WorldWideScience

Sample records for pathological ncat image

  1. Normal and Pathological NCAT Image and Phantom Data Based on Physiologically Realistic Left Ventricle Finite-Element Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Segars, W. Paul; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-01-01

    The 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom, which provides a realistic model of the normal human anatomy and cardiac and respiratory motions, is used in medical imaging research to evaluate and improve imaging devices and techniques, especially dynamic cardiac applications. One limitation of the phantom is that it lacks the ability to accurately simulate altered functions of the heart that result from cardiac pathologies such as coronary artery disease (CAD). The goal of this work was to enhance the 4D NCAT phantom by incorporating a physiologically based, finite-element (FE) mechanical model of the left ventricle (LV) to simulate both normal and abnormal cardiac motions. The geometry of the FE mechanical model was based on gated high-resolution x-ray multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) data of a healthy male subject. The myocardial wall was represented as transversely isotropichyperelastic material, with the fiber angle varying from -90 degrees at the epicardial surface, through 0 degrees at the mid-wall, to 90 degrees at the endocardial surface. A time varying elastance model was used to simulate fiber contraction, and physiological intraventricular systolic pressure-time curves were applied to simulate the cardiac motion over the entire cardiac cycle. To demonstrate the ability of the FE mechanical model to accurately simulate the normal cardiac motion as well abnormal motions indicative of CAD, a normal case and two pathologic cases were simulated and analyzed. In the first pathologic model, a subendocardial anterior ischemic region was defined. A second model was created with a transmural ischemic region defined in the same location. The FE based deformations were incorporated into the 4D NCAT cardiac model through the control points that define the cardiac structures in the phantom which were set to move according to the predictions of the mechanical model. A simulation study was performed using the FE-NCAT combination to investigate how the

  2. Normal and Pathological NCAT Image and PhantomData Based onPhysiologically Realistic Left Ventricle Finite-Element Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veress, Alexander I.; Segars, W. Paul; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Tsui,Benjamin M.W.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-08-02

    The 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom, whichprovides a realistic model of the normal human anatomy and cardiac andrespiratory motions, is used in medical imaging research to evaluate andimprove imaging devices and techniques, especially dynamic cardiacapplications. One limitation of the phantom is that it lacks the abilityto accurately simulate altered functions of the heart that result fromcardiac pathologies such as coronary artery disease (CAD). The goal ofthis work was to enhance the 4D NCAT phantom by incorporating aphysiologically based, finite-element (FE) mechanical model of the leftventricle (LV) to simulate both normal and abnormal cardiac motions. Thegeometry of the FE mechanical model was based on gated high-resolutionx-ray multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) data of a healthy malesubject. The myocardial wall was represented as transversely isotropichyperelastic material, with the fiber angle varying from -90 degrees atthe epicardial surface, through 0 degreesat the mid-wall, to 90 degreesat the endocardial surface. A time varying elastance model was used tosimulate fiber contraction, and physiological intraventricular systolicpressure-time curves were applied to simulate the cardiac motion over theentire cardiac cycle. To demonstrate the ability of the FE mechanicalmodel to accurately simulate the normal cardiac motion as well abnormalmotions indicative of CAD, a normal case and two pathologic cases weresimulated and analyzed. In the first pathologic model, a subendocardialanterior ischemic region was defined. A second model was created with atransmural ischemic region defined in the same location. The FE baseddeformations were incorporated into the 4D NCAT cardiac model through thecontrol points that define the cardiac structures in the phantom whichwere set to move according to the predictions of the mechanical model. Asimulation study was performed using the FE-NCAT combination toinvestigate how the differences in contractile function

  3. Evaluation of amplitude-based sorting algorithm to reduce lung tumor blurring in PET images using 4D NCAT phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Byrne, James; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    develop and validate a PET sorting algorithm based on the respiratory amplitude to correct for abnormal respiratory cycles. using the 4D NCAT phantom model, 3D PET images were simulated in lung and other structures at different times within a respiratory cycle and noise was added. To validate the amplitude binning algorithm, NCAT phantom was used to simulate one case of five different respiratory periods and another case of five respiratory periods alone with five respiratory amplitudes. Comparison was performed for gated and un-gated images and for the new amplitude binning algorithm with the time binning algorithm by calculating the mean number of counts in the ROI (region of interest). an average of 8.87+/-5.10% improvement was reported for total 16 tumors with different tumor sizes and different T/B (tumor to background) ratios using the new sorting algorithm. As both the T/B ratio and tumor size decreases, image degradation due to respiration increases. The greater benefit for smaller diameter tumor and lower T/B ratio indicates a potential improvement in detecting more problematic tumors.

  4. NMR imaging of osteoarticular pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; Gagey, N.

    1987-01-01

    NMR imaging is assuming an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of osteo-articular disorders. Semiological descriptions of the mean pathological disorders of the locomotor system are presented. Some investigation strategies are proposed to compare NMR imaging with other imaging techniques in various pathological states [fr

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of labyrinthine pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Vignaud, J.; Mehdi, M.; Pharaboz, C.; Meyer, B.

    1996-01-01

    Membranous labyrinth pathologies are quite rare. They were until recently difficult to demonstrate by imaging technics, CT being the modality of choice. Our purpose was to stress the interest of MR examination for investigating patients complaining of vertigo, tinnitus, and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Normal anatomy as well as the main pathologically encountered changes are illustrated. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of labyrinthine pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Vignaud, J [Val de Grace, Hopital d` Instruction du Service de Sante des Armees, 75 - Paris (France); Mehdi, M [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Pharaboz, C [Hopital Begin, Hopital d` Instruction des Armees, 94 - Saint-Mande (France); Meyer, B [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service d` ORL, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-10-01

    Membranous labyrinth pathologies are quite rare. They were until recently difficult to demonstrate by imaging technics, CT being the modality of choice. Our purpose was to stress the interest of MR examination for investigating patients complaining of vertigo, tinnitus, and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Normal anatomy as well as the main pathologically encountered changes are illustrated. (orig.)

  9. Muscular pathology: echographic and NMR imaging aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal-Suisse, P.; Beaurain, P.; Mougniot, C.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of echographic techniques and NMR imaging has been done for the diagnosis of muscular trauma and tumor pathologies. In traumatic pathology, the echographic analysis allows to determine the complete assessment of recent muscular injuries. NMR imaging can be used in granuloma or fibrous callosity appreciation and for the analysis of deep injury (muscles and muscles-tendon junctions) and of muscular aponeurosis. Echography must be used together with color coding Doppler technique in the diagnosis of tumor pathology and for the study of slow fluxes. The recently available energy Doppler technique seems to be powerful in the study of vascularization of small expansive formations, but their extension to adjacent bone or tissue can only be appreciated using NMR imaging. (J.S.)

  10. Imaging of orbital and visual pathway pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Forell, W.S.

    2006-01-01

    This is one of the first books to deal with imaging of pathology of the entire visual system. It is divided into two parts, general and special. In the general part, the most important basics of modern imaging methods are discussed, but with less emphasis on the physical background than in purely neuro-/radiological textbooks. Chapters are devoted to the meticulous presentation of imaging anatomy of the orbit and intracranial visual pathway. The latest knowledge on the indication, technique, and results of functional MR imaging is presented. Visual system impairment in the pediatric age group is also discussed. The special part of the book provides detailed descriptions of the symptoms and clinical and imaging findings in individual patients with orbital and intracranial pathologies. This book is specifically designed to be of value not only to neuroradiologists but also to ophthalmologists, neurosurgeons, oto-/rhino-laryngologists, and neurologists who require more detailed information on these special diseases. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of orbital and visual pathway pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Forell, W.S. (ed.) [Medical School Univ. of Mainz (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology

    2006-07-01

    This is one of the first books to deal with imaging of pathology of the entire visual system. It is divided into two parts, general and special. In the general part, the most important basics of modern imaging methods are discussed, but with less emphasis on the physical background than in purely neuro-/radiological textbooks. Chapters are devoted to the meticulous presentation of imaging anatomy of the orbit and intracranial visual pathway. The latest knowledge on the indication, technique, and results of functional MR imaging is presented. Visual system impairment in the pediatric age group is also discussed. The special part of the book provides detailed descriptions of the symptoms and clinical and imaging findings in individual patients with orbital and intracranial pathologies. This book is specifically designed to be of value not only to neuroradiologists but also to ophthalmologists, neurosurgeons, oto-/rhino-laryngologists, and neurologists who require more detailed information on these special diseases. (orig.)

  12. Internet images of the speech pathology profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nicole

    2017-06-05

    Objective The Internet provides the general public with information about speech pathology services, including client groups and service delivery models, as well as the professionals providing the services. Although this information assists the general public and other professionals to both access and understand speech pathology services, it also potentially provides information about speech pathology as a prospective career, including the types of people who are speech pathologists (i.e. demographics). The aim of the present study was to collect baseline data on how the speech pathology profession was presented via images on the Internet. Methods A pilot prospective observational study using content analysis methodology was conducted to analyse publicly available Internet images related to the speech pathology profession. The terms 'Speech Pathology' and 'speech pathologist' to represent both the profession and the professional were used, resulting in the identification of 200 images. These images were considered across a range of areas, including who was in the image (e.g. professional, client, significant other), the technology used and the types of intervention. Results The majority of images showed both a client and a professional (i.e. speech pathologist). While the professional was predominantly presented as female, the gender of the client was more evenly distributed. The clients were more likely to be preschool or school aged, however male speech pathologists were presented as providing therapy to selected age groups (i.e. school aged and younger adults). Images were predominantly of individual therapy and the few group images that were presented were all paediatric. Conclusion Current images of speech pathology continue to portray narrow professional demographics and client groups (e.g. paediatrics). Promoting images of wider scope to fully represent the depth and breadth of speech pathology professional practice may assist in attracting a more diverse

  13. Accelerated Performance Testing on the 2006 NCAT Pavement Test Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The original National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) Pavement Test Track was built in 2000 in Opelika, Alabama where it has served as a state-of-the-art, full-scale, closed-loop accelerated loading facility. The construction, operation, and res...

  14. The use of digital images in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, P N

    1997-11-01

    Digital images are routinely used by the publishing industry, but most diagnostic pathologists are unfamiliar with the technology and its possibilities. This review aims to explain the basic principles of digital image acquisition, storage, manipulation and use, and the possibilities provided not only in research, but also in teaching and in routine diagnostic pathology. Images of natural objects are usually expressed digitally as 'bitmaps'--rectilinear arrays of small dots. The size of each dot can vary, but so can its information content in terms, for example, of colour, greyscale or opacity. Various file formats and compression algorithms are available. Video cameras connected to microscopes are familiar to most pathologists; video images can be converted directly to a digital form by a suitably equipped computer. Digital cameras and scanners are alternative acquisition tools of relevance to pathologists. Once acquired, a digital image can easily be subjected to the digital equivalent of any conventional darkroom manipulation and modern software allows much more flexibility, to such an extent that a new tool for scientific fraud has been created. For research, image enhancement and analysis is an increasingly powerful and affordable tool. Morphometric measurements are, after many predictions, at last beginning to be part of the toolkit of the diagnostic pathologist. In teaching, the potential to create dramatic yet informative presentations is demonstrated daily by the publishing industry; such methods are readily applicable to the classroom. The combination of digital images and the Internet raises many possibilities; for example, instead of seeking one expert diagnostic opinion, one could simultaneously seek the opinion of many, all around the globe. It is inevitable that in the coming years the use of digital images will spread from the laboratory to the medical curriculum and to the whole of diagnostic pathology.

  15. Panning artifacts in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Lanciault, Christian; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    In making a pathologic diagnosis, a pathologist uses cognitive processes: perception, attention, memory, and search (Pena and Andrade-Filho, 2009). Typically, this involves focus while panning from one region of a slide to another, using either a microscope in a traditional workflow or software program and display in a digital pathology workflow (DICOM Standard Committee, 2010). We theorize that during panning operation, the pathologist receives information important to diagnosis efficiency and/or correctness. As compared to an optical microscope, panning in a digital pathology image involves some visual artifacts due to the following: (i) the frame rate is finite; (ii) time varying visual signals are reconstructed using imperfect zero-order hold. Specifically, after pixel's digital drive is changed, it takes time for a pixel to emit the expected amount of light. Previous work suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., 2015), but the influence of display factors has not been measured. We conducted a reader study to establish a relationship between display frame rate, panel response time, and threshold panning speed (above which the artifacts become noticeable). Our results suggest visual tasks that involve tissue structure are more impacted by the simulated panning artifacts than those that only involve color (e.g., staining intensity estimation), and that the panning artifacts versus normalized panning speed has a peak behavior which is surprising and may change for a diagnostic task. This is work in progress and our final findings should be considered in designing future digital pathology systems.

  16. Financing translation: analysis of the NCATS rare-diseases portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnan, David E; Yang, N Nora; McKew, John C; Lo, Andrew W

    2015-02-25

    The portfolio of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) rare-diseases therapeutic development program comprises 28 research projects initiated at the preclinical stage. Historical data reveal substantially lower costs and higher success rates but longer preclinical timelines for the NCATS projects relative to the industry averages for early-stage translational medical research and development (R&D) typically cited in literature. Here, we evaluate the potential risks and rewards of investing in a portfolio of rare-disease therapeutics. Using a "megafund" financing structure, NCATS data, and valuation estimates from a panel of industry experts, we simulate a hypothetical megafund in which senior and junior debt yielded 5 and 8%, respectively. The simulated expected return to equity was 14.7%, corresponding to a modified internal rate of return of 21.6%. These returns and the likelihood of private-sector funding can be enhanced through third-party funding guarantees from philanthropies, patient advocacy groups, and government agencies. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracavernous pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, Masaki; Yasui, Toshihiro; Yagura, Hisatsugu; Fu, Yoshihiko; Baba, Mitsuru [Baba Memorial Hospital, Sakai, Osaka (Japan); Hakuba, Akira; Nishimura, Shuro

    1989-07-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of intracavernous pathology, T{sub 1}-weighted spin echo images of four vascular lesions and 10 neoplastic lesions with surgically confirmed cavernous sinus (CS) invasion were reviewed retrospectively. In one case of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) and one of dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM), the internal carotid artery (ICA) and rapid shunted flow were depicted as signal voids, and the relationship between the ICA and shunted flow was clearly shown. Normal venous flow appeared as a low-intensity area and was observed even in the presence of the CCF and dural AVM. In two cases of thrombosed aneurysms, the thrombosis was clearly demonstrated, along with patent arterial flow in one case; in the other case, however, it was impossible to differentiate patent arterial flow from calcification. The intensity of all neoplastic lesions was similar to that of the cerebral cortex. The relationship between the ICA and the tumors was clearly demonstrated. The visual pathways were also plainly shown unless they were involved, or markedly compressed, by tumor. CS invasion was strongly associated with four findings: (1) encasement of the ICA by the tumor; (2) marked displacement of the ICA; (3) absence of low intensity, which reflects normal venous flow, in the CS; and (4) extension of extrasellar tumors to the medial wall or of intrasellar tumors to the lateral wall. MR imaging was judged promising in the evaluation of intracavernous pathology. (author).

  18. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: imaging-pathology correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Stephen M.; Hansell, David M.

    2002-01-01

    The terminology related to idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) remains confusing and in some cases wholly inaccurate. In addition, a greater understanding of the correlation between high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) appearances and the corresponding histopathological changes found in the interstitial pneumonias has resulted in a crucial role for HRCT in the investigation of IIPs. The role of the radiologist is becoming increasingly important with a strong emphasis on establishing a diagnosis without resorting to lung biopsy. We aim to clarify the current classification of the IIPs highlighting their clinical, pathological and imaging characteristics in order to assist the radiologist in performing their increasingly important diagnostic role. (orig.)

  19. HDR Pathological Image Enhancement Based on Improved Bias Field Correction and Guided Image Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjiao Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological image enhancement is a significant topic in the field of pathological image processing. This paper proposes a high dynamic range (HDR pathological image enhancement method based on improved bias field correction and guided image filter (GIF. Firstly, a preprocessing including stain normalization and wavelet denoising is performed for Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E stained pathological image. Then, an improved bias field correction model is developed to enhance the influence of light for high-frequency part in image and correct the intensity inhomogeneity and detail discontinuity of image. Next, HDR pathological image is generated based on least square method using low dynamic range (LDR image, H and E channel images. Finally, the fine enhanced image is acquired after the detail enhancement process. Experiments with 140 pathological images demonstrate the performance advantages of our proposed method as compared with related work.

  20. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Allison; Barker, Jocelyn; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline

  1. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Allison [Stanford Institutes of Medical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Barker, Jocelyn [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Rubin, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline.

  2. COMPARISON OF RETINAL PATHOLOGY VISUALIZATION IN MULTISPECTRAL SCANNING LASER IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, Amit; Lin, Tiezhu; Dans, Kunny; Chen, Kevin C; Amador, Manuel; Hasenstab, Kyle; Muftuoglu, Ilkay Kilic; Nudleman, Eric; Chao, Daniel; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Freeman, William R

    2018-03-16

    To compare retinal pathology visualization in multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging between the Spectralis and Optos devices. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 42 eyes from 30 patients with age-related macular degeneration (19 eyes), diabetic retinopathy (10 eyes), and epiretinal membrane (13 eyes). All patients underwent retinal imaging with a color fundus camera (broad-spectrum white light), the Spectralis HRA-2 system (3-color monochromatic lasers), and the Optos P200 system (2-color monochromatic lasers). The Optos image was cropped to a similar size as the Spectralis image. Seven masked graders marked retinal pathologies in each image within a 5 × 5 grid that included the macula. The average area with detected retinal pathology in all eyes was larger in the Spectralis images compared with Optos images (32.4% larger, P < 0.0001), mainly because of better visualization of epiretinal membrane and retinal hemorrhage. The average detection rate of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy pathologies was similar across the three modalities, whereas epiretinal membrane detection rate was significantly higher in the Spectralis images. Spectralis tricolor multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging had higher rate of pathology detection primarily because of better epiretinal membrane and retinal hemorrhage visualization compared with Optos bicolor multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging.

  3. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Prostate Pathology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Clinical Pathology, Chicago 3. Partin AW, Mangold LA, Lamm DM , Walsh PC, Epstein JI, Pearson JD (2001) Urology 58:843–848 4. De La Taille A, Viellefond...are used to seeing only in optical microscopy,” he recalls. “The crispness , the details were comparable.” In fact, the pixel size is only a half

  4. Whole slide imaging in pathology: advantages, limitations, and emerging perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahani N

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Navid Farahani,1 Anil V Parwani,2 Liron Pantanowitz2 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Significant technologic gains have led to the adoption of innovative digital imaging solutions in pathology. Whole slide imaging (WSI, which refers to scanning of conventional glass slides in order to produce digital slides, is the most recent imaging modality being employed by pathology departments worldwide. WSI continues to gain traction among pathologists for diagnostic, educational, and research purposes. This article provides a technologic review of WSI platforms and covers clinical and nonclinical pathology applications of these imaging systems. Barriers to adoption of WSI include limiting technology, image quality, problems with scanning all materials (eg, cytology slides, cost, digital slide storage, inability to handle high-throughput routine work, regulatory barriers, ergonomics, and pathologists' reluctance. Emerging issues related to clinical validation, standardization, and forthcoming advances in the field are also addressed. Keywords: digital, imaging, microscopy, pathology, validation, whole slide image, telepathology

  5. Pilomatricomas in children: imaging characteristics with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jin; Lee, Heejeong; Sung, Mi Sook; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Jee Young

    2007-01-01

    Although pilomatricoma commonly occurs in children, there is still a poor understanding of the imaging characteristics of pilomatricoma and lack of agreement regarding its imaging findings and histopathologic features. To characterize the radiologic appearance of pilomatricomas on US, CT, and MR and to correlate the imaging findings with histopathologic features. The imaging findings of 47 pilomatricomas on US (n = 17), CT (n = 31), and MR (n = 5) were retrospectively evaluated. Pathologic specimens of all cases were reviewed and compared with imaging findings. All lesions were well-circumscribed, subcutaneous nodules with partial attachment to the overlying skin. On US, the lesions were mostly hyperechoic with posterior acoustic shadowing and hypoechoic rim. On CT, they appeared as enhancing soft-tissue masses with varying amounts of calcification. MR findings were internal reticulations and patchy areas on T2-weighted images and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, corresponding to edematous stroma on pathology. Peritumoral inflammatory changes and connective capsule on pathology were well correlated with imaging findings. Pilomatricoma should be considered when US or CT shows a well-defined hyperechoic or calcific nodule in subcutaneous fat attached to the skin in children. MR images may be helpful in diagnosis. Pathologic findings are well correlated with imaging findings. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Ngan, Bo Yee; Gundogan, Munire; Daneman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging findings for congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN) and two main pathological variants: classic and cellular. To determine whether imaging findings in children can predict the likely pathological variant. We reviewed imaging in children with pathology-proven CMN. Imaging findings correlated with gross and histological appearance. In 15 boys and 15 girls with CMN, US was performed in 27, CT in 19, and MRI in 7. Cystic components were readily identified on US; central hemorrhage was better differentiated on CT. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for both. Histology confirmed classic CMN in 13 children, cellular CMN in 14 and ''mixed'' CMN in 3. Age at presentation was significantly higher in children with the cellular variant. Of 15 solid or predominantly solid tumors and 10 lesions with a hypoechoic ring, 12 and 7, respectively, had pathology consistent with classic CMN. In contrast, five of seven with intratumoral hemorrhage and all with a large cystic/necrotic component had pathology consistent with the cellular variant. The imaging appearance of CMN is often determined by the pathological type of tumor. Findings suggestive of the classic variant include a peripheral hypoechoic ring or large solid component. In comparison, cystic/necrotic change and hemorrhage is much more common in cellular CMN. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of data reduction methods for dynamic PET series based on Monte Carlo techniques and the NCAT phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thireou, Trias; Rubio Guivernau, Jose Luis; Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Ledesma, Maria Jesus; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Santos, Andres; Kontaxakis, George

    2006-01-01

    A realistic dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) thoracic study was generated, using the 4D NURBS-based (non-uniform rational B-splines) cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a sophisticated model of the PET imaging process, simulating two solitary pulmonary nodules. Three data reduction and blind source separation methods were applied to the simulated data: principal component analysis, independent component analysis and similarity mapping. All methods reduced the initial amount of image data to a smaller, comprehensive and easily managed set of parametric images, where structures were separated based on their different kinetic characteristics and the lesions were readily identified. The results indicate that the above-mentioned methods can provide an accurate tool for the support of both visual inspection and subsequent detailed kinetic analysis of the dynamic series via compartmental or non-compartmental models

  8. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semin Chong; Kyung Soo Lee; Myung Jin Chung; Joungho Han; O. Jung Kwon; d Tae Sung Kim [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Republic of Korea). Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  9. Pneumoconiosis: Comparison of imaging and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, S.; Lee, K.S.; Chung, M.J.; Han, J.H.; Kwon, O.J.; Kim, T.S. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Republic of Korea). Samsung Medical Center

    2006-01-15

    Pneumoconiosis may be classified as either fibrotic or nonfibrotic, according to the presence or absence of fibrosis. Silicosis, coal worker pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, berylliosis, and talcosis are examples of fibrotic pneumoconiosis. Siderosis, stannosis, and baritosis are nonfibrotic forms of pneumoconiosis that result from inhalation of iron oxide, tin oxide, and barium sulfate particles, respectively. In an individual who has a history of exposure to silica or coal dust, a finding of nodular or reticulonodular lesions at chest radiography or small nodules with a perilymphatic distribution at thin-section computed tomography (CT), with or without eggshell calcifications, is suggestive of silicosis or coal worker pneumoconiosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful for distinguishing between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. CT and histopathologic findings in asbestosis are similar to those in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but the presence of asbestos bodies in histopathologic specimens is specific for the diagnosis of asbestosis. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia due to exposure to hard metals is classified as a fibrotic form of pneumoconiosis and appears on CT images as mixed ground-glass opacities and reticulation. Berylliosis simulates pulmonary sarcoidosis on CT images. CT findings in talcosis include small centrilobular and subpleural nodules or heterogeneous conglomerate masses that contain foci of high attenuation indicating talc deposition. Siderosis is nonfibrotic and is indicated by a CT finding of poorly defined centrilobular nodules or ground-glass opacities.

  10. Wavelet-based compression of pathological images for telemedicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang W.; Jiang, Jianfei; Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Xue G.; Yu, Lun

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we present the performance evaluation of wavelet-based coding techniques as applied to the compression of pathological images for application in an Internet-based telemedicine system. We first study how well suited the wavelet-based coding is as it applies to the compression of pathological images, since these images often contain fine textures that are often critical to the diagnosis of potential diseases. We compare the wavelet-based compression with the DCT-based JPEG compression in the DICOM standard for medical imaging applications. Both objective and subjective measures have been studied in the evaluation of compression performance. These studies are performed in close collaboration with expert pathologists who have conducted the evaluation of the compressed pathological images and communication engineers and information scientists who designed the proposed telemedicine system. These performance evaluations have shown that the wavelet-based coding is suitable for the compression of various pathological images and can be integrated well with the Internet-based telemedicine systems. A prototype of the proposed telemedicine system has been developed in which the wavelet-based coding is adopted for the compression to achieve bandwidth efficient transmission and therefore speed up the communications between the remote terminal and the central server of the telemedicine system.

  11. Salivary gland masses. Dynamic MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinho; Inoue, Shingo; Ishizuka, Yasuhito; Shindo, Hiroaki; Kawanishi, Masayuki; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Ebihara, Yoshiro

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of salivary gland masses. We retrospectively examined 19 salivary gland masses that were pathologically diagnosed by surgical operation or biopsy. We obtained T1- and T2-weighted images on MRI, performed dynamic studies on each mass and examined the correlation between enhancement patterns and pathological findings. Four enhancement patterns were recognized on contrast-enhanced MRI: type 1 showed marked, homogeneous enhancement; type 2 slights, homogeneous enhancement; type 3 marginal enhancement; and type 4 poor enhancement of the mass. Most pleomorphic adenomas had a type 1 enhancement pattern, but two had a type 2 pattern. Pathologically, each mass enhancement pattern had different tumor cell and matrix components. Warthin's tumor generally showed the type 4 pattern. Primary malignant tumors of the salivary gland all showed the type 3 pattern, and pathological specimens showed many tumor cells along the marginal portion of the tumor. One inflammatory cyst and one Warthin's tumor also showed the type 3 pattern. Except for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the enhancement patterns of late phase images and dynamic study images were the same. Dynamic MRI added little diagnostic information about salivary gland masses, but the contrast-enhanced MR features correlated well with the pathological findings. (author)

  12. Extension of the NCAT phantom for the investigation of intra-fraction respiratory motion in IMRT using 4D Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGurk, Ross; Seco, Joao; Wolfgang, John; Paganetti, Harald; Riboldi, Marco; Segars, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to create a computational platform for studying motion in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Specifically, the non-uniform rational B-spline (NURB) cardiac and torso (NCAT) phantom was modified for use in a four-dimensional Monte Carlo (4D-MC) simulation system to investigate the effect of respiratory-induced intra-fraction organ motion on IMRT dose distributions as a function of diaphragm motion, lesion size and lung density. Treatment plans for four clinical scenarios were designed: diaphragm peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm and 3 cm, and two lesion sizes-2 cm and 4 cm diameter placed in the lower lobe of the right lung. Lung density was changed for each phase using a conservation of mass calculation. Further, a new heterogeneous lung model was implemented and tested. Each lesion had an internal target volume (ITV) subsequently expanded by 15 mm isotropically to give the planning target volume (PTV). The PTV was prescribed to receive 72 Gy in 40 fractions. The MLC leaf sequence defined by the planning system for each patient was exported and used as input into the MC system. MC simulations using the dose planning method (DPM) code together with deformable image registration based on the NCAT deformation field were used to find a composite dose distribution for each phantom. These composite distributions were subsequently analyzed using information from the dose volume histograms (DVH). Lesion motion amplitude has the largest effect on the dose distribution. Tumor size was found to have a smaller effect and can be mitigated by ensuring the planning constraints are optimized for the tumor size. The use of a dynamic or heterogeneous lung density model over a respiratory cycle does not appear to be an important factor with a ≤ 0.6% change in the mean dose received by the ITV, PTV and right lung. The heterogeneous model increases the realism of the NCAT phantom and may provide more accurate simulations in radiation therapy

  13. MR imaging of the neonatal brain: Pathologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, C.B.; Richardson, C.J.; Nicholas, D.A.; Hayden, C.K.; Amparo, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-three neonates, aged 29-43 weeks since conception, were studied. US and/or CT correlations were obtained in most infants with pathology. In the first 4-5 days after hemorrhage, US and CT were superior to MR imaging, but after that time MR imaging was the single best modality for imaging blood. In early premature infants with very watery white matter, US detected infarction and brain edema that were poorly seen on both MR imaging and CT. However, in late premature and full-term infants, MR imaging was better than CT in distinguishing between normal white matter and infarction. Only MR imaging disclosed delayed myelination in 13 term infants with hydrocephalus and severe asphyxia. MR imaging with play an important role in imaging neonates once MR imaging-compatible monitors and neonatal head coils become widely available

  14. Automatic anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lidong; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, Yubing; Odhner, Dewey; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Body-wide anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem because various diseases result in various abnormalities of objects such as shape and intensity patterns. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [1] whose applicability was demonstrated on near normal diagnostic CT images in different body regions on 35 organs. The aim of this paper is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to diagnostic CT images of patients with various pathologies as a first step toward automated body-wide disease quantification. The AAR approach consists of three main steps - model building, object recognition, and object delineation. In this paper, within the broader AAR framework, we describe a new strategy for object recognition to handle abnormal images. In the model building stage an optimal threshold interval is learned from near-normal training images for each object. This threshold is optimally tuned to the pathological manifestation of the object in the test image. Recognition is performed following a hierarchical representation of the objects. Experimental results for the abdominal body region based on 50 near-normal images used for model building and 20 abnormal images used for object recognition show that object localization accuracy within 2 voxels for liver and spleen and 3 voxels for kidney can be achieved with the new strategy.

  15. Evaluation of skin pathologies by RGB autofluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihachev, Alexey; Plorina, Emilija V.; Derjabo, Alexander; Lange, Marta; Lihacova, Ilze

    2017-12-01

    A clinical trial on autofluorescence imaging of malignant and non-malignant skin pathologies comprising 32 basal cell carcinomas (BCC), 4 malignant melanomas (MM), 1 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 89 nevi, 14 dysplastic nevi, 20 hemangiomas, 23 seborrheic keratoses, 4 hyperkeratoses, 3 actinic keratoses, 3 psoriasis, 1 dematitis, 2 dermatofibromas, 5 papillofibromas, 12 lupus erythematosus, 7 purpura, 6 bruises, 5 freckles, 3 fungal infections, 1 burn, 1 tattoo, 1 age spot, 1 vitiligo, 32 postoperative scars, 8 post cream therapy BCCs, 4 post radiation therapy scars, 2 post laser therapy scars, 1 post freezing scar as well as 114 reference images of healthy skin was performed. The sequence of autofluorescence images of skin pathologies were recorded by smartphone RGB camera under continuous 405 nm LED excitation during 20 seconds with 0.5 fps. Obtained image sequences further were processed with subsequent extraction of autofluorescence intensity and photobleaching parameters.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Nonneoplastic Musculoskeletal Pathologies in the Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Sindhura; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Komarraju, Aparna; Guidry, Carey; Pandey, Tarun

    2017-06-01

    Musculoskeletal pathologies in the pelvis encompass a wide variety of lesions including femoroacetabular impingement, athletic pubalgia, ischiofemoral impingement, and apophyseal avulsion injuries. Magnetic resonance imaging is the noninvasive imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and management of these lesions. In this article, the authors discuss the nonneoplastic musculoskeletal lesions in the pelvis, with illustrations and relevant case examples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Usefulness of MR imaging in pathologic fracture of long bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyo Soon; Park, Jin Gyoon; Song, Jae Min; Chung, Tae Woong; Yoon, Woong; Kang, Heoung Kyun

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging of pathologic fractures of the long bones. In 18 patients aged between four and 75 (mean, 25.8) years with histologically confirmed pathologic fractures of the long bones, plain radiographs and MR images were retrospectively analyzed. The former were examined with regard to location and type of fracture, and the presence or absence of underlying disease causing fracture; and the latter in terms of underlying disease, extraosseous mass formation, and soft tissue change. The long bones involved were the femur in nine patients, the humerus in six, and the tibia in three. Underlying diseases were metastatic tumor (n=6), benign bone tumor (n=5), primary malignant bone tumor (n=4), osteomyelitis (n=2), and eosinophilic granuloma (n=1). Plain radiographs showed the fracture site as the metaphysis in ten cases, the disphysis in five, and the metadisphysis in one. Fractures were either transverse (n=10), oblique (n=3), spiral (n=1), vertical (n=1), or telescopic (n=1). In two cases, the fracture line was not visible. MR images revealed underlying diseases in all cases. Two benign bone tumors took the form of a cystic mass, hematoma was seen in three cases. Where pathologic fracture of a long bone had occurred, or a pathologic fracture in which the findings of plain radiography were equivocal, MR imaging was useful for evaluating the pattern and extent of an underlying lesion

  18. Imaging characteristics of intraparenchymal schwannoma and the related pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuyong; Geng Daoying; He Huijin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To Analyze the imaging characteristics of intraparenchymal schwannoma and the related pathology, in order to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and be in favor of the clinics and the prognosis. Methods: Four cases were confirmed to be intraparenchymal schwannoma by pathological and immunohistochemistry examination. One case was examined with precontrast and enhanced CT scanning, one with unenhanced MRI scanning, two with unenhanced and enhanced CT and MRI scanning. Their images were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of the four cases, three patients were less than 30 years old, with tumors located supratentorially. Cysts were found in all cases, with nodules on the wall in 3 cases. The nodules were enhanced markedly in two cases and moderately in one case. In addition, calcification was detected in one case and prominent peritumoral edema existed in 1 case. The picture of the pathology demonstrated Antoni type A and Antoni type B. Immunostaining showed intense immunoreactivity for S-100 protein and Vim and negative immunoreactivity for GFAP and EMA. Conclusions: Intraparenchymal schwannoma mostly occurred in juvenile, which located supratentorially in most cases. The presence of a cyst and peritumoral edema together with the tumor appears to be characteristic of intraparenchymal schwannoma. Calcification or the enhanced nodule is the helpful sign for the diagnosis. Combining the imaging findings with the pathology and immunohistochemistry results can gain the accurate diagnosis. (authors)

  19. Detecting brain tumor in pathological slides using hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Samuel; Fabelo, Himar; Camacho, Rafael; de la Luz Plaza, María; Callicó, Gustavo M; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging technology for medical diagnosis. This research work presents a proof-of-concept on the use of HSI data to automatically detect human brain tumor tissue in pathological slides. The samples, consisting of hyperspectral cubes collected from 400 nm to 1000 nm, were acquired from ten different patients diagnosed with high-grade glioma. Based on the diagnosis provided by pathologists, a spectral library of normal and tumor tissues was created and processed using three different supervised classification algorithms. Results prove that HSI is a suitable technique to automatically detect high-grade tumors from pathological slides.

  20. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  1. MR imaging of symptomatic osteochondromas with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.; Knapp, T.; White, L.M.; Wunder, J.S.; Bell, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis and differentiation of the various symptomatic complications of osteochondromas, providing pathological correlation with emphasis on the usefulness of MR imaging as a single imaging modality in these patients. Design. We retrospectively reviewed all MR examinations of clinically symptomatic osteochondromas (30 patients) performed at our institution between March 1990 and October 1997. Patients. Thirty patients had clinically symptomatic osteochondromas during the study period. Twenty patients were male and 10 were female. There were five cases of multiple osteochondromatosis. Pathological correlation was available in 24 patients. Results and conclusion. Symptomatic complications included fracture (7%), osseous deformity limiting range of motion (23%), vascular injury (7%), neurological compromise (10%), bursa formation (27%) and malignant transformation (27%). MR imaging was able to diagnose or suggest the etiology for the clinical symptomatology in all cases, demonstrating that it is an ideal imaging modality in the diagnostic evaluation of symptomatic complications of osteochondromas and often avoids the need for further imaging. (orig.)

  2. Spinal Schmorl's nodes: Sagittal sectional imaging and pathological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Opeskin, K.

    1999-01-01

    The presence, location and number of Schmorl's nodes was determined in the thoracolumbar spines of 70 motor vehicle accident victims using radiographic examination of a midline sagittal section and subsequent pathological examinations, including histology. In 28% of spines, a greater number of Schmorl's nodes were identified with radiography, while in 44%, pathological examination revealed a greater number of nodes. The visibility of Schmorl's nodes was enhanced by using a sagittal radiographic approach, and, in contrast to previous work, nodes below 0.5 cm 2 were readily detected. The results of the present study offer an additional imaging technique for postmortem analysis of the spine, and support the use of sagittal MR imaging for the evaluation of this condition. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Imaging Spectrum of Cerebellar Pathologies: A Pictorial Essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is a crucial structure of hindbrain which helps in maintaining motor tone, posture, gait and also coordinates skilled voluntary movements including eye movements. Cerebellar abnormalities have different spectrum, presenting symptoms and prognosis as compared to supratentorial structures and brainstem. This article intends to review the various pathological processes involving the cerebellum along with their imaging features on MR, which are must to know for all radiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons for their prompt diagnosis and management

  4. Skull base chordoid meningioma: Imaging features and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, Mark Y.S.; Gomes, Lavier; Ng, Thomas; Cruz, Malville Da; Dexter, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The clinical, imaging and pathological features of a skull base chordoid meningioma (CM) are described. The huge tumour resulted in obstructive hydrocephalus and partial erosion of the clivus such that a chordoma was suspected. The lesion's MRI findings were similar to those of a meningioma. Light microscopic, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural features were diagnostic of CM. Chordoid meningioma is a rare subtype of meningioma and has a great tendency to recur should surgical resection be incomplete Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  5. [Clinical, pathological and imaging features of primary pelvic Ewing's sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Chen, Y; Ling, X L; Gong, Y; Ding, J P; Zhang, Z K; Wang, Y J

    2016-07-19

    To explore the clinical, pathological and imaging features of Ewing's sarcoma in pelvis and to improve knowledge and diagnosis of the disease. A retrospective analysis of the clinical, pathological and imaging data of pathologically confirmed 13 cases of Ewing's sarcoma in pelvis was carried out between May 2008 and March 2016 in the Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University and the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University. The median age 13 cases of pelvic primary Ewing's sarcoma was 17 years old.The X-ray and CT imagings showed osteolytic and mixed bone destruction, CT showed mixed type in 10 cases, 8 cases of bone tumors as a flocculent, 10 cases of bone expansion failure, 10 cases of periosteal reaction, the layered 5 cases, radial in 5 cases.Thirteen cases showed soft tissue mass, soft tissue mass was equal or slightly lower density.Four cases showed heterogeneous contrast enhancement.The lesions showed low signal in T1WI and mixed high signal in T2WI of magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). The boundary of the lesions were obscure, and 5 cases had patchy necrosis area, and 9 cases had incomplete false capsule, surrounding soft tissue was violated.Four cases showed heterogeneous contrast enhancement after MRI enhancement scan. The age of onset of Ewing's sarcoma of the pelvis is more concentrated in about 15 years.The imaging feaures are mixed bone destruction and more bone is swelling and permeability damage, soft tissue mass is larger, bone tumor is cloudy or acicular, periosteal reaction in a layered and radial, most cases show that the false envelope is not complete.Combined with clinical and imaging examination, the diagnosis of the disease can be made.

  6. Primary colorectal lymphoma: spectrum of imaging findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Kyoung Won; Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2002-01-01

    Primary colorectal lymphoma is a very uncommon disease; therefore, it has received little attention in the radiology literature. Moreover, imaging features of newly described pathologic subtypes have not been reported such as low-grade B-cell lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and peripheral T-cell lymphoma that involves colorectal area. We retrospectively reviewed double-contrast barium enema and CT scans in the patients with primary colorectal lymphoma. In this article the radiologic appearances of primary colorectal lymphoma are categorized into focal lesion and diffuse lesion. Focal lesion includes polypoid mass, circumferential infiltration with smooth mucosal surface, circumferential infiltration with extensive ulceration, cavitary mass, mucosal nodularity, and mucosal fold thickening. Diffuse lesion includes diffuse ulcerative lesion and diffuse nodular lesion. Peripheral T-cell lymphomas that involve the colon manifested as either a diffuse or focal segmental lesion and showed extensive mucosal ulceration. These findings are similar to those of Crohn's disease or tuberculous colitis and are different from those of previously reported colorectal lymphoma. Low-grade B-cell lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue manifest as multiple mucosal nodularity. The imaging features of primary colorectal lymphoma are quite variable and overlap with other colonic pathology; however, it is important for radiologists to know the imaging features of primary colorectal lymphoma with their pathologic correlation. (orig.)

  7. Chondrosarcoma : MR imaging findings correlated with pathologic classification and grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seong Whi; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of chondrosarcomas by correlation with pathologic classification and grade. We performed MR imaging-pathologic correlation of nineteen chondrosarcomas. Conventional chondrosarcomas accounted for 15 cases (grade I:6, II:6, III:3) and the mesenchymal and dedifferentiated types each accounted for two. MR signal intensity (SI) of the tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images (T1WI and T2WI, respectively), was classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous low-, iso- or high SI, and enhancing pattern as marginal, marginal and septal, marginal and nodular, or diffuse enhancement. Eighteen cases of chondrosarcomas (95%) showed homogeneous or heterogeneous low- or iso SI on T1WI and high SI on T2WI. Low grade conventional chondrosarcomas showed marginal and septal (n=8/10) or marginal (n=2/10) enhancement on Gd-enhanced MR images. Grade III conventional chondrosarcomas showed marginal or marginal and nodular enhancement. Dedifferentiated and mesenchymal chondrosarcomas showed marginal and nodular or diffuse enhancement. Chondrosarcomas showed iso- or low SI on T1WI and high SI on T2WI. Marginal and septal enhancement was demonstrated on Gd-enhanced MR images of grade I and II conventional chondrosarcomas. If a tumor showed a marginal and nodular or diffuse enhancing pattern, this suggested it was a of high grade chondrosarcoma

  8. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine Whole Slide Imaging Connectathon at Digital Pathology Association Pathology Visions 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clunie, David; Hosseinzadeh, Dan; Wintell, Mikael; De Mena, David; Lajara, Nieves; Garcia-Rojo, Marcial; Bueno, Gloria; Saligrama, Kiran; Stearrett, Aaron; Toomey, David; Abels, Esther; Apeldoorn, Frank Van; Langevin, Stephane; Nichols, Sean; Schmid, Joachim; Horchner, Uwe; Beckwith, Bruce; Parwani, Anil; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2018-01-01

    As digital pathology systems for clinical diagnostic work applications become mainstream, interoperability between these systems from different vendors becomes critical. For the first time, multiple digital pathology vendors have publicly revealed the use of the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) standard file format and network protocol to communicate between separate whole slide acquisition, storage, and viewing components. Note the use of DICOM for clinical diagnostic applications is still to be validated in the United States. The successful demonstration shows that the DICOM standard is fundamentally sound, though many lessons were learned. These lessons will be incorporated as incremental improvements in the standard, provide more detailed profiles to constrain variation for specific use cases, and offer educational material for implementers. Future Connectathon events will expand the scope to include more devices and vendors, as well as more ambitious use cases including laboratory information system integration and annotation for image analysis, as well as more geographic diversity. Users should request DICOM features in all purchases and contracts. It is anticipated that the growth of DICOM-compliant manufacturers will likely also ease DICOM for pathology becoming a recognized standard and as such the regulatory pathway for digital pathology products.

  9. Vaginal Masses: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features with Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayes, K.M.; Narra, V.R.; Dillman, J.R.; Velcheti, V.; Hameed, O.; Tongdee, R.; Menias, C.O.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of vaginal lesions has increased with the expanding use of cross-sectional imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - with its high-contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities - is often useful for characterizing vaginal masses. Vaginal masses can be classified as congenital, inflammatory, cystic (benign), and neoplastic (benign or malignant) in etiology. Recognition of the typical MR imaging features of such lesions is important because it often determines the treatment approach and may obviate surgery. Finally, vaginal MR imaging can be used to evaluate post-treatment changes related to previous surgery and radiation therapy. In this article, we will review pertinent vaginal anatomy, vaginal and pelvic MRI technique, and the MRI features of a variety of vaginal lesions with pathological correlation

  10. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Rohrmann, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented. (orig.)

  11. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Rohrmann, Charles A; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2013-07-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented.

  12. Objective and Subjective Assessment of Digital Pathology Image Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Shrestha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of an image produced by the Whole Slide Imaging (WSI scanners is of critical importance for using the image in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, it is very important to monitor and ensure the quality of images. Since subjective image quality assessments by pathologists are very time-consuming, expensive and difficult to reproduce, we propose a method for objective assessment based on clinically relevant and perceptual image parameters: sharpness, contrast, brightness, uniform illumination and color separation; derived from a survey of pathologists. We developed techniques to quantify the parameters based on content-dependent absolute pixel performance and to manipulate the parameters in a predefined range resulting in images with content-independent relative quality measures. The method does not require a prior reference model. A subjective assessment of the image quality is performed involving 69 pathologists and 372 images (including 12 optimal quality images and their distorted versions per parameter at 6 different levels. To address the inter-reader variability, a representative rating is determined as a one-tailed 95% confidence interval of the mean rating. The results of the subjective assessment support the validity of the proposed objective image quality assessment method to model the readers’ perception of image quality. The subjective assessment also provides thresholds for determining the acceptable level of objective quality per parameter. The images for both the subjective and objective quality assessment are based on the HercepTestTM slides scanned by the Philips Ultra Fast Scanners, developed at Philips Digital Pathology Solutions. However, the method is applicable also to other types of slides and scanners.

  13. Image standards in Tissue-Based Diagnosis (Diagnostic Surgical Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollmer Ekkehard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in automated image analysis, virtual microscopy, hospital information systems, and interdisciplinary data exchange require image standards to be applied in tissue-based diagnosis. Aims To describe the theoretical background, practical experiences and comparable solutions in other medical fields to promote image standards applicable for diagnostic pathology. Theory and experiences Images used in tissue-based diagnosis present with pathology – specific characteristics. It seems appropriate to discuss their characteristics and potential standardization in relation to the levels of hierarchy in which they appear. All levels can be divided into legal, medical, and technological properties. Standards applied to the first level include regulations or aims to be fulfilled. In legal properties, they have to regulate features of privacy, image documentation, transmission, and presentation; in medical properties, features of disease – image combination, human – diagnostics, automated information extraction, archive retrieval and access; and in technological properties features of image acquisition, display, formats, transfer speed, safety, and system dynamics. The next lower second level has to implement the prescriptions of the upper one, i.e. describe how they are implemented. Legal aspects should demand secure encryption for privacy of all patient related data, image archives that include all images used for diagnostics for a period of 10 years at minimum, accurate annotations of dates and viewing, and precise hardware and software information. Medical aspects should demand standardized patients' files such as DICOM 3 or HL 7 including history and previous examinations, information of image display hardware and software, of image resolution and fields of view, of relation between sizes of biological objects and image sizes, and of access to archives and retrieval. Technological aspects should deal with image

  14. Image processing methods and architectures in diagnostic pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar DĂŠniz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Grid technology has enabled the clustering and the efficient and secure access to and interaction among a wide variety of geographically distributed resources such as: supercomputers, storage systems, data sources, instruments and special devices and services. Their main applications include large-scale computational and data intensive problems in science and engineering. General grid structures and methodologies for both software and hardware in image analysis for virtual tissue-based diagnosis has been considered in this paper. This methods are focus on the user level middleware. The article describes the distributed programming system developed by the authors for virtual slide analysis in diagnostic pathology. The system supports different image analysis operations commonly done in anatomical pathology and it takes into account secured aspects and specialized infrastructures with high level services designed to meet application requirements. Grids are likely to have a deep impact on health related applications, and therefore they seem to be suitable for tissue-based diagnosis too. The implemented system is a joint application that mixes both Web and Grid Service Architecture around a distributed architecture for image processing. It has shown to be a successful solution to analyze a big and heterogeneous group of histological images under architecture of massively parallel processors using message passing and non-shared memory.

  15. Meningioangiomatosis: MR imaging and pathological correlation in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.-Y.; Kim, W.S.; Cheon, J.-E.; Yeon, K.M.; Kim, I.-O.

    2002-01-01

    Meningioangiomatosis is a rare, benign neoplastic disorder involving the cortex and leptomeninges. The pathological findings are characterised by proliferation of meningothelial cells and leptomeningeal vessels and calcifications within the mass. We experienced two cases of pathologically confirmed meningioangiomatosis, one as a solitary cortical mass with calcification and the other as a cortical lesion manifested as extensive intracranial haemorrhage. On MRI, the first case showed an isointense cortical mass in the left frontal lobe and homogeneous enhancement on the contrast-enhanced study. The second case showed a target-like lesion with a peripheral dark signal rim on T2-weighted images accompanied by extensive haemorrhage in the adjacent frontal lobe and lateral ventricles. (orig.)

  16. Unusual cystic pancreatic neoplasms -image-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilendarov, A.; Simova, E.; Petrova, A.; Traikova, N.; Deenichin, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim is to present the variety of signs and symptoms from the diagnostic imaging methods of atypical neoplasms of the pancreas, presented as a type of cystic lesions. This often leads to unnecessary surgery or inappropriate tracking. In 115 patients (85 men and 30 women) with cystic lesions of the pancreas ultrasonic (US),computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and verified through histological and macroscopic pathology preparations. The ultrasound machines equipped with linear and convex transducers, MDCT and MRI imaging systems were used. In 14 of 115 patients atypical neoplasms of the pancreas were diagnosed: two cases with macroscopic serous cystic neoplasms, two nonmucinous cystic neoplasms, two hemorrhagic mucinous neoplasms, two ductal adenocarcinomas with cystic changes, one islet cell cystic tumor, two lymphoepithetial cysts, one lymphangioma, one solid papillary epithelial neoplasm and one mucinous adenocarcinoma. The authors take into consideration and overlapping of clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. Although much of the imaging features and morphological characteristics of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are well known, should be known about the atypical unusual images in so-called 'typical' cystic neoplasms, cystic images in solid neoplasms and various atypical tumors with cystic lesions. (authors)

  17. Meningioangiomatosis: advanced imaging and pathological study of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Anson, B.; Munoz, A.; Blasco, A.; Madero, S.; Esparza, J.; Cordobes, F.; Orejon, G.; Mateos, F.

    1995-01-01

    Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare benign intracranial tumour of uncertain pathogenesis, with only 33 cases reported in the literature. Imaging features have been described in 21 cases, only 3 with contrast-enhanced MRI. We present two cases of MA with MRI and/or CT findings and gross, ultra-structural, and immunohistochemical characteristics. MRI is particularly helpful for establishing the origin of the lesion and its anatomical location, while CT shows calcification, if present. The pathological characteristics establish the diagnosis and underline the differences from other entities such as malignant meningioma, one of the most important differential diagnostic considerations. (orig.)

  18. Meningioangiomatosis: advanced imaging and pathological study of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Anson, B [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Radiodiagnostica (Neurorradiologia Infantil); Munoz, A [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Radiodiagnostica (Neurorradiologia Infantil); Blasco, A [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Seccion de Neuropatologia; Madero, S [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Seccion de Neuropatologia; Esparza, J [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Neurocirugia Pediatrica; Cordobes, F [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Neurocirugia Pediatrica; Orejon, G [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Neurologia; Mateos, F [Hospital Universitario ` ` Doce de Octubre` ` , Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Neurologia

    1995-02-01

    Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare benign intracranial tumour of uncertain pathogenesis, with only 33 cases reported in the literature. Imaging features have been described in 21 cases, only 3 with contrast-enhanced MRI. We present two cases of MA with MRI and/or CT findings and gross, ultra-structural, and immunohistochemical characteristics. MRI is particularly helpful for establishing the origin of the lesion and its anatomical location, while CT shows calcification, if present. The pathological characteristics establish the diagnosis and underline the differences from other entities such as malignant meningioma, one of the most important differential diagnostic considerations. (orig.)

  19. Mapping stain distribution in pathology slides using whole slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI offers a novel approach to digitize and review pathology slides, but the voluminous data generated by this technology demand new computational methods for image analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report a method that recognizes stains in WSI data and uses kernel density estimator to calculate the stain density across the digitized pathology slides. The validation study was conducted using a rat model of acute cardiac allograft rejection and another rat model of heart ischemia/reperfusion injury. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was conducted to label ED1 + macrophages in the tissue sections and the stained slides were digitized by a whole slide scanner. The whole slide images were tessellated to enable parallel processing. Pixel-wise stain classification was conducted to classify the IHC stains from those of the background and the density distribution of the identified IHC stains was then calculated by the kernel density estimator. Results: The regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient of 0.8961 between the number of IHC stains counted by our stain recognition algorithm and that by the manual counting, suggesting that our stain recognition algorithm was in good agreement with the manual counting. The density distribution of the IHC stains showed a consistent pattern with those of the cellular magnetic resonance (MR images that detected macrophages labeled by ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide or micron-sized iron-oxide particles. Conclusions: Our method provides a new imaging modality to facilitate clinical diagnosis. It also provides a way to validate/correlate cellular MRI data used for tracking immune-cell infiltration in cardiac transplant rejection and cardiac ischemic injury.

  20. Acute Severe Aortic Regurgitation: Imaging with Pathological Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Rajesh; Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid

    2016-03-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) is an important finding associated with a wide variety of disease processes. Its timely diagnosis is of utmost importance. Delay in diagnosis could prove fatal. We describe a case of acute severe AR that was timely diagnosed using real time three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiogram (3D TEE). Not only did it diagnose but also the images obtained by 3D TEE clearly matched with the pathologic specimen. Using this sophisticated imaging modality that is mostly available at the tertiary centers helped in the timely diagnosis, which lead to the optimal management saving his life. Echocardiography and especially 3D TEE can diagnose AR very accurately. Surgical intervention is the definitive treatment but medical therapy is utilized to stabilize the patient initially.

  1. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathfinder: multiresolution region-based searching of pathology images using IRM.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J. Z.

    2000-01-01

    The fast growth of digitized pathology slides has created great challenges in research on image database retrieval. The prevalent retrieval technique involves human-supplied text annotations to describe slide contents. These pathology images typically have very high resolution, making it difficult to search based on image content. In this paper, we present Pathfinder, an efficient multiresolution region-based searching system for high-resolution pathology image libraries. The system uses wave...

  3. Correlation of Imaging Findings with Pathologic Findings of Sclerosing Adenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Bae; Shu, Kwang Sun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mammographic and sonographic findings of pure sclerosing adenosis. We retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic findings in 40 cases of pure sclerosing adenosis confirmed by core needle biopsy (n = 23), vacuum-assisted biopsy (n = 7), excision biopsy (n = 9), and lumpectomy (n = 1) from January 2002 to March 2010. All imaging findings were analyzed according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS). Radiologic features were correlated with pathologic findings. Although most mammograms showed negative findings (57%), calcification was the most common abnormal finding of sclerosing adenosis. On sonography, the most common finding was a circumscribed oval hypoechoic mass without posterior features (78%). Most masses showed BI-RADS category 3, (75%, 27/36). Five cases showed categories 4 or 5 (14%, 5/36). Most mammographic and sonographic findings of sclerosing adenosis are non-specific and non-pathognomonic, even though sometimes sclerosing adenosis can be radiologically or histopathologically confused with malignancy

  4. Using the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT) in Long-Term Care: An Update on Psychometrics and Scoring Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerly, Susan; Heggestad, Eric D; Myers, Haley; Yap, Tracey L

    2015-07-29

    An effective workforce performing within the context of a positive cultural environment is central to a healthcare organization's ability to achieve quality outcomes. The Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT) provides nurses with a valid and reliable tool that captures the general aspects of nursing culture. This study extends earlier work confirming the tool's construct validity and dimensionality by standardizing the scoring approach and establishing norm-referenced scoring. Scoring standardization provides a reliable point of comparison for NCAT users. NCAT assessments support nursing's ability to evaluate nursing culture, use results to shape the culture into one that supports change, and advance nursing's best practices and care outcomes. Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants from 54 long-term care facilities in Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, and Oregon were surveyed. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded six first order factors forming the NCAT's subscales (Expectations, Behaviors, Teamwork, Communication, Satisfaction, Commitment) (Comparative Fit Index 0.93) and a second order factor-The Total Culture Score. Aggregated facility level comparisons of observed group variance with expected random variance using rwg(J) statistics is presented. Normative scores and cumulative rank percentages and how the NCAT can be used in implementing planned change are provided.

  5. Epithelioid sarcoma: clinical, MR imaging and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.L.; Kaste, S.; Jenkins, J.J.; Hewan-Lowe, K.; Spence, J.V.; Gupta, M.; Monson, D.; Fletcher, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To report and describe the MR imaging features of eight new cases of this rare soft tissue sarcoma and correlate them with the clinical and histologic findings.Design and patients. Retrospective analysis was carried out for the MR imaging characteristics and histologic findings of eight patients with pathologically proven epithelioid sarcoma and the literature was reviewed. Findings were correlated in each case with the patient's clinical presentation and eventual outcome.Results. The patients, whose primary tumors ranged from 2.5 cm to 19 cm in maximum dimension, were 1 to 90 years of age. Tumors involved the extremities (n=5), the scalp (n=2) and the paraspinal muscles (n=1). Five tumors presented as well-defined, frequently painful, deeply situated masses and three as subcutaneous nodules or cutaneous ulcers with no palpable mass. Four patients had associated regional lymphadenopathy and one had distant metastases at diagnosis. MR imaging showed tumor infiltration of adjacent tissues in seven patients. Signal characteristics reflected varying degrees of cellularity, and the presence of necrosis, hemorrhage, fibrosis, hyalinization and inflammation. Bone marrow involvement was demonstrated in one patient. Clinical outcomes were generally poor.Conclusions. Epithelioid sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with a varied clinical presentation, growth pattern, MR signal characteristics and histologic picture. The tumor favors the distal extremities and is commonly infiltrative and accompanied by enlarged regional lymph nodes. This neoplasm may present as an intramuscular mass but should also be suspected in patients with ulcerating cutaneous nodules with or without regional lymphadenopathy. (orig.)

  6. In Vivo Imaging of Tau Pathology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Textural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Colgan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-invasive characterization of the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD could enhance patient management and the development of therapeutic strategies. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis (MRTA has been used previously to extract texture descriptors from structural clinical scans in AD to determine cerebral tissue heterogeneity. In this study, we examined the potential of MRTA to specifically identify tau pathology in an AD mouse model and compared the MRTA metrics to histological measures of tau burden.Methods: MRTA was applied to T2 weighted high-resolution MR images of nine 8.5-month-old rTg4510 tau pathology (TG mice and 16 litter matched wild-type (WT mice. MRTA comprised of the filtration-histogram technique, where the filtration step extracted and enhanced features of different sizes (fine, medium, and coarse texture scales, followed by quantification of texture using histogram analysis (mean gray level intensity, mean intensity, entropy, uniformity, skewness, standard-deviation, and kurtosis. MRTA was applied to manually segmented regions of interest (ROI drawn within the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus regions and the level of tau burden was assessed in equivalent regions using histology.Results: Texture parameters were markedly different between WT and TG in the cortex (E, p < 0.01, K, p < 0.01, the hippocampus (K, p < 0.05 and in the thalamus (K, p < 0.01. In addition, we observed significant correlations between histological measurements of tau burden and kurtosis in the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus.Conclusions: MRTA successfully differentiated WT and TG in brain regions with varying degrees of tau pathology (cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus based on T2 weighted MR images. Furthermore, the kurtosis measurement correlated with histological measures of tau burden. This initial study indicates that MRTA may have a role in the early diagnosis of AD and the assessment of tau pathology using

  7. Imaging characteristics of hepatocellular adenoma compared with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Zhao Xinming; Ouyang Han; Huang Wenting; Zhou Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    -intense signal on the T 1 WI and hyper-intense signal on the T 2 WI with fat suppression sequences. There were 3 patients with an atypical adenoma type. One patient appeared uniform hypo-density on the non-enhanced CT and hyper-density on the hepatic arterial-dominant phase and became iso-dense on the portal venous phase. On the delay phase, it was slightly hyper-dense. Two out of the three lesions showed isointense and one hypo-intense signal on the in-phase T 1 WI, and hypo-intense, hyper-intense, and iso-intense signal on the T 2 WI with fat suppression sequences,respectively. Two patients examined on all phases of post-contrast MRI scans. The result was similar to the CT findings. Conclusion: The imaging features of hepatocellular adenoma are closely associated with pathological characteristics. (authors)

  8. Imaging-pathologic correlation of multi-step hepatocarcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, O.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Approximately 80% of Japanese HCC cases are derived from HCV-associated liver cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis, and the remaining less than 20% of patients are HBV positive. Because of the introduction of this surveillance system by periodic ultrasound in these high-risk patients, the size of HCCs firstly detected during 2004 to 2005 (n=16809) was less than 2cm in 35% of all cases, 2.1-5.0 cm 48%, respectively. However, various types of hepatocellular nodules such as dysplastic nodule are also detected during screening procedures. Pathologically, human HCC often develops in a multistep fashion from dysplastic nodule to classic hyper vascular HCC. Therefore, for the early diagnosis of HCC, understanding of the sequential changes of imaging findings in accordance with multi-step hepatocarcinogenseis is important. In addition, to understand the imaging features of various types of HCC is also important for the precise characterization of HCCs. (1) Classification of hepatocellular nodules during multistep hepatocarcinogenesis; According to International Consensus Group for Hepatocellular Neoplasia, these nodules are divided into large regenerative nodule, low grade dysplastic nodule (L-DN), high-grade dysplastic nodule (H-DN), and HCC. In addition, small HCC (less than 2 cm) is divided into early HCC and progressed HCC. Early HCC has a vaguely nodular appearance and is highly well differentiated. (2) Imaging of multistep hepatocarcinogenesis; We revealed that the intranodular blood supply changes in accordance with the progression of human hepatocarcinogenesis from dyspalstic nodule to overt HCC. The intranodular portal supply relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma evaluated by CT during arterial portography (CTAP) is decreased, whereas the intranodular arterial supply evaluated by CT during hepatic arteriography (CTHA) revealed is first decreased during the early stage of hepatocarcinogenesis and then increased in parallel with increasing grade of

  9. Fat suppression applied to MR imaging of the pathologic orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.H.; Kido, D.K.; Ekholm, S.E.; Totterman, S.; Szumowski, J.; Manzione, J.V. Jr.; Joy, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Previous MR studies of the normal orbit have shown that fat suppression sequences applied at the proper T1-T2 weighting will decrease artifacts from chemical shift, and can be used to enhance contrast in selected anatomic regions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical application of fat suppression to studies of the pathologic orbit. The studies included conventional imaging sequences and comparative fat suppression sequences through a range of T1-T2 weighting (repetition time [TR] 400 msec, echo time [TE]20 msec, to TR 2,000 msec, TE 90 msec), using the chopper fat suppression technique developed by J. Szumowski and D. Plewes, which requires no postprocessing and no increased scan time to achieve relatively linear fat suppression. Fat suppression was advantageous in determining tumor margins (extension through sclera); increasing diagnostic specificity (fat vs. water content); detailing anatomic relationships along bony margins (particularly in the orbital apex); and for demonstrating true thickness of optic nerve separate from adjacent cerebrospinal fluid and fibrous sheath. Disadvantages included susceptibility to motion artifact and a perception of lower quality due to lower overall orbital signal

  10. Evaluating imaging-pathology concordance and discordance after ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided breast biopsy has become the main method for diagnosing breast pathology, and it has a high diagnostic accuracy, approaching that of open surgical biopsy. However, methods for confirming adequate lesion retrieval after US-guided biopsy are relatively limited and false-negative results are unavoidable. Determining imaging-pathology concordance after US-guided biopsy is essential for validating the biopsy result and providing appropriate management. In this review article, we briefly present the results of US-guided breast biopsy; describe general aspects to consider when establishing imaging-pathology concordance; and review the various categories of imaging-pathology correlations and corresponding management strategies. PMID:29169231

  11. Digital image analysis in breast pathology-from image processing techniques to artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Stephanie; Azizpour, Hossein; Smith, Kevin; Hartman, Johan

    2018-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women worldwide. In recent decades, earlier diagnosis and better adjuvant therapy have substantially improved patient outcome. Diagnosis by histopathology has proven to be instrumental to guide breast cancer treatment, but new challenges have emerged as our increasing understanding of cancer over the years has revealed its complex nature. As patient demand for personalized breast cancer therapy grows, we face an urgent need for more precise biomarker assessment and more accurate histopathologic breast cancer diagnosis to make better therapy decisions. The digitization of pathology data has opened the door to faster, more reproducible, and more precise diagnoses through computerized image analysis. Software to assist diagnostic breast pathology through image processing techniques have been around for years. But recent breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI) promise to fundamentally change the way we detect and treat breast cancer in the near future. Machine learning, a subfield of AI that applies statistical methods to learn from data, has seen an explosion of interest in recent years because of its ability to recognize patterns in data with less need for human instruction. One technique in particular, known as deep learning, has produced groundbreaking results in many important problems including image classification and speech recognition. In this review, we will cover the use of AI and deep learning in diagnostic breast pathology, and other recent developments in digital image analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Whole slide images and digital media in pathology education, testing, and practice: the Oklahoma experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kar-Ming; Hassell, Lewis A; Talbert, Michael L; Wiechmann, Allan F; Chaser, Brad E; Ramey, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Examination of glass slides is of paramount importance in pathology training. Until the introduction of digitized whole slide images that could be accessed through computer networks, the sharing of pathology slides was a major logistic issue in pathology education and practice. With the help of whole slide images, our department has developed several online pathology education websites. Based on a modular architecture, this program provides online access to whole slide images, still images, case studies, quizzes and didactic text at different levels. Together with traditional lectures and hands-on experiences, it forms the back bone of our histology and pathology education system for residents and medical students. The use of digitized whole slide images has a.lso greatly improved the communication between clinicians and pathologist in our institute.

  13. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  14. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging of the eyeball : anatomy and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Ho Kyu; Yoon, Young Hee; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    The eyeball can be divided into the anterior and posterior compartment bordering on the lens. The ocular wall is composed of three layers, namely the sclera, choroid and retina. Different pathologic conditions can occur, depending on the anatomic location. This paper illustrates the anatomical features of normal eyeball, as seen on MRI, and a variety of pathologic conditions of the compartments. An understanding of the MR features of various intraocular lesions is thus facilitated.

  16. MR imaging of the eyeball : anatomy and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Ho Kyu; Yoon, Young Hee; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    1999-01-01

    The eyeball can be divided into the anterior and posterior compartment bordering on the lens. The ocular wall is composed of three layers, namely the sclera, choroid and retina. Different pathologic conditions can occur, depending on the anatomic location. This paper illustrates the anatomical features of normal eyeball, as seen on MRI, and a variety of pathologic conditions of the compartments. An understanding of the MR features of various intraocular lesions is thus facilitated

  17. Using the Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT in Long-Term Care: An Update on Psychometrics and Scoring Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Kennerly

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An effective workforce performing within the context of a positive cultural environment is central to a healthcare organization’s ability to achieve quality outcomes. The Nursing Culture Assessment Tool (NCAT provides nurses with a valid and reliable tool that captures the general aspects of nursing culture. This study extends earlier work confirming the tool’s construct validity and dimensionality by standardizing the scoring approach and establishing norm-referenced scoring. Scoring standardization provides a reliable point of comparison for NCAT users. NCAT assessments support nursing’s ability to evaluate nursing culture, use results to shape the culture into one that supports change, and advance nursing’s best practices and care outcomes. Registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants from 54 long-term care facilities in Kentucky, Nevada, North Carolina, and Oregon were surveyed. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded six first order factors forming the NCAT’s subscales (Expectations, Behaviors, Teamwork, Communication, Satisfaction, Commitment (Comparative Fit Index 0.93 and a second order factor—The Total Culture Score. Aggregated facility level comparisons of observed group variance with expected random variance using rwg(J statistics is presented. Normative scores and cumulative rank percentages and how the NCAT can be used in implementing planned change are provided.

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cortical multiple sclerosis pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tardif, Christine L; Bedell, Barry J; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    2012-01-01

    pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic) MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from...

  19. High-speed image analysis reveals chaotic vibratory behaviors of pathological vocal folds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 (China); Shao Jun [Shanghai EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Krausert, Christopher R. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-7375 (United States); Zhang Sai [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 (China); Jiang, Jack J. [Shanghai EENT Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-7375 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Low-dimensional human glottal area data. Evidence of chaos in human laryngeal activity from high-speed digital imaging. Traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to aperiodic high speed image signals. Nonlinear dynamic analysis may be helpful for understanding disordered behaviors in pathological laryngeal systems. - Abstract: Laryngeal pathology is usually associated with irregular dynamics of laryngeal activity. High-speed imaging facilitates direct observation and measurement of vocal fold vibrations. However, chaotic dynamic characteristics of aperiodic high-speed image data have not yet been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we will apply nonlinear dynamic analysis and traditional perturbation methods to quantify high-speed image data from normal subjects and patients with various laryngeal pathologies including vocal fold nodules, polyps, bleeding, and polypoid degeneration. The results reveal the low-dimensional dynamic characteristics of human glottal area data. In comparison to periodic glottal area series from a normal subject, aperiodic glottal area series from pathological subjects show complex reconstructed phase space, fractal dimension, and positive Lyapunov exponents. The estimated positive Lyapunov exponents provide the direct evidence of chaos in pathological human vocal folds from high-speed digital imaging. Furthermore, significant differences between the normal and pathological groups are investigated for nonlinear dynamic and perturbation analyses. Jitter in the pathological group is significantly higher than in the normal group, but shimmer does not show such a difference. This finding suggests that the traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to high speed image signals. However, the correlation dimension and the maximal Lyapunov exponent reveal a statistically significant difference between normal and pathological groups. Nonlinear dynamic analysis is capable of

  20. High-speed image analysis reveals chaotic vibratory behaviors of pathological vocal folds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Shao Jun; Krausert, Christopher R.; Zhang Sai; Jiang, Jack J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Low-dimensional human glottal area data. → Evidence of chaos in human laryngeal activity from high-speed digital imaging. → Traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to aperiodic high speed image signals. → Nonlinear dynamic analysis may be helpful for understanding disordered behaviors in pathological laryngeal systems. - Abstract: Laryngeal pathology is usually associated with irregular dynamics of laryngeal activity. High-speed imaging facilitates direct observation and measurement of vocal fold vibrations. However, chaotic dynamic characteristics of aperiodic high-speed image data have not yet been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we will apply nonlinear dynamic analysis and traditional perturbation methods to quantify high-speed image data from normal subjects and patients with various laryngeal pathologies including vocal fold nodules, polyps, bleeding, and polypoid degeneration. The results reveal the low-dimensional dynamic characteristics of human glottal area data. In comparison to periodic glottal area series from a normal subject, aperiodic glottal area series from pathological subjects show complex reconstructed phase space, fractal dimension, and positive Lyapunov exponents. The estimated positive Lyapunov exponents provide the direct evidence of chaos in pathological human vocal folds from high-speed digital imaging. Furthermore, significant differences between the normal and pathological groups are investigated for nonlinear dynamic and perturbation analyses. Jitter in the pathological group is significantly higher than in the normal group, but shimmer does not show such a difference. This finding suggests that the traditional perturbation analysis should be cautiously applied to high speed image signals. However, the correlation dimension and the maximal Lyapunov exponent reveal a statistically significant difference between normal and pathological groups. Nonlinear dynamic

  1. Emerging Themes in Image Informatics and Molecular Analysis for Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-07-11

    Pathology is essential for research in disease and development, as well as for clinical decision making. For more than 100 years, pathology practice has involved analyzing images of stained, thin tissue sections by a trained human using an optical microscope. Technological advances are now driving major changes in this paradigm toward digital pathology (DP). The digital transformation of pathology goes beyond recording, archiving, and retrieving images, providing new computational tools to inform better decision making for precision medicine. First, we discuss some emerging innovations in both computational image analytics and imaging instrumentation in DP. Second, we discuss molecular contrast in pathology. Molecular DP has traditionally been an extension of pathology with molecularly specific dyes. Label-free, spectroscopic images are rapidly emerging as another important information source, and we describe the benefits and potential of this evolution. Third, we describe multimodal DP, which is enabled by computational algorithms and combines the best characteristics of structural and molecular pathology. Finally, we provide examples of application areas in telepathology, education, and precision medicine. We conclude by discussing challenges and emerging opportunities in this area.

  2. Whole Slide Images for primary diagnostics in pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Janabi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Whole slide imaging is the process of digitizing glass slides resulting in the creation of Whole Slide Images (WSI). WSI are usually explored with the aid of an image viewer in a manner that closely simulates examining glass slides with a conventional microscope, permitting the manipulation of an

  3. 11C-Choline PET/pathology image coregistration in primary localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Prokic, Vesna; Weirich, Gregor; Wendl, Christina; Geinitz, Hans; Molls, Michael; Kirste, Simon; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Treiber, Uwe; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Krause, Bernd Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the comparison of pathology specimens after prostatectomy (post-S) with PET images obtained before surgery (pre-S). This method was used to evaluate the merit of 11 C-choline PET/CT for delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in prostate cancer (PC). In 28 PC patients, 11 C-choline PET/CT was performed before surgery. PET/CT data were coregistered with the pathology specimens. GTV on PET images (GTV-PET) was outlined automatically and corrected manually. Tumour volume in the prostate (TVP) was delineated manually on the pathology specimens. Based on the coregistered PET/pathology images, the following parameters were assessed: SUVmax and SUVmean in the tumoral and nontumoral prostate (NP), GTV-PET (millilitres) and TVP (millilitres). PET/pathology image coregistration was satisfactory. Mean SUVmax in the TVP was lower than in the NP: 5.0 and 5.5, respectively (p = 0.093). Considering the entire prostate, SUVmax was located in the TVP in two patients, in the TVP and NP in 12 patients and exclusively in NP in 14 patients. Partial overlap the TVP and GTV-PET was seen in 71 % of patients, and complete overlap in 4 %. PET/pathology image coregistration can be used for evaluation of different imaging modalities. 11 C-Choline PET failed to distinguish tumour from nontumour tissue. (orig.)

  4. Multi-scale learning based segmentation of glands in digital colonrectal pathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Liu, William; Arjun, Shipra; Zhu, Liangjia; Ratner, Vadim; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-02-01

    Digital histopathological images provide detailed spatial information of the tissue at micrometer resolution. Among the available contents in the pathology images, meso-scale information, such as the gland morphology, texture, and distribution, are useful diagnostic features. In this work, focusing on the colon-rectal cancer tissue samples, we propose a multi-scale learning based segmentation scheme for the glands in the colon-rectal digital pathology slides. The algorithm learns the gland and non-gland textures from a set of training images in various scales through a sparse dictionary representation. After the learning step, the dictionaries are used collectively to perform the classification and segmentation for the new image.

  5. The apport of functional cerebral imaging in the psychiatric pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maktouf, Ch.; Kotzki, P.O.; Humbert, Th.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in medical brain imaging using structural and functional brain imaging techniques have contributed to the investigation of the living human brain. These new techniques hold great promise for the evaluation and understanding mental disorders. We report the position emission tomography (PET) and the more widely available single emission photon (SPECT) studies, as functional brain imaging, to assess regional cerebral metabolism and blood flow in psychiatric illness. (author)

  6. MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone: correlation with surgical and pathologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Kyung Tai; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Heung Sik

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone and to correlate these with the surgical and pathologic findings. The MR images of 17 patients with medial foot pain and surgically proven type II accessory navicular abnormalities were reviewed. The changes of signal intensity in the accessory navicular, synchondrosis and adjacent soft tissue, the presence of synchondrosis widening, and posterior tibial tendon (PTT) pathology on the T1-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images were analyzed. The MR imaging findings were compared with the surgical and pathologic findings. The fat-suppressed T2-weighted images showed high signal intensity in the accessory navicular bones and synchondroses in all patients, and in the soft tissue in 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients, as well as synchondrosis widening in 3 (17.6%) of the 17 patients. The MR images showed tendon pathology in 12 (75%) of the 16 patients with PTT dysfunction at surgery. The pathologic findings of 16 surgical specimens included areas of osteonecrosis with granulomatous inflammation, fibrosis and destruction of the cartilage cap. The MR imaging findings of painful type II accessory navicular bone are a persistent edema pattern in the accessory navicular bone and within the synchondrosis, indicating osteonecrosis, inflammation and destruction of the cartilage cap. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction was clinically evident in most patients

  7. Integration of digital gross pathology images for enterprise-wide access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milon Amin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sharing digital pathology images for enterprise- wide use into a picture archiving and communication system (PACS is not yet widely adopted. We share our solution and 3-year experience of transmitting such images to an enterprise image server (EIS. Methods: Gross pathology images acquired by prosectors were integrated with clinical cases into the laboratory information system′s image management module, and stored in JPEG2000 format on a networked image server. Automated daily searches for cases with gross images were used to compile an ASCII text file that was forwarded to a separate institutional Enterprise Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM Wrapper (EDW server. Concurrently, an HL7-based image order for these cases was generated, containing the locations of images and patient data, and forwarded to the EDW, which combined data in these locations to generate images with patient data, as required by DICOM standards. The image and data were then "wrapped" according to DICOM standards, transferred to the PACS servers, and made accessible on an institution-wide basis. Results: In total, 26,966 gross images from 9,733 cases were transmitted over the 3-year period from the laboratory information system to the EIS. The average process time for cases with successful automatic uploads (n=9,688 to the EIS was 98 seconds. Only 45 cases (0.5% failed requiring manual intervention. Uploaded images were immediately available to institution- wide PACS users. Since inception, user feedback has been positive. Conclusions: Enterprise- wide PACS- based sharing of pathology images is feasible, provides useful services to clinical staff, and utilizes existing information system and telecommunications infrastructure. PACS-shared pathology images, however, require a "DICOM wrapper" for multisystem compatibility.

  8. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  9. Image analysis and machine learning in digital pathology: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabhushi, Anant; Lee, George

    2016-10-01

    With the rise in whole slide scanner technology, large numbers of tissue slides are being scanned and represented and archived digitally. While digital pathology has substantial implications for telepathology, second opinions, and education there are also huge research opportunities in image computing with this new source of "big data". It is well known that there is fundamental prognostic data embedded in pathology images. The ability to mine "sub-visual" image features from digital pathology slide images, features that may not be visually discernible by a pathologist, offers the opportunity for better quantitative modeling of disease appearance and hence possibly improved prediction of disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. However the compelling opportunities in precision medicine offered by big digital pathology data come with their own set of computational challenges. Image analysis and computer assisted detection and diagnosis tools previously developed in the context of radiographic images are woefully inadequate to deal with the data density in high resolution digitized whole slide images. Additionally there has been recent substantial interest in combining and fusing radiologic imaging and proteomics and genomics based measurements with features extracted from digital pathology images for better prognostic prediction of disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. Again there is a paucity of powerful tools for combining disease specific features that manifest across multiple different length scales. The purpose of this review is to discuss developments in computational image analysis tools for predictive modeling of digital pathology images from a detection, segmentation, feature extraction, and tissue classification perspective. We discuss the emergence of new handcrafted feature approaches for improved predictive modeling of tissue appearance and also review the emergence of deep learning schemes for both object detection and tissue classification

  10. Pathological diagnosis of bladder cancer by image analysis of hypericin induced fluorescence cystoscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, James C. Y.; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma based on hypericin fluorescence cystoscopy has shown to have a higher degree of sensitivity for the detection of flat bladder carcinoma compared to white light cystoscopy. The potential of the photosensitizer hypericin-induced fluorescence in performing non-invasive optical biopsy to grade bladder cancer in vivo using fluorescence cystoscopic image analysis without surgical resection for tissue biopsy is investigated in this study. The correlation between tissue fluorescence and histopathology of diseased tissue was explored and a diagnostic algorithm based on fluorescence image analysis was developed to classify the bladder cancer without surgical resection for tissue biopsy. Preliminary results suggest a correlation between tissue fluorescence and bladder cancer grade. By combining both the red-to-blue and red-to-green intensity ratios into a 2D scatter plot yields an average sensitivity and specificity of around 70% and 85% respectively for pathological cancer grading of the three different grades of bladder cancer. Therefore, the diagnostic algorithm based on colorimetric intensity ratio analysis of hypericin fluorescence cystoscopic images developed in this preliminary study shows promising potential to optically diagnose and grade bladder cancer in vivo.

  11. Digital transplantation pathology: combining whole slide imaging, multiplex staining and automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isse, K; Lesniak, A; Grama, K; Roysam, B; Minervini, M I; Demetris, A J

    2012-01-01

    Conventional histopathology is the gold standard for allograft monitoring, but its value proposition is increasingly questioned. "-Omics" analysis of tissues, peripheral blood and fluids and targeted serologic studies provide mechanistic insights into allograft injury not currently provided by conventional histology. Microscopic biopsy analysis, however, provides valuable and unique information: (a) spatial-temporal relationships; (b) rare events/cells; (c) complex structural context; and (d) integration into a "systems" model. Nevertheless, except for immunostaining, no transformative advancements have "modernized" routine microscopy in over 100 years. Pathologists now team with hardware and software engineers to exploit remarkable developments in digital imaging, nanoparticle multiplex staining, and computational image analysis software to bridge the traditional histology-global "-omic" analyses gap. Included are side-by-side comparisons, objective biopsy finding quantification, multiplexing, automated image analysis, and electronic data and resource sharing. Current utilization for teaching, quality assurance, conferencing, consultations, research and clinical trials is evolving toward implementation for low-volume, high-complexity clinical services like transplantation pathology. Cost, complexities of implementation, fluid/evolving standards, and unsettled medical/legal and regulatory issues remain as challenges. Regardless, challenges will be overcome and these technologies will enable transplant pathologists to increase information extraction from tissue specimens and contribute to cross-platform biomarker discovery for improved outcomes. ©Copyright 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for extramammary Paget's disease: radiological and pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaike, Gensuke; Nozaki, Taiki; Matsusako, Masaki; Saida, Yukihisa; Matsui, Mizuko; Ohtake, Naoyuki; Eto, Hikaru; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous neoplasm that is thought to represent intraepithelial adenocarcinoma developing in an area rich in apocrine glands. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for this disease are not well established. We report three cases of pathologically confirmed EMPD in which MRI was performed before surgery. The lesions were widespread in the epidermis and the dermis. Lesions were sharply well enhanced on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and appeared hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging in all cases. Areas with enhancement in depth corresponded well with the pathological lesion. In addition, different malignant legions were found on the same images from MRI in two cases, indicating potential associations with other malignancies. We describe the MRI findings and their pathological correlation. MRI could be useful for preoperative evaluation of disease spread and detection of associated malignancies. (orig.)

  13. The four-dimensional non-uniform rational B-splines-based cardiac-torso phantom and its application in medical imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chongguo; Wu Dake; Lang Jinyi

    2008-01-01

    Simulation skill is playing an increasingly important role in medical imaging research. four-dimensional non-uniform rational B-splines-based cardiac-torso (4D NCAT) phantom is new tool for meoical imaging res catch and when combined with accurate models for the imaging process a wealth of realistic imaging data from subjects of various anatomies. Can be provided 4D NCAT phantoms have bend widely used in medical research such as SPECT, PET, CT and so on. 4D NCAT phantoms have also been used in inverse planning system of intensity modulated radiation therapy. (authors)

  14. Imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canjau, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Topala, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 90% of oral cancer. Early detection is a cornerstone to improve survival. Interaction of light with tissues may highlight changes in tissue structure and metabolism. We propose optical coherence tomography (OCT), as a non-invasive diagnosis method, being a new high-resolution optical technique that permits tri-dimensional (3-D), real-time imaging of near surface abnormalities in complex tissues. In this study half of the excisional biopsy was directed to the pathologist and the other half was assigned for OCT investigation. Histopathology validated the results. Areas of OSCC of the buccal mucosa were identified in the OCT images. The elements obserced included extensive epithelial down-growth, the disruption of the basement membrane, with areas of erosion, an epithelial layer that was highly variable in thickness and invasion into the sub-epithelial layers. Therefore, OCT appears to be a highly promising imaging modality.

  15. Role of targeted magnetic resonance imaging sequences in the surgical management of anterior skull base pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, S; Bowman, J; Gandhi, M; Panizza, B

    2017-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex anatomical region that provides passage for important nerves and vessels as they course into and out of the cranial cavity. Key to the management of pathology in this region is a thorough understanding of the anatomy, with its variations, and the relationship of various neurovascular structures to the pathology in question. Targeted high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging on high field strength magnets can enable the skull base surgeon to understand this intricate relationship and deal with the pathology from a position of relative advantage. With the help of case studies, this paper illustrates the application of specialised magnetic resonance techniques to study pathology of the orbital apex in particular. The fine anatomical detail provided gives surgeons the ability to design an endonasal endoscopic procedure appropriate to the anatomy of the pathology.

  16. Periosteal anomaly in osteosarcoma: the imaging findings and its pathological basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingming; Meng Quanfei; Jiang Bo; Ma Ling; Lai Yingrong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the types and imaging features of periosteal anomaly in osteosmcoma. Further to seek the feature of genesis and advancement of periosteal anomaly and its clinical significance. Methods: One hundred and twenty-eight patients with osteosarcoma were enrolled in this study, which consisted of 76 males and 52 females aging from 5 to 66 years old with an average of 19 years. Both x-ray plain film and MR images were obtained in all patients, and DWI were done in 23 patients. CT scanning was conducted in 48 patients, which included post-contrast scanning done in 36. The pathological gross specimen, macrosection and point-to-point microsection were obtained in each of 14 cases to correlate the imaging findings of periosteal anomaly to the pathological outcome. Results: The imaging and pathological finding: (1) Periosteodema, occurring in 96 patients. The sign was merely demonstratable on MR image and presented as loosened periosteal structure with no tumoral infiltration pathologically. (2) Periosteal lift and thickening, demonstratable on both CT and MR image, including 13 noted on CT and 42 on MR image. Pathologically, non-tumoral infiltration was noted in the thickened periosteum. (3) Periosteal destruction, occurring in 48 patients. Periosteal destruction was merely demonstratable on MR image and presented as localized or generalized tumoral infiltration of the periosteum. (4) Linear periosteal neo-bone formation, demonstrated in 42 cases on plain films, 13 cases on CT and 22 on MR images, respectively. The linear periosteal neo-bone formation was pathologically regularly arranged periosteal neo-bone. (5) Laminar periosteal neo-bone fomation, demonstrated in 21 cases on plain films, 6 cases on CT and 21 on MR images, respectively. Pathologically, it appeared as multi-layer arrangement. (6) Radiated and spiculate periosteal neo-bone formation, demonstrated in 13 cases on plain films, 7 cases on CT and 14 on MR images, respectively. On both plain

  17. The right atrium: gateway to the heart--anatomic and pathologic imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sachin B; Kwan, Damon; Shah, Amar B; Hsu, Joe Y

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of right atrial anatomic and pathologic imaging findings and associated clinical symptoms is important to avoid false-positive diagnoses and missed findings. Complete evaluation of the heart often requires a multimodality approach that includes radiography, echocardiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and invasive angiography. In general, CT provides the highest spatial resolution of these modalities at the cost of radiation exposure to the patient. Echocardiography and MR imaging offer complementary and detailed information for functional evaluation without added radiation exposure. The advantages and disadvantages of each modality for the evaluation of right atrial anatomic structure, size, and pathologic findings are discussed. Cardiac MR imaging is the reference standard for evaluation of right atrial size and volume but often is too time consuming and resource intensive to perform in routine clinical practice. Therefore, established reference ranges for two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography are often used. Right atrial pathologic findings can be broadly categorized into (a) congenital anomalies (cor triatriatum dexter, Ebstein anomaly, and aneurysm), (b) disorders of volume (tricuspid regurgitation, pathologic mimics such as a pseudoaneurysm, and atrial septal defect), (c) disorders of pressure (tricuspid stenosis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and constrictive pericarditis), and (d) masses (pseudomasses, thrombus, lipomatous hypertrophy of the interatrial septum, lipoma, myxoma, sarcoma, and metastatic disease). Familiarity with each pathologic entity and its treatment options is essential to ensure that appropriate imaging modalities are selected. Online supplemental material is available for this article. RSNA, 2015

  18. Comparison of Macroscopic Pathology Measurements With Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Assessment of Microscopic Pathology Extension for Colorectal Liver Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Verheij, Joanne; Dwarkasing, Roy S.; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Redekop, William K.; Zondervan, Pieter E.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Ijzermans, Jan N.M.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare pathology macroscopic tumor dimensions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements and to establish the microscopic tumor extension of colorectal liver metastases. Methods and Materials: In a prospective pilot study we included patients with colorectal liver metastases planned for surgery and eligible for MRI. A liver MRI was performed within 48 hours before surgery. Directly after surgery, an MRI of the specimen was acquired to measure the degree of tumor shrinkage. The specimen was fixed in formalin for 48 hours, and another MRI was performed to assess the specimen/tumor shrinkage. All MRI sequences were imported into our radiotherapy treatment planning system, where the tumor and the specimen were delineated. For the macroscopic pathology analyses, photographs of the sliced specimens were used to delineate and reconstruct the tumor and the specimen volumes. Microscopic pathology analyses were conducted to assess the infiltration depth of tumor cell nests. Results: Between February 2009 and January 2010 we included 13 patients for analysis with 21 colorectal liver metastases. Specimen and tumor shrinkage after resection and fixation was negligible. The best tumor volume correlations between MRI and pathology were found for T1-weighted (w) echo gradient sequence (r s = 0.99, slope = 1.06), and the T2-w fast spin echo (FSE) single-shot sequence (r s = 0.99, slope = 1.08), followed by the T2-w FSE fat saturation sequence (r s = 0.99, slope = 1.23), and the T1-w gadolinium-enhanced sequence (r s = 0.98, slope = 1.24). We observed 39 tumor cell nests beyond the tumor border in 12 metastases. Microscopic extension was found between 0.2 and 10 mm from the main tumor, with 90% of the cases within 6 mm. Conclusions: MRI tumor dimensions showed a good agreement with the macroscopic pathology suggesting that MRI can be used for accurate tumor delineation. However, microscopic extensions found beyond the tumor border indicate that caution is needed

  19. Limitations in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathologies with fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Steen, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    To describe the limitations of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathology. Retrospective, single-center case series of 40 patients with conjunctival and cornea pathology. Fourier-domain OCT imaged laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flaps in detail, including its relation to other corneal structures and abnormalities. Similarly, in infectious or degenerative corneal disorders, Fourier-domain OCT successfully showed the extent of infiltration or material deposition, which appeared as hyper-reflective areas. In cases with pterygium, the underlying cornea could not be imaged. All cases of common conjunctival pathologies, such as nevus or pinguecula, were successfully imaged in detail. Nevi, scleritis, pterygium, pinguecula, and subconjunctival hemorrhage were hyper-reflective lesions, while cysts and lymphangiectasia were hyporeflective. The details of the underlying sclera were not uniformly imaged in conjunctival pathologies. Fourier-domain OCT imaged the trabeculectomy bleb in detail, whereas the details of structures of the anterior chamber angle were not routinely visualized in all cases. Light scatter through vascularized, densely inflamed, or thick lesions limits the imaging capabilities of Fourier-domain anterior segment OCT.

  20. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    OpenAIRE

    Serhat Avcu; Ersan Altun; Ihsan Akpinar; Mehmet Deniz Bulut; Kemal Eresov; Tugrul Biren

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to exam...

  1. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma: associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings.

    OpenAIRE

    Yabuki, Takayuki; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsushima, Tomoyasu; Shirasaki, Yoshinori; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions) were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics ...

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Yan, Fuhua, E-mail: zemylife@163.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ{sup 2} = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up.

  3. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming; Yan, Fuhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ 2 = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up

  4. Quantitative assessment of videolaryngostroboscopic images in patients with glottic pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebudek-Bogusz, Ewa; Kopczynski, Bartosz; Strumillo, Pawel; Morawska, Joanna; Wiktorowicz, Justyna; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2017-07-01

    Digital imaging techniques enable exploration of novel visualization modalities of the vocal folds during phonation and definition of parameters, facilitating more precise diagnosis of voice disorders. Application of computer vision algorithms for analysis of videolaryngostroboscopic (VLS) images aimed at qualitative and quantitative description of phonatory vibrations. VLS examinations were conducted for 45 females, including 15 subjects with vocal nodules, 15 subjects with glottal incompetence, and 15 normophonic females. The recorded VLS images were preprocessed, the glottis area was segmented out, and the glottal cycles were identified. The glottovibrograms were built, and then the glottal area waveforms (GAW) were quantitatively described by computing the following parameters: open quotient (OQ), closing quotient (CQ), speed quotient (SQ), minimal relative glottal area (MRGA), and a new parameter termed closure difference index (CDI). Profiles of the glottal widths assessed along the glottal length differentiated the study groups (P diagnostics. Results of the performed ROC curve analysis suggest that the evaluated parameters can distinguish patients with voice disorders from normophonic subjects.

  5. Quantitative image variables reflect the intratumoral pathologic heterogeneity of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, E-Ryung; Lee, Ho Yun; Jeong, Ji Yun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Jhingook; Bae, Jungmin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-10-11

    We aimed to compare quantitative radiomic parameters from dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of lung adenocarcinoma and pathologic complexity.A total 89 tumors with clinical stage I/II lung adenocarcinoma were prospectively included. Fifty one radiomic features were assessed both from iodine images and non-contrast images of DECT datasets. Comprehensive histologic subtyping was evaluated with all surgically resected tumors. The degree of pathologic heterogeneity was assessed using pathologic index and the number of mixture histologic subtypes in a tumor. Radiomic parameters were correlated with pathologic index. Tumors were classified as three groups according to the number of mixture histologic subtypes and radiomic parameters were compared between the three groups.Tumor density and 50th through 97.5th percentile Hounsfield units (HU) of histogram on non-contrast images showed strong correlation with the pathologic heterogeneity. Radiomic parameters including 75th and 97.5th percentile HU of histogram, entropy, and inertia on 1-, 2- and 3 voxel distance on non-contrast images showed incremental changes while homogeneity showed detrimental change according to the number of mixture histologic subtypes (all Ps heterogeneity, which may help in the prediction of intratumoral heterogeneity of the whole tumor.

  6. Digital imaging and electronic patient records in pathology using an integrated department information system with PACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinski, Thomas; Hofmann, Harald; Franke, Dagmar-Sybilla; Roessner, Albert

    2002-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems have been widely used in radiology thus far. Owing to the progress made in digital photo technology, their use in medicine opens up further opportunities. In the field of pathology, digital imaging offers new possiblities for the documentation of macroscopic and microscopic findings. Digital imaging has the advantage that the data is permanently and readily available, independent of conventional archives. In the past, PACS was a separate entity. Meanwhile, however, PACS has been integrated in DIS, the department information system, which was also run separately in former times. The combination of these two systems makes the administration of patient data, findings and images easier. Moreover, thanks to the introduction of special communication standards, a data exchange between different department information systems and hospital information systems (HIS) is possible. This provides the basis for a communication platform in medicine, constituting an electronic patient record (EPR) that permits an interdisciplinary treatment of patients by providing data of findings and images from clinics treating the same patient. As the pathologic diagnosis represents a central and often therapy-determining component, it is of utmost importance to add pathologic diagnoses to the EPR. Furthermore, the pathologist's work is considerably facilitated when he is able to retrieve additional data from the patient file. In this article, we describe our experience gained with the combined PACS and DIS systems recently installed at the Department of Pathology, University of Magdeburg. Moreover, we evaluate the current situation and future prospects for PACS in pathology.

  7. Successful treatment of suspected organizing pneumonia in a patient without typical imaging and pathological characteristic: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailing, Liu; Ning, Xu; Tao, Qu; Aijun, Li

    2017-01-01

    Organizing pneumonia (OP) is a clinicopathological entity characterized by granulation tissue plugs in the lumen of small airways, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. Diagnosis of OP needs the combination of clinical features, imaging and pathology. But it occurs often that there are no typical pathological features to support the diagnosis, which poses a challenge for clinicians' diagnosis and treatment. We diagnosed a case of OP without typical imaging and pathological characteristic and treated successfully. Finally we confirmed the pathological diagnosis. Not every OP case is supported by pathological evidence and typical imaging changes. It is important for us to judge and decide the diagnosis according to clinical experience.

  8. Imaging of Cerebrovascular Pathology in Animal Models of Alzheimer`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eKlohs

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer’s disease (AD, vascular pathology may interact with neurodegeneration and thus aggravate cognitive decline. As the relationship between these two processes is poorly understood, research has been increasingly focused on understanding the link between cerebrovascular alterations and AD. This has at last been spurred by the engineering of transgenic animals, which display pathological features of AD and develop cerebral amyloid angiopathy to various degrees. Transgenic models are versatile for investigating the role of amyloid deposition and vascular dysfunction, and for evaluating novel therapeutic concepts. In addition, research has benefited from the development of novel imaging techniques, which are capable of characterizing vascular pathology in vivo. They provide vascular structural read-outs and have the ability to assess the functional consequences of vascular dysfunction as well as to visualize and monitor the molecular processes underlying these pathological alterations. This article focusses on recent in vivo small animal imaging studies addressing vascular aspects related to AD. With the technical advances of imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance, nuclear and microscopic imaging, molecular, functional and structural information related to vascular pathology can now be visualized in vivo in small rodents. Imaging vascular and parenchymal amyloid-β (Aβ deposition as well as Aβ transport pathways have been shown to be useful to characterize their dynamics and to elucidate their role in the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and AD. Structural and functional imaging read-outs have been employed to describe the deleterious affects of Aβ on vessel morphology, hemodynamics and vascular integrity. More recent imaging studies have also addressed how inflammatory processes partake in the pathogenesis of the disease. Moreover, imaging can be pivotal in the search for novel therapies targeting the vasculature.

  9. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging and scanning: Current and future applications for pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Farahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging is vital for the assessment of physiologic and phenotypic details. In the past, biomedical imaging was heavily reliant on analog, low-throughput methods, which would produce two-dimensional images. However, newer, digital, and high-throughput three-dimensional (3D imaging methods, which rely on computer vision and computer graphics, are transforming the way biomedical professionals practice. 3D imaging has been useful in diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making for the medical and biomedical professions. Herein, we summarize current imaging methods that enable optimal 3D histopathologic reconstruction: Scanning, 3D scanning, and whole slide imaging. Briefly mentioned are emerging platforms, which combine robotics, sectioning, and imaging in their pursuit to digitize and automate the entire microscopy workflow. Finally, both current and emerging 3D imaging methods are discussed in relation to current and future applications within the context of pathology.

  11. Database Description - Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database Database Description General information of database Database... name Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database Alternative name - DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00954-0...iomedical Innovation 7-6-8, Saito-asagi, Ibaraki-city, Osaka 567-0085, Japan TEL:81-72-641-9826 Email: Database... classification Toxicogenomics Database Organism Taxonomy Name: Rattus norvegi... Article title: Author name(s): Journal: External Links: Original website information Database

  12. Imaging of compound palmar ganglion with pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Talukder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compound palmar ganglion, or chronic flexor tenosynovitis, most commonly of tuberculousorigin, is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis (TB. The flexor synovialsheath is not a common site for TB but, once involved, causes rapid involvement of all flexortendons. We discuss the case of a 70-year-old farmer who presented to us with pain and progressive swelling of the palmar aspect of the wrist. On clinical examination, swelling both above and below the proximal wrist crease was found, with positive cross-fluctuation. Onultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, features suggestive of compound palmarganglion were present. The patient underwent surgical resection (extensive tenosynovectomyand chemotherapy. Post-operative histopatholgical findings correlated with the radiological features.

  13. Implementation of whole slide imaging in surgical pathology: A value added approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Isaacs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI makes it possible to capture images of an entire histological slide. WSI has established roles in surgical pathology, including support of off-site frozen section interpretation, primary diagnosis, educational activities, and laboratory quality assurance (QA activities. Analyses of the cost of WSI have traditionally been based solely on direct costs and diagnostic accuracy; however, these types of analyses largely ignore workflow and cost issues that arise as a result of redundancy, the need for additional staffing, and customized software development when WSI is integrated into routine diagnostic surgical pathology. The pre-scan, scan, and post-scan costs; quality control and QA costs; and IT process costs can be significant, and consequently, pathology groups can find it difficult to perform a realistic cost-benefit analysis of adding WSI to their practice. Materials and Methods: In this paper, we report a "value added" approach developed to guide our decisions regarding integration of WSI into surgical pathology practice. The approach focuses on specific operational measures (cost, time, and enhanced patient care and practice settings (clinical, education, and research to identify routine activities in which the addition of WSI can provide improvements. Results: When applied to our academic pathology group practice, the value added approach resulted in expanded and improved operations, as demonstrated by outcome based measures. Conclusion: A value added can be used to perform a realistic cost-benefit analysis of integrating WSI into routine surgical pathology practice.

  14. Computer Aided Quantification of Pathological Features for Flexor Tendon Pulleys on Microscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chun Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the pathological features of flexor tendon pulleys is essential for grading the trigger finger since it provides clinicians with objective evidence derived from microscopic images. Although manual grading is time consuming and dependent on the observer experience, there is a lack of image processing methods for automatically extracting pulley pathological features. In this paper, we design and develop a color-based image segmentation system to extract the color and shape features from pulley microscopic images. Two parameters which are the size ratio of abnormal tissue regions and the number ratio of abnormal nuclei are estimated as the pathological progression indices. The automatic quantification results show clear discrimination among different levels of diseased pulley specimens which are prone to misjudgments for human visual inspection. The proposed system provides a reliable and automatic way to obtain pathological parameters instead of manual evaluation which is with intra- and interoperator variability. Experiments with 290 microscopic images from 29 pulley specimens show good correspondence with pathologist expectations. Hence, the proposed system has great potential for assisting clinical experts in routine histopathological examinations.

  15. Correlation of an abnormal rest /sup 201/Tl myocardial image: Pathological findings in cardiac transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKillop, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Billingham, M.; Schroeder, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    Rest myocardial /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy was undertaken in 15 males mean age 39 years (22-54) who had been accepted for cardiac transplantation. Complete pathological correlation was obtained in 14 after transplantation and in 1 who died before a suitable donor heart became available. The average time from scintigraphy to pathological evaluation was 42 days (9-103). All the /sup 201/Tl images were grossly abnormal and on the basis of these studies it was not possible to differentiate ischemic from idiopathic cardiomyopathy. Each of the three views of the /sup 201/Tl study was divided into three segments, therefore 135 areas were available for comparison (3 x 3 x 15). Eighty-eight of these were abnormal on scan and 78 of these were abnormal pathologically. The right ventricle was seen on all rest images but the degree of uptake bore no relationship to the measured thickness of the right ventricular wall. Structures such as the atrial wall and the enlarged papillary muscle were visualized in some patients. In two patients there was an improvement of the rest /sup 201/Tl image in delayed views and histologically these areas showed a mixture of muscle and fibrous tissue. The sensitivity of /sup 201/Tl imaging in this study was 89% and there was close correlation of the images with gross and microscopic pathological findings.

  16. Tendo-ligamentous pathologies of the wrist joint: Can ultrasonography replace magnetic resonance imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Characterization of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist remains problematic, despite advances in imaging. By using clinical history and imaging appearance, one can determine the diagnosis. USG is used as first imaging modality whereas MRI aids in making a specific diagnosis of few of the lesions. Aims: To investigate the etiological spectrum of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist on USG & MRI with statistical correlation. Patients and methods: 80 patients (male/female = 46/34 with complaint of swelling or pain in wrist were included and underwent USG and MRI of both the wrists. Results: The spectrum included ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, ligament tears and fibrosis. The analysis was done using kappa coefficient and spearman's rho correlation coefficient. The strength of agreement between USG and MRI for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis and tendinopathy was found to be very good. Conclusion: USG provides detailed depiction of superficial structures, is less expensive, and allows dynamic examinations of the wrist. It should be the first choice of investigation for majority of the cystic, tendinous, vascular, and fibrotic pathologies of the wrist. However, less promising results were observed for ligamentous pathologies on USG in our study. Keywords: Tendo-ligamentous pathologies, Ganglion cyst, Tenosynovitis, Ultrasonography, MRI

  17. Cascade classification of endocytoscopic images of colorectal lesions for automated pathological diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hayato; Mori, Yuichi; Misawa, Masashi; Oda, Masahiro; Kudo, Shin-ei; Mori, Kensaku

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a new classification method for endocytoscopic images. Endocytoscopy is a new endoscope that enables us to perform conventional endoscopic observation and ultramagnified observation of cell level. This ultramagnified views (endocytoscopic images) make possible to perform pathological diagnosis only on endo-scopic views of polyps during colonoscopy. However, endocytoscopic image diagnosis requires higher experiences for physicians. An automated pathological diagnosis system is required to prevent the overlooking of neoplastic lesions in endocytoscopy. For this purpose, we propose a new automated endocytoscopic image classification method that classifies neoplastic and non-neoplastic endocytoscopic images. This method consists of two classification steps. At the first step, we classify an input image by support vector machine. We forward the image to the second step if the confidence of the first classification is low. At the second step, we classify the forwarded image by convolutional neural network. We reject the input image if the confidence of the second classification is also low. We experimentally evaluate the classification performance of the proposed method. In this experiment, we use about 16,000 and 4,000 colorectal endocytoscopic images as training and test data, respectively. The results show that the proposed method achieves high sensitivity 93.4% with small rejection rate 9.3% even for difficult test data.

  18. High-resolution imaging of neural anatomy and pathology of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheng, Kai Lung [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung (China)

    2017-01-15

    The neck has intricately connected neural structures, including cervical and brachial plexi, the sympathetic system, lower cranial nerves, and their branches. Except for brachial plexus, there has been little research regarding the normal imaging appearance or corresponding pathologies of neural structures in the neck. The development in imaging techniques with better spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio has made it possible to see many tiny nerves to predict complications related to image-guided procedures and to better assess treatment response, especially in the management of oncology patients. The purposes of this review is to present imaging-based anatomy of major nerves in the neck and explain their relevant clinical significance according to representative pathologies of regarded nerves in the neck.

  19. A computer-aided diagnosis system to detect pathologies in temporal subtraction images of chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looper, Jared; Harrison, Melanie; Armato, Samuel G.

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists often compare sequential radiographs to identify areas of pathologic change; however, this process is prone to error, as human anatomy can obscure the regions of change, causing the radiologists to overlook pathology. Temporal subtraction (TS) images can provide enhanced visualization of regions of change in sequential radiographs and allow radiologists to better detect areas of change in radiographs. Not all areas of change shown in TS images, however, are actual pathology. The purpose of this study was to create a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that identifies which regions of change are caused by pathology and which are caused by misregistration of the radiographs used to create the TS image. The dataset used in this study contained 120 images with 74 pathologic regions on 54 images outlined by an experienced radiologist. High and low ("light" and "dark") gray-level candidate regions were extracted from the images using gray-level thresholding. Then, sampling techniques were used to address the class imbalance problem between "true" and "false" candidate regions. Next, the datasets of light candidate regions, dark candidate regions, and the combined set of light and dark candidate regions were used as training and testing data for classifiers by using five-fold cross validation. Of the classifiers tested (support vector machines, discriminant analyses, logistic regression, and k-nearest neighbors), the support vector machine on the combined candidates using synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) performed best with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.85, a sensitivity of 85%, and a specificity of 84%.

  20. Chondro-osseous differentiation in fat tissue tumors: magnetic resonance imaging with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orui, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Akira; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Takahara, Masatoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko; Ito, Masafumi

    2000-01-01

    Chondro-osseous differentiation of three benign or malignant fat tissue tumors - two chondrolipomas and a liposarcoma with cartilaginous metaplasia - was studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and compared with their pathological findings. The results suggest that demarcation of cartilage tisssue can be clearly defined on MR imaging when the size of the cartilaginous area is large. Myxoid matrix, degenerative fat tissue and lipodystrophic change may decrease the delineation of the cartilage tissue. (orig.)

  1. Chondro-osseous differentiation in fat tissue tumors: magnetic resonance imaging with pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orui, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Akira; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Takahara, Masatoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan); Ito, Masafumi [1. Dept. of Pathology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Chondro-osseous differentiation of three benign or malignant fat tissue tumors - two chondrolipomas and a liposarcoma with cartilaginous metaplasia - was studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and compared with their pathological findings. The results suggest that demarcation of cartilage tisssue can be clearly defined on MR imaging when the size of the cartilaginous area is large. Myxoid matrix, degenerative fat tissue and lipodystrophic change may decrease the delineation of the cartilage tissue. (orig.)

  2. Disc pathology after whiplash injury. A prospective magnetic resonance imaging and clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, K; Hildingsson, C; Toolanen, G; Fagerlund, M; Björnebrink, J

    1997-02-01

    This study was used to evaluate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical findings after whiplash injury. To identify initial soft-tissue damage after whiplash injury, the development of disc pathology, and the relationship of disc pathology to clinical findings. Although a few studies have reported pathological magnetic resonance imaging findings after whiplash injuries, there is no prospective study published to our knowledge. Thirty-nine patients, 20 women and 19 men with a mean age of 32 years, were treated for whiplash injury. Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical examination were performed in a blinded manner at a mean of 11 days after trauma. The procedure was repeated at a 2-year follow-up visit. Two patients could not be examined with the second magnetic resonance imaging because of claustrophobia and pregnancy, respectively. The authors found 13 patients (33%) with disc herniations with medullary (six cases) or dura (seven cases) impingement over the 2-year follow-up period. At the follow-up examination all patients with medullary impingement had persistent or increased symptoms, and three of 27 patients (11%) with no or slight changes on magnetic resonance imaging had persistent symptoms. No ligament injuries were diagnosed. Although disc pathology seems to be one contributing factor in the development of chronic symptoms after whiplash injury, it may be unnecessary to examine these patients in the acute phase with magnetic resonance imaging; correlating initial symptoms and signs to magnetic resonance imaging findings is difficult because of the relatively high proportion of false-positive results. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated later in the course of treatment in patients with persistent arm pain, neurologic deficits or clinical signs of nerve root compression to diagnose disc herniations requiring surgery.

  3. Quantitative Imaging In Pathology (QUIP) | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site hosts web accessible applications, tools and data designed to support analysis, management, and exploration of whole slide tissue images for cancer research. The following tools are included: caMicroscope: A digital pathology data management and visualization plaform that enables interactive viewing of whole slide tissue images and segmentation results. caMicroscope can be also used independently of QUIP. FeatureExplorer: An interactive tool to allow patient-level feature exploration across multiple dimensions.

  4. Characterization of Long Working Distance Optical Coherence Tomography for Imaging of Pediatric Retinal Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ruobing; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Sarin, Neeru; Vajzovic, Lejla; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2017-10-01

    We determined the feasibility of fovea and optic nerve head imaging with a long working distance (LWD) swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype in adults, teenagers, and young children. A prototype swept source OCT system with a LWD (defined as distance from the last optical element of the imaging system to the eye) of 350 mm with custom fixation targets was developed to facilitate imaging of children. Imaging was performed in 49 participants from three age groups: 26 adults, 16 children 13 to 18 years old (teenagers), and seven children under 6 years old (young children) under an approved institutional review board protocol. The imaging goal was to acquire high quality scans of the fovea and optic nerve in each eye in the shortest time possible. OCT B-scans and volumes of the fovea and optic nerve head of each eligible eye were captured and graded based on four categories (lateral and axial centration, contrast, and resolution) and on ability to determine presence or absence of pathology. LWD-OCT imaging was successful in 88 of 94 eligible eyes, including seven of 10 eyes of young children. Of the successfully acquired OCT images, 83% of B-scan and volumetric images, including 86% from young children, were graded as high-quality scans. Pathology was observed in high-quality OCT images. The prototype LWD-OCT system achieved high quality retinal imaging of adults, teenagers, and some young children with and without pathology with reasonable alignment time. The LWD-OCT system can facilitate imaging in children.

  5. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Ju; Park, In Suh; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Choi, Suk Jin; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Woo Chul; Han, Jun Gu; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic correlation and to determine whether these schwannomas share the imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves. The MRIs of 17 cases of pathologically proven spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were reviewed retrospectively, and cystic changes, enhancement, and intratumoral hemorrhage of the tumors were evaluated. Imaging features known to be common findings of schwannoma in the peripheral nerves, such as encapsulation, the target sign, the fascicular sign, and visualization of entering or exiting nerve rootlets, were also evaluated. The histopathology of the tumors was correlated with the MRI findings. Cystic changes were detected in 14 cases by MRI and in 16 cases by pathology. The most common pattern of enhancement was a thick peripheral septal pattern (70.59%). Intratumoral hemorrhage was detected in four cases on MRI, but in all cases on pathology. Encapsulation was observed in all cases. The fascicular sign was seen in only four cases, and thickening of an exiting rootlet was visualized in one case. None of the cases showed the target sign. Spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were typical encapsulated cystic tumors and had few imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves.

  6. Imaging Findings of Complex Fibroadenoma of the Breast: Correlation with Pathologic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyoung; Choi, Bo Bae; Kim, Kyung Hee [Chungnam National University Hospital College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The imaging findings of complex fibroadenoma have been rarely reported even though the risk of developing breast carcinoma in a patient with complex fibroadenoma is higher than that for a patient with simple fibroadenoma. We reviewed the imaging features and pathologic findings of complex fibroadenomas. Between April 2003 and April 2010, the mammographic and sonographic findings of five patients with complex fibroadenomas were retrospectively reviewed according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). The pathologic findings were retrospectively reviewed for all 5 patients. The mammography findings showed masses (3 cases) and asymmetry (1 case). On ultrasonography, complex echo patterns were noted in all the patients, and all the lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4, suspicious for abnormality. The complex echoic patterns showed two types: 1) a mixture of a heterogeneous hypoechoic central portion and a fuzzy hyperechoic peripheral area in 2 cases, 2) a mixture of tiny anechoic and hypoehoic lesions in 3 cases. Multiple cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Complex fibroadenomas showed different ultrasonographic findings from simple fibroadenomas such as two types of complex echo patterns, even though the other findings were similar to those of simple fibroadenoma. Cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Awareness of these imaging findings will help us to properly diagnose complex fibroadenoma

  7. Imaging Findings of Complex Fibroadenoma of the Breast: Correlation with Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Sun Kyoung; Choi, Bo Bae; Kim, Kyung Hee

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of complex fibroadenoma have been rarely reported even though the risk of developing breast carcinoma in a patient with complex fibroadenoma is higher than that for a patient with simple fibroadenoma. We reviewed the imaging features and pathologic findings of complex fibroadenomas. Between April 2003 and April 2010, the mammographic and sonographic findings of five patients with complex fibroadenomas were retrospectively reviewed according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). The pathologic findings were retrospectively reviewed for all 5 patients. The mammography findings showed masses (3 cases) and asymmetry (1 case). On ultrasonography, complex echo patterns were noted in all the patients, and all the lesions were assigned to BI-RADS category 4, suspicious for abnormality. The complex echoic patterns showed two types: 1) a mixture of a heterogeneous hypoechoic central portion and a fuzzy hyperechoic peripheral area in 2 cases, 2) a mixture of tiny anechoic and hypoehoic lesions in 3 cases. Multiple cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Complex fibroadenomas showed different ultrasonographic findings from simple fibroadenomas such as two types of complex echo patterns, even though the other findings were similar to those of simple fibroadenoma. Cystic changes were noted in all the cases on the pathologic analysis. Awareness of these imaging findings will help us to properly diagnose complex fibroadenoma

  8. MR imaging features and staging of neuroendocrine carcinomas of the uterine cervix with pathological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Huijun; Li, Guozhao; Wang, Dongye; Zhang, Fang; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Ban, Xiaohua [Sun Yat-Sen University, Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wang, Charles Qian [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou (China); University of New South Wales, JMO, Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    To determine MR imaging features and staging accuracy of neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the uterine cervix with pathological correlations. Twenty-six patients with histologically proven NECs, 60 patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), and 30 patients with adenocarcinomas of the uterine cervix were included. The clinical data, pathological findings, and MRI findings were reviewed retrospectively. MRI features of cervical NECs, SCCs, and adenocarcinomas were compared, and MRI staging of cervical NECs was compared with the pathological staging. Cervical NECs showed a higher tendency toward a homogeneous signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging and a homogeneous enhancement pattern, as well as a lower ADC value of tumour and a higher incidence of lymphadenopathy, compared with SCCs and adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05). An ADC value cutoff of 0.90 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s was robust for differentiation between cervical NECs and other cervical cancers, with a sensitivity of 63.3 % and a specificity of 95 %. In 21 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy, the overall accuracy of tumour staging by MR imaging was 85.7 % with reference to pathology staging. Homogeneous lesion texture and low ADC value are likely suggestive features of cervical NECs and MR imaging is reliable for the staging of cervical NECs. (orig.)

  9. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Saltz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. : Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs were identified from standard pathology cancer images by a deep-learning-derived “computational stain” developed by Saltz et al. They processed 5,202 digital images from 13 cancer types. Resulting TIL maps were correlated with TCGA molecular data, relating TIL content to survival, tumor subtypes, and immune profiles. Keywords: digital pathology, immuno-oncology, machine learning, lymphocytes, tumor microenvironment, deep learning, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer vision

  10. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma. Associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuki, Takayuki; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsushima, Tomoyasu; Shirasaki, Yoshinori; Hiraki, Yoshio [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions) were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics were compared against pathologic findings after resection, and the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings were then assessed. A significant correlation was observed between tumor grade and tumor enhancement, with G3 lesions tending to show little enhancement. Regardless of the histologic classification, G3 tumors were found to contain highly heterotypic cancer cells and very few vessels by histopathologic examination. No significant correlations were noted between the other MR characteristics and pathologic findings. Renal cell carcinomas showing little enhancement tend to be highly malignant lesions based on the pathologic findings. Special consideration is required for these tumors with regard to the selection of surgical intervention and follow-up observation. (author)

  11. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma. Associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuki, Takayuki; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsushima, Tomoyasu; Shirasaki, Yoshinori; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions) were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics were compared against pathologic findings after resection, and the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings were then assessed. A significant correlation was observed between tumor grade and tumor enhancement, with G3 lesions tending to show little enhancement. Regardless of the histologic classification, G3 tumors were found to contain highly heterotypic cancer cells and very few vessels by histopathologic examination. No significant correlations were noted between the other MR characteristics and pathologic findings. Renal cell carcinomas showing little enhancement tend to be highly malignant lesions based on the pathologic findings. Special consideration is required for these tumors with regard to the selection of surgical intervention and follow-up observation. (author)

  12. Whole Slide Imaging Versus Microscopy for Primary Diagnosis in Surgical Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Feldman, Michael D.; Abels, Esther; Ashfaq, Raheela; Beltaifa, Senda; Cacciabeve, Nicolas G.; Cathro, Helen P.; Cheng, Liang; Cooper, Kumarasen; Dickey, Glenn E.; Gill, Ryan M.; Heaton, Robert P.; Kerstens, René; Lindberg, Guy M.; Malhotra, Reenu K.; Mandell, James W.; Manlucu, Ellen D.; Mills, Anne M.; Mills, Stacey E.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Nelis, Mischa; Patil, Deepa T.; Przybycin, Christopher G.; Reynolds, Jordan P.; Rubin, Brian P.; Saboorian, Mohammad H.; Salicru, Mauricio; Samols, Mark A.; Sturgis, Charles D.; Turner, Kevin O.; Wick, Mark R.; Yoon, Ji Y.; Zhao, Po

    2018-01-01

    Most prior studies of primary diagnosis in surgical pathology using whole slide imaging (WSI) versus microscopy have focused on specific organ systems or included relatively few cases. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that WSI is noninferior to microscopy for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology. A blinded randomized noninferiority study was conducted across the entire range of surgical pathology cases (biopsies and resections, including hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemistry, and special stains) from 4 institutions using the original sign-out diagnosis (baseline diagnosis) as the reference standard. Cases were scanned, converted to WSI and randomized. Sixteen pathologists interpreted cases by microscopy or WSI, followed by a wash-out period of ≥4 weeks, after which cases were read by the same observers using the other modality. Major discordances were identified by an adjudication panel, and the differences between major discordance rates for both microscopy (against the reference standard) and WSI (against the reference standard) were calculated. A total of 1992 cases were included, resulting in 15,925 reads. The major discordance rate with the reference standard diagnosis was 4.9% for WSI and 4.6% for microscopy. The difference between major discordance rates for microscopy and WSI was 0.4% (95% confidence interval, −0.30% to 1.01%). The difference in major discordance rates for WSI and microscopy was highest in endocrine pathology (1.8%), neoplastic kidney pathology (1.5%), urinary bladder pathology (1.3%), and gynecologic pathology (1.2%). Detailed analysis of these cases revealed no instances where interpretation by WSI was consistently inaccurate compared with microscopy for multiple observers. We conclude that WSI is noninferior to microscopy for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology, including biopsies and resections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemistry and special stains. This conclusion is valid across a

  13. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  14. Chronic kidney disease: Pathological and functional evaluation with intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Zhou, Jianjun; Zeng, Mengsu; Ding, Yuqin; Qu, Lijie; Chen, Caizhong; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yaqiong; Fu, Caixia

    2018-05-01

    Because chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide problem, accurate pathological and functional evaluation is required for planning treatment and follow-up. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging (IVIM-DWI) can assess both capillary perfusion and tissue diffusion and may be helpful in evaluating renal function and pathology. To evaluate functional and pathological alterations in CKD by applying IVIM-DWI. Prospective study. In all, 72 CKD patients who required renal biopsy and 20 healthy volunteers. 1.5T. All subjects underwent IVIM-DWI of the kidneys, and image analysis was performed by two radiologists. The mean values of true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) were acquired from renal parenchyma. Correlation between IVIM-DWI parameters and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage, were assessed. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired sample t-test and Spearman correlation analysis. The paired sample t-test revealed that IVIM-DWI parameters were significantly lower in medulla than cortex for both patients and controls (P Imaging 2018;47:1251-1259. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Degeneration of uterine leiomyoma: comparison between Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, M. J.; Kim, G. W.; No, T. Y.; Ahn, W. H.; Baik, S. K.; Kim, B. G.; Choi, H. Y.; Paik, O. J.

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone(GnRH) analogues have been used as a conservative or preoperative therapy in the treatment of uterine leiomyoma. Since these drugs, which can induce a low estrogenic state, affect only undegenerative leiomyoma tissue, the aim of the present study was to differentiate degenerative leiomyoma from undegenerative one by Gd-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). There were 40 masses in 24 patients; all were diagnosed by surgical-pathology. With superconductive 0.5T MR circuit, T1-and T2-weighted images and Gd-DTPA T1-weighted images were obtained. Based on a combination of signal intensities of T2-weighted and enhanced T1 weighted image on the same tumor section all the lesions were classified to one of four MRI patterns. Pattern I was a heterogeneous hyperintensity on the T2-weighted images that was enhancement by Gd-DTPA. Pattern II was a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted MR images but no enhancement by Gd-DTPA. Pattern III was a low to intermediate signal intensity on the T2-weighted MR images and enhancement on the Gd-DTPA T1-weighted images. Pattern IV was a low to intermediate signal intensity on the T2-weighted images and no enhancement by Gd-DTPA. Each of these 4 groups of MRI pattern were co-related to the surgical-pathology findings. Pathologically, pattern I corresponded to an edematous leiomyoma in 3 cases and a connective tissue leiomyoma in one case. Pattern II corresponded to three red degeneration, two cystic degeneration and one infected leiomyoma. Pattern III corresponded to eighteen undegenerative leiomyomas, but some of them showed focal connective tissue proliferation. All of twelve cases in pattern IV corresponded to a hyaline degeneration. MRI with Gd-DTPA enhancement may differentiate undegenerative leiomyoma from degenerated one

  16. Degeneration of uterine leiomyoma: comparison between Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, M. J.; Kim, G. W.; No, T. Y.; Ahn, W. H.; Baik, S. K.; Kim, B. G.; Choi, H. Y.; Paik, O. J. [Wallace Memorial Baptist Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone(GnRH) analogues have been used as a conservative or preoperative therapy in the treatment of uterine leiomyoma. Since these drugs, which can induce a low estrogenic state, affect only undegenerative leiomyoma tissue, the aim of the present study was to differentiate degenerative leiomyoma from undegenerative one by Gd-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). There were 40 masses in 24 patients; all were diagnosed by surgical-pathology. With superconductive 0.5T MR circuit, T1-and T2-weighted images and Gd-DTPA T1-weighted images were obtained. Based on a combination of signal intensities of T2-weighted and enhanced T1 weighted image on the same tumor section all the lesions were classified to one of four MRI patterns. Pattern I was a heterogeneous hyperintensity on the T2-weighted images that was enhancement by Gd-DTPA. Pattern II was a high signal intensity on the T2-weighted MR images but no enhancement by Gd-DTPA. Pattern III was a low to intermediate signal intensity on the T2-weighted MR images and enhancement on the Gd-DTPA T1-weighted images. Pattern IV was a low to intermediate signal intensity on the T2-weighted images and no enhancement by Gd-DTPA. Each of these 4 groups of MRI pattern were co-related to the surgical-pathology findings. Pathologically, pattern I corresponded to an edematous leiomyoma in 3 cases and a connective tissue leiomyoma in one case. Pattern II corresponded to three red degeneration, two cystic degeneration and one infected leiomyoma. Pattern III corresponded to eighteen undegenerative leiomyomas, but some of them showed focal connective tissue proliferation. All of twelve cases in pattern IV corresponded to a hyaline degeneration. MRI with Gd-DTPA enhancement may differentiate undegenerative leiomyoma from degenerated one.

  17. Serial MR Imaging of Intramuscular Hematoma: Experimental Study in a Rat Model with the Pathologic Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Kwon, Soon Tae; Kim, Jong Ok

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to demonstrate the temporal changes of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas in rats and to correlate these data with the concurrent pathologic observations. Materials and Methods Intramuscular hematoma was induced in 30 rats. The MR images were obtained at 1, 4, 7 and 10 days and at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after muscle injury. The characteristic serial MRI findings were evaluated and the relative signal intensities were calculated. Pathologic specimens were obtained at each time point. Results On the T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), the intramuscular hematomas exhibited isointensity compared to that of muscle or the development of a high signal intensity (SI) rim on day one after injury. The high SI persisted until eight weeks after injury. On the T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), the hematomas showed high SI or centrally low SI on day one after injury, and mainly high SI after four days. A dark signal rim was apparent after seven days, which was indicative of hemosiderin on the pathology. The gradient echo (GRE) imaging yielded dark signal intensities at all stages. Conclusion Unlike brain hematomas, experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas show increased SI on both the T1WI and T2WI from the acute stage onward, and this is pathologically correlated with a rich blood supply and rapid healing response to injury in the muscle. On the T2WI and GRE imaging, high SI with a peripheral dark signal rim is apparent from seven days to the chronic stage. PMID:21228942

  18. Serial MR Imaging of Intramuscular Hematoma: Experimental Study in a Rat Model with the Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kwon, Soon Tae

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to demonstrate the temporal changes of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas in rats and to correlate these data with the concurrent pathologic observations. Intramuscular hematoma was induced in 30 rats. The MR images were obtained at 1, 4, 7 and 10 days and at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after muscle injury. The characteristic serial MRI findings were evaluated and the relative signal intensities were calculated. Pathologic specimens were obtained at each time point. On the T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), the intramuscular hematomas exhibited isointensity compared to that of muscle or the development of a high signal intensity (SI) rim on day one after injury. The high SI persisted until eight weeks after injury. On the T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), the hematomas showed high SI or centrally low SI on day one after injury, and mainly high SI after four days. A dark signal rim was apparent after seven days, which was indicative of hemosiderin on the pathology. The gradient echo (GRE) imaging yielded dark signal intensities at all stages. Unlike brain hematomas, experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas show increased SI on both the T1WI and T2WI from the acute stage onward, and this is pathologically correlated with a rich blood supply and rapid healing response to injury in the muscle. On the T2WI and GRE imaging, high SI with a peripheral dark signal rim is apparent from seven days to the chronic stage

  19. Disc pathology after whiplash injury. A prospective magnetic resonance imaging and clinical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.; Toolanen, G.; Fagerlund, M.; Bjornebrink, J.

    1997-01-01

    Although disc pathology seems to be one contributing factor in the development of chronic symptoms after whiplash injury, it may be unnecessary to examine these patients in the acute phase with magnetic resonance imaging ; correlating initial symptoms and signs to magnetic resonance imaging findings is difficult because of the relatively high proportion of false-positive results. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated later in the course of treatment in patients with persistent arm pain, neurologic deficits, or clinical signs of nerve root compression to diagnose disc herniations requiring surgery. (authors)

  20. An efficient architecture to support digital pathology in standard medical imaging repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Godinho, Tiago; Lebre, Rui; Silva, Luís Bastião; Costa, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, digital pathology and whole-slide imaging (WSI) have been gaining momentum with the proliferation of digital scanners from different manufacturers. The literature reports significant advantages associated with the adoption of digital images in pathology, namely, improvements in diagnostic accuracy and better support for telepathology. Moreover, it also offers new clinical and research applications. However, numerous barriers have been slowing the adoption of WSI, among which the most important are performance issues associated with storage and distribution of huge volumes of data, and lack of interoperability with other hospital information systems, most notably Picture Archive and Communications Systems (PACS) based on the DICOM standard. This article proposes an architecture of a Web Pathology PACS fully compliant with DICOM standard communications and data formats. The solution includes a PACS Archive responsible for storing whole-slide imaging data in DICOM WSI format and offers a communication interface based on the most recent DICOM Web services. The second component is a zero-footprint viewer that runs in any web-browser. It consumes data using the PACS archive standard web services. Moreover, it features a tiling engine especially suited to deal with the WSI image pyramids. These components were designed with special focus on efficiency and usability. The performance of our system was assessed through a comparative analysis of the state-of-the-art solutions. The results demonstrate that it is possible to have a very competitive solution based on standard workflows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between imaging and pathological features and clinical factors in surgical cases of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Hideji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Onuma, Teiichi [National Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Arai, Nobutaka; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Maehara, Taketoshi; Yanashita, Akira

    1998-03-01

    The relationships between imaging, pathology and presumed causes in surgical cases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was studied. The subject was 62 patients. MRI, PET and SPECT were performed. Hematoxylin and eosin was used for pathological judgement. On MRI, mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was detected in 48 of 52 patients (92%); 32 (62%) had high-signal intensity on T2-weighted images; 31 (60%) had atrophy {l_brace}23 (44%) had high-signal intensity on T2+atrophy{r_brace}; 5 (10%) had calcified lesions; and 2 (4%) had cystic lesions. On PET and SPECT, abnormal cerebral blood flow was noted in 33 of 36 (92%). On pathological findings (61 cases), Ammon`s horn sclerosis (AHS), tumors, gliosis in lateral temporal and meningeal inflammatory finding were detected in 42 (69%), 10 (23%) and 8 (13%) cases, respectively, whereas 2 showed no abnormalities. The 2 patients with normal pathology showed both high-signal intensity and atrophy on MRI. The presumed causes of TLE were encephalitis/meningitis and/or suspected of these diseases in 15 patients (24%), injuries at birth in 5 (8%), and none in 42 (68%). The presumed causes in the 43 patients with AHS were encephalitis/meningitis in 11, injuries at birth in 3, and none in 29. Of the 15 patients in whom encephalitis/meningitis was estimated as the causes of TLE, only 6 (40%) had pathological evidence of meningeal inflammatory finding. Of the 42 patients in whom cause could not be determined, 2 had pathological evidence of meningeal inflammatory finding. (K.H.)

  2. Exploring gender differences in body image, eating pathology, and sexual harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Nicole T; Bluestein, Brooke M; Nappa, Alexa C; Woods, Krystle C; Depatie, Melissa M

    2013-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between body image (weight/shape concerns), eating pathology, and sexual harassment among men and women (N=2446). Hierarchical regressions controlling for depression revealed main effects of gender such that women reported greater weight/shape concerns, eating pathology, dietary restraint, eating concerns, and binge eating compared to men. Main effects for sexual harassment indicated that as harassment increased, participants reported increased weight/shape concerns, eating pathology, dietary restraint, eating concerns, binge eating, and compensatory behaviors. There were small but significant interactions between gender and harassment for eating pathology total score (which included each of the domains listed above), weight/shape concerns, dietary restraint, and eating concerns such that the relationship between increased harassment and increased pathology was stronger for women compared to men. The largest interaction was found for compensatory behaviors, such that while women and men's scores both increased as harassment increased, the relationship was stronger for men. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multimodal PET Imaging of Amyloid and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer Disease and Non-Alzheimer Disease Dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chenjie; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-07-01

    Biomarkers of the molecular pathology underpinning dementia syndromes are increasingly recognized as crucial for diagnosis and development of disease-modifying treatments. Amyloid PET imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic assessment of Alzheimer disease. Its use has also deepened understanding of the role of amyloid pathology in Lewy body disorders and aging. Tau PET imaging is an imaging biomarker that will likely play an important role in the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment in dementias. Using tau PET imaging to examine how tau pathology relates to amyloid and other markers of neurodegeneration will serve to better understand the pathophysiologic cascade that leads to dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic classification of pathological myopia in retinal fundus images using PAMELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon W. K.; Tan, Ngan Meng; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Shijian; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi; Saw, Seang Mei; Tong, Louis; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-03-01

    Pathological myopia is the seventh leading cause of blindness. We introduce a framework based on PAMELA (PAthological Myopia dEtection through peripapilLary Atrophy) for the detection of pathological myopia from fundus images. The framework consists of a pre-processing stage which extracts a region of interest centered on the optic disc. Subsequently, three analysis modules focus on detecting specific visual indicators. The optic disc tilt ratio module gives a measure of the axial elongation of the eye through inference from the deformation of the optic disc. In the texturebased ROI assessment module, contextual knowledge is used to demarcate the ROI into four distinct, clinically-relevant zones in which information from an entropy transform of the ROI is analyzed and metrics generated. In particular, the preferential appearance of peripapillary atrophy (PPA) in the temporal zone compared to the nasal zone is utilized by calculating ratios of the metrics. The PPA detection module obtains an outer boundary through a level-set method, and subtracts this region against the optic disc boundary. Temporal and nasal zones are obtained from the remnants to generate associated hue and color values. The outputs of the three modules are used as in a SVM model to determine the presence of pathological myopia in a retinal fundus image. Using images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute, the proposed framework reported an optimized accuracy of 90% and a sensitivity and specificity of 0.85 and 0.95 respectively, indicating promise for the use of the proposed system as a screening tool for pathological myopia.

  5. Advanced MR imaging in Lhermitte-Duclos disease: moving closer to pathology and pathophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.; Krishnamoorthy, T.; Kesavadas, C.; Radhakrishnan, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD, dysplastic gangliocytoma) is an extremely rare cerebellar lesion of uncertain etiology. The debate as to whether it constitutes a neoplastic, malformative, or hamartomatous lesion is still continuing. In this report we explore the usefulness of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging, and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in demonstrating the pathology and pathophysiology in two patients with LDD. MR imaging of the brain and the cervicodorsal spine was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in a 47-year-old woman presenting with numbness and paresthesia of both upper and lower limbs, and in a 17-year-old male with right frontal headache associated with neck pain. Routine imaging in the first patient showed a left-side cerebellar mass with characteristic 'tiger-striped' thick folia associated with Chiari I malformation, tonsillar herniation and cervicodorsal syringomyelia and in the second patient a right cerebellar mass with similar findings. The SWI demonstrated the characteristic deep running veins between the folia, which is thought to be the cause for vascular contrast enhancement. Diffusion showed a T2 shine-through effect with mild increased diffusivity, and perfusion showed increase in relative cerebral blood volume, relative cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time in the lesion. MR spectroscopy demonstrated reduction in metabolites and a prominent lactate peak in both the patients. The pathological and pathophysiological significance of these findings is discussed. MRI with the newer imaging capabilities can demonstrate the pathology and pathophysiology in Lhermitte-Duclos disease better. SWI helps in detecting the veins around the thickened folia. (orig.)

  6. Advanced MR imaging in Lhermitte-Duclos disease: moving closer to pathology and pathophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.; Krishnamoorthy, T.; Kesavadas, C. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Kerala (India); Radhakrishnan, V.V. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Pathology, Kerala (India)

    2007-09-15

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD, dysplastic gangliocytoma) is an extremely rare cerebellar lesion of uncertain etiology. The debate as to whether it constitutes a neoplastic, malformative, or hamartomatous lesion is still continuing. In this report we explore the usefulness of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging, and chemical shift imaging (CSI) in demonstrating the pathology and pathophysiology in two patients with LDD. MR imaging of the brain and the cervicodorsal spine was performed on a 1.5-T scanner in a 47-year-old woman presenting with numbness and paresthesia of both upper and lower limbs, and in a 17-year-old male with right frontal headache associated with neck pain. Routine imaging in the first patient showed a left-side cerebellar mass with characteristic 'tiger-striped' thick folia associated with Chiari I malformation, tonsillar herniation and cervicodorsal syringomyelia and in the second patient a right cerebellar mass with similar findings. The SWI demonstrated the characteristic deep running veins between the folia, which is thought to be the cause for vascular contrast enhancement. Diffusion showed a T2 shine-through effect with mild increased diffusivity, and perfusion showed increase in relative cerebral blood volume, relative cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time in the lesion. MR spectroscopy demonstrated reduction in metabolites and a prominent lactate peak in both the patients. The pathological and pathophysiological significance of these findings is discussed. MRI with the newer imaging capabilities can demonstrate the pathology and pathophysiology in Lhermitte-Duclos disease better. SWI helps in detecting the veins around the thickened folia. (orig.)

  7. Whole-slide imaging in pathology: the potential impact on PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Steven C.

    2007-03-01

    Pathology, the medical specialty charged with the evaluation of macroscopic and microscopic aspects of disease, is increasingly turning to digital imaging. While the conventional tissue blocks and glass slides form an "archive" that pathology departments must maintain, digital images acquired from microscopes or digital slide scanners are increasingly used for telepathology, consultation, and intra-facility communication. Since many healthcare facilities are moving to "enterprise PACS" with departments in addition to radiology using the infrastructure of such systems, some understanding of the potential of whole-slide digital images is important. Network and storage designers, in particular, are very likely to be impacted if a significant number of such images are to be moved on, or stored (even temporarily) in, enterprise PACS. As an example, a typical commercial whole-slide imaging system typically generates 15 gigabytes per slide scanned (per focal plane). Many of these whole-slide scanners have a throughput of 1000 slides per day. If that full capacity is used and all the resulting digital data is moved to the enterprise PACS, it amounts to 15 terabytes per day; the amount of data a large radiology department might generate in a year or two. This paper will review both the clinical scenarios of whole-slide imaging as well as the resulting data volumes. The author will emphasize the potential PACS infrastructure impact of such huge data volumes.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: examples of normal anatomy and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, D M; Worthington, B S; Preston, B J; Roebuck, E J; McKim-Thomas, H; Hawkes, R C; Holland, G N; Moore, W S

    1983-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance images of the knee were obtained from three normal volunteers and from two patients. The pathology included an osteosarcoma of the distal femur and a fracture of the tibia. Steady State Free Precession (SSFP) techniques were used with a 0.15 Tesla resistive type magnet. Normal anatomy was well displayed and the size of the osteosarcoma was accurately predicted. Using SSFP techniques, the blood in the knee joint was not visualised, but the underlying tibial fracture was clearly outlined.

  9. Pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity: usual and unusual manifestations and pitfalls on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Yoshida, Shusaku; Nishitani, Hiromu [University of Tokushima, Department of Radiology, Tokushima (Japan); Uehara, Hisanori [University of Tokushima, Department of Molecular and Environmental Pathology, Tokushima (Japan); Shimazu, Hideki [Oe Kyoudo Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The endometrial cavity may demonstrate various imaging manifestations such as normal, reactive, inflammatory, and benign and malignant neoplasms. We evaluated usual and unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the uterine endometrial cavity, and described the diagnostic clues to differential diagnoses. Surgically proven pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity were evaluated retrospectively with pathologic correlation. The pathologies included benign endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial hyperplasia and polyp, malignant endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial carcinoma and carcinosarcoma, endometrial-myometrial neoplasm such as endometrial stromal sarcoma, pregnancy-related lesions in the endometrial cavity such as gestational trophoblastic diseases (hydatidiform mole, invasive mole and choriocarcinoma) and placental polyp, myometrial lesions simulating endometrial lesions such as submucosal leiomyoma and some adenomyosis, endometrial neoplasms simulating myometrial lesions such as adenomyomatous polyp and endometrial lesions arising in the hemicavity of a septate/bicornate uterus, and fluid collections in the uterine cavity (hydro/hemato/pyometra). It is important to recognize various imaging findings in these diseases, in order to make a correct preoperative diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. A high-performance spatial database based approach for pathology imaging algorithm evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Algorithm evaluation provides a means to characterize variability across image analysis algorithms, validate algorithms by comparison with human annotations, combine results from multiple algorithms for performance improvement, and facilitate algorithm sensitivity studies. The sizes of images and image analysis results in pathology image analysis pose significant challenges in algorithm evaluation. We present an efficient parallel spatial database approach to model, normalize, manage, and query large volumes of analytical image result data. This provides an efficient platform for algorithm evaluation. Our experiments with a set of brain tumor images demonstrate the application, scalability, and effectiveness of the platform. Context: The paper describes an approach and platform for evaluation of pathology image analysis algorithms. The platform facilitates algorithm evaluation through a high-performance database built on the Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS data model. Aims: (1 Develop a framework to support algorithm evaluation by modeling and managing analytical results and human annotations from pathology images; (2 Create a robust data normalization tool for converting, validating, and fixing spatial data from algorithm or human annotations; (3 Develop a set of queries to support data sampling and result comparisons; (4 Achieve high performance computation capacity via a parallel data management infrastructure, parallel data loading and spatial indexing optimizations in this infrastructure. Materials and Methods: We have considered two scenarios for algorithm evaluation: (1 algorithm comparison where multiple result sets from different methods are compared and consolidated; and (2 algorithm validation where algorithm results are compared with human annotations. We have developed a spatial normalization toolkit to validate and normalize spatial boundaries produced by image analysis algorithms or human annotations. The

  11. A high-performance spatial database based approach for pathology imaging algorithm evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gao, Jingjing; Cooper, Lee A D; Kurc, Tahsin; Zhou, Zhengwen; Adler, David; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Katigbak, Bryan; Brat, Daniel J; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Algorithm evaluation provides a means to characterize variability across image analysis algorithms, validate algorithms by comparison with human annotations, combine results from multiple algorithms for performance improvement, and facilitate algorithm sensitivity studies. The sizes of images and image analysis results in pathology image analysis pose significant challenges in algorithm evaluation. We present an efficient parallel spatial database approach to model, normalize, manage, and query large volumes of analytical image result data. This provides an efficient platform for algorithm evaluation. Our experiments with a set of brain tumor images demonstrate the application, scalability, and effectiveness of the platform. The paper describes an approach and platform for evaluation of pathology image analysis algorithms. The platform facilitates algorithm evaluation through a high-performance database built on the Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS) data model. (1) Develop a framework to support algorithm evaluation by modeling and managing analytical results and human annotations from pathology images; (2) Create a robust data normalization tool for converting, validating, and fixing spatial data from algorithm or human annotations; (3) Develop a set of queries to support data sampling and result comparisons; (4) Achieve high performance computation capacity via a parallel data management infrastructure, parallel data loading and spatial indexing optimizations in this infrastructure. WE HAVE CONSIDERED TWO SCENARIOS FOR ALGORITHM EVALUATION: (1) algorithm comparison where multiple result sets from different methods are compared and consolidated; and (2) algorithm validation where algorithm results are compared with human annotations. We have developed a spatial normalization toolkit to validate and normalize spatial boundaries produced by image analysis algorithms or human annotations. The validated data were formatted based on the PAIS data model and

  12. Robust skull stripping using multiple MR image contrasts insensitive to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Snehashis; Butman, John A; Pham, Dzung L

    2017-02-01

    Automatic skull-stripping or brain extraction of magnetic resonance (MR) images is often a fundamental step in many neuroimage processing pipelines. The accuracy of subsequent image processing relies on the accuracy of the skull-stripping. Although many automated stripping methods have been proposed in the past, it is still an active area of research particularly in the context of brain pathology. Most stripping methods are validated on T 1 -w MR images of normal brains, especially because high resolution T 1 -w sequences are widely acquired and ground truth manual brain mask segmentations are publicly available for normal brains. However, different MR acquisition protocols can provide complementary information about the brain tissues, which can be exploited for better distinction between brain, cerebrospinal fluid, and unwanted tissues such as skull, dura, marrow, or fat. This is especially true in the presence of pathology, where hemorrhages or other types of lesions can have similar intensities as skull in a T 1 -w image. In this paper, we propose a sparse patch based Multi-cONtrast brain STRipping method (MONSTR), 2 where non-local patch information from one or more atlases, which contain multiple MR sequences and reference delineations of brain masks, are combined to generate a target brain mask. We compared MONSTR with four state-of-the-art, publicly available methods: BEaST, SPECTRE, ROBEX, and OptiBET. We evaluated the performance of these methods on 6 datasets consisting of both healthy subjects and patients with various pathologies. Three datasets (ADNI, MRBrainS, NAMIC) are publicly available, consisting of 44 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with schizophrenia. Other three in-house datasets, comprising 87 subjects in total, consisted of patients with mild to severe traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, and various movement disorders. A combination of T 1 -w, T 2 -w were used to skull-strip these datasets. We show significant improvement in stripping

  13. Using MATLAB software with Tomcat server and Java platform for remote image analysis in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Tomasz

    2011-03-30

    The Matlab software is a one of the most advanced development tool for application in engineering practice. From our point of view the most important is the image processing toolbox, offering many built-in functions, including mathematical morphology, and implementation of a many artificial neural networks as AI. It is very popular platform for creation of the specialized program for image analysis, also in pathology. Based on the latest version of Matlab Builder Java toolbox, it is possible to create the software, serving as a remote system for image analysis in pathology via internet communication. The internet platform can be realized based on Java Servlet Pages with Tomcat server as servlet container. In presented software implementation we propose remote image analysis realized by Matlab algorithms. These algorithms can be compiled to executable jar file with the help of Matlab Builder Java toolbox. The Matlab function must be declared with the set of input data, output structure with numerical results and Matlab web figure. Any function prepared in that manner can be used as a Java function in Java Servlet Pages (JSP). The graphical user interface providing the input data and displaying the results (also in graphical form) must be implemented in JSP. Additionally the data storage to database can be implemented within algorithm written in Matlab with the help of Matlab Database Toolbox directly with the image processing. The complete JSP page can be run by Tomcat server. The proposed tool for remote image analysis was tested on the Computerized Analysis of Medical Images (CAMI) software developed by author. The user provides image and case information (diagnosis, staining, image parameter etc.). When analysis is initialized, input data with image are sent to servlet on Tomcat. When analysis is done, client obtains the graphical results as an image with marked recognized cells and also the quantitative output. Additionally, the results are stored in a server

  14. MR arthrography gadolinium versus standard MR imaging in rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.; Brahme, S.K.; Karzel, R.; Cervilla, V.; Snyder, S.; Schweitzer, M.; Flannigan, B.; Resnick, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of MR imaging with and without intraarticular gadolinium in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology, using arthroscopy as the gold standard. The authors examined 36 patients, first with T2-weighted sequences and then with T1-weighted sequences after the injection of 15-20 mL of diluted gadolinium. The images were read blindly by three radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal MR imaging. The results were compared with those of arthroscopy. In 16 of 19 arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, both sequences demonstrated no evidence of rotator cuff tear. The remaining three cases were interpreted as partial or full-thickness tears. Of 12 partial tears, T1-weighted images with intraarticular gadolinium demonstrated a partial tear in five, degeneration in four, a full thickness tear in two, and a normal rotator cuff in one

  15. SPECT/CT in imaging foot and ankle pathology-the demise of other coregistration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Hosahalli K; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Vijayanathan, Sanjay; Fogelman, Ignac

    2010-01-01

    Disorders of the ankle and foot are common and given the complex anatomy and function of the foot, they present a significant clinical challenge. Imaging plays a crucial role in the management of these patients, with multiple imaging options available to the clinician. The American College of radiology has set the appropriateness criteria for the use of the available investigating modalities in the management of foot and ankle pathologies. These are broadly classified into anatomical and functional imaging modalities. Recently, single-photon emission computed tomography and/or computed tomography scanners, which can elegantly combine functional and anatomical images have been introduced, promising an exciting and important development. This review describes our clinical experience with single-photon emission computed tomography and/or computed tomography and discusses potential applications of these techniques.

  16. MDA-image: an environment of networked desktop computers for teleradiology/pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, M E; Richli, W R; Carrasco, C H; Wallace, S; Zimmerman, S O; Ayala, A G; Benjamin, R S; Chee, S; Wood, P; Daniels, P

    1991-04-01

    MDA-Image, a project of The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, is an environment of networked desktop computers for teleradiology/pathology. Radiographic film is digitized with a film scanner and histopathologic slides are digitized using a red, green, and blue (RGB) video camera connected to a microscope. Digitized images are stored on a data server connected to the institution's computer communication network (Ethernet) and can be displayed from authorized desktop computers connected to Ethernet. Images are digitized for cases presented at the Bone Tumor Management Conference, a multidisciplinary conference in which treatment options are discussed among clinicians, surgeons, radiologists, pathologists, radiotherapists, and medical oncologists. These radiographic and histologic images are shown on a large screen computer monitor during the conference. They are available for later review for follow-up or representation.

  17. MR imaging of the finger tendons: Normal anatomy and commonly encountered pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, Dina; Stanley, Anthony; Gentili, Amilcare; Hughes, Tudor; Chung, Christine B.

    2005-01-01

    MR imaging has emerged as a powerful tool in the evaluation of soft tissue structures such as the tendons of the hand and finger due to its excellent soft tissue contrast and multiplanar imaging capabilities. In the finger and hand, perhaps more than in any other location in the body, a detailed and intimate understanding of anatomy is crucial for lesion localization, directing clinical management and predicting long-term prognosis. These issues are of paramount importance to both the clinician and imager, both faced with the challenge of the complex anatomy and pathology associated with these delicate structures. The anatomy of the finger including intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, retinacular structures, and tendons will be discussed. The MR imaging features of common lesions of the tendons of the hand and finger will be reviewed

  18. An analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging and pathology of intracal lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianli; Zhou Junlin; Ma Yongheng; Dong Chi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the MRI features of the intracranial lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma and the correlation between the MRI features and pathology. Methods: Review retrospectively the MRI and pathologic data of seven patients with lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma which were confirmed by surgery and pathology. Results: The seven cases of lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma were solitary, six cases demonstrated flat growth along the meninges, five cases had not yet formed specific nodules, and two cases exhibited irregular lobulation. Seven cases had no clear boundary, peritumoral brain edema was obvious and adjacent brain tissues were invaded to varying degrees. After plain MRI scans, the focuses of seven cases exhibited lower-isointense signal in T1WI, five cases revealed higher-isointense signal and two cases showed lower-isointense signal in T2WI. Enhancement scans demonstrated marked enhancement in seven cases, and the meninges in six cases thicken irregularly and extensively. Pathology showed the richness and diversity of cells, an infiltration containing plasma cells and lymphocytes, as well as the unequal areas of neoplastic spindle cells and meninge epithelial cells. Conclusion: Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma is a subtype meningioma of WHO I-grade, which is seldom seen and whose imaging appearances are varied from ordinary meningioma. Its features include growing flat along the meninges, irregular forms, unclear boundary, obvious edema, notable strengthening effect, usual invasion of adjacent brain tissues, and similar inflammation.

  19. A data model and database for high-resolution pathology analytical image informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The systematic analysis of imaged pathology specimens often results in a vast amount of morphological information at both the cellular and sub-cellular scales. While microscopy scanners and computerized analysis are capable of capturing and analyzing data rapidly, microscopy image data remain underutilized in research and clinical settings. One major obstacle which tends to reduce wider adoption of these new technologies throughout the clinical and scientific communities is the challenge of managing, querying, and integrating the vast amounts of data resulting from the analysis of large digital pathology datasets. This paper presents a data model, which addresses these challenges, and demonstrates its implementation in a relational database system. Context: This paper describes a data model, referred to as Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS, and a database implementation, which are designed to support the data management and query requirements of detailed characterization of micro-anatomic morphology through many interrelated analysis pipelines on whole-slide images and tissue microarrays (TMAs. Aims: (1 Development of a data model capable of efficiently representing and storing virtual slide related image, annotation, markup, and feature information. (2 Development of a database, based on the data model, capable of supporting queries for data retrieval based on analysis and image metadata, queries for comparison of results from different analyses, and spatial queries on segmented regions, features, and classified objects. Settings and Design: The work described in this paper is motivated by the challenges associated with characterization of micro-scale features for comparative and correlative analyses involving whole-slides tissue images and TMAs. Technologies for digitizing tissues have advanced significantly in the past decade. Slide scanners are capable of producing high-magnification, high-resolution images from whole

  20. A data model and database for high-resolution pathology analytical image informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Chen, Wenjin; Sharma, Ashish; Niedermayr, Cristobal; Oh, Tae W; Brat, Daniel; Farris, Alton B; Foran, David J; Saltz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The systematic analysis of imaged pathology specimens often results in a vast amount of morphological information at both the cellular and sub-cellular scales. While microscopy scanners and computerized analysis are capable of capturing and analyzing data rapidly, microscopy image data remain underutilized in research and clinical settings. One major obstacle which tends to reduce wider adoption of these new technologies throughout the clinical and scientific communities is the challenge of managing, querying, and integrating the vast amounts of data resulting from the analysis of large digital pathology datasets. This paper presents a data model, which addresses these challenges, and demonstrates its implementation in a relational database system. This paper describes a data model, referred to as Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS), and a database implementation, which are designed to support the data management and query requirements of detailed characterization of micro-anatomic morphology through many interrelated analysis pipelines on whole-slide images and tissue microarrays (TMAs). (1) Development of a data model capable of efficiently representing and storing virtual slide related image, annotation, markup, and feature information. (2) Development of a database, based on the data model, capable of supporting queries for data retrieval based on analysis and image metadata, queries for comparison of results from different analyses, and spatial queries on segmented regions, features, and classified objects. The work described in this paper is motivated by the challenges associated with characterization of micro-scale features for comparative and correlative analyses involving whole-slides tissue images and TMAs. Technologies for digitizing tissues have advanced significantly in the past decade. Slide scanners are capable of producing high-magnification, high-resolution images from whole slides and TMAs within several minutes. Hence, it is becoming

  1. Learning pathology using collaborative vs. individual annotation of whole slide images: a mixed methods trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, Michael; Leung, Betty; Dowdell, Stephanie; Velan, Gary M

    2016-12-12

    Students in biomedical disciplines require understanding of normal and abnormal microscopic appearances of human tissues (histology and histopathology). For this purpose, practical classes in these disciplines typically use virtual microscopy, viewing digitised whole slide images in web browsers. To enhance engagement, tools have been developed to enable individual or collaborative annotation of whole slide images within web browsers. To date, there have been no studies that have critically compared the impact on learning of individual and collaborative annotations on whole slide images. Junior and senior students engaged in Pathology practical classes within Medical Science and Medicine programs participated in cross-over trials of individual and collaborative annotation activities. Students' understanding of microscopic morphology was compared using timed online quizzes, while students' perceptions of learning were evaluated using an online questionnaire. For senior medical students, collaborative annotation of whole slide images was superior for understanding key microscopic features when compared to individual annotation; whilst being at least equivalent to individual annotation for junior medical science students. Across cohorts, students agreed that the annotation activities provided a user-friendly learning environment that met their flexible learning needs, improved efficiency, provided useful feedback, and helped them to set learning priorities. Importantly, these activities were also perceived to enhance motivation and improve understanding. Collaborative annotation improves understanding of microscopic morphology for students with sufficient background understanding of the discipline. These findings have implications for the deployment of annotation activities in biomedical curricula, and potentially for postgraduate training in Anatomical Pathology.

  2. Experimental abscess in the thigh of rabbit : magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Chung, Yoong Ki; Jang, Ja June

    1996-01-01

    To understand MR imaging characteristics, of abscesses by correlation with pathologic findings, with emphasis on the hypointense rim of the abscess wall on T2-weighted images. We experimentally induced twenty abscesses on both thighs of ten New Zealand white rabbits by innoculation of E. coli. Spin-echo axial T1-weighted images(T1WI), proton density weighted images(PDWI), T2-weighted images(T2WI) and gadolinium enhanced T1WI of two rabbits were each obtained at 1 and 3 days, and at 1, 2 and 4 weeks following innoculation of pathogens. Rabbits were sacrificed after MR imaging, and freezing, sectioning along MR imaging planes and histopathologic examination were subsequently carried out. MR-pathologic correlation was performed, with emphasis on the MR signal characteristics of the abscess wall. In 19 abscesses, necrotic portions except gas showed hypointensity or hyperintensity on T1WI and hyperintensity on T2WI. Peripheral inflammatory reaction showed hypointensity on T1WI, hyperintensity on PDWI and T2WI, and contrast enhancement. Abscess wall showed slightly increased signal intensity on T1WI. A hypointense rim on PDWI and T2WI appeared from 3 days after pathogen innoculation. The rim was thickest at 1 week, and showed multilayers at 2 weeks and double layers at 4 weeks after pathogen innoculation. Cellular and necrotic debris was accumulated at the inner portion of the abscess wall. Inflammatory cells were mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes. Macrophages, which appeared at 3 days, suggested active phagocytosis at 1 week after innoculation. Thereafter, inflammatory reactions decreased and fibrosis progressed. The hypointense rim of the abscess wall on T2WI reflects the accumulation of cellular debris, the paramagnetic effect of free radicals due to active phagocytosing macrophages during the abscess forming stage, and fibrosis during the maturation stage

  3. Normal and pathological findings for the facial nerve on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Noury, K., E-mail: Kalnoury@kau.edu.sa [Department of Otolaryngology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Lotfy, A. [Radiology Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital and International Medical Centre, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the enhanced radiological anatomy and common pathological conditions of the facial nerve by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the MRI findings of the facial nerve of 146 patients who visited a tertiary academic referral center was conducted. Results: The radiological anatomy of the facial nerve was well illustrated using MRI, as were most of the common pathological conditions of the facial nerve. Conclusions: Enhancement of the facial nerve in MRI should be correlated with the clinical data. Normal individuals can show enhancement of the tympanic or vertical segments of the facial nerve. Enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the nerve is almost diagnostic of Bell's palsy. No specific enhancement patterns were observed for tumours or for infections of the middle or external ear. A larger population study is required for the accurate assessment of facial nerve enhancement in multiple sclerosis patients.

  4. Normal and pathological findings for the facial nerve on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Noury, K.; Lotfy, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the enhanced radiological anatomy and common pathological conditions of the facial nerve by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the MRI findings of the facial nerve of 146 patients who visited a tertiary academic referral center was conducted. Results: The radiological anatomy of the facial nerve was well illustrated using MRI, as were most of the common pathological conditions of the facial nerve. Conclusions: Enhancement of the facial nerve in MRI should be correlated with the clinical data. Normal individuals can show enhancement of the tympanic or vertical segments of the facial nerve. Enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the nerve is almost diagnostic of Bell's palsy. No specific enhancement patterns were observed for tumours or for infections of the middle or external ear. A larger population study is required for the accurate assessment of facial nerve enhancement in multiple sclerosis patients.

  5. Spring ligament complex: Illustrated normal anatomy and spectrum of pathologies on 3T MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Hythem [Musculoskeletal Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Saini, Vikram [Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wadhwa, Vibhor [Department of Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Liu, George [Orthopaedic Surgery, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh, E-mail: avneesh.chhabra@utsouthwestern.edu [Musculoskeletal Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Spring ligament complex is an important stabilizer of medial arch of foot. • Of all SLC components, the integrity of Supero-Medial band is the most important. • Associated pathologies with SLC instability include PTT injury, pes planovalgus and sinus tarsi syndrome. • Conservative and operative management are viable depending on pes planovalgus progression. - Abstract: The spring (plantar calcaneonavicular) ligament complex connects the calcaneus and navicular bone of the foot and serves as the primary static stabilizer of the medial longitudinal arch of the foot. In this article, we describe the normal anatomy of the spring ligament complex, illustrate 3T magnetic resonance imaging appearances in its normal and abnormal states, and discuss the pathological associations with relevant case examples.

  6. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ijin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haeryoung [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients.

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Ijin; Kim, Haeryoung; Lee, Jeong Min

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients

  8. Pictorial essay of ultrasound-reconstructed coronal plane images of the uterus in different uterine pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Mihaela; Grigore, Anamaria; Gafitanu, Dumitru; Furnica, Cristina

    2018-04-01

    Imaging in the major planes (horizontal, coronal, and sagittal) of the uterus is important for determining anatomy and allowing the findings to be standardized, and for evaluating and diagnosing different pathological conditions in clinical practice. Examination of the coronal plane is an important step in identifying uterine pathologies and their relationships to the endometrial canal. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reveals the normal anatomy better and improves the depiction of abnormal anatomy, as the coronal plane of the uterus can easily be obtained using 3D reconstruction techniques. Our pictorial essay demonstrates that adding 3D ultrasound to a routine gynecological workup can be beneficial for clinicians, enabling a precise diagnosis to be made. In addition, the volumes obtained and stored by 3D ultrasound can allow students or residents to become more familiar with normal and abnormal pelvic structures. Clin. Anat. 31:373-379, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Temporomandibular joint MR images: Incidental head and neck findings and pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Kaan; Avsever, Hakan; Aksoy, Seçil; Seki, Umut; Bozkurt, Poyzan

    2017-10-17

    To report the number and frequency of incidental findings (IFs) detected during magnetic resonance (MR) imaging screening of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to define related diseases. Bilateral TMJ MR images in the sagittal and coronal sections, from 518 patients with TMJ symptoms were evaluated retrospectively. Patients who were diagnosed with IFs were sent for consultation and clarification of the findings. Patient age, gender, IFs, locations, and diseases were classified and noted.  Results: Seventy-eight (15%) patients were diagnosed with 117 IFs. Of them, 43 were diagnosed with a single IF, and 35 were diagnosed with more than one IF. The most frequent locations were paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. The most frequent diseases were inflammatory and cystic lesions.  Discussion: While examining TMJ MR images, it is important to check for evidence of IFs or pathologies that may have mimicked signs and symptoms of TMJ disorders.

  10. 3D Modeling of Vascular Pathologies from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor Rivera, Diego; Orkisz, Maciej; Arias, Julian; Uriza, Luis Felipe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for generating 3D vascular models from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) using a fast marching algorithm. The main contributions of this work are: the use of the original image for defining a speed function (which determines the movement of the interface) and the calculation of the time in which the interface identifies the artery. The proposed method was validated on pathologic carotid artery images of patients and vascular phantoms. A visual appraisal of vascular models obtained with the method shows a satisfactory extraction of the vascular wall. A quantitative assessment proved that the generated models depend on the values of algorithm parameters. The maximum induced error was equal to 1.34 voxels in the diameter of the measured stenoses.

  11. Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia of the extremities: MR imaging findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Suh, Jin-Suck; Lim, Byung Il; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoo-Ho

    2004-01-01

    We report the MRI findings of three cases of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) of the extremities with correlation of the pathologic findings. The IPEH is a non-neoplastic reactive lesion within the vessels and is commonly associated with thrombi. Signal intensity of the IPEH is complex due to the thrombi and the PEH itself. The thrombi are characterized by a slightly hyperintense signal on T1- and T2-weighted images compared with that of muscle when it comes at the medium stage of hemorrhage. Papillary endothelial hyperplastic tissue appears either as iso- or hyperintense to the muscle on T2- and T1-weighted images and shows variable enhancement on Gd-DTPA-enhanced images. (orig.)

  12. Preoperative localization of epileptic foci with SPECT brain perfusion imaging, electrocorticography, surgery and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Shaowei; Xu Wengui; Chen Hongyan; Weng Yongmei; Yang Pinghua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The value of preoperative localization of epileptic foci with SPECT brain perfusion imaging was investigated. Methods: The study population consisted of 23 patients with intractable partial seizures which was difficult to control with anticonvulsant for long period. In order to preoperatively locate the epileptic foci, double SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed during interictal and ictal stage. The foci were confirmed with electrocorticography (EcoG), surgery and pathology. Results: The author checked with EcoG the foci shown by SPECT, 23 patients had all typical spike discharge. The regions of radioactivity increase in ictal matched with the abnormal electrical activity areas that EcoG showed. The spike wave originated in the corresponding cerebrum cortex instead of hyperplastic and adherent arachnoid or tumor itself. Conclusions: SPECT brain perfusion imaging contributes to distinguishing location, size, perfusion and functioning of epileptogenic foci, and has some directive function on to making out a treatment programme at preoperation

  13. Characteristic MR and CT imaging findings of hepatobiliary paragonimiasis and their pathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chunyan; Hu, Yajun; Chen, Weixia [Dept of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan Univ., Sichuan (China)], e-mail: wxchen25@126.com

    2012-06-15

    Background: Hepatobiliary paragonimiasis (HP) is not commonly encountered and may be confused with hepatobiliary tumors; however, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of HP allow this entity to be distinguished from other diseases. Purpose: To present the CT and MRI findings in patients with HP and to describe some specific imaging findings along with their pathological correlations. Material and Methods: Imaging and clinical findings of 21 patients (9 boys/men and 12 girls/women; age range 3-67 years; mean age 40 years) who were diagnosed with HP were retrospectively evaluated. Among these patients, 16 underwent CT examination only, two had MR examination only, and three underwent both CT and MR. All patients underwent surgery, and the HP diagnosis was confirmed by the surgical and histopathologic results. Results: Chronic abdominal pain or back pain was reported by 14 patients, severe abdominal pain with acute onset was reported by one patient, and six patients were asymptomatic and were discovered incidentally. Peripheral eosinophilia was present in 14 patients (14/21, 66.7%), and abnormal liver function tests were found in 16 patients (16/21, 76.2%). Of the 19 patients who underwent CT imaging, 17 patients showed multiple mixed hypodense lesions or multiple cysts with inlaying septation with separate irregular rims or circular enhancement on post-contrast CT images. Tunnel-shaped micro abscesses and necrotic cavities were found in the lesions of 12 of those 17 patients. The other two patients showed smaller cystic masses. MRI showed faveolate T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas in the liver parenchyma with rim or peripheral enhancement. Nodular or circular hyperintense materials were found scattered in the lesions on T1-weighted imaging. Conclusion: CT and MRI can reveal the radiological-pathological features of HP. Together with laboratory findings, MRI and CT findings may provide diagnostic clues, especially in endemic

  14. Characteristic MR and CT imaging findings of hepatobiliary paragonimiasis and their pathologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chunyan; Hu, Yajun; Chen, Weixia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hepatobiliary paragonimiasis (HP) is not commonly encountered and may be confused with hepatobiliary tumors; however, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of HP allow this entity to be distinguished from other diseases. Purpose: To present the CT and MRI findings in patients with HP and to describe some specific imaging findings along with their pathological correlations. Material and Methods: Imaging and clinical findings of 21 patients (9 boys/men and 12 girls/women; age range 3-67 years; mean age 40 years) who were diagnosed with HP were retrospectively evaluated. Among these patients, 16 underwent CT examination only, two had MR examination only, and three underwent both CT and MR. All patients underwent surgery, and the HP diagnosis was confirmed by the surgical and histopathologic results. Results: Chronic abdominal pain or back pain was reported by 14 patients, severe abdominal pain with acute onset was reported by one patient, and six patients were asymptomatic and were discovered incidentally. Peripheral eosinophilia was present in 14 patients (14/21, 66.7%), and abnormal liver function tests were found in 16 patients (16/21, 76.2%). Of the 19 patients who underwent CT imaging, 17 patients showed multiple mixed hypodense lesions or multiple cysts with inlaying septation with separate irregular rims or circular enhancement on post-contrast CT images. Tunnel-shaped micro abscesses and necrotic cavities were found in the lesions of 12 of those 17 patients. The other two patients showed smaller cystic masses. MRI showed faveolate T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas in the liver parenchyma with rim or peripheral enhancement. Nodular or circular hyperintense materials were found scattered in the lesions on T1-weighted imaging. Conclusion: CT and MRI can reveal the radiological-pathological features of HP. Together with laboratory findings, MRI and CT findings may provide diagnostic clues, especially in endemic

  15. Image Montaging for Creating a Virtual Pathology Slide: An Innovative and Economical Tool to Obtain a Whole Slide Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Spoorthi Ravi; Chippagiri, Prashanthi; Pandurangappa, Rohit; Annavajjula, Saileela; Rajashekaraiah, Premalatha Bidadi

    2016-01-01

    Background . Microscopes are omnipresent throughout the field of biological research. With microscopes one can see in detail what is going on at the cellular level in tissues. Though it is a ubiquitous tool, the limitation is that with high magnification there is a small field of view. It is often advantageous to see an entire sample at high magnification. Over the years technological advancements in optics have helped to provide solutions to this limitation of microscopes by creating the so-called dedicated "slide scanners" which can provide a "whole slide digital image." These scanners can provide seamless, large-field-of-view, high resolution image of entire tissue section. The only disadvantage of such complete slide imaging system is its outrageous cost, thereby hindering their practical use by most laboratories, especially in developing and low resource countries. Methods . In a quest for their substitute, we tried commonly used image editing software Adobe Photoshop along with a basic image capturing device attached to a trinocular microscope to create a digital pathology slide. Results . The seamless image created using Adobe Photoshop maintained its diagnostic quality. Conclusion . With time and effort photomicrographs obtained from a basic camera-microscope set up can be combined and merged in Adobe Photoshop to create a whole slide digital image of practically usable quality at a negligible cost.

  16. Pathological Brain Detection by a Novel Image Feature—Fractional Fourier Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To detect pathological brain conditions early is a core procedure for patients so as to have enough time for treatment. Traditional manual detection is either cumbersome, or expensive, or time-consuming. We aim to offer a system that can automatically identify pathological brain images in this paper. Method: We propose a novel image feature, viz., Fractional Fourier Entropy (FRFE, which is based on the combination of Fractional Fourier Transform (FRFT and Shannon entropy. Afterwards, the Welch’s t-test (WTT and Mahalanobis distance (MD were harnessed to select distinguishing features. Finally, we introduced an advanced classifier: twin support vector machine (TSVM. Results: A 10 × K-fold stratified cross validation test showed that this proposed “FRFE + WTT + TSVM” yielded an accuracy of 100.00%, 100.00%, and 99.57% on datasets that contained 66, 160, and 255 brain images, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed “FRFE + WTT + TSVM” method is superior to 20 state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Septum-like structures in lipoma and liposarcoma: MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujimoto, R.; Kotoura, Y.; Tsuboyama, T.; Matsusue, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Itoh, T.; Konishi, J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the septum-like structures in predominantly lipomatous tumors, by correlating fat-suppressed MR images with histopathologic findings. Design and patients. The MR findings of three cases of well-differentiated liposarcoma (atypical lipoma), one case of lipoma-like component of dedifferentiated liposarcoma, and nine cases of lipoma were analyzed. T1-, T2-, and fat-suppressed T1-weighted images after Gd-DTPA administration were obtained. Surgical specimens from five patients (four with liposarcoma and one with lipoma) were also scanned with a MR unit, and compared with the pathologic findings. Results and conclusions. Enhancement features of lipoma and liposarcoma were well visualized on fat-suppressed T1-weighted images after Gd-DTPA administration. The septum-like structures of liposarcoma are thick and enhanced considerably, while septa of lipoma are thin and enhanced only slightly. Pathologically, the septum-like structures of liposarcoma contained muscle fibers and the septa of lipoma represented fibrous capsule. Identification of well-enhanced septa in a predominantly lipomatous tumor helps to differentiate malignant tumors from lipomas. As the septum-like structures of liposarcoma contain a skeletal muscle component the tumor might need more extensive surgical procedures including resection of adjacent muscles. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity: findings on MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.Y.; Ahn, J.M.; Yoon, H.K.; Do, Y.S.; Kim, S.H.; Choo, S.W.; Choo, I.W.; Suh, Y.L.; Kim, S.M.; Kang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the findings of intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity on MR imaging and to correlate these findings with histopathologic examination.Design and patients. The findings on MR imaging and the medical records of 14 patients with an intramuscular vascular malformation of the extremity were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent surgical excision. Diagnoses were based on the results of pathologic examination. Findings on MR imaging were noted and correlated with the histopathologic findings.Results. Intramuscular vascular malformations of an extremity showed multi-septate, honeycomb, or mixed appearance on MR imaging. Multi-septate areas correlated with dilated and communicating vascular spaces with flattened endothelium. Honeycomb areas corresponded to vascular spaces with inconspicuous small lumina and thickened vascular walls. Areas of increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images were found in all intramuscular vascular malformations. Infiltrative margins were more commonly seen in intramuscular lymphaticovenous malformations. Adherence to neurovascular structures and orientation of the lesion along the long axis of the affected muscle were more commonly seen in intramuscular venous malformations.Conclusions. Intramuscular vascular malformations showed either a multi-septate, honeycomb, or mixed appearance, reflecting the size of the vascular spaces and the thickness of the smooth muscles of the vessel walls. Prediction of the subtype of an intramuscular vascular malformation of an extremity on MR imaging seems to be difficult, although there are associated findings that may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of each subtype. (orig.)

  19. Fusion of SPECT/TC images: Usefulness and benefits in degenerative spinal cord pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Monica; Ucros, Gonzalo; Bermudez, Sonia; Morillo, Anibal; Rodriguez, Andres

    2005-01-01

    The objectives are to compare CT and SPECT bone scintigraphy evaluated independently with SPECT-CT fusion images in patients with known degenerative spinal pathology. To demonstrate the clinical usefulness of CT and SPECT fusion images. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients with suspected degenerative spinal disease were evaluated with thin-slice, non-angled helical CT and bone scintigrams with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), both with multiplanar reconstructions within a 24-hour period After independent evaluation by a nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist, multimodality image fusion software was used to merge the CT and SPECT studies and a final consensus interpretation of the combined images was obtained. Results: Thirty-two SPECT bone scintigraphy images, helical CT studies and SPECT-CT fusion images were obtained for 31 patients with degenerative spinal disease. The results of the bone scintigraphy and CT scans were in agreement in 17 pairs of studies (53.12%). In these studies image fusion did not provide additional information on the location or extension of the lesions. In 11 of the study pairs (34.2%), the information obtained was not in agreement between scintigraphy and CT studies: CT images demonstrated several abnormalities, whereas the SPECT images showed only one dominant lesion, or the SPECT images did not provide enough information for anatomical localization. In these cases image fusion helped establish the precise localization of the most clinically significant lesion, which matched the lesion with the greatest uptake. In 4 studies (12.5%) the CT and SPECT images were not in agreement: CT and SPECT images showed different information (normal scintigraphy, abnormal CT), thus leading to inconclusive fusion images. Conclusion: The use of CT-SPECT fusion images in degenerative spinal disease allows for the integration of anatomic detail with physiologic and functional information. CT-SPECT fusion improves the

  20. Long bicipital tendon of the shoulder: normal anatomy and pathologic findings on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, S J; Fitzgerald, S W; Quinn, S F; Carrera, G F; Black, K P; Lawson, T L

    1992-05-01

    The tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle (long bicipital tendon) has a complex course from its muscle belly to its insertion onto the supraglenoid tubercle/glenoid labrum. It is stabilized by numerous tendinous and ligamentous structures and is, in turn, partly responsible for maintenance of normal glenohumeral function. In this report we describe the anatomy of this tendon, correlating high-resolution MR images with cryomicrotome sections. We illustrate typical MR findings in pathologic conditions affecting the long bicipital tendon sheath, the substance of the tendon, and finally the tendon position.

  1. Estimation of T2 relaxation time of breast cancer: Correlation with clinical, imaging and pathological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae; Sohn, Yu Mee [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jung Kyu; Jahng, Geon Ho; Rhee, Sun Jung; Oh, Jang Hoon; Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the T2* relaxation time in breast cancer, and to evaluate the association between the T2* value with clinical-imaging-pathological features of breast cancer. Between January 2011 and July 2013, 107 consecutive women with 107 breast cancers underwent multi-echo T2*-weighted imaging on a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging system. The Student's t test and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare the T2* values of cancer for different groups, based on the clinical-imaging-pathological features. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to find independent predictive factors associated with the T2* values. Of the 107 breast cancers, 92 were invasive and 15 were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The mean T2* value of invasive cancers was significantly longer than that of DCIS (p = 0.029). Signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers showed significant correlation with T2* relaxation time in univariate and multivariate analysis. Breast cancer groups with higher signal intensity on T2WI showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.005). Cancer groups with higher histologic grade showed longer T2* relaxation time (p = 0.017). The T2* value is significantly longer in invasive cancer than in DCIS. In invasive cancers, T2* relaxation time is significantly longer in higher histologic grades and high signal intensity on T2WI. Based on these preliminary data, quantitative T2* mapping has the potential to be useful in the characterization of breast cancer.

  2. Image and pathological changes after microwave ablation of breast cancer: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenbin [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Jiang, Yanni [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Chen, Lin; Ling, Lijun; Liang, Mengdi; Pan, Hong [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Siqi [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Ding, Qiang [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Liu, Xiaoan, E-mail: liuxiaoan@126.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Shui, E-mail: ws0801@hotmail.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report successful experience of MWA in breast cancer under local anesthesia. • We report MR imaging evaluation of microwave ablation zone in breast cancer. • Pathological changes after microwave ablation in breast cancer was reported. • 2 min MWA caused an ablation zone with three diameters > 2 cm in breast cancer. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively assess MR imaging evaluation of the ablation zone and pathological changes after microwave ablation (MWA) in breast cancer. Materials and methods: Twelve enrolled patients, diagnosed with non-operable locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), were treated by MWA and then neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgery. MR imaging was applied to evaluate the effect of MWA. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to analyze the ablated area. Results: All MWA procedures were performed successfully under local anesthesia. For a mean duration of 2.15 min, the mean largest, middle and smallest diameters in the ablated zone 24-h post-ablation in MR imaging were 2.98 cm ± 0.53, 2.51 cm ± 0.41 and 2.23 cm ± 0.41, respectively. The general shape of the ablation zone was close to a sphere. The ablated area became gradually smaller in MR imaging. No adverse effects related to MWA were noted in all 12 patients during and after MWA. HE staining could confirm the effect about 3 months after MWA, which was confirmed by TEM. Conclusions: 2 min MWA can cause an ablation zone with three diameters larger than 2 cm in breast cancer, which may be suitable for the local treatment of breast cancer up to 2 cm in largest diameter. However, the long-term effect of MWA in the treatment of small breast cancer should be determined in the future.

  3. 78 FR 8546 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and National Human Genome Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... March 8, 2013 for consideration. Guidelines for the preparation of a full CRADA proposal will be... recapitulates the pathologic hallmarks of Gaucher disease,'' Panicker LM, Miller D, Park TS, Patel B, Azevedo JL...

  4. A Meta-Analysis Examining the Influence of Pro-Eating Disorder Websites on Body Image and Eating Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Lowy, Alice S; Halperin, Daniella M; Franko, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that exposure to pro-eating disorder websites might increase eating pathology; however, the magnitude of this effect is unknown. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effect of exposure to pro-eating disorder websites on body image and eating pathology. Studies examining the relationship between exposure to pro-eating disorder websites and eating pathology-related outcomes were included. The systematic review identified nine studies. Findings revealed significant effect sizes of exposure to pro-eating disorder websites on body image dissatisfaction (five studies), d = .41, p = .003; dieting (six studies), d = .68, p eating disorder websites on body image and eating pathology, highlighting the need for enforceable regulation of these websites. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Finding regions of interest in pathological images: an attentional model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Francisco; Villalón, Julio; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Romero, Eduardo

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduces an automated method for finding diagnostic regions-of-interest (RoIs) in histopathological images. This method is based on the cognitive process of visual selective attention that arises during a pathologist's image examination. Specifically, it emulates the first examination phase, which consists in a coarse search for tissue structures at a "low zoom" to separate the image into relevant regions.1 The pathologist's cognitive performance depends on inherent image visual cues - bottom-up information - and on acquired clinical medicine knowledge - top-down mechanisms -. Our pathologist's visual attention model integrates the latter two components. The selected bottom-up information includes local low level features such as intensity, color, orientation and texture information. Top-down information is related to the anatomical and pathological structures known by the expert. A coarse approximation to these structures is achieved by an oversegmentation algorithm, inspired by psychological grouping theories. The algorithm parameters are learned from an expert pathologist's segmentation. Top-down and bottom-up integration is achieved by calculating a unique index for each of the low level characteristics inside the region. Relevancy is estimated as a simple average of these indexes. Finally, a binary decision rule defines whether or not a region is interesting. The method was evaluated on a set of 49 images using a perceptually-weighted evaluation criterion, finding a quality gain of 3dB when comparing to a classical bottom-up model of attention.

  6. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to interobserver variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literature. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation.

  7. Chronic kidney disease: pathological and functional assessment with diffusion tensor imaging at 3T MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiling; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Yuan, Xianshun; Liu, Qingwei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Rong; Zhen, Junhui

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate pathological and functional changes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T. There were fifty-one patients with CKD who required biopsy and 19 healthy volunteers who were examined using DTI at 3 T. The mean values of fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were obtained from the renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla). Correlations between imaging results and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage (glomerular lesion and tubulointerstitial injury), were evaluated. The renal cortical FA was significantly lower than the medullary in both normal and affected kidneys (p < 0.001). The parenchymal FA was significantly lower in patients than healthy controls, regardless of whether eGFR was reduced. There were positive correlations between eGFR and FA (cortex, r = 0.689, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = 0.696, p = 0.000), and between eGFR and ADC (cortex, r = 0.310, p = 0.017; and medulla, r = 0.356, p = 0.010). Negative correlations were found between FA and the glomerular lesion (cortex, r = -0.499, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.530, p = 0.000), and between FA and tubulointerstitial injury (cortex, r = -0.631, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.724, p = 0.000). DTI is valuable for noninvasive assessment of renal function and pathology in patients with CKD. A decrease in FA could identify the glomerular lesions, tubulointerstitial injuries, and eGFR. (orig.)

  8. Chronic kidney disease: pathological and functional assessment with diffusion tensor imaging at 3T MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiling; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Yuan, Xianshun; Liu, Qingwei [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Xu, Ying; Wang, Rong [Shandong University, Department of Nephrology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhen, Junhui [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2014-10-11

    Our objective was to evaluate pathological and functional changes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T. There were fifty-one patients with CKD who required biopsy and 19 healthy volunteers who were examined using DTI at 3 T. The mean values of fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were obtained from the renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla). Correlations between imaging results and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage (glomerular lesion and tubulointerstitial injury), were evaluated. The renal cortical FA was significantly lower than the medullary in both normal and affected kidneys (p < 0.001). The parenchymal FA was significantly lower in patients than healthy controls, regardless of whether eGFR was reduced. There were positive correlations between eGFR and FA (cortex, r = 0.689, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = 0.696, p = 0.000), and between eGFR and ADC (cortex, r = 0.310, p = 0.017; and medulla, r = 0.356, p = 0.010). Negative correlations were found between FA and the glomerular lesion (cortex, r = -0.499, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.530, p = 0.000), and between FA and tubulointerstitial injury (cortex, r = -0.631, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.724, p = 0.000). DTI is valuable for noninvasive assessment of renal function and pathology in patients with CKD. A decrease in FA could identify the glomerular lesions, tubulointerstitial injuries, and eGFR. (orig.)

  9. A medical software system for volumetric analysis of cerebral pathologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution, a medical software system for volumetric analysis of different cerebral pathologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is presented. The software system is based on a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm and helps to overcome the time-consuming process of volume determination during monitoring of a patient. After imaging, the parameter settings-including a seed point-are set up in the system and an automatic segmentation is performed by a novel graph-based approach. Manually reviewing the result leads to reseeding, adding seed points or an automatic surface mesh generation. The mesh is saved for monitoring the patient and for comparisons with follow-up scans. Based on the mesh, the system performs a voxelization and volume calculation, which leads to diagnosis and therefore further treatment decisions. The overall system has been tested with different cerebral pathologies-glioblastoma multiforme, pituitary adenomas and cerebral aneurysms- and evaluated against manual expert segmentations using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Additionally, intra-physician segmentations have been performed to provide a quality measure for the presented system.

  10. Molecular Imaging on the Cerebral Pathological Damage Target of Ketamine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Hong-jie1,2;HU Shu1;JIA Shao-wei1;GAO Zhou1;WANG Tong3;ZHAO Zheng-qin1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the cerebral pathological damage target which result from abusing ketamine through molecular imaging techniques, 20 cases of ketamine dependent patients looking for treatment at the Peking University Shenzhen Hospital and 31 healthy volunteers were included in this study, all of them got brain SPECT DAT imaging. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0. The bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen of healthy volunteers were roughly equally large, and the radioactive distribution of DAT in healthy volunteers were uniform and symmetrical. The bilateral corpora striatum showed typical “panda eyes” pattern. But the bilateral corpora striatum of ketamine dependent patients got smaller in shape, got disorders in pattern, and the radioactive distribution of DAT reduced or defected or even got disturbance and with much more non-specific radioactive. The V, m and Ra of bilateral corpora striatum in ketamine dependent patients were (21.03±3.15) cm3, (22.08±3.31) g and (5.37±1.08) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than the healthy volunteers (p<0.01. The cerebral pathological damage target which resulted from abusing ketamine was similar to those of compound codeine phosphate antitussive solution dependence, heroin dependence and MDMA dependence, all of these psychoactive substances damaged the function of DAT.

  11. Gallbladder wall thickening: MR imaging and pathologic correlation with emphasis on layered pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.E.; Lee, J.M.; Hahn, S.T.; Lee, K.; Rha, S.E.; Choi, B.G.; Kim, E.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate MR findings of gallbladder wall thickening with pathologic findings on the basis of the layered pattern and to evaluate the diagnostic value of MR imaging in gallbladder disease. We retrospectively evaluated the source images of HASTE sequences for MR cholangiography in 144 patients with gallbladder wall thickening. The layered pattern of thickened wall was classified into four patterns. Type 1 shows two layers with a thin hypointense inner layer and thick hyperintense outer layer. Type 2 has two layers of ill-defined margin. Type 3 shows multiple hyperintense cystic spaces in the wall. Type 4 shows diffuse nodular thickening without layering. MR findings of a layered pattern of thickened gallbladder were well correlated with histopathology. Chronic cholecystitis matched to type 1, acute cholecystitis corresponded to type 2, adenomyomatosis showed type 3, and the gallbladder carcinomas showed type 4. All four layered patterns were associated with PPV of 73% or greater, sensitivity of 92% or greater and specificity of 95% or greater. Our results indicate that MR findings of gallbladder wall thickening are characteristic in each entity and correlate well with pathologic findings. The classification of the layered pattern may be valuable for interpreting thickened gallbladder wall. (orig.)

  12. Imaging of degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs; linking anatomy, pathology and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ashok; Roche, Oran; Mazumder, Asif; Davagnanam, Indran; Mankad, Kshitij

    2014-09-01

    Low back pain is a common medical condition that has significant implications for healthcare providers and the UK economy. Low back pain can be classified as 'specific' in which an underlying pathophysiological mechanism is identified (eg, herniated intervertebral disc). Advanced imaging should be performed in this situation and in those patients in whom systemic disease is strongly suspected. In the majority (approximately 90%), low back pain in 'non specific' and there is a weak correlation with imaging abnormalities. This is an area of ongoing research and remains controversial in terms of imaging approach and treatment (eg, theory of discogenic pain, interpretation and treatment of endplate changes). With regards Modic endplate changes, current research suggests that an infective component may be involved that may identify novel potential treatments in patients with chronic low back pain refractory to other treatment modalities. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of degenerative changes in intervertebral discs. MRI has superior soft tissue contrast resolution when compared to other imaging modalities (eg, plain radiography, CT). An understanding of normal anatomy and MR appearances of intervertebral discs, particularly with regards to how these appearances change with advancing age, is required to aid image interpretation. Knowledge of the spectrum of degenerative processes that may occur in the intervertebral discs is required in order to identify and explain abnormal MRI appearances. As the communication of MRI findings may guide therapeutic decision making and surgical intervention, the terminology used by radiologists must be accurate and consistent. Therefore, description of degenerative disc changes in the current paper is based on the most up-to-date recommendations, the aim being to aid reporting by radiologists and interpretation of reports by referring clinicians. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  13. Imaging findings of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia presenting in extremities: correlation with pathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Park, Ji Sung; Park, Yeong-Mi; Eun, Choong Ki; Hong, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jongmin; Jung, Soo-Jin

    2010-08-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) findings of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) arising in extremities. Six patients with IPEH confirmed by surgical resection were reviewed retrospectively. Before resection, 3 patients underwent both MRI and US and 3 patients underwent only MRI. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR/US imaging results and correlated them with pathological features. The 6 IPEHs were diagnosed as 4 mixed forms and 2 pure forms. The pre-existing pathology of four mixed forms was intramuscular or intermuscular hemangioma. By MRI, the mixed form of IPEH (n = 4) revealed iso- to slightly high signal intensity containing nodule-like foci of high signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal intensity-containing nodule-like foci of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI). The pure form of IPEH (n = 2) showed homogeneous iso- signal intensity on T1WI and high and low signal intensity containing nodule-like foci of low signal intensity on T2WI. On gadolinium-enhanced fat-suppressed T1WI, 50% of cases (n = 3: mixed forms) revealed peripheral, septal, and central enhancement. The other IPEHs (n = 3: 1 mixed and 2 pure forms) showed peripheral and septal enhancement or only peripheral enhancement. By US, two mixed forms of IPEH showed well-defined hypoechoic masses containing hyperechoic septa and central portion with vascularities. One pure form of IPEH was a homogeneous hypoechoic mass with septal and peripheral vascularities on color Doppler imaging. The foci of high signal intensity on T1WI, foci of low signal intensity on T2WI, and non-enhancing portions on MRI and the hypoechoic portion on US were histopathologically correlated with thrombi and the peripheral/septal or central enhancing areas on MRI, hyperechoic septa and the central portion on US, and septal/central or peripheral vascularities on color Doppler imaging corresponded to hypertrophic papillary epithelium and

  14. Imaging findings of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia presenting in extremities: correlation with pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Park, Ji Sung; Park, Yeong-Mi; Eun, Choong Ki; Hong, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jongmin; Jung, Soo-Jin

    2010-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) findings of intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) arising in extremities. Six patients with IPEH confirmed by surgical resection were reviewed retrospectively. Before resection, 3 patients underwent both MRI and US and 3 patients underwent only MRI. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed MR/US imaging results and correlated them with pathological features. The 6 IPEHs were diagnosed as 4 mixed forms and 2 pure forms. The pre-existing pathology of four mixed forms was intramuscular or intermuscular hemangioma. By MRI, the mixed form of IPEH (n = 4) revealed iso- to slightly high signal intensity containing nodule-like foci of high signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal intensity-containing nodule-like foci of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI). The pure form of IPEH (n = 2) showed homogeneous iso- signal intensity on T1WI and high and low signal intensity containing nodule-like foci of low signal intensity on T2WI. On gadolinium-enhanced fat-suppressed T1WI, 50% of cases (n = 3: mixed forms) revealed peripheral, septal, and central enhancement. The other IPEHs (n = 3: 1 mixed and 2 pure forms) showed peripheral and septal enhancement or only peripheral enhancement. By US, two mixed forms of IPEH showed well-defined hypoechoic masses containing hyperechoic septa and central portion with vascularities. One pure form of IPEH was a homogeneous hypoechoic mass with septal and peripheral vascularities on color Doppler imaging. The foci of high signal intensity on T1WI, foci of low signal intensity on T2WI, and non-enhancing portions on MRI and the hypoechoic portion on US were histopathologically correlated with thrombi and the peripheral/septal or central enhancing areas on MRI, hyperechoic septa and the central portion on US, and septal/central or peripheral vascularities on color Doppler imaging corresponded to hypertrophic papillary epithelium and

  15. Cytopathology whole slide images and adaptive tutorials for postgraduate pathology trainees: a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Es, Simone L; Kumar, Rakesh K; Pryor, Wendy M; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Velan, Gary M

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether cytopathology whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials aid learning by postgraduate trainees, we designed a randomized crossover trial to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative impact of whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials compared with traditional glass slide and textbook methods of learning cytopathology. Forty-three anatomical pathology registrars were recruited from Australia, New Zealand, and Malaysia. Online assessments were used to determine efficacy, whereas user experience and perceptions of efficiency were evaluated using online Likert scales and open-ended questions. Outcomes of online assessments indicated that, with respect to performance, learning with whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials was equivalent to using traditional methods. High-impact learning, efficiency, and equity of learning from virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials were strong themes identified in open-ended responses. Participants raised concern about the lack of z-axis capability in the cytopathology whole slide images, suggesting that delivery of z-stacked whole slide images online may be important for future educational development. In this trial, learning cytopathology with whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials was found to be as effective as and perceived as more efficient than learning from glass slides and textbooks. The use of whole slide images and virtual microscopy adaptive tutorials has the potential to provide equitable access to effective learning from teaching material of consistently high quality. It also has broader implications for continuing professional development and maintenance of competence and quality assurance in specialist practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatocellular adenoma: findings at state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography and pathologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shahid M.; Bos, Indra C. van den; Dwarkasing, Roy S.; Kuiper, Jan-Willem; Hollander, Jan den

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the most recent concepts and pertinent findings of hepatocellular adenomas, including clinical presentation, gross pathology and histology, pathogenesis and transformation into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and imaging findings at ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. (orig.)

  17. CT and MR imaging findings of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuto, R.; Kiyosue, H.; Komatsu, E.; Matsumoto, S.; Mori, H. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kawano, K. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Surgery; Kondo, Y.; Yokoyama, S. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Pathology

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate CT and MRI findings in xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) and to correlate the imaging findings with various pathologic parameters. The study included 13 patients with histopathologically confirmed XGC. The CT (n=13) and MRI (n=5) obtained in these patients were evaluated retrospectively. On CT, low-attenuation areas in the wall of XGC correlated with foam and inflammatory cells or necrosis and/or abscess in XGC. Areas of iso- to slightly high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, showing slight enhancement at early phase and strong enhancement at last phase on dynamic study, corresponded with areas of abundant xanthogranulomas. Areas with very high signal intensity on T2-weighted images without enhancement corresponded with necrosis and/or abscesses. Luminal surface enhancement (LSE) of gallbladder wall represented preservation of the epithelial layer. The early-enhanced areas of the liver bed on dynamic CT and MR images corresponded with accumulation of inflammatory cells and abundant fibrosis. Our results indicate that CT and MRI findings correlate well with the histopathologic findings of XGC.

  18. Enhanced Visualization of Subtle Outer Retinal Pathology by En Face Optical Coherence Tomography and Correlation with Multi-Modal Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta M Sampson

    Full Text Available To present en face optical coherence tomography (OCT images generated by graph-search theory algorithm-based custom software and examine correlation with other imaging modalities.En face OCT images derived from high density OCT volumetric scans of 3 healthy subjects and 4 patients using a custom algorithm (graph-search theory and commercial software (Heidelberg Eye Explorer software (Heidelberg Engineering were compared and correlated with near infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, adaptive optics flood-illumination ophthalmoscopy (AO-FIO and microperimetry.Commercial software was unable to generate accurate en face OCT images in eyes with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE pathology due to segmentation error at the level of Bruch's membrane (BM. Accurate segmentation of the basal RPE and BM was achieved using custom software. The en face OCT images from eyes with isolated interdigitation or ellipsoid zone pathology were of similar quality between custom software and Heidelberg Eye Explorer software in the absence of any other significant outer retinal pathology. En face OCT images demonstrated angioid streaks, lesions of acute macular neuroretinopathy, hydroxychloroquine toxicity and Bietti crystalline deposits that correlated with other imaging modalities.Graph-search theory algorithm helps to overcome the limitations of outer retinal segmentation inaccuracies in commercial software. En face OCT images can provide detailed topography of the reflectivity within a specific layer of the retina which correlates with other forms of fundus imaging. Our results highlight the need for standardization of image reflectivity to facilitate quantification of en face OCT images and longitudinal analysis.

  19. Bioluminescence imaging of β cells and intrahepatic insulin gene activity under normal and pathological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokio Katsumata

    Full Text Available In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse. BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-lucVUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP, the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions.

  20. MSCT imaging appearance and pathology of struma ovarii (report of 3 cases and literature review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ling; Guan Jian; Li Mei; Wu Ling; Xie Chuanmiao; Zhang Rong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of CT diagnosis for struma ovarii (SO), and discuss the clinical and pathological characteristic. Methods: Clinical and CT findings of three patients with struma ovarii proved by operation pathology were analyzed retrospectively. All three cases were received pre-enhanced CT scan and enhanced CT. The literatures for CT diagnosis, clinical and pathological characteristic were reviewed. Results: The volume of tumor in the three patients was relatively large (the diameter was 8∼14 cm). On CT imaging, it was showed as the cystic or cyst-solid mass. The boundary was clear and the cyst wall was smooth. The cyst part was single or multi-cyst-shaped within a little higer density area. The solid part was soft tissue density similar to thyroid gland. The spot or patch calcification was seen inside of mass or on the wall of cyst. The solid part was obviously enhanced, while cyst part was not. One patient was combined with nodular goiter. The following characteristics were valuable. (1) There was a unilateral cyst-solid mass with clear edge; (2) The density of content in cyst was a little higher than water, and density of solid part was similar to thyroid gland; (3) Calcification was usually showed inside of mass or on the wall of cyst; (4) The wall of cyst was smooth, and no nodule; (5) Solid part was markedly enhanced; (6) It was usual in patients with abnormal tumor markers, symptoms of hyperthyroidism or goiter. Conclusion: Struma ovarii with typical appearance had a certain CT characteristics, and combined with clinical data, most cases could be correctly diagnosed. Diagnosis of atypical cases must be based on histopathology. (authors)

  1. Epithelioid Myoepithelioma of the Accessory Parotid Gland: Pathological and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyoshi Iguchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumors of the accessory parotid gland (APG are rare, and pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common benign APG tumor subtype. Myoepithelioma of the APG is much rarer than PA, and to date, only 5 cases have been sporadically reported in the English literature. We describe the clinicopathological and MRI findings of an epithelioid myoepithelioma of the APG that was treated in our hospital. The patient's only clinical symptom was a slow-growing and painless mid-cheek mass. The tumor was suspected to be PA before surgery based on the following MRI findings: (1 a well-circumscribed and lobulated contour, (2 isointensity and hyperintensity relative to the muscle on T1- and T2-weighted images (WIs, respectively, (3 good enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-WIs, (4 peripheral hypointensity on T2-WIs, and (5 a gradual time-signal intensity curve enhancement pattern on gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MRI. The tumor was completely resected via a standard parotidectomy approach, and the postoperative pathological examination of the tumor, including immunohistochemistry, confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioid myoepithelioma. As it is hardly possible to distinguish myoepithelioma from PA and low-grade malignant tumors preoperatively, a pathological examination using frozen sections is helpful for surgical strategy-related decisions.

  2. RecutClub.com: An open source, whole slide image-based pathology education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Christensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our institution's pathology unknown conferences provide educational cases for our residents. However, the cases have not been previously available digitally, have not been collated for postconference review, and were not accessible to a wider audience. Our objective was to create an inexpensive whole slide image (WSI education suite to address these limitations and improve the education of pathology trainees. Materials and Methods: We surveyed residents regarding their preference between four unique WSI systems. We then scanned weekly unknown conference cases and study set cases and uploaded them to our custom built WSI viewer located at RecutClub.com. We measured site utilization and conference participation. Results: Residents preferred our OpenLayers WSI implementation to Ventana Virtuoso, Google Maps API, and OpenSlide. Over 16 months, we uploaded 1366 cases from 77 conferences and ten study sets, occupying 793.5 GB of cloud storage. Based on resident evaluations, the interface was easy to use and demonstrated minimal latency. Residents are able to review cases from home and from their mobile devices. Worldwide, 955 unique IP addresses from 52 countries have viewed cases in our site. Conclusions: We implemented a low-cost, publicly available repository of WSI slides for resident education. Our trainees are very satisfied with the freedom to preview either the glass slides or WSI and review the WSI postconference. Both local users and worldwide users actively and repeatedly view cases in our study set.

  3. Hemorrhagic necrosis due to peliosis hepatis: imaging findings and pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignaux, O.; Legmann, P.; Bonnin, A.; Pinieux, G. de; Chaussade, S.; Couturier, D.; Spaulding, C.

    1999-01-01

    Peliosis hepatis is an uncommon liver condition characterized by blood-filled cavities. We report the CT, angiographic and MR features of a case of peliosis hepatis with no obvious etiology and spontaneously regressing hemorrhagic necrosis. Helical CT showed multiple peripheral low-density regions with foci of spontaneous high density suggesting the presence of blood component. On MR imaging, the multiple peripheral lesions were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperdense on T2-weighted images, with bright foci on all sequences suggesting subacute blood. Angiography showed no evidence of tumor or vascular malformation; multiple nodular vascular lesions filling in the parenchymal phase and persisting in the venous phase suggested blood-filled cavities. Pathological examination showed blood-filled spaces with no endothelial lining, characteristic of the parenchymal type of peliosis. Knowledge of the imaging features of hemorrhagic necrosis due to peliosis hepatis is important since it can be responsive to antibiotic therapy. Furthermore, differentiating hemorrhagic necrosis from hepatic abscess avoids dangerous and sometimes fatal percutaneous drainage. (orig.)

  4. Neuronal pathology in deep grey matter structures: a multimodal imaging analysis combining PET and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosque-Freeman, L.; Leroy, C.; Galanaud, D.; Sureau, F.; Assouad, R.; Tourbah, A.; Papeix, C.; Comtat, C.; Trebossen, R.; Lubetzki, C.; Delforge, J.; Bottlaender, M.; Stankoff, B. [Serv. Hosp. Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2009-07-01

    Objective: To assess neuronal damage in deep gray matter structures by positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 11}C]-flumazenil (FMZ), a specific central benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, and [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which reflects neuronal metabolism. To compare results obtained by PET and those with multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Background: It is now accepted that neuronal injury plays a crucial role in the occurrence and progression of neurological disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, available MRI techniques do not specifically assess neuronal damage, but early abnormalities, such as iron deposition or atrophy, have been described in deep gray matter structures. Whether those MRI modifications correspond to neuronal damage remains to be further investigated. Materials and methods: Nine healthy volunteers were compared to 10 progressive and 9 relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients. Each subject performed two PET examinations with [{sup 11}C]-FMZ and [{sup 18}F]-FDG, on a high resolution research tomograph dedicated to brain imaging (Siemens Medical Solution, spatial resolution of 2.5 mm). Deep gray matter regions were manually segmented on T1-weighted MR images with the mutual information algorithm (www.brainvisa.info), and co-registered with PET images. A multimodal MRI including T1 pre and post gadolinium, T2-proton density sequences, magnetization transfer, diffusion tensor, and protonic spectroscopy was also performed for each subject. Results: On PET with [{sup 11}C]-FMZ, there was a pronounced decrease in receptor density for RR patients in all deep gray matter structures investigated, whereas the density was unchanged or even increased in the same regions for progressive patients. Whether the different patterns between RR and progressive patients reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms is currently investigated by comparing PET and multimodal MRI results. Conclusion: Combination of PET and multimodal MR imaging

  5. Pathology Image-Sharing on Social Media: Recommendations for Protecting Privacy While Motivating Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Genevieve M; Gardner, Jerad M

    2016-08-01

    There is a rising interest in the use of social media by pathologists. However, the use of pathology images on social media has been debated, particularly gross examination, autopsy, and dermatologic condition photographs. The immediacy of the interactions, increased interest from patients and patient groups, and fewer barriers to public discussion raise additional considerations to ensure patient privacy is protected. Yet these very features all add to the power of social media for educating other physicians and the nonmedical public about disease and for creating better understanding of the important role of pathologists in patient care. The professional and societal benefits are overwhelmingly positive, and we believe the potential for harm is minimal provided common sense and routine patient privacy principles are utilized. We lay out ethical and practical guidelines for pathologists who use social media professionally. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  6. MALDI TOF imaging mass spectrometry in clinical pathology: a valuable tool for cancer diagnostics (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsmann, Jörg; Kriegsmann, Mark; Casadonte, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an evolving technique in cancer diagnostics and combines the advantages of mass spectrometry (proteomics), detection of numerous molecules, and spatial resolution in histological tissue sections and cytological preparations. This method allows the detection of proteins, peptides, lipids, carbohydrates or glycoconjugates and small molecules.Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue can also be investigated by IMS, thus, this method seems to be an ideal tool for cancer diagnostics and biomarker discovery. It may add information to the identification of tumor margins and tumor heterogeneity. The technique allows tumor typing, especially identification of the tumor of origin in metastatic tissue, as well as grading and may provide prognostic information. IMS is a valuable method for the identification of biomarkers and can complement histology, immunohistology and molecular pathology in various fields of histopathological diagnostics, especially with regard to identification and grading of tumors.

  7. Experimentally induced cerebral fat embolism with linoleic acid; MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Bae; Kim, Hak Jin; Kim, Yong; Lee, Suck Hong; Park, Byeong Rae

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the MRI findings of cerebral fat embolism induced by injecting linoleic acid into ten cats, and pathologic diagnosis. Using a microcatheter, 30μ1 of linoleic acid was injeted into the internal carotid artery of ten cats. MR T2-weighted (T2WI), diffusion-weighted (DWI), and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images(Gd-enhanced T1WI) were obtained after 30 minutes and after 2 hours of embolization. We pathlogically examined endothelial cell damage, cellular change, perivascular abnormality and fat vacuoles, and then determined the correlation between MRI and the pathologic findings. After 30 minutes of embolization, lesions of very high signal intensity were detected by T2WI in six cats, and of slightly high signal intensity in two:in the remaining two, signal intensity was normal. DWI showed lesions of very high intensity in nine animals and of slightly high intensity in one, while Gd-enhanced T1WI showed well-enhanced lesions in nine and a minimally enhanced lesion in one. After 2 hours of embolization, T2WI revealed lesions of very high signal intensity in nine cats, and of slightly high signal intensity in one, while DWI detected lesions of very high signal intensity in all cats. On Gd-enhanced T1WI, lesions in all cats were well enhanced. According to the findings of light microscopic examination, infarcted lesions mainly involved the gray matter, but also some white matter. In the lesions, neurophil matrix edema, neuronal degeneration, perivascular swelling, the widening of extracellular space, extravascular hemorrhage, and fat vacuoles were evident. During the initial two hours following injuction, MR imaging of cerebral fat embolism induced by linoleic acid through the internal carotid artery in cats showed high signal intensity on T2WI and DWI, and clear enhancement on Gd-enhanced T1WI. In cases involving cellular edema, cerebrovascular injury and extracellular space widening, the pathologic evidence suggested the coexistence of

  8. Analysis of longitudinal diffusion-weighted images in healthy and pathological aging: An ADNI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruggel, Frithjof; Masaki, Fumitaro; Solodkin, Ana

    2017-02-15

    The widely used framework of voxel-based morphometry for analyzing neuroimages is extended here to model longitudinal imaging data by exchanging the linear model with a linear mixed-effects model. The new approach is employed for analyzing a large longitudinal sample of 756 diffusion-weighted images acquired in 177 subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging initiative (ADNI). While sample- and group-level results from both approaches are equivalent, the mixed-effect model yields information at the single subject level. Interestingly, the neurobiological relevance of the relevant parameter at the individual level describes specific differences associated with aging. In addition, our approach highlights white matter areas that reliably discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls with a predictive power of 0.99 and include the hippocampal alveus, the para-hippocampal white matter, the white matter of the posterior cingulate, and optic tracts. In this context, notably the classifier includes a sub-population of patients with minimal cognitive impairment into the pathological domain. Our classifier offers promising features for an accessible biomarker that predicts the risk of conversion to Alzheimer's disease. Data used in preparation of this article were obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database (adni.loni.usc.edu). As such, the investigators within the ADNI contributed to the design and implementation of ADNI and/or provided data but did not participate in analysis or writing of this report. A complete listing of ADNI investigators can be found at: http://adni.loni.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/how to apply/ADNI Acknowledgement List.pdf. Significance statement This study assesses neuro-degenerative processes in the brain's white matter as revealed by diffusion-weighted imaging, in order to discriminate healthy from pathological aging in a large sample of elderly subjects. The analysis of time

  9. Micro-CT Imaging of Denatured Chitin by Silver to Explore Honey Bee and Insect Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzloff, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chitin and cuticle coatings are important to the environmental and immune defense of honey bees and insect pollinators. Pesticides or environmental effects may target the biochemistry of insect chitin and cuticle coating. Denaturing of chitin involves a combination of deacetylation, intercalation, oxidation, Schweiger-peeling, and the formation of amine hydrochloride salt. The term “denatured chitin” calls attention to structural and property changes to the internal membranes and external carapace of organisms so that some properties affecting biological activities are diminished. Methodology/Principal Findings A case study was performed on honey bees using silver staining and microscopic computer-tomographic x-ray radiography (micro-CT). Silver nitrate formed counter-ion complexes with labile ammonium cations and reacted with amine hydrochloride. Silver was concentrated in the peritrophic membrane, on the abdomen, in the glossa, at intersegmental joints (tarsi), at wing attachments, and in tracheal air sacs. Imaged mono-esters and fatty acids from cuticle coating on external surfaces were apparently reduced by an alcohol pretreatment. Conclusions/Significance The technique provides 3-dimensional and sectional images of individual honey bees consistent with the chemistries of silver reaction and complex formation with denatured chitin. Environmental exposures and influences such as gaseous nitric oxide intercalant, trace oxidants such as ozone gas, oligosachharide salt conversion, exposure to acid rain, and chemical or biochemical denaturing by pesticides may be studied using this technique. Peritrophic membranes, which protect against food abrasion, microorganisms, and permit efficient digestion, were imaged. Apparent surface damage to the corneal lenses of compound eyes by dilute acid exposure consistent with chitin amine hydrochloride formation was imaged. The technique can contribute to existing insect pathology research, and may provide an

  10. Paediatric parotid neoplasms: a 10 year retrospective imaging and pathology review of these rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamlouk, M.D.; Rosbe, K.W.; Glastonbury, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    tumors are rare. • Pediatric parotid masses are more likely to be malignant than benign. • Clinical symptoms and CT are not helpful in determining tumor pathology. • Certain MR imaging features should raise concern for malignancy

  11. Micro-CT imaging of denatured chitin by silver to explore honey bee and insect pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Butzloff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin and cuticle coatings are important to the environmental and immune defense of honey bees and insect pollinators. Pesticides or environmental effects may target the biochemistry of insect chitin and cuticle coating. Denaturing of chitin involves a combination of deacetylation, intercalation, oxidation, Schweiger-peeling, and the formation of amine hydrochloride salt. The term "denatured chitin" calls attention to structural and property changes to the internal membranes and external carapace of organisms so that some properties affecting biological activities are diminished. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case study was performed on honey bees using silver staining and microscopic computer-tomographic x-ray radiography (micro-CT. Silver nitrate formed counter-ion complexes with labile ammonium cations and reacted with amine hydrochloride. Silver was concentrated in the peritrophic membrane, on the abdomen, in the glossa, at intersegmental joints (tarsi, at wing attachments, and in tracheal air sacs. Imaged mono-esters and fatty acids from cuticle coating on external surfaces were apparently reduced by an alcohol pretreatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The technique provides 3-dimensional and sectional images of individual honey bees consistent with the chemistries of silver reaction and complex formation with denatured chitin. Environmental exposures and influences such as gaseous nitric oxide intercalant, trace oxidants such as ozone gas, oligosachharide salt conversion, exposure to acid rain, and chemical or biochemical denaturing by pesticides may be studied using this technique. Peritrophic membranes, which protect against food abrasion, microorganisms, and permit efficient digestion, were imaged. Apparent surface damage to the corneal lenses of compound eyes by dilute acid exposure consistent with chitin amine hydrochloride formation was imaged. The technique can contribute to existing insect pathology research, and may

  12. The Effectiveness of Ultrasonography in Detecting Emergent Pediatric Pathologies and Requirement for Additional Imaging Techniques: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Tiryaki Baştuğ

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In emergency cases, ultrasonography is used in guiding resuscitation, to provide procedural guidance, and confirm a clinical diagnosis. In addition, it may prevent unnecessary exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and risks caused by transporting the patient away from monitoring. This paper aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasonography in detecting emergent pediatric pathologies in a state hospital radiology unit, and to identify whether additional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography, were required. Methods: This study was designed as a retrospective investigation. A group of 536 patients were randomly selected from 1.401 pediatric patients who underwent ultrasonography for non-traumatic emergent pathologies between 2015 and 2016. Results: Of the 536 patients, 46 were diagnosed with appendicitis, 14 with pathologies of the urinary system, 1 with ileus, 29 with mesenteric lymphadenitis, 4 with intussusception, 3 with ovarian cyst rupture, 1 with ovarian torsion, and 32 with scrotal pathologies. Computed tomography was performed for 20 patients. Ureteral calculi and appendicitis were confirmed by computed tomography in 5 and 14 patients, respectively, after being identified as secondary findings by ultrasonography. In 1 patient, ileus was verified by computed tomography. The sensitivity of ultrasonography was determined to be 85.7%. Only 14% of patients were not given definite pathological diagnoses by ultrasonography alone. Subsequent computed tomography for verifying secondary findings detected by ultrasonography was essential in only 20 patients. Conclusion: Our results promote the use of ultrasonography as the initial imaging test for evaluating pediatric patients with suspected emergency pathologies.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balejcikova, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Strbak, Oliver [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Baciak, Ladislav [Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology STU, Radlinskeho 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kovac, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Dobrota, Dusan [Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation. - Highlights: • MRI is the sensitive technique for detecting iron-based aggregates. • Reconstructed Ferritin is suitable model system of iron-related disorders. • MRI allow distinguish of native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin. • MRI could be useful for diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  14. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to inter-observer variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literatures. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast (DIC), fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. PMID:26742143

  15. Correlation between pathology and neuromelanin MR imaging in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitao, Shinichiro; Fujii, Shinya; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide; Matsusue, Eiji; Kato, Shinsuke; Ito, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Direct correlation between neuropathological findings and postmortem neuromelanin MR imaging (NmMRI) was performed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to clarify the pathological background of the signal changes in normal, Parkinson's disease (PD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) cases. NmMRI of 10 % formalin-fixed autopsied midbrains was performed in three cases (normal control, DLB, and PD) with a 3T imaging system, using a 3D gradient echo T1-weighted sequence with a magnetization transfer contrast pulse. Neuropathological examinations of the midbrains were performed, and the density of neuromelanin-positive neurons (number per square millimeter) was determined. The extent of iron deposition in the midbrain was also evaluated using ferritin immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we directly correlated the contrast signal ratio in the SNc and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons. Diffuse hyperintense areas in the SNc reflected well-preserved neuromelanin-containing neurons in the normal control case, whereas an iso-intense area in the SNc showed severe loss of neuromelanin-containing neurons in the DLB and PD cases. Increased signal intensity in the SNc was apparently not influenced by iron deposition. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between signal intensity and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons was seen in the SNc. Based on the direct correlation between postportem NmMRI and neuropathological findings, signal intensity in the SNc is closely related to the quantity of neuromelanin-containing neurons but is not influenced by iron deposition. (orig.)

  16. US of the Nongravid Cervix with Multimodality Imaging Correlation: Normal Appearance, Pathologic Conditions, and Diagnostic Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenberg, Joseph C; Yam, Benjamin L; Langer, Jill E; Jones, Lisa P

    2016-01-01

    The adult uterine cervix may exhibit a wide variety of pathologic conditions that include benign entities (eg, cervicitis, hyperplasia, nabothian cysts, cervical polyps, leiomyomas, endometriosis, and congenital abnormalities) as well as malignant lesions, particularly cervical carcinoma. In addition, lesions that arise in the uterine body may secondarily involve the cervix, such as endometrial carcinoma and prolapsed intracavitary masses. Many of these conditions can be identified and characterized at ultrasonography (US), which is considered the first-line imaging examination for the female pelvis. However, examination of the cervix is often cursory during pelvic US, such that cervical disease may be overlooked or misdiagnosed. Transabdominal US of the cervix may not afford sufficient spatial resolution to depict cervical disease in many patients; therefore, endovaginal US is considered the optimal technique. Use of supplemental imaging techniques, particularly the application of transducer pressure on the cervix, may be helpful. This review describes the normal appearance of the cervix at US, the appearance of cervical lesions and conditions that mimic abnormalities at US, and optimal US techniques for evaluation of the cervix. This information will help radiologists detect and diagnose cervical abnormalities more confidently at pelvic US. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  17. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J.M.; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J.B.; van Bemmel, Margaretha E.M.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Velders, Aldrik H.; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2017-01-01

    intracellular distribution. In vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) of the hybrid peptide were shown to be similar. Assessment of tracer distribution in excised tissues revealed the location of tracer uptake with both LA-ICP-MS-imaging and fluorescence imaging. Conclusion: Lanthanide-isotope chelation expands the scope of fluorescent/radioactive hybrid tracers to include MS-based analytical tools such as mass-cytometry, ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS imaging in molecular pathology. In contradiction to common expectations, MS detection using a single chelate imaging agent was shown to be feasible, enabling a direct link between nuclear medicine-based imaging and theranostic methods. PMID:28255355

  18. ROLE OF IMAGING TESTS FOR PREOPERATIVE LOCATION OF PATHOLOGIC PARATHYROID TISSUE IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Maria Caroline Alves; de Oliveira E Silva de Morais, Nathalie Anne; Beuren, Andrea Cristiani; Lopes, Cristiane Bertolino; Santos, Camila Vicente; Cantoni, Joyce; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Lima, Maurício Barbosa

    2016-09-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) can be cured by parathyroidectomy, and the preoperative location of enlarged pathologic parathyroid glands is determined by imaging studies, especially cervical ultrasonography and scintigraphy scanning. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the use of preoperative cervical ultrasonography and/or parathyroid scintigraphy in locating pathologic parathyroid tissue in a group of patients with PHPT followed in the same endocrine center. We examined the records of 61 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy for PHPT following (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy scan and/or cervical ultrasonography. Scintigraphic and ultrasonographic findings were compared to histopathologic results of the surgical specimens. Ultrasonography detected enlarged parathyroid glands in 87% (48/55) of patients with PHPT and (99m)Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy in 79% (37/47) of the cases. Ultrasonography was able to correctly predict the surgical findings in 75% (41/55) of patients and scintigraphy in 72% (34/47). Of 7 patients who had negative ultrasonography, scintigraphy correctly predicted the surgical results in 2 (29%). Of 10 patients who had negative scintigraphy, ultrasonography correctly predicted the surgical results in 4 (40%). When we analyzed only patients with solitary eutopic parathyroid adenomas, the predictive positive values of ultrasonography and scintigraphy were 90% and 86%, respectively. Cervical ultrasonography had a higher likelihood of a correct positive test and a greater predictive positive value for solitary adenoma compared to (99m)Tc-sestamibi and should be used as the first diagnostic tool for preoperative localization of affected parathyroid glands in PHPT. Ca = calcium IEDE = Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione PHPT = primary hyperparathyroidism PTH = parathyroid hormone.

  19. Basic pathologies of neurodegenerative dementias and their relevance for state-of-the-art molecular imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drzezga, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Rising life-expectancy in the modern society has resulted in a rapidly growing prevalence of dementia, particularly of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dementia turns into one of the most common age-related disorders with deleterious consequences for the concerned patients and their relatives, as well as worrying effects on the socio-economic systems. These facts justify strengthened scientific efforts to identify the pathologic origin of dementing disorders, to improve diagnosis, and to interfere therapeutically with the disease progression. In the recent years, remarkable progress has been made concerning the identification of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders. Growing evidence indicates that a common basis of many neurodegenerative dementias can be found in increased production, misfolding and pathological aggregation of proteins, such as ss-amyloid, tau protein, a-synuclein, or the recently described ubiquitinated TDP-43. This progressive insight in pathological processes is paralleled by the development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the exact contribution or mechanism of different pathologies with regard to the development of disease is not yet sufficiently clear. Considerable overlap of pathologies has been documented in different types of clinically defined dementias post mortem, and it has been difficult to correlate post mortem histopathology data with disease-expression during life. Molecular imaging procedures may play a valuable role to circumvent this limitation. In general, methods of molecular imaging have recently experienced an impressive advance, with numerous new and improved technologies emerging. These exciting tools may play a key role in the future regarding the evaluation of pathomechanisms, preclinical evaluation of new diagnostic procedures in animal models, selection of patients for clinical trials, and therapy monitoring. In this overview, molecular key pathologies, which are currently

  20. Pathologic contrast enhancement of cerebral lesions: A comparative study using stereotactic CT, stereotactic MR imaging, and stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnest, F. IV; Kelly, P.J.; Scheithauer, B.; Kall, B.; Cascino, T.L.; Ehman, R.L.; Forbes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author compared the pattern and degree of Gd-DTPA dimeglumine contrast enhancement demonstrated on stereotactic MR images with that seen on stereotactic CT images obtained after conventional iodinated contrast agent enhancement and with histopathologic findings on sequential stereotactic brain biopsies. Stereotactic biopsies of the areas that enhanced on CT or MR imaging revealed tumor tissue with neovascularity. Tumor tissue with no or mild neovascularity did not enhance with contrast agent administration. Isolated tumor cells were frequently found beyond the margins of some primary brain neoplasms defined by contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging and CT. The histopathologic findings associated with pathologic contrast agent enhancement are presented

  1. Peritendinous calcinosis of calcaneus tendon associated with dermatomyositis: correlation between conventional radiograph, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and gross surgical pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Gomide, Lidyane Marques de Paula; Lemes, Marcella Stival

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial calcinosis is an uncommon condition in which there is either localized or widely disseminated deposition of calcium in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, muscles, and tendons. Calcinosis is often associated with collagen diseases, scleroderma and dermatomyositis. The authors report a case of interstitial calcinosis associated with dermatomyositis studied with conventional radiograph, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and correlate the imaging findings with the results of surgical pathology gross examination. (author)

  2. Discordant correlation of breast adenoid cystic carcinoma on imaging and pathology: A case report and literature review on surgical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyan Yan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: ACC can be extensively infiltrative and present much larger than its radiological size, as reported in our case. Use of better imaging modalities judiciously, in these cases, are needed to more accurately predict the true pathological size of ACC to prevent inadequate surgery.

  3. Deep learning for digital pathology image analysis: A comprehensive tutorial with selected use cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowczyk, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Deep learning (DL) is a representation learning approach ideally suited for image analysis challenges in digital pathology (DP). The variety of image analysis tasks in the context of DP includes detection and counting (e.g., mitotic events), segmentation (e.g., nuclei), and tissue classification (e.g., cancerous vs. non-cancerous). Unfortunately, issues with slide preparation, variations in staining and scanning across sites, and vendor platforms, as well as biological variance, such as the presentation of different grades of disease, make these image analysis tasks particularly challenging. Traditional approaches, wherein domain-specific cues are manually identified and developed into task-specific "handcrafted" features, can require extensive tuning to accommodate these variances. However, DL takes a more domain agnostic approach combining both feature discovery and implementation to maximally discriminate between the classes of interest. While DL approaches have performed well in a few DP related image analysis tasks, such as detection and tissue classification, the currently available open source tools and tutorials do not provide guidance on challenges such as (a) selecting appropriate magnification, (b) managing errors in annotations in the training (or learning) dataset, and (c) identifying a suitable training set containing information rich exemplars. These foundational concepts, which are needed to successfully translate the DL paradigm to DP tasks, are non-trivial for (i) DL experts with minimal digital histology experience, and (ii) DP and image processing experts with minimal DL experience, to derive on their own, thus meriting a dedicated tutorial. This paper investigates these concepts through seven unique DP tasks as use cases to elucidate techniques needed to produce comparable, and in many cases, superior to results from the state-of-the-art hand-crafted feature-based classification approaches. Specifically, in this tutorial on DL for DP image

  4. Deep learning for digital pathology image analysis: A comprehensive tutorial with selected use cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Janowczyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep learning (DL is a representation learning approach ideally suited for image analysis challenges in digital pathology (DP. The variety of image analysis tasks in the context of DP includes detection and counting (e.g., mitotic events, segmentation (e.g., nuclei, and tissue classification (e.g., cancerous vs. non-cancerous. Unfortunately, issues with slide preparation, variations in staining and scanning across sites, and vendor platforms, as well as biological variance, such as the presentation of different grades of disease, make these image analysis tasks particularly challenging. Traditional approaches, wherein domain-specific cues are manually identified and developed into task-specific "handcrafted" features, can require extensive tuning to accommodate these variances. However, DL takes a more domain agnostic approach combining both feature discovery and implementation to maximally discriminate between the classes of interest. While DL approaches have performed well in a few DP related image analysis tasks, such as detection and tissue classification, the currently available open source tools and tutorials do not provide guidance on challenges such as (a selecting appropriate magnification, (b managing errors in annotations in the training (or learning dataset, and (c identifying a suitable training set containing information rich exemplars. These foundational concepts, which are needed to successfully translate the DL paradigm to DP tasks, are non-trivial for (i DL experts with minimal digital histology experience, and (ii DP and image processing experts with minimal DL experience, to derive on their own, thus meriting a dedicated tutorial. Aims: This paper investigates these concepts through seven unique DP tasks as use cases to elucidate techniques needed to produce comparable, and in many cases, superior to results from the state-of-the-art hand-crafted feature-based classification approaches. Results : Specifically, in

  5. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Schemuth, Haemi; Nensa, Felix; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Schlosser, Thomas; Schoenecker, Anne; Neudorf, Ulrich; Schara, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m 2 ; range, 48-116 ml/m 2 ) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m 2 ; range, 15-74 ml/m 2 ). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m 2 ; range, 31-55 g/m 2 ). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  6. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Schemuth, Haemi; Nensa, Felix; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Schlosser, Thomas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schoenecker, Anne; Neudorf, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Essen (Germany); Schara, Ulrike [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 48-116 ml/m{sup 2}) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 15-74 ml/m{sup 2}). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m{sup 2}; range, 31-55 g/m{sup 2}). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  7. Imaging pathologic pulmonary air and fluid accumulation by functional and absolute EIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, G; Just, A; Dudykevych, T; Frerichs, I; Hinz, J; Quintel, M; Hellige, G

    2006-05-01

    The increasing use of EIT in clinical research on severely ill lung patients requires a clarification of the influence of pathologic impedance distributions on the validity of the resulting tomograms. Significant accumulation of low-conducting air (e.g. pneumothorax or emphysema) or well-conducting liquid (e.g. haematothorax or atelectases) may conflict with treating the imaging problem as purely linear. First, we investigated the influence of stepwise inflation and deflation by up to 300 ml of air and 300 ml of Ringer solution into the pleural space of five pigs on the resulting tomograms during ventilation at constant tidal volume. Series of EIT images representing relative impedance changes were generated on the basis of a modified Sheffield back projection algorithm and ventilation distribution was displayed as functional (f-EIT) tomograms. In addition, a modified simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) was applied to quantify the resistivity distribution on an absolute level scaled in Omega m (a-EIT). Second, we applied these two EIT techniques on four intensive care patients with inhomogeneous air and fluid distribution and compared the EIT results to computed tomography (CT) and to a reference set of intrathoracic resistivity data of 20 healthy volunteers calculated by SIRT. The results of the animal model show that f-EIT based on back projection is not disturbed by the artificial pneumo- or haematothorax. Application of SIRT allows reliable discrimination and detection of the location and amplitude of pneumo- or haematothorax. These results were supported by the good agreement between the electrical impedance tomograms and CT scans on patients and by the significant differences of regional resistivity data between patients and healthy volunteers.

  8. Correlation of B-mode ultrasound imaging and arteriography with pathologic findings at carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, T F; Erdoes, L; Mackey, W C; McCullough, J; Shepard, A; Heggerick, P; Isner, J; Callow, A D

    1985-04-01

    Presently most noninvasive methods for assessing extracranial carotid disease have relied on hemodynamic change associated with significant stenosis. Recent evidence has suggested that both ulceration and/or plaque hemorrhage may frequently play an important role in the pathophysiology of carotid disease. To assess the ability of B-mode ultrasound to provide this anatomic information, in a prospective blinded manner we compared B-mode ultrasound and selective four-vessel arteriography to pathologic specimens obtained at the time of 89 carotid endarterectomies. The presence of ulceration, plaque characteristics (particularly hemorrhage), and luminal diameter were described for each modality. While arteriography detected only 16 of 27 ulcerations (sensitivity, 59%), B-mode ultrasound had a greater sensitivity (24/27, 89%). Both modalities had comparable specificities (arteriography, 73%; B-mode ultrasound, 87%). Moreover, B-mode ultrasound was highly sensitive for demonstrating plaque hemorrhage (27/29, 93%), as well as being quite specific (84%). Assessment of luminal reduction by B-mode ultrasound improved with technologist/interpreter experience and was significantly improved by adding real-time spectral analysis. Because of B-mode ultrasound's sensitivity for imaging ulceration and plaque hemorrhage, it offers significant advantages for the noninvasive detection of extracranial carotid disease.

  9. Impaired cognitive functions in mild traumatic brain injury patients with normal and pathologic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurca, E.; Sivak, S.; Kucera, P.

    2006-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common neurological (neurotraumatological) diagnosis. As well as different subjective symptoms, many patients develop neuropsychological dysfunction with objective impairment of attention, memory and certain executive functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely used in MTBI patients despite its proven greater sensitivity and specificity in comparison with computed tomography (CT). The patient group consisted of 30 persons with MTBI and the control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Both groups underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological testing (including the Postconcussion Symptoms Scale questionnaire, PCSS) and brain MRI (the patient group within 96 h after injury). The analyzed groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex, age, or level or duration of education. MRI pathological findings (traumatic and nonspecific) were present in nine patients. Traumatic lesions were found in seven patients. Nonspecific white matter lesions were found in five healthy controls. There were significant differences between MTBI patients and controls in terms of subjective symptoms (PCSS) and selected neuropsychological tests. Statistically significant neuropsychological differences were found between MTBI patients with true traumatic lesions and MTBI patients with nonspecific lesions. There is evidence that MTBI patients with true traumatic MRI lesions are neuropsychologically different from MTBI patients with nonspecific MRI lesions or normal brain MRI. These results support the hypothesis that some acute MTBI signs and symptoms have a real organic basis which can be detected by selected new MRI modalities. (orig.)

  10. Impaired cognitive functions in mild traumatic brain injury patients with normal and pathologic magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurca, E.; Sivak, S. [Comenius University, Clinic of Neurology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Martin (Slovakia); Kucera, P. [Comenius University, 1st Clinic of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2006-09-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common neurological (neurotraumatological) diagnosis. As well as different subjective symptoms, many patients develop neuropsychological dysfunction with objective impairment of attention, memory and certain executive functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely used in MTBI patients despite its proven greater sensitivity and specificity in comparison with computed tomography (CT). The patient group consisted of 30 persons with MTBI and the control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Both groups underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological testing (including the Postconcussion Symptoms Scale questionnaire, PCSS) and brain MRI (the patient group within 96 h after injury). The analyzed groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex, age, or level or duration of education. MRI pathological findings (traumatic and nonspecific) were present in nine patients. Traumatic lesions were found in seven patients. Nonspecific white matter lesions were found in five healthy controls. There were significant differences between MTBI patients and controls in terms of subjective symptoms (PCSS) and selected neuropsychological tests. Statistically significant neuropsychological differences were found between MTBI patients with true traumatic lesions and MTBI patients with nonspecific lesions. There is evidence that MTBI patients with true traumatic MRI lesions are neuropsychologically different from MTBI patients with nonspecific MRI lesions or normal brain MRI. These results support the hypothesis that some acute MTBI signs and symptoms have a real organic basis which can be detected by selected new MRI modalities. (orig.)

  11. A prospective study of shoulder pain in primary care: Prevalence of imaged pathology and response to guided diagnostic blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNair Peter J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of imaged pathology in primary care has received little attention and the relevance of identified pathology to symptoms remains unclear. This paper reports the prevalence of imaged pathology and the association between pathology and response to diagnostic blocks into the subacromial bursa (SAB, acromioclavicular joint (ACJ and glenohumeral joint (GHJ. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain recruited from primary care underwent standardised x-ray, diagnostic ultrasound scan and diagnostic injections of local anaesthetic into the SAB and ACJ. Subjects who reported less than 80% reduction in pain following either of these injections were referred for a magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA and GHJ diagnostic block. Differences in proportions of positive and negative imaging findings in the anaesthetic response groups were assessed using Fishers test and odds ratios were calculated a for positive anaesthetic response (PAR to diagnostic blocks. Results In the 208 subjects recruited, the rotator cuff and SAB displayed the highest prevalence of pathology on both ultrasound (50% and 31% respectively and MRA (65% and 76% respectively. The prevalence of PAR following SAB injection was 34% and ACJ injection 14%. Of the 59% reporting a negative anaesthetic response (NAR for both of these injections, 16% demonstrated a PAR to GHJ injection. A full thickness tear of supraspinatus on ultrasound was associated with PAR to SAB injection (OR 5.02; p p p p ≤ 0.05. Conclusions Rotator cuff and SAB pathology were the most common findings on ultrasound and MRA. Evidence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear was associated with symptoms arising from the subacromial region, and a biceps tendon sheath effusion and an intact rotator cuff were associated with an intra-articular GHJ pain source. When combined with clinical information, these results may help guide diagnostic decision making in primary care.

  12. A resolution adaptive deep hierarchical (RADHicaL) learning scheme applied to nuclear segmentation of digital pathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowczyk, Andrew; Doyle, Scott; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2018-01-01

    Deep learning (DL) has recently been successfully applied to a number of image analysis problems. However, DL approaches tend to be inefficient for segmentation on large image data, such as high-resolution digital pathology slide images. For example, typical breast biopsy images scanned at 40× magnification contain billions of pixels, of which usually only a small percentage belong to the class of interest. For a typical naïve deep learning scheme, parsing through and interrogating all the image pixels would represent hundreds if not thousands of hours of compute time using high performance computing environments. In this paper, we present a resolution adaptive deep hierarchical (RADHicaL) learning scheme wherein DL networks at lower resolutions are leveraged to determine if higher levels of magnification, and thus computation, are necessary to provide precise results. We evaluate our approach on a nuclear segmentation task with a cohort of 141 ER+ breast cancer images and show we can reduce computation time on average by about 85%. Expert annotations of 12,000 nuclei across these 141 images were employed for quantitative evaluation of RADHicaL. A head-to-head comparison with a naïve DL approach, operating solely at the highest magnification, yielded the following performance metrics: .9407 vs .9854 Detection Rate, .8218 vs .8489 F -score, .8061 vs .8364 true positive rate and .8822 vs 0.8932 positive predictive value. Our performance indices compare favourably with state of the art nuclear segmentation approaches for digital pathology images.

  13. Improved classification and visualization of healthy and pathological hard dental tissues by modeling specular reflections in NIR hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots, which are difficult to diagnose. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization which can classify healthy and pathological dental tissues. However, due to non-ideal illumination of the tooth surface the hyperspectral images can exhibit specular reflections, in particular around the edges and the ridges of the teeth. These reflections significantly affect the performance of automated classification and visualization methods. Cross polarized imaging setup can effectively remove the specular reflections, however is due to the complexity and other imaging setup limitations not always possible. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on modeling the specular reflections of hard dental tissues, which significantly improves the classification accuracy in the presence of specular reflections. The method was evaluated on five extracted human teeth with corresponding gold standard for 6 different healthy and pathological hard dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. The classification was performed by employing multiple discriminant analysis. Based on the obtained results we believe the proposed method can be considered as an effective alternative to the complex cross polarized imaging setups.

  14. Self-compassion moderates the relationship between body mass index and both eating disorder pathology and body image flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Allison C; Vimalakanthan, Kiruthiha; Miller, Kathryn E

    2014-09-01

    The current study examined whether self-compassion, the tendency to treat oneself kindly during distress and disappointments, would attenuate the positive relationship between body mass index (BMI) and eating disorder pathology, and the negative relationship between BMI and body image flexibility. One-hundred and fifty-three female undergraduate students completed measures of self-compassion, self-esteem, eating disorder pathology, and body image flexibility, which refers to one's acceptance of negative body image experiences. Controlling for self-esteem, hierarchical regressions revealed that self-compassion moderated the relationships between BMI and the criteria. Specifically, the positive relationship between BMI and eating disorder pathology and the negative relationship between BMI and body image flexibility were weaker the higher women's levels of self-compassion. Among young women, self-compassion may help to protect against the greater eating disturbances that coincide with a higher BMI, and may facilitate the positive body image experiences that tend to be lower the higher one's BMI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Virtual MR arthroscopy of the shoulder: image gallery with arthroscopic correlation of major pathologies in shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, A; Volpe, D; Volpe, N; Fornara, P; Castagna, A; Carriero, A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare virtual MR arthroscopic reconstructions with arthroscopic images in patients affected by shoulder joint instability. MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the shoulder is now a well-assessed technique, based on the injection of a contrast medium solution, which fills the articular space and finds its way between the rotator cuff (RC) and the glenohumeral ligaments. In patients with glenolabral pathology, we used an additional sequence that provided virtual arthroscopy (VA) post-processed views, which completed the MR evaluation of shoulder pathology. We enrolled 36 patients, from whom MR arthrographic sequence data (SE T1w and GRE T1 FAT SAT) were obtained using a GE 0.5 T Signa--before any surgical or arthroscopic planned treatment; the protocol included a supplemental 3D, spoiled GE T1w positioned in the coronal plane. Dedicated software loaded on a work-station was used to elaborate VAs. Two radiologists evaluated, on a semiquantitative scale, the visibility of the principal anatomic structures, and then, in consensus, the pathology emerging from the VA images. These images were reconstructed in all patients, except one. The visualization of all anatomical structures was acceptable. VA and MR arthrographic images were fairly concordant with intraoperative findings. Although in our pilot study the VA findings did not change the surgical planning, the results showed concordance with the surgical or arthroscopic images.

  16. Effect of pathological heterogeneity on shear wave elasticity imaging in the staging of deep venous thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    Full Text Available We aimed to observe the relationship between the pathological components of a deep venous thrombus (DVT, which was divided into three parts, and the findings on quantitative ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE to increase the accuracy of thrombus staging in a rabbit model.A flow stenosis-induced vein thrombosis model was used, and the thrombus was divided into three parts (head, body and tail, which were associated with corresponding observation points. Elasticity was quantified in vivo using SWE over a 2-week period. A quantitative pathologic image analysis (QPIA was performed to obtain the relative percentages of the components of the main clots.DVT maturity occurred at 2 weeks, and the elasticity of the whole thrombus and the three parts (head, body and tail showed an increasing trend, with the Young's modulus values varying from 2.36 ± 0.41 kPa to 13.24 ± 1.71 kPa; 2.01 ± 0.28 kPa to 13.29 ± 1.48 kPa; 3.27 ± 0.57 kPa to 15.91 ± 2.05 kPa; and 1.79 ± 0.36 kPa to 10.51 ± 1.61 kPa, respectively. Significant increases occurred on different days for the different parts: the head showed significant increases on days 4 and 6; the body showed significant increases on days 4 and 7; and the tail showed significant increases on days 3 and 6. The QPIA showed that the thrombus composition changed dynamically as the thrombus matured, with the fibrin and calcium salt deposition gradually increasing and the red blood cells (RBCs and platelet trabecula gradually decreasing. Significant changes were observed on days 4 and 7, which may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi. Significant heterogeneity was observed between and within the thrombi.Variations in the thrombus components were generally consistent between the SWE and QPIA. Days 4 and 7 after thrombus induction may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi in rabbit models. A dynamic examination of the same part of the thrombus

  17. Effect of pathological heterogeneity on shear wave elasticity imaging in the staging of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaona; Li, Na; Wen, Chaoyang

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to observe the relationship between the pathological components of a deep venous thrombus (DVT), which was divided into three parts, and the findings on quantitative ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE) to increase the accuracy of thrombus staging in a rabbit model. A flow stenosis-induced vein thrombosis model was used, and the thrombus was divided into three parts (head, body and tail), which were associated with corresponding observation points. Elasticity was quantified in vivo using SWE over a 2-week period. A quantitative pathologic image analysis (QPIA) was performed to obtain the relative percentages of the components of the main clots. DVT maturity occurred at 2 weeks, and the elasticity of the whole thrombus and the three parts (head, body and tail) showed an increasing trend, with the Young's modulus values varying from 2.36 ± 0.41 kPa to 13.24 ± 1.71 kPa; 2.01 ± 0.28 kPa to 13.29 ± 1.48 kPa; 3.27 ± 0.57 kPa to 15.91 ± 2.05 kPa; and 1.79 ± 0.36 kPa to 10.51 ± 1.61 kPa, respectively. Significant increases occurred on different days for the different parts: the head showed significant increases on days 4 and 6; the body showed significant increases on days 4 and 7; and the tail showed significant increases on days 3 and 6. The QPIA showed that the thrombus composition changed dynamically as the thrombus matured, with the fibrin and calcium salt deposition gradually increasing and the red blood cells (RBCs) and platelet trabecula gradually decreasing. Significant changes were observed on days 4 and 7, which may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi. Significant heterogeneity was observed between and within the thrombi. Variations in the thrombus components were generally consistent between the SWE and QPIA. Days 4 and 7 after thrombus induction may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi in rabbit models. A dynamic examination of the same part of the thrombus may be

  18. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  19. Microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ: Clinical presentation, imaging features, pathologic findings, and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Cristina C. [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Mercado, Cecilia L. [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine (United States)], E-mail: Cecilia.mercado@nyumc.org; Cangiarella, Joan F. [Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Moy, Linda; Toth, Hildegard K. [Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine (United States); Guth, Amber A. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical features, imaging characteristics, pathologic findings and outcome of microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM). Materials and methods: The records of 21 women diagnosed with microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM) from November 1993 to September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic features, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Results: The 21 lesions all occurred in women with a mean age of 56 years (range, 27-79 years). Clinical findings were present in ten (48%): 10 with palpable masses, four with associated nipple discharge. Mean lesion size was 21 mm (range, 9-65 mm). The lesion size in 62% was 15 mm or smaller. Mammographic findings were calcifications only in nine (43%) and an associated or other finding in nine (43%) [mass (n = 7), asymmetry (n = 1), architectural distortion (n = 1)]. Three lesions were mammographically occult. Sonographic findings available in 11 lesions showed a solid hypoechoic mass in 10 cases (eight irregular in shape, one round, one oval). One lesion was not seen on sonography. On histopathologic examination, all lesions were diagnosed as DCISM, with a focus of invasive carcinoma less than or equal to 1 mm in diameter within an area of DCIS. Sixteen (76%) lesions were high nuclear grade, four (19%) were intermediate and one was low grade (5%). Sixteen (76%) had the presence of necrosis. Positivity for ER and PR was noted in 75% and 38%. Nodal metastasis was present in one case with axillary lymph node dissection. Mean follow-up time for 16 women was 36 months without evidence of local or systemic recurrence. One patient developed a second primary in the contralateral breast 3 years later. Conclusion: The clinical presentation and radiologic appearance of a mass are commonly encountered in DCISM lesions (48% and 57%, respectively), irrespective of lesion size, mimicking findings seen in invasive carcinoma

  20. Microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ: Clinical presentation, imaging features, pathologic findings, and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Cristina C.; Mercado, Cecilia L.; Cangiarella, Joan F.; Moy, Linda; Toth, Hildegard K.; Guth, Amber A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical features, imaging characteristics, pathologic findings and outcome of microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM). Materials and methods: The records of 21 women diagnosed with microinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCISM) from November 1993 to September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic features, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Results: The 21 lesions all occurred in women with a mean age of 56 years (range, 27-79 years). Clinical findings were present in ten (48%): 10 with palpable masses, four with associated nipple discharge. Mean lesion size was 21 mm (range, 9-65 mm). The lesion size in 62% was 15 mm or smaller. Mammographic findings were calcifications only in nine (43%) and an associated or other finding in nine (43%) [mass (n = 7), asymmetry (n = 1), architectural distortion (n = 1)]. Three lesions were mammographically occult. Sonographic findings available in 11 lesions showed a solid hypoechoic mass in 10 cases (eight irregular in shape, one round, one oval). One lesion was not seen on sonography. On histopathologic examination, all lesions were diagnosed as DCISM, with a focus of invasive carcinoma less than or equal to 1 mm in diameter within an area of DCIS. Sixteen (76%) lesions were high nuclear grade, four (19%) were intermediate and one was low grade (5%). Sixteen (76%) had the presence of necrosis. Positivity for ER and PR was noted in 75% and 38%. Nodal metastasis was present in one case with axillary lymph node dissection. Mean follow-up time for 16 women was 36 months without evidence of local or systemic recurrence. One patient developed a second primary in the contralateral breast 3 years later. Conclusion: The clinical presentation and radiologic appearance of a mass are commonly encountered in DCISM lesions (48% and 57%, respectively), irrespective of lesion size, mimicking findings seen in invasive carcinoma

  1. A review of novel optical imaging strategies of the stroke pathology and stem cell therapy in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eAswendt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplanted stem cells can induce and enhance functional recovery in experimental stroke. Invasive analysis has been extensively used to provide detailed cellular and molecular characterization of the stroke pathology and engrafted stem cells. But post mortem analysis is not appropriate to reveal the time scale of the dynamic interplay between the cell graft, the ischemic lesion and the endogenous repair mechanisms. This review describes non-invasive imaging techniques which have been developed to provide complementary in vivo information. Recent advances were made in analyzing simultaneously different aspects of the cell graft (e.g. number of cells, viability state and cell fate, the ischemic lesion (e.g. blood brain barrier consistency, hypoxic and necrotic areas and the neuronal and vascular network. We focus on optical methods, which permit simple animal preparation, repetitive experimental conditions, relatively medium-cost instrumentation and are performed under mild anesthesia, thus nearly under physiological conditions. A selection of recent examples of optical intrinsic imaging, fluorescence imaging (FLI and bioluminescence imaging (BLI to characterize the stroke pathology and engrafted stem cells are discussed. Special attention is paid to novel optimal reporter genes/probes for genetic labeling and tracking of stem cells and appropriate transgenic animal models. Requirements, advantages and limitations of these imaging platforms are critically discussed and placed into the context of other non-invasive techniques, e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET, which can be joined with optical imaging in multimodal approaches.

  2. HLA-DRB*1501 associations with magnetic resonance imaging measures of grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaldizli, Özgür; Sethi, Varun; Pardini, Matteo; Tur, Carmen; Mok, Kin Y; Muhlert, Nils; Liu, Zheng; Samson, Rebecca S; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Yousry, Tarek A; Houlden, Henry; Hardy, John; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2016-05-01

    The HLA-DRB*1501 haplotype influences the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is not known how it affects grey matter pathology. To assess HLA-DRB(*)1501 effects on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cortical grey matter pathology. Whole and lesional cortical grey matter volumes, lesional and normal-appearing grey matter magnetization transfer ratio were measured in 85 people with MS and 36 healthy control subjects. HLA-DRB(*)1501 haplotype was determined by genotyping (rs3135388). No significant differences were observed in MRI measures between the HLA-DRB(*)1501 subgroups. The HLA-DRB(*)1501 haplotype is not strongly associated with MRI-visible grey matter pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Does the Internet function like magazines? An exploration of image-focused media, eating pathology, and body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Carrie E; Kelly, Nichole R; Serdar, Kasey L; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2012-12-01

    Research has identified a relation between exposure to thin-ideal magazine and television media images and eating disorder pathology. However, few studies have examined the potential influence of Internet media on eating disorder behaviors and attitudes. This study investigated associations among image-focused media exposure, body dissatisfaction, eating pathology and thin-ideal internalization in a sample of 421 female undergraduates. Undergraduate women spent significantly more time viewing online appearance-oriented media, rather than reading image-focused magazines. Appearance-oriented Internet and television use were associated with eating pathology. Moreover, the association between image-focused Internet use and BD was mediated by thin-ideal internalization. These findings are consistent with those of previous research, and highlight the vulnerability individuals high in thin-ideal internalization might have to media exposure. They also suggest that Internet media use is an important topic to attend to in eating disorders prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Delineation of cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis using multi-surface magnetization transfer ratio imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Rudko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of measurements of cortical surface magnetization transfer ratio (csMTR on the inner, mid and outer cortical boundaries as clinically accessible biomarkers of cortical gray matter pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS. Twenty-five MS patients and 12 matched controls were recruited from the MS Clinic of the Montreal Neurological Institute. Anatomical and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR images were acquired using 3 Tesla MRI at baseline and two-year time-points. MTR maps were smoothed along meshes representing the inner, mid and outer neocortical boundaries. To evaluate csMTR reductions suggestive of sub-pial demyelination in MS patients, a mixed model analysis was carried out at both the individual vertex level and in anatomically parcellated brain regions. Our results demonstrate that focal areas of csMTR reduction are most prevalent along the outer cortical surface in the superior temporal and posterior cingulate cortices, as well as in the cuneus and precentral gyrus. Additionally, age regression analysis identified that reductions of csMTR in MS patients increase with age but appear to hit a plateau in the outer caudal anterior cingulate, as well as in the precentral and postcentral cortex. After correction for the naturally occurring gradient in cortical MTR, the difference in csMTR between the inner and outer cortex in focal areas in the brains of MS patients correlated with clinical disability. Overall, our findings support multi-surface analysis of csMTR as a sensitive marker of cortical sub-pial abnormality indicative of demyelination in MS patients.

  5. Diversity of imaging and pathological features at different stages of primary central nervous system lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing LIU

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The clinical, imaging and pathological manifestations of one patient at different stages of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL have been analyzed to disclose its pathogenesis. Methods and Results A 29-year-old female patient showed recurrent onsets. On the first onset, the main clinical manifestation was blurred vision and visual field defect. Cranial MRI showed a patchy lesion in the right parietal and occipital lobes without obvious occupying sign. T1WI showed slight low-intensity sign, T2WI and FLAIR showed high-intensity signs. Enhanced scanning showed heterogeneous punctate enhancement. The lesion disappeared gradually after glucocorticoid impact therapy. Headache, vomiting and left limb paralysis were the main clinical manifestations on the second onset, and MRI showed a lesion in the right frontal and parietal lobes with obvious occupying sign and solid enhancement, low-intensity on T1WI, high-intensity on T2WI and FLAIR. The tumor was totally removed under microscope. Histological findings showed large tumor cells, rich cytoplasm, nuclei with various sizes and shapes, conspicuous mitosis, patchy necrosis, and interstitial small vessel hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical staining showed that membrane of tumor cells was positive for CD20, and nuclei were positive for paired box gene 5 (PAX5 and multiple myeloma oncogene 1 (MUM1. In a few tumor cells, membrane was positive for CD10 and CD30, and nuclei were positive for cyclin D1. Besides, tumor cells were negative for CD3, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Ki?67 labeling index was about 80%. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH assay showed that mRNA coded by Epstein?Barr (EB virus was negative. The tumor showed angiotropic characteristics, and the walls of involved blood vessels were wrapped and destructed. The final diagnosis was confirmed as diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Conclusions PCNSL has various imaging features, revealing as

  6. The pseudocapsule in hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between dynamic MR imaging and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazioli, L.; Stanga, C.; Dettori, E.; Gallo, C.; Matricardi, L.; Chiesa, A.; Olivetti, L.; Fugazzola, C.; Giacobbe, A.; Benetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    Nodular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by the presence of a pseudocapsule (constructed usually from connective fibrous tissue) that appears hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging sequences without a contrast medium. The presence of vascular structures inside the tumor, which are verified by histological exam, affects enhancement of the PC after administrating the contrast medium: The impregnation is more evident in the dynamic study but also persists on the delayed T1-weighted SE images. The accuracy of MR in detecting the pseudocapsule of HCC and contrast enhancement of the pseudocapsule during dynamic studies were evaluated and related to pathological findings. Thirty-seven HCC were examined in 33 patients and afterwards resected. In capsulated nodules, besides usual hematoxylin, eosin, and trichrome stainings, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods were performed. On a 1.5-T MR unit, T1- and T2-weighted SE and GE FLASH 2D sequences after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (dynamic study) were used. In a later phase, T1-weighted SE sequences were repeated. Histologically, the pseudocapsule (thickness 0.2-6 mm) was present in 26 of 37 nodules (70 %). The dynamic study was the most suitable technique to show the pseudocapsule, which was recognized in 80.7 % (21 of 26 nodules). In 5 of 26 cases, the pseudocapsule, not demonstrated by MR, was thinner than 0.4 mm. In 16 of 21 cases, in the early portal phase (30-60 s), the pseudocapsule had an early enhancement, which was more evident later; in 5 of 21 cases the enhancement was observed only in the late portal phase (1-2 min). At histological examination, 14 of 16 pseudocapsules with early enhancement showed a more prominent vasculature than those with enhancement in the equilibrium phase. Magnetic resonance was a reliable tool in demonstrating the pseudocapsule of HCC. The histological examination demonstrated a good correlation between the

  7. Automated classification and visualization of healthy and pathological dental tissues based on near-infrared hyper-spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots which are difficult to diagnose. If detected early enough, such demineralization can be arrested and reversed by non-surgical means through well established dental treatments (fluoride therapy, anti-bacterial therapy, low intensity laser irradiation). Near-infrared (NIR) hyper-spectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization based on distinct spectral features of healthy and pathological dental tissues. In this study, we apply NIR hyper-spectral imaging to classify and visualize healthy and pathological dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized areas. For this purpose, a standardized teeth database was constructed consisting of 12 extracted human teeth with different degrees of natural dental lesions imaged by NIR hyper-spectral system, X-ray and digital color camera. The color and X-ray images of teeth were presented to a clinical expert for localization and classification of the dental tissues, thereby obtaining the gold standard. Principal component analysis was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. Finally, the dental tissues were classified by employing multiple discriminant analysis. High agreement was observed between the resulting classification and the gold standard with the classification sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85 % and 97 %, respectively. This study demonstrates that NIR hyper-spectral imaging has considerable diagnostic potential for imaging hard dental tissues.

  8. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopic Imaging of Human Tissue Sections towards Improving Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter L.; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis. PMID:25650759

  9. Imaging and Pathological Features of Percutaneous Cryosurgery on Normal Lung Evaluated in a Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi NIU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is one of the most commonly occurring malignancies and frequent causes of death in the world. Cryoablation is a safe and alternative treatment for unresectable lung cancer. Due to the lung being gas-containing organ and different from solid organs such as liver and pancreas, it is difficult to achieve the freezing range of beyond the tumor edge 1 cm safety border. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of different numbers of freeze cycles on the effectiveness of cryoablation on normal lung tissue and to create an operation guideline that gives the best effect. Methods Six healthy Tibetan miniature pigs were given a CT scan and histological investigation after percutaneous cryosurgery. Cryoablation was performed as 2 cycles of 10 min of active freezing in the left lung; each freeze followed by a 5 min thaw. In the right lung, we performed the same 2 cycles of 5 min of freezing followed by 5 min of thawing. However, for the right lung, we included a third cycle of consisting of 10 min of freezing followed by 5 min of thawing. Three cryoprobes were inserted into the left lung and three cryoprobes in the right lung per animal, one in the upper and two in the lower lobe, so as to be well away from each other. Comparison under the same experimental condition was necessary. During the experiment, observations were made regarding the imaging change of ice-ball. The lungs were removed postoperatively at 3 intervals: 4 h, 3 d of postoperation and 7 d of postoperation, respectively, to view microscopic and pathological change. Results The ice-ball grew gradually in relation to the increase in time, and the increase in number of cycles. The size of the cryolesion (hypothesis necrotic area in specimens, over time, became larger in size than the size of the ice-ball during operation, regardless of whether 2 or 3 freeze-thaw cycles were performed. The area of necrosis was gradually increased over the course of time

  10. Fusion of lens-free microscopy and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-color-accuracy and high-resolution pathology imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Digital pathology and telepathology require imaging tools with high-throughput, high-resolution and accurate color reproduction. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital in-line holography is a promising technique towards these needs, as it offers a wide field of view (FOV >20 mm2) and high resolution with a compact, low-cost and portable setup. Color imaging has been previously demonstrated by combining reconstructed images at three discrete wavelengths in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum, i.e., the RGB combination method. However, this RGB combination method is subject to color distortions. To improve the color performance of lens-free microscopy for pathology imaging, here we present a wavelet-based color fusion imaging framework, termed "digital color fusion microscopy" (DCFM), which digitally fuses together a grayscale lens-free microscope image taken at a single wavelength and a low-resolution and low-magnification color-calibrated image taken by a lens-based microscope, which can simply be a mobile phone based cost-effective microscope. We show that the imaging results of an H&E stained breast cancer tissue slide with the DCFM technique come very close to a color-calibrated microscope using a 40x objective lens with 0.75 NA. Quantitative comparison showed 2-fold reduction in the mean color distance using the DCFM method compared to the RGB combination method, while also preserving the high-resolution features of the lens-free microscope. Due to the cost-effective and field-portable nature of both lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy techniques, their combination through the DCFM framework could be useful for digital pathology and telepathology applications, in low-resource and point-of-care settings.

  11. High grade glioma: Imaging combined with pathological grade defines management and predicts prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, Neil G.; Lynch, Andrew G.; Jefferies, Sarah J.; Price, Stephen J.; Jones, Phil H.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Xuereb, John H.; Pohl, Ute

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: There is ambiguity in pathological grading of high grade gliomas within the WHO 2000 classification, especially those with predominant oligodendroglial differentiation. Patients and methods: All adult high grade gliomas treated radically, 1996-2005, were assessed. Cases in which pathology was grade III but radiology suggested glioblastoma (GBM) were classified as 'grade III/IV'; their pathology was reviewed. Results: Data from 245 patients (52 grade III, 18 grade III/IV, 175 GBM) were analysed using a Cox Proportional Hazards model. On pathology review, features suggestive of more aggressive behaviour were found in all 18 grade III/IV tumours. Oligodendroglial components with both necrosis and microvascular proliferation were present in 7. MIB-1 counts for the last 8 were all above 14%, mean 27%. Median survivals were: grade III 34 months, grade III/IV 10 months, GBM 11 months. Survival was not significantly different between grade III/IV and GBM. Patients with grade III/IV tumours had significantly worse outcome than grade III, with a hazard of death 3.7 times higher. Conclusions: The results highlight the current inconsistency in pathological grading of high grade tumours, especially those with oligodendroglial elements. Patients with histological grade III tumours but radiological appearances suggestive of GBM should be managed as glioblastoma

  12. Pseudo-HE images derived from CARS/TPEF/SHG multimodal imaging in combination with Raman-spectroscopy as a pathological screening tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocklitz, Thomas W.; Salah, Firas Subhi; Vogler, Nadine; Heuke, Sandro; Chernavskaia, Olga; Schmidt, Carsten; Waldner, Maximilian J.; Greten, Florian R.; Bräuer, Rolf; Schmitt, Michael; Stallmach, Andreas; Petersen, Iver; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Due to the steadily increasing number of cancer patients worldwide the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is a major field of research. The diagnosis of cancer is mostly performed by an experienced pathologist via the visual inspection of histo-pathological stained tissue sections. To save valuable time, low quality cryosections are frequently analyzed with diagnostic accuracies that are below those of high quality embedded tissue sections. Thus, alternative means have to be found that enable for fast and accurate diagnosis as the basis of following clinical decision making. In this contribution we will show that the combination of the three label-free non-linear imaging modalities CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering), TPEF (two-photon excited autofluorescence) and SHG (second harmonic generation) yields information that can be translated into computational hematoxylin and eosin (HE) images by multivariate statistics. Thereby, a computational HE stain is generated resulting in pseudo-HE overview images that allow for identification of suspicious regions. The latter are analyzed further by Raman-spectroscopy retrieving the tissue’s molecular fingerprint. The results suggest that the combination of non-linear multimodal imaging and Raman-spectroscopy possesses the potential as a precise and fast tool in routine histopathology. As the key advantage, both optical methods are non-invasive enabling for further pathological investigations of the same tissue section, e.g. a direct comparison with the current pathological gold-standard

  13. Imaging noradrenergic influence on amyloid pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkeler, A.; Waerzeggers, Y.; Klose, A.; Monfared, P.; Thomas, A.V.; Jacobs, A.H.; Schubert, M.; Heneka, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims towards the non-invasive characterization of disease-specific molecular alterations in the living organism in vivo. In that, molecular imaging opens a new dimension in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, as it allows the non-invasive determination of the dynamics of changes on the molecular level. The imaging technology being employed includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging as well as optical-based imaging technologies. These imaging modalities are employed together or alone for disease phenotyping, development of imaging-guided therapeutic strategies and in basic and translational research. In this study, we review recent investigations employing positron emission tomography and MRI for phenotyping mouse models of Alzheimers' disease by imaging. We demonstrate that imaging has an important role in the characterization of mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. (orig.)

  14. MRI Brain Images Healthy and Pathological Tissues Classification with the Aid of Improved Particle Swarm Optimization and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheejakumari, V.; Sankara Gomathi, B.

    2015-01-01

    The advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over other diagnostic imaging modalities are its higher spatial resolution and its better discrimination of soft tissue. In the previous tissues classification method, the healthy and pathological tissues are classified from the MRI brain images using HGANN. But the method lacks sensitivity and accuracy measures. The classification method is inadequate in its performance in terms of these two parameters. So, to avoid these drawbacks, a new classification method is proposed in this paper. Here, new tissues classification method is proposed with improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) technique to classify the healthy and pathological tissues from the given MRI images. Our proposed classification method includes the same four stages, namely, tissue segmentation, feature extraction, heuristic feature selection, and tissue classification. The method is implemented and the results are analyzed in terms of various statistical performance measures. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed classification method in classifying the tissues and the achieved improvement in sensitivity and accuracy measures. Furthermore, the performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by comparing it with the other segmentation methods. PMID:25977706

  15. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmin, N.V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P.C.; Noske, D.P.; Galgano, G.D.; Mansvelder, H.D.; Baayen, J.C.; Groot, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third

  16. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third

  17. Imaging and the clinical-pathologic features of invasive micropapillary carcinoma of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Sik; Cho, Nariya; Ko, En Sook; Kim, Do Youn; Yang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Seung Ja; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the mammographic and sonographic appearances and the clinical-pathologic features of invasive micropapillary carcinoma. Between December 1999 and March 2005, among the 3,109 patients who underwent operation for breast cancer, 25 patients proved to have invasive micropaillary carcinoma. Among the 25 patients, we included 22 patients (mean age: 48, range: 26-77 years) who had undergone preoperative mammography and ultrasound. The mammographic and sonographic findings of the lesions were analyzed retrospectively. The pathologic findings were analyzed via the clinical records and pathology reports. Patients manifested with a palpable mass (77%, 17/22), bloody nipple discharge (14%, 3/22) or incidental lesion on the screening mammography (9%, 2/22). On mammography, a mass with an irregular (86%, 12/14) shape and an indistinct (43%, 6/14) or spiculated (43%, 6/14) margin was the most common findings on mammography. On sonography, a hypoechoic (91%, 20/22) mass with irregular shape (73%, 16/22) and an indistinct (32%, 7/22) or microlobulated (32%, 7/22) margin was the most common findings. Pathologically, axillary lymph node metastasis was present in 73% (16/22) of the patients. Invasive micropapillary carcinoma appeared an irregular shaped mass with an indistinct margin mass or microcalcifications on mammography and/or sonography. The tumors were frequently associated with axillary lymph node metastasis

  18. Automated Multi-Contrast Brain Pathological Area Extraction from 2D MR Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Bartušek, Karel; Kropatsch, W.G.; Smékal, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2015), s. 58-69 ISSN 1665-6423 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brain Pathology * Brain Tumor * MRI * Multi-contrast MRI * Symmetry Analysis Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.447, year: 2013

  19. Atomic force microscopy-based antibody recognition imaging of proteins in the pathological deposits in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creasey, Rhiannon [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Sharma, Shiwani [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Gibson, Christopher T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Craig, Jamie E. [School of Medicine, Ophthalmology, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ebner, Andreas [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Becker, Thomas [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, 6845 WA (Australia); Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Voelcker, Nicolas H., E-mail: nico.voelcker@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University of SA, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    The phenomenon of protein aggregation is of considerable interest to various disciplines, including the field of medicine. A range of disease pathologies are associated with this phenomenon. One of the ocular diseases hallmarked by protein aggregation is the Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) Syndrome. This condition is characterized by the deposition of insoluble proteinaceous material on the anterior human lens capsule. Genomic and proteomic analyses have revealed an association of specific genetic markers and various proteins, respectively, with PEX syndrome. However, the ultrastructure of the protein aggregates is poorly characterized. This study seeks to build capacity to determine the molecular nature of PEX aggregates on human lens capsules in their native state by AFM-based antibody recognition imaging. Lysyl oxidase-Like 1 (LOXL1), a protein identified as a component of PEX aggregates, is detected by an antibody-modified AFM probe. Topographical AFM images and antibody recognition images are obtained using three AFM-based techniques: TREC, phase and force-volume imaging. LOXL1 is found to be present on the lens capsule surface, and is localized around fibrous protein aggregates. Our evaluation shows that TREC imaging is best suited for human tissue imaging and holds significant potential for imaging of human disease tissues in their native state. -- Highlights: {yields} Atomic force microscopy techniques were applied to diseased human tissues. {yields} LOXL1 protein was detected on the small fibers of Pseudoexfoliation deposits. {yields} PicoTREC was the optimum technique for investigating protein aggregates.

  20. Clinical-pathologic correlation in early cervical carcinoma: CT-MR imaging comparison for effect on staging and treatment choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubens, D.; Thornbury, J.R.; Weiss, S.L.; Lerner, R.M.; Angel, C.; Beecham, J.; Stoler, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    A group of patients with clinical stage I or II squamous cell cervical carcinoma have been examined using a 1.5-T magnet. Of these, six have had radical hysterectomy (by April 1986), providing specimens for pathologic correlation. In this preliminary group of patients, MR imaging gave a more accurate assessment of primary tumor extent than did clinical staging. In three of six patients, the disease was underestimated clinically at examination under anesthesia. These patients would have been managed with preoperative radiation rather than surgery alone if the investigative MR imaging information had been used in treatment planning. CT examinations of these patients did not contribute useful information for patient management. Preoperative MR imaging has the potential to alter patient treatment in early cervical carcinoma

  1. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) determination in normal and pathological fetal kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumoitre, K; Colavolpe, N; Shojai, R; Sarran, A; D' Ercole, C; Panuel, M

    2007-01-01

    To assess the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in the evaluation of the fetal kidney and to estimate age-dependent changes in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal and pathological fetal kidneys. DW-MRI was performed on a 1.5-T machine at 23-38 gestational weeks in 51 pregnant women in whom the fetal kidneys were normal and in 10 whose fetuses had renal pathology (three with suspected nephropathy, three with renal tract dilatation, one with unilateral renal venous thrombosis, and three with twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS)). The ADC was measured in an approximately 1-cm2 region of interest within the renal parenchyma. ADC values in normal renal parenchyma ranged from 1.1 to 1.8 10(-3) mm2 s-1. There was no significant age-dependent change in the ADC of normal kidneys. In cases of nephropathy, the ADC value was not always pathological but an ADC map could show abnormal findings. In cases of dilatation, the ADC value was difficult to determine when the dilatation was huge. In cases of TTTS, the ADC of the donor twin was higher than that of the recipient twin and the difference seemed to be related to the severity of the syndrome. Evaluation of the ADC for fetal kidneys is feasible. Fetal measurement of the ADC value and ADC maps may be useful tools with which to explore the fetal kidney when used in conjunction with current methods. DW-MR images, ADC value and ADC map seem to be useful in cases of suspected nephropathy (hyperechoic kidneys), dilated kidney and vascular pathology (renal venous thrombosis, TTTS). Copyright (c) 2006 ISUOG.

  2. Pre- and postcontrast FLAIR MR imaging in the diagnosis of intracranial meningeal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Hachiya, Junichi

    2000-01-01

    Few reports address the use of fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images of the brain in the diagnosis of extraaxial lesions. Our purpose was to assess the value of FLAIR images, including postcontrast ones, in the diagnosis of intracranial meningeal diseases. We reviewed precontrast (n=24) and postcontrast (n=20) FLAIR images obtained from 25 patients with infectious meningitis (n=13), carcinomatous meningitis or dissemination of primary brain tumor (n=7), dural metastasis (n=3), and others (n=2) in comparison with fast spin-echo T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted images. In lesion detectability, precontrast FLAIR images were significantly superior to fast spin-echo T2-weighted images but inferior to postcontrast T1-weighted images. There was no significant difference between postcontrast T1-weighted and FLAIR images. Precontrast FLAIR images can substitute for conventional fast spin-echo T2-weighted images. Postcontrast FLAIR images have diagnostic potential equivalent to conventional postcontrast T1-weighted images. (author)

  3. MR imaging of the hip in avascular necrosis: Radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Cho, Z.H.; Han, M.C.; Kim, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging is the most sensitive modality for diagnosing avascular necrosis (AVN), but there is no established explanation for the change of signal intensity of the osteonecrotic segment. Ten surgically removed femoral heads with AVN underwent MR imaging at 2.0 T. A combination of high gradient strength (0.1 m T/cm) and small radio frequency coil (8 cm in diameter) was used to obtain images with effective thickness of 2.0 mm and pixel dimensions as small as 200 μm. MR images were correlated with high-resolution CT and histologic findings. This paper illustrates how MR images the histologic findings of AVN

  4. Comparison of the binding characteristics of [18F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging tracers to Alzheimer's disease pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Iwata, Ren; Maruyama, Masahiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2013-01-01

    Extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although several PET imaging agents have been developed for in vivo detection of senile plaques, no PET probe is currently available for selective detection of neurofibrillary tangles in the living human brain. Recently, [ 18 F]THK-523 was developed as a potential in vivo imaging probe for tau pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare the binding properties of [ 18 F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging agents, including PiB, BF-227 and FDDNP, to synthetic protein fibrils and human brain tissue. In vitro radioligand binding assays were conducted using synthetic amyloid β 42 and K18ΔK280-tau fibrils. Nonspecific binding was determined by the addition of unlabelled compounds at a concentration of 2 μM. To examine radioligand binding to neuropathological lesions, in vitro autoradiography was conducted using sections of AD brain. [ 18 F]THK-523 showed higher affinity for tau fibrils than for Aβ fibrils, whereas the other probes showed a higher affinity for Aβ fibrils. The autoradiographic analysis indicated that [ 18 F]THK-523 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of tau protein deposits. Conversely, PiB and BF-227 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of Aβ plaques. These findings suggest that the unique binding profile of [ 18 F]THK-523 can be used to identify tau deposits in AD brain. (orig.)

  5. Application of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) to a tau pathology model of Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colgan, N

    2015-10-23

    Increased hyperphosphorylated tau and the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles are associated with the loss of neurons and cognitive decline in Alzheimer\\'s disease, and related neurodegenerative conditions. We applied two diffusion models, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), to in vivo diffusion magnetic resonance images (dMRI) of a mouse model of human tauopathy (rTg4510) at 8.5months of age. In grey matter regions with the highest degree of tau burden, microstructural indices provided by both NODDI and DTI discriminated the rTg4510 (TG) animals from wild type (WT) controls; however only the neurite density index (NDI) (the volume fraction that comprises axons or dendrites) from the NODDI model correlated with the histological measurements of the levels of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Reductions in diffusion directionality were observed when implementing both models in the white matter region of the corpus callosum, with lower fractional anisotropy (DTI) and higher orientation dispersion (NODDI) observed in the TG animals. In comparison to DTI, histological measures of tau pathology were more closely correlated with NODDI parameters in this region. This in vivo dMRI study demonstrates that NODDI identifies potential tissue sources contributing to DTI indices and NODDI may provide greater specificity to pathology in Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  6. Laser interference fringe tomography: a novel 3D imaging technique for pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Haylock, Thomas M.; Chifman, Lev M.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Behr, Bradford B.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Meade, Jeff T.; Hendrikse, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Laser interference fringe tomography (LIFT) is within the class of optical imaging devices designed for in vivo and ex vivo medical imaging applications. LIFT is a very simple and cost-effective three-dimensional imaging device with performance rivaling some of the leading three-dimensional imaging devices used for histology. Like optical coherence tomography (OCT), it measures the reflectivity as a function of depth within a sample and is capable of producing three-dimensional images from optically scattering media. LIFT has the potential capability to produce high spectral resolution, full-color images. The optical design of LIFT along with the planned iterations for improvements and miniaturization are presented and discussed in addition to the theoretical concepts and preliminary imaging results of the device.

  7. Clinical and imaging features of male breast disease, with pathological correlation: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angeline Mei Lian; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Wylie, Elizabeth; Metcalf, Cecily

    2014-01-01

    The majority of male breast diseases are benign. The most common is gynaecomastia. Although it is rare, the most critical diagnosis is a malignancy. Radiologists are generally less familiar with breast disease in males compared with females. This pictorial review will highlight the ultrasonographic, mammographic and pathological features of a spectrum of benign and malignant male breast diseases. This includes gynaecomastia, fat necrosis, lipoma, epidermoid cyst, subareolar abscess, chronic inflammation, melanoma and ductal carcinoma.

  8. Clinical and imaging features of male breast disease, with pathological correlation: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Angeline Mei Lian; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Wylie, Elizabeth [Department of Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia); Metcalf, Cecily [Department of Pathology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    The majority of male breast diseases are benign. The most common is gynaecomastia. Although it is rare, the most critical diagnosis is a malignancy. Radiologists are generally less familiar with breast disease in males compared with females. This pictorial review will highlight the ultrasonographic, mammographic and pathological features of a spectrum of benign and malignant male breast diseases. This includes gynaecomastia, fat necrosis, lipoma, epidermoid cyst, subareolar abscess, chronic inflammation, melanoma and ductal carcinoma.

  9. The diverse pathology and kinetics of mass, nonmass and focus enhancement on MR imaging of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanaz A.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Zak, Lindsay; Fan, Xiaobing; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the pathology and kinetic characteristics of breast lesions with focus, mass and nonmass-like enhancement. Materials and Methods 852 MRI detected breast lesions in 697 patients were selected for an IRB approved review. Patients underwent dynamic contrast enhanced MRI using one pre and three to six post-contrast T1 weighted images. The ‘type’ of enhancement was classified as mass, non-mass or focus, and kinetic curves quantified by the initial enhancement percentage (E1), time to peak enhancement (Tpeak) and signal enhancement ratio (SER). These kinetic parameters were compared between malignant and benign lesions within each morphologic type. Results 552 lesions were classified as mass (396 malignant, 156 benign), 261 as nonmass (212 malignant,49 benign) and 39 as focus (9 malignant,30 benign). The most common pathology of malignant/benign lesions by morphology: for mass, invasive ductal carcinoma/fibroadenoma; for nonmass, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)/fibrocystic change(FCC); for focus, DCIS/FCC. Benign mass lesions exhibited significantly lower E1, longer Tpeak and lower SER compared with malignant mass lesions (p < 0.0001). Benign nonmass lesions exhibited only a lower SER compared to malignant nonmass lesions (p<0.01). Conclusions By considering the diverse pathology and kinetic characteristics of different lesion morphologies, diagnostic accuracy may be improved. PMID:21591007

  10. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; De Smet, Arthur A.; Fine, Jason P.

    2005-01-01

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  11. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Madison (United States); Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Statistics, Madison (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Madison (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  12. Imaging-Assisted Large-Format Breast Pathology: Program Rationale and Development in a Nonprofit Health System in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lee Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern breast imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, provides an increasingly clear depiction of breast cancer extent, often with suboptimal pathologic confirmation. Pathologic findings guide management decisions, and small increments in reported tumor characteristics may rationalize significant changes in therapy and staging. Pathologic techniques to grossly examine resected breast tissue have changed little during this era of improved breast imaging and still rely primarily on the techniques of gross inspection and specimen palpation. Only limited imaging information is typically conveyed to pathologists, typically in the form of wire-localization images from breast-conserving procedures. Conventional techniques of specimen dissection and section submission destroy the three-dimensional integrity of the breast anatomy and tumor distribution. These traditional methods of breast specimen examination impose unnecessary limitations on correlation with imaging studies, measurement of cancer extent, multifocality, and margin distance. Improvements in pathologic diagnosis, reporting, and correlation of breast cancer characteristics can be achieved by integrating breast imagers into the specimen examination process and the use of large-format sections which preserve local anatomy. This paper describes the successful creation of a large-format pathology program to routinely serve all patients in a busy interdisciplinary breast center associated with a community-based nonprofit health system in the United States.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous carcinoma in the breast according to echogenicity on ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Gyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, JUng Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the clinical and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous breast carcinoma (PMBC) according to internal echogenicity on ultrasonography (US). Thirty-three patients with PMBC diagnosed at surgery were included in this study. Cases of PMBC were classified according to internal echogenicity on US. The imaging features on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were compared between the hypoechogenic and the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic groups. Eleven cases of PMBC (33.3%) exhibited hypoechogenicity on US, while 22 cases (66.7%) exhibited isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity. Of the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs, 95.5% showed a high signal on T2-weighted images, which was a significantly greater percentage than was observed for the hypoechogenic group (54.5%) (P=0.010). Of the hypoechogenic PMBCs, 63.6% showed a washout pattern in the delayed phase, which was substantially more than the result of 23.8% observed for the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs (P=0.053). PMBCs with isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity were more likely to show a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images than hypoechogenic PMBCs. However, other MR imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous carcinoma in the breast according to echogenicity on ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Gyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, JUng Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to explore the clinical and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous breast carcinoma (PMBC) according to internal echogenicity on ultrasonography (US). Thirty-three patients with PMBC diagnosed at surgery were included in this study. Cases of PMBC were classified according to internal echogenicity on US. The imaging features on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were compared between the hypoechogenic and the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic groups. Eleven cases of PMBC (33.3%) exhibited hypoechogenicity on US, while 22 cases (66.7%) exhibited isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity. Of the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs, 95.5% showed a high signal on T2-weighted images, which was a significantly greater percentage than was observed for the hypoechogenic group (54.5%) (P=0.010). Of the hypoechogenic PMBCs, 63.6% showed a washout pattern in the delayed phase, which was substantially more than the result of 23.8% observed for the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs (P=0.053). PMBCs with isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity were more likely to show a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images than hypoechogenic PMBCs. However, other MR imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar intervertebral disks with its pathological cerrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakitsubata, Yousuke; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Kihara, Yasushi; Harada, Kuniko; Mori, Yukiko; Kakitsubata, Sachiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1988-02-01

    Three cadaver spines were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 0.1 tesla resistive magnet. Anatomic sections of lumbar intervertebral disks were compared with various MR images, saturation recovery (SR), inversion recovery (IR), T1 and T2 weighted spin echo (SE) images. And the signal intensity of degenerated disks on T2 weighted images were correlated with the histological studies. The disks were well delineated by SR and their degenerative changes were detected most sensitively by T2 weighted SE image. Two parts of disk were delineated on T2 weighted SE image. The central portion of disk showed high signal intensity and the periphery a low signal intensity. The central high signal intensity area corresponded to the combination of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, which cannot be differenciated by MR. And the peripheral low signal intensity area corresponded to the collagenous fibers of annulus fibrosus. Histologically, disks with decreased signal intensity had marked increase of collagen fibers. The intranuclear cleft were evident on T2 weighted image, and the corresponding structures thought to be caused by invagination of the lamellae of the annulus into the nucleus in the histological specimens. MRI were useful modality for evaluation of intervertebral disks, but biochemical analysis may be needed for precise interpretation of MR images of disks in addition to histological studies.

  16. Disorders of paravertebral lumbar muscles: from pathology to cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Kremer, Stephane; Abu Eid, Maher; Bogorin, Adriana; Dietemann, Jean-Louis [University Hospital, Hautepierre Hospital, Department of Radiology 2, Strasbourg (France); Kellner, Frauke [Inselspital Bern, Department of Radiology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    Paravertebral lumbar muscles are important for spine stabilization and mobility. They may be abnormal in several disorders that may be associated with pain or functional impairment. Special attention should be paid to the paravertebral muscles during imaging, so that a possible muscular disease is not overlooked, especially in patients with low back pain. This article reviews such imaging abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. Disorders of paravertebral lumbar muscles: from pathology to cross-sectional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Kremer, Stephane; Abu Eid, Maher; Bogorin, Adriana; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Kellner, Frauke

    2008-01-01

    Paravertebral lumbar muscles are important for spine stabilization and mobility. They may be abnormal in several disorders that may be associated with pain or functional impairment. Special attention should be paid to the paravertebral muscles during imaging, so that a possible muscular disease is not overlooked, especially in patients with low back pain. This article reviews such imaging abnormalities. (orig.)

  18. Automated pathologies detection in retina digital images based on complex continuous wavelet transform phase angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmiri, Salim; Gargour, Christian S; Gabrea, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    An automated diagnosis system that uses complex continuous wavelet transform (CWT) to process retina digital images and support vector machines (SVMs) for classification purposes is presented. In particular, each retina image is transformed into two one-dimensional signals by concatenating image rows and columns separately. The mathematical norm of phase angles found in each one-dimensional signal at each level of CWT decomposition are relied on to characterise the texture of normal images against abnormal images affected by exudates, drusen and microaneurysms. The leave-one-out cross-validation method was adopted to conduct experiments and the results from the SVM show that the proposed approach gives better results than those obtained by other methods based on the correct classification rate, sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Pigeons (Columba livia) as Trainable Observers of Pathology and Radiology Breast Cancer Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard M; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Navarro, Victor M; Wasserman, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Pathologists and radiologists spend years acquiring and refining their medically essential visual skills, so it is of considerable interest to understand how this process actually unfolds and what image features and properties are critical for accurate diagnostic performance. Key insights into human behavioral tasks can often be obtained by using appropriate animal models. We report here that pigeons (Columba livia)-which share many visual system properties with humans-can serve as promising surrogate observers of medical images, a capability not previously documented. The birds proved to have a remarkable ability to distinguish benign from malignant human breast histopathology after training with differential food reinforcement; even more importantly, the pigeons were able to generalize what they had learned when confronted with novel image sets. The birds' histological accuracy, like that of humans, was modestly affected by the presence or absence of color as well as by degrees of image compression, but these impacts could be ameliorated with further training. Turning to radiology, the birds proved to be similarly capable of detecting cancer-relevant microcalcifications on mammogram images. However, when given a different (and for humans quite difficult) task-namely, classification of suspicious mammographic densities (masses)-the pigeons proved to be capable only of image memorization and were unable to successfully generalize when shown novel examples. The birds' successes and difficulties suggest that pigeons are well-suited to help us better understand human medical image perception, and may also prove useful in performance assessment and development of medical imaging hardware, image processing, and image analysis tools.

  20. Automated Grading of Gliomas using Deep Learning in Digital Pathology Images: A modular approach with ensemble of convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertosun, Mehmet Günhan; Rubin, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with different pathologic subtypes: Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade II, Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade III, and Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Grade IV. The survival and treatment options are highly dependent of this glioma grade. We propose a deep learning-based, modular classification pipeline for automated grading of gliomas using digital pathology images. Whole tissue digitized images of pathology slides obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to train our deep learning modules. Our modular pipeline provides diagnostic quality statistics, such as precision, sensitivity and specificity, of the individual deep learning modules, and (1) facilitates training given the limited data in this domain, (2) enables exploration of different deep learning structures for each module, (3) leads to developing less complex modules that are simpler to analyze, and (4) provides flexibility, permitting use of single modules within the framework or use of other modeling or machine learning applications, such as probabilistic graphical models or support vector machines. Our modular approach helps us meet the requirements of minimum accuracy levels that are demanded by the context of different decision points within a multi-class classification scheme. Convolutional Neural Networks are trained for each module for each sub-task with more than 90% classification accuracies on validation data set, and achieved classification accuracy of 96% for the task of GBM vs LGG classification, 71% for further identifying the grade of LGG into Grade II or Grade III on independent data set coming from new patients from the multi-institutional repository.

  1. SDOCT imaging to identify macular pathology in patients diagnosed with diabetic maculopathy by a digital photographic retinal screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mackenzie

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetic macular edema (DME is an important cause of vision loss. England has a national systematic photographic retinal screening programme to identify patients with diabetic eye disease. Grading retinal photographs according to this national protocol identifies surrogate markers for DME. We audited a care pathway using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT clinic to identify macular pathology in this subset of patients. METHODS: A prospective audit was performed of patients referred from screening with mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and surrogate markers for diabetic macular edema (M1 attending an SDOCT clinic. The SDOCT images were graded by an ophthalmologist as SDOCT positive, borderline or negative. SDOCT positive patients were referred to the medical retina clinic. SDOCT negative and borderline patients were further reviewed in the SDOCT clinic in 6 months. RESULTS: From a registered screening population of 17 551 patients with diabetes mellitus, 311 patients met the inclusion criteria between (March 2008 and September 2009. We analyzed images from 311 patients' SDOCT clinic episodes. There were 131 SDOCT negative and 12 borderline patients booked for revisit in the OCT clinic. Twenty-four were referred back to photographic screening for a variety of reasons. A total of 144 were referred to ophthalmology with OCT evidence of definite macular pathology requiring review by an ophthalmologist. DISCUSSION: This analysis shows that patients with diabetes, mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (R1 and evidence of diabetic maculopathy on non-stereoscopic retinal photographs (M1 have a 42.1% chance of having no macular edema on SDOCT imaging as defined by standard OCT definitions of DME when graded by a retinal specialist. SDOCT imaging is a useful adjunct to colour fundus photography in screening for referable diabetic maculopathy in our screening population.

  2. [Imaging manifestations and pathologic basis for hepatic capsular retraction syndrome caused by benign and malignant liver tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Youkuan; Xiao, Enhua; Shang, Quanliang; Chen, Juan

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the imaging manifestations of CT, MRI and pathological basis for hepatic capsular retraction syndrome caused by benign and malignant liver tumors.
 CT or MRI images and pathological features for hepatic capsular retraction syndrome were retrospectively analyzed in 50 patients with benign and malignant liver tumors. Picture archive and communication system (PACS) was used to observe and compare the morphology, size, width, depth, edge of the capsular retraction and the status of liquid under the liver capsule. The structure, differentiation and proliferation of the tumor were analyzed under the microscope.
 There were malignant liver tumors in 44 patients and benign tumor in 6 patients. The smooth or rough for the edge of capsular retraction was significant difference between the benign tumors and the malignant tumors with three differentiated grades (all PBenign and malignant hepatic tumors may appear capsule retraction syndrome, but there are morphological differences between them. The differences are closely related with the lesion size, differentiated degree of tumor and fibrous tissue proliferation.

  3. Four cases of solid pseudopapillary tumors of pancreas: Imaging findings and pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Serrano, Blanca; Dominguez-Ferreras, Esther; Chinchon-Espino, David

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP tumor) is a rare pancreatic neoplasm with low malignant potential, which usually affects female patients in the second or third decades of life. It is a non-functional, slow-growing neoplasm that very often reaches considerable size before the first symptoms appear. Symptomatology is frequently related to tumor size. Surgical excision is usually curative in most cases. Infrequently the tumor can appear in male patients or in aged women, which can make the diagnosis more difficult. Some patients develop liver metastases in the follow-up that can be resected. Our purpose is to review the radiological and pathological findings of SPTP with emphasis on these infrequent cases. Subjects and methods: The medical records and radiological findings of patients who underwent surgery for SPTP between 2000 and 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Study eligibility required that patients had undergone surgical resection and that a SPTP had been pathologically proved. Results: Four cases of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas were diagnosed and treated in our institution in the study period. Two of the patients, developed on follow-up liver metastases, and peritoneal, hepatic, and nodal metastases, respectively. Conclusion: Solid pseudopapillary tumors are well-encapsulated neoplasms that usually have a good prognosis after surgical excision. A malignant behavior is uncommon and in this case lymph node involvement, hepatic metastases and occasionally peritoneal invasion may also occur. Resection of liver metastases can prolong the long-term survival of the patients

  4. A Cluster-then-label Semi-supervised Learning Approach for Pathology Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikari, Mohammad; Salama, Sherine; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Martel, Anne L

    2018-05-08

    Completely labeled pathology datasets are often challenging and time-consuming to obtain. Semi-supervised learning (SSL) methods are able to learn from fewer labeled data points with the help of a large number of unlabeled data points. In this paper, we investigated the possibility of using clustering analysis to identify the underlying structure of the data space for SSL. A cluster-then-label method was proposed to identify high-density regions in the data space which were then used to help a supervised SVM in finding the decision boundary. We have compared our method with other supervised and semi-supervised state-of-the-art techniques using two different classification tasks applied to breast pathology datasets. We found that compared with other state-of-the-art supervised and semi-supervised methods, our SSL method is able to improve classification performance when a limited number of labeled data instances are made available. We also showed that it is important to examine the underlying distribution of the data space before applying SSL techniques to ensure semi-supervised learning assumptions are not violated by the data.

  5. Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, Andre; Watzek, G.; Imhof, H.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high-resolution imaging technique has gained importance in diagnosing dental-associated diseases of the mandible and maxilla. Since most radiologists have had little experience in these areas, many of the CT findings remain undescribed. The objective of this review article is to present the technique of dental CT, to illustrate the typical appearance of jaw anatomy and dental-related diseases of the jaws with dental CT, and to show where it can serve as an addition to conventional imaging methods in dental radiology. (orig.)

  6. Smart optical probes for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Skoch, Jesse; Hills, Ivory D.; Swager, Timothy M.; Nesterov, Evgueni E.

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent probes for amyloid-beta (Aβ) are an exciting option for molecular imaging in Alzheimer's disease research and may translate to clinical diagnostics. However, Aβ-targeted optical probes often suffer from poor specificity and slow clearance from the brain. We are designing smart optical probes that emit characteristic fluorescence signal only when bound to Aβ. We synthesized a family of dyes and tested Aβ-binding sensitivity with fluorescence spectroscopy and tissue-staining. Select compounds exhibited Aβ-dependent changes in fluorescence quantum yield, lifetime, and emission spectra that may be imaged microscopically or in vivo using new lifetime and spectral fluorescence imaging techniques. Smart optical probes that turn on when bound to Aβ will improve amyloid detection and may enable quantitative molecular imaging in vivo. (orig.)

  7. Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Watzek, G. [Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high-resolution imaging technique has gained importance in diagnosing dental-associated diseases of the mandible and maxilla. Since most radiologists have had little experience in these areas, many of the CT findings remain undescribed. The objective of this review article is to present the technique of dental CT, to illustrate the typical appearance of jaw anatomy and dental-related diseases of the jaws with dental CT, and to show where it can serve as an addition to conventional imaging methods in dental radiology. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging validation of pituitary gland compression and distortion by typical sellar pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Charles H; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Hsu, Liangge; Bi, Wenya Linda; Zamani, Amir A; Laws, Edward R

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the normal pituitary gland is an important component of presurgical planning, defining many aspects of the surgical approach and facilitating normal gland preservation. Magnetic resonance imaging is a proven imaging modality for optimal soft-tissue contrast discrimination in the brain. This study is designed to validate the accuracy of localization of the normal pituitary gland with MRI in a cohort of surgical patients with pituitary mass lesions, and to evaluate for correlation between presurgical pituitary hormone values and pituitary gland characteristics on neuroimaging. Fifty-eight consecutive patients with pituitary mass lesions were included in the study. Anterior pituitary hormone levels were measured preoperatively in all patients. Video recordings from the endoscopic or microscopic surgical procedures were available for evaluation in 47 cases. Intraoperative identification of the normal gland was possible in 43 of 58 cases. Retrospective MR images were reviewed in a blinded fashion for the 43 cases, emphasizing the position of the normal gland and the extent of compression and displacement by the lesion. There was excellent agreement between imaging and surgery in 84% of the cases for normal gland localization, and in 70% for compression or noncompression of the normal gland. There was no consistent correlation between preoperative pituitary dysfunction and pituitary gland localization on imaging, gland identification during surgery, or pituitary gland compression. Magnetic resonance imaging proved to be accurate in identifying the normal gland in patients with pituitary mass lesions, and was useful for preoperative surgical planning.

  9. Computer analysis of gallbladder ultrasonic images towards recognition of pathological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiela, M. R.; Bodzioch, S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach to gallbladder ultrasonic image processing and analysis towards automatic detection and interpretation of disease symptoms on processed US images. First, in this paper, there is presented a new heuristic method of filtering gallbladder contours from images. A major stage in this filtration is to segment and section off areas occupied by the said organ. This paper provides for an inventive algorithm for the holistic extraction of gallbladder image contours, based on rank filtration, as well as on the analysis of line profile sections on tested organs. The second part concerns detecting the most important lesion symptoms of the gallbladder. Automating a process of diagnosis always comes down to developing algorithms used to analyze the object of such diagnosis and verify the occurrence of symptoms related to given affection. The methodology of computer analysis of US gallbladder images presented here is clearly utilitarian in nature and after standardising can be used as a technique for supporting the diagnostics of selected gallbladder disorders using the images of this organ.

  10. Crowdsourcing image annotation for nucleus detection and segmentation in computational pathology: evaluating experts, automated methods, and the crowd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, H; Montaser-Kouhsari, L; Waltz, G; Bucur, O; Nowak, J A; Dong, F; Knoblauch, N W; Beck, A H

    2015-01-01

    The development of tools in computational pathology to assist physicians and biomedical scientists in the diagnosis of disease requires access to high-quality annotated images for algorithm learning and evaluation. Generating high-quality expert-derived annotations is time-consuming and expensive. We explore the use of crowdsourcing for rapidly obtaining annotations for two core tasks in com- putational pathology: nucleus detection and nucleus segmentation. We designed and implemented crowdsourcing experiments using the CrowdFlower platform, which provides access to a large set of labor channel partners that accesses and manages millions of contributors worldwide. We obtained annotations from four types of annotators and compared concordance across these groups. We obtained: crowdsourced annotations for nucleus detection and segmentation on a total of 810 images; annotations using automated methods on 810 images; annotations from research fellows for detection and segmentation on 477 and 455 images, respectively; and expert pathologist-derived annotations for detection and segmentation on 80 and 63 images, respectively. For the crowdsourced annotations, we evaluated performance across a range of contributor skill levels (1, 2, or 3). The crowdsourced annotations (4,860 images in total) were completed in only a fraction of the time and cost required for obtaining annotations using traditional methods. For the nucleus detection task, the research fellow-derived annotations showed the strongest concordance with the expert pathologist- derived annotations (F-M =93.68%), followed by the crowd-sourced contributor levels 1,2, and 3 and the automated method, which showed relatively similar performance (F-M = 87.84%, 88.49%, 87.26%, and 86.99%, respectively). For the nucleus segmentation task, the crowdsourced contributor level 3-derived annotations, research fellow-derived annotations, and automated method showed the strongest concordance with the expert pathologist

  11. A comparative study of postmortem MR imaging and pathological examination of human brain specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Tohru

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the value of MRI of the postmortem brain specimens by comparing MRI findings with neuropathological findings. Postmortem MRI was performed in 17 consecutive formalin-fixed whole brains comprising 3 with primary CNS neoplasm, 1 with metastatic brain tumor, 6 with cerebral vascular disease (CVD), 1 with degenerative disease, 1 with spongy state in thalamus, and 5 with no abnormality. Postmortem T2WI detected all neuropathological abnormalities but sparsely distributed tumor cells without edema. In one case of CNS neoplasm, the tumor lesions with little necrosis or edema showed isointensity to brain tissue, while others with large amounts of necrosis and edema showed high signal intensity on T2WI. In the cases of CVD, the major signal changes on T2WI were due to edema, necrosis, and damage of the organization as observed on neuropathological studies. There was one case in which both MRI and neuropathological examination showed an abnormality, which was pathologically unexplainable. In two cases, findings of postmortem MRI were more apparent than those of macroscopic examination. Postmortem MRI appeared different from premortem MRI in one of the rest three cases whereas the postmortem MRI correlated well with neuropathological findings. Progression of the disease immediately before death may have caused this difference. In conclusion, the correlations between MRI and neuropathological findings facilitate understanding the mechanisms responsible for MRI abnormalities. An increase in free water in edema, necrosis, and damage in brain tissue can explain an increased signal intensity on T2WI. Postmortem MRI may contribute to the effective pathological examination by pointing out subtle abnormalities before brain cutting. (author)

  12. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of arthritic pathology in the rat knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, T.A. (Herchel Smith Lab. for Medicinal Chemistry, Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)); Everett, J.R. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, Betchworth (United Kingdom)); Hall, L.D. (Herchel Smith Lab. for Medicinal Chemistry, Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)); Harper, G.P. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, Welwyn (United Kingdom)); Hodgson, R.J. (Herchel Smith Lab. for Medicinal Chemistry, Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)); James, M.F. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, Harlow (United Kingdom)); Watson, P.J. (Herchel Smith Lab. for Medicinal Chemistry, Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to visualise the changes that occur in both soft tissue and bone during antigen-induced, monoarticular arthritis (AIMA) of the rat knee. Extensive optimisation studies were performed in order to minimise the time of the experiments and to maximise both the signal-to-noise ratio and the contrast in the MR images. The study was cross-sectional rather than longitudinal and at each of the 13 time points studied during the progression of the disease, corresponding X-radiographs and histological sections were obtained. Interpretation of the spin echo MR images was aided by the use of chemical shift-selective imaging, magnetisation transfer contrast and relaxation time experiments, as well as by correlation with the histology and X-radiography data. The MR images clearly show invasion of the synovium by an inflammatory pannus which spreads over the articular cartilage and invades the bone, leading to erosion and later remodelling. Two distinct types of bony erosion were observed: focal erosions, especially at the margins of the joint, and subchondral erosions. It is concluded that MRI provides a sensitive, non-invasive method for investigating both early-stage inflammatory changes and late-stage bony changes in the knee joints of the arthritic rat. (orig.)

  13. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of arthritic pathology in the rat knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, T.A.; Everett, J.R.; Hall, L.D.; Harper, G.P.; Hodgson, R.J.; James, M.F.; Watson, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to visualise the changes that occur in both soft tissue and bone during antigen-induced, monoarticular arthritis (AIMA) of the rat knee. Extensive optimisation studies were performed in order to minimise the time of the experiments and to maximise both the signal-to-noise ratio and the contrast in the MR images. The study was cross-sectional rather than longitudinal and at each of the 13 time points studied during the progression of the disease, corresponding X-radiographs and histological sections were obtained. Interpretation of the spin echo MR images was aided by the use of chemical shift-selective imaging, magnetisation transfer contrast and relaxation time experiments, as well as by correlation with the histology and X-radiography data. The MR images clearly show invasion of the synovium by an inflammatory pannus which spreads over the articular cartilage and invades the bone, leading to erosion and later remodelling. Two distinct types of bony erosion were observed: focal erosions, especially at the margins of the joint, and subchondral erosions. It is concluded that MRI provides a sensitive, non-invasive method for investigating both early-stage inflammatory changes and late-stage bony changes in the knee joints of the arthritic rat. (orig.)

  14. Utility of whole slide imaging and virtual microscopy in prostate pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camparo, Philippe; Egevad, Lars; Algaba, Ferran

    2012-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) has been used in conjunction with virtual microscopy (VM) for training or proficiency testing purposes, multicentre research, remote frozen section diagnosis and to seek specialist second opinion in a number of organ systems. The feasibility of using WSI/VM for routine...... to examine images at different magnifications as well as to view histology and immunohistochemistry side-by-side on the screen. Use of WSI/VM would also solve the difficulty in obtaining multiple identical copies of small lesions in prostate biopsies for teaching and proficiency testing. It would also permit...... delay in presentation of images on the screen may be very disturbing for a pathologist used to the rapid viewing of glass slides under a microscope. However, these problems are likely to be overcome by technological advances in the future....

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease; Correlation with clinical findings, radiography, ultrasonography, CT and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J. (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Medicine Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.).

  16. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: pathology, imaging and treatment of skeletal involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azouz, E. Michel [University of Miami, Pediatric Radiology Section, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Saigal, Gaurav [McGill University, Department of Medical Imaging, Quebec (Canada); Rodriguez, Maria M. [University of Miami, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Podda, Antonello [University of Miami, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is manifested in a variety of ways, the most common being the eosinophilic granuloma, a localized, often solitary bone lesion that occurs predominantly in the pediatric age group. The hallmark of LCH is the proliferation and accumulation of a specific histiocyte: the Langerhans' cell. In bone this may cause pain and adjacent soft-tissue swelling, but some lesions are asymptomatic. LCH can involve any bone, but most lesions occur in the skull (especially the calvarium and temporal bones), the pelvis, spine, mandible, ribs, and tubular bones. Imaging diagnosis of the disease in bone is first based on the plain radiographic appearance, which is usually a central destructive, aggressive-looking lesion. In the skull, the lesions develop in the diploic space, are lytic, and their edges may be beveled, scalloped or confluent (geographic), or show a ''button sequestrum.'' Vertebral body involvement usually causes collapse, resulting in vertebra plana. With significant recent improvements in the quality of gamma cameras, imaging techniques, and in studying children, bone scintigraphy at diagnosis and on follow-up usually reveals the sites of active disease, especially when the involvement is polyostotic. CT and MR imaging are very useful in providing detailed cross-sectional anatomic detail of the involved bone, including the bone marrow and the adjacent soft tissues. CT is better suited for demonstrating bone detail and MR imaging for bone marrow and soft-tissue involvement. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the human female breast. Current status and pathologic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, D.E.; Stelling, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    In the field of breast cancer, attention has focused on the problem of detection and diagnosis of the tumor in its early stages as the best means of reducing mortality. Many imaging modalities have been applied to breast cancer, including mammography, ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and thermography. More recently interest has turned to NMR or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (as it is termed in more current usage) for the detection of breast disease and particularly carcinoma of the breast. This review discusses the present role of MR imaging in the diagnosis of breast lesions based on work from several institutions. Possible areas for future development to increase the usefulness of MR as a diagnostic modality are discussed. For those not familiar with terminology used in the field of MR, a short glossary of terms is supplied at the end of the chapter. Some general references on MR imaging are give at the end of the references for those wishing to review the subject in general

  18. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  19. Validated automatic segmentation of AMD pathology including drusen and geographic atrophy in SD-OCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Stephanie J; Izatt, Joseph A; O'Connell, Rachelle V; Winter, Katrina P; Toth, Cynthia A; Farsiu, Sina

    2012-01-05

    To automatically segment retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and various levels of image quality to advance the study of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)+drusen complex (RPEDC) volume changes indicative of AMD progression. A general segmentation framework based on graph theory and dynamic programming was used to segment three retinal boundaries in SD-OCT images of eyes with drusen and geographic atrophy (GA). A validation study for eyes with nonneovascular AMD was conducted, forming subgroups based on scan quality and presence of GA. To test for accuracy, the layer thickness results from two certified graders were compared against automatic segmentation results for 220 B-scans across 20 patients. For reproducibility, automatic layer volumes were compared that were generated from 0° versus 90° scans in five volumes with drusen. The mean differences in the measured thicknesses of the total retina and RPEDC layers were 4.2 ± 2.8 and 3.2 ± 2.6 μm for automatic versus manual segmentation. When the 0° and 90° datasets were compared, the mean differences in the calculated total retina and RPEDC volumes were 0.28% ± 0.28% and 1.60% ± 1.57%, respectively. The average segmentation time per image was 1.7 seconds automatically versus 3.5 minutes manually. The automatic algorithm accurately and reproducibly segmented three retinal boundaries in images containing drusen and GA. This automatic approach can reduce time and labor costs and yield objective measurements that potentially reveal quantitative RPE changes in longitudinal clinical AMD studies. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00734487.).

  20. Guidelines from the Canadian Association of Pathologists for establishing a telepathology service for anatomic pathology using whole-slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of telepathology for clinical applications in Canada has steadily become more attractive over the last 10 years, driven largely by its potential to provide rapid pathology consulting services throughout the country regardless of the location of a particular institution. Based on this trend, the president of the Canadian Association of Pathologists asked a working group consisting of pathologists, technologists, and healthcare administrators from across Canada to oversee the development of guidelines to provide Canadian pathologists with basic information on how to implement and use this technology. The guidelines were systematically developed, based on available medical literature and the clinical experience of early adopters of telepathology in Canada. While there are many different modalities and applications of telepathology, this document focuses specifically on whole-slide imaging as applied to intraoperative pathology consultation (frozen section, primary diagnosis, expert or second opinions and quality assurance activities. Applications such as hematopathology, microbiology, tumour boards, education, research and technical and/or standard-related issues are not covered.

  1. Diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and the pathologic basis of parotid Warthin's tumor in 46 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianpeng; Huang Suiqiao; Xie Bangkun; Zhong Jinglian; Li Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize MR manifestations of parotid Warthin's tumor and to investigate their pathological fundament. MR findings of parotid Warthin's tumor including shape, margin, signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI, homogeneity of the signal, enhancement were analyzed retrospectively in this study. Methods: In total 46 cases (54 lesions) of parotid Warthin's tumor proved by surgery were enrolled. MRI manifestations were comparatively studied with pathological findings. T 1 WI and T 2 WI sequence were used in non-contrast scan, while both non-contrast and enhanced scan were performed in 50 lesions out of 54. Results: The shapes of Warthin's tumor were regular (51/54); the edges were clear (54/54); more than half of the lesions (33/54) presented with low or equal signal intensity on T 2 WI; 50 Warthin's tumors enhanced slightly. The MR features of Warthin's tumors were different from pleomorphic adenoma and other parotid benign tumors. Conclusion: There are certain characteristics of Warthin's tumors on MR images, and these are helpful in determining the histological nature of the tumor

  2. Ceruminous Adenoma of the External Auditory Canal: A Case Report with Imaging and Pathologic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Psillas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceruminous adenomas are benign tumors that are rare in humans and present with a nonspecific symptomatology. The treatment of choice is surgical excision. We present an 87-year-old woman who presented with a reddish, tender, round, soft mass of the outer third of the inferior wall of the left external auditory canal, discharging a yellowish fluid upon pressure. Coincidentally, due to her poor general condition, this patient also showed symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media, parotitis, and cervical lymphadenopathy, such as otorrhea, through a ruptured tympanic membrane and swelling of the parotid gland and cervical lymph nodes. The external auditory canal lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia, utilizing a transmeatal approach. The pathological diagnosis was ceruminous gland adenoma. The tumor was made of tubular and cystic structures and embedded in a fibrous, focally hyalinized stroma. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of two distinct cell populations. The luminal cells expressed keratin 7, while peripheral (basal cells expressed keratins 5/6, S100 protein, and p63. The apocrine gland-related antigen GCDFP-15 was focally expressed by tumor cells. The postoperative course was uneventful and at the 2-year follow-up no recurrence of the ceruminous adenoma was noted.

  3. Is grandma like a lichen planus? The problem of image perception and knowledge retention in pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Legowski, Elizabeth; Tseytlin, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    Medicine is the science of acquiring a lot of obscure knowledge and the art of knowing when to apply it, even if only once in a physician's lifetime. Although medical experts seem to have it all figured out, being significantly better and faster than trainees, many studies have suggested that it is not only the amount of knowledge - which comes with experience - that differentiates the experts, but it is also how the knowledge is structured in memory. To acquire new knowledge, trainees will first encode both `surface' (i.e., irrelevant) and `structural' (relevant) features, and repeated presentations of the material will allow for dismissal of the unimportant elements from memory. However, just because knowledge has been encoded it does not mean that it is safely guarded in the physician's memory; as with any information, if it is not tended to, it will slowly decay, and eventually it may be completely forgotten. In this study we investigated knowledge retention in a specific sub-domain of Pathology which is rarely, if ever, used by trainees. We wanted to determine the relationship between the way long-term memory is accessed (i.e., through recognition or free recall) and trainee performance. We also sought to determine whether access to long-term memory through either mechanism led to better transfer of newly acquired knowledge to never before seen cases.

  4. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) of the pleura and chest wall: Normal findings and pathological changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, R.C.; Schnoy, N.; Schoenfeld, N.; Grassot, A.; Loddenkemper, R.; Lode, H.; Kaiser, D.; Krumhaar, D.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the value of high-resolution MRI in pleural and chest wall diseases, the normal and pathologic costal pleura and adjacent chest wall between paravertebral and the axillar region were examined with contrast enhanced high-resolution T 1 -weighted MRI images using a surface coil. Normal anatomy was evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers and a normal specimen of the thoracic wall, and correlation was made with corresponding HR-CT and histologic sections. CT-proved focal and diffuse changes of the pleura and the chest wall in 36 patients underwent HR-MRI, and visual comparison of MRI and CT was done retrospectively. Especially sagittal T 1 -weighted HR-MRI images allowed accurate delineation of the peripleural fat layer (PFL) and the innermost intercostal muscle (IIM), which served as landmarks of the intact inner chest wall. PFL and IIM were well delineated in 3/4 patients with tuberculous pleuritis, and in all 7 patients with non-specific pleuritis, as opposed to impairment of the PFL and/or the IIM, which was detected in 15/18 malignancies as a pattern of malignant chest wall involvement. In one case of tuberculous pleural empyema with edema of the inner chest wall HR-MRI produced false positive diagnosis of malignant disease. HR-MRI images improved non-invasive evaluation of pleural and chest wall diseases, and allowed for differentiation of bengin and malignant changes. (orig./MG) [de

  5. MR imaging of the ankle at 3 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla: protocol optimization and application to cartilage, ligament and tendon pathology in cadaver specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, Cameron; Malfair, David; Henning, Tobias D.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M.; Bauer, Jan S.; Ma, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize ankle joint MR imaging in volunteers at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T, and to compare these optimized sequences concerning image quality and performance in assessing cartilage, ligament and tendon pathology in fresh human cadaver specimens. Initially our clinical ankle protocol consisting of T1-weighted (-w), fat-saturated (fs) T2-w, and short τ inversion-recovery fast spinecho (FSE) sequences was optimized at 1.5 T and 3.0 T by two radiologists. For dedicated cartilage imaging, fs-intermediate (IM)-w FSE, fs spoiled gradient echo, and balanced free-precession steady-state sequences were optimized. Using the optimized sequences, thirteen cadaver ankle joints were imaged. Four radiologists independently assessed these images concerning image quality and pathology. All radiologists consistently rated image quality higher at 3.0 T (all sequences p<0.05). For detecting cartilage pathology, diagnostic performance was significantly higher at 3.0 T (ROC-values up to 0.93 vs. 0.77; p<0.05); the fs-IM FSE sequence showed highest values among the different sequences. Average sensitivity for detecting tendon pathology was 63% at 3.0 T vs. 41% at 1.5 T and was significantly higher at 3.0 T for 2 out of 4 radiologists (p<0.05). Compared to 1.5 T, imaging of the ankle joint at 3.0 T significantly improved image quality and diagnostic performance in assessing cartilage pathology. (orig.)

  6. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pathologic changes of the mandible after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.; Rau, W.S.; Roessler, R.; Klett, R.; Bauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 85 patients with oral cancer, treated with high-dose radiation therapy was performed to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy for diagnosis of pathologic changes in the mandible. During postradiotherapeutic monitoring, radiation osteomyelitis occurred in 12 cases, tumor recurrences infiltrating the mandible in five cases, and progressive periodontal disease in nine cases. MRI permitted early diagnosis of radiation osteomyelitis in 11 out of 12 cases; only two cases were false positive. In scintigraphy with 99m Tc-HDP, all alterations of the mandible, such as osteoradionecrosis, tumor infiltration, and periodontitis, showed a high uptake, resulting in a sensitivity of up to 100%, but a low specificity of 57%. Scintigraphy permitted assessment of the extension and location of the lesions. Both methods were superior to conventional radiography and clinical examination and should be integrated into a comprehensive follow-up program after radiation therapy. (au) 25 refs

  7. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pathologic changes of the mandible after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.; Rau, W.S.; Roessler, R.; Klett, R.; Bauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 85 patients with oral cancer, treated with high-dose radiation therapy, was performed to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy for diagnosis of pathologic changes in the mandible. During postradiotherapeutic monitoring, radiation osteomyelitis occurred in 12 cases, tumor occurrences infiltrating the mandible in five cases, and progressive periodontal disease in nine cases. MRI permitted early diagnosis of radiation osteomyelitis in 11 out of 12 cases; only two cases were false positive. In scintigraphy with 99m Tc-HDP, all alterations of the mandible, such as osteoradionecrosis, tumor infiltration, and periodontitis, showed a high uptake, resulting in a sensitivity of up to 100%, but a low specificity of 57%. Scintigraphy permitted assessment of the extension and location of the lesions. Both methods were superior to conventional radiography and clinical examination and should be integrated into a comprehensive follow-up program after radiation therapy. (au) 14 refs

  8. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pathologic changes of the mandible after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G.; Rau, W.S. [Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Dept. of Radiology, Giessen (Germany); Roessler, R. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Dept. of Periodontology, Giessen (Germany); Klett, R.; Bauer, R. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Giessen (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    A prospective study of 85 patients with oral cancer, treated with high-dose radiation therapy, was performed to assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy for diagnosis of pathologic changes in the mandible. During postradiotherapeutic monitoring, radiation osteomyelitis occurred in 12 cases, tumor occurrences infiltrating the mandible in five cases, and progressive periodontal disease in nine cases. MRI permitted early diagnosis of radiation osteomyelitis in 11 out of 12 cases; only two cases were false positive. In scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-HDP, all alterations of the mandible, such as osteoradionecrosis, tumor infiltration, and periodontitis, showed a high uptake, resulting in a sensitivity of up to 100%, but a low specificity of 57%. Scintigraphy permitted assessment of the extension and location of the lesions. Both methods were superior to conventional radiography and clinical examination and should be integrated into a comprehensive follow-up program after radiation therapy. (au) 14 refs.

  9. Lipofibromatosis: magnetic resonance imaging features and pathological correlation in three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Daniela; Righi, Alberto; Kreshak, Jennifer; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Merlino, Biagio; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Vanel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Lipofibromatosis is a rare, benign, but infiltrative, soft tissue tumor seen in children. We present three cases of lipofibromatosis, each with different magnetic resonance imaging features and correlate this with the histological findings. The patients comprised two males and one female who presented in infancy; at birth, 5 months, and 7 months of age. Clinically, the masses were painless and slow-growing. The masses ranged in size from 2 to 6 cm and involved the distal extremities in two cases (one foot, one wrist) and the trunk. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lipomatous lesions with varying amounts of adipose and solid components in each case. There were no capsules at the periphery of the lesions. One case showed a fat-predominant lesion, another an equal mixture of fat and solid tissue, and the third was predominantly solid. This was reflected in the histology, which showed corresponding features. Radiological and histopathological differential diagnoses are reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Lipofibromatosis: magnetic resonance imaging features and pathological correlation in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Daniela; Righi, Alberto; Kreshak, Jennifer; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Merlino, Biagio [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Policlinico ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Roma (Italy); Brunocilla, Eugenio [U.O. di UROLOGIA, Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, Daniel [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Anatomia Patologica, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Lipofibromatosis is a rare, benign, but infiltrative, soft tissue tumor seen in children. We present three cases of lipofibromatosis, each with different magnetic resonance imaging features and correlate this with the histological findings. The patients comprised two males and one female who presented in infancy; at birth, 5 months, and 7 months of age. Clinically, the masses were painless and slow-growing. The masses ranged in size from 2 to 6 cm and involved the distal extremities in two cases (one foot, one wrist) and the trunk. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lipomatous lesions with varying amounts of adipose and solid components in each case. There were no capsules at the periphery of the lesions. One case showed a fat-predominant lesion, another an equal mixture of fat and solid tissue, and the third was predominantly solid. This was reflected in the histology, which showed corresponding features. Radiological and histopathological differential diagnoses are reviewed. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the intradural prepontine chordoma mimicking an epidermoid cyst: Pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoun; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Han Kyu [Eulji Univ. Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Intracranial chordomas, originating from remnants of the primitive notochord, are extradural tumors arising mostly at the sphenooccipital synchondrosis in the clivus. We present an unusual case of intradural chordoma at the prepontine cistern, with parenchymal compressive invasion to the pons. It was excised subtotally, followed by a second operation due to the increasing remnant tumor size during 8 months. A differential diagnosis for intradural chordoma must be considered when the preoperative MRI features are not consistent with an epidermoid cyst if there are multiple fine enhancing lesions on enhanced magnetic resonance images and no bright signal intensity on diffusion weighted images. This report is concerned with the radiological findings in the intradural chordoma and the differential diagnosis focused on the epidermoid cyst.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the intradural prepontine chordoma mimicking an epidermoid cyst: Pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyoun; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Han Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial chordomas, originating from remnants of the primitive notochord, are extradural tumors arising mostly at the sphenooccipital synchondrosis in the clivus. We present an unusual case of intradural chordoma at the prepontine cistern, with parenchymal compressive invasion to the pons. It was excised subtotally, followed by a second operation due to the increasing remnant tumor size during 8 months. A differential diagnosis for intradural chordoma must be considered when the preoperative MRI features are not consistent with an epidermoid cyst if there are multiple fine enhancing lesions on enhanced magnetic resonance images and no bright signal intensity on diffusion weighted images. This report is concerned with the radiological findings in the intradural chordoma and the differential diagnosis focused on the epidermoid cyst

  13. The spectrum of Castleman's disease: Mimics, radiologic pathologic correlation and role of imaging in patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madan, Rachna; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice; Jacobson, Francine; Hunsaker, Andetta

    2012-01-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare benign lymphoid disorder with variable clinical course. The two principal histologic subtypes of CD are hyaline-vascular and plasma cell variants and the major clinicoradiological entities are unicentric and multicentric CD. Management of CD is tailored to clinicoradiologic subtype. In this review, we describe the CT, MR and PET/CT findings in Castleman's disease which can help suggest a diagnosis of CD as well as emphasize role of imaging in management of patients with CD.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of primary bone lymphoma presenting with pathological fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karadeli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malignant bone lymphomas are uncommonly encountered clinically. Men, 77-years-old, was admitted to hospital because of pain in the left shoulder. After imaging and histological examination diagnosed primary bone lymphoma. Primary lymphoma of the bone is an extranodal lymphoma that arises from the medullary cavity and manifests as a localized, solitary lesion, which represents 1% of all malignant lymphomas. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 103-104

  15. Increased Sensitivity to Pathological Brain Changes Using Co-registration of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdett, J.; Stevens, J.; Flugel, D.; Williams, E.; Duncan, J.S.; Lemieux, L. [National Society for Epilepsy, Chalfont St Peter (United Kingdom). The MRI Unit

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To compare automatic software-based co-registration of serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with conventional visual comparison, by expert neuroradiologists.Material and Methods: Sixty-four patients who were referred to our epilepsy MRI unit for cerebral imaging were identified as having potentially, non- or slow-growing lesions or cerebral atrophy and followed with sequential scans over a period of up to 8 years, resulting in a total of 92 pairs of scans. Scans were categorized as showing either lesions or atrophy. Each pair of scans was reviewed twice for the presence of change, with and without co-registration, performed using automated software. Results: Co-registration and visual reporting without co-registration were discordant in the lesions group in nine out of 69 datasets (13%), and in 16 out of 23 pairs of scans in the atrophy group (69%). The most common cause of discordance was visual reporting not detecting changes apparent by co-registration. In three cases, changes detected visually were not detected following co-registration. Conclusion: In the group of patients studied, co-registration was more sensitive for detecting changes than visual comparison, particularly with respect to atrophic changes of the brain. With the increasing availability of sophisticated independent consoles attached to MRI scanners that may be used for image co-registration, we propose that serial T1-weighted volumetric MRI brain co-registration should be considered for integration into routine clinical practice to assess patients with suspected progressive disease.

  16. Increased Sensitivity to Pathological Brain Changes Using Co-registration of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdett, J.; Stevens, J.; Flugel, D.; Williams, E.; Duncan, J.S.; Lemieux, L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare automatic software-based co-registration of serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans with conventional visual comparison, by expert neuroradiologists.Material and Methods: Sixty-four patients who were referred to our epilepsy MRI unit for cerebral imaging were identified as having potentially, non- or slow-growing lesions or cerebral atrophy and followed with sequential scans over a period of up to 8 years, resulting in a total of 92 pairs of scans. Scans were categorized as showing either lesions or atrophy. Each pair of scans was reviewed twice for the presence of change, with and without co-registration, performed using automated software. Results: Co-registration and visual reporting without co-registration were discordant in the lesions group in nine out of 69 datasets (13%), and in 16 out of 23 pairs of scans in the atrophy group (69%). The most common cause of discordance was visual reporting not detecting changes apparent by co-registration. In three cases, changes detected visually were not detected following co-registration. Conclusion: In the group of patients studied, co-registration was more sensitive for detecting changes than visual comparison, particularly with respect to atrophic changes of the brain. With the increasing availability of sophisticated independent consoles attached to MRI scanners that may be used for image co-registration, we propose that serial T1-weighted volumetric MRI brain co-registration should be considered for integration into routine clinical practice to assess patients with suspected progressive disease

  17. Imaging diagnosis in the elderly. Physiological and pathological changes in the aging brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumaru, Aya M.; Saito, Yuko; Murayama, Shigeo

    2007-01-01

    The unprecedented aging of society is occurring rapidly Rather than a problem facing the future, this trend is already a reality in Japan. The discussion regarding the maintenance of the social environment surrounding medical care is important. Also important are the appropriate medical interventions for the diagnosis of various changes and conditions that are characteristic of the aging patient. However, it is extremely difficult to establish the border of morbid change if the brain-related change is normal. The main risk factor for the patient with dementia is aging itself. The neuroradiologist is an important source of precise imaging information as to what is normal and what is abnormal. (author)

  18. Imaging benign pathology and variants with uptake in 68ga-Dotatate PET/CT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servente, L.; Bianco, C.; Gigirey, V.; Alonso, O.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the physiological, anatomical variants and benign lesions in positron emission computed tomography (PET/CT) studies with 68Ga-DOTATATE.Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed PET/CT reports scanned with 68Ga-DOTATATE and selected those that contained words in the report related to anatomical, physiological variants and benign tumors. The degree of 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by measuring the standarized uptake max value (SUVmax value). The anatomical location, SUVmax value and morphological CT image findings were recorded. All cases had clinical and imaging follow-up. Results: From a total of 772 PET/CT reports, 28 patients were obtained with 33 benign variants or tumors, 14 females and 14 males with a median age of 63 years. Uptake patterns were classified into four groups: anatomic and physiological variants (15), dependent on osteoblastic activity (4), dependent on inflammatory activity (10) and non-neuro-endocrine benign tumors (4).Discussion: Somatostatin receptors are overexpressed not only in the neuroendocrine system but also in other tissues. Physiological, anatomical variants and benign tumors expressing these receptors may be misleading. In the present work the frequency of this finding is 5.1%.Conclusion: Physiological variants and benign lesions (tumor and inflammatory) can accumulate 68Ga-DOTATATE since their tissues can express somatostatin receptors. The semiologic analysis of the tomographic component of this hybrid method enhances the diagnostic efficacy, optimizing PET/CT study performance. (authors) [es

  19. Automatic segmentation and 3D reconstruction of intravascular ultrasound images for a fast preliminar evaluation of vessel pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Moratal, David; García-Sánchez, Diego Ramón; Bodí, Vicente; Rieta, José Joaquín; Sanchis, Juan Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is used along with X-ray coronary angiography to detect vessel pathologies. Manual analysis of IVUS images is slow and time-consuming and it is not feasible for clinical purposes. A semi-automated method is proposed to generate 3D reconstructions from IVUS video sequences, so that a fast diagnose can be easily done, quantifying plaque length and severity as well as plaque volume of the vessels under study. The methodology described in this work has four steps: a pre-processing of IVUS images, a segmentation of media-adventitia contour, a detection of intima and plaque and a 3D reconstruction of the vessel. Preprocessing is intended to remove noise from the images without blurring the edges. Segmentation of media-adventitia contour is achieved using active contours (snakes). In particular, we use the gradient vector flow (GVF) as external force for the snakes. The detection of lumen border is obtained taking into account gray-level information of the inner part of the previously detected contours. A knowledge-based approach is used to determine which level of gray corresponds statistically to the different regions of interest: intima, plaque and lumen. The catheter region is automatically discarded. An estimate of plaque type is also given. Finally, 3D reconstruction of all detected regions is made. The suitability of this methodology has been verified for the analysis and visualization of plaque length, stenosis severity, automatic detection of the most problematic regions, calculus of plaque volumes and a preliminary estimation of plaque type obtaining for automatic measures of lumen and vessel area an average error smaller than 1mm(2) (equivalent aproximately to 10% of the average measure), for calculus of plaque and lumen volume errors smaller than 0.5mm(3) (equivalent approximately to 20% of the average measure) and for plaque type estimates a mismatch of less than 8% in the analysed frames.

  20. Polypoid endocervical adenomyoma of the uterus: A case report with MR imaging and pathological analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Shunichiro [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Asahi-Machi 67, Kurume, Fukuoka, 830-0011 (Japan)], E-mail: otsir@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Ushijima, Kimio; Nishio, Shin; Takemoto, Shuji; Fujiyoshi, Naoki; Fukui, Akimasa; Terada, Atsumu; Kamura, Toshiharu [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Asahi-Machi 67, Kurume, Fukuoka, 830-0011 (Japan)

    2008-05-15

    A case of polypoid endocervical adenomyoma in the uterine cervix was encountered in a 56-year-old woman. A well-circumscribed polypoid tumour was observed protruding from the uterine cervix. Based on the findings of MR imaging, the patient was assumed to have an adenoma malignum in the uterine cervix. The tumour was composed of a mixture of endocervical type proliferating glands and fascicles of smooth muscle. No distinct nuclear anaplasia, architectural abnormality, or evidence of destructive stromal invasion was observed. In our case, the tumour was a well-circumscribed polypoid lesion, with no cytologic abnormality, thus suggesting polypoid endocervical adenomyoma. The result of ancillary diagnostic modalities should be interpreted with caution and combined with gross and light microscopic findings.

  1. Polypoid endocervical adenomyoma of the uterus: A case report with MR imaging and pathological analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Shunichiro; Ushijima, Kimio; Nishio, Shin; Takemoto, Shuji; Fujiyoshi, Naoki; Fukui, Akimasa; Terada, Atsumu; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2008-01-01

    A case of polypoid endocervical adenomyoma in the uterine cervix was encountered in a 56-year-old woman. A well-circumscribed polypoid tumour was observed protruding from the uterine cervix. Based on the findings of MR imaging, the patient was assumed to have an adenoma malignum in the uterine cervix. The tumour was composed of a mixture of endocervical type proliferating glands and fascicles of smooth muscle. No distinct nuclear anaplasia, architectural abnormality, or evidence of destructive stromal invasion was observed. In our case, the tumour was a well-circumscribed polypoid lesion, with no cytologic abnormality, thus suggesting polypoid endocervical adenomyoma. The result of ancillary diagnostic modalities should be interpreted with caution and combined with gross and light microscopic findings

  2. Benign bone-forming lesions: osteoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma; Clinical, imaging, pathologic, and differential considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, A. (Depts. of Radiology and Orthopedic Surgery, California Univ., Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States) Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    The benign bone lesions - osteoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma - are characterized as bone-forming because tumor cells produce osteoid or mature bone. Osteoma is a slow-growing lesion most commonly seen in the paranasal sinuses and in the calvaria. When it occurs in the long bones, it is invariably juxtacortical and may need to be differentiated from, among others, parosteal osteosarcoma, sessile osteochondroma, and a matured juxtacortical focus of myositis ossificans. Osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma appear histologically very similar. Their clinical presentations and distribution in the skeleton, however, are distinct: osteoid osteoma is usually accompanied by nocturnal pain promptly relieved by salicylates; osteoblastoma arises predominantly in the axial skeleton, spinal lesions constituting one-third of reported cases. This review focuses on the application of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and evaluation of these lesions. Their histopathology also is discussed, and their treatment briefly outlined. (orig.)

  3. Intraocular in vivo imaging of pancreatic islet cell physiology/pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo B. Leibiger

    2017-09-01

    Major conclusions: Data provided by us and others demonstrate the high versatility of this imaging platform. The use of ‘reporter islets’ engrafted in the eye, reporting on the status of in situ endogenous islets in the pancreas of the same animal, allows the identification of key-events in the development and progression of diabetes. This will not only serve as a versatile research tool but will also lay the foundation for a personalized medicine approach and will serve as a screening platform for new drugs and/or treatment protocols. ‘Metabolic’ islet transplantation, in which islets engrafted in the eye replace the endogenous beta cells, will allow for the establishment of islet-specific transgenic models and ‘humanized’ mouse models as well as serving as the basis for a new clinical transplantation site for the cure of diabetes.

  4. Correlation between pathology and neuromelanin MR imaging in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitao, Shinichiro; Fujii, Shinya; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori (Japan); Matsusue, Eiji [Tottori Prefectural Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tottori, Tottori (Japan); Kato, Shinsuke [Tottori University, Division of Neuropathology, Department of Brain and Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Ito, Hisao [Tottori University, Division of Organ Pathology, Department of Microbiology and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Direct correlation between neuropathological findings and postmortem neuromelanin MR imaging (NmMRI) was performed in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to clarify the pathological background of the signal changes in normal, Parkinson's disease (PD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) cases. NmMRI of 10 % formalin-fixed autopsied midbrains was performed in three cases (normal control, DLB, and PD) with a 3T imaging system, using a 3D gradient echo T1-weighted sequence with a magnetization transfer contrast pulse. Neuropathological examinations of the midbrains were performed, and the density of neuromelanin-positive neurons (number per square millimeter) was determined. The extent of iron deposition in the midbrain was also evaluated using ferritin immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we directly correlated the contrast signal ratio in the SNc and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons. Diffuse hyperintense areas in the SNc reflected well-preserved neuromelanin-containing neurons in the normal control case, whereas an iso-intense area in the SNc showed severe loss of neuromelanin-containing neurons in the DLB and PD cases. Increased signal intensity in the SNc was apparently not influenced by iron deposition. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between signal intensity and the density of neuromelanin-containing neurons was seen in the SNc. Based on the direct correlation between postportem NmMRI and neuropathological findings, signal intensity in the SNc is closely related to the quantity of neuromelanin-containing neurons but is not influenced by iron deposition. (orig.)

  5. Predicting Pathological Features at Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer Eligible for Active Surveillance by Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottavio de Cobelli

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS score in predicting pathologic features in a cohort of patients eligible for active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy.A total of 223 patients who fulfilled the criteria for "Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance", were included. Mp-1.5 Tesla MRI examination staging with endorectal coil was performed at least 6-8 weeks after TRUS-guided biopsy. In all patients, the likelihood of the presence of cancer was assigned using PIRADS score between 1 and 5. Outcomes of interest were: Gleason score upgrading, extra capsular extension (ECE, unfavorable prognosis (occurrence of both upgrading and ECE, large tumor volume (≥ 0.5 ml, and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves and Decision Curve Analyses (DCA were performed for models with and without inclusion of PIRADS score.Multivariate analysis demonstrated the association of PIRADS score with upgrading (P < 0.0001, ECE (P < 0.0001, unfavorable prognosis (P < 0.0001, and large tumor volume (P = 0.002. ROC curves and DCA showed that models including PIRADS score resulted in greater net benefit for almost all the outcomes of interest, with the only exception of SVI.mpMRI and PIRADS scoring are feasible tools in clinical setting and could be used as decision-support systems for a more accurate selection of patients eligible for AS.

  6. Towards better digital pathology workflows: programming libraries for high-speed sharpness assessment of Whole Slide Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameisen, David; Deroulers, Christophe; Perrier, Valérie; Bouhidel, Fatiha; Battistella, Maxime; Legrès, Luc; Janin, Anne; Bertheau, Philippe; Yunès, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Since microscopic slides can now be automatically digitized and integrated in the clinical workflow, quality assessment of Whole Slide Images (WSI) has become a crucial issue. We present a no-reference quality assessment method that has been thoroughly tested since 2010 and is under implementation in multiple sites, both public university-hospitals and private entities. It is part of the FlexMIm R&D project which aims to improve the global workflow of digital pathology. For these uses, we have developed two programming libraries, in Java and Python, which can be integrated in various types of WSI acquisition systems, viewers and image analysis tools. Development and testing have been carried out on a MacBook Pro i7 and on a bi-Xeon 2.7GHz server. Libraries implementing the blur assessment method have been developed in Java, Python, PHP5 and MySQL5. For web applications, JavaScript, Ajax, JSON and Sockets were also used, as well as the Google Maps API. Aperio SVS files were converted into the Google Maps format using VIPS and Openslide libraries. We designed the Java library as a Service Provider Interface (SPI), extendable by third parties. Analysis is computed in real-time (3 billion pixels per minute). Tests were made on 5000 single images, 200 NDPI WSI, 100 Aperio SVS WSI converted to the Google Maps format. Applications based on our method and libraries can be used upstream, as calibration and quality control tool for the WSI acquisition systems, or as tools to reacquire tiles while the WSI is being scanned. They can also be used downstream to reacquire the complete slides that are below the quality threshold for surgical pathology analysis. WSI may also be displayed in a smarter way by sending and displaying the regions of highest quality before other regions. Such quality assessment scores could be integrated as WSI's metadata shared in clinical, research or teaching contexts, for a more efficient medical informatics workflow.

  7. Towards better digital pathology workflows: programming libraries for high-speed sharpness assessment of Whole Slide Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Since microscopic slides can now be automatically digitized and integrated in the clinical workflow, quality assessment of Whole Slide Images (WSI) has become a crucial issue. We present a no-reference quality assessment method that has been thoroughly tested since 2010 and is under implementation in multiple sites, both public university-hospitals and private entities. It is part of the FlexMIm R&D project which aims to improve the global workflow of digital pathology. For these uses, we have developed two programming libraries, in Java and Python, which can be integrated in various types of WSI acquisition systems, viewers and image analysis tools. Methods Development and testing have been carried out on a MacBook Pro i7 and on a bi-Xeon 2.7GHz server. Libraries implementing the blur assessment method have been developed in Java, Python, PHP5 and MySQL5. For web applications, JavaScript, Ajax, JSON and Sockets were also used, as well as the Google Maps API. Aperio SVS files were converted into the Google Maps format using VIPS and Openslide libraries. Results We designed the Java library as a Service Provider Interface (SPI), extendable by third parties. Analysis is computed in real-time (3 billion pixels per minute). Tests were made on 5000 single images, 200 NDPI WSI, 100 Aperio SVS WSI converted to the Google Maps format. Conclusions Applications based on our method and libraries can be used upstream, as calibration and quality control tool for the WSI acquisition systems, or as tools to reacquire tiles while the WSI is being scanned. They can also be used downstream to reacquire the complete slides that are below the quality threshold for surgical pathology analysis. WSI may also be displayed in a smarter way by sending and displaying the regions of highest quality before other regions. Such quality assessment scores could be integrated as WSI's metadata shared in clinical, research or teaching contexts, for a more efficient medical informatics

  8. MR imaging of clear cell sarcoma (malignant melanoma of the soft parts): a multicenter correlative MRI-pathology study of 21 cases and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuckeleer, L.H. de; Schepper, A.M. de; Vandevenne, J.E.; Bloem, J.L.; Davies, A.M.; Oudkerk, M.; Hauben, E.; Marck, E. van; Somville, J.; Vanel, D.; Steinbach, L.S.; Guinebretiere, J.M.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.; Mooi, W.J.; Verstraete, K.; Zaloudek, C.; Jones, H.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate MR imaging and pathology findings in order to define the characteristic features of clear cell sarcoma of the soft tissues (malignant melanoma of the soft parts).Design and patients. MR examinations of 21 patients with histologically proven clear cell sarcoma of the musculoskeletal system were retrospectively reviewed and assessed for shape, homogeneity, delineation, signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted images, contrast enhancement, relationship with adjacent fascia or tendon, secondary bone involvement, and intratumoral necrosis. In 19 cases the pathology findings were available for review and for a comparative MR-pathology study.Results. On T1-weighted images, lesions were isointense (n=3), hypointense (n=7) or slightly hyperintense to muscle (n=11). Immunohistochemical examination was performed in 17 patients. All 17 specimens showed positivity for HMB-45 antibody. In nine of 11 lesions with slightly increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, a correlative MR imaging-pathology study was possible. All nine were positive to HMB-45 antibody.Conclusions. Clear cell sarcoma of the musculoskeletal system often has a benign-looking appearance on MR images. In up to 52% of patients, this lesion with melanocytic differentiation has slightly increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images compared with muscle. As the presence of this relative higher signal intensity on T1-weighted images is rather specific for tumors displaying melanocytic differentiation, radiologists should familiarize themselves with this rare entity and include it in their differential diagnosis when confronted with a well-defined, homogeneous, strongly enhancing mass with slightly higher signal intensity compared with muscle on native T1-weighted images. (orig.)

  9. Thymic lesions and myasthenia gravis. Diagnosis based on mediastinal imaging and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirronti, T.; Rinaldi, P.; Marano, P.; Batocchi, A.P.; Evoli, A.; Di Schino, C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the role of CT and MR imaging in the study of the mediastinum in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods: Mediastinal CT and MR findings were correlated with the histopathological results in 104 thymectomized MG patients. Results: CT was performed in 104 patients; in 11 of them, MR was also carried out. 44 patients had hyperplasia at histology. On CT, thymic hyperplasia was confirmed in 16 cases, thymoma was diagnosed in 10 and a normal thymus in 18 (sensitivity 36%, specificity 95%). Of 52 patients with thymoma at histology, CT showed thymoma in 46, hyperplasia in 1, and normal thymus in 5. CT showed 88.5% sensitivity and 77% specificity for thymoma. In 10 patients with invasive thymoma, CT was indiscriminate, while invasiveness was detected in 7 cases at MR (70% sensitivity) and at CT in 1 case. Both CT and MR detected tumor recurrence in 5 cases, but the exact localization and degree of invasion were best defined by MR. Conclusion: In MG patients CT is a sensitive, specific and efficient modality for detecting thymoma, but is less so for detecting thymic hyperplasia. MR was shown to be accurate in detecting invasive thymoma both preoperatively and in postoperative follow-up

  10. Chest imaging in aids - radiological findings with pathologic correlation: review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qazi, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Majority of life threatening illnesses in AIDS begin as pulmonary infections and a radiologist must always seriously consider the possibility of HIV infection and its manifestation when confronting an abnormal chest study in a young adult. Chest radiography may be normal in up to 15% of patients with proven pulmonary involvement or the radiographic picture may be confusing due to atypical appearances of opportunistic infections in immuno-compromised host, compounded further by concomitant appearance of neoplastic complications like Kaposi AIDS relate lymphoma. Cases with normal chest radiograph but high degree of suspicion of chest disease need to be evaluated by CT scan which has been found to be superior to chest radiography in identifying patient with and without chest disease and in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary complications in patients with AIDS. Radio nuclear scans and MRI have some role only in selected few cases. Combining imaging features with clinical presentation, CD4 lymphocyte count, previous treatment and underlying risk group can narrow down differential diagnosis, expedite treatment and may be helpful in preventing complications. (author)

  11. Normal and pathological NMR imaging aspects of the posterolateral corner (PLC) of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardieu, M.; Lazennec, J.Y.; Christel, P.; Brasseur, J.L.; Roger, B.; Grenier, P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare normal PLC (limits lateral condyle anterior sub luxation) anatomy and its magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance, with the various lesions observed in MRI, from the simple popliteus tendinous contusion to the complete PLC rupture. For this specific work on PLC lesions, we selected 61 examinations among the traumatic knees explored during the last 3 years. Surgical correlation is obtained for the 61 patients. MRI examinations are performed on a 0.5 T. unit. Normal PLC anatomy is compared to the dissection of 4 anatomic subjects. Normal MRI slices are evaluated with this reference analysis. The principle anatomical structures of the PLC include the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteus tendon, the arcuate ligament, the fabello fibular ligament, the posterolateral condylar capsule, and the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. Surgical findings confirm PLC lesion for 58 patients with 3 false positive. Diagnosis of these lesions is important because chronical posterolateral laxity is secondary to the destabilization of lateral condyle. Unrecognized and untreated posterolateral instability may result in failure of ACL (limits lateral condyle posterior sub-luxation) reconstruction. When clinical tests are doubtful or complex, or the examination very painful, MRI evaluates completely the traumatic knee and particularly the PLC. (authors). 3 refs., 26 figs

  12. Cryotherapy of malignant tumors: MR imaging in comparison with pathological changes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaneehsen, B.; Anders, M.; Roehrl, B.; Hast, H.J.; Schiffer, I.; Neugebauer, B.; Teichmann, E.; Schreiber, W.G.; Thelen, M.; Hengstler, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Aim of our study was to investigate the efficacy of 7 F cryoprobes for percutaneous use morpho- and histologically, to examine the role of apoptosis after cryotherapy, and to compare contrast-enhanced MRI with histopathological findings at different time intervals in a tumor-mouse model. Methods: Percutaneous cryotherapy was performed in 15 immunocompromised nude mice with subcutaneously implanted tumors using the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line Lu 1. In group a) 7 mice were sacrificed after definite time intervals and histological examinations were done for evaluation of necrosis and apoptosis (HE; TUNEL assay); 2 mice are in long-term follow-up. In group b) in 6 mice tumor destruction and perfusion before and after freezing were investigated with native and contrast-enhanced MR imaging (T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin-echo) and compared with histopathological findings. Histological control were done in 2 untreated mice. Results: We observed fast tumor-reduction within two weeks (ca. 50%). On long-term follow-up (> 6 months) no recurrence has been noticed so far. Tumors were well vascularized prior to treatment and did not-show contrast enhancement an any time after cryotherapy. A narrow contrast-enhanced zone was seen on the tumor border subcutaneously as a sign of peripheral hyperemia and central vascular stasis after cryotherapy. On histology there was evidence of both apoptosis and necrosis. (orig.) [de

  13. Thymic lesions and myasthenia gravis. Diagnosis based on mediastinal imaging and pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirronti, T.; Rinaldi, P.; Marano, P. [Univ. Cattolica del S. Cuore, Roma (Italy). Inst. of Radiology; Batocchi, A.P.; Evoli, A.; Di Schino, C. [Univ. Cattolica del S. Cuore, Roma (Italy). Inst. of Neurology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the role of CT and MR imaging in the study of the mediastinum in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods: Mediastinal CT and MR findings were correlated with the histopathological results in 104 thymectomized MG patients. Results: CT was performed in 104 patients; in 11 of them, MR was also carried out. 44 patients had hyperplasia at histology. On CT, thymic hyperplasia was confirmed in 16 cases, thymoma was diagnosed in 10 and a normal thymus in 18 (sensitivity 36%, specificity 95%). Of 52 patients with thymoma at histology, CT showed thymoma in 46, hyperplasia in 1, and normal thymus in 5. CT showed 88.5% sensitivity and 77% specificity for thymoma. In 10 patients with invasive thymoma, CT was indiscriminate, while invasiveness was detected in 7 cases at MR (70% sensitivity) and at CT in 1 case. Both CT and MR detected tumor recurrence in 5 cases, but the exact localization and degree of invasion were best defined by MR. Conclusion: In MG patients CT is a sensitive, specific and efficient modality for detecting thymoma, but is less so for detecting thymic hyperplasia. MR was shown to be accurate in detecting invasive thymoma both preoperatively and in postoperative follow-up.

  14. Benign submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum: Imaging characteristics with endoscopic and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Cho, Jin Han; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Choi, Sun Seob; Kwon, Hee Jin; Yoon, Jung Hee; Kim, Su Jin

    2008-01-01

    Benign submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum are occasionally encountered during endoscopy. But endoscopy has its limitations in the diagnosis and differentiation of these lesions, because submucosal lesions are often difficult to visualize at endoscopy due to minimal change of the overlying mucosa. Furthermore, endoscopic biopsy may not always yield adequate tissue for diagnosis due to the submucosal location of the lesions. For this reason, the role of radiologic imaging is important in the diagnosis of submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum. Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) and sonographic technology are helpful in narrowing the differential diagnosis of gastroduodenal submucosal lesions. In contrast to endoscopy and barium studies, CT or ultrasonography (US) provides information about both the gastric wall and the extragastric extent of the disease. Arterial phase contrast enhanced CT enables us to discriminate a mass of submucosal from that of a mucosal origin in the differential diagnosis of gastric or duodenal lesions. Although endoscopic sonography has been considered the better modality in the diagnosis of gastroduodenal submucosal lesions, transabdominal sonography can still be an alternative method to endoscopic sonography in assessing of the origin and character of the submucosal lesions. Some gastroduodenal submucosal lesions have similar radiologic findings that make differentiation difficult. But despite overlaps in radiologic findings, some lesions have characteristic radiologic features that may suggest a specific diagnosis. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of benign submucosal lesions in the stomach and duodenum may promote correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment

  15. Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Resembles Patterns of Pathology Progression in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia (bvFTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kassubek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recently, the characteristic longitudinal distribution pattern of the underlying phosphorylated TDP-43 (pTDP-43 pathology in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD excluding Pick's disease (PiD across specific brain regions was described. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether in vivo investigations of bvFTD patients by use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI were consistent with these proposed patterns of progression.Methods: Sixty-two bvFTD patients and 47 controls underwent DTI in a multicenter study design. Of these, 49 bvFTD patients and 34 controls had a follow-up scan after ~12 months. Cross-sectional and longitudinal alterations were assessed by a two-fold analysis, i.e., voxelwise comparison of fractional anisotropy (FA maps and a tract of interest-based (TOI approach, which identifies tract structures that could be assigned to brain regions associated with disease progression.Results: Whole brain-based spatial statistics showed white matter alterations predominantly in the frontal lobes cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The TOIs of bvFTD neuroimaging stages 1 and 2 (uncinate fascicle—bvFTD pattern I; corticostriatal pathway—bvFTD pattern II showed highly significant differences between bvFTD patients and controls. The corticospinal tract-associated TOI (bvFTD pattern III did not differ between groups, whereas the differences in the optic radiation (bvFTD pattern IV reached significance. The findings in the corticospinal tract were due to a “dichotomous” behavior of FA changes there.Conclusion: Longitudinal TOI analysis demonstrated a pattern of white matter pathways alterations consistent with patterns of pTDP-43 pathology.

  16. Pathological Assessment of Brain White Matter in Relapsing-Remitting MS Patients using Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodarahm Pahlevan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS is characterized by lesions in the white matter (WM of the central nervous system. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most specific and sensitive method for diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. However, the ability of conventional MRI to show histopathologic heterogeneity of MS lesions is insufficient. Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging (qMTI is a relatively new method to investigate pathologic processes of the brain tissue occurring in MS patients. Material and Methods: Voxel-based analyses allow regional comparisons between groups to be made for the whole brain in a single analysis. This is done by coregistering data from all individual subjects to a reference brain, generally referred to as the "standard space", and then comparing them on a voxel-by-voxel basis. This study aimed to analyze whole-brain quantitative T1 maps, not to find global changes or changes in selected regions, but specifically to investigate the spatial distribution throughout the brain of T1 increases in MS WM with respect to control WM. In this study, 11 healthy controls, 10 relapsing-remitting (RR MS patients and 13 CIS patients were studied using MT-MRI imaging. MT parameters, including magnetization transfer ratio (MTR, magnetization transfer rate between free protons and restricted macromolecular protons, Ksat and longitudinal relaxation times (with and without MT saturation pulse, T1sat and T1free values were evaluated. Results: The results showed that, at a group level, there is widespread involvement of WM throughout the brain in CIS MS and especially in RRMS, where a significant T1 increase was found in 15.58% of WM voxels (normals < RR. Discussion and Conclusion: This study demonstrates that WM in large parts of the brain is susceptible to disease processes in RR and CIS MS

  17. A study of radiologic imagings and pathologic correlation in breast fibroadenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Tae Hee; Oh, Ki Keun; Suh, Jung Ho

    1986-01-01

    fibroadenoma was 92%, however combined imaging modalities raised the diagnostic accuracy into 95%.

  18. Driving reaction times in patients with foot and ankle pathology before and after image-guided injection: pain relief without improved function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talusan, Paul G; Miller, Christopher P; Save, Ameya V; Reach, John S

    2015-04-01

    Foot and ankle pathology is common in the driving population. Local anesthetic steroid injections are frequent ambulatory treatments. Brake reaction time (BRT) has validated importance in motor vehicle safety. There are no prior studies examining the effect of foot and ankle pathology and injection treatment on the safe operation of motor vehicles. We studied BRT in patients with foot and ankle musculoskeletal disease before and after image-guided injection treatment. A total of 37 participants were enrolled. Image-guided injections of local anesthetic and steroid were placed into the pathological anatomical location of the right or left foot and ankles. A driving reaction timer was used to measure BRTs before and after injection. Patients suffering right "driving" and left "nondriving" pathology as well as a healthy control group were studied. All patients reported >90% pain relief postinjection. All injections were confirmed to be accurate by imaging. Post hoc Bonferonni analysis demonstrated significant difference between the healthy group and the right-sided injection group (P = .008). Mean BRT for healthy controls was 0.57 ± 0.11 s. Patients suffering right foot and ankle disease displayed surprisingly high BRTs (0.80 ± 0.23 s preinjection and 0.78 ± 0.16 s postinjection, P > .99). Left nondriving foot and ankle pathology presented a driving hazard as well (BRT of 0.75 ± 0.12 s preinjection and 0.77 ± 0.12 s postinjection, P > .99). Injections relieved pain but did not significantly alter BRT (P > .99 for all). Patients suffering chronic foot and ankle pathology involving either the driving or nondriving side have impaired BRTs. This preexisting driving impairment has not previously been reported and exceeds recommended cutoff safety values in the United States. Despite symptom improvement, there was no statistically significant change in BRT following image-guided injection in either foot and ankle. Therapeutic, Level II: Prospective Comparative Study.

  19. A level-set method for pathology segmentation in fluorescein angiograms and en face retinal images of patients with age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Fatimah; Ansari, Rashid; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-03-01

    The visibility and continuity of the inner segment outer segment (ISOS) junction layer of the photoreceptors on spectral domain optical coherence tomography images is known to be related to visual acuity in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Automatic detection and segmentation of lesions and pathologies in retinal images is crucial for the screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of patients with retinal diseases. One of the challenges of using the classical level-set algorithms for segmentation involves the placement of the initial contour. Manually defining the contour or randomly placing it in the image may lead to segmentation of erroneous structures. It is important to be able to automatically define the contour by using information provided by image features. We explored a level-set method which is based on the classical Chan-Vese model and which utilizes image feature information for automatic contour placement for the segmentation of pathologies in fluorescein angiograms and en face retinal images of the ISOS layer. This was accomplished by exploiting a priori knowledge of the shape and intensity distribution allowing the use of projection profiles to detect the presence of pathologies that are characterized by intensity differences with surrounding areas in retinal images. We first tested our method by applying it to fluorescein angiograms. We then applied our method to en face retinal images of patients with AMD. The experimental results included demonstrate that the proposed method provided a quick and improved outcome as compared to the classical Chan-Vese method in which the initial contour is randomly placed, thus indicating the potential to provide a more accurate and detailed view of changes in pathologies due to disease progression and treatment.

  20. Various ocular MR imaging in a mouse implanted with a new cell line of retinoblastoma and the correlation with the pathology: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Il Joong; Yang, Jae Han; Byun, Joo Nam; Lee, Bong Jae; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to show various MR and correlated pathologic images of retinoblastoma in nude mouse with a new human retinoblastoma cell line (SNUOT-Rb1), which was inoculated into the intravitreous cavity. The established cell line was inoculated into the intravitreous cavity of 36 eyeballs of 18 mice and the transplanted retinoblastoma was examined for 3 months. The T1-weighted (T1WI), T2-weighted (T2WI), and contrast enhanced (Gd-DTPA) T1-weighted images were obtained with using a small loop coil. After scanning, the mice's eyeballs were extracted and the hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens were examined with a microscope. We compared the MR imagings with pathologic findings and evaluated the character of the tumors. The innoculated cells in the eyeballs of the mice grew into retinoblastoma (23/36, 64%). The eyeballs with retinoblastoma protruded externally and showed focal hemorrhage. Most tumors showed iso-signal intensity on TIWI (13/23, 57%), high signal intensity on T2WI (17/23, 74%), and good enhancement (21/23, 91%) with contrast. Almost all of the tumors (n = 21) were located in the retina and three extraretinal tumors were confirmed by pathology. Involvement of the optic nerve was suspected on MRI and this was confirmed by pathology in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. We could demonstrate various MR imagings of transplanted retinoblastoma by using the new tumor cell line in vivo

  1. Various ocular MR imaging in a mouse implanted with a new cell line of retinoblastoma and the correlation with the pathology: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Il Joong; Yang, Jae Han; Byun, Joo Nam; Lee, Bong Jae [Chosun University, College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    We wanted to show various MR and correlated pathologic images of retinoblastoma in nude mouse with a new human retinoblastoma cell line (SNUOT-Rb1), which was inoculated into the intravitreous cavity. The established cell line was inoculated into the intravitreous cavity of 36 eyeballs of 18 mice and the transplanted retinoblastoma was examined for 3 months. The T1-weighted (T1WI), T2-weighted (T2WI), and contrast enhanced (Gd-DTPA) T1-weighted images were obtained with using a small loop coil. After scanning, the mice's eyeballs were extracted and the hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens were examined with a microscope. We compared the MR imagings with pathologic findings and evaluated the character of the tumors. The innoculated cells in the eyeballs of the mice grew into retinoblastoma (23/36, 64%). The eyeballs with retinoblastoma protruded externally and showed focal hemorrhage. Most tumors showed iso-signal intensity on TIWI (13/23, 57%), high signal intensity on T2WI (17/23, 74%), and good enhancement (21/23, 91%) with contrast. Almost all of the tumors (n = 21) were located in the retina and three extraretinal tumors were confirmed by pathology. Involvement of the optic nerve was suspected on MRI and this was confirmed by pathology in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. We could demonstrate various MR imagings of transplanted retinoblastoma by using the new tumor cell line in vivo.

  2. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  3. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included

  4. Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer Local Recurrence After Radiation Therapy Occurs at the Site of Primary Tumor: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Step-Section Pathology Evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucar, Darko; Hricak, Hedvig; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Drobnjak, Marija; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prostate cancer local recurrence after radiation therapy (RT) occurs at the site of primary tumor by retrospectively comparing the tumor location on pre-RT and post-RT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and using step-section pathology after salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) as the reference standard. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with intensity modulated RT (69-86.4 Gy), and had pre-RT and post-RT prostate MRI, biopsy-proven local recurrence, and SRP. The location and volume of lesions on pre-RT and post-RT MRI were correlated with step-section pathology findings. Tumor foci >0.2 cm 3 and/or resulting in extraprostatic disease on pathology were considered clinically significant. Results: All nine significant tumor foci (one in each patient; volume range, 0.22-8.63 cm 3 ) were detected both on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and displayed strikingly similar appearances on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and step-section pathology. Two clinically insignificant tumor foci (≤0.06 cm 3 ) were not detected on imaging. The ratios between tumor volumes on pathology and on post-RT MRI ranged from 0.52 to 2.80. Conclusions: Our study provides a direct visual confirmation that clinically significant post-RT local recurrence occurs at the site of primary tumor. Our results are in agreement with reported clinical and pathologic results and support the current practice of boosting the radiation dose within the primary tumor using imaging guidance. They also suggest that monitoring of primary tumor with pre-RT and post-RT MRI could lead to early detection of local recurrence amenable to salvage treatment

  5. Whole Slide Imaging Versus Microscopy for Primary Diagnosis in Surgical Pathology: A Multicenter Blinded Randomized Noninferiority Study of 1992 Cases (Pivotal Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Feldman, Michael D; Abels, Esther; Ashfaq, Raheela; Beltaifa, Senda; Cacciabeve, Nicolas G; Cathro, Helen P; Cheng, Liang; Cooper, Kumarasen; Dickey, Glenn E; Gill, Ryan M; Heaton, Robert P; Kerstens, René; Lindberg, Guy M; Malhotra, Reenu K; Mandell, James W; Manlucu, Ellen D; Mills, Anne M; Mills, Stacey E; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Nelis, Mischa; Patil, Deepa T; Przybycin, Christopher G; Reynolds, Jordan P; Rubin, Brian P; Saboorian, Mohammad H; Salicru, Mauricio; Samols, Mark A; Sturgis, Charles D; Turner, Kevin O; Wick, Mark R; Yoon, Ji Y; Zhao, Po; Taylor, Clive R

    2018-01-01

    Most prior studies of primary diagnosis in surgical pathology using whole slide imaging (WSI) versus microscopy have focused on specific organ systems or included relatively few cases. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that WSI is noninferior to microscopy for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology. A blinded randomized noninferiority study was conducted across the entire range of surgical pathology cases (biopsies and resections, including hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemistry, and special stains) from 4 institutions using the original sign-out diagnosis (baseline diagnosis) as the reference standard. Cases were scanned, converted to WSI and randomized. Sixteen pathologists interpreted cases by microscopy or WSI, followed by a wash-out period of ≥4 weeks, after which cases were read by the same observers using the other modality. Major discordances were identified by an adjudication panel, and the differences between major discordance rates for both microscopy (against the reference standard) and WSI (against the reference standard) were calculated. A total of 1992 cases were included, resulting in 15,925 reads. The major discordance rate with the reference standard diagnosis was 4.9% for WSI and 4.6% for microscopy. The difference between major discordance rates for microscopy and WSI was 0.4% (95% confidence interval, -0.30% to 1.01%). The difference in major discordance rates for WSI and microscopy was highest in endocrine pathology (1.8%), neoplastic kidney pathology (1.5%), urinary bladder pathology (1.3%), and gynecologic pathology (1.2%). Detailed analysis of these cases revealed no instances where interpretation by WSI was consistently inaccurate compared with microscopy for multiple observers. We conclude that WSI is noninferior to microscopy for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology, including biopsies and resections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemistry and special stains. This conclusion is valid across a wide

  6. Development of a networked four-million-pixel pathological and radiological digital image presentation system and its application to medical conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Toshikazu; Furukawa, Isao; Okumura, Akira; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujii, Tetsuro; Ono, Sadayasu; Suzuki, Junji; Matsuya, Shoji; Ishihara, Teruo

    2001-08-01

    The wide spread of digital technology in the medical field has led to a demand for the high-quality, high-speed, and user-friendly digital image presentation system in the daily medical conferences. To fulfill this demand, we developed a presentation system for radiological and pathological images. It is composed of a super-high-definition (SHD) imaging system, a radiological image database (R-DB), a pathological image database (P-DB), and the network interconnecting these three. The R-DB consists of a 270GB RAID, a database server workstation, and a film digitizer. The P-DB includes an optical microscope, a four-million-pixel digital camera, a 90GB RAID, and a database server workstation. A 100Mbps Ethernet LAN interconnects all the sub-systems. The Web-based system operation software was developed for easy operation. We installed the whole system in NTT East Kanto Hospital to evaluate it in the weekly case conferences. The SHD system could display digital full-color images of 2048 x 2048 pixels on a 28-inch CRT monitor. The doctors evaluated the image quality and size, and found them applicable to the actual medical diagnosis. They also appreciated short image switching time that contributed to smooth presentation. Thus, we confirmed that its characteristics met the requirements.

  7. Imaging in-vivo tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease with THK5317 PET in a multimodal paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Savitcheva, Irina; Jelic, Vesna; Andersen, Pia; Jonasson, My; Eriksson, Jonas; Antoni, Gunnar; Lubberink, Mark; Almkvist, Ove; Wall, Anders; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the cerebral distribution of the tau-specific PET tracer [ 18 F]THK5317 (also known as (S)-[ 18 F]THK5117) retention in different stages of Alzheimer's disease; and study any associations with markers of hypometabolism and amyloid-beta deposition. Thirty-three individuals were enrolled, including nine patients with Alzheimer's disease dementia, thirteen with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), two with non-Alzheimer's disease dementia, and nine healthy controls (five young and four elderly). In a multi-tracer PET design [ 18 F]THK5317, [ 11 C] Pittsburgh compound B ([ 11 C]PIB), and [ 18 F]FDG were used to assess tau pathology, amyloid-beta deposition and cerebral glucose metabolism, respectively. The MCI patients were further divided into MCI [ 11 C]PIB-positive (n = 11) and MCI [ 11 C]PIB-negative (n = 2) groups. Test-retest variability for [ 18 F]THK5317-PET was very low (1.17-3.81 %), as shown by retesting five patients. The patients with prodromal (MCI [ 11 C]PIB-positive) and dementia-stage Alzheimer's disease had significantly higher [ 18 F]THK5317 retention than healthy controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively) in areas exceeding limbic regions, and their discrimination from this control group (using the area under the curve) was >98 %. Focal negative correlations between [ 18 F]THK5317 retention and [ 18 F]FDG uptake were observed mainly in the frontal cortex, and focal positive correlations were found between [ 18 F]THK5317 and [ 11 C]PIB retentions isocortically. One patient with corticobasal degeneration syndrome and one with progressive supranuclear palsy showed no [ 11 C]PIB but high [ 18 F]THK5317 retentions with a different regional distribution from that in Alzheimer's disease patients. The tau-specific PET tracer [ 18 F]THK5317 images in vivo the expected regional distribution of tau pathology. This distribution contrasts with the different patterns of hypometabolism and amyloid

  8. Computational Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  9. Construction of 3D MR image-based computer models of pathologic hearts, augmented with histology and optical fluorescence imaging to characterize action potential propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Mihaela; Sermesant, Maxime; Liu, Garry; Relan, Jatin; Mansi, Tommaso; Soong, Alan; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Truong, Michael V; Fefer, Paul; McVeigh, Elliot R; Delingette, Herve; Dick, Alexander J; Ayache, Nicholas; Wright, Graham A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computer models can help us understand and predict the propagation of excitation waves (i.e., action potential, AP) in healthy and pathologic hearts. Our broad aim is to develop accurate 3D MR image-based computer models of electrophysiology in large hearts (translatable to clinical applications) and to validate them experimentally. The specific goals of this paper were to match models with maps of the propagation of optical AP on the epicardial surface using large porcine hearts with scars, estimating several parameters relevant to macroscopic reaction-diffusion electrophysiological models. We used voltage-sensitive dyes to image AP in large porcine hearts with scars (three specimens had chronic myocardial infarct, and three had radiofrequency RF acute scars). We first analyzed the main AP waves' characteristics: duration (APD) and propagation under controlled pacing locations and frequencies as recorded from 2D optical images. We further built 3D MR image-based computer models that have information derived from the optical measures, as well as morphologic MRI data (i.e., myocardial anatomy, fiber directions and scar definition). The scar morphology from MR images was validated against corresponding whole-mount histology. We also compared the measured 3D isochronal maps of depolarization to simulated isochrones (the latter replicating precisely the experimental conditions), performing model customization and 3D volumetric adjustments of the local conductivity. Our results demonstrated that mean APD in the border zone (BZ) of the infarct scars was reduced by ~13% (compared to ~318 ms measured in normal zone, NZ), but APD did not change significantly in the thin BZ of the ablation scars. A generic value for velocity ratio (1:2.7) in healthy myocardial tissue was derived from measured values of transverse and longitudinal conduction velocities relative to fibers direction (22 cm/s and 60 cm/s, respectively). The model customization and 3D volumetric

  10. Blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging for detecting pathological patterns in lupus nephritis patients: a preliminary study using a decision tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huilan; Jia, Junya; Li, Dong; Wei, Li; Shang, Wenya; Zheng, Zhenfeng

    2018-02-09

    Precise renal histopathological diagnosis will guide therapy strategy in patients with lupus nephritis. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applicable noninvasive technique in renal disease. This current study was performed to explore whether BOLD MRI could contribute to diagnose renal pathological pattern. Adult patients with lupus nephritis renal pathological diagnosis were recruited for this study. Renal biopsy tissues were assessed based on the lupus nephritis ISN/RPS 2003 classification. The Blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) was used to obtain functional magnetic resonance parameter, R2* values. Several functions of R2* values were calculated and used to construct algorithmic models for renal pathological patterns. In addition, the algorithmic models were compared as to their diagnostic capability. Both Histopathology and BOLD MRI were used to examine a total of twelve patients. Renal pathological patterns included five classes III (including 3 as class III + V) and seven classes IV (including 4 as class IV + V). Three algorithmic models, including decision tree, line discriminant, and logistic regression, were constructed to distinguish the renal pathological pattern of class III and class IV. The sensitivity of the decision tree model was better than that of the line discriminant model (71.87% vs 59.48%, P decision tree model was equivalent to that of the line discriminant model (63.87% vs 63.73%, P = 0.939) and higher than that of the logistic regression model (63.87% vs 38.0%, P decision tree model was greater than that of the line discriminant model (0.765 vs 0.629, P Decision tree models constructed using functions of R2* values may facilitate the prediction of renal pathological patterns.

  11. Exploring viewing behavior data from whole slide images to predict correctness of students' answers during practical exams in oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkowski, Slawomir; Lundin, Mikael; Szymas, Janusz; Lundin, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The way of viewing whole slide images (WSI) can be tracked and analyzed. In particular, it can be useful to learn how medical students view WSIs during exams and how their viewing behavior is correlated with correctness of the answers they give. We used software-based view path tracking method that enabled gathering data about viewing behavior of multiple simultaneous WSI users. This approach was implemented and applied during two practical exams in oral pathology in 2012 (88 students) and 2013 (91 students), which were based on questions with attached WSIs. Gathered data were visualized and analyzed in multiple ways. As a part of extended analysis, we tried to use machine learning approaches to predict correctness of students' answers based on how they viewed WSIs. We compared the results of analyses for years 2012 and 2013 - done for a single question, for student groups, and for a set of questions. The overall patterns were generally consistent across these 3 years. Moreover, viewing behavior data appeared to have certain potential for predicting answers' correctness and some outcomes of machine learning approaches were in the right direction. However, general prediction results were not satisfactory in terms of precision and recall. Our work confirmed that the view path tracking method is useful for discovering viewing behavior of students analyzing WSIs. It provided multiple useful insights in this area, and general results of our analyses were consistent across two exams. On the other hand, predicting answers' correctness appeared to be a difficult task - students' answers seem to be often unpredictable.

  12. Exploring viewing behavior data from whole slide images to predict correctness of students′ answers during practical exams in oral pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Walkowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The way of viewing whole slide images (WSI can be tracked and analyzed. In particular, it can be useful to learn how medical students view WSIs during exams and how their viewing behavior is correlated with correctness of the answers they give. We used software-based view path tracking method that enabled gathering data about viewing behavior of multiple simultaneous WSI users. This approach was implemented and applied during two practical exams in oral pathology in 2012 (88 students and 2013 (91 students, which were based on questions with attached WSIs. Gathered data were visualized and analyzed in multiple ways. As a part of extended analysis, we tried to use machine learning approaches to predict correctness of students′ answers based on how they viewed WSIs. We compared the results of analyses for years 2012 and 2013 - done for a single question, for student groups, and for a set of questions. The overall patterns were generally consistent across these 3 years. Moreover, viewing behavior data appeared to have certain potential for predicting answers′ correctness and some outcomes of machine learning approaches were in the right direction. However, general prediction results were not satisfactory in terms of precision and recall. Our work confirmed that the view path tracking method is useful for discovering viewing behavior of students analyzing WSIs. It provided multiple useful insights in this area, and general results of our analyses were consistent across two exams. On the other hand, predicting answers′ correctness appeared to be a difficult task - students′ answers seem to be often unpredictable.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected adaptation and pathology in the distal condyles of the third metacarpus, associated with lateral condylar fracture in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquille, C A; Parkin, T D H; Murray, R C

    2012-11-01

    Lateral condylar (LC) fractures of the third metacarpus (McIII) are a common reason for euthanasia in racehorses, and may be the result of repetitive overloading or cumulative pathological change. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows monitoring of bone and cartilage to detect pathological and adaptive changes that may be precursors of fracture. To describe bone and cartilage MRI features in the distal condyles of McIII of Thoroughbred racehorses, with and without condylar fracture. 1) A greater degree of bone and cartilage adaptation or pathology will be seen in fractured McIIIs compared with their respective contralateral McIIIs. 2) Contralateral McIIIs will have a greater degree of bone and cartilage adaptation or pathology than McIIIs from control horses that did not sustain a LC fracture. The McIIIs from 96 horses subjected to euthanasia at racecourses were divided into 3 groups: Group 1: nonfractured bones from horses without LC fracture; Group 2: nonfractured bones from horses with unilateral LC fracture; and Group 3: fractured bones from horses with unilateral LC fracture. The MR images were examined and graded for bone and cartilage changes. Nine percent of Group 1 (n = 9) and 11% of Group 2 bones (n = 5) had incomplete LC fractures. Focal palmar necrosis was most frequently detected in bones from Group 1 (12%) compared with Groups 2 (9%) and 3 (4%). The prevalence of bone and/or cartilage abnormalities tended to increase from Group 1 to Group 2 to Group 3. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to detect cartilage and bone changes that may be associated with LC fracture. There was no significant difference in bone/cartilage changes between bones from Groups 1 and 2, despite increased pathology in Group 2 bones. Periodic monitoring of bone and/or cartilage changes in distal McIII of Thoroughbred racehorses may help to prevent catastrophic LC fractures. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Pathological and 3 Tesla Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Biochemical Recurrence after Robotic Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Correlation with Whole Mount Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Nelly; Shen, Luyao; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Alcalá, Héctor E; Yu, Weixia; Hsu, William; Reiter, Robert E; Lu, David Y; Raman, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    We sought to identify the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging variables predictive of biochemical recurrence after robotic assisted radical prostatectomy in patients who underwent multiparametric 3 Tesla prostate magnetic resonance imaging. We performed an institutional review board approved, HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) compliant, single arm observational study of 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging prior to robotic assisted radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to March 2016. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological information, and clinical outcomes were compiled. Biochemical recurrence was defined as prostate specific antigen 0.2 ng/cc or greater. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Biochemical recurrence had developed in 62 of the 255 men (24.3%) included in the study at a median followup of 23.5 months. Compared to the subcohort without biochemical recurrence the subcohort with biochemical recurrence had a greater proportion of patients with a high grade biopsy Gleason score, higher preoperative prostate specific antigen (7.4 vs 5.6 ng/ml), intermediate and high D'Amico classifications, larger tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (0.66 vs 0.30 ml), higher PI-RADS® (Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System) version 2 category lesions, a greater proportion of intermediate and high grade radical prostatectomy Gleason score lesions, higher pathological T3 stage (all p <0.01) and a higher positive surgical margin rate (19.3% vs 7.8%, p = 0.016). On multivariable analysis only tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging (adjusted OR 1.57, p = 0.016), pathological T stage (adjusted OR 2.26, p = 0.02), positive surgical margin (adjusted OR 5.0, p = 0.004) and radical prostatectomy Gleason score (adjusted OR 2.29, p = 0.004) predicted biochemical recurrence. In this cohort tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological variables, including Gleason score

  15. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided....

  16. An Exploration of the Associations Among Multiple Aspects of Religiousness, Body Image, Eating Pathology, and Appearance Investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Carol; Henrie, James; Szymanski, Lynda

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of positive and negative aspects of religiousness on eating pathology, body satisfaction, and appearance investment beyond previously established variables (age, BMI, exercise frequency, weight stability, and self-esteem). Data collected from 168 adult females at a Catholic-affiliated university were analyzed using hierarchical linear regressions. As expected, some religiousness variables (spirituality and seeing one's body as having sacred qualities) were associated with eating pathology, body satisfaction, and appearance investment in potentially beneficial ways, and others (negative interaction with one's religious community) were associated in potentially harmful ways. Interestingly, greater religious meaning, or the importance of religion in one's life, was associated with greater eating pathology, and some variables (religious coping, participation in and support from one's religious community) expected to be associated with greater body satisfaction were unrelated. Results are discussed in terms of mechanisms through which the aspects of religiousness may influence body satisfaction, appearance investment, and eating pathology.

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Cortical Inflammation and Subpial Pathology in Multiple Sclerosis by Combined PET and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    microglia to assess whether more severe structural cortical pathology in MS is related to the presence of neuroinflammation. Our initial findings...potential biomarkers of MS progression. Since cortical lesions appeared topographically related to focal meningeal inflammation in some pathological ...mm3, p=0.004 adjusting for age and total intracranial volume). In MS, cortical thinning was related with diffuse inflammation in cortex, thalamus and

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: radiologic-pathologic correlation of the response and disease-free survival depending on molecular subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Ciria, S; Jiménez Aragón, F; García Mur, C; Esteban Cuesta, H; Gros Bañeres, B

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic and pathologic responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their correlation in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer and to analyze their impact in disease-free survival. We included 205 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We evaluated the radiologic response by comparing MRI images acquired before and after chemotherapy. The pathologic response was classified on the Miller and Payne scale. For each subtype (HER2+, TN, luminal A, luminal B HER2-, and luminal B HER2+), we used the χ(2) test, Student's t-test, ANOVA, and Kendall's Tau-b to evaluate the radiologic response and the pathologic response, the radiologic-pathologic correlation, and the disease-free survival. The subtypes HER2+ (62.1%) and TN (45.2%) had higher rates of complete radiologic response. The pathologic response was 65.5% in the HER2+ subtype, 38.1% in the TN subtype, 2.6% in the luminal A subtype, 8.2% in the luminal B HER2- subtype, and 31% in the luminal B HER2+ subtype. The rate of radiologic-pathologic correlation was significant in all subtypes, higher in TN and HER2 (Tau-b coefficients 0.805 and 0.717, respectively). Disease-free survival was higher in HER2+ (91.9±3.3 months) and lower in TN (69.5±6.3 months), with significant differences between the cases with poor and good radiologic responses (P=.040). Survival was greater in cases with good radiologic response, except in cases with luminal A subtype. MRI can be a useful tool that provides information about the evolution of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which varies with the immunohistochemical subtype. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of imaging-based gross tumor volume and pathological volume determined by whole-mount serial sections in primary cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang,1,* Jing Hu,1,* Jianping Li,1 Ning Wang,1 Weiwei Li,1 Yongchun Zhou,1 Junyue Liu,1 Lichun Wei,1 Mei Shi,1 Shengjun Wang,2 Jing Wang,2 Xia Li,3 Wanling Ma4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the accuracy of imaging-based gross tumor volume (GTV compared with pathological volume in cervical cancer.Methods: Ten patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–II cervical cancer were eligible for investigation and underwent surgery in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT scans were taken the day before surgery. The GTVs under MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT (GTV-MRI, GTV-PET, GTV-CT were calculated automatically by Eclipse treatment-planning systems. Specimens of excised uterine cervix and cervical cancer were consecutively sliced and divided into whole-mount serial sections. The tumor border of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was outlined under a microscope by an experienced pathologist. GTV through pathological image (GTV-path was calculated with Adobe Photoshop.Results: The GTVs (average ± standard deviation delineated and calculated under CT, MRI, PET, and histopathological sections were 19.41 ± 11.96 cm3, 12.66 ± 10.53 cm3, 11.07 ± 9.44 cm3, and 10.79 ± 8.71 cm3, respectively. The volume of GTV-CT or GTV-MR was bigger than GTV-path, and the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05. Spearman correlation analysis showed that GTV-CT, GTV-MRI, and GTV-PET were significantly correlated with GTV-path (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference in the lesion coverage factor among the three modalities.Conclusion: The present study showed that GTV defined under 40% of maximum standardized

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging: Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram analysis for detecting pathologic complete response to chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moon Hyung; Oh, Soon Nam; Rha, Sung Eun; Choi, Joon-Il; Lee, Sung Hak; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Grimm, Robert; Son, Yohan

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values derived from histogram analysis of the whole rectal cancer as a quantitative parameter to evaluate pathologic complete response (pCR) on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We enrolled a total of 86 consecutive patients who had undergone surgery for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) at our institution between July 2012 and November 2014. Two radiologists who were blinded to the final pathological results reviewed post-CRT MRI to evaluate tumor stage. Quantitative image analysis was performed using T2 -weighted and diffusion-weighted images independently by two radiologists using dedicated software that performed histogram analysis to assess the distribution of ADC in the whole tumor. After surgery, 16 patients were confirmed to have achieved pCR (18.6%). All parameters from pre- and post-CRT ADC histogram showed good or excellent agreement between two readers. The minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile and mean ADC from post-CRT ADC histogram were significantly higher in the pCR group than in the non-pCR group for both readers. The 25th percentile value from ADC histogram in post-CRT MRI had the best diagnostic performance for detecting pCR, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.796. Low percentile values derived from the ADC histogram analysis of rectal cancer on MRI after CRT showed a significant difference between pCR and non-pCR groups, demonstrating the utility of the ADC value as a quantitative and objective marker to evaluate complete pathologic response to preoperative CRT in rectal cancer. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:212-220. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pathologic conditions in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beomonte Zobel, B.; Tella, S.; Innacoli, M.; D'Archivio, C.; Cardone, G.; Masciocchi, C.; Gallucci, M.; Passariello, R.; Cappa, F.

    1991-01-01

    Soma authors suggested that MR imaging could rapresent an effective diagnostic alternative in the study of pathologic conditions of mother and fetus during pregnancy. To verify the actual role of MR imaging, we examined 20 patients in the 2nd and 3rd trimester of gestation, after a preliminary US examination. Fifteen patients presented fetal or placental pathologies; in 4 patients the onset of the pathologic condition occurred during pregnancy; in 1 case of US diagnosis of fetal ascites, MR findings were nornal and the newborn was healty. As for placental pathologies, our series included a case of placental cyst, two hematomas between placenta and uterine wall, and two cases of partial placenta previa. As for fetal malformation, we evaluated a case of omphalocele, one of Prune-Belly syndrome, a case of femoral asimmetry, one of thanatophoric dwarfism, a case of thoracopagus twins with cardiovascular abnormalities, two fetal hydrocephali, and three cases of pyelo-ureteral stenosis. As for maternal pathologies during pregnancy, we observed a case of subserous uterine fibromyoma, one of of right hydronephrosis, one of protrusion of lumbar invertebral disk, and a large ovarian cyst. In our experience, MR imaging exhibited high sensitivity and a large field of view, which were both useful in the investigation of the different conditions occurring during pregnancy. In the evaluation of fetal and placental abnormalities, especially during the 3rd trimester, the diagnostic yieldof MR imaging suggested it as a complementary technique to US for the evaluation of fetal malformation and of intrauterine growth retardation

  2. Computer-Assisted Segmentation of Videocapsule Images Using Alpha-Divergence-Based Active Contour in the Framework of Intestinal Pathologies Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meziou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract through natural orifices is a challenge for endoscopists. Videoendoscopy is currently the “gold standard” technique for diagnosis of different pathologies of the intestinal tract. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE has been developed in the 1990s as an alternative to videoendoscopy to allow direct examination of the gastrointestinal tract without any need for sedation. Nevertheless, the systematic postexamination by the specialist of the 50,000 (for the small bowel to 150,000 images (for the colon of a complete acquisition using WCE remains time-consuming and challenging due to the poor quality of WCE images. In this paper, a semiautomatic segmentation for analysis of WCE images is proposed. Based on active contour segmentation, the proposed method introduces alpha-divergences, a flexible statistical similarity measure that gives a real flexibility to different types of gastrointestinal pathologies. Results of segmentation using the proposed approach are shown on different types of real-case examinations, from (multipolyp(s segmentation, to radiation enteritis delineation.

  3. MR imaging of postoperative change of dura mater of rabbits; Effect of contrast enhancement of dura mater and correlation with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Fumiaki (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-01-01

    To explain the mechanism of benign postoperative dural enhancement, the author made experimental model of rabbit's subdual hematoma and performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). On plain T1-weighted images, infused blood or blood cells could not be detected immediately after surgery. On follow up plain T1-weighted images, the infused blood could be identified in only a case with 1 cc blood infusion. Marked dural enhancement could be seen immediately after surgery and continued three to fourteen days after 1 cc or 0.1 cc blood or 0.1 cc red blood cells infusion. To the contrary, no definite dural enhancement could be seen in the cases with plasma or saline infusion. Subdural red blood cells were required for dural enhancement immediately after surgery. Pathological findings revealed three types of reaction to infused blood: newly formed capillarization with fresh hemorrhage from the capillaries; subdural hematoma and no reaction. After vanishment of dural enhancement, pathological findings of the specimens were identical to that of normal dura. Dural enhancement may be induced by increased permeability of the dura associated with subdural hematoma and/or the extravasation of the contrast from newly formed capillaries. (author).

  4. Imaging and radiological-pathological correlation in histologically proven cases of focal cortical dysplasia and other glial and neuronoglial malformative lesions in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Anson, B.; Thom, M.; Moran, N.; Stevens, J.; Scaravilli, F.

    2000-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a pathological entity first described in 1971. Other more subtle cortical malformations found in patients with epilepsy include microdysgenesis (MD), and glioneuronal hamartias. Although these glial and neuronoglial malformations have distinct histological features, there is terminological confusion in the radiological literature. Few cases have been reported in adults with both imaging and histology. We address these issues, giving a radiological-pathological correlation of histologically proven cortical malformations in adults. We describe clinical, radiological and histological features of 12 cases (five FCD, five MD with glioneuronal hamartias, and two hamartomas), unassociated with other conditions, and discuss them in the light of the literature. FCD is usually seen on MRI as cortical thickening, with or without signal change, which may extend into the adjacent white matter. On histology, abnormal neurons and/or glial cells, blurring of the grey-white matter interface, myelin pallor, demyelination, and gliosis may be found. Glioneuronal hamartias and hamartomas usually appear as complex masses on MRI. FCD and hamartias may be associated, and a combination of imaging findings may be seen on MRI. Atrophy of the ipsilateral hippocampus may be present on MRI in patients with hamartias, and minor cell loss on histology, but not definitive hippocampal sclerosis. Although the imaging findings of cortical malformations are protean, some characteristic MRI features, with histological correlates, may be found. The relevance of most of these observations remains unclear. (orig.)

  5. Islet Cell Tumors of the Pancreas: A Variety of Multiphase Dynamic Imaging Findings with Pathologic Correlations Focusing on Nonfunctioning Tumors and Insulinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yoo Jin; Yu, Jeong Sik; Park, Chan Il; Kwon, Ji Eun; Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Ki Whang

    2010-01-01

    Islet cell tumors (ICTs) are rare pancreatic neoplasms of neuroendocrine origin, posing a diagnostic challenge to radiologists. We illustrated a spectrum of features of pancreatic ICTs that could be found on multiphase dynamic CT or MRI, and elucidated the histopathologic characteristics by determining the contrast enhancement pattern of the lesions. Various enhancement patterns were dependant on the internal composition of the tumor, that is, the proportion of vascular densities for early enhancement and non-hypervascular interstitial tissue for late enhancement regardless of the size or functional behavior. This knowledge of the imaging-pathologic spectrum of ICTs could be helpful for the proper differential diagnosis from other pancreatic tumors

  6. Prediction of pathologic staging with magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: pooled analysis of KROG 10-01 and 11-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Hee Cheol; Nam, Taek-Keun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jung, Ji-Han; Oh, Seong Taek

    2014-10-01

    The reported overall accuracy of MRI in predicting the pathologic stage of nonirradiated rectal cancer is high. However, the role of MRI in restaging rectal tumors after neoadjuvant CRT is contentious. Thus, we evaluate the accuracy of restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer patients who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3-4N0-2) who had received preoperative CRT. Pre-CRT MRI was performed for local tumor and nodal staging. All patients underwent restaging MRI followed by total mesorectal excision after the end of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint of the present study was to estimate the accuracy of post-CRT MRI as compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic T classification matched the post-CRT MRI findings in 97 (64.7%) of 150 patients. 36 (24.0%) of 150 patients were overstaged in T classification, and the concordance degree was moderate (k=0.33, prectal cancer patients who received preoperative CRT. The diagnostic accuracy of restaging MRI is relatively high in rectal cancer patients who achieved clinical downstaging after CRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  8. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  9. Development of PET tracers for neuro inflammation imaging in neuro degenerative diseases; Developpement de radiotraceurs de la neuroinflammation pour l'imagerie des pathologies neurodegeneratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauveau, F

    2007-10-15

    Inflammatory processes such as micro-glial or endothelial activation are involved in many neuro-degenerative conditions. Neuro-inflammation imaging is considered an attractive tool for fundamental research, diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation in neuro-pathologies. First, an aptamer was selected against a recombinant fragment of the endothelial target VCAM-1, but proved unable to bind the target protein in native conformation, as expressed by a cell line. Second, five radioligands of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), a marker of micro-glial activation, were evaluated in vivo using PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging in a rat model of neuro-inflammation, and were compared to [11C]PK11195. Four radiotracers displayed a better contrast than [11C]PK11195. In a competitive field of research, this work demonstrates the efficiency of in vivo screening of radiotracers for fast selection of clinically relevant molecules. (author)

  10. Development of PET tracers for neuro inflammation imaging in neuro degenerative diseases; Developpement de radiotraceurs de la neuroinflammation pour l'imagerie des pathologies neurodegeneratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauveau, F

    2007-10-15

    Inflammatory processes such as micro-glial or endothelial activation are involved in many neuro-degenerative conditions. Neuro-inflammation imaging is considered an attractive tool for fundamental research, diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation in neuro-pathologies. First, an aptamer was selected against a recombinant fragment of the endothelial target VCAM-1, but proved unable to bind the target protein in native conformation, as expressed by a cell line. Second, five radioligands of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), a marker of micro-glial activation, were evaluated in vivo using PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging in a rat model of neuro-inflammation, and were compared to [11C]PK11195. Four radiotracers displayed a better contrast than [11C]PK11195. In a competitive field of research, this work demonstrates the efficiency of in vivo screening of radiotracers for fast selection of clinically relevant molecules. (author)

  11. Comprehensive small animal imaging strategies on a clinical 3 T dedicated head MR-scanner; adapted methods and sequence protocols in CNS pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu R Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented customizations including extensive

  12. Comprehensive Small Animal Imaging Strategies on a Clinical 3 T Dedicated Head MR-Scanner; Adapted Methods and Sequence Protocols in CNS Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Deepu R.; Heidemann, Robin M.; Lanz, Titus; Dittmar, Michael S.; Sandner, Beatrice; Beier, Christoph P.; Weidner, Norbert; Greenlee, Mark W.; Schuierer, Gerhard; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Background Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. Methodology and Results This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. Conclusions The implemented customizations including extensive sequence protocol

  13. Automatic Vertebral Fracture Assessment System (AVFAS) for Spinal Pathologies Diagnosis Based on Radiograph X-Ray Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Aouache; Hussain, Aini; Samad, Salina Abd; Bin Abdul Hamid, Hamzaini; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    Nowadays, medical imaging has become a major tool in many clinical trials. This is because the technology enables rapid diagnosis with visualization and quantitative assessment that facilitate health practitioners or professionals. Since the medical and healthcare sector is a vast industry that is very much related to every citizen's quality of life, the image based medical diagnosis has become one of the important service areas in this sector. As such, a medical diagnostic imaging (MDI) software tool for assessing vertebral fracture is being developed which we have named as AVFAS short for Automatic Vertebral Fracture Assessment System. The developed software system is capable of indexing, detecting and classifying vertebral fractures by measuring the shape and appearance of vertebrae of radiograph x-ray images of the spine. This paper describes the MDI software tool which consists of three main sub-systems known as Medical Image Training & Verification System (MITVS), Medical Image and Measurement & Decision System (MIMDS) and Medical Image Registration System (MIRS) in term of its functionality, performance, ongoing research and outstanding technical issues.

  14. SU-E-J-95: Towards Optimum Boundary Conditions for Biomechanical Model Based Deformable Registration Using Intensity Based Image Matching for Prostate Correlative Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samavati, N; McGrath, D M; Lee, J; van der Kwast, T; Jewett, M; Mã Nard, C; Pluim, J P W; Brock, K K

    2012-06-01

    Deformable registration of histology to MRI is an essential tool to validate in vivo prostate cancer imaging. However, direct registration of histology to in vivo MR is prone to error due to geometric differences between the tissue sections and the in vivo imaging planes. To increase the accuracy of registration, an ex vivo high resolution MRI is acquired to compensate for the direct registration difficulties. A novel intensity-based deformable registration algorithm based on local variation in image intensities is proposed to register the histology to ex vivo MRI of prostatectomy specimens. Four sets of ex vivo MR and whole mount pathology images from four patients were used to investigate and validate the technique. In addition, 9 synthetically deformed ex vivo MR images were used. The standard deviation in local windows within the images was calculated to generate intermediate images based on both MR and histology. The intermediate images were registered using the Drop package (Munich, Germany). To further increase the accuracy, a final refinement of the registration was performed using Drop with a finer B-spline rid. The registration parameters were tuned to achieve a visually acceptable registration. Magnitude of Differences (MOD) and Angular Error (AE) were used to validate the synthetic data, and the Target Registration Error (TRE) of manually indicated landmarks was used for the clinical data. MOD of 0.6mm and AE of 8.3 degrees showed the efficacy of using intermediate images, compared to 0.8mm and 10.0 degrees achieved with Drop without the intermediate images. The average mean±std TRE among the four patients was 1.0±0.6 mm using the proposed method compared to 1.6±1.1 mm using Elastix (Utrecht, The Netherlands). An intensity-based deformable registration algorithm which uses intermediate images was evaluated on prostatectomy specimens and synthetically deformed clinical data, indicating improvement in overall accuracy and robustness. OICR, Terry Fox

  15. TC pathological Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Fontes, M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT, RNM, PET-CT. These techniques permit to detect head and neck tumors, breast and digestive pathologies as well as congenital diseases and glandular tumor in the thyroid, parathyroid, muscles, lymphatic, nerves and vessels

  16. Phenotype analysis of early risk factors from electronic medical records improves image-derived diagnostic classifiers for optic nerve pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nabar, Kunal P.; Nelson, Katrina M.; Mawn, Louise A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-03-01

    We examine imaging and electronic medical records (EMR) of 588 subjects over five major disease groups that affect optic nerve function. An objective evaluation of the role of imaging and EMR data in diagnosis of these conditions would improve understanding of these diseases and help in early intervention. We developed an automated image processing pipeline that identifies the orbital structures within the human eyes from computed tomography (CT) scans, calculates structural size, and performs volume measurements. We customized the EMR-based phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) to derive diagnostic EMR phenotypes that occur at least two years prior to the onset of the conditions of interest from a separate cohort of 28,411 ophthalmology patients. We used random forest classifiers to evaluate the predictive power of image-derived markers, EMR phenotypes, and clinical visual assessments in identifying disease cohorts from a control group of 763 patients without optic nerve disease. Image-derived markers showed more predictive power than clinical visual assessments or EMR phenotypes. However, the addition of EMR phenotypes to the imaging markers improves the classification accuracy against controls: the AUC improved from 0.67 to 0.88 for glaucoma, 0.73 to 0.78 for intrinsic optic nerve disease, 0.72 to 0.76 for optic nerve edema, 0.72 to 0.77 for orbital inflammation, and 0.81 to 0.85 for thyroid eye disease. This study illustrates the importance of diagnostic context for interpretation of image-derived markers and the proposed PheWAS technique provides a flexible approach for learning salient features of patient history and incorporating these data into traditional machine learning analyses.

  17. Comparison of the binding characteristics of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging tracers to Alzheimer's disease pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tago, Tetsuro; Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Maruyama, Masahiro; Higuchi, Makoto [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Arai, Hiroyuki [Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although several PET imaging agents have been developed for in vivo detection of senile plaques, no PET probe is currently available for selective detection of neurofibrillary tangles in the living human brain. Recently, [{sup 18}F]THK-523 was developed as a potential in vivo imaging probe for tau pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare the binding properties of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging agents, including PiB, BF-227 and FDDNP, to synthetic protein fibrils and human brain tissue. In vitro radioligand binding assays were conducted using synthetic amyloid {beta}{sub 42} and K18{Delta}K280-tau fibrils. Nonspecific binding was determined by the addition of unlabelled compounds at a concentration of 2 {mu}M. To examine radioligand binding to neuropathological lesions, in vitro autoradiography was conducted using sections of AD brain. [{sup 18}F]THK-523 showed higher affinity for tau fibrils than for A{beta} fibrils, whereas the other probes showed a higher affinity for A{beta} fibrils. The autoradiographic analysis indicated that [{sup 18}F]THK-523 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of tau protein deposits. Conversely, PiB and BF-227 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of A{beta} plaques. These findings suggest that the unique binding profile of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 can be used to identify tau deposits in AD brain. (orig.)

  18. Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck: Comprehensive imaging-based review with pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourani, Roula, E-mail: rh64@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: bt05@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Shabb, Nina S., E-mail: ns04@aub.edu.lb [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Nassar, Lara, E-mail: ln07@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Hourani, Mukbil H., E-mail: mh17@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Moukarbel, Roger, E-mail: rm17@aub.edu.lb [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Sabri, Alain, E-mail: as71@aub.edu.lb [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Rizk, Toni, E-mail: tonirisk@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Hôtel-Dieu de France, Saint-Joseph University, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Almost all fibroblastic tumors are evaluated with non-invasive imaging. • Radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of fibroblastic tumors. • Most appropriate initial examination when fibromatosis coli suspected is ultrasound. • Most common location of ossifying fibromas is the tooth-bearing regions. - Abstract: Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the proliferation of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, or both. These tumors may be further subclassified on the basis of their behavior as benign, intermediate with malignant potential, or malignant. There are different types of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors that can involve the head and neck including desmoid-type fibromatosis, solitary fibrous tumor, myofibroma/myofibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, fibrosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, fibromatosis coli, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, ossifying fibroma, fibrous histiocytoma, nodular fasciitis, fibromyxoma, hyaline fibromatosis and fibrous hamartoma. Although the imaging characteristics of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are nonspecific, imaging plays a pivotal role in the noninvasive diagnosis and characterization of these tumors, providing information about the constitution of tumors, their extension and invasion of adjacent structures. Correlation with the clinical history may help limit the differential diagnosis and radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of these tumors to reach an accurate diagnosis.

  19. Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck: Comprehensive imaging-based review with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourani, Roula; Taslakian, Bedros; Shabb, Nina S.; Nassar, Lara; Hourani, Mukbil H.; Moukarbel, Roger; Sabri, Alain; Rizk, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Almost all fibroblastic tumors are evaluated with non-invasive imaging. • Radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of fibroblastic tumors. • Most appropriate initial examination when fibromatosis coli suspected is ultrasound. • Most common location of ossifying fibromas is the tooth-bearing regions. - Abstract: Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the proliferation of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, or both. These tumors may be further subclassified on the basis of their behavior as benign, intermediate with malignant potential, or malignant. There are different types of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors that can involve the head and neck including desmoid-type fibromatosis, solitary fibrous tumor, myofibroma/myofibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, fibrosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, fibromatosis coli, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, ossifying fibroma, fibrous histiocytoma, nodular fasciitis, fibromyxoma, hyaline fibromatosis and fibrous hamartoma. Although the imaging characteristics of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are nonspecific, imaging plays a pivotal role in the noninvasive diagnosis and characterization of these tumors, providing information about the constitution of tumors, their extension and invasion of adjacent structures. Correlation with the clinical history may help limit the differential diagnosis and radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of these tumors to reach an accurate diagnosis

  20. [Pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinsky, Yael; Iancu, Iulian; Dannon, Pinhas

    2007-10-01

    Gambling behaviour is well-known for many centuries and is growing in popularity and frequency. Its etiology is multi-factorial and in this paper we review new developments in the field of pathological gambling, both regarding etiology and treatment progress. The aim of this review is to increase the physicians' awareness towards this entity.

  1. Otosclerosis: Temporal Bone Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Ishai, Reuven; McKenna, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    Otosclerosis is pathologically characterized by abnormal bony remodeling, which includes bone resorption, new bone deposition, and vascular proliferation in the temporal bone. Sensorineural hearing loss in otosclerosis is associated with extension of otosclerosis to the cochlear endosteum and deposition of collagen throughout the spiral ligament. Persistent or recurrent conductive hearing loss after stapedectomy has been associated with incomplete footplate fenestration, poor incus-prosthesis connection, and incus resorption in temporal bone specimens. Human temporal bone pathology has helped to define the role of computed tomography imaging for otosclerosis, confirming that computed tomography is highly sensitive for diagnosis, yet limited in assessing cochlear endosteal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by 18 F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by 18 F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUV max ) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p 2 = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p 2 = 0.37 and p 2 = 0.48, respectively). 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUV max .

  3. Boys with precocious or early puberty: incidence of pathological brain magnetic resonance imaging findings and factors related to newly developed brain lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun Hee Choi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeBrain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings and factors predictive of pathological brain lesions in boys with precocious puberty (PP or early puberty (EP were investigated.MethodsSixty-one boys with PP or EP who had brain MRI performed were included. PP was classified into the central or peripheral type. Brain MRI findings were categorized into group I (pathological brain lesion known to cause puberty; newly diagnosed [group Ia] or previously diagnosed [group Ib]; group II (brain lesion possibly related to puberty; and group III (incidental or normal findings. Medical history, height, weight, hormone test results, and bone age were reviewed.ResultsBrain lesions in groups I and II were detected in 17 of 23 boys (74% with central PP, 9 of 30 boys (30% with EP, and 7 of 8 boys (88% with peripheral PP. All brain lesions in boys with peripheral PP were germ cell tumors (GCT, and 3 lesions developed later during follow-up. Group I showed earlier pubertal onset (P<0.01 and greater bone age advancement (P<0.05 than group III. Group III had lower birth weight and fewer neurological symptoms than "Ia and II" (all P<0.05.ConclusionEarlier onset of puberty, greater bone age advancement, and/or neurological symptoms suggested a greater chance of pathological brain lesions in boys with central PP or EP. All boys with peripheral PP, even those with normal initial MRI findings, should be evaluated for the emergence of GCT during follow-up.

  4. MR imaging and MR cholangiopancreatography in the preoperative evaluation of hilar cholangiocarcinoma: correlation with surgical and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Gualdi, Gianfranco [Umberto I Hospital-La Sapienza University Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Manfredi, Riccardo [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Vecchioli, Amorino [A. Gemelli Hospital-University of Sacred Heart, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    The primary aim was to evaluate delayed contrast-enhanced MRI in depicting perineural spread of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) and consequently to determine the capability of MRI/MRCP for staging CCC. Fifteen patients that underwent MRI/MRCP and surgical treatment were retrospectively included. Two radiologists evaluated MR images to assess delayed periductal enhancement, extent of bile duct stenosis, liver parenchymal and vascular involvement and presence of liver atrophy. An agreement between delayed enhancement of the bile duct walls and perineural neoplastic spread showed a very good correlation factor (0.93). The overall accuracy in detecting biliary neoplastic invasion was higher for delayed T1-weighted images (93.3%) than for the MRCP images (80%), and T1-delayed image increased the MR accuracy in assessing the neoplastic resectability (p < 0.05). MRI correctly predicted vascular involvement in 73% and liver involvement in 80% of the cases. The number of overall correctly assessed patients with regard to resectability was 11 true positive, 1 false positive and 3 true negative. The combination of MRI/MRCP is a reliable diagnostic method for staging hilar cholangiocarcinomas. Delayed periductal enhancement is accurate in the evaluation of neoplastic perineural spread, and it can improve diagnostic accuracy to identify resectable and unresectable tumours. (orig.)

  5. Mapping pathological changes in brain structure by combining T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzetti, Marco; Mantini, Dante; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    A workflow based on the ratio between standardized T1-weighted (T1-w) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MR images has been proposed as a new tool to study brain structure. This approach was previously used to map structural properties in the healthy brain. Here, we evaluate whether the T1-w/T2-w approach can support the assessment of structural impairments in the diseased brain. We use schizophrenia data to demonstrate the potential clinical utility of the technique. We analyzed T1-w and T2-w images of 36 schizophrenic patients and 35 age-matched controls. These were collected for the Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network (fBIRN) collaborative project, which had an IRB approval and followed the HIPAA guidelines. We computed T1-w/T2-w images for each individual and compared intensities in schizophrenic and control groups on a voxel-wise basis, as well as in regions of interest (ROIs). Our results revealed that the T1-w/T2-w image permits to discriminate brain regions showing group-level differences between patients and controls with greater accuracy than conventional T1-w and T2-w images. Both the ROIs and the voxel-wise analysis showed globally reduced gray and white matter values in patients compared to controls. Significantly reduced values were found in regions such as insula, primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Our findings were consistent with previous meta-analyses in schizophrenia corroborating the hypothesis of a potential ''disconnection'' syndrome in conjunction with structural alterations in local gray matter regions. Overall, our study suggested that the T1-w/T2-w technique permits to reliably map structural differences between the brains of patients and healthy individuals. (orig.)

  6. Mapping pathological changes in brain structure by combining T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganzetti, Marco; Mantini, Dante [ETH Zurich, Neural Control of Movement Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Oxford, Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Wenderoth, Nicole [ETH Zurich, Neural Control of Movement Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Movement Control and Neuroplasticity, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    A workflow based on the ratio between standardized T1-weighted (T1-w) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MR images has been proposed as a new tool to study brain structure. This approach was previously used to map structural properties in the healthy brain. Here, we evaluate whether the T1-w/T2-w approach can support the assessment of structural impairments in the diseased brain. We use schizophrenia data to demonstrate the potential clinical utility of the technique. We analyzed T1-w and T2-w images of 36 schizophrenic patients and 35 age-matched controls. These were collected for the Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network (fBIRN) collaborative project, which had an IRB approval and followed the HIPAA guidelines. We computed T1-w/T2-w images for each individual and compared intensities in schizophrenic and control groups on a voxel-wise basis, as well as in regions of interest (ROIs). Our results revealed that the T1-w/T2-w image permits to discriminate brain regions showing group-level differences between patients and controls with greater accuracy than conventional T1-w and T2-w images. Both the ROIs and the voxel-wise analysis showed globally reduced gray and white matter values in patients compared to controls. Significantly reduced values were found in regions such as insula, primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Our findings were consistent with previous meta-analyses in schizophrenia corroborating the hypothesis of a potential ''disconnection'' syndrome in conjunction with structural alterations in local gray matter regions. Overall, our study suggested that the T1-w/T2-w technique permits to reliably map structural differences between the brains of patients and healthy individuals. (orig.)

  7. The significance of a uniform definition of pathological lymph nodes in Hodgkin lymphoma: Impact of different thresholds for positive lymph nodes in CT imaging on staging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Obenauer, Silvia; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hess, Clemens F.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The most commonly used approach for the assessment for differentiating malignant versus reactive lymph nodes is the measurement of the cross-section diameter of the lymph nodes in the transversal CT-planes. The intention of this article is to assess the impact of varying definitions of pathological lymph node size in CT-imaging in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and to evaluate its effect on staging, chemotherapy regimes and radiation field size. Materials and methods: Pretherapeutic CT-scans of 10 consecutive patients with Hodgkin lymphoma have been evaluated based on two different definitions for malignant lymph node size; the classification of the German study group for Hodgkin lymphoma (1.0 cm) and the classification according to the results of the Cotswold consensus meeting 1989 (1.5 cm). Results: Applying the definitions of the DHSG and the Cotswold meeting we found more affected lymph node regions compared to the evaluation of the referring institutions in 9/10 and 6/10 patients, higher stages in 2/10 and 1/10 patients, more intense chemotherapy regimes in 3/10 and 1/10 and larger radiation fields in 10/10 and 6/10 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Varying definitions of pathologic lymph node size and inconsequent application of definitions reduce the comparability between different studies and within each study

  8. Primary periosteal lymphoma: an unusual presentation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with radiographic, MR imaging, and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Scot E.; Beall, Douglas P.; Sanders, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall Medical Center, 759th MDTS/MTRD, 2200 Bergquist Drive, Suite 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236-5300 (United States); Filzen, Timothy W.; Parsons, Theodore W. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wilford Hall Medical Center, 59th MDW/MCSO, 2200 Bergquist Drive, Suite 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236-5300 (United States); Bezzant, Shane M. [Department of Radiology, Brooke Army Medical Center, 3851 Roger Brooke Drive, Bldg 3600, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6200 (United States); Burton, Mark P. [Department of Pathology, Wilford Hall Medical Center, 59th MDW/MTLP, 2200 Bergquist Drive, Suite 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236-5300 (United States)

    2003-04-01

    This report describes a primary periosteal location of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, without nodal disease, and without adjacent intramedullary disease at presentation. The clinical and imaging appearance of periosteal lymphoma simulates other neoplastic osseous surface tumors more than that of lymphoma in other locations. Consideration of this rare presentation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the differential diagnosis of periosteal bone lesions can be helpful to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment. (orig.)

  9. [Dual pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, A

    2008-05-01

    Dual pathology is defined as the association of two potentially epileptogenic lesions, hippocampal (sclerosis, neuronal loss) and extrahippocampal (temporal or extratemporal). Epileptic activity may be generated by either lesion and the relative importance of every lesion's epileptogenicity conditions the surgical strategy adopted. Most frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis are cortical dysplasias. The common physiopathology of the two lesions is not clearly established. Extrahippocampal lesions may be undetectable on MRI (microdysgenesis, for example) and ictal discharge patterns may vary among dual pathology patients. The surgical strategy depends on the location of the extrahippocampal lesion and its relative role in seizure generation; however, reported surgical results suggest that simultaneous resection of mesial temporal structures along with the extrahippocampal lesion should be performed.

  10. Microglial pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan; Tischer, Jasmin; Bechmann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes pathological changes that affect microglial cells in the human brain during aging and in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, primarily Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It also provides examples of microglial changes that have been observed in laboratory animals during aging and in some experimentally induced lesions and disease models. Dissimilarities and similarities between humans and rodents are discussed in an attempt to generate a current understanding of microglial ...

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: prediction of pathologic response with PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging--prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Miyake, Mototaka; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kazunori; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2012-04-01

    To clarify whether fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) can be used to predict pathologic response in breast cancer. Institutional human research committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. Accuracy after two cycles of NAC for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR) was examined in 142 women (mean age, 57 years: range, 43-72 years) with histologically proved breast cancer between December 2005 and February 2009. Quantitative PET/CT and DCE MR imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of NAC. Parameters of PET/CT and of blood flow and microvascular permeability at DCE MR were compared with pathologic response. Patients were also evaluated after NAC by using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 based on DCE MR measurements and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 based on PET/CT measurements. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine continuous variables at PET/CT and DCE MR to predict pCR, and diagnostic accuracies were compared with the McNemar test. Significant decrease from baseline of all parameters at PET/CT and DCE MR was observed after NAC. Therapeutic response was obtained in 24 patients (17%) with pCR and 118 (83%) without pCR. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 45.5%, 85.5%, and 82.4%, respectively, with RECIST and 70.4%, 95.7%, and 90.8%, respectively, with EORTC and PERCIST. Multiple logistic regression revealed three significant independent predictors of pCR: percentage maximum standardized uptake value (%SUV(max)) (odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11, 1.34; P PET/CT is superior to DCE MR for the prediction of pCR (%SUV(max) [90.1%] vs %κ

  12. Potential of Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Relaxometry for the Detection of Specific Pathological Alterations in Parkinson's Disease (PD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Esterhammer

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of multimodal MR imaging including mean diffusivity (MD, fractional anisotropy (FA, relaxation rates R2 and R2* to detect disease specific alterations in Parkinson's Disease (PD. We enrolled 82 PD patients (PD-all with varying disease durations (≤5 years: PD≤5, n = 43; >5 years: PD>5, n = 39 and 38 matched healthy controls (HC, receiving diffusion tensor imaging as well as R2 and R2* relaxometry calculated from multi-echo T2*-weighted and dual-echo TSE imaging, respectively. ROIs were drawn to delineate caudate nucleus (CN, putamen (PU, globus pallidus (GP and substantia nigra (SN on the co-registered maps. The SN was divided in 3 descending levels (SL 1-3. The most significant parameters were used for a flexible discrimination analysis (FDA in a training collective consisting of 25 randomized subjects from each group in order to predict the classification of remaining subjects. PD-all showed significant increases in MD, R2 and R2* within SN and its subregions as well as in MD and R2* within different basal ganglia regions. Compared to the HC group, the PD≤5 and the PD>5 group showed significant MD increases within the SN and its lower two subregions, while the PD≤5 group exhibited significant increases in R2 and R2* within SN and its subregions, and tended to elevation within the basal ganglia. The PD>5 group had significantly increased MD in PU and GP, whereas the PD≤5 group presented normal MD within the basal ganglia. FDA achieved right classification in 84% of study participants. Micro-structural damage affects primarily the SN of PD patients and in later disease stages the basal ganglia. Iron contents of PU, GP and SN are increased at early disease stages of PD.

  13. Chondroitin sulfate iron colloid-enhanced MR imaging in patients with small hepatocellular carcinomas. Correlations with hemodynamic and pathologic examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamba, Masayuki; Suto, Yuji; Kodama, Fumiko; Sugihara, Shuji; Yoshida, Kotaro [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of chondroitin sulfate iron colloid (CSIC)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of the histologic grade of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we performed a comparative study with computed tomography during arterial portography (CTAP) and CT arteriography. Twenty-one surgically resected HCCs 3 cm or less in diameter were examined. There were five well-differentiated, six well- to moderately-differentiated and ten moderately- or poorly- differentiated HCCs. T2-weighted spin echo images (repetition time: 2,000 ms, echo time: 90 ms) were taken before and after intravenous injection of 23.6 {mu}molFe/kg of CSIC. The differences between precontrast and postcontrast contrast-to-noise ratios (enhancement index) was correlated with the findings of CTAP, CT arteriography and histological examination. The enhancement index increased with statistical significance as the intranodular arterial perfusion increased (p<0.01), and as the intranodular portal perfusion decreased (p<0.01). Though the enhancement index tended to increase as the grade of malignancy increased, no statistical significance was found. CSIC-enhanced MRI allowed a noninvasive evaluation of the intranodular reticuloendothelial function. We consider this procedure as a supplementary method for evaluation of the histologic grade of HCC prior to performing invasive procedures such as angiography and biopsy. (author)

  14. Primary (recurrent) and metastatic lesions detection in cervical cancer: A comparison of positron emission tomography, CT and/or MRI image and pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, T.C.; Tzen, K.Y.; Ma, S.Y.; Ng, K.K.; Hsueh, S.; Lai, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: This prospective study is to compare the results of primary (recurrence) and metastatic lesions detection, based on pathologic results, with computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Materials and Methods: An FDG PET scan was performed in 136 patients with ICC (107 squamous cell carcinoma [SCC], 18 adenocarcinoma [AdenoCa], 5 adeosquamous cell carcinoma, 4 small cell carcinoma, and 2 poorly differentiated carcinoma; from FIGO staging IB to IVB prior to operation). CT and/or MRI image were performed within one week before or after FDG PET scan was done. The accuracy of lymph node status was based on histological result or a second FDG PET combined with a CT and/or MRI image images. Results: Totally, 68 main tumor and 147 metastatic lesions were recognized by either histopathology or a follow up study. On a lesion basis, CT and/or MRI image images demonstrated 63 (92.6 %) main tumor and 103 (70.1 %) metastatic lesions. For lymph node metastatic lesions detection, there were 6(75 %) enlarged inguinal lymph nodes, 38(76 %) enlarged pelvic lymph nodes (PLN), 28(73.7 %) enlarged para-aortic lymph nodes (PAN), 8(50 %) enlarged supraclavicular lymph nodes (SLNs), and 5(62.5 %) enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs). Liver metastases were found in 4(100 %), in lung in 7(70 %) and in bone in 5(83.3 %). Peritoneal metastases were found in 2(28.6 %). FDG PET demonstrated 63 (92.6 %) and 135 (91.8 %) metastatic lesions. For lymph node metastases, FDG PET found 8(100 %) enlarged inguinal lymph nodes, 44(88 %) enlarged PLNs, 36(94.7 %) enlarged PANs, 15(93.8 %) enlarged SLNs, and 8(100 %) enlarged MLNs. Liver metastases were found in 4(100 %), in lung in 9(90 %) and in bone in 6(100 %). Peritoneal metastases were found in 5(71.4 %). On a patient basis, with FDG PET scan, 31(22.8%) were upstaging while 4(2.9%) were down staging. 35

  15. In vivo imaging reveals rapid astrocyte depletion and axon damage in a model of neuromyelitis optica-related pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herwerth, Marina; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Srivastava, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    IgG autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel. Antibodies against AQP4 can damage astrocytes via complement, but NMO histopathology also shows demyelination, and - importantly - axon injury, which may determine permanent deficits following NMO relapses. The dynamics...... antibodies in mice. RESULTS: We found that human AQP4 antibodies caused acute astrocyte depletion with initial oligodendrocyte survival. Within two hours of antibody application, we observed secondary axon injury in the form of progressive swellings. Astrocyte toxicity and axon damage were dependent on AQP4...... antibody concentration and complement, specifically C1q. INTERPRETATION: In vivo imaging of the spinal cord reveals the swift development of NMO-related acute axon injury following AQP4 antibody-mediated astrocyte depletion. This approach will be useful in studying the mechanisms underlying the spread...

  16. Nuclear/Nucleolar morphometry and DNA image cytometry as a combined diagnostic tool in pathology of prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavantzas, N.; Agapitos, E.; Lazaris, A. C.; Pavlopulos, P.M.; Sofikitis, N.; Davaris, P. [National University of Athens, Dept. of Pathology, Medical School, Athens (Greece)

    2001-12-01

    Paraffin tissue sections from 50 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma were used to study nuclear and nucleolar morphometric features by image analysis. The results were compared to DNA ploidy and Gleason grade. In the examined histological samples nuclear and nucleolar areas were positively interrelated. It was also noticed that the higher the percentage of nucleolated nuclei, the bigger the nuclear and nucleolar areas. The morphometric characteristics did not differ significantly among the four grades of the examined specimens. In well-differentiated carcinomas the DNA index was lower than in the rest at a statistically significant level. Hypodiploid carcinomas were found to possess significantly bigger nuclear areas than any other DNA index group. Morphonuclear evidence of anaplasia and DNA aneuploidy may be used as diagnostic tools in prostate cancer in addition to Gleason grade.

  17. Nuclear/Nucleolar morphometry and DNA image cytometry as a combined diagnostic tool in pathology of prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavantzas, N.; Agapitos, E.; Lazaris, A. C.; Pavlopulos, P.M.; Sofikitis, N.; Davaris, P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin tissue sections from 50 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma were used to study nuclear and nucleolar morphometric features by image analysis. The results were compared to DNA ploidy and Gleason grade. In the examined histological samples nuclear and nucleolar areas were positively interrelated. It was also noticed that the higher the percentage of nucleolated nuclei, the bigger the nuclear and nucleolar areas. The morphometric characteristics did not differ significantly among the four grades of the examined specimens. In well-differentiated carcinomas the DNA index was lower than in the rest at a statistically significant level. Hypodiploid carcinomas were found to possess significantly bigger nuclear areas than any other DNA index group. Morphonuclear evidence of anaplasia and DNA aneuploidy may be used as diagnostic tools in prostate cancer in addition to Gleason grade

  18. Whole-tumour diffusion kurtosis MR imaging histogram analysis of rectal adenocarcinoma: Correlation with clinical pathologic prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanfen; Yang, Xiaotang; Du, Xiaosong; Zhuo, Zhizheng; Xin, Lei; Cheng, Xintao

    2018-04-01

    To investigate potential relationships between diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI)-derived parameters using whole-tumour volume histogram analysis and clinicopathological prognostic factors in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. 79 consecutive patients who underwent MRI examination with rectal adenocarcinoma were retrospectively evaluated. Parameters D, K and conventional ADC were measured using whole-tumour volume histogram analysis. Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test, receiver operating characteristic curves and Spearman's correlation were used for statistical analysis. Almost all the percentile metrics of K were correlated positively with nodal involvement, higher histological grades, the presence of lymphangiovascular invasion (LVI) and circumferential margin (CRM) (phistogram analysis, especially K parameters, were associated with important prognostic factors of rectal cancer. • K correlated positively with some important prognostic factors of rectal cancer. • K mean showed higher AUC and specificity for differentiation of nodal involvement. • DKI metrics with whole-tumour volume histogram analysis depicted tumour heterogeneity.

  19. Information content of the space-frequency filtering of blood plasma layers laser images in the diagnosis of pathological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, A. G.; Boychuk, T. M.; Mincer, O. P.; Bodnar, G. B.; Kushnerick, L. Ya.; Savich, V. O.

    2013-12-01

    The bases of method of the space-frequency of the filtering phase allocation of blood plasma pellicle are given here. The model of the optical-anisotropic properties of the albumen chain of blood plasma pellicle with regard to linear and circular double refraction of albumen and globulin crystals is proposed. Comparative researches of the effectiveness of methods of the direct polarized mapping of the azimuth images of blood plasma pcllicle layers and space-frequency polarimetry of the laser radiation transformed by divaricate and holelikc optical-anisotropic chains of blood plasma pellicles were held. On the basis of the complex statistic, correlative and fracta.1 analysis of the filtered frcquencydimensional polarizing azimuth maps of the blood plasma pellicles structure a set of criteria of the change of the double refraction of the albumen chains caused by the prostate cancer was traced and proved.

  20. Longitudinal imaging of Alzheimer pathology using [11C]PIB, [18F]FDDNP and [18F]FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Adriaanse, Sofie F.; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Yaqub, Maqsood; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Flier, Wiesje M. van der

    2012-01-01

    [ 11 C]PIB and [ 18 F]FDDNP are PET tracers for in vivo detection of the neuropathology underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). [ 18 F]FDG is a glucose analogue and its uptake reflects metabolic activity. The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinal changes in these tracers in patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in healthy controls. Longitudinal, paired, dynamic [ 11 C]PIB and [ 18 F]FDDNP (90 min each) and static [ 18 F]FDG (15 min) PET scans were obtained in 11 controls, 12 MCI patients and 8 AD patients. The mean interval between baseline and follow-up was 2.5 years (range 2.0-4.0 years). Parametric [ 11 C]PIB and [ 18 F]FDDNP images of binding potential (BP ND ) and [ 18 F]FDG standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) images were generated. A significant increase in global cortical [ 11 C]PIB BP ND was found in MCI patients, but no changes were observed in AD patients or controls. Subsequent regional analysis revealed that this increase in [ 11 C]PIB BP ND in MCI patients was most prominent in the lateral temporal lobe (p 18 F]FDDNP, no changes in global BP ND were found. [ 18 F]FDG uptake was reduced at follow-up in the AD group only, especially in frontal, parietal and lateral temporal lobes (all p 11 C]PIB binding (ρ = -0.42, p 18 F]FDG uptake (ρ = 0.54, p 18 F]FDDNP binding (ρ = -0.18, p = 0.35) were not. [ 11 C]PIB and [ 18 F]FDG track molecular changes in different stages of AD. We found increased amyloid load in MCI patients and progressive metabolic impairment in AD patients. [ 18 F]FDDNP seems to be less useful for examining disease progression. (orig.)

  1. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grova, C [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Jannin, P [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Biraben, A [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Buvat, I [INSERM U494, CHU Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Benali, H [INSERM U494, CHU Pitie Salpetriere, Paris (France); Bernard, A M [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Eugene Marquis, Rennes (France); Scarabin, J M [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Gibaud, B [Laboratoire IDM, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France)

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were

  2. Microglial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan; Tischer, Jasmin; Bechmann, Ingo

    2014-09-26

    This paper summarizes pathological changes that affect microglial cells in the human brain during aging and in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, primarily Alzheimer's disease (AD). It also provides examples of microglial changes that have been observed in laboratory animals during aging and in some experimentally induced lesions and disease models. Dissimilarities and similarities between humans and rodents are discussed in an attempt to generate a current understanding of microglial pathology and its significance during aging and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer dementia (AD). The identification of dystrophic (senescent) microglia has created an ostensible conflict with prior work claiming a role for activated microglia and neuroinflammation during normal aging and in AD, and this has raised a basic question: does the brain's immune system become hyperactive (inflamed) or does it become weakened (senescent) in elderly and demented people, and what is the impact on neuronal function and cognition? Here we strive to reconcile these seemingly contradictory notions by arguing that both low-grade neuroinflammation and microglial senescence are the result of aging-associated free radical injury. Both processes are damaging for microglia as they synergistically exhaust this essential cell population to the point where the brain's immune system is effete and unable to support neuronal function.

  3. Detailed imaging of the normal anatomy and pathologic conditions of the cavernous region at 3 Tesla using a contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer; Peters, Friederike; Lummel, Nina; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Yousry, Indra [University Hospital Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Schankin, Christoph [University Hospital Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Rachinger, Walter [University Hospital Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) at 3 Tesla for the delineation of the cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy both under normal and under pathological conditions. Fifteen patients without pathologies in the CS and ten patients with pituitary adenomas were included. The CE-MRA was performed on a 3-Tesla scanner and analyzed collaboratively by two readers. The cranial nerves (CNs) within the CS, namely CNIII, CNIV, CNV1, CNV2, and CNVI, were identified in both patient groups. In the adenoma patients it was also assessed whether and to which extend the adenoma invaded the CS and the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs was determined. In the patients with normal CS anatomy, CNIII could be identified in 100%, CNIV in 86.7%, and CNV1, CNV2, as well as CNVI in 100% of analyzed sides. Pituitary adenomas invaded the CS unilaterally (right side) in four patients, and bilaterally in six patients. In patients with adenomas, the CN could be identified and differentiated from the tumor in the following percentages: CNIII in 100%, CNIV in 70%, both CNV1 and CNV2 in 90%, and CNVI in 100%. In all these cases, the tumor-nerve spatial relationship could be visualized. 3-Tesla CE-MRA allows detailed imaging of the complex anatomy of the CS and its structures. In adenoma patients, it clearly visualizes the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs, and thus might be helpful to optimize presurgical planning. (orig.)

  4. Pathology in a tube step 2: simple rapid fabrication of curved circular cross section millifluidic channels for biopsy preparation/3D imaging towards pancreatic cancer detection and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ronnie; Burfeind, Chris W.; Lim, Saniel D.; Patle, Shubham; Seibel, Eric J.

    2018-02-01

    3D pathology is intrinsically dependent on 3D microscopy, or the whole tissue imaging of patient tissue biopsies (TBs). Consequently, unsectioned needle specimens must be processed whole: a procedure which cannot necessarily be accomplished through manual methods, or by retasking automated pathology machines. Thus "millifluidic" devices (for millimeter-scale biopsies) are an ideal solution for tissue handling/preparation. TBs are large, messy and a solid-liquid mixture; they vary in material, geometry and structure based on the organ biopsied, the clinician skill and the needle type used. As a result, traditional microfluidic devices are insufficient to handle such mm-sized samples and their associated fabrication techniques are impractical and costly with respect to time/efficiency. Our research group has devised a simple, rapid fabrication process for millifluidic devices using jointed skeletal molds composed of machined, reusable metal rods, segmented rods and stranded wire as structural cores; these cores are surrounded by Teflon outer housing. We can therefore produce curving, circular-cross-section (CCCS) millifluidic channels in rapid fashion that cannot normally be achieved by microfabrication, micro-/CNC-machining, or 3D printing. The approach has several advantages. CLINICAL: round channels interface coring needles. PROCESSING: CCCS channels permit multi-layer device designs for additional (processing, monitoring, testing) stages. REUSABILITY: for a biopsy/needle diameter, molding (interchangeable) components may be produced one-time then reused for other designs. RAPID: structural cores can be quickly removed due to Teflon®'s ultra-low friction; housing may be released with ethanol; PDMS volumes cure faster since metal skeleton molds conduct additional heat from within the curing elastomer.

  5. Detailed imaging of the normal anatomy and pathologic conditions of the cavernous region at 3 Tesla using a contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Jennifer; Peters, Friederike; Lummel, Nina; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Yousry, Indra; Schankin, Christoph; Rachinger, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) at 3 Tesla for the delineation of the cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy both under normal and under pathological conditions. Fifteen patients without pathologies in the CS and ten patients with pituitary adenomas were included. The CE-MRA was performed on a 3-Tesla scanner and analyzed collaboratively by two readers. The cranial nerves (CNs) within the CS, namely CNIII, CNIV, CNV1, CNV2, and CNVI, were identified in both patient groups. In the adenoma patients it was also assessed whether and to which extend the adenoma invaded the CS and the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs was determined. In the patients with normal CS anatomy, CNIII could be identified in 100%, CNIV in 86.7%, and CNV1, CNV2, as well as CNVI in 100% of analyzed sides. Pituitary adenomas invaded the CS unilaterally (right side) in four patients, and bilaterally in six patients. In patients with adenomas, the CN could be identified and differentiated from the tumor in the following percentages: CNIII in 100%, CNIV in 70%, both CNV1 and CNV2 in 90%, and CNVI in 100%. In all these cases, the tumor-nerve spatial relationship could be visualized. 3-Tesla CE-MRA allows detailed imaging of the complex anatomy of the CS and its structures. In adenoma patients, it clearly visualizes the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs, and thus might be helpful to optimize presurgical planning. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of prostate cancer: a platform for 3D co-registration of in-vivo MRI ex-vivo MRI and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orczyk, Clément; Mikheev, Artem; Rosenkrantz, Andrew; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Rusinek, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Multi-parametric MRI is emerging as a promising method for prostate cancer diagnosis. prognosis and treatment planning. However, the localization of in-vivo detected lesions and pathologic sites of cancer remains a significant challenge. To overcome this limitation we have developed and tested a system for co-registration of in-vivo MRI, ex-vivo MRI and histology. Materials and Methods: Three men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (ages 54-72, PSA levels 5.1-7.7 ng/ml) were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent 3T multi-parametric MRI that included T2W, DCEMRI, and DWI prior to robotic-assisted prostatectomy. Ex-vivo multi-parametric MRI was performed on fresh prostate specimen. Excised prostates were then sliced at regular intervals and photographed both before and after fixation. Slices were perpendicular to the main axis of the posterior capsule, i.e., along the direction of the rectal wall. Guided by the location of the urethra, 2D digital images were assembled into 3D models. Cancer foci, extra-capsular extensions and zonal margins were delineated by the pathologist and included in 3D histology data. A locally-developed software was applied to register in-vivo, ex-vivo and histology using an over-determined set of anatomical landmarks placed in anterior fibro-muscular stroma, central. transition and peripheral zones. The mean root square distance across corresponding control points was used to assess co-registration error. Results: Two specimens were pT3a and one pT2b (negative margin) at pathology. The software successfully fused invivo MRI. ex-vivo MRI fresh specimen and histology using appropriate (rigid and affine) transformation models with mean square error of 1.59 mm. Coregistration accuracy was confirmed by multi-modality viewing using operator-guided variable transparency. Conclusion: The method enables successful co-registration of pre-operative MRI, ex-vivo MRI and pathology and it provides initial evidence

  7. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p < 0.01, R{sup 2} = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p < 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.37 and p < 0.01, R{sup 2} = 0.48, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUV{sub max}.

  8. Atypical MRI features in soft-tissue arteriovenous malformation: a novel imaging appearance with radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Anand S. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Interventional Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Schulman, Joshua M.; Ruben, Beth S. [University of California, San Francisco, Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hoffman, William Y. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Plastic Surgery, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States); Dowd, Christopher F. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States); Frieden, Ilona J. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Dermatology, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hess, Christopher P. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neuroradiology, Birthmarks and Vascular Anomalies Clinic, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The absence of a discrete mass, surrounding signal abnormality and solid enhancement are imaging features that have traditionally been used to differentiate soft-tissue arteriovenous malformations from vascular tumors on MRI. We have observed that these findings are not uncommon in arteriovenous malformations, which may lead to misdiagnosis or inappropriate treatment. To estimate the frequency of atypical MRI features in soft-tissue arteriovenous malformations and assess their relationship to lesion size, location, tissue type involved and vascular architecture. Medical records, MRI and histopathology were reviewed in consecutive patients with soft-tissue arteriovenous malformations in a multidisciplinary vascular anomalies clinic. Arteriovenous malformations were divided into those with and without atypical MRI findings (perilesional T2 signal abnormality, enhancement and/or a soft-tissue mass). Lesion location, size, tissue involved and vascular architecture were also compared between groups. Tissue stains were reviewed in available biopsy or resection specimens to assess relationships between MRI findings and histopathology. Thirty patients with treatment-naive arteriovenous malformations were included. Fifteen lesions demonstrated atypical MRI. There was no difference in age, gender, lesion size or involved body part between the groups. However, more than half of the atypical lesions demonstrated multicompartmental involvement, and tiny intralesional flow voids were more common in atypical arteriovenous malformations. Histopathology also differed in atypical cases, showing densely packed endothelial cells with connective tissue architectural distortion and edema. Arteriovenous malformations may exhibit features of a vascular tumor on MRI, particularly when multicompartmental and/or containing tiny internal vessels. These features are important to consider in suspected fast-flow vascular malformations and may have implications with respect to their treatment

  9. Peritendinous calcinosis of calcaneus tendon associated with dermatomyositis: correlation between conventional radiograph, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and gross surgical pathology; Calcinose peritendinea do tendao calcaneo associada a dermatomiosite: correlacao entre radiografia convencional, ultra-sonografia, ressonancia magnetica e macroscopia cirurgica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Gomide, Lidyane Marques de Paula; Lemes, Marcella Stival [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiana, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Costa, Edegmar Nunes; Rocha, Valney Luiz da [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Ortopedia; Machado, Marcio Martins; Santos Junior, Rubens Carneiro dos; Barros, Nestor de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Sernik, Renato Antonio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia; Nunes, Rodrigo Alvarenga [Universidade do Vale do Sapucai (UNIVAS), Pouso Alegre, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Albieri, Alexandre Daher [Hospital de Acidentados de Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    Interstitial calcinosis is an uncommon condition in which there is either localized or widely disseminated deposition of calcium in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, muscles, and tendons. Calcinosis is often associated with collagen diseases, scleroderma and dermatomyositis. The authors report a case of interstitial calcinosis associated with dermatomyositis studied with conventional radiograph, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and correlate the imaging findings with the results of surgical pathology gross examination. (author)

  10. High-resolution CISS MR imaging with and without contrast for evaluation of the upper cranial nerves: segmental anatomy and selected pathologic conditions of the cisternal through extraforaminal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ari M; Macedo, Leonardo L; Chonka, Zachary D; Ilica, Ahmet T; Choudhri, Asim F; Gallia, Gary L; Aygun, Nafi

    2014-02-01

    The authors review the course and appearance of the major segments of the upper cranial nerves from their apparent origin at the brainstem through the proximal extraforaminal region, focusing on the imaging and anatomic features of particular relevance to high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Selected pathologic entities are included in the discussion of the corresponding cranial nerve segments for illustrative purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics

  12. [Pathologic gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespor, K

    1996-01-31

    The author presents a review on pathological gambling. Similarly as in other addictive diseases, early therapeutic intervention is important. The latter may include: 1: Evaluation of the problem 2. Recommendation that the subject should avoid places where the gambling is pursued. He should not have larger financial sums on him. 3. Recommendations pertaining to lifestyle and prevention of excessive stress. 4. Handling of printed material (the author mentions the text issued to his patients). In the paper therapeutic procedures are described, incl. the author's experience such as the foundation of the group of Gamblers anonymous. Prevention is also considered. It is important that gambling should be less readily available and the demand for it should be smaller.

  13. 18F Fluorocholine Dynamic Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Intermediate- to High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Clinical-Pathologic Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Young; Yang, Jaewon; Noworolski, Susan M; Behr, Spencer; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Nguyen, Hao G; Carroll, Peter R; Kurhanewicz, John; Seo, Youngho

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To investigate the initial clinical value of fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorocholine (FCH) dynamic positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging by comparing its parameters with clinical-pathologic findings in patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) who plan to undergo radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed written consent was obtained from all subjects for this HIPAA-compliant study. Twelve men (mean age ± standard deviation, 61.7 years ± 8.4; range, 46-74 years) with untreated intermediate- to high-risk PCa characterized according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) underwent preoperative FCH dynamic PET/MR imaging followed by radical prostatectomy between April and November 2015. PET/MR imaging parameters including average and maximum K1 (delivery rate constant) and standardized uptake values (SUVs) and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2 scores were measured and compared with clinical-pathologic characteristics. For statistical analysis, the Spearman rank correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed. Results Of the PET parameters, maximum SUV of primary tumors showed significant correlations with several clinical-pathologic parameters including serum prostate-specific antigen level (ρ = 0.71, P = .01), pathologic stage (ρ = 0.59, P = .043), and postsurgical CAPRA score (ρ = 0.72, P = .008). The overall PI-RADS score showed significant correlations with pathologic tumor volume (ρ = 0.81, P PET and MR imaging showed improved sensitivity (88%) for prediction of pathologic extraprostatic extension compared with that with MR imaging (50%) and PET (75%) performed separately. Conclusion Maximum SUVs and PI-RADS scores from FCH PET/MR imaging show good correlation with clinical-pathologic characteristics, such as postsurgical CAPRA score, which are related to prognosis in

  14. Enterprise Implementation of Digital Pathology: Feasibility, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, D J; Pantanowitz, L; McHugh, J S; Piccoli, A L; OLeary, M J; Lauro, G R

    2017-10-01

    Digital pathology is becoming technically possible to implement for routine pathology work. At our institution, we have been using digital pathology for second opinion intraoperative consultations for over 10 years. Herein, we describe our experience in converting to a digital pathology platform for primary pathology diagnosis. We implemented an incremental rollout for digital pathology on subspecialty benches, beginning with cases that contained small amounts of tissue (biopsy specimens). We successfully scanned over 40,000 slides through our digital pathology system. Several lessons (both challenges and opportunities) were learned through this implementation. A successful conversion to digital pathology requires pre-imaging adjustments, integrated software and post-imaging evaluations.

  15. Comparison of Tumor Volumes as Determined by Pathologic Examination and FDG-PET/CT Images of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinming; Li Xinke; Xing Ligang; Mu Dianbin; Fu Zheng; Sun Xiaorong; Sun Xiangyu; Yang Guoren; Zhang Baijiang; Sun Xindong; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the cut-off standardized uptake value (SUV) on 18 F fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to pathologic gross tumor volume (GTV path ) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with NSCLC who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 5-7-μm sections at approximately 4-mm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The tumor-containing area was outlined slice by slice and the GTV path determined by summing over all the slices, taking into account the interslice thickness and fixation-induced volume reduction. The gross tumor volume from the PET images, GTV PET , was determined as a function of cut-off SUV. The optimal threshold or optimal absolute SUV was defined as the value at which the GTV PET was the same as the GTV path . Results: The fixation process induced a volumetric reduction to 82% ± 10% (range, 62-100%) of the original. The maximal SUV was 10.1 ± 3.6 (range, 4.2-18.7). The optimal threshold and absolute SUV were 31% ± 11% and 3.0 ± 1.6, respectively. The optimal threshold was inversely correlated with GTV path and tumor diameter (p path or tumor diameter (p > 0.05). Conclusion: This study evaluated the use of GTV path as a criterion for determining the optimal cut-off SUV for NSCLC target volume delineation. Confirmatory studies including more cases are being performed.

  16. Accuracy of non-arthrographic 3T MR imaging in evaluation of intra-articular pathology of the hip in femoroacetabular impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Dorota D. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Naraghi, Ali; White, Lawrence M. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Murnaghan, Lucas; Whelan, Daniel [University of Toronto, Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopedics, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the accuracy of non-arthrographic 3-T MRI compared to hip arthroscopy in the assessment of labral and cartilaginous pathology in patients with suspected FAI. Following IRB approval and waived consent, 42 consecutive cases of suspected FAI with non-arthrographic 3-T MRI and arthroscopy of the hip were reviewed. High-resolution TSE MR imaging was evaluated in consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists, blinded to arthroscopic findings, for the presence of labral tears and articular cartilage lesions. Acetabular cartilage was categorized as normal, degeneration/fissuring, delamination, or denudation. MRI findings were compared to arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values for MRI were calculated using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. Forty-two hips in 38 patients with a mean age of 29 (range 13-45 years) were assessed. Mean interval between MRI and arthroscopy was 154 days (range 27-472 days). MRI depicted 41 cases with labral tears (sensitivity 100%, specificity 50%, accuracy 98%, PPV 98%, NPV 100%), 11 cases with femoral cartilage abnormalities (sensitivity 85%, specificity 100%, accuracy 95%, PPV 100%, NPV 94%), and 36 cases with acetabular cartilage lesions (sensitivity 94% specificity 67%, accuracy 90%, PPV 94%, NPV 67%). Of the 36 cases with acetabular cartilage lesions on MRI, 7 were characterized as degeneration/fissuring, 26 as delamination, and 3 as denudation, with discordant results between MRI and arthroscopy for grading of articular cartilage in ten cases. Non-arthrographic 3-T MR imaging is a highly accurate technique for evaluation of the labrum and cartilage in patients with clinically suspected FAI. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of non-arthrographic 3T MR imaging in evaluation of intra-articular pathology of the hip in femoroacetabular impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linda, Dorota D.; Naraghi, Ali; White, Lawrence M.; Murnaghan, Lucas; Whelan, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the accuracy of non-arthrographic 3-T MRI compared to hip arthroscopy in the assessment of labral and cartilaginous pathology in patients with suspected FAI. Following IRB approval and waived consent, 42 consecutive cases of suspected FAI with non-arthrographic 3-T MRI and arthroscopy of the hip were reviewed. High-resolution TSE MR imaging was evaluated in consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists, blinded to arthroscopic findings, for the presence of labral tears and articular cartilage lesions. Acetabular cartilage was categorized as normal, degeneration/fissuring, delamination, or denudation. MRI findings were compared to arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values for MRI were calculated using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. Forty-two hips in 38 patients with a mean age of 29 (range 13-45 years) were assessed. Mean interval between MRI and arthroscopy was 154 days (range 27-472 days). MRI depicted 41 cases with labral tears (sensitivity 100%, specificity 50%, accuracy 98%, PPV 98%, NPV 100%), 11 cases with femoral cartilage abnormalities (sensitivity 85%, specificity 100%, accuracy 95%, PPV 100%, NPV 94%), and 36 cases with acetabular cartilage lesions (sensitivity 94% specificity 67%, accuracy 90%, PPV 94%, NPV 67%). Of the 36 cases with acetabular cartilage lesions on MRI, 7 were characterized as degeneration/fissuring, 26 as delamination, and 3 as denudation, with discordant results between MRI and arthroscopy for grading of articular cartilage in ten cases. Non-arthrographic 3-T MR imaging is a highly accurate technique for evaluation of the labrum and cartilage in patients with clinically suspected FAI. (orig.)

  18. PET Imaging of Tau Pathology and Relationship to Amyloid, Longitudinal MRI, and Cognitive Change in Down Syndrome: Results from the Down Syndrome Biomarker Initiative (DSBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Michael S; Lukic, Ana S; Andrews, Randolph D; Brewer, James; Rissman, Robert A; Strother, Stephen C; Wernick, Miles N; Pennington, Craig; Mobley, William C; Ness, Seth; Matthews, Dawn C

    2017-01-01

    Adults with Down syndrome (DS) represent an enriched population for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which could aid the study of therapeutic interventions, and in turn, could benefit from discoveries made in other AD populations. 1) Understand the relationship between tau pathology and age, amyloid deposition, neurodegeneration (MRI and FDG PET), and cognitive and functional performance; 2) detect and differentiate AD-specific changes from DS-specific brain changes in longitudinal MRI. Twelve non-demented adults, ages 30 to 60, with DS were enrolled in the Down Syndrome Biomarker Initiative (DSBI), a 3-year, observational, cohort study to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting AD intervention/prevention trials in adults with DS. We collected imaging data with 18F-AV-1451 tau PET, AV-45 amyloid PET, FDG PET, and volumetric MRI, as well as cognitive and functional measures and additional laboratory measures. All amyloid negative subjects imaged were tau-negative. Among the amyloid positive subjects, three had tau in regions associated with Braak stage VI, two at stage V, and one at stage II. Amyloid and tau burden correlated with age. The MRI analysis produced two distinct volumetric patterns. The first differentiated DS from normal (NL) and AD, did not correlate with age or amyloid, and was longitudinally stable. The second pattern reflected AD-like atrophy and differentiated NL from AD. Tau PET and MRI atrophy correlated with several cognitive and functional measures. Tau accumulation is associated with amyloid positivity and age, as well as with progressive neurodegeneration measurable using FDG and MRI. Tau correlates with cognitive decline, as do AD-specific hypometabolism and atrophy.

  19. A thickened or indistinct junctional zone on T2-weighted MR images in patients with endometrial carcinoma: pathologic consideration based on microcirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Saida, Yukihisa; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine' ' University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, 305-8575, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishida, Masato; Tsunoda, Hajime; Ichikawa, Yoshihito [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, 305-8575, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    Thickened or indistinct junctional zone (JZ) is a problematic finding in staging endometrial carcinoma. We studied the incidence, pathological cause of this condition correlated to microcirculation, and the utility of dynamic contrast MRI for differential diagnosis. T2-weighted images were analyzed in 119 cases with endometrial carcinoma. The enhancement of the JZ during the dynamic contrast MRI, histopathological causes, and the density of arterioles in the JZ were retrospectively analyzed in cases with thickened or indistinct JZ. The MRI histopathological correlation of all 31 patients with a thickened or indistinct JZ were analyzed, in which it was corresponded to myometrial cancer invasion only in 22%. The sensitivity of a poor early enhancement pattern on dynamic study for detecting myometrial invasion was 71.4%, the specificity was 100%, and the overall accuracy was 92.5%. Although only weak relationship between the contrast enhancement and the arteriole density was revealed, the arteriole density within the JZ with cancer invasion was significantly decreased. Poor enhancement of JZ in early dynamic phase was correlated with the decreased density of arterioles within the myometrium which was invaded by endometrial carcinoma. Dynamic contrast study should be performed in staging endometrial carcinoma especially when JZ was thickened or indistinct. (orig.)

  20. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  1. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, I.; Doursounian, L.; Maigne, J.Y.; Guinet, C.; Meary, E.; Buy, J.N.; Touzard, R.C.; Vadrot, D.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2 * -weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  2. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects - a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, Robert; Luke, Anthony; Ma, C.B.; Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P < 0.05). A high prevalence of knee abnormalities was found in marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences. (orig.)

  3. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects-a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Robert; Luke, Anthony; Ma, C Benjamin; Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences.

  4. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects - a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Robert [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals-Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Luke, Anthony [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Family and Community Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, C.B. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P < 0.05). A high prevalence of knee abnormalities was found in marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences. (orig.)

  5. 3D printing from diagnostic images: a radiologist's primer with an emphasis on musculoskeletal imaging-putting the 3D printing of pathology into the hands of every physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Tamir; Michalski, Mark; Goodman, T Rob; Brown, J Elliott

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently erupted into the medical arena due to decreased costs and increased availability of printers and software tools. Due to lack of detailed information in the medical literature on the methods for 3D printing, we have reviewed the medical and engineering literature on the various methods for 3D printing and compiled them into a practical "how to" format, thereby enabling the novice to start 3D printing with very limited funds. We describe (1) background knowledge, (2) imaging parameters, (3) software, (4) hardware, (5) post-processing, and (6) financial aspects required to cost-effectively reproduce a patient's disease ex vivo so that the patient, engineer and surgeon may hold the anatomy and associated pathology in their hands.

  6. Radiosynoviorthesis in hemophilic arthropathy: pathologic blood pool imaging on pre-therapeutic bone scintigraphy is not a predictor of treatment success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabet, Amir [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Strauss, Andreas Christian; Schmolders, Jan; Bornemann, Rahel; Pennekamp, Peter Hans [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Bonn (Germany); Sabet, Amin; Biersack, Hans Juergen [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Oldenburg, Johannes [University of Bonn, Department of Experimental Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Saarland University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Increased articular {sup 99m}Tc MDP uptake on blood pool imaging (BPI) of patients with rheumatologic conditions is indicative of active inflammatory changes, and has been suggested as a strong predictor of response to radiosynoviorthesis (RSO). In this study, we aimed to assess the value of pretreatment BPI positivity (i.e. scintigraphic-apparent hyperemia) for successful RSO in hemophilic arthropathy. Thirty-four male patients with painful hemophilic arthropathy underwent RSO after failure of conservative treatment. Treated joints comprised the knee in eight, elbow in five, and ankle in 21 patients. Pretreatment triple-phase bone scintigraphy showed hyperemic joints (pathologic BPI) in 17 patients, whereas 17 patients had no increased tracer uptake on BPI. Response to RSO was evaluated 6 months post-treatment by measuring changes in intensity of arthralgia according to the visual analog scale (VAS), bleeding frequency, and range of motion. The association between hyperemia (pathologic BPI) and treatment outcome was examined using nonparametric tests for independent samples. Clinically evident pain relief occurred in 26 patients (76.5 %), and the mean VAS decreased from 7.7 ± 1.1 to 4.6 ± 2.7 (p < 0.001). Joint bleeding frequency (hemarthrosis) decreased from 4.5 ± 0.6 to 2.1 ± 0.4 during the first 6 months after RSO (p < 0.001). For both parameters (pain relief and bleeding frequency), patients experienced a similar benefit from RSO regardless of pretreatment BPI: arthralgia (p = 0.312) and frequency of hemarthrosis (p = 0.396). No significant improvement was observed for range of motion, but it was significantly more restricted in hyperemic joints both before (p = 0.036) and after treatment (p = 0.022). Hemophilic arthropathy can be effectively treated with RSO regardless of pre-therapeutic BPI. Patients in whom articular hyperemia is not detectable by scintigraphy may have similar (outstanding) outcomes, and thus should not be excluded from treatment. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation with 3.0-T MR imaging: predicting the pathological response of triple-negative breast cancer treated with anthracycline and taxane neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Seho; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) which expresses neither hormonal receptors nor HER-2 is associated with poor prognosis and shorter survival. Several studies have suggested that TNBC patients attaining pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) show a longer survival than those without pCR. To assess the accuracy of 3.0-T breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting pCR and to evaluate the clinicoradiologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of 3.0-T breast MRI in TNBC patients treated with anthracycline and taxane (ACD). This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board; patient consent was not required. Between 2009 and 2012, 35 TNBC patients with 3.0-T breast MRI prior to (n = 26) or after (n = 35) NAC were included. MRI findings were reviewed according to pCR to chemotherapy. The diagnostic accuracy of 3.0-T breast MRI for predicting pCR and the clinicoradiological factors affecting MRI accuracy and response to NAC were analyzed. 3.0-T MRI following NAC with ACD accurately predicted pCR in 91.4% of TNBC patients. The residual tumor size between pathology and 3.0-T MRI in non-pCR cases showed a higher correlation in the Ki-67-positive TNBC group (r = 0.947) than in the Ki-67 negative group (r = 0.375) with statistical trends (P = 0.069). Pre-treatment MRI in the non-pCR group compared to the pCR group showed a larger tumor size (P = 0.030) and non-mass presentation (P = 0.015). 3.0-T MRI in TNBC patients following NAC with ACD showed a high accuracy for predicting pCR to NAC. Ki-67 can affect the diagnostic accuracy of 3.0-T MRI for pCR to NAC with ACD in TNBC patients. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  8. Disc pathology after whiplash injury. A prospective magnetic resonance imaging and clinical investigation; Pathologie vertebrale apres le coup du lapin. Une investigation clinique et d` imagerie prospective par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.; Toolanen, G.; Fagerlund, M.; Bjornebrink, J. [University Hospital of Northem (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    Although disc pathology seems to be one contributing factor in the development of chronic symptoms after whiplash injury, it may be unnecessary to examine these patients in the acute phase with magnetic resonance imaging ; correlating initial symptoms and signs to magnetic resonance imaging findings is difficult because of the relatively high proportion of false-positive results. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated later in the course of treatment in patients with persistent arm pain, neurologic deficits, or clinical signs of nerve root compression to diagnose disc herniations requiring surgery. (authors).

  9. Comparison of diffusion-weighted MR imaging and FDG PET/CT to predict pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Im, Seock-Ah; Park, In Ae; Kang, Keon Wook; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2012-01-01

    To compare the use of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and 18 F-FDG PET/CT to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Thirty-four women with 34 invasive breast cancers underwent DWI and PET/CT before and after chemotherapy and before surgery. The percentage changes in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the standardised uptake value (SUV) were calculated, and the diagnostic performances for predicting pCR were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. After surgery, 7/34 patients (20.6%) were found to have pCR. A z values for DWI, PET/CT and the combined use of DWI and PET/CT were 0.910, 0.873 and 0.944, respectively. The best cut-offs for differentiating pCR from non-pCR were a 54.9% increase in the ADC and a 63.9% decrease in the SUV. DWI showed 100% (7/7) sensitivity and 70.4% (19/27) specificity and PET/CT showed 100% sensitivity and 77.8% (21/27) specificity. When DWI and PET/CT were combined, there was a trend towards improved specificity compared with DWI. DWI and FDG PET/CT show similar diagnostic accuracy for predicting pCR to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. The combined use of DWI and FDG PET/CT has the potential to improve specificity in predicting pCR. (orig.)

  10. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de, E-mail: ricardomcfreitas@gmail.com; Andrade, Celi Santos, E-mail: celis.andrade@hotmail.com; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira, E-mail: jgmpcaldas@uol.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit of the Instituto de Radiologia (Brazil); Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi, E-mail: miharumi@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Department of Biostatistics, Biosciences Institute (Brazil); Ferreira, Lorraine Braga, E-mail: lorraine.braga@gmail.com; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias, E-mail: vearana@usp.br [Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Oral Pathology (Brazil); Cury, Patrícia Maluf, E-mail: pmcury@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  11. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de; Andrade, Celi Santos; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Ferreira, Lorraine Braga; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Cury, Patrícia Maluf

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO 2 ) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO 2 epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers

  12. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  13. CT features of jejunal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyland, R.; Chalmers, A.

    2007-01-01

    The imaging of duodenal and ileal diseases is well documented in radiological literature but the jejunum has been relatively neglected. The aim of this review is to outline the current methods of investigation of the jejunum, and provide a comprehensive review of common pathologies affecting the jejunum, with particular emphasis on investigation by computed tomography

  14. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging for detecting pathological patterns in patients with lupus nephritis: a preliminary study using gray-level co-occurrence matrix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huilan; Jia, Junya; Li, Dong; Wei, Li; Shang, Wenya; Zheng, Zhenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Objective Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) is a noninvasive technique useful in patients with renal disease. The current study was performed to determine whether BOLD MRI can contribute to the diagnosis of renal pathological patterns. Methods BOLD MRI was used to obtain functional magnetic resonance parameter R2* values. Gray-level co-occurrence matrixes (GLCMs) were generated for gray-scale maps. Several GLCM parameters were calculated and used to construct algorithmic models for renal pathological patterns. Results Histopathology and BOLD MRI were used to examine 12 patients. Two GLCM parameters, including correlation and energy, revealed differences among four groups of renal pathological patterns. Four Fisher's linear discriminant formulas were constructed using two variables, including the correlation at 45° and correlation at 90°. A cross-validation test showed that the formulas correctly predicted 28 of 36 samples, and the rate of correct prediction was 77.8%. Conclusions Differences in the texture characteristics of BOLD MRI in patients with lupus nephritis may be detected by GLCM analysis. Discriminant formulas constructed using GLCM parameters may facilitate prediction of renal pathological patterns.

  15. Surgical, pathological and clinical correlation of Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary imaging in 138 adult males, in the diagnosis of functional cystic duct obstruction VS acute or chronic cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J.H.K.; Beal, W.H.; Ware, R.W.; Straw, J.D.; Chaudhuri, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    Despite the wide acceptance of the hepatobiliary scintigraphy as a popular diagnostic imaging modality for gallbladder and hepatobiliary disease, correlation between radionuclide diagnoses and the final clinical and/or pathologic findings have not been thoroughly evaluated. The lack of correlative studies frequently generates difficulties in making appropriate diagnostic interpretation of the objective findings. A retrospective clinical pathological and surgical correlative study was undertaken by the authors in 138 male veteran patients, who underwent computer assisted minute by minute Tc-99m DISIDA cholescintigraphy. A very high percentage (75%) revealed abnormalities; non-visualization of gallbladder (GB) with normal choledochus system (46%), choledochal obstruction with no GB visualization (13%), choledochal obstruction with normal GB visualization (6%), severe hepatocellular disease with non-diagnostic GB (4%), and delayed GB visualization (longer than 60 minutes) (3%). Non-visualization of GB but normal choledochus demonstrated diverse pathologic etiologies, acute and chronic cholecystitis (64%), S/P cholecystectomy (8%), functional obstruction secondary to sepsis or pancreatitis (6%), and various other pathologies including porcelain GB and cholangitis (22%). The most important cause of choledochal obstruction was mass lesions or local infiltration with metastases (33%) rather than acute cholecystitis (27%). Although the sensitivity (98%) and specificity (92%) for cystic duct obstruction were very high, the specificity decreases significantly for cholecystitis

  16. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible

  17. The Danish Pathology Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Beth; Larsen, Ole B

    2011-01-01

    The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established.......The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established....

  18. Grey matter damage in multiple sclerosis A pathology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, R.; de Vries, H.E.; Schenk, G.J.; Geurts, J.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, immunohistochemical studies have provided compelling evidence that gray matter (GM) pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) is extensive. Until recently, this GM pathology was difficult to visualize using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI ) techniques. However, with newly

  19. [Correlation between iridology and general pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demea, Sorina

    2002-01-01

    The research proposal is to evaluate the association between certain irian signs and general pathology of studied patients. There were studied 57 hospitalized patients; there was taken over all their iris images, which were analyzed through iridological protocols; in the same time the pathology of these patients was noted from their records in the hospital, concordant with the clinical diagnosis; all these information were included in a database for a computerised processing. The correlations resulted from, shows a high connection between the irian constitution establish through iridological criteria and the existent pathology. Iris examination can be very useful for diagnosis of a certain general pathology, in a holistic approach of the patient.

  20. The possibilities and limitations of neuronavigation method in the treatment of intracranial pathology, on the basis of anatomic registering markers and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lickendorf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The evaluation of technical parameters of the system and the evaluation of the influence of changing intraoperative conditions on the accuracy of the indications of the neuronavigational system has the key meaning in the effectiveness on the work of a neurosurgeon. On the other hand the employment of neuronavigation during an operation on the brain allows to get an insight into the dynamics and directions of the shifts of individual brain structures in regard to themselves and hard integuments. Material and methods: In the experimental part of the work an analysis was done of the theoretical and actual accuracy of indications of the neuronavigational system obtained after the registering process in modal and clinical conditions. In the clinical part of the work, during the operations of 69 patients with the use of the neuronavigational system an analysis was done of the dynamics and the direction of shifts of the brain's surface and the boundaries of pathological focus in regard to the placement and volume of the pathological focus, volume of the peritumorous edema and the usage of the escape of the cerebrospinal fluid, as well as resulting from those shifts the divergence in the indications of the neuronavigational system. Results and conclusions: A smaller accuracy of the neuronavigational system in clinical than in modal conditions was proved. Anatomical registering markers cause the shifts of areas of greatest accuracy to the face area of patients, not including in its range the back sides of the head and there localized 65.4% of pathological focuses. In model and clinical conditions significant differences between computer error of the RMSE registering process and the marker localization error empirically defined were proved. In result of the analysis of the shifts of the cerebral cortex during the operation of tumors: Meta, Astr. II, Astr. III, GBM, vascular and intrachamberal it was proved that the peritumorous edema, the volume of the

  1. Radiologic-pathologic analysis of quantitative 3D tumour enhancement on contrast-enhanced MR imaging: a study of ROI placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockalingam, Arun; Duran, Rafael; Sohn, Jae Ho; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Chapiro, Julius; Lee, Howard; Sahu, Sonia; Nguyen, Sonny; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Lin, MingDe

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of region-of-interest (ROI) placement on 3D tumour enhancement [Quantitative European Association for the Study of the Liver (qEASL)] in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Phase 1: 40 HCC patients had nine ROIs placed by one reader using systematic techniques (3 ipsilateral to the lesion, 3 contralateral to the lesion, and 3 dispersed throughout the liver) and qEASL variance was measured. Intra-class correlations were computed. Phase 2: 15 HCC patients with histosegmentation were selected. Six ROIs were systematically placed by AC (3 ROIs ipsilateral and 3 ROIs contralateral to the lesion). Three ROIs were placed by 2 radiologists. qEASL values were compared to histopathology by Pearson's correlation, linear regression, and median difference. Phase