive any abnormal settings or performance to obtain the image. the X-ray tube output for different kVp values is measured periodically, allowing for the automatic calculation of the ESD. The system also allows for image quality audit linking it with the dose imparted and other technical parameters if the alarm condition if produced. Results and advantages derived from this online quality control are discussed. (Author) 5 refs

  3. MR imaging of abdominopelvic involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1: a review of 43 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T. Thomas [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Poussaint, Tina Young [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Korf, Bruce [University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, Department of Genetics, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are a frequent complication of neurofibromatosis type 1. This article discusses MR imaging findings and distribution of plexiform neurofibromas in the abdomen and pelvis. To define the most prevalent patterns of involvement and MR imaging findings in abdominopelvic neurofibromatosis type 1. We reviewed the MR appearance of abdominopelvic lesions in 23 male and 20 female patients (median age: 16 years) with type 1 neurofibromatosis. The patients were part of a multi-institutional study of 300 patients. Imaging included coronal or sagittal, and axial short tau inversion recovery images. The most common abdominopelvic involvement was in the abdominopelvic wall (n=28, 65%) and lumbosacral plexus (n=27, 63%). Retroperitoneal involvement was frequent (n=15, 35%). Lesions were less often intraperitoneal (21%) (P=0.001). Pelvic disease (n=27, 63%), neural canal involvement (n=18, 42%), and hydronephrosis (n=4, 9%) were also noted. Target-like appearance of plexiform lesions was noted in more than half the patients. Abdominopelvic involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1 is primarily extraperitoneal. Although lesions are most prevalent in the abdominopelvic wall and lumbosacral plexus, retroperitoneal and pelvic involvement is common and usually affects important organs. MR imaging added information in the initial and follow-up clinical evaluation of these patients. (orig.)

  4. Clinical safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL infusion pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehn, Felix E.; Wood, Christopher P.; Watson, Robert E.; Hunt, Christopher H.; Mauck, William D.; Burke, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with implanted SynchroMed spinal infusion pumps (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) routinely undergo magnetic resonance imaging at our institution. In August 2008, Medtronic issued an urgent medical device correction report regarding several pumps. Because of the rare potential ''for a delay in the return of proper drug infusion'' and ''for a delay in the logging of motor stall events,'' ''a patient's pump must be interrogated after MRI exposure in order to confirm proper pump functionality.'' This is particularly important in patients receiving intrathecal baclofen, for whom a delay in return of proper pump infusion could lead to life-threatening baclofen withdrawal syndrome. The objective of this report is to present our experience and protocol of performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL pumps. We retrospectively reviewed records of 86 patients with implanted SynchroMed EL spinal infusion pumps who underwent 112 examinations on 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanners from September 1, 1998 to July 7, 2004. No SynchroMed EL pumps were damaged by magnetic resonance imaging, and the programmable settings remained unchanged in all patients. Our data suggest that SynchroMed EL pump malfunction is indeed rare after routine clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging examinations. However, based on the Medtronic correction report, we perform pump interrogation before and after imaging. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic imaging in fertility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, A.C.; Fleischer, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Some 10%-15% of married couples are affected by a fertility disorder. The number of infertile couples seeking medical assistance has increased dramatically in the past decade. The roles of diagnostic imaging with radiography and US (conventional and transvaginal) is emphasized in the assessment of couples with fertility disorders and an unexpectedly higher incidence of fetal wastage secondary to unsuspected uterine anomalies. The most frequently utilized radiographic examination in infertile patients is hysterosalpingography (HSG). Techniques and complications of HSG are illustrated. The normal anatomy, variants, and congenital anomalies of the uterus and fallopian tubes are demonstrated, as are the numerous abnormalities such as filling defects of the uterine cavity, synechiae, effects of maternal diethylstilbestrol exposure, inflammatory tubal disease, and the more common HSG findings following uterine and tubal surgery. The role of diagnostic imaging in male infertility, including vasography and varicocele detection, are addressed. Conventional and transvaginal US in the management of gynecologic fertility disorders are examined, with an emphasis on follicular monitoring, guided follicular aspirations, endometrial evaluations, and evaluation of other disorders (such as endometriosis) associated with infertility

  6. Transtentorial diachisis in stroke patients demonstrated by I-123 HIPDM brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.J.; DeKosky, S.; Coupal, J.J.; Clark, D.; Ryo, U.Y.; Kung, H.F.

    1988-01-01

    SPECT and planar images of 35 patients with stroke were compared with images of 26 patients with Alzheimer disease, two with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and one with schizoaffective disorder. Transtentorial diaschisis (TTD) with decreased cerebellar activity was shown in 18 patients with large infarcts of middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory and in four patients with internal capsule and basal ganglia infarcts. No TTD was shown in the 29 patients without stroke and those with small infarcts. Decreased cerebral activity contralateral to cerebral infarct due to interruption of cerebellar flow in TTD was hypothesized. The authors concluded that TTD occurs exclusively in an extensive cerebral infarct of the MCA territory, and an absent cortical perfusion abnormality with presence of TTD may indicate basal ganglia and/or internal capsule infarct

  7. Automatic detection of retinal exudates in fundus images of diabetic retinopathy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Partovi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the most frequent microvascular complication of diabetes and can lead to several retinal abnormalities including microaneurysms, exudates, dot and blot hemorrhages, and cotton wool spots. Automated early detection of these abnormalities could limit the severity of the disease and assist ophthalmologists in investigating and treating the disease more efficiently. Segmentation of retinal image features provides the basis for automated assessment. In this study, exudates lesion on retinopathy retinal images was segmented by different image processing techniques. The objective of this study is detection of the exudates regions on retinal images of retinopathy patients by different image processing techniques. Methods: A total of 30 color images from retinopathy patients were selected for this study. The images were taken by Topcon TRC-50 IX mydriatic camera and saves with TIFF format with a resolution of 500 × 752 pixels. The morphological function was applied on intensity components of hue saturation intensity (HSI space. To detect the exudates regions, thresholding was performed on all images and the exudates region was segmented. To optimize the detection efficiency, the binary morphological functions were applied. Finally, the exudates regions were quantified and evaluated for further statistical purposes. Results: The average of sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 98%, and accuracy of 97% was obtained. Conclusion: The results showed that our approach can identify the exudate regions in retinopathy images.

  8. Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, A.; Grosse, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. (orig.) [de

  9. Analysis of patient setup accuracy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onogi, Yuzo; Aoki, Yukimasa; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy is performed in many fractions, and accurate patient setup is very important. This is more significant nowadays because treatment planning and radiation therapy are more precisely performed. Electronic portal imaging devices and automatic image comparison algorithms let us analyze setup deviations quantitatively. With such in mind we developed a simple image comparison algorithm. Using 2459 electronic verification images (335 ports, 123 treatment sites) generated during the past three years at our institute, we evaluated the results of the algorithm, and analyzed setup deviations according to the area irradiated, use of a fixing device (shell), and arm position. Calculated setup deviation was verified visually and their fitness was classified into good, fair, bad, and incomplete. The result was 40%, 14%, 22%, 24% respectively. Using calculated deviations classified as good (994 images), we analyzed setup deviations. Overall setup deviations described in 1 SD along axes x, y, z, was 1.9 mm, 2.5 mm, 1.7 mm respectively. We classified these deviations into systematic and random components, and found that random error was predominant in our institute. The setup deviations along axis y (cranio-caudal direction) showed larger distribution when treatment was performed with the shell. Deviations along y (cranio-caudal) and z (anterior-posterior) had larger distribution when treatment occurred with the patient's arm elevated. There was a significant time-trend error, whose deviations become greater with time. Within all evaluated ports, 30% showed a time-trend error. Using an electronic portal imaging device and automatic image comparison algorithm, we are able to analyze setup deviations more precisely and improve setup method based on objective criteria. (author)

  10. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT or SPECT/CT for lung function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeling, Vera; Heimann, Uwe; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Kroencke, Thomas J; Maurer, Martin H; Doellinger, Felix; Geisel, Dominik; Hamm, Bernd; Brenner, Winfried; Schreiter, Nils F

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the utility of attenuation correction (AC) of V/P SPECT images for patients with pulmonary emphysema. Twenty-one patients (mean age 67.6 years) with pulmonary emphysema who underwent V/P SPECT/CT were included. AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images were compared visually and semiquantitatively. Visual comparison of AC/non-AC images was based on a 5-point likert scale. Semiquantitative comparison assessed absolute counts per lung (aCpLu) and lung lobe (aCpLo) for AC/non-AC images using software-based analysis; percentage counts (PC = (aCpLo/aCpLu) × 100) were calculated. Correlation between AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images was analyzed using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient; differences were tested for significance with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Visual analysis revealed high conformity for AC and non-AC V/P SPECT images. Semiquantitative analysis of PC in AC/non-AC images had an excellent correlation and showed no significant differences in perfusion (ρ = 0.986) or ventilation (ρ = 0.979, p = 0.809) SPECT/CT images. AC of V/P SPECT images for lung lobe-based function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema do not improve visual or semiquantitative image analysis.

  11. Comparison of daily megavoltage electronic portal imaging or kilovoltage imaging with marker seeds to ultrasound imaging or skin marks for prostate localization and treatment positioning in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serago, Christopher F.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Igel, Todd C.; Gale, Ashley A.; Serago, Nicole E.; Earle, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of imaging modalities, immobilization, localization, and positioning techniques in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer had gold marker seeds implanted transrectally and were treated with fractionated radiotherapy. Twenty of the 35 patients had limited immobilization; the remaining had a vacuum-based immobilization. Patient positioning consisted of alignment with lasers to skin marks, ultrasound or kilovoltage X-ray imaging, optical guidance using infrared reflectors, and megavoltage electronic portal imaging (EPI). The variance of each positioning technique was compared to the patient position determined from the pretreatment EPI. Results: With limited immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 9.1 ± 5.3 mm, the average difference between the skin marks' infrared position and EPI pretreatment position is 11.8 ± 7.2 mm, the average difference between the ultrasound position and EPI pretreatment position is 7.0 ± 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 3.5 ± 3.1 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 3.4 ± 2.7 mm. For the patients with the vacuum-style immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 10.7 ± 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 1.9 ± 1.5 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 2.1 ± 1.5 mm. Conclusions: Compared with use of skin marks, ultrasound imaging for positioning provides an increased degree of agreement to EPI-based positioning, though not as favorable as kV imaging fiducial seeds. Intrafraction movement during treatment decreases with improved immobilization

  12. Effect of quality control implementation on image quality of radiographic films and irradiation doses to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuxi; Zhou Qipu; Ge Lijuan; Hou Changsong; Qi Xuesong; Yue Baorong; Wang Zuoling; Wei Kedao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes in the image quality of radiographic films and the irradiation doses to patients after quality control (QC) implementation. Methods: The entrance surface doses (ESD) to patients measured with TLD and the image quality of radiographic films were evaluated on the basis of CEC image quality criteria. Results: The ESD to patients were significantly reduced after QC implementation (P 0.05), but the post-QC image quality was significantly improved in chest PA, lumbar spine AP and pelvis AP(P0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: Significantly reduced irradiation dose with improved image quality can be obtained by QC implementation

  13. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, A.; Weir-McCall, J.R.; Webb, D.J.; Beek, E.J.R. van; Mirsadraee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardiovascular risk stratification in Turner's syndrome is challenging and imaging is not systematically used. The aim of this article is to review cardiovascular risks in this group of patients and discuss a systematic imaging approach for early identification of cardiovascular disorders in these patients

  14. Automated Patient Identification and Localization Error Detection Using 2-Dimensional to 3-Dimensional Registration of Kilovoltage X-Ray Setup Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, James M.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether kilovoltage x-ray projection radiation therapy setup images could be used to perform patient identification and detect gross errors in patient setup using a computer algorithm. Methods and Materials: Three patient cohorts treated using a commercially available image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system that uses 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional (2D-3D) image registration were retrospectively analyzed: a group of 100 cranial radiation therapy patients, a group of 100 prostate cancer patients, and a group of 83 patients treated for spinal lesions. The setup images were acquired using fixed in-room kilovoltage imaging systems. In the prostate and cranial patient groups, localizations using image registration were performed between computed tomography (CT) simulation images from radiation therapy planning and setup x-ray images corresponding both to the same patient and to different patients. For the spinal patients, localizations were performed to the correct vertebral body, and to an adjacent vertebral body, using planning CTs and setup x-ray images from the same patient. An image similarity measure used by the IGRT system image registration algorithm was extracted from the IGRT system log files and evaluated as a discriminant for error detection. Results: A threshold value of the similarity measure could be chosen to separate correct and incorrect patient matches and correct and incorrect vertebral body localizations with excellent accuracy for these patient cohorts. A 10-fold cross-validation using linear discriminant analysis yielded misclassification probabilities of 0.000, 0.0045, and 0.014 for the cranial, prostate, and spinal cases, respectively. Conclusions: An automated measure of the image similarity between x-ray setup images and corresponding planning CT images could be used to perform automated patient identification and detection of localization errors in radiation therapy treatments

  15. Automated Patient Identification and Localization Error Detection Using 2-Dimensional to 3-Dimensional Registration of Kilovoltage X-Ray Setup Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, James M., E-mail: jlamb@mednet.ucla.edu; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether kilovoltage x-ray projection radiation therapy setup images could be used to perform patient identification and detect gross errors in patient setup using a computer algorithm. Methods and Materials: Three patient cohorts treated using a commercially available image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system that uses 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional (2D-3D) image registration were retrospectively analyzed: a group of 100 cranial radiation therapy patients, a group of 100 prostate cancer patients, and a group of 83 patients treated for spinal lesions. The setup images were acquired using fixed in-room kilovoltage imaging systems. In the prostate and cranial patient groups, localizations using image registration were performed between computed tomography (CT) simulation images from radiation therapy planning and setup x-ray images corresponding both to the same patient and to different patients. For the spinal patients, localizations were performed to the correct vertebral body, and to an adjacent vertebral body, using planning CTs and setup x-ray images from the same patient. An image similarity measure used by the IGRT system image registration algorithm was extracted from the IGRT system log files and evaluated as a discriminant for error detection. Results: A threshold value of the similarity measure could be chosen to separate correct and incorrect patient matches and correct and incorrect vertebral body localizations with excellent accuracy for these patient cohorts. A 10-fold cross-validation using linear discriminant analysis yielded misclassification probabilities of 0.000, 0.0045, and 0.014 for the cranial, prostate, and spinal cases, respectively. Conclusions: An automated measure of the image similarity between x-ray setup images and corresponding planning CT images could be used to perform automated patient identification and detection of localization errors in radiation therapy treatments.

  16. Automated patient identification and localization error detection using 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional registration of kilovoltage x-ray setup images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, James M; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether kilovoltage x-ray projection radiation therapy setup images could be used to perform patient identification and detect gross errors in patient setup using a computer algorithm. Three patient cohorts treated using a commercially available image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system that uses 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional (2D-3D) image registration were retrospectively analyzed: a group of 100 cranial radiation therapy patients, a group of 100 prostate cancer patients, and a group of 83 patients treated for spinal lesions. The setup images were acquired using fixed in-room kilovoltage imaging systems. In the prostate and cranial patient groups, localizations using image registration were performed between computed tomography (CT) simulation images from radiation therapy planning and setup x-ray images corresponding both to the same patient and to different patients. For the spinal patients, localizations were performed to the correct vertebral body, and to an adjacent vertebral body, using planning CTs and setup x-ray images from the same patient. An image similarity measure used by the IGRT system image registration algorithm was extracted from the IGRT system log files and evaluated as a discriminant for error detection. A threshold value of the similarity measure could be chosen to separate correct and incorrect patient matches and correct and incorrect vertebral body localizations with excellent accuracy for these patient cohorts. A 10-fold cross-validation using linear discriminant analysis yielded misclassification probabilities of 0.000, 0.0045, and 0.014 for the cranial, prostate, and spinal cases, respectively. An automated measure of the image similarity between x-ray setup images and corresponding planning CT images could be used to perform automated patient identification and detection of localization errors in radiation therapy treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Image quality and patient exposure in mammography, tomography, angiography, and bone radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haus, A.G.; Rossmann, K.; Doi, K.; Chiles, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology, the physical factors affecting image quality and patient exposure are complex and must be studied for each individual procedure. They are a function of recording system unsharpness, geometric unsharpness, image noise, and of the shape, size, and absorption properties of the anatomic part radiographed and the lesion to be detected. The choice of recording system has a significant effect on image quality, and the speed of the recording system is directly related to patient exposure for each procedure. In this presentation, the complexities involved in the selection of recording systems for four radiologic procedures are discussed. We describe in detail our most recent work on mammography with the Lo-Dose system, whereby a significant reduction in exposure may not reduce, but may even increase the diagnostic accuracy by reducing geometric unsharpness. We also describe several examples: (a) in tomography, image resolution is not decreased and diagnostic certainty is affected by a change from a medium-speed screen to a high-speed screen recording system (patient exposure is reduced by a factor of 2); (b) in fine-detail skeletal radiography, the diagnostic information is increased significantly by a change from a conventional screen-film technique to a non-screen technique with fine-grain film and optical magnification, but at the cost of increased patient exposure; and (c) in cerebral angiography, diagnostic information can be increased by use of a screen-film recording system of higher resolution, but lower speed for imaging of small blood vessels. Modulation Transfer Functions and clinical examples are used to illustrate each procedure. (U.S.)

  18. Image quality and patient exposure in mammography, tomography, angiography and bone radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haus, A.G.; Rossmann, K.; Doi, K.; Chiles, J.T.

    1975-01-01

    In diagnostic radiology, the physical factors affecting image quality and patient exposure are complex and must be studied for each individual procedure. They are a function of recording system unsharpness, geometric unsharpness, image noise, and of the shape, size, and absorption properties of the anatomic part radiographed and the lesion to be detected. The choice of recording system has a significant effect on image quality, and the speed of the recording system is directly related to patient exposure for each procedure. This paper discusses the complexities involved in the selection of recording systems for four radiologic procedures. The authors describe in detail their most recent work on mammography with the Lo-Dose system, whereby a significant reduction in exposure may not reduce, but may even increase, the diagnostic accuracy by reducing geometric unsharpness. We also describe several examples: (a) in tomography, image resolution is not decreased and diagnostic certainty is affected by a change from a medium-speed screen to a high-speed screen recording system (patient exposure is reduced by a factor of 2); (b) in fine-detail skeletal radiography, the diagnostic information is increased significantly by a change from a conventional screen-film technique to a non-screen technique with fine-grain film and optical magnification, but at the cost of increased patient exposure; and (c) in cerebral angiography, diagnostic information can be increased by use of a screen-film recording system of higher resolution, but lower speed for imaging of small blood vessels. Modulation transfer functions and clinical examples are used to illustrate each procedure. (author)

  19. Pilot study on virtual imaging for patient information on radiotherapy planning and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulé-Suso, J.; Finney, S.; Bisson, J.; Hammersley, S.; Jassel, S.; Knight, R.; Hicks, C.; Sargeant, S.; Lam, K.-P.; Belcher, J.; Collins, D.; Bhana, R.; Adab, F.; O'Donovan, C.; Moloney, A.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that health professionals might sometimes underestimate cancer patients' needs for information on the complex process of radiotherapy (RT) planning and delivery. Furthermore, relatives might also feel excluded from the treatment of their loved ones. This pilot study was carried out in order to assess whether both patients and their relatives would welcome further information on RT planning and delivery using the virtual reality (VR) system VERT. One hundred and fifty patients with different types of cancer receiving radical RT were included in the study. Patients and relatives were shown using VERT on a one-to-one basis with an oncologist or a radiographer, a standard room where RT is given, a linear accelerator, and how RT is planned and delivered using their own planning CT Scans. Patients welcomed this information as it helped them to reduce their fears about RT. Relatives felt also more involved in the treatment of their loved one. The results obtained in this pilot study show that VR aids could become an important tool for delivering information on RT to both patients and relatives. - Highlights: • Virtual imaging helps patients to better understand RT planning and delivery. • Virtual imaging reduces the fear factor. • Virtual imaging improves patients and relatives satisfaction

  20. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Automatic Recognition of Patient Treatment Site in Portal Images Using Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, X; Yang, D [Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the method to automatically recognize the treatment site in the X-Ray portal images. It could be useful to detect potential treatment errors, and to provide guidance to sequential tasks, e.g. automatically verify the patient daily setup. Methods: The portal images were exported from MOSAIQ as DICOM files, and were 1) processed with a threshold based intensity transformation algorithm to enhance contrast, and 2) where then down-sampled (from 1024×768 to 128×96) by using bi-cubic interpolation algorithm. An appearance-based vector space model (VSM) was used to rearrange the images into vectors. A principal component analysis (PCA) method was used to reduce the vector dimensions. A multi-class support vector machine (SVM), with radial basis function kernel, was used to build the treatment site recognition models. These models were then used to recognize the treatment sites in the portal image. Portal images of 120 patients were included in the study. The images were selected to cover six treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, abdomen and pelvis. Each site had images of the twenty patients. Cross-validation experiments were performed to evaluate the performance. Results: MATLAB image processing Toolbox and scikit-learn (a machine learning library in python) were used to implement the proposed method. The average accuracies using the AP and RT images separately were 95% and 94% respectively. The average accuracy using AP and RT images together was 98%. Computation time was ∼0.16 seconds per patient with AP or RT image, ∼0.33 seconds per patient with both of AP and RT images. Conclusion: The proposed method of treatment site recognition is efficient and accurate. It is not sensitive to the differences of image intensity, size and positions of patients in the portal images. It could be useful for the patient safety assurance. The work was partially supported by a research grant from Varian Medical System.

  1. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Automatic Recognition of Patient Treatment Site in Portal Images Using Machine Learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, X; Yang, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the method to automatically recognize the treatment site in the X-Ray portal images. It could be useful to detect potential treatment errors, and to provide guidance to sequential tasks, e.g. automatically verify the patient daily setup. Methods: The portal images were exported from MOSAIQ as DICOM files, and were 1) processed with a threshold based intensity transformation algorithm to enhance contrast, and 2) where then down-sampled (from 1024×768 to 128×96) by using bi-cubic interpolation algorithm. An appearance-based vector space model (VSM) was used to rearrange the images into vectors. A principal component analysis (PCA) method was used to reduce the vector dimensions. A multi-class support vector machine (SVM), with radial basis function kernel, was used to build the treatment site recognition models. These models were then used to recognize the treatment sites in the portal image. Portal images of 120 patients were included in the study. The images were selected to cover six treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, abdomen and pelvis. Each site had images of the twenty patients. Cross-validation experiments were performed to evaluate the performance. Results: MATLAB image processing Toolbox and scikit-learn (a machine learning library in python) were used to implement the proposed method. The average accuracies using the AP and RT images separately were 95% and 94% respectively. The average accuracy using AP and RT images together was 98%. Computation time was ∼0.16 seconds per patient with AP or RT image, ∼0.33 seconds per patient with both of AP and RT images. Conclusion: The proposed method of treatment site recognition is efficient and accurate. It is not sensitive to the differences of image intensity, size and positions of patients in the portal images. It could be useful for the patient safety assurance. The work was partially supported by a research grant from Varian Medical System

  2. Extracardiac 18F-florbetapir imaging in patients with systemic amyloidosis: more than hearts and minds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T; Page, J; Burniston, M; Skillen, A; Ross, J C; Manwani, R; McCool, D; Hawkins, P N; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D

    2018-07-01

    18 F-Florbetapir has been reported to show cardiac uptake in patients with systemic light-chain amyloidosis (AL). This study systematically assessed uptake of 18 F-florbetapir in patients with proven systemic amyloidosis at sites outside the heart. Seventeen patients with proven cardiac amyloidosis underwent 18 F-florbetapir PET/CT imaging, 15 with AL and 2 with transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR). Three patients had repeat scans. All patients had protocolized assessment at the UK National Amyloidosis Centre including imaging with 123 I-serum amyloid P component (SAP). 18 F-Florbetapir images were assessed for areas of increased tracer accumulation and time-uptake curves in terms of standardized uptake values (SUV mean ) were produced. All 17 patients showed 18 F-florbetapir uptake at one or more extracardiac sites. Uptake was seen in the spleen in 6 patients (35%; 6 of 9, 67%, with splenic involvement on 123 I-SAP scintigraphy), in the fat in 11 (65%), in the tongue in 8 (47%), in the parotids in 8 (47%), in the masticatory muscles in 7 (41%), in the lungs in 3 (18%), and in the kidney in 2 (12%) on the late half-body images. The 18 F-florbetapir spleen retention index (SRI) was calculated. SRI >0.045 had 100% sensitivity/sensitivity (in relation to 123 I-SAP splenic uptake, the current standard) in detecting splenic amyloid on dynamic imaging and a sensitivity of 66.7% and a specificity of 100% on the late half-body images. Intense lung uptake was seen in three patients, one of whom had lung interstitial infiltration suggestive of amyloid deposition on previous high-resolution CT. Repeat imaging showed a stable appearance in all three patients suggesting no early impact of treatment response. 18 F-Florbetapir PET/CT is a promising tool for the detection of extracardiac sites of amyloid deposition. The combination of uptake in the heart and uptake in the spleen on 18 F-florbetapir PET/CT, a hallmark of AL, suggests that this tracer holds promise as a screening tool

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to determine the inter-reliability and intra-observer reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lateral epicondylitis and investigate whether there is a potential relationship between MRI abnormalities of the common extensor tendon (CET) and its clinical symptom. The study group comprised 96 consecutive patients (46 men and 50 women) with a clinical diagnosis of chronic lateral epicondylitis, which were examined on 3.0 T MR. An MRI scoring system was used to grade the degree of tendinopahty. Three independent musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to the patients’ clinical information, scored images separately. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE). Of all the patients, total 96 elbows had MRI-assessed tendinopathy, including 38 (39.6%) with grade 1, 31 (32.3%) with grade 2, and 27 (28.1%) with grade 3. Inter-observer reliability and intra-observer agreement for MRI interpretation of the grades of tendinopathy was good, and a positive correlation between the grades of tendinopathy and PRTEE was determined. MRI is a reliable tool in determining radiological severity of chronical lateral epicondylitis. The severity of MR signal changes positively correlate with the patient's clinical symptom. PMID:26844506

  4. Body image, self-esteem, and quality of life in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Nazik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that may affect the visible areas of body. Hence, the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image can be affected in psoriasis patients. Objectives: We aimed in the present study to assess the effects of psoriasis on the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. Materials and Methods: The study included 92 patients with psoriasis, along with 98 control participants. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patients were assessed, their Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI scores were calculated to determine the clinical severity of the psoriasis, and the values were recorded. In addition, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, Body Image Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale results were evaluated. Results: When the control and psoriasis groups were evaluated regarding the DLQI, self-esteem, and body image, quality of life was found to be more negatively affected in the psoriasis group than the controls, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001, and self-esteem (P < 0.001 and body image (P < 0.001 were found to be significantly lower. Educational status significantly affected self-esteem (P < 0.001 and body image (P = 0.021, however, quality of life was not significantly affected by this parameter (P = 0.345. PASI was positively correlated with the quality of life (r = 0.703 and self-esteem (r = 0.448, however, it was negatively correlated with the body image (r = −0.423. Conclusions: Psoriasis may negatively affect quality of life, self-esteem, and body image, and may also cause psychosocial problems. An assessment of new approaches on this issue may contribute to developments in the treatment of and rehabilitation from this disease.

  5. Cardiovascular assessment of patients with Ullrich-Turner's Syndrome on Doppler echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Ana Valéria Barros de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the cardiovascular features of Ullrich-Turner's syndrome using echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging, and to correlate them with the phenotype and karyotype of the patients. The diagnostic concordance between the 2 methods was also assessed. METHODS: Fifteen patients with the syndrome were assessed by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (cardiac chambers, valves, and aorta. Their ages ranged from 10 to 28 (mean of 16.7 years. The karyotype was analyzed in 11 or 25 metaphases of peripheral blood lymphocytes, or both. RESULTS: The most common phenotypic changes were short stature and spontaneous absence of puberal development (100%; 1 patient had a cardiac murmur. The karyotypes detected were as follows: 45,X (n=7, mosaics (n=5, and deletions (n=3. No echocardiographic changes were observed. In regard to magnetic resonance imaging, coarctation and dilation of the aorta were found in 1 patient, and isolated dilation of the aorta was found in 4 patients. CONCLUSION: The frequencies of coarctation and dilation of the aorta detected on magnetic resonance imaging were similar to those reported in the literature (5.5% to 20%, and 6.3% to 29%, respectively. This confirmed the adjuvant role of magnetic resonance imaging to Doppler echocardiography for diagnosing cardiovascular alterations in patients with Ullrich-Turner's syndrome.

  6. Impact of body image on patients' attitude towards conventional, minimal invasive, and natural orifice surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadé, Wolfram; Friedrich, Colin; Ulmer, Christoph; Basar, Tarkan; Weiss, Heinz; Thon, Klaus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A series of investigations proposed that patients' preference on minimal invasive and scarless surgery may be influenced by age, sex, and surgical as well as endoscopic history of the individual patient. However, it is unknown which psychological criteria lead to the acceptance of increased personal surgical risk or increased personal expenses in patients demanding scarless operations. We investigated whether individual body image contributes to the patient's readiness to assume higher risk in favor of potentially increased cosmesis. We conducted a nonrandomized survey among 63 consecutive surgical patients after receiving surgery. Individual body image perception was assessed postoperatively applying the FKB-20 questionnaire extended by four additional items. The FKB-20 questionnaire is a validated tool for measuring body image disturbances resulting in a two-dimensional score with negative body image (NBI) and vital body dynamics (VBD) being the two resulting scores. A subgroup analysis was performed according to the conducted operations: conventional open surgery = group 1, traditional laparoscopic surgery = group 2, and no scar surgery = group 3. There was a significant correlation between a negative body image and the preference for scar sparing and scarless surgery indicated by a significantly increased acceptance of surgical risks and the willingness to spend additional money for receiving scarless surgery (r = 0.333; p = 0.0227). Allocated to operation subgroups, 17 of 63 patients belonged to group 1 (OS), 29 to group 2 (minimally invasive surgery), and 17 patients to group 3 (no scar). Although age and sex were unequally distributed, the groups were homogenous regarding body mass index and body image (NBI). Subgroup analysis revealed that postoperative desire for scar sparing approaches was most frequently expressed by patients who received no scar operations. Patients with an NBI tend towards scarless surgery and are willing to accept increased

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuppen, J. van; Olthof, D.C.; Wilde, J.C.H.; Beenen, L.F.M.; Rijn, R.R. van; Goslings, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important but often unrecognized cause of death in children. Imaging plays a vital role in the early detection of abdominal trauma. The exact role of imaging in the management of BAT in children is still under research. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic accuracy of a step-up imaging strategy, where the decision to observe or to perform an intervention depends on the vital parameters of the patient, in combination with the presence or absence of free fluid at Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and the findings on CT (performed selectively), for pediatric patients presenting to the ED with a blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Consecutive patients aged ≤16 years admitted between January 2008 and December 2012 to a Dutch level 1 trauma centre were included in this retrospective study. Sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and the negative likelihood ratio (LR−) of the imaging strategy were calculated. Results: The cohort consisted of 122 patients; 66 (54%) patients were discharged home after primary survey, 51 (41%) patients were admitted and observed, 3 (2%) patients underwent transarterial embolization and 2 (2%) patients underwent surgery. Treatment failed in 1 patient, initially selected for observation. The sensitivity of the imaging strategy was 0.833 (0.446–0.990). The NPV and LR− were 0.991 (0.963–1.000) and 0.167 (0.028–0.997), respectively. Conclusion: The step-up imaging strategy that is applied in our academic level 1 trauma centre has a high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value. No clinically relevant injuries were missed without doing unnecessary harm, e.g. radiation or an intervention

  8. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, Sayan, E-mail: ghos0087@umn.edu; Salapaka, Murti, E-mail: murtis@umn.edu [Nanodynamics Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  9. Pseudo Prune Belly Syndrome: Diagnosis Revealed by Imaging - A Case Report and Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Hemal; Sethi, Sanjay; Garg, Jatin; Ahluwalia, Amrit Pal

    2017-01-01

    Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare entity, usually found in male neonates. It comprises complex urinary tract anomalies, bilateral undescended testis and absence of anterior abdominal wall muscles. Patients with unilateral abdominal wall deficiency, unilateral undescended testis and female neonates with abdominal wall laxity are classified as Pseudo Prune Belly syndrome (PPBS). Reports on PPBS do not highlight the radiological and imaging characteristics of this syndrome and the current literature on the role of newer imaging modalities, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), remains relatively sparse. We describe a new case of PPBS and emphasize the role of imaging, especially ultrasound and MRI in the process of diagnosis and briefly review the subject. A male infant of four months of age was referred for evaluation of left-sided cryptorchidism. Clinical examination revealed laxity of the left abdominal wall. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen, pelvis and scrotum was performed together with routine laboratory tests. Ultrasound examination was followed by intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI of the abdomen. On ultrasound, the left testis was located in the inguinal canal, the right kidney was slightly enlarged and the left kidney could not be localized. Ultrasound appearances suggested chronic obstruction in the urinary bladder. Intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI confirmed the ultrasound diagnosis and also revealed a left dysplastic kidney with a dilated, tortuous ureter. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with pseudo prune belly syndrome (PPBS). We report a new occurrence of PPBS, a rare entity. The imaging approach for a comprehensive evaluation of the renal system in PPBS, especially with MRI, is emphasized.

  10. Meniscal configuration using magnetic resonance imaging; Configuracao meniscal pela ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Arthur da Rocha C.; Turrini, Elisabete; Karoauk, Teresa C.C.; Lederman, Henrique M. [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a review of the normal meniscal configuration and correlation with anatomic specimens. The images were obtained by magnetic resonance imaging. The images were obtained by magnetic resonance imaging. The authors emphasize the importance of knowing the relationship between the meniscus and the adjacent anatomic structures. (author) 31 refs., 10 figs., tabs.

  11. Exploring a new quantitative image marker to assess benefit of chemotherapy to ovarian cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirniaharikandehei, Seyedehnafiseh; Patil, Omkar; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Zheng, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Accurately assessing the potential benefit of chemotherapy to cancer patients is an important prerequisite to developing precision medicine in cancer treatment. The previous study has shown that total psoas area (TPA) measured on preoperative cross-section CT image might be a good image marker to predict long-term outcome of pancreatic cancer patients after surgery. However, accurate and automated segmentation of TPA from the CT image is difficult due to the fuzzy boundary or connection of TPA to other muscle areas. In this study, we developed a new interactive computer-aided detection (ICAD) scheme aiming to segment TPA from the abdominal CT images more accurately and assess the feasibility of using this new quantitative image marker to predict the benefit of ovarian cancer patients receiving Bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. ICAD scheme was applied to identify a CT image slice of interest, which is located at the level of L3 (vertebral spines). The cross-sections of the right and left TPA are segmented using a set of adaptively adjusted boundary conditions. TPA is then quantitatively measured. In addition, recent studies have investigated that muscle radiation attenuation which reflects fat deposition in the tissue might be a good image feature for predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. The scheme and TPA measurement task were applied to a large national clinical trial database involving 1,247 ovarian cancer patients. By comparing with manual segmentation results, we found that ICAD scheme could yield higher accuracy and consistency for this task. Using a new ICAD scheme can provide clinical researchers a useful tool to more efficiently and accurately extract TPA as well as muscle radiation attenuation as new image makers, and allow them to investigate the discriminatory power of it to predict progression-free survival and/or overall survival of the cancer patients before and after taking chemotherapy.

  12. Indications for and clinical procedures resulting from magnetic resonance imaging of the knee in older patients: Are we choosing wisely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marc-Etienne; Vézina, François; Carrier, Nathalie; Masetto, Ariel

    2018-03-01

    To analyze the indications for and clinical procedures resulting from knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in older patients. We retrospectively analyzed 215 medical records of patients 50 years of age and older who had undergone a unilateral knee MRI in 2009. Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke in Quebec. Patients 50 years of age and older who underwent a knee MRI in 2009. The main outcome measure was an invasive procedure in the same knee that underwent an MRI. Medical charts were reviewed up to 2014 for patient characteristics, MRI indication, ordering physician specialty, radiography before MRI, MRI findings, and clinical procedures resulting from the MRI. The patients' mean (SD) age was 60.6 (7.5) years. The main MRI indications were meniscopathy (148 [68.8%]) and chronic pain (92 [42.8%]). The main MRI findings were osteoarthritis (OA) (185 [86.0%]) and meniscal lesions (170 [79.1%]). Only 82 (38.1%) patients had a plain radiograph in the 24 months preceding the MRI, usually without a standing anteroposterior view. Findings on pre-MRI radiography (n = 201) demonstrated OA in 144 (71.6%) patients. Overall, 87 (40.5%) patients were seen by an orthopedic surgeon and 27 (31.0%) of these patients underwent an invasive intervention. Among the 81 patients with moderate to severe OA on MRI, 36 (44.4%) had radiographic evidence of moderate to severe OA and only 3 (3.7%) underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. Our study reproduces the known association between OA and degenerative meniscal changes in older patients. We have found a surprising underuse of the standing anteroposterior view on radiography. Most patients in our cohort could have been appropriately diagnosed and treated based on such radiographic information, as demonstrated by pre-MRI findings, thus avoiding the MRI and subsequent evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. Meniscectomy was rarely performed, particularly in patients with advanced OA. Educational and pragmatic measures must be emphasized

  13. Clinical safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL infusion pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehn, Felix E.; Wood, Christopher P.; Watson, Robert E.; Hunt, Christopher H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mauck, William D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Anesthesiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Burke, Michelle M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Patients with implanted SynchroMed spinal infusion pumps (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) routinely undergo magnetic resonance imaging at our institution. In August 2008, Medtronic issued an urgent medical device correction report regarding several pumps. Because of the rare potential ''for a delay in the return of proper drug infusion'' and ''for a delay in the logging of motor stall events,'' ''a patient's pump must be interrogated after MRI exposure in order to confirm proper pump functionality.'' This is particularly important in patients receiving intrathecal baclofen, for whom a delay in return of proper pump infusion could lead to life-threatening baclofen withdrawal syndrome. The objective of this report is to present our experience and protocol of performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL pumps. We retrospectively reviewed records of 86 patients with implanted SynchroMed EL spinal infusion pumps who underwent 112 examinations on 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanners from September 1, 1998 to July 7, 2004. No SynchroMed EL pumps were damaged by magnetic resonance imaging, and the programmable settings remained unchanged in all patients. Our data suggest that SynchroMed EL pump malfunction is indeed rare after routine clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging examinations. However, based on the Medtronic correction report, we perform pump interrogation before and after imaging. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of the lymphatic system in patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrmann, Christian, E-mail: christian.lohrmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany); Foeldi, Etelka, E-mail: foeldi@foeldiklinik.de [Foeldi Clinic for Lymphology, Hinterzarten, Roesslehofweg 2-6, D-79856 Hinterzarten (Germany); Langer, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.langer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To assess the lymphatic system in patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis by magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: 15 patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging. Three locations were examined: first, the lower leg and foot region; second, the upper leg and the knee region; and third, the pelvic with retroperitoneal and abdominal region. For magnetic resonance lymphangiography a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo and a T2-weighted 3D-TSE sequence was used. Results: The size of the genital lymphangiomas, which were revealed in all patients, varied between 5 and 83 mm. In 47% of the patients lymphangiomas were detected at the level of the lower legs, and in 87% of the patients at the level of the upper leg and retroperitoneum. Furthermore, lymphangiomas were seen in the inguinal and pelvic region in 100% and intraabdominally in 40% of the patients. The lymphangiomas extended into the abdominal wall in 93% of the examined patients. A chylous pleural effusion was revealed in 20% and a chylous ascites in 13% of patients. 93% of patients suffered due to the diffuse lymphangiomatous pathologies from a lymphedema of the lower extremities, while a generalized lymphedema of the trunk was found in 87% of the patients. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and accurate minimal-invasive imaging modality for the evaluation of the lymphatic system in patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis. Since the localization and extension of the lymphangiomas are important prognostic factors, it is crucial to perform a safe radiologic evaluation with a high resolution for the patient's therapeutic planning.

  15. Patient-centered image and data management in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steil, Volker; Schneider, Frank; Kuepper, Beate; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Weisser, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Background: recent changes in the radiotherapy (RT) workflow through the introduction of complex treatment paradigms such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and, recently, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with their increase in data traffic for different data classes have mandated efforts to further integrate electronic data management for RT departments in a patient- and treatment-course-centered fashion. Methods: workflow in an RT department is multidimensional and multidirectional and consists of at least five different data classes (RT/machine data, patient-related documents such as reports and letters, progress notes, DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) image data, and non-DICOM image data). Data has to be handled in the framework of adaptive feedback loops with increasing frequency. This is in contrast to a radiology department where mainly DICOM image data and reports have to be widely accessible but are dealt with in a mainly unidirectional manner. When compared to a diagnostic Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), additional legal requirements have to be conformed to when an integrated electronic RT data management system is installed. Among these are extended storage periods, documentation of treatment plan approval by physicians and physicist, documentation of informed consent, etc. Conclusion: since the transition to a paper- and filmless environment in medicine and especially m radiation ''neology is unavoidable this review discusses these issues and suggests a possible hardware and organizational architecture of an RT department information system under control of a Hospital Information System (HIS), based on combined features of genuine RT Record and Verify (R and V) Systems, PACS, and Electronic Medical Records (EMR). (orig.)

  16. Body image in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: validation of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire--Scoliosis Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Joshua D; Lonner, Baron S; Crerand, Canice E; Shah, Suken A; Flynn, John M; Bastrom, Tracey; Penn, Phedra; Ahn, Jennifer; Toombs, Courtney; Bharucha, Neil; Bowe, Whitney P; Newton, Peter O

    2014-04-16

    Appearance concerns in individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis can result in impairment in daily functioning, or body image disturbance. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire (BIDQ) is a self-reported, seven-question instrument that measures body image disturbance in general populations; no studies have specifically examined body image disturbance in those with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This study aimed to validate a modified version of the BIDQ in a population with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and to establish discriminant validity by comparing responses of operatively and nonoperatively treated patients with those of normal controls. In the first phase, a multicenter study of forty-nine patients (mean age, fourteen years; thirty-seven female) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was performed to validate the BIDQ-Scoliosis version (BIDQ-S). Participants completed the BIDQ-S, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22, Children's Depression Index (CDI), and Body Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA) questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. In the second phase, ninety-eight patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (mean age, 15.7 years; seventy-five female) matched by age and sex with ninety-eight healthy adolescents were enrolled into a single-center study to evaluate the discriminant validity of the BIDQ-S. Subjects completed the BIDQ-S and a demographic form before treatment. Independent-sample t tests and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. The BIDQ-S was internally consistent (Cronbach alpha = 0.82), and corrected item total correlations ranged from 0.47 to 0.67. The BIDQ-S was significantly correlated with each domain of the SRS-22 and the total score (r = -0.50 to -0.72, p ≤ 0.001), with the CDI (r = 0.31, p = 0.03), and with the BESAA (r = 0.60, p image disturbance compared with healthy controls. To our knowledge, this user-friendly instrument is the first to

  17. Usefulness of true FISP cine MR imaging in patients with poor cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Motooka, Makoto; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Maeshima, Isamu; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Urayama, Shinichi; Ikeo, Miki

    2002-01-01

    This study was done to assess the value of True FISP cine in patients with poor cardiac function. True FISP cine and FLASH cine imaging were performed on a 1.5 T machine. Both short axis and horizontal long axis imaging sections were used. The imaging sections used a Matrix (120 x 128), FOV (24 x 32 cm), and had a slice thickness of 8 mm. The imaging time for True FISP cine was 8 heart beats and 17 heart beats for FLASH cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the blood and myocardium (CNR) was measured at enddiastole and endsystole. The subjects in the study were 10 healty volunteers (average age 26.5±3.2 years) and 12 patients with hypofunction (average age 53.9±13.2 years). In the volunteers, the CNR of the short axis imaging was similar in both True FISP (24.6±3.7) and FLASH (23.4±5.9). In the patients with poor cardiac function however, the CNR of True FISP was larger than FLASH in both the short and long axis. In the short axis (22.7±6.1 vs. 17.9±5.3, P<0.01) and in the long axis (17.4±4.3 vs. 9.3±4.0, P<0.01). We conclude that True FISP cine has a higher contrast in a shorter imaging time than FLASH cine. True FISP cine is especially useful in patients with poor cardiac function. (author)

  18. Myocardial imaging in the noninvasive evaluation of patients with suspected ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, B.; Strauss, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Three noninvasive radioactive tracer techniques for evaluating patients with ischemic heart disease are described: (1) myocardial perfusion imaging, (2) acute infarct imaging, and (3) the gated blood pool scan. Myocardial perfusion imaging with tracers that distribute in the myocardium in relation to regional blood flow allows detection of patients with transmural and nontransmural infarction by the finding of decreased tracer concentration in the affected region of the myocardium. If these tracers are injected at the time of maximal stress to patients with significant coronary arterial stenosis but without infarction, areas of transient ischemia can be identified as zones of decreased tracer concentration not found when an examination is performed at rest. Acute infarct imaging with tracers that localize in acutely damaged tissue permits separation of patients with acute myocardial necrosis from those without infarction and those with more chronic damage. The gated blood pool scan permits assessment of left ventricular function and regional wall motion. The measurement of ventricular volumes, ejection fraction and regional wall motion adds significantly to the determination of hemodynamic variables in assessing patients with acute infarction. The technique also permits detection of right ventricular dysfunction. Performance of a combination of these radioactive tracer techniques is often advantageous, particularly in patients with suspected infarction. The techniques can establish whether infarction is present, whether it is acute, where the damage is located and how extensive it is; they can also provide a measure of the effect of this damage on left ventricular function

  19. Automated interpretation of PET/CT images in patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Jakobsson, David; Olofsson, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    cancer. METHODS: A total of 87 patients who underwent PET/CT examinations due to suspected lung cancer comprised the training group. The test group consisted of PET/CT images from 49 patients suspected with lung cancer. The consensus interpretations by two experienced physicians were used as the 'gold...... method measured as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was 0.97 in the test group, with an accuracy of 92%. The sensitivity was 86% at a specificity of 100%. CONCLUSIONS: A completely automated method using artificial neural networks can be used to detect lung cancer......PURPOSE: To develop a completely automated method based on image processing techniques and artificial neural networks for the interpretation of combined [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images for the diagnosis and staging of lung...

  20. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  1. 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Osborne, Joseph R.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Beylergil, Volkan; Ruan, Shutian; Cheal, Sarah M.; Lyashchenko, Serge; Gonen, Mithat; Lewis, Jason S.; Holland, Jason P.; Reuter, Victor E.; Loda, Massimo F.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Larson, Steven M.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. 89 Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of 89 Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by 89 Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of 89 Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of 89 Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1-14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51-89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153-317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on 89 Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were 89 Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on 89 Zr-huJ591 study, while the

  2. The patient experience of high technology medical imaging: A systematic review of the qualitative evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, Zachary; Jordan, Zoe

    2011-01-01

    Background: When presenting to an imaging department, the person who is to be imaged is often in a vulnerable state, and can experience the scan in a number of ways. It is the role of the radiographer to produce a high quality image and facilitate patient care throughout the imaging process. A qualitative systematic review was performed to synthesise the existent evidence on the patient experience of high technology medical imaging. Only papers relating to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) were identified. Inclusion criteria: Studies that were of a qualitative design that explored the phenomenon of interest, the patient experience of high technology medical imaging. Participants included anyone who had undergone one of these procedures. Methods: A systematic search of medical and allied health databases was conducted. Articles identified during the search process that met the inclusion criteria were then critically appraised for methodological quality independently by two reviewers. Results: During the search and inclusion process, 15 studies were found that were deemed of suitable quality to be included in the review. From the 15 studies, 127 findings were extracted from the included studies. These were analysed in more detail to observe common themes, and then grouped into 33 categories. From these 33 categories, 11 synthesised findings were produced. The 11 synthesised findings highlight the diverse, unique and challenging ways in which people experience imaging with MRI and CT scanners. Conclusion: The results of the review demonstrate the diverse ways in which people experience medical imaging. All health professionals involved in imaging need to be aware of the different ways each patient may experience imaging.

  3. Imaging of hepatic infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, D.J.; Hanbidge, A.E.; O'Malley, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented

  4. Imaging of hepatic infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, D.J. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)]. E-mail: doyledj@hotmail.com; Hanbidge, A.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); O' Malley, M.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented.

  5. Optimization of patient protection using rare earth screen in conventional imaging procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkoom, S.; Schandorf, C.; Fletcher, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize patient protection using rare earth screen of speed 400 in place of conventional screen-film of speed 200. The entrance surface dose (ESD) for the two screen-film systems was determined for patients undergoing simple radiographic examinations (chest, lumbar spine and pelvis series). The determination of the ESD included backscatter factors. The ESD was the optimizing parameter and its trade off with the image quality assessment, which was surveyed based on the information obtained through standardized questionnaire. The estimated ESDs were compared with reference levels set by the Community of European Commission (CEC) for a standard adult patient. For chest PA, ESD estimates were lower than the CEC reference levels whilst that of lumbar spine AP and LAT and pelvis AP were high. Upon the adoption of rare earth screen of speed 400, a dose reduction of 33% for chest, 17% for lumbar spine and 28% for pelvis examinations was achieved. From the observations made from this study, some corrective actions such as equipment quality control of parameters that affect patient dose and image quality like kVp accuracy and consistency, mAs accuracy and consistency, optimal film processing conditions, regular film reject analysis to detect and minimize the root causes and contributory factors to poor image quality and periodic training of staff on dose reduction techniques must be undertaken. Regular assessment of patient dose and image quality, equipment quality control, adoption of faster rare earth screens and optimum radiographic technique are therefore recommended in order to achieve optimization goals. (author)

  6. Importance of body image in marketing communication

    OpenAIRE

    Váradyová, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The thesis dedicated to the issue of body image in the context of marketing communication emphasizing female body imaging in advertising. The aim of Master's thesis is to identify differences in the perception of beauty between the German and Czechoslovak culture. The theoretical part is intended to explain the body image issues, including historical development. Furthermore points out the influence of mass media on women's physical self-concept. The practical part deals with content analysis...

  7. Amygdala Volumetry in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Normal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Aggarwal, Simmi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy may relate to abnormalities in various brain structures, including the amygdala. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NMRI) represent a challenge for diagnosis of the underlying abnormality and for presurgical evaluation. To date, however, only few studies have used quantitative structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based techniques to examine amygdalar pathology in these patients. Based on clinical examination, 24-hour video EEG recordings and MRI findings, 50 patients with EEG lateralized TLE and normal structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging results were included in this study. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the amygdalas and hippocampi were conducted in 50 non-epileptic controls (age 7–79 years) and 50 patients with MTLE with normal MRI on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. Visual assessment and amygdalar volumetry were performed on oblique coronal T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images respectively. The T2 relaxation times were measured using the 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence (TE, 22–352). Volumetric data were normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Results were assessed by SSPS statistic program. Individual manual volumetric analysis confirmed statistically significant amygdala enlargement (AE) in eight (16%) patients. Overall, among all patients with AE and a defined epileptic focus, 7 had predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. The T2 relaxometry demonstrated no hyperintense signal of the amygdala in any patient with significant AE. This paper presented AE in a few patients with TLE and normal MRI. These findings support the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NMRI in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process

  8. Amygdala Volumetry in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Normal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Aggarwal, Simmi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background It has been suggested that the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy may relate to abnormalities in various brain structures, including the amygdala. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NMRI) represent a challenge for diagnosis of the underlying abnormality and for presurgical evaluation. To date, however, only few studies have used quantitative structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based techniques to examine amygdalar pathology in these patients. Material/Methods Based on clinical examination, 24-hour video EEG recordings and MRI findings, 50 patients with EEG lateralized TLE and normal structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging results were included in this study. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the amygdalas and hippocampi were conducted in 50 non-epileptic controls (age 7–79 years) and 50 patients with MTLE with normal MRI on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. Visual assessment and amygdalar volumetry were performed on oblique coronal T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images respectively. The T2 relaxation times were measured using the 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence (TE, 22–352). Volumetric data were normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Results were assessed by SSPS statistic program. Results Individual manual volumetric analysis confirmed statistically significant amygdala enlargement (AE) in eight (16%) patients. Overall, among all patients with AE and a defined epileptic focus, 7 had predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. The T2 relaxometry demonstrated no hyperintense signal of the amygdala in any patient with significant AE. Conclusions This paper presented AE in a few patients with TLE and normal MRI. These findings support the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NMRI in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. PMID:27231493

  9. Adaptive optics fundus images of cone photoreceptors in the macula of patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Naoki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Fuchizawa, Chiharu; Oiwake, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine cone photoreceptors in the macula of patients with retinitis pigmentosa using an adaptive optics fundus camera and to investigate any correlations between cone photoreceptor density and findings on optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence. We examined two patients with typical retinitis pigmentosa who underwent ophthalmological examination, including measurement of visual acuity, and gathering of electroretinographic, optical coherence tomographic, fundus autofluorescent, and adaptive optics fundus images. The cone photoreceptors in the adaptive optics images of the two patients with retinitis pigmentosa and five healthy subjects were analyzed. An abnormal parafoveal ring of high-density fundus autofluorescence was observed in the macula in both patients. The border of the ring corresponded to the border of the external limiting membrane and the inner segment and outer segment line in the optical coherence tomographic images. Cone photoreceptors at the abnormal parafoveal ring were blurred and decreased in the adaptive optics images. The blurred area corresponded to the abnormal parafoveal ring in the fundus autofluorescence images. Cone densities were low at the blurred areas and at the nasal and temporal retina along a line from the fovea compared with those of healthy controls. The results for cone spacing and Voronoi domains in the macula corresponded with those for the cone densities. Cone densities were heavily decreased in the macula, especially at the parafoveal ring on high-density fundus autofluorescence in both patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Adaptive optics images enabled us to observe in vivo changes in the cone photoreceptors of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, which corresponded to changes in the optical coherence tomographic and fundus autofluorescence images.

  10. Impact of imaging room environment: staff job stress and satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and willingness to recommend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiaobo; Joseph, Anjali; Ensign, Janet C

    2012-01-01

    The built environment significantly affects the healthcare experiences of patients and staff. Healthcare administrators and building designers face the opportunity and challenge of improving healthcare experience and satisfaction through better environmental design. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how a novel environmental intervention for imaging rooms, which integrated multiple elements of healing environments including positive distractions and personal control over environment, affects the perceptions and satisfactions of its primary users-patients and staff. Anonymous questionnaire surveys were conducted to compare patient and staff perceptions of the physical environment, satisfaction, and stress in two types of imaging rooms: imaging rooms with the intervention installed (intervention rooms) and traditionally designed rooms without the intervention (comparison rooms). Imaging technologists and patients perceived the intervention rooms to be significantly more pleasant-looking. Patients in the intervention rooms reported significantly higher levels of environmental control and were significantly more willing to recommend the intervention rooms to others. The environmental intervention was effective in improving certain aspects of the imaging environment: pleasantness and environmental control. Further improvement of the imaging environment is needed to address problematic areas such as noise.

  11. Prediction of response to first-line chemotherapy with steamboat's imaging in lymphoma patients. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyridonidis, T.; Apostolopoulos, D.; Giannakenas, C.; Xourgia, X.; Vasilakosa, P.; Frangos, S.; Matsouka, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Sestamibi is a transport substrate for both Pgp and MRP, which are closely related to MDR (multidrug resistance), a significant factor for chemotherapy treatment failure in many cancer patients. Imaging with Tc99m-Sestamibi has been studied for predicting chemotherapy response mainly in breast and lung cancer. A few studies exist regarding lymphoma patients. In our study we included 24 consecutive lymphoma patients that were referred to our department for initial (before treatment) Ga-67 scan. All these patients were also imaged with Tc99m-Sestamibi in order to evaluate its prognostic value in predicting response to first-line chemotherapy. 20 mCi of Tc99m-Sestamibi was injected intravenously and planar images of the whole body were obtained at 15 min and 2 hours later. In 21/24 patients SPECT was performed in area of interest (most commonly in thorax) both in early and late imaging. Ratios of tumor average counts to background in early and late planar and SPECT images were calculated, also ratios of max tumor counts to background were calculated, as well as tumor washout rate. In all the estimations time decay correction was applied. A visual interpretation score was introduced for early uptake and another for Sestamibi retention in late images. Early uptake score was considered 0 in no or nearly no uptake, 1 in low uptake, 2 in moderate uptake, and 3 in high uptake. Tumor retention score was considered 0 in no retention (not or nearly not visible on late images), 1 in slight/moderate uptake (tumor better seen on early images), 2 in moderate uptake (tumor seen similar/somehow better in late images), 3 high retention (tumor definitely seen better on late images). Finally a total prognostic score (TPS) was derived by the sum of the two above-mentioned scores (uptake score plus retention score). The mean age of our patients was 48.8 ±13.9 years (range 17-80 years). 12 patients were men, and 12 women. There were 8 patients with HD and 16 with NHL. Three of

  12. Pulmonary fungal infection: Imaging findings in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Yi, Chin A; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Joungho

    2006-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is the most common endemic mycosis in North America, and is followed by coccidioidomycosis and blastomycosis. Although the majority of these infections in immunocompetent persons are self-limited, some patients can develop severe pneumonitis or various forms of chronic pulmonary infection. Cryptococcoci, Aspergillus, Candidas, and Mucorals are ubiquitous organisms, which may affect immunocompromised patients. Specific imaging findings can be expected, depending on the organisms involved, underlying patients' conditions (immune status), and specific situations after immune depleting procedures

  13. Esophageal transit study using a sliding sum image. Application to patients with probable and definite systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Inaki, Anri; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Hosoya, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal complication is common in systemic sclerosis (SSc), but scintigraphic transit patterns based on each subtype have not been understood well. The aim of this study was to develop a new algorithm for integrating a dynamic esophageal transit study and to apply the method to patients with SSc. A total of 40 patients suspected of having SSc were examined by a dynamic esophageal transit study. The subtypes included 32 with definite SSc (15 limited cutaneous type and 17 diffuse cutaneous type) and 8 with probable SSc. The serial esophageal images were shifted and summed to a functional image (sliding sum image) and compared to a conventional condensed image analysis. Esophageal retention fraction at 90 s (R 90 ) and half-time (T 1/2 ) of transit were also measured. The four patterns of the sliding sum image and condensed image agreed in all patients. Abnormal retention patterns were observed in none of the 8 (0%) patients with the probable SSc and in 15 of 32 (47%) patients with definite SSc (p=0.014). The severity of scleroderma assessed by modified Rodnan skin thickness score correlated with that of esophageal retention R 90 (p=0.04). The sliding sum image is a simple and effective method for integrating esophageal transit. Patients with definite SSc and severe scleroderma had significantly higher retention patterns, while probable SSc patients showed no esophageal dysmotility. (author)

  14. Relation between self-image score of SRS-22 with deformity measures in female adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, Y P; Yu, B; Zhang, J G; Shen, J X; Qiu, G X; Li, Y

    2014-11-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a pathology which affects the individual's functioning in the widely understood physical, psychic, and social aspects. More attention should be paid to patients' perception of self-image when evaluating the spine deformity. The present retrospective study evaluated the associations between the deformity measures and self-image score as determined by the SRS-22 questionnaire in Chinese female AIS patients. The self-image score correlates significantly with deformity measures. The location of main curve apex and the number of curve could affect the self-image score. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 202 female patients, collected data on patient's age, body mass index, radiographic and physical measures and self-image score of SRS-22 questionnaire. According to the location of main curve apex and the number of curve, the patients were divided to different subgroups. Correlations between deformity measures and self-image score of different groups were evaluated by the Spearman correlation test. The self-image score correlated negatively with the main Cobb angle, apical vertebral translation (AVT), and razor hump height. There is no significant difference of self-image score between thoracic curve (TC) and thoracolumbar curve (TL/LC) subgroups. And the self-image scores of one-curve, two-curve and three-curve subgroups are similar. For Chinese female AIS patients in our study, self-image was found to correlate negatively with the main Cobb angle, AVT and razor hump height. And the location of scoliosis apex and the number of curve are not influencing factors of self-image perception. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Usefulness of dipyridamole stress myocardial imaging in patients who have exercise limitations due to various orthopedic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Hirofumi; Ashihara, Toshiaki; Fukuyama, Takaya; Matsui, Kanji; Yamamoto, Sumiki; Yamamoto, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease in patients unable to exercise adequately because of chronic rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, hip bone fractures or disk herniation, we performed dipyridamole-stress thallium-201 myocardial imaging in thirty-three patients. Twelve of the 33 patients showed perfusion defect and redistribution by thallium imaging. Coronary angiography was performed in 9 patients out of these 12 dipyridamole-positive patients and significant coronary artery stenosis was detected in 7 of them (78%). Due to these results of dipyridamole-imaging and coronary angiograms, surgical intervention for the underlying bone or joint disorder was performed under cardioprotective strategy in 15 patients, in which no cardiovascular events occurred. Thus, dipyridamole-stress myocardial imaging is a satisfactory alternative to the exercise test for detecting coronary artery disease in patients with bone or joint disorders. (author)

  16. Verification of patient position and delivery of IMRT by electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, Andrew L.; Evans, Philip M.; Clark, Catharine H.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of the work presented in this paper was to determine whether patient positioning and delivery errors could be detected using electronic portal images of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patients and methods: We carried out a series of controlled experiments delivering an IMRT beam to a humanoid phantom using both the dynamic and multiple static field method of delivery. The beams were imaged, the images calibrated to remove the IMRT fluence variation and then compared with calibrated images of the reference beams without any delivery or position errors. The first set of experiments involved translating the position of the phantom both laterally and in a superior/inferior direction a distance of 1, 2, 5 and 10 mm. The phantom was also rotated 1 and 2 deg. For the second set of measurements the phantom position was kept fixed and delivery errors were introduced to the beam. The delivery errors took the form of leaf position and segment intensity errors. Results: The method was able to detect shifts in the phantom position of 1 mm, leaf position errors of 2 mm, and dosimetry errors of 10% on a single segment of a 15 segment IMRT step and shoot delivery (significantly less than 1% of the total dose). Conclusions: The results of this work have shown that the method of imaging the IMRT beam and calibrating the images to remove the intensity modulations could be a useful tool in verifying both the patient position and the delivery of the beam

  17. MR imaging of hepatic metastasis in patients with malignant melanoma: Evaluation of suspected lesions screened at contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Tateishi, Ukihide; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Arai, Yasuaki; Yamazaki, Naoya; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging feature of suspected hepatic metastasis in patients with malignant melanoma which showed intermediate findings on screened contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT). Materials and methods: MR imaging was performed in 38 patients (22 men, 16 women; mean age, 58 years) whose CECT findings were intermediate. Hepatic metastases had been diagnosed on MR imaging in 23 of the 38 patients. Verification of hepatic metastasis was made by histological examination: ultrasonographic-guided needle biopsy (n = 3), autopsy (n = 3), and surgical resection (n = 1), or by an obvious progression in number and/or size of the lesions on follow-up MR imaging (n = 24). Two diagnostic radiologists reviewed MR images by consensus. The median follow-up duration was 14.2 months. Results: Abnormal findings were detected in 31 patients on MR images, and undetected in the remaining seven patients resulting in false-positive on CECT. The mean size of the lesion was 11.0 mm. False-positive results were obtained in two lesions which disappeared on follow-up MR imaging. In six patients, lesions were considered as hepatic cysts on MR images. As a result, a total of 35 hepatic metastases were detected on MR images. Of these, 18 patients demonstrated typical melanotic appearance on MR images which showed shortened T1 and T2 relaxation times, and five patients demonstrated atypical melanotic appearance. In 16 patients, extra-hepatic metastases were also developed. Conclusion: MR imaging could rule out hepatic metastasis in patients with malignant melanoma which showed intermediate findings on screened CECT, and could detect additional extra-hepatic metastases.

  18. A new robust markerless method for automatic image-to-patient registration in image-guided neurosurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinlong; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Manning

    2017-12-01

    Compared with the traditional point-based registration in the image-guided neurosurgery system, surface-based registration is preferable because it does not use fiducial markers before image scanning and does not require image acquisition dedicated for navigation purposes. However, most existing surface-based registration methods must include a manual step for coarse registration, which increases the registration time and elicits some inconvenience and uncertainty. A new automatic surface-based registration method is proposed, which applies 3D surface feature description and matching algorithm to obtain point correspondences for coarse registration and uses the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm in the last step to obtain an image-to-patient registration. Both phantom and clinical data were used to execute automatic registrations and target registration error (TRE) calculated to verify the practicality and robustness of the proposed method. In phantom experiments, the registration accuracy was stable across different downsampling resolutions (18-26 mm) and different support radii (2-6 mm). In clinical experiments, the mean TREs of two patients by registering full head surfaces were 1.30 mm and 1.85 mm. This study introduced a new robust automatic surface-based registration method based on 3D feature matching. The method achieved sufficient registration accuracy with different real-world surface regions in phantom and clinical experiments.

  19. The clinical application value of myocardial perfusion imaging in evaluating coronary artery myocardial bridge patients with symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuetao; Fu Ning; Ding Xuemei; Lu Cunzhi; Zhu Feng; Wang Guanmin; Huang Yijie; Wang Linguang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Myocardial bridge is a common inborn coronary artery anomaly, myocardial bridge may be associated with myocardial ischemia. Only a few patients with coronary artery myocardial bridge were evaluated with nuclear medicine techniques. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nuclear cardiology with myocardial perfusion technique in symptomatic myocardial bridge patients. Methods Nineteen myocardial bridge patients with the symptoms of chest pain and chest distress were analyzed retrospectively. 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) myocardial perfusion images (both exercise and rest) were performed in all. Imaging results were compared with the results of movement electrocardiogram (ECG) and coronary arteriography. The t test or χ 2 test was used to statistically analyze the data with Stata 7.0 software. Results: Of the 19 patients, 18 patients had myocardial bridge locating at the left anterior descending artery, 1 patient at the left anterior descending and left circumflex artery, the mean angiographic systolic occlusion within the myocardial bridge was (65.4 ± 22.1)%. Of these 19 patients, Exercise-rest 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging defined positive myocardial ischemia in 10 and negative in 9 patients. Of the 10 patients with 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging defined myocardial ischemia, 8 had reversible radioactive defect of partial anterior wall and (or) apex, 1 had reversible defect of post lateral wall and post septal wall, and 1 had reversible defect of inferior wall. The positive predictive value of myocardial perfusion imaging was 52.6% (10/19), which was higher than movement ECG [21.1% (4/19), χ 2 = 4.07, P 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial periusion imaging defined myocardial ischemia. Six cases with Grade II stenosis, two were 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging defined myocardial ischemia. Eight cases with Grade III stenosis, seven were 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging defined myocardial

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in epileptic adult patients: experience in Ramathibodi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solosrungruang, Anusorn; Laothamatas, Jiraporn; Chinwarun, Yotin

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to classify the imaging structural abnormalities of epileptic adult patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) of the brain at Ramathibodi Hospital and to correlate with the clinical data and EEG. MR imaging of 91 adult epileptic patients (age ranging from 15-85 years old with an average of 36.90 years old) were retrospectively reviewed and classified into eight groups according to etiologies. Then clinical data and EEG correlations were analyzed using the Kappa analysis. All of the MR imaging of the brain were performed at Ramathibodi Hospital from January 2001 to December 2002. Secondary generalized tonic clonic seizure was the most common clinical presenting seizure type. Extra temporal lobe epilepsy was the most common clinical diagnosis. Of the thirty-three patients who underwent EEG before performing MR imaging, 17 had normal EEG From MR imaging, temporal lobe lesion was the main affected location and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was the most common cause of the epilepsy in patients. For age group classification, young adult (15-34 years old) and adult (35-64 years old) age groups, MTS was the most common etiology of epilepsy with cortical dysplasia being the second most common cause for the first group and vascular disease for the latter group. For the older age group (> 64 years old), vascular disease and idiopathic cause were equally common etiologies. MRI, EEG findings, and clinical data were all concordant with statistical significance. MRI is the non-invasive modality of choice for evaluation of the epileptic patients. The result is concordant with the clinical and EEG findings. It can detect and localize the structural abnormality accurately and is useful in the treatment planning.

  1. Medical images of patients in voxel structures in high resolution for Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Menezes, Artur F.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to present a computational process of conversion of tomographic and MRI medical images from patients in voxel structures to an input file, which will be manipulated in Monte Carlo Simulation code for tumor's radiotherapic treatments. The problem's scenario inherent to the patient is simulated by such process, using the volume element (voxel) as a unit of computational tracing. The head's voxel structure geometry has voxels with volumetric dimensions around 1 mm 3 and a population of millions, which helps - in that way, for a realistic simulation and a decrease in image's digital process techniques for adjustments and equalizations. With such additional data from the code, a more critical analysis can be developed in order to determine the volume of the tumor, and the protection, beside the patients' medical images were borrowed by Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (COI/RJ), joined to the previous performed planning. In order to execute this computational process, SAPDI computational system is used in a digital image process for optimization of data, conversion program Scan2MCNP, which manipulates, processes, and converts the medical images into voxel structures to input files and the graphic visualizer Moritz for the verification of image's geometry placing. (author)

  2. Tc-99m-diethyl-IDA imaging: clinical evaluation in jaundiced patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, S.; Piret, L.; Schoutens, A.; Vandermoten, G.; Beckers, C.

    1980-01-01

    Hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m-N,α-(2,6-diethylacetanilide)-iminodiacetic acid (Tc-diethyl-IDA) was performed in 91 jaundiced patients with documented hepatobiliary damage and serum total bilirubin up to 35 mg/dl. There were 56 patients with obstructive jaundice and 35 with hepatocellular disease. Correct discrimination between hepatocellular and obstructive jaundice was possible with an overall accuracy of 90%. Agreement with the final clinical diagnosis was obtained in 97% of patients with hepatocellular disease, and in 86% of patients with obstructive jaundice. The reliability of the test was inversely related to the serum bilirubin levels below 10 mg/dl to 83% for bilirubin between 10 and 20 mg/dl. Above 20 mg/dl, the demonstration of a mechanical obstruction was possible in only one out of the four patients with obstructive jaundice. The high predictive values of the test illustrate that Tc-diethyl-IDA imaging constitutes a reliable method to demonstrate an obstructive cause for the jaundice as long as the bilirubin level remains below 20 mg/dl

  3. Observer variability when evaluating patient movement from electronic portal images of pelvic radiotherapy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraint Lewis, D.; Ryan, Karen R.; Smith, Cyril W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study has been performed to evaluate inter-observer variability when assessing pelvic patient movement using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Materials and methods: Four patient image sets were used with 3-6 portal images per set. The observer group consisted of nine radiographers with 3-18 months clinical EPID experience. The observers outlined bony landmarks on a digital simulator image and used matching software to evaluate field placement errors (FPEs) on each portal image relative to the reference simulator image. Data were evaluated statistically, using a two-component analysis of variance technique, to quantify both the inter-observer variability in evaluating FPEs and inter-fraction variability in patient position relative to the residuals of the analysis. Intra-observer variability was also estimated using four of the observers carrying out three sets of repeat readings. Results: Eight sets of variance data were analysed, based on FPEs in two orthogonal directions for each of the four patient image sets studied. Initial analysis showed that both inter-observer variation and inter-fraction-patient position variation were statistically significant (P<0.05) in seven of the eight cases evaluated. The averaged root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of the observers from the group mean was 1.1 mm, with a maximum deviation of 5.0 mm recorded for an individual observer. After additional training and re-testing of two of the observers who recorded the largest deviations from the group mean, a subsequent analysis showed the inter-observer variability for the group to be significant in only three of the eight cases, with averaged RMS deviation reduced to 0.5 mm, with a maximum deviation of 2.7 mm. The intra-observer variability was 0.5 mm, averaged over the four observers tested. Conclusions: We have developed a quantitative approach to evaluate inter-observer variability in terms of its statistical significance compared to inter

  4. Construction of realistic phantoms from patient images and a commercial three-dimensional printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Chen, Baiyu; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Alexander, Amy; Matsumoto, Jane; Morris, Jonathan; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use three-dimensional (3-D) printing techniques to construct liver and brain phantoms having realistic pathologies, anatomic structures, and heterogeneous backgrounds. Patient liver and head computed tomography (CT) images were segmented into tissue, vessels, liver lesion, white and gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Stereolithography files of each object were created and imported into a commercial 3-D printer. Printing materials were assigned to each object after test scans, which showed that the printing materials had CT numbers ranging from 70 to 121 HU at 120 kV. Printed phantoms were scanned on a CT scanner and images were evaluated. CT images of the liver phantom had measured CT numbers of 77.8 and 96.6 HU for the lesion and background, and 137.5 to 428.4 HU for the vessels channels, which were filled with iodine solutions. The difference in CT numbers between lesions and background (18.8 HU) was representative of the low-contrast values needed for optimization tasks. The liver phantom background was evaluated with Haralick features and showed similar texture between patient and phantom images. CT images of the brain phantom had CT numbers of 125, 134, and 108 HU for white matter, gray matter, and CSF, respectively. The CT number differences were similar to those in patient images.

  5. Gene therapy imaging in patients for oncological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penuelas, Ivan; Haberkorn, Uwe; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2005-01-01

    Thus far, traditional methods for evaluating gene transfer and expression have been shown to be of limited value in the clinical arena. Consequently there is a real need to develop new methods that could be repeatedly and safely performed in patients for such purposes. Molecular imaging techniques for gene expression monitoring have been developed and successfully used in animal models, but their sensitivity and reproducibility need to be tested and validated in human studies. In this review, we present the current status of gene therapy-based anticancer strategies and show how molecular imaging, and more specifically radionuclide-based approaches, can be used in gene therapy procedures for oncological applications in humans. The basis of gene expression imaging is described and specific uses of these non-invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring illustrated. Molecular imaging of transgene expression in humans and evaluation of response to gene-based therapeutic procedures are considered. The advantages of molecular imaging for whole-body monitoring of transgene expression as a way to permit measurement of important parameters in both target and non-target organs are also analyzed. The relevance of this technology for evaluation of the necessary vector dose and how it can be used to improve vector design are also examined. Finally, the advantages of designing a gene therapy-based clinical trial with imaging fully integrated from the very beginning are discussed and future perspectives for the development of these applications outlined. (orig.)

  6. Congenital anorectal atresia: MR imaging of late post-operative appearances in adult patients with anal incontinence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartner, Louise; Peiris, Chand; Marshall, Michele; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve

    2013-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging findings in adults presenting with anal incontinence following pull-through perineoplasty for anorectal atresia. 15 adults (12 male, 3 female; age 22-52 years) with anal incontinence following a prior perineal pull-through procedure as an infant for anorectal atresia were identified retrospectively. MR imaging was performed using either an endoanal coil or body coil. MR images were reviewed by three observers who noted whether pelvic floor and sphincter muscles were present and, if so, whether they were thinned or not. Data were tabulated and raw frequencies determined. Images were unavailable for one patient, leaving 14 for analysis. Anal stenosis prevented endoanal coil placement in 5. The pull-through was anatomically correct in 12 (86 %) patients but was misdirected in 2. Thinned muscle was seen in 11 (79 %) patients. External sphincter thinning was commonest (present in 10 patients), with levator plate thinning least common (present in 4 patients). Only one patient had thinning of all muscle groups. MR imaging may be used to determine the extent and quality of residual pelvic floor and anal sphincter muscle in adults who have functional disability following pull-through perineoplasty for anorectal agenesis. (orig.)

  7. Applied medical image processing a basic course

    CERN Document Server

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    A widely used, classroom-tested text, Applied Medical Image Processing: A Basic Course delivers an ideal introduction to image processing in medicine, emphasizing the clinical relevance and special requirements of the field. Avoiding excessive mathematical formalisms, the book presents key principles by implementing algorithms from scratch and using simple MATLAB®/Octave scripts with image data and illustrations on an accompanying CD-ROM or companion website. Organized as a complete textbook, it provides an overview of the physics of medical image processing and discusses image formats and data storage, intensity transforms, filtering of images and applications of the Fourier transform, three-dimensional spatial transforms, volume rendering, image registration, and tomographic reconstruction.

  8. Impact of CT perfusion imaging on the assessment of peripheral chronic pulmonary thromboembolism: clinical experience in 62 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Faivre, Julien; Khung, Suonita; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France); Lamblin, Nicolas [University of Lille, Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Hospital, Lille (France)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of CT perfusion imaging on the detection of peripheral chronic pulmonary embolisms (CPE). 62 patients underwent a dual-energy chest CT angiographic examination with (a) reconstruction of diagnostic and perfusion images; (b) enabling depiction of vascular features of peripheral CPE on diagnostic images and perfusion defects (20 segments/patient; total: 1240 segments examined). The interpretation of diagnostic images was of two types: (a) standard (i.e., based on cross-sectional images alone) or (b) detailed (i.e., based on cross-sectional images and MIPs). The segment-based analysis showed (a) 1179 segments analyzable on both imaging modalities and 61 segments rated as nonanalyzable on perfusion images; (b) the percentage of diseased segments was increased by 7.2 % when perfusion imaging was compared to the detailed reading of diagnostic images, and by 26.6 % when compared to the standard reading of images. At a patient level, the extent of peripheral CPE was higher on perfusion imaging, with a greater impact when compared to the standard reading of diagnostic images (number of patients with a greater number of diseased segments: n = 45; 72.6 % of the study population). Perfusion imaging allows recognition of a greater extent of peripheral CPE compared to diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  9. Piriformis muscle syndrome. A cross-sectional imaging study in 116 patients and evaluation of therapeutic outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassalou, Evangelia E. [Heraklion University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Voutes, Crete (Greece); Katonis, Pavlos [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Orthopaedics, Voutes, Crete (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [Heraklion University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Voutes, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Voutes, Crete (Greece)

    2018-02-15

    To increase the clinical awareness of piriformis muscle syndrome (PMs) by reporting cross-sectional imaging findings, the clinical impact of imaging studies and treatment outcome. Within a 10-year-period, 116 patients referred for radiological evaluation of clinically suspected PMs, with excluded lumbar pathology related to symptomatology, were prospectively studied with MRI and/or computed tomography (CT). Piriformis muscle (PM), sciatic nerve (SN), piriformis region and sacroiliac joints were evaluated. PMs was categorised into primary/secondary, according to a reported classification system. Treatment decisions were recorded. Outcome was categorised using a 3-point-scale. Seventy-four patients (63.8%) exhibited pathologies related to PMs. Primary causes were detected in 12 and secondary in 62 patients. PM enlargement was found in 45.9% of patients, abnormal PM signal intensity/density in 40.5% and sciatic neuritis in 25.7%. Space-occupying lesions represented the most common related pathology. Treatment proved effective in 5/8 patients with primary and 34/51 patients with secondary PMs. In 34 patients, imaging revealed an unknown underlying medical condition and altered treatment planning. Secondary PMs aetiologies appear to prevail. In suspected PMs, PM enlargement represented the most common imaging finding and space-occupying lesions the leading cause. Imaging had the potential to alter treatment decisions. (orig.)

  10. Piriformis muscle syndrome. A cross-sectional imaging study in 116 patients and evaluation of therapeutic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassalou, Evangelia E.; Katonis, Pavlos; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2018-01-01

    To increase the clinical awareness of piriformis muscle syndrome (PMs) by reporting cross-sectional imaging findings, the clinical impact of imaging studies and treatment outcome. Within a 10-year-period, 116 patients referred for radiological evaluation of clinically suspected PMs, with excluded lumbar pathology related to symptomatology, were prospectively studied with MRI and/or computed tomography (CT). Piriformis muscle (PM), sciatic nerve (SN), piriformis region and sacroiliac joints were evaluated. PMs was categorised into primary/secondary, according to a reported classification system. Treatment decisions were recorded. Outcome was categorised using a 3-point-scale. Seventy-four patients (63.8%) exhibited pathologies related to PMs. Primary causes were detected in 12 and secondary in 62 patients. PM enlargement was found in 45.9% of patients, abnormal PM signal intensity/density in 40.5% and sciatic neuritis in 25.7%. Space-occupying lesions represented the most common related pathology. Treatment proved effective in 5/8 patients with primary and 34/51 patients with secondary PMs. In 34 patients, imaging revealed an unknown underlying medical condition and altered treatment planning. Secondary PMs aetiologies appear to prevail. In suspected PMs, PM enlargement represented the most common imaging finding and space-occupying lesions the leading cause. Imaging had the potential to alter treatment decisions. (orig.)

  11. Socializing the Semantic Gap: A Comparative Survey on Image Tag Assignment, Refinement and Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Uricchio, T.; Ballan, L.; Bertini, M.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Del Bimbo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Where previous reviews on content-based image retrieval emphasize what can be seen in an image to bridge the semantic gap, this survey considers what people tag about an image. A comprehensive treatise of three closely linked problems (i.e., image tag assignment, refinement, and tag-based image

  12. Short-Term Results of Carotid Endarterectomy and Stenting After the Introduction of Carotid Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Single-Institution Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumitsu, Ryu; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Torihashi, Koichi; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Narumi, Osamu; Sato, Tsukasa; Chin, Masaki; Handa, Akira; Yamagata, Sen; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2017-05-01

    Although carotid artery stenting (CAS) has been gaining popularity as an alternative to carotid endarterectomy (CEA), perioperative stroke rate following contemporary CAS remains significantly higher than stroke rate after CEA. The purpose of this study was to assess perioperative (within 30 days) therapeutic results in patients with carotid stenosis (CS) after introduction of preoperative carotid magnetic resonance imaging plaque evaluation in a single center performing both CEA and CAS. Based on prospectively collected data for patients with CS who were scheduled for carotid revascularization, retrospective analysis was conducted of 295 consecutive patients with CS. An intervention was selected after consideration of periprocedural risks for both CEA and CAS. Concerning risk factors for CAS, results of magnetic resonance imaging plaque evaluation were emphasized with a view toward reducing embolic complications. CAS was performed in 114 patients, and CEA was performed in 181 patients. Comparing baseline characteristics of the 295 patients, age, T1 signal intensity of plaque, symptomatic CS, urgent intervention, and diabetes mellitus differed significantly between CAS and CEA groups. Among patients who underwent CAS, new hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging were confirmed in 47 patients. New hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging were recognized in 21.4% of patients who underwent CEA (n = 39), significantly less frequent than in patients who underwent CAS. The overall short-term outcome of CEA and CAS is acceptable. Preoperative carotid magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of plaque might contribute to low rates of ischemic complications in CAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Laser Imaging Facilitates Early Detection of Synchronous Adenocarcinomas in Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Iwashita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Barrett’s adenocarcinoma may occur in multiple sites, and recurrence and metachronous lesions are the major problems with endoscopic resection. Therefore, early detection of such lesions is ideal to achieve complete resection and obtain improved survival rates with minimally invasive treatment. Laser imaging systems allow multiple modalities of endoscopic imaging by using white light laser, flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE, blue laser imaging (BLI, and linked color imaging even at a distant view. However, the usefulness of these modalities has not been sufficiently reported regarding Barrett’s adenocarcinoma. Here, we report on a patient with three synchronous lesions followed by one metachronous lesion in a long segment with changes of Barrett’s esophagus, all diagnosed with this new laser endoscopic imaging system and enhanced by using FICE and/or BLI with high contrast compared with the surrounding mucosa. Laser endoscopic imaging may facilitate the detection of malignancies in patients with early Barrett’s adenocarcinoma.

  14. Patient dosimetry and image quality in conventional diagnostic radiology. An experience from a local Serbian hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivera Ciraj-Bjelac; Milojko Kovacevic; Dusko Kosutic; Milan Loncar; Dajana Veljkovic

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. The optimization of image quality vs. patient dose ins an important task in medical imaging. Maximal validity of optimization has to be based on clinical images. Simultaneous measurement of patient dose levels and image quality assessment is used to investigate possibilities for dose reduction and maintain image quality. The survey was conducted in a local hospital performing more than 60000 images annually and representing typical Serbian practice. For four most frequent diagnostic procedures (seven projections) patient exposure was measured using kerma area product meter. Image quality was assessed by experienced radiologists using 'European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images'. Following examination types were included into the survey: chest PA, chest LAT, pelvis AP, lumbar spine AP, lumbar spine LAT and LSJ, skull PA and skull LAT. Comparing actual radiographic technique with recommended technique in European Guidelines, modification of practice was proposed and implemented and image quality was re-assessed. At least 10 adult patients were followed for each projection, before and after corrective actions. Large dose saving without compromising diagnostic information were found for some examination types, showing that this simple method is very efficient dose reduction tool in conventional diagnostic radiology. Also, need for staff training and difficulties related to practical implementation of optimization methods in Serbia were discussed.

  15. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J; Cross, Russell R; O'Brien, Kendall E; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Hansen, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static black-blood imaging, a TSE sequence should be used with fat saturation turned off and high receiver bandwidth.

  16. Patient-specific quantification of image quality: An automated method for measuring spatial resolution in clinical CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Jeremiah, E-mail: jeremiah.sanders@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Hurwitz, Lynne [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an automated technique for evaluating the spatial resolution characteristics of clinical computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Twenty one chest and abdominopelvic clinical CT datasets were examined in this study. An algorithm was developed to extract a CT resolution index (RI) analogous to the modulation transfer function from clinical CT images by measuring the edge-spread function (ESF) across the patient’s skin. A polygon mesh of the air-skin boundary was created. The faces of the mesh were then used to measure the ESF across the air-skin interface. The ESF was differentiated to obtain the line-spread function (LSF), and the LSF was Fourier transformed to obtain the RI. The algorithm’s ability to detect the radial dependence of the RI was investigated. RIs measured with the proposed method were compared with a conventional phantom-based method across two reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iterative) using the spatial frequency at 50% RI, f{sub 50}, as the metric for comparison. Three reconstruction kernels were investigated for each reconstruction algorithm. Finally, an observer study was conducted to determine if observers could visually perceive the differences in the measured blurriness of images reconstructed with a given reconstruction method. Results: RI measurements performed with the proposed technique exhibited the expected dependencies on the image reconstruction. The measured f{sub 50} values increased with harder kernels for both FBP and iterative reconstruction. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm was able to detect the radial dependence of the RI. Patient-specific measurements of the RI were comparable to the phantom-based technique, but the patient data exhibited a large spread in the measured f{sub 50}, indicating that some datasets were blurrier than others even when the projection data were reconstructed with the same reconstruction algorithm and kernel. Results from the observer study substantiated this

  17. Pseudo Prune Belly Syndrome: Diagnosis Revealed by Imaging – A Case Report and Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Hemal; Sethi, Sanjay; Garg, Jatin; Ahluwalia, Amrit Pal

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare entity, usually found in male neonates. It comprises complex urinary tract anomalies, bilateral undescended testis and absence of anterior abdominal wall muscles. Patients with unilateral abdominal wall deficiency, unilateral undescended testis and female neonates with abdominal wall laxity are classified as Pseudo Prune Belly syndrome (PPBS). Reports on PPBS do not highlight the radiological and imaging characteristics of this syndrome and the current literature on the role of newer imaging modalities, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), remains relatively sparse. We describe a new case of PPBS and emphasize the role of imaging, especially ultrasound and MRI in the process of diagnosis and briefly review the subject. Case Report A male infant of four months of age was referred for evaluation of left-sided cryptorchidism. Clinical examination revealed laxity of the left abdominal wall. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen, pelvis and scrotum was performed together with routine laboratory tests. Ultrasound examination was followed by intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI of the abdomen. On ultrasound, the left testis was located in the inguinal canal, the right kidney was slightly enlarged and the left kidney could not be localized. Ultrasound appearances suggested chronic obstruction in the urinary bladder. Intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI confirmed the ultrasound diagnosis and also revealed a left dysplastic kidney with a dilated, tortuous ureter. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with pseudo prune belly syndrome (PPBS). Conclusions We report a new occurrence of PPBS, a rare entity. The imaging approach for a comprehensive evaluation of the renal system in PPBS, especially with MRI, is emphasized. PMID:28580040

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughrey, Gareth J.; Collins, Conor D.; Todd, Susan M.; Brown, Nicola M.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty-five patients underwent a total of 159 spinal MRI examinations over a three-year period. Patients were examined using a 1.0T magnet and a phased array surface spine coil. Sagittal T1 weighted spin echo and STIR sequences were routinely employed. Axial T1 and T2 weighted spin echo images were obtained at sites of identified pathology. Contrast enhanced sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin echo images were acquired when the unenhanced appearances did not correlate with the clinical findings or when the images suggested intradural or intramedullary disease. RESULTS: Malignant disease affecting the spinal cord or cauda equina was noted in 104/159 (65%) patients (extradural n= 78, intradural n= 20, intramedullary n= 7); one patient had evidence of both intradural and intramedullary deposits. Multiple levels of extradural cord/cauda equina compression were present in 18/78 patients (23%). The thoracic spine was the most frequently affected (74%). Bone elements were the major component of extradural compression in 11/78 patients (14%). Intradural metastases were multiple in 15/20 patients (75%). Four of the six solitary intramedullary metastases were situated in the conus medullaris. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging of the entire spine is the investigation of choice in patients with known malignancy and suspected spinal canal disease. Contrast-enhanced images should be acquired when the unenhanced appearances do not correlate with the clinical findings or when they suggest intradural or intramedullary disease. Loughrey, G.J. (2000)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughrey, Gareth J.; Collins, Conor D.; Todd, Susan M.; Brown, Nicola M.; Johnson, Richard J

    2000-11-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty-five patients underwent a total of 159 spinal MRI examinations over a three-year period. Patients were examined using a 1.0T magnet and a phased array surface spine coil. Sagittal T1 weighted spin echo and STIR sequences were routinely employed. Axial T1 and T2 weighted spin echo images were obtained at sites of identified pathology. Contrast enhanced sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin echo images were acquired when the unenhanced appearances did not correlate with the clinical findings or when the images suggested intradural or intramedullary disease. RESULTS: Malignant disease affecting the spinal cord or cauda equina was noted in 104/159 (65%) patients (extradural n= 78, intradural n= 20, intramedullary n= 7); one patient had evidence of both intradural and intramedullary deposits. Multiple levels of extradural cord/cauda equina compression were present in 18/78 patients (23%). The thoracic spine was the most frequently affected (74%). Bone elements were the major component of extradural compression in 11/78 patients (14%). Intradural metastases were multiple in 15/20 patients (75%). Four of the six solitary intramedullary metastases were situated in the conus medullaris. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging of the entire spine is the investigation of choice in patients with known malignancy and suspected spinal canal disease. Contrast-enhanced images should be acquired when the unenhanced appearances do not correlate with the clinical findings or when they suggest intradural or intramedullary disease. Loughrey, G.J. (2000)

  20. Body Image and Self-Esteem in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emine; Özdilli, Kürşat; Yorulmaz, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    The study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of disease-related variables such as socio-demographic characteristics, disease complaints and use of necrosis factor (anti-TNF) on the body image and self-esteem in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The data was collected by an Introductory Information Form, Body Image Scale (PfP) BIS and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI) in 120 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 120 healthy controls. One-way analysis of variance, Tukey HDS analysis, t-test, Kruskal-Wallis test, the Mann-Whitney U test, and Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to compare the data. 60% of the control group were in the 20-44 year-age group, 75% were women and 30.8% had a bachelor's degree or above, while 60% of patient group were in the 20-44 year-age group, 71.7% were women and 36.7% had a bachelor's degree or higher education level. We observed that the body satisfaction and self-esteem levels were higher in the 20-44 age group, in those with a bachelor's degree or higher education and in the patients who had no additional disease and who did not use anti-TNF. The body satisfaction and self-esteem levels were lower in those who had been receiving treatment for longer than 5 years, who had changes in hands and body, who had gait disturbance and who had changes in family and working life. The assessment of the psychosocial needs with a holistic approach and training programs for body image and self-esteem would be advisable for patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are aged 45-59 years, who have low self-esteem, who have additional diseases, who use anti-TNF, who have changes in hands and body and who have primary-school education.

  1. Diagnostic imaging of sport related musculoskeletal system injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Schivartche, Vivian

    1998-01-01

    The authors review the literature about musculoskeletal injuries related to sports, emphasizing the main findings with different imaging methods. They also present the specific characteristics of each method. (author)

  2. A comparison with result of normalized image to different template image on statistical parametric mapping of ADHD children patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Ho [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soung Ock; Kwon, Soo Il [Dongnam Health College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Joh, Chol Woo; Yoon, Seok Nam [Medical College, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    We studied 64 ADHD children patients group (4 {approx} 15 ys, mean age: 8 {+-} 2.6 ys. M/F: 52/12) and 12 normal group (6 {approx} 7 ys, mean age: 9.4 {+-} 3.4 ys, M/F: 8/4) of the brain had been used to analysis of blood flow between normal and ADHD group. For analysis of Children ADHD, we used 12 children's mean brain images and made Template image of SPM99 program. In crease of blood flow (P-value 0.05), the result of normalized images to Template image to offer from SPM99 program, showed significant cluster in inter-Hemispheric and occipital Lobe, in the case of normalized images to children template image, showed inter-hemispheric and parietal lobe.

  3. A comparison with result of normalized image to different template image on statistical parametric mapping of ADHD children patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Soung Ock; Kwon, Soo Il; Joh, Chol Woo; Yoon, Seok Nam

    2003-01-01

    We studied 64 ADHD children patients group (4 ∼ 15 ys, mean age: 8 ± 2.6 ys. M/F: 52/12) and 12 normal group (6 ∼ 7 ys, mean age: 9.4 ± 3.4 ys, M/F: 8/4) of the brain had been used to analysis of blood flow between normal and ADHD group. For analysis of Children ADHD, we used 12 children's mean brain images and made Template image of SPM99 program. In crease of blood flow (P-value 0.05), the result of normalized images to Template image to offer from SPM99 program, showed significant cluster in inter-Hemispheric and occipital Lobe, in the case of normalized images to children template image, showed inter-hemispheric and parietal lobe

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, H.; Sakai, F.; Kan, S.; Okada, J.; Tazaki, Y. (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied in 91 patients with migraine and in 98 controls. Risk factors known to cause MRI lesions were carefully examined. In 36 patients with migraine (39.6%), small foci of high intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted and proton-density-weighted images were seen in the white matter. Of patients with migraine who were less than 40 years old and without any risk factor, 29.4% showed lesions on MRI; this was singificantly higher than the 11.2% for the group of age-matched controls (n=98). The lesions were distributed predominantly in the centrum semiovale and frontal white matter in young patients, but extended to the deeper white matter at the level of basal ganglia in the older age group. The side of the MRI lesions did not always correspond to the side of usual aura or headache. Migraine-related variables such as type of migraine, frequency, duration or intensity of headache or consumption of ergotamine showed no significant correlation with the incidence om MRI abnormalities. The data indicated that migraine may be associated with early pathologic changes in the brain. 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, H.; Sakai, F.; Kan, S.; Okada, J.; Tazaki, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied in 91 patients with migraine and in 98 controls. Risk factors known to cause MRI lesions were carefully examined. In 36 patients with migraine (39.6%), small foci of high intensity on T 2 -weighted and proton-density-weighted images were seen in the white matter. Of patients with migraine who were less than 40 years old and without any risk factor, 29.4% showed lesions on MRI; this was singificantly higher than the 11.2% for the group of age-matched controls (n=98). The lesions were distributed predominantly in the centrum semiovale and frontal white matter in young patients, but extended to the deeper white matter at the level of basal ganglia in the older age group. The side of the MRI lesions did not always correspond to the side of usual aura or headache. Migraine-related variables such as type of migraine, frequency, duration or intensity of headache or consumption of ergotamine showed no significant correlation with the incidence om MRI abnormalities. The data indicated that migraine may be associated with early pathologic changes in the brain. 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in 120 patients with intractable partial seizures: a preoperative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkopoulos, A.; Haritanti, A.; Papadopoulou, E.; Karanikolas, D.; Fotiadis, N.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [AHEPA University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with medically intractable epilepsy and to compare different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to establish a dedicated and shorter scan time imaging protocol of choice. One hundred and twenty patients with seizures that were refractory to medical treatment were assessed by MRI with spin-echo (SE) T1, fast spin-echo (FSE) T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), inversion recovery (IR) and contrast-enhanced T1 SE sequences. Pathological scans were acquired in 78 patients. Hippocampal sclerosis was detected in 30 patients (25%), cerebral, tumoral, mass lesions in 12 patients (10%), vascular malformations in nine patients (7.5%), cortical infarcts in eight patients (6.7%), cerebral infections in four patients (4.2%) and developmental disorders in 15 patients (12.5%). The most common location of the lesions was the temporal lobe (60%). Coronal, thin (slice thickness 4-5 mm) images have proven to be the most useful in the assessment of the hippocampus. FLAIR and IR are particularly useful in the detection of lesions abutting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and developmental disorders, respectively, while T1 SE sequences before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium offer great facility in identifying space-occupying lesions and infections. MRI is the most important diagnostic tool for the assessment of epileptogenic foci, thus playing the primary role in indicating the type of treatment to be applied. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in 120 patients with intractable partial seizures: a preoperative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, A.; Haritanti, A.; Papadopoulou, E.; Karanikolas, D.; Fotiadis, N.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with medically intractable epilepsy and to compare different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to establish a dedicated and shorter scan time imaging protocol of choice. One hundred and twenty patients with seizures that were refractory to medical treatment were assessed by MRI with spin-echo (SE) T1, fast spin-echo (FSE) T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), inversion recovery (IR) and contrast-enhanced T1 SE sequences. Pathological scans were acquired in 78 patients. Hippocampal sclerosis was detected in 30 patients (25%), cerebral, tumoral, mass lesions in 12 patients (10%), vascular malformations in nine patients (7.5%), cortical infarcts in eight patients (6.7%), cerebral infections in four patients (4.2%) and developmental disorders in 15 patients (12.5%). The most common location of the lesions was the temporal lobe (60%). Coronal, thin (slice thickness 4-5 mm) images have proven to be the most useful in the assessment of the hippocampus. FLAIR and IR are particularly useful in the detection of lesions abutting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and developmental disorders, respectively, while T1 SE sequences before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium offer great facility in identifying space-occupying lesions and infections. MRI is the most important diagnostic tool for the assessment of epileptogenic foci, thus playing the primary role in indicating the type of treatment to be applied. (orig.)

  8. Multimodal imaging of language reorganization in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsuan A; Kemmotsu, Nobuko; Leyden, Kelly M; Kucukboyaci, N Erkut; Iragui, Vicente J; Tecoma, Evelyn S; Kansal, Leena; Norman, Marc A; Compton, Rachelle; Ehrlich, Tobin J; Uttarwar, Vedang S; Reyes, Anny; Paul, Brianna M; McDonald, Carrie R

    2017-07-01

    This study explored the relationships among multimodal imaging, clinical features, and language impairment in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE). Fourteen patients with LTLE and 26 controls underwent structural MRI, functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and neuropsychological language tasks. Laterality indices were calculated for each imaging modality and a principal component (PC) was derived from language measures. Correlations were performed among imaging measures, as well as to the language PC. In controls, better language performance was associated with stronger left-lateralized temporo-parietal and temporo-occipital activations. In LTLE, better language performance was associated with stronger right-lateralized inferior frontal, temporo-parietal, and temporo-occipital activations. These right-lateralized activations in LTLE were associated with right-lateralized arcuate fasciculus fractional anisotropy. These data suggest that interhemispheric language reorganization in LTLE is associated with alterations to perisylvian white matter. These concurrent structural and functional shifts from left to right may help to mitigate language impairment in LTLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unintended Effects of Emphasizing Disparities in Cancer Communication to African-Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Kreuter, Matthew W.; Lapka, Christina; Wellborn, Rachel; Clark, Eddie M.; Sanders-Thompson, Vetta; Jacobsen, Heather M.; Casey, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about how minority groups react to public information that highlights racial disparities in cancer. This double-blind randomized study compared emotional and behavioral reactions to four versions of the same colon cancer (CRC) information presented in mock news articles to a community sample of African-American adults (n = 300). Participants read one of four articles that varied in their framing and interpretation of race-specific CRC mortality data, emphasizing impact (CRC is...

  10. The value of endorectal MR imaging to predict positive biopsies in clinically intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilanova, J.C.; Barcelo, J.; Comet, J.; Capdevila, A.; Dolz, J.L.; Huguet, M.; Aldoma, J.; Delgado, E.; Barcelo, C.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endorectal MR imaging in predicting the positive biopsy results in patients with clinically intermediate risk for prostate cancer. We performed a prospective endorectal MR imaging study with 81 patients at intermediate risk to detect prostate cancer between January 1997 and December 1998. Intermediate risk was defined as: prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels between 4 and 10 ng/ml or PSA levels in the range of 10-20 ng/ml but negative digital rectal examination (DRE) or PSA levels progressively higher (0.75 ng/ml year -1 ). A transrectal sextant biopsy was performed after the endorectal MR exam, and also of the area of suspicion detected by MR imaging. The accuracies were measured, both singly for MR imaging and combined for PSA level and DRE, by calculating the area index of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Cancer was detected in 23 patients (28 %). Overall sensitivity and specificity of endorectal MRI was 70 and 76 %, respectively. Accuracy was 71 % estimated from the area under the ROC curve for the total patient group and 84 % for the group of patients with PSA level between 10-20 ng/ml. Positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 63 % for the group with PSA 10-20 ng/ml and a positive MR imaging, and 15 % with a negative MR exam. The PBR was 43 % for the group with PSA 4-10 ng/ml and a positive MR study, and 13 % with a negative MR imaging examination. We would have avoided 63 % of negative biopsies, while missing 30 % of cancers for the total group of patients. Endorectal MR imaging was not a sufficient predictor of positive biopsies for patients clinically at intermediate risk for prostate cancer. Although we should not avoid performing systematic biopsies in patients with endorectal MR imaging negative results, as it will miss a significant number of cancers, selected patients with a PSA levels between 10-20 ng/ml or clinical-biopsy disagreement might benefit from endorectal MR imaging. (orig.)

  11. The value of endorectal MR imaging to predict positive biopsies in clinically intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, J.C.; Barcelo, J. [Ressonancia Girona, Clinica Girona, Girona (Spain); Comet, J. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. Hospital of Girona (Spain); Capdevila, A.; Dolz, J.L.; Huguet, M.; Aldoma, J.; Delgado, E. [Centre Diagnostic Pedralbes, Cetir Grup Medic, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo, C. [Dept. of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, University of Girona (Spain)

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endorectal MR imaging in predicting the positive biopsy results in patients with clinically intermediate risk for prostate cancer. We performed a prospective endorectal MR imaging study with 81 patients at intermediate risk to detect prostate cancer between January 1997 and December 1998. Intermediate risk was defined as: prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels between 4 and 10 ng/ml or PSA levels in the range of 10-20 ng/ml but negative digital rectal examination (DRE) or PSA levels progressively higher (0.75 ng/ml year{sup -1}). A transrectal sextant biopsy was performed after the endorectal MR exam, and also of the area of suspicion detected by MR imaging. The accuracies were measured, both singly for MR imaging and combined for PSA level and DRE, by calculating the area index of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Cancer was detected in 23 patients (28 %). Overall sensitivity and specificity of endorectal MRI was 70 and 76 %, respectively. Accuracy was 71 % estimated from the area under the ROC curve for the total patient group and 84 % for the group of patients with PSA level between 10-20 ng/ml. Positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 63 % for the group with PSA 10-20 ng/ml and a positive MR imaging, and 15 % with a negative MR exam. The PBR was 43 % for the group with PSA 4-10 ng/ml and a positive MR study, and 13 % with a negative MR imaging examination. We would have avoided 63 % of negative biopsies, while missing 30 % of cancers for the total group of patients. Endorectal MR imaging was not a sufficient predictor of positive biopsies for patients clinically at intermediate risk for prostate cancer. Although we should not avoid performing systematic biopsies in patients with endorectal MR imaging negative results, as it will miss a significant number of cancers, selected patients with a PSA levels between 10-20 ng/ml or clinical-biopsy disagreement might benefit from endorectal MR imaging

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  13. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm 2 ). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with progressive myelopathy following spinal surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Avrahami, E; Tadmor, R; Cohn, D F

    1989-01-01

    Thirty one patients with insidious progressive myelopathy 2 to 8 years following surgery of the cervical spine were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 15 patients operated on for vascular malformations or intramedullary tumours, syringomyelia and cystic lesions of the spinal cord were shown. Seven of these patients also showed a combination of a recurrent tumour and spinal atrophy. Out of 16 patients who had surgery for herniated disc or spinal stenosis of the cervical spine, f...

  15. Disappearance of myocardial perfusion defects on prone SPECT imaging: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients without established coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedén Bo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is of great clinical importance to exclude myocardial infarction in patients with suspected coronary artery disease who do not have stress-induced ischemia. The diagnostic use of myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT in this situation is sometimes complicated by attenuation artifacts that mimic myocardial infarction. Imaging in the prone position has been suggested as a method to overcome this problem. Methods In this study, 52 patients without known prior infarction and no stress-induced ischemia on SPECT imaging were examined in both supine and prone position. The results were compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR with delayed-enhancement technique to confirm or exclude myocardial infarction. Results There were 63 defects in supine-position images, 37 of which disappeared in the prone position. None of the 37 defects were associated with myocardial infarction by CMR, indicating that all of them represented attenuation artifacts. Of the remaining 26 defects that did not disappear on prone imaging, myocardial infarction was confirmed by CMR in 2; the remaining 24 had no sign of ischemic infarction but 2 had other kinds of myocardial injuries. In 3 patients, SPECT failed to detect small scars identified by CMR. Conclusion Perfusion defects in the supine position that disappeared in the prone position were caused by attenuation, not myocardial infarction. Hence, imaging in the prone position can help to rule out ischemic heart disease for some patients admitted for SPECT with suspected but not documented ischemic heart disease. This would indicate a better prognosis and prevent unnecessary further investigations and treatment.

  16. 123I-BMIPP delayed scintigraphic imaging in patients with chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Keisuke; Akashi, Yoshihiro J.; Yoneyama, Kihei; Shimokawa, Mitsuhiro; Musha, Haruki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the ability of 123 I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid ( 123 I-BMIPP) to evaluate the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio and myocardial global washout rate (WR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The severity of CHF was evaluated on the basis of the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Twenty patients with CHF (13 with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and 7 with ischemic cardiomyopathy) and 11 age-matched controls underwent myocardial radionuclide imaging. Scintigraphic images were obtained from each participant at the early (30 min following radio-isotope injection) and late (4 h) phases using 123 I-BMIPP. The H/M ratio and WR were calculated from planar images. Concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured prior to the scintigraphic study. The 123 I-BMIPP uptake of early H/M and global WR did not significantly differ among groups, but uptake of delayed H/M was significantly lower in patients with NYHA class III than in controls (control 2.47±0.39; class III 1.78±0.28 P 123 I-BMIPP uptake of delayed H/M enhances the image of CHF severity. The myocardial WR of 123 I-BMIPP also effectively depicted the severity of CHF. (author)

  17. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveistrup, Joen; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-02-04

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1-2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5-7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction.

  18. MR imaging of sickle cell patients: Comparison during pain-free and crisis states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogdon, B.G.; Williams, J.P.; Mankad, V.N.; Harpen, M.D.; Moore, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The MR imaging appearance of long bones and femoral heads of patients with sickle cell disease during a pain-free steady state and during a crisis-pain state was compared with the MR imaging appearance of matched healthy control subjects. A distinctive signal change in the narrow spaces of the long bones of patients with sickle cell disease was seen at all times. Distinct signal changes during pain crises were found in the marrow of a significant number of patients. Changes associated with aseptic necrosis, when present, did not differ from changes seen in aseptic necrosis of other causes

  19. Validation of intensity modulated radiation therapy patient plans with portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpon, G.; Warren, S.; Mahe, D.; Gaudaire, S.; Lisbona, A.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to show the feasibility of step and shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy pre-treatment quality control for patients using the electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT) fitted on a Sli+ linac (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) instead of radiographic films. Since the beginning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, the dosimetric quality control necessary before treating each new patient has been a time-consuming and therefore costly obligation. In order to fully develop this technique, it seems absolutely essential to reduce the cost of these controls, especially the linac time. Up to now, verification of the relative dosimetry field by field has been achieved by acquiring radiographic films in the isocenter plane and comparing them to the results of the XiO planning system (Computerized Medical Systems, Missouri, USA) using RIT113 v4.1 software (Radiological Imaging Technology, Colorado, USA). A qualitative and quantitative evaluation was realised for every field of every patient. A quick and simple procedure was put into place to be able to make the same verifications using portal images. This new technique is not a modification of the overall methodology of analysis. The results achieved by comparing the measurement with the electronic portal imaging device and the calculation with the treatment planning system were in line with those achieved with the films for all indicators we studied (isodoses, horizontal and vertical dose profiles and gamma index). (authors)

  20. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  1. Automatic detection of patient identification and positioning errors in radiation therapy treatment using 3-dimensional setup images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Shyam S; Low, Daniel A; Lamb, James M

    2015-01-01

    To develop an automated system that detects patient identification and positioning errors between 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) and kilovoltage CT planning images. Planning kilovoltage CT images were collected for head and neck (H&N), pelvis, and spine treatments with corresponding 3-dimensional cone beam CT and megavoltage CT setup images from TrueBeam and TomoTherapy units, respectively. Patient identification errors were simulated by registering setup and planning images from different patients. For positioning errors, setup and planning images were misaligned by 1 to 5 cm in the 6 anatomical directions for H&N and pelvis patients. Spinal misalignments were simulated by misaligning to adjacent vertebral bodies. Image pairs were assessed using commonly used image similarity metrics as well as custom-designed metrics. Linear discriminant analysis classification models were trained and tested on the imaging datasets, and misclassification error (MCE), sensitivity, and specificity parameters were estimated using 10-fold cross-validation. For patient identification, our workflow produced MCE estimates of 0.66%, 1.67%, and 0% for H&N, pelvis, and spine TomoTherapy images, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity ranged from 97.5% to 100%. MCEs of 3.5%, 2.3%, and 2.1% were obtained for TrueBeam images of the above sites, respectively, with sensitivity and specificity estimates between 95.4% and 97.7%. MCEs for 1-cm H&N/pelvis misalignments were 1.3%/5.1% and 9.1%/8.6% for TomoTherapy and TrueBeam images, respectively. Two-centimeter MCE estimates were 0.4%/1.6% and 3.1/3.2%, respectively. MCEs for vertebral body misalignments were 4.8% and 3.6% for TomoTherapy and TrueBeam images, respectively. Patient identification and gross misalignment errors can be robustly and automatically detected using 3-dimensional setup images of different energies across 3 commonly treated anatomical sites. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by

  2. Building-up domestic enrichment capacity is emphasized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This is an interim report presented by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Committee of the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission to recommend adequate policy lines in each field of fuel cycle. As for the procurement of natural uranium, advises are given for both state authorities and for private companies (including electric utilities) on the basis of the ''develop-and-import'' policy. As for the procurement of enriched uranium, the urgency of the development of enrichment techniques and plants is emphasized together with the important role of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). As for reprocessing, it is confirmed that the construction and operation of the second reprocessing plant should be undertaken by private interests. The state authorities are advised to undertake revisions of the relevant laws, regulations, and standards. As for plutonium recycle, the demonstration of the use of plutonium with Fugen type heavy water reactors, as well as light water reactors is encouraged. As for the radiative waste disposal, advices associated with experimental ocean dumping, solidification, storage, and geological disposal are given. Finally, as for spent fuel transportation, problems associate with the physical protection and the safety of spent fuel transportation are treated. (Aoki, K.)

  3. Self-image of the Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Mixed Method Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shalini G; Pai, Mamatha Shivananda; George, Linu Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the self-image of the patients with head and neck cancers (HNCs) by using a mixed method research. Subjects and Methods: A mixed method approach and triangulation design was used with the aim of assessing the self-image of the patients with HNCs. Data was gathered by using self-administered self-image scale and structured interview. Nested sampling technique was adopted. Sample size for quantitative approach was 54 and data saturation was achieved with seven subjects for qualitative approach. Institutional Ethical Committee clearance was obtained. Results: The results of the study showed that 30 (56%) subjects had positive self-image and 24 (44%) had negative self-image. There was a moderate positive correlation between body image and integrity (r = 0.430, P = 0.001), weak positive correlation between body image and self-esteem (r = 0.270, P = 0.049), and no correlation between self-esteem and integrity (r = 0.203, P = 0.141). The participants also scored maximum (24/24) in the areas of body image and self-esteem. Similar findings were also observed in the phenomenological approach. The themes evolved were immaterial of outer appearance and desire of good health to all. Conclusion: The illness is long-term and impacts the individual 24 h a day. Understanding patients’ self-concept and living experiences of patients with HNC is important for the health care professionals to improve the care. PMID:27559264

  4. Self-image of the patients with head and neck cancer: A mixed method research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini G Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the self-image of the patients with head and neck cancers (HNCs by using a mixed method research. Subjects and Methods: A mixed method approach and triangulation design was used with the aim of assessing the self-image of the patients with HNCs. Data was gathered by using self-administered self-image scale and structured interview. Nested sampling technique was adopted. Sample size for quantitative approach was 54 and data saturation was achieved with seven subjects for qualitative approach. Institutional Ethical Committee clearance was obtained. Results: The results of the study showed that 30 (56% subjects had positive self-image and 24 (44% had negative self-image. There was a moderate positive correlation between body image and integrity (r = 0.430, P = 0.001, weak positive correlation between body image and self-esteem (r = 0.270, P = 0.049, and no correlation between self-esteem and integrity (r = 0.203, P = 0.141. The participants also scored maximum (24/24 in the areas of body image and self-esteem. Similar findings were also observed in the phenomenological approach. The themes evolved were "immaterial of outer appearance" and "desire of good health to all." Conclusion: The illness is long-term and impacts the individual 24 h a day. Understanding patients′ self-concept and living experiences of patients with HNC is important for the health care professionals to improve the care.

  5. A proposed new imaging pathway for patients with suspected lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macpherson, R.; Benamore, R.; Panakis, N.; Sayeed, R.; Breen, D.; Bradley, K.; Carter, R.; Baldwin, D.; Craig, J.; Gleeson, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: PET-CT scans are routinely performed in patients with lung cancer after investigation by chest x-ray (CXR) and CT scan, when these have demonstrated potentially curable disease. If the majority of patients with lung cancer potentially suitable for curative treatment could be identified earlier in the diagnostic pathway on the basis of CXR findings they could be referred for PET-CT imaging without a prior CT scan. We investigated the clinical and financial implications of adopting such a strategy. Materials and methods: The details of 1187 patients referred with suspected lung cancer between July 2006 and August 2009 were analysed. The initial CXR and subsequent imaging of patients fit for curative treatment (Performance Status 0/1, FEV1 > 1.0) were reviewed (n = 251). The clinical and financial implications of referring patients for first line PET-CT if deemed potentially curable based on CXR findings were assessed. Results: 107 of 1187 patients had potentially curable lung cancer on PS, lung function, CT and PET-CT. 96 of these 107 patients (90%) were correctly identified on CXR. 149 patients overall were diagnosed as potentially curable on CXR. Referring suitable patients for an immediate PET-CT scan resulted in a reduction in the time to complete staging investigations. Conclusions: Early PET-CT scanning for patients with suspected lung cancer, potentially suitable for curative therapy could result in more efficient staging with little additional cost.

  6. A proposed new imaging pathway for patients with suspected lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macpherson, R.; Benamore, R. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Panakis, N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Sayeed, R. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Breen, D. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bradley, K.; Carter, R. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Baldwin, D. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Craig, J. [York Health Economics Consortium Ltd, University of York, York (United Kingdom); Gleeson, F., E-mail: fergus.gleeson@nds.ox.ac.uk [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Aims: PET-CT scans are routinely performed in patients with lung cancer after investigation by chest x-ray (CXR) and CT scan, when these have demonstrated potentially curable disease. If the majority of patients with lung cancer potentially suitable for curative treatment could be identified earlier in the diagnostic pathway on the basis of CXR findings they could be referred for PET-CT imaging without a prior CT scan. We investigated the clinical and financial implications of adopting such a strategy. Materials and methods: The details of 1187 patients referred with suspected lung cancer between July 2006 and August 2009 were analysed. The initial CXR and subsequent imaging of patients fit for curative treatment (Performance Status 0/1, FEV1 > 1.0) were reviewed (n = 251). The clinical and financial implications of referring patients for first line PET-CT if deemed potentially curable based on CXR findings were assessed. Results: 107 of 1187 patients had potentially curable lung cancer on PS, lung function, CT and PET-CT. 96 of these 107 patients (90%) were correctly identified on CXR. 149 patients overall were diagnosed as potentially curable on CXR. Referring suitable patients for an immediate PET-CT scan resulted in a reduction in the time to complete staging investigations. Conclusions: Early PET-CT scanning for patients with suspected lung cancer, potentially suitable for curative therapy could result in more efficient staging with little additional cost.

  7. Errors in imaging patients in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Antonio; Reginelli, Alfonso; Pinto, Fabio; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Midiri, Federico; Muzj, Carlo; Romano, Luigia; Brunese, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Emergency and trauma care produces a "perfect storm" for radiological errors: uncooperative patients, inadequate histories, time-critical decisions, concurrent tasks and often junior personnel working after hours in busy emergency departments. The main cause of diagnostic errors in the emergency department is the failure to correctly interpret radiographs, and the majority of diagnoses missed on radiographs are fractures. Missed diagnoses potentially have important consequences for patients, clinicians and radiologists. Radiologists play a pivotal role in the diagnostic assessment of polytrauma patients and of patients with non-traumatic craniothoracoabdominal emergencies, and key elements to reduce errors in the emergency setting are knowledge, experience and the correct application of imaging protocols. This article aims to highlight the definition and classification of errors in radiology, the causes of errors in emergency radiology and the spectrum of diagnostic errors in radiography, ultrasonography and CT in the emergency setting.

  8. Impact of CT perfusion imaging on the assessment of peripheral chronic pulmonary thromboembolism: clinical experience in 62 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Faivre, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Khung, Suonita; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Lamblin, Nicolas; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of CT perfusion imaging on the detection of peripheral chronic pulmonary embolisms (CPE). 62 patients underwent a dual-energy chest CT angiographic examination with (a) reconstruction of diagnostic and perfusion images; (b) enabling depiction of vascular features of peripheral CPE on diagnostic images and perfusion defects (20 segments/patient; total: 1240 segments examined). The interpretation of diagnostic images was of two types: (a) standard (i.e., based on cross-sectional images alone) or (b) detailed (i.e., based on cross-sectional images and MIPs). The segment-based analysis showed (a) 1179 segments analyzable on both imaging modalities and 61 segments rated as nonanalyzable on perfusion images; (b) the percentage of diseased segments was increased by 7.2 % when perfusion imaging was compared to the detailed reading of diagnostic images, and by 26.6 % when compared to the standard reading of images. At a patient level, the extent of peripheral CPE was higher on perfusion imaging, with a greater impact when compared to the standard reading of diagnostic images (number of patients with a greater number of diseased segments: n = 45; 72.6 % of the study population). Perfusion imaging allows recognition of a greater extent of peripheral CPE compared to diagnostic imaging. • Dual-energy computed tomography generates standard diagnostic imaging and lung perfusion analysis. • Depiction of CPE on central arteries relies on standard diagnostic imaging. • Detection of peripheral CPE is improved by perfusion imaging.

  9. Magnetization transfer imaging of periventricular white matter lesions in patients with multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Imon, Yukari; Asano, Tetsuichi; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru

    1998-01-01

    Using magnetization transfer (MT) imaging, we studied the underlying pathological conditions of periventricular hyperintense (PVH) white matter changes seen on T2-weighted MR images of patients with multi-infarct dementia. Twenty-two patients with multiple lacunar infarcts and PVH lesions, including 11 with dementia (diagnosed as multi-infarct dementia) and 11 without dementia, and 10 control subjects (with multiple lacunes, but no PVH lesion) were studied using the MT technique. MT ratios (MTRs) were calculated for PVH lesions (normal-appearing frontal white matter in controls) and the genu of the corpus callosum. Signal intensities on T2-weighted images in PVH lesions of patients were significantly higher than those in normal-appearing white matter of controls, while there were no significant differences in signal intensity in the genu of the corpus callosum among the dementia, non-dementia and control groups. However, MTRs in patients with PVH lesions were significantly lower than those in controls, and MTRs in demented patients were significantly lower than those in non-demented patients. Moreover, MTRs in the genu of the corpus callosum of demented patients were significantly lower than in those in non-demented patients and controls. MTRs in PVH lesions and the genu of the corpus callosum significantly correlated with Hasegawa's dementia scale score. These results suggest that there is some difference in histopathologic changes of PVH lesions between demented and non-demented patients and that the pathological substrate in the corpus callosum may play a role in inducing cognitive decline. Studies with MT imaging may allow the characterization of different pathological conditions that cannot be visualized by conventional MRI. (author)

  10. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without immune reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchanov, Juri; Branding, Gordian; Jefferys, Laura; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Siebert, Eberhard

    2016-02-01

    To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  12. Australian diagnostic radiographers' attitudes and perceptions of imaging obese patients: A study of self, peers and students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aweidah, L.; Robinson, J.; Cumming, S.; Lewis, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objective: Imaging obese patients poses a number of challenges for diagnostic radiographers through positioning, radiation exposure, communication and care. Furthermore, the increasing prevalence of obesity in Australian society ensures these imaging challenges are more frequent however little is known about this area. This study aims to explore the attitudes and perceptions of diagnostic radiographers toward imaging obese patients through a mixed methods study. Methods: Ethics approval was granted to interview and survey diagnostic radiographers about their attitudes and perceptions of imaging obese patients. Twelve diagnostic radiographers who are designated clinical educators (DR CEs) took part in a 30–45 min semi-structured interview as well as a 20 min computer-based Weight Implicit Association Test (Weight-IAT) and self-report questionnaire of explicit attitudes. An additional 25 experienced Diagnostic Radiographers who were associate supervisors completed the Weight-IAT/explicit questionnaire only. Results: Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed that DR CEs adopted an image-focussed or patient-focussed approach to obese patients. Key themes with a negative bias included blame, tolerance and insecurity of skill. Positively associated key themes were empathy and experience in radiography. The sample overall showed a significant negative implicit weight bias (P = 0.016) as measured by the Weight-IAT and there was no evidence of negative explicit attitudes. Conclusion: Australian diagnostic radiographers in this study exhibited significant negative implicit weight bias, with interview results highlighting attitudes of blame and frustration towards obese patients. DR CEs were more likely to be focussed on image acquisition rather than patient considerations, with fewer responses related to empathy and equity. - Highlights: • Mixed-methods study combining qualitative interviews and implicit–explicit bias towards imaging obese

  13. Medical images of patients in voxel structures in high resolution for Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Menezes, Artur F.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: lboia@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Salmon Junior, Helio A. [Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (COI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work aims to present a computational process of conversion of tomographic and MRI medical images from patients in voxel structures to an input file, which will be manipulated in Monte Carlo Simulation code for tumor's radiotherapic treatments. The problem's scenario inherent to the patient is simulated by such process, using the volume element (voxel) as a unit of computational tracing. The head's voxel structure geometry has voxels with volumetric dimensions around 1 mm{sup 3} and a population of millions, which helps - in that way, for a realistic simulation and a decrease in image's digital process techniques for adjustments and equalizations. With such additional data from the code, a more critical analysis can be developed in order to determine the volume of the tumor, and the protection, beside the patients' medical images were borrowed by Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas (COI/RJ), joined to the previous performed planning. In order to execute this computational process, SAPDI computational system is used in a digital image process for optimization of data, conversion program Scan2MCNP, which manipulates, processes, and converts the medical images into voxel structures to input files and the graphic visualizer Moritz for the verification of image's geometry placing. (author)

  14. Cervicofacial tissue infarction in patients with acute invasive fungal sinusitis: prevalence and characteristic MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jungmin; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Chung, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Hanbee; Choi, Jin Wook; Cha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Tae

    2013-03-01

    Tissue infarction is known as one of the characteristic features of invasive fungal sinusitis (IFS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristic MR imaging findings of cervicofacial tissue infarction (CFTI) associated with acute IFS. We retrospectively reviewed MR images in 23 patients with histologically or microbiologically proven acute IFS. CFTI was defined as an area of lack of enhancement in and around the sinonasal tract on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. We divided CFTI into two groups, i.e., intrasinonasal and extrasinonasal. Particular attention was paid to the location of extrasinonasal CFTI and the signal intensity of CFTI on T1- and T2-weighted images. The presence of bone destruction on CT scans was also recorded. CFTI was found in 17 (74%) of 23 patients. All of these 17 patients had intrasinonasal CFTI, and 13 patients also had extrasinonasal CFTI. All 13 patients with extrasinonasal CFTI died of disease directly related to IFS. Various locations were involved in the 13 patients with extrasinonasal CFTI, including the orbit (n = 8), infratemporal fossa (n = 7), intracranial cavity (n = 3), and oral cavity and/or facial soft tissue (n = 4). Various signal intensities were noted at the area of CFTI on T1- and T2-weighted images. Bone destruction was found on CT scans in only 3 of 17 patients with CFTI. CFTI with preservation of the bony wall of the involved sinonasal tract may be a characteristic MR imaging finding of acute IFS. The mortality is very high once the lesion extends beyond the sinonasal tract.

  15. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubu